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Sample records for messenger rna interferase

  1. Who discovered messenger RNA?

    PubMed

    Cobb, Matthew

    2015-06-29

    The announcement of the discovery of messenger RNA (mRNA) and the cracking of the genetic code took place within weeks of each other in a climax of scientific excitement during the summer of 1961. Although mRNA is of decisive importance to our understanding of gene function, no Nobel Prize was awarded for its discovery. The large number of people involved, the complex nature of the results, and the tortuous path that was taken over half a century ago, all show that simple claims of priority may not reflect how science works.

  2. Bifunctional transfer-messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Nitya S.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is a bifunctional RNA that has properties of a tRNA and an mRNA. tmRNA uses these two functions to release ribosomes stalled during translation and target the nascent polypeptides for degradation. This concerted reaction, known as trans-translation, contributes to translational quality control and regulation of gene expression in bacteria. tmRNA is conserved throughout bacteria, and is one of the most abundant RNAs in the cell, suggesting that trans-translation is of fundamental importance for bacterial fitness. Mutants lacking tmRNA activity typically have severe phenotypes, including defects in viability, virulence, and responses to environmental stresses. PMID:21664408

  3. Messenger RNA Methylation Regulates Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Xie, Qi; Rich, Jeremy N; Zhao, Jing Crystal

    2017-04-10

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) modification provides an additional layer of gene regulation in cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Zhang et al. report that ALKBH5, a demethylase of the mRNA modification N(6)-methyladenosine, regulates proliferation and self-renewal of glioblastoma stem-like cells by modulating pre-mRNA stability and expression of the FOXM1 gene.

  4. [Posttranscriptional messenger RNA modifications in eukaryotes].

    PubMed

    Laptev, I G; Golovina, A Ya; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Genomewide mapping of posttranscriptional modification in eukaryotic RNA allowed to reveal tens of thousands modification sites. Among modified nucleotides of eukaryotic RNA 6-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytidine, pseudouridine, inosine, and others. Many modification sites are conserved, many are regulated. Function is known for a small subset of modified nucleotides, while the role of majority of them is still obscure. Global character of mRNA modifications allowed scientists to coin a new term, RNA epigenetics. The review is about posttranscriptional messenger RNA modifications in eukaryotes. Main modifications, their role in cell, their mapping techniques and proteins, that are responsible for such RNA modifications are observed.

  5. Messenger RNA modifications: Form, distribution, and function.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Wendy V; Bell, Tristan A; Schaening, Cassandra

    2016-06-17

    RNA contains more than 100 distinct modifications that promote the functions of stable noncoding RNAs in translation and splicing. Recent technical advances have revealed widespread and sparse modification of messenger RNAs with N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C), and pseudouridine (Ψ). Here we discuss the rapidly evolving understanding of the location, regulation, and function of these dynamic mRNA marks, collectively termed the epitranscriptome. We highlight differences among modifications and between species that could instruct ongoing efforts to understand how specific mRNA target sites are selected and how their modification is regulated. Diverse molecular consequences of individual m(6)A modifications are beginning to be revealed, but the effects of m(5)C and Ψ remain largely unknown. Future work linking molecular effects to organismal phenotypes will broaden our understanding of mRNA modifications as cell and developmental regulators.

  6. ACTH Action on Messenger RNA Stability Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Cherradi, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA stability has emerged as a critical control step in dynamic gene expression. This process occurs in response to modifications of the cellular environment, including hormonal variations, and regulates the expression of subsets of proteins whose levels need to be rapidly adjusted. Modulation of messenger RNA stability is usually mediated by stabilizing or destabilizing RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BP) that bind to the 3′-untranslated region regulatory motifs, such as AU-rich elements (AREs). Destabilizing ARE-binding proteins enhance the decay of their target transcripts by recruiting the mRNA decay machineries. Failure of such mechanisms, in particular misexpression of RNA-BP, has been linked to several human diseases. In the adrenal cortex, the expression and activity of mRNA stability regulatory proteins are still understudied. However, ACTH- or cAMP-elicited changes in the expression/phosphorylation status of the major mRNA-destabilizing protein TIS11b/BRF1 or in the subcellular localization of the stabilizing protein Human antigen R have been reported. They suggest that this level of regulation of gene expression is also important in endocrinology. PMID:28163695

  7. Chemical and structural effects of base modifications in messenger RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcourt, Emily M.; Kietrys, Anna M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of nucleobase modifications in messenger RNA have been revealed through advances in detection and RNA sequencing. Although some of the biochemical pathways that involve modified bases have been identified, research into the world of RNA modification -- the epitranscriptome -- is still in an early phase. A variety of chemical tools are being used to characterize base modifications, and the structural effects of known base modifications on RNA pairing, thermodynamics and folding are being determined in relation to their putative biological roles.

  8. Messenger RNA degradation in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Monica P; Foley, Patricia L; Belasco, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    mRNA degradation is an important mechanism for controlling gene expression in bacterial cells. This process involves the orderly action of a battery of cellular endonucleases and exonucleases, some universal and others present only in certain species. These ribonucleases function with the assistance of ancillary enzymes that covalently modify the 5' or 3' end of RNA or unwind base-paired regions. Triggered by initiating events at either the 5' terminus or an internal site, mRNA decay occurs at diverse rates that are transcript specific and governed by RNA sequence and structure, translating ribosomes, and bound sRNAs or proteins. In response to environmental cues, bacteria are able to orchestrate widespread changes in mRNA lifetimes by modulating the concentration or specific activity of cellular ribonucleases or by unmasking the mRNA-degrading activity of cellular toxins.

  9. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Messenger RNA processing sites in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Benz, Corinna; Nilsson, Daniel; Andersson, Björn; Clayton, Christine; Guilbride, D Lys

    2005-10-01

    In Kinetoplastids, protein-coding genes are transcribed polycistronically by RNA polymerase II. Individual mature mRNAs are generated from polycistronic precursors by 5' trans splicing of a 39-nt capped leader RNA and 3' polyadenylation. It was previously known that trans splicing generally occurs at an AG dinucleotide downstream of a polypyrimidine tract, and that polyadenylation is coupled to downstream trans splicing. The few polyadenylation sites that had been examined were 100-400 nt upstream of the polypyrimidine tract which marked the adjacent trans splice site. We wished to define the sequence requirements for trypanosome mRNA processing more tightly and to generate a predictive algorithm. By scanning all available Trypanosoma brucei cDNAs for splicing and polyadenylation sites, we found that trans splicing generally occurs at the first AG following a polypyrimidine tract of 8-25 nt, giving rise to 5'-UTRs of a median length of 68 nt. We also found that in general, polyadenylation occurs at a position with one or more A residues located between 80 and 140 nt from the downstream polypyrimidine tract. These data were used to calibrate free parameters in a grammar model with distance constraints, enabling prediction of polyadenylation and trans splice sites for most protein-coding genes in the trypanosome genome. The data from the genome analysis and the program are available from: .

  11. Estrogen Regulation of Messenger RNA Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-17

    ribonucleic acid S phase- synthesis phase of celi cycle SI nuclease- single strand specific endonuclease which hydrolyzes single- stranded RNA or DNA into...The significance of these features are not known. Common structural elements have been found in the 5’ end of prol(I) collagen mRNAs (Chu et ai...tube containing the plasmid DNA, sequencing buffer, and primer was warmed to 65°C for 3 min. The temperature of the tube was allowed to cool slowly to

  12. Messenger RNA-based vaccines: progress, challenges, applications.

    PubMed

    Kramps, Thomas; Probst, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Twenty years after the demonstration that messenger RNA (mRNA) was expressed and immunogenic upon direct injection in mice, the first successful proof-of-concept of specific protection against viral infection in small and large animals was reported. These data indicate wider applicability to infectious disease and should encourage continued translation of mRNA-based prophylactic vaccines into human clinical trials. At the conceptual level, mRNA-based vaccines-more than other genetic vectors-combine the simplicity, safety, and focused immunogenicity of subunit vaccines with favorable immunological properties of live viral vaccines: (1) mRNA vaccines are molecularly defined and carry no excess information. In the environment and upon physical contact, RNA is rapidly degraded by ubiquitous RNases and cannot persist. These characteristics also guarantee tight control over their immunogenic profile (including avoidance of vector-specific immune responses that could interfere with repeated administration), pharmacokinetics, and dosing. (2) mRNA vaccines are synthetically produced by an enzymatic process, just requiring information about the nucleic acid sequence of the desired antigen. This greatly reduces general complications associated with biological vaccine production, such as handling of infectious agents, genetic variability, environmental risks, or restrictions to vaccine distribution. (3) RNA can be tailored to provide potent adjuvant stimuli to the innate immune system by direct activation of RNA-specific receptors; this may reduce the need for additional adjuvants. The formation of native antigen in situ affords great versatility, including intracellular localization, membrane association, posttranslational modification, supra-molecular assembly, or targeted structural optimization of delivered antigen. Messenger RNA vaccines induce balanced immune responses including B cells, helper T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, rendering them an extremely adaptable

  13. The dynamic N(1)-methyladenosine methylome in eukaryotic messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Dominissini, Dan; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Peer, Eyal; Kol, Nitzan; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Dai, Qing; Di Segni, Ayelet; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Clark, Wesley C; Zheng, Guanqun; Pan, Tao; Solomon, Oz; Eyal, Eran; Hershkovitz, Vera; Han, Dali; Doré, Louis C; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; He, Chuan

    2016-02-25

    Gene expression can be regulated post-transcriptionally through dynamic and reversible RNA modifications. A recent noteworthy example is N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), which affects messenger RNA (mRNA) localization, stability, translation and splicing. Here we report on a new mRNA modification, N(1)-methyladenosine (m(1)A), that occurs on thousands of different gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, at an estimated average transcript stoichiometry of 20% in humans. Employing newly developed sequencing approaches, we show that m(1)A is enriched around the start codon upstream of the first splice site: it preferentially decorates more structured regions around canonical and alternative translation initiation sites, is dynamic in response to physiological conditions, and correlates positively with protein production. These unique features are highly conserved in mouse and human cells, strongly indicating a functional role for m(1)A in promoting translation of methylated mRNA.

  14. Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, Angelo; Zhang, Gong; Nagar, Apoorva; Ignatova, Zoya; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-04-01

    A simple measure for the efficiency of protein synthesis by ribosomes is provided by the steady state amount of protein per messenger RNA (mRNA), the so-called translational ratio, which is proportional to the translation rate. Taking the degradation of mRNA into account, we show theoretically that both the translation rate and the translational ratio decrease with increasing mRNA length, in agreement with available experimental data for the prokaryote Escherichia coli. We also show that, compared to prokaryotes, mRNA degradation in eukaryotes leads to a less rapid decrease of the translational ratio. This finding is consistent with the fact that, compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes tend to have longer proteins.

  15. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  16. Multifunctional triblock copolymers for intracellular messenger RNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Connie; Convertine, Anthony J; Stayton, Patrick S; Bryers, James D

    2012-10-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a promising alternative to plasmid DNA (pDNA) for gene vaccination applications, but safe and effective delivery systems are rare. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to synthesize a series of triblock copolymers designed to enhance the intracellular delivery of mRNA. These materials are composed of a cationic dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) segment to mediate mRNA condensation, a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) segment to enhance stability and biocompatibility, and a pH-responsive endosomolytic copolymer of diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) designed to facilitate cytosolic entry. The blocking order and PEGMA segment length were systematically varied to investigate the effect of different polymer architectures on mRNA delivery efficacy. These polymers were monodisperse, exhibited pH-dependent hemolytic activity, and condensed mRNA into 86-216 nm particles. mRNA polyplexes formed from polymers with the PEGMA segment in the center of the polymer chain displayed the greatest stability to heparin displacement and were associated with the highest transfection efficiencies in two immune cell lines, RAW 264.7 macrophages (77%) and DC2.4 dendritic cells (50%). Transfected DC2.4 cells were shown to be capable of subsequently activating antigen-specific T cells, demonstrating the potential of these multifunctional triblock copolymers for mRNA-based vaccination strategies.

  17. BACTERIAL IDENTIFICATION USING SSRA ENCODING TRANSFER-MESSENGER RNA.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kayo; Shigemura, Katsumi; Shirai, Hiroki; Kato, Ayaka; Okuya, Yuma; Jikimoto, Takumi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2015-07-01

    Abstract. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are widely used for phylogenetic and bacterial identification. However, rDNA of different species often reveals similar or identical same sequences. This study employed the bacterial stable small RNA (ssrA) gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) as a tool for identification of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, Pseudomonas spp and Enterobacteriaceae from clinical isolates as representative groups using PCR and species specific primers. The method correctly identified 11 standard strains and 99 clinical isolates. Quantitative PCR revealed a limit of detection of 10(-5) µg of DNA for S. aureus and Enterococcus spp, and 10(-6) µg for Pseudomonas spp and Enterobacteriaceae. Further studies with a greater number of bacteria especially from clinical samples will need to be undertaken before this bacterial molecular marker can be applied in a clinical setting.

  18. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  19. Pseudo–Messenger RNA: Phantoms of the Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Martin C; Wilming, Laurens G; Forrest, Alistair; Kawaji, Hideya; Tan, Sin Lam; Wahlestedt, Claes; Bajic, Vladimir B; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bailey, Timothy L; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian transcriptome harbours shadowy entities that resist classification and analysis. In analogy with pseudogenes, we define pseudo–messenger RNA to be RNA molecules that resemble protein-coding mRNA, but cannot encode full-length proteins owing to disruptions of the reading frame. Using a rigorous computational pipeline, which rules out sequencing errors, we identify 10,679 pseudo–messenger RNAs (approximately half of which are transposon-associated) among the 102,801 FANTOM3 mouse cDNAs: just over 10% of the FANTOM3 transcriptome. These comprise not only transcribed pseudogenes, but also disrupted splice variants of otherwise protein-coding genes. Some may encode truncated proteins, only a minority of which appear subject to nonsense-mediated decay. The presence of an excess of transcripts whose only disruptions are opal stop codons suggests that there are more selenoproteins than currently estimated. We also describe compensatory frameshifts, where a segment of the gene has changed frame but remains translatable. In summary, we survey a large class of non-standard but potentially functional transcripts that are likely to encode genetic information and effect biological processes in novel ways. Many of these transcripts do not correspond cleanly to any identifiable object in the genome, implying fundamental limits to the goal of annotating all functional elements at the genome sequence level. PMID:16683022

  20. [Deregulation of pre-messenger RNA splicing and rare diseases].

    PubMed

    de la Grange, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Most of protein-coding human genes are subjected to alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This mechanism is highly regulated to precisely modulate detection of specific splice sites. This regulation is under control of the spliceosome and several splicing factors are also required to modulate the alternative usage of splice sites. Splicing factors and spliceosome components recognize splicing signals and regulatory sequences of the pre-mRNAs. These splicing sequences make splicing susceptible to polymorphisms and mutations. Examples of associations between human rare diseases and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing sequence (i.e., cis acting mutations), recent studies described the disruptive impact of mutations within spliceosome components or splicing factors (i.e., trans acting mutations). Following growing of knowledge regarding splicing regulation, several approaches have been developed to compensate for the effect of deleterious mutations and to restore sufficient amounts of functional protein.

  1. A discontinuous hammerhead ribozyme embedded in a mammalian messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.; Scott, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Structured RNAs embedded in the untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNAs can regulate gene expression. In bacteria, control of a metabolite gene is mediated by the self-cleaving activity of a ribozyme embedded in its 5′ UTR1. This discovery has raised the question of whether gene-regulating ribozymes also exist in eukaryotic mRNAs. Here we show that highly active hammerhead ribozymes2,3 are present in the 3′ UTRs of rodent C-type lectin type II (Clec2) genes4–7. Using a hammerhead RNA motif search with relaxed delimitation of the non-conserved regions, we detected ribozyme sequences in which the invariant regions, in contrast to the previously identified continuous hammerheads8–10, occur as two fragments separated by hundreds of nucleotides. Notably, a fragment pair can assemble to form an active hammerhead ribozyme structure between the translation termination and the poly-adenylation signals within the 3′ UTR. We demonstrate that this hammerhead structure can self-cleave both in vitro and in vivo, and is able to reduce protein expression in mouse cells. These results indicate that an unrecognized mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation involving association of discontinuous ribozyme sequences within an mRNA may be modulating the expression of several CLEC2 proteins that function in bone remodelling and the immune response of several mammals. PMID:18615019

  2. Messenger RNA patterns in rat liver nuclei before and after treat-ment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Drews, J; Brawerman, G

    1967-06-09

    Like cortisol, growth hormone enhances RNA synthesis in rat liver nuclei. However, DNA-RNA hybridization experiments show that the application of growth hormone does not stimulate the formation of new species of messenger RNA. The latter phenomenon was observed after treatment with cortisol.

  3. Solid-phase synthesis of branched oligoribonucleotides related to messenger RNA splicing intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Damha, M J; Ganeshan, K; Hudson, R H; Zabarylo, S V

    1992-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of oligoribonucleotides containing vicinal (2'-5')- and (3'-5')-phosphodiester linkages is described. The solid-phase method, based on silyl-phosphoramidite chemistry, was applied to the synthesis of a series of branched RNA [(Xp)nA2' (pN)n3'(pN)n] related to the splicing intermediates derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae rp51a pre-messenger RNA. The branched oligonucleotides have been thoroughly characterized by nucleoside and branched nucleotide composition analysis. Branched oligoribonucleotides will be useful in the study of messenger RNA splicing and in determining the biological role of RNA 'lariats' and 'forks' in vivo. Images PMID:1480476

  4. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  5. Radioautographic localization of prolactin messenger RNA on histological sections by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pochet, R; Brocas, H; Vassart, G; Toubeau, G; Seo, H; Refetoff, S; Dumont, J E; Pasteels, J L

    1981-05-04

    In situ hybridization of complementary [H3]DNA ([H3]cDNA) synthetized from purified rat prolactin messenger RNA (rPRL mRNA) was performed to specifically identify on histologic sections of rat hypophysis cells expressing the PRL gene. Radioautographic labelling occurred over weakly acidophilic cells, while other acidophils, with darker cytoplasm did not contain more silver grains than blood vessels.

  6. MicroRNA and messenger RNA profiling reveals new biomarkers and mechanisms for RDX induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RDX is a well-known pollutant to induce neurotoxicity. MicroRNAs (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles are useful tools for toxicogenomics studies. It is worthy to integrate MiRNA and mRNA expression data to understand RDX-induced neurotoxicity. Results Rats were treated with or without RDX for 48 h. Both miRNA and mRNA profiles were conducted using brain tissues. Nine miRNAs were significantly regulated by RDX. Of these, 6 and 3 miRNAs were up- and down-regulated respectively. The putative target genes of RDX-regulated miRNAs were highly nervous system function genes and pathways enriched. Fifteen differentially genes altered by RDX from mRNA profiles were the putative targets of regulated miRNAs. The induction of miR-71, miR-27ab, miR-98, and miR-135a expression by RDX, could reduce the expression of the genes POLE4, C5ORF13, SULF1 and ROCK2, and eventually induce neurotoxicity. Over-expression of miR-27ab, or reduction of the expression of unknown miRNAs by RDX, could up-regulate HMGCR expression and contribute to neurotoxicity. RDX regulated immune and inflammation response miRNAs and genes could contribute to RDX- induced neurotoxicity and other toxicities as well as animal defending reaction response to RDX exposure. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that integrating miRNA and mRNA profiles is valuable to indentify novel biomarkers and molecular mechanisms for RDX-induced neurological disorder and neurotoxicity. PMID:25559034

  7. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-01

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26751491

  8. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-06

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  9. Characterization of long noncoding RNA and messenger RNA signatures in melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siqi; Fan, Wenliang; Wan, Bing; Tu, Mengqi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Fang; Xu, Haibo; Han, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma, the most aggressive and life-threatening form of skin cancer, has significantly risen over recent decades. Therefore, it is essential to identify the mechanisms that underlie melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis and to explore novel and effective melanoma treatment strategies. Accumulating evidence s uggests that aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have vital functions in multiple cancers. However, lncRNA functions in melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles in primary melanomas, metastatic melanomas and normal skin samples from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. We used GSE15605 as the training set (n = 74) and GSE7553 as the validation set (n = 58). In three comparisons (primary melanoma versus normal skin, metastatic melanoma versus normal skin, and metastatic melanoma versus primary melanoma), 178, 295 and 48 lncRNAs and 847, 1758, and 295 mRNAs were aberrantly expressed, respectively. We performed Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses to examine the differentially expressed mRNAs, and potential core lncRNAs were predicted by lncRNA-mRNA co-expression networks. Based on our results, 15 lncRNAs and 144 mRNAs were significantly associated with melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis. A subsequent analysis suggested a critical role for a five-lncRNA signature during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis. Low expression of U47924.27 was significantly associated with decreased survival of patients with melanoma. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to explore the expression patterns of lncRNAs and mRNAs during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis by re-annotating microarray data from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray dataset. These findings reveal potential roles for lncRNAs during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis and provide a rich candidate reservoir for

  10. Self-complementarity of messenger RNA's of periodic proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ycas, M.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the mRNA's of three periodic proteins, collagen, keratin and freezing point depressing glycoproteins show a marked degree of self-complementarity. The possible origin of this self-complementarity is discussed.

  11. Construction of a synthetic messenger RNA encoding a membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have synthesized microgram quantities of a functional eucaryotic mRNA by in vitro transcription. For this purpose, we constructed a plasmid in which the Escherichia coli lactose promoter was 5' to the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein gene (Rose, J. K., and C. J. Gallione, 1981, J. Virol., 39:519-528). This DNA served as the template in an in vitro transcription reaction utilizing E. coli RNA polymerase. The RNA product was capped using the vaccinia guanylyltransferase. A typical preparation of the synthetic G mRNA was equivalent to the amount of G mRNA that can be isolated from approximately 10(8) VSV- infected cells. This synthetic mRNA was translated by a wheat germ extract in the presence of microsomes, producing a polypeptide that was indistinguishable from G protein in its size, antigenicity, degree of glycosylation, and its membrane insertion. This technique should aid in identifying features needed by proteins for insertion into membranes. PMID:6341380

  12. Defective control of pre–messenger RNA splicing in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-01

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre–messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies. PMID:26728853

  13. Defective control of pre-messenger RNA splicing in human disease.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Benoit; Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-04

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies.

  14. Regulation of chemoresistance via alternative messenger RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Eblen, Scott T

    2012-04-15

    The acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy is a significant problem in the treatment of cancer, greatly increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Tumors are often sensitive to chemotherapy upon initial treatment, but repeated treatments can select for those cells that were able to survive initial therapy and have acquired cellular mechanisms to enhance their resistance to subsequent chemotherapy treatment. Many cellular mechanisms of drug resistance have been identified, most of which result from changes in gene and protein expression. While changes at the transcriptional level have been duly noted, it is primarily the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA into mature mRNA that regulates the composition of the proteome and it is the proteome that actually regulates the cell's response to chemotherapeutic insult, inducing cell survival or death. During pre-mRNA processing, intronic non-protein-coding sequences are removed and protein-coding exons are spliced to form a continuous template for protein translation. Alternative splicing involves the differential inclusion or exclusion of exonic sequences into the mature transcript, generating different mRNA templates for protein production. This regulatory mechanism enables the potential to produce many different protein isoforms from the same gene. In this review I will explain the mechanism of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and look at some specific examples of how splicing factors, splicing factor kinases and alternative splicing of specific pre-mRNAs from genes have been shown to contribute to acquisition of the drug resistant phenotype.

  15. Messenger RNA exchange between scions and rootstocks in grafted grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We demonstrated the existence of genome-scale mRNA exchange in grafted grapevines, a woody fruit species with significant economic importance. By using diagnostic SNPs derived from high throughput genome sequencing, we identified more than three thousand genes transporting mRNAs across graft junctio...

  16. Regulation of Chemoresistance Via Alternative Messenger RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Eblen, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance to chemotherapy is a significant problem in the treatment of cancer, greatly increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Tumors are often sensitive to chemotherapy upon initial treatment, but repeated treatments can select for those cells that have were able to survive initial therapy and have acquired cellular mechanisms to enhance their resistance to subsequent chemotherapy treatment. Many cellular mechanisms of drug resistance have been identified, most of which result from changes in gene and protein expression. While changes at the transcriptional level have been duly noted, it is primarily the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA into mature mRNA that regulates the composition of the proteome and it is the proteome that actually regulates the cell’s response to chemotherapeutic insult, inducing cell survival or death. During pre-mRNA processing, intronic non-protein-coding sequences are removed and protein-coding exons are spliced to form a continuous template for protein translation. Alternative splicing involves the differential inclusion or exclusion of exonic sequences into the mature transcript, generating different mRNA templates for protein production. This regulatory mechanism enables the potential to produce many different protein isoforms from the same gene. In this review I will explain the mechanism of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and look at some specific examples of how splicing factors, splicing factor kinases and alternative splicing of specific pre-mRNAs from genes have been shown to contribute to acquisition of the drug resistant phenotype. PMID:22248731

  17. Labelling and imaging of single endogenous messenger RNA particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    RNA molecules carry out widely diverse functions in numerous different physiological processes in living cells. The RNA life cycle from transcription, through the processing of nascent RNA, to the regulatory function of non-coding RNA and cytoplasmic translation of messenger RNA has been studied extensively using biochemical and molecular biology techniques. In this Commentary, we highlight how single molecule imaging and particle tracking can yield further insight into the dynamics of RNA particles in living cells. In the past few years, a variety of bright and photo-stable labelling techniques have been developed to generate sufficient contrast for imaging of single endogenous RNAs in vivo. New imaging modalities allow determination of not only lateral but also axial positions with high precision within the cellular context, and across a wide range of specimen from yeast and bacteria to cultured cells, and even multicellular organisms or live animals. A whole range of methods to locate and track single particles, and to analyze trajectory data are available to yield detailed information about the kinetics of all parts of the RNA life cycle. Although the concepts presented are applicable to all types of RNA, we showcase here the wealth of information gained from in vivo imaging of single particles by discussing studies investigating dynamics of intranuclear trafficking, nuclear pore transport and cytoplasmic transport of endogenous messenger RNA.

  18. Deregulated messenger RNA expression during T cell apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, E; Ziff, E B

    1995-01-01

    The IL-2 dependent murine cytotoxic T cell line CTLL-2 undergoes programmed cell death when deprived of its specific cytokine. We analyzed the expression of cell cycle related genes after IL-2 deprivation. Here we show that a generalized decrease and re elevation of the levels of mRNA takes place as part of the apoptotic program. The levels of several mRNAs encoding cell cycle functions, including cyclin D2, cyclin D3, cyclin B1, c-myc and max all declined at 1.5-3 h following IL-2 deprivation. Notably, the maxmRNA, which was shown to be expressed in proliferating, growth arrested and differentiated cells, is down regulated with the same kinetics as the other mRNAs. Surprisingly, the mRNAs whose levels declined at 1.5-3 h rose again at 10-14 h, a time which closely followed the time of the first detection of apoptotic DNA degradation, at 8 h, but which precedes actual loss of viability, at 14 h, as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Of all analyzed genes only the expression of the S-phase specific histone H4 gene resists the initial decrease and declines gradually over the course of cell death. Measurement of c-Myc protein synthesis at a late stage of the apoptotic program revealed that the accumulated reinduced mRNA is not translated into protein. Because transcriptional regulation has been shown to be dependent on the chromatin structure, the reinduction may be triggered by relaxation of the chromatin caused by alterations in the chromatin structure of apoptotic cells. Images PMID:8532529

  19. Messenger RNA processing is altered in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Gasparini, Laura; Giacomini, Caterina; Corrado, Patrizia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Giorgio, Elisa; Magini, Pamela; Seri, Marco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Parchi, Piero; Brusco, Alfredo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterized by autonomic dysfunction, followed by cerebellar and pyramidal features. ADLD is caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene (LMNB1), which leads to its increased expression. The molecular pathways involved in the disease are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed global gene expression in fibroblasts and whole blood of LMNB1 duplication carriers and used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to explore their gene signatures. We found that LMNB1 duplication is associated with dysregulation of genes involved in the immune system, neuronal and skeletal development. Genes with an altered transcriptional profile clustered in specific genomic regions. Among the dysregulated genes, we further studied the role of RAVER2, which we found to be overexpressed at mRNA and protein level. RAVER2 encodes a putative trans regulator of the splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) and is likely implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Functional studies demonstrated an abnormal splicing pattern of several PTB-target genes and of the myelin protein gene PLP1, previously demonstrated to be involved in ADLD. Mutant mice with different lamin B1 expression levels confirmed that Raver2 expression is dependent on lamin B1 in neural tissue and determines an altered splicing pattern of PTB-target genes and Plp1. Overall our results demonstrate that deregulation of lamin B1 expression induces modified splicing of several genes, likely driven by raver-2 overexpression, and suggest that an alteration of mRNA processing could be a pathogenic mechanism in ADLD. PMID:25637521

  20. Role of Auf1 in elimination of oxidatively damaged messenger RNA in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takashi; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Adachi, Noritaka; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2015-02-01

    In aerobically growing cells, in which reactive oxygen species are produced, the guanine base of RNA is oxidized to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, which induces alterations in gene expression. Here we show that the human Auf1 protein, also called HNRNPD, binds specifically to RNA containing this oxidized base and may be involved in cellular processes associated with managing the problems caused by RNA oxidation. Auf1-deficient cells were constructed from human HeLa and Nalm-6 lines using two different targeting procedures. Both types of Auf1-deficient cells are viable, but exhibit growth retardation. The stability of messenger RNA for four different housekeeping genes was determined in Auf1-deficient and -proficient cells, treated with or without hydrogen peroxide. The level of oxidized messenger RNA was considerably higher in Auf1-deficient cells than in Auf1-proficient cells. Auf1 may play a role in the elimination of oxidized RNA, which is required for the maintenance of proper gene expression under conditions of oxidative stress.

  1. Alterations of microRNA and microRNA-regulated messenger RNA expression in germinal center B-cell lymphomas determined by integrative sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Hezaveh, Kebria; Kloetgen, Andreas; Bernhart, Stephan H; Mahapatra, Kunal Das; Lenze, Dido; Richter, Julia; Haake, Andrea; Bergmann, Anke K; Brors, Benedikt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Drexler, Hans G; Eils, Roland; Haas, Siegfried; Hoffmann, Steve; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Korbel, Jan; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Leich, Ellen; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Loeffler, Luisa; López, Cristina; McHardy, Alice C; Möller, Peter; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholz, Ingrid; Stadler, Peter F; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Siebert, Reiner; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hummel, Michael; Hoell, Jessica I

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNA are well-established players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, information on the effects of microRNA deregulation mainly relies on bioinformatic prediction of potential targets, whereas proof of the direct physical microRNA/target messenger RNA interaction is mostly lacking. Within the International Cancer Genome Consortium Project "Determining Molecular Mechanisms in Malignant Lymphoma by Sequencing", we performed miRnome sequencing from 16 Burkitt lymphomas, 19 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and 21 follicular lymphomas. Twenty-two miRNA separated Burkitt lymphomas from diffuse large B-cell lymphomas/follicular lymphomas, of which 13 have shown regulation by MYC. Moreover, we found expression of three hitherto unreported microRNA. Additionally, we detected recurrent mutations of hsa-miR-142 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and follicular lymphomas, and editing of the hsa-miR-376 cluster, providing evidence for microRNA editing in lymphomagenesis. To interrogate the direct physical interactions of microRNA with messenger RNA, we performed Argonaute-2 photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments. MicroRNA directly targeted 208 messsenger RNA in the Burkitt lymphomas and 328 messenger RNA in the non-Burkitt lymphoma models. This integrative analysis discovered several regulatory pathways of relevance in lymphomagenesis including Ras, PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling pathways, also recurrently deregulated in lymphomas by mutations. Our dataset reveals that messenger RNA deregulation through microRNA is a highly relevant mechanism in lymphomagenesis.

  2. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, JoLynn B; McComb, David W; Schmittgen, Thomas D; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-02-26

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery.

  3. Exploring the recovery and detection of messenger RNA and DNA from enhanced fingermarks in blood.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Gittos, M; Harbison, S A; Fleming, R; Wivell, R

    2014-05-01

    Often in the examination of bloodstained fingermarks discussion occurs around whether to prioritise the fingerprint evidence or focus on the biological evidence. Collecting a sample for genetic profiling may result in the loss of ridge detail that could have been used for fingerprint comparison. Fingermark enhancement and recovery methods along with sample collection methods could also compromise downstream genetic analysis. Previous forensic casework has highlighted circumstances where, after enhancement had been performed, it would have been extremely valuable to both identify the body fluid and generate a DNA profile from the same sample. We enhanced depletion series of fingermarks made in blood, using single treatments consisting of aqueous amido black, methanol-based amido black, acid yellow and leucocrystal violet, and exposure to long wave UV light. We then extracted the DNA and RNA for profiling, to assess the recovery and detection of genetic material from the enhanced fingermarks. We have shown that genetic profiling of bloodstained fingermarks can be successful after chemical enhancement; however it may still be necessary to prioritise evidence types in certain circumstances. From our results it appears that even with visible bloodstained fingermarks, leucocrystal violet can reduce the effectiveness of subsequent messenger RNA profiling. Aqueous amido black and acid yellow also have adverse effects on messenger RNA profiling of depleted fingermarks with low levels of cellular material. These results help with forensic decision-making by expanding knowledge of the extent of the detrimental effects of blood-enhancement reagents on both DNA profiling and body fluid identification using messenger RNA profiling.

  4. Messenger RNA-based therapeutics for the treatment of apoptosis-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Akitsugu; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishii, Takehiko; Itaka, Keiji; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-10-28

    Gene therapy is a promising approach for treating diseases that are closely associated with excessive apoptosis, because the gene can effectively and sustainably introduce anti-apoptotic factors into cells. However, DNA delivery poses the risk of random genomic integration, leading to overexpression of the delivered gene and cancer development. Messenger RNA (mRNA) can evade integration events in target cells. We examined the use of mRNA-based therapeutics for introducing anti-apoptotic factors by using a mouse model of fulminant hepatitis. For introducing mRNA into the liver, a synthesised polymer-based carrier of polyplex nanomicelles was used for hydrodynamic intravenous injection. Using GFP as a reporter, we demonstrate that mRNA delivery induced efficient protein expression in almost 100% of liver cells, while plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery provided a smaller percentage of GFP-positive cells. Analyses using Cy5-labelled mRNA and pDNA revealed that efficient expression by mRNA was attributed to a simple intracellular mechanism, without the need for nuclear entry. Consistent with this observation, Bcl-2 mRNA was more effective on reducing apoptosis in the liver of mice with fulminant hepatitis than Bcl-2 pDNA. Therefore, mRNA-based therapeutics combined with an effective delivery system such as polyplex nanomicelles is a promising treatment for intractable diseases associated with excessive apoptosis.

  5. Protein Kinase Target Discovery From Genome-Wide Messenger RNA Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ma’ayan, Avi; He, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide messenger RNA profiling provides a snapshot of the global state of the cell under different experimental conditions such as diseased versus normal cellular states. However, because measurements are in the form of quantitative changes in messenger RNA levels, such experimental data does not provide direct understanding of the regulatory molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed changes. Identifying potential cell signaling regulatory mechanisms responsible for changes in gene expression under different experimental conditions or in different tissues has been the focus of many computational systems biology studies. Most popular approaches include promoter analysis, gene ontology, or pathway enrichment analysis, as well as reverse engineering of networks from messenger RNA expression data. Here we present a rational approach for identifying and ranking protein kinases that are likely responsible for observed changes in gene expression. By combining promoter analysis; data from various chromatin immunoprecipitation studies such as chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with paired-end ditag, and chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip; protein-protein interactions; and kinase-protein phosphorylation reactions collected from the literature, we can identify and rank candidate protein kinases for knock-down, or other types of functional validations, based on genome-wide changes in gene expression. We describe how protein kinase candidate identification and ranking can be made robust by cross-validation with phosphoproteomics data as well as through a literature-based text-mining approach. In conclusion, data integration can produce robust candidate rankings for understanding cell regulation through identification of protein kinases responsible for gene expression changes, and thus rapidly advancing drug target discovery and unraveling drug mechanisms of action. PMID:20687179

  6. Developmental regulation of a proinsulin messenger RNA generated by intron retention

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Carmen; de la Rosa, Enrique J; García-Martínez, Virginio; Martínez-Salas, Encarna; de Pablo, Flora; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina

    2005-01-01

    Proinsulin gene expression regulation and function during early embryonic development differ remarkably from those found in postnatal organisms. The embryonic proinsulin protein content decreased from gastrulation to neurulation in contrast with the overall proinsulin messenger RNA increase. This is due to increasing levels of a proinsulin mRNA variant generated by intron 1 retention in the 5′ untranslated region. Inclusion of intron 1 inhibited proinsulin translation almost completely without affecting nuclear export or cytoplasmic decay. The novel proinsulin mRNA isoform expression was developmentally regulated and tissue specific. The proportion of intron retention increased from gastrulation to organogenesis, was highest in the heart tube and presomitic region, and could not be detected in the pancreas. Notably, proinsulin addition induced cardiac marker gene expression in the early embryonic stages when the translationally active transcript was expressed. We propose that regulated unproductive splicing and translation is a mechanism that regulates proinsulin expression in accordance with specific requirements in developing vertebrates. PMID:16179943

  7. Circulating thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA and differentiated thyroid cancer: A diagnostic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chao-Yue; Li, Zhan-Ming; Wang, Li-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR-mRNA) is over-expressed in thyroid cancer patients, which indicates that TSHR-mRNA is a potential biomarker of thyroid cancer. However, system evaluation for TSHR-mRNA as a diagnostic biomarker of thyroid cancer is deficient. The performance of TSHR-mRNA for thyroid cancer diagnosis was evaluated in this study. Three common international databases as well as a Chinese database were applied for literature researching. Quality assessment of the included literatures was conducted by the QUADAS-2 tool. Totally, 1027 patients from nine studies eligible for the meta-analysis were included in this study. Global sensitivity and specificity for the positivity of TSHR-mRNA in the thyroid cancer diagnosis is 72% and 82%. The value of AUC for this test performance was 0.84. Our meta-analysis suggests that TSHR-mRNA might be a potential biomarker to complete present diagnostic methods for early and precision diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Notably, this findings need validation thorough large-scale clinical studies. PMID:28036261

  8. In vivo messenger RNA introduction into the central nervous system using polyplex nanomicelle.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Uchida, Hirokuni; Hayakawa, Kentaro; Ogata, Toru; Ishii, Takehiko; Fukushima, Shigeto; Osada, Kensuke; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) introduction is a promising approach to produce therapeutic proteins and peptides without any risk of insertion mutagenesis into the host genome. However, it is difficult to introduce mRNA in vivo mainly because of the instability of mRNA under physiological conditions and its strong immunogenicity through the recognition by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We used a novel carrier based on self-assembly of a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer, polyplex nanomicelle, to administer mRNA into the central nervous system (CNS). The nanomicelle with 50 nm in diameter has a core-shell structure with mRNA-containing inner core surrounded by PEG layer, providing the high stability and stealth property to the nanomicelle. The functional polyamino acids possessing the capacity of pH-responsive membrane destabilization allows smooth endosomal escape of the nanomicelle into the cytoplasm. After introduction into CNS, the nanomicelle successfully provided the sustained protein expression in the cerebrospinal fluid for almost a week. Immune responses after mRNA administration into CNS were effectively suppressed by the use of the nanomicelle compared with naked mRNA introduction. In vitro analyses using specific TLR-expressing HEK293 cells confirmed that the nanomicelle inclusion prevented mRNA from the recognition by TLRs. Thus, the polyplex nanomicelle is a promising system that simultaneously resolved the two major problems of in vivo mRNA introduction, the instability and immunogenicity, opening the door to various new therapeutic strategies using mRNA.

  9. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  10. FATHEAD MINNOW VITELLOGENIN: COMPLEMENTARY DNA SEQUENCE AND MESSENGER RNA AND PROTEIN EXPRESSION AFTER 17B-ESTRADIOL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) in oviparous animals has been proposed as a sensitive indicator of invironmental contaminants that activate the estrogen receptor. In the present study, a sensitive ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) for VTG messenger RNA (mRNA) was developed for ...

  11. Expression and localization of lactotransferrin messenger RNA in the cortex of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    An, Li; Sato, Haruhisha; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Walker, Douglas G; Beach, Thomas G; Rogers, Joseph; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2009-03-20

    We and others have previously reported that lactotransferrin (LF), acting both as an iron-binding protein and inflammatory modulator, is greatly up-regulated in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unknown which type of cells express LF in the brain of AD. In this study, therefore, we investigated the expression and localization of LF messenger RNA (mRNA) in the cerebral cortex of AD and control cases using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization histochemistry. Real-time PCR demonstrated that LF mRNA expression in the cortex of AD cases was significantly greater than that in control cases. LF mRNA-positive granules were observed in the cortex by in situ hybridization histochemistry, and the number of positive granules was increased in AD cases compared to controls. The double staining technique of LF mRNA in situ hybridisation and D-related human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) immunohistochemistry revealed that positive granules were localized in a subpopulation of HLA-DR-positive reactive microglia. In addition, LF mRNA-positive granules were observed in some cells that were negative for HLA-DR. These cells were also negative for CD4 and CD8 but positive for leukocyte common antigen (CD45RB), suggesting they were monocytes/macrophages. These results indicate that reactive microglia in the cerebral cortex and monocytes/macrophages infiltrating from the circulation might be responsible for synthesizing LF in AD brain.

  12. Comment on ``Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-02-01

    In a recent paper by Valleriani [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.042903 83, 042903 (2011)], a simple model for the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) is presented. Using this model, the protein translational ratio r, defined as the ratio of protein translation rate ωtl from mRNA to protein degradation rate ωp, is obtained. The key point in obtaining the translational ratio r is to get the protein translation rate ωtl. In Valleriani 's paper, ωtl is obtained as the mean value of the measured translation rate, which is the ratio of the synthesized protein number to the mRNA lifetime. However, in experiments, different methods might be used to obtain the value of ωtl. Therefore, to apply Valleriani 's model to more general experiments, in this Comment three methods to obtain the translation rate ωtl, and consequently the translational ratio r, are presented. Based on one of the methods which might be employed in most of the experiments, we find that the translational ratio r decays exponentially with mRNA length in prokaryotic cells, and decays reciprocally with mRNA length in eukaryotic cells. This result is slight different from that which was obtained in Valleriani 's paper.

  13. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  14. Don't kill the messenger: Long-distance trafficking of mRNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Spiegelman, Ziv; Golan, Guy; Wolf, Shmuel

    2013-12-01

    The phloem sap contains numerous macromolecules such as proteins and RNAs, in addition to photoassimilates, amino acids and other small molecules. The transcription profile of messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules in the sieve tubes is unique and does not reflect the transcript profile in the neighboring companion cells. This discovery suggests tight regulation on cell-to-cell movement of mRNA molecules from the companion cells into the sieve tube. Heterografting experiments and RNA-detection methods have provided unequivocal evidence for the trafficking of several specific mRNA molecules between distant organs. Detection of various plant transcripts in their respective plant parasites further confirms this long-distance movement. The finding that several of these trafficked transcripts are involved in the control of developmental processes as well as responses to growth substances or environmental cues has led to a new paradigm that mRNA molecules act as non-cell-autonomous signaling agents operating in the vascular system. Trafficking of these molecules creates a communication network between distant organs that is required for coordinated development of the whole plant under adverse conditions. The generality of this concept, however, is still under debate, because the raison d'être for long-distance movement of mRNA is not clear. In this review we discuss the identity and potential function of phloem-sap mRNA molecules, the factors facilitating RNA transport, and the rationale for their action as long-distance signaling agents in the control of developmental processes.

  15. A quantitative method to identify microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a 3'UTR RNA affinity technique.

    PubMed

    Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2013-12-01

    The identification of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that target a given messenger RNA (mRNA) is essential for studies in gene regulation, but the available bioinformatic software programs are often unreliable. We have developed a unique experimental miRNA affinity assay whereby a 3'UTR RNA is end-labeled with biotin, immobilized, and then used as a bait sequence for affinity pull-down of miRNAs. After washes and release, cloning and sequencing identify the miRNAs. Binding affinity is quantitated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), comparing released and original input concentrations. As an initial demonstration, the TCF8/ZEB1 mRNA affinity pull-down yielded miR-200 family member miRs in the majority of clones, and binding affinity was approximately 100%; virtually all copies of miR-200c bound the immobilized mRNA transcript. For validation in cells, miR-200c strongly inhibited expression of a TCF8 luciferase reporter, native TCF8 mRNA, and protein levels, which contrasted with other recovered miRNAs with lower binding affinities. For Smad4 mRNA, miR-150 (and others) displayed a binding affinity of 39% (or less) yet did not inhibit a Smad4 reporter, native Smad4 mRNA, or protein levels. These results were not predicted by available software. This work demonstrates this miRNA binding affinity assay to be a novel yet facile experimental means of identification of miRNAs targeting a given mRNA.

  16. Serotonin transporter messenger RNA expression in neural crest-derived structures and sensory pathways of the developing rat embryo.

    PubMed

    Hansson, S R; Mezey, E; Hoffman, B J

    1999-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that serotonin plays an important role in the early development of both neural and non-neural tissues from vertebrate and invertebrate species. Serotonin is removed from the extracellular space by the cocaine- and antidepressant-sensitive serotonin transporter, thereby limiting its action on receptors. In situ hybridization histochemistry was used to delineate serotonin transporter messenger RNA expression during rat embryonic development. Serotonin transporter messenger RNA was widely expressed beginning prior to organogenesis and throughout the second half of gestation. Strikingly, serotonin transporter messenger RNA was detected in neural crest cells, some of which respond to serotonin in vitro, and neural crest-derived tissues, such as autonomic ganglia, tooth primordia, adrenal medulla, chondrocytes and neuroepithelial cells, in the skin, heart, intestine and lung. Within the peripheral sensory pathways, two major cells types were serotonin transporter messenger RNA-positive: (i) sensory ganglionic neurons and (ii) neuroepithelial cells which serve as targets for the outgrowing sensory neurons. Several sensory organs (cochlear and retinal ganglionic cells, taste buds, whisker and hair follicles) contained serotonin transporter messenger RNA by late gestation. The expression of serotonin transporter messenger RNA throughout the sensory pathways from central nervous system relay stations [Hansson S. R. et al. (1997) Neuroscience 83, 1185-1201; Lebrand C. et al. (1996) Neuron 17, 823-835] to sensory nerves and target organs as shown in this study suggests that serotonin may regulate peripheral synaptogenesis, and thereby influence later processing of sensory stimuli. If the early detection of serotonin transporter messenger RNA in skin and gastrointestinal and airway epithelia correlates with protein activity, it may permit establishment of a serotonin concentration gradient across epithelia, either from serotonin in the

  17. Feeder-Free Derivation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Luigi; Ni, Yuhui; Wang, Jiwu; Guo, Xirong

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic promise of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has spurred efforts to circumvent genome alteration when reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotency. Approaches based on episomal DNA, Sendai virus, and messenger RNA (mRNA) can generate “footprint-free” iPSCs with efficiencies equaling or surpassing those attained with integrating viral vectors. The mRNA method uniquely affords unprecedented control over reprogramming factor (RF) expression while obviating a cleanup phase to purge residual traces of vector. Currently, mRNA-based reprogramming is relatively laborious due to the need to transfect daily for ~2 weeks to induce pluripotency, and requires the use of feeder cells that add complexity and variability to the procedure while introducing a route for contamination with non-human-derived biological material. We accelerated the mRNA reprogramming process through stepwise optimization of the RF cocktail and leveraged these kinetic gains to establish a feeder-free, xeno-free protocol which slashes the time, cost and effort involved in iPSC derivation. PMID:22984641

  18. Exercise does not influence myostatin and follistatin messenger RNA expression in young women.

    PubMed

    Jensky, Nicole E; Sims, Jennifer K; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Sattler, Fred R; Rice, Judd C; Schroeder, E Todd

    2010-02-01

    We evaluated changes in myostatin, follistatin, and MyoD messenger RNA (mRNA) gene expression using eccentric exercise (EE) and concentric exercise (CE) as probes to better understand the mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy in young women. Twelve women performed single-leg maximal eccentric (n = 6, 25 +/- 1 years, 59 +/- 7 kg) or concentric (n = 6, 24 +/- 1 years, 65 +/- 7 kg) isokinetic knee extension exercise for 7 sessions. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at baseline, 8 hours after the first exercise session, and 8 hours after the seventh exercise session. In the EE group, there were no changes in myostatin and follistatin (p > or = 0.17); however, MyoD expression increased after 1 exercise bout (p = 0.02). In the CE group, there were no changes in myostatin, follistatin, or MyoD mRNA gene expression (p > or = 0.07). Differences between the EE and CE groups were not significant (p > or = 0.05). These data suggest that a single bout or multiple bouts of maximal EE or CE may not significantly alter myostatin or follistatin mRNA gene expression in young women. However, MyoD mRNA expression seems to increase only after EE.

  19. Messenger RNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification: research and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Su-hua; Di, Zhou; Zhao, Shu-min; Li, Cheng-tao

    2013-10-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. However, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time consumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Recently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profiling, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibility with current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review, we provided an overview of the present knowledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possible practical application to forensic casework.

  20. Messenger RNA sequence and the translation process --a particle transport perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajia; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, Royce K. P.

    2008-03-01

    The translation process in bacteria has been under intensive study. A key question concerns the quantitative effect of different elongation rates, associated with different codons, on the overall translation efficiency. Starting with a simple particle transport model, the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we incorporate the essential components of the translation process: Ribosomes, cognate tRNA concentrations, and messenger RNA (mRNA) templates correspond to particles, hopping rates, and the underlying lattice, respectively. Using simulations and mean-field approximations to obtain the stationary currents (the protein production rates) associated with different mRNA sequences, we are especially interested in the effect of slow codons, i.e., codons which are associated with rare tRNAs and are therefore translated very slowly. As the first step, we look at a ``designed sequence'' with one and two slow codons and quantify the marked impact of their spatial distribution to the currents. Extending the results to several mRNA sequences taken from real genes, we argue that an effective translation rate including the information from the vicinity of each codon needs to be taken into consideration when seeking an efficient strategy to optimize the protein production.

  1. Role of messenger RNA-ribosome complex in complementary DNA display.

    PubMed

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Ohtsuka, Isao; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kudou, Motonori; Kimura, Shinnosuke

    2013-07-15

    In vitro display technologies such as ribosome display and messenger RNA (mRNA)/complementary DNA (cDNA) display are powerful methods that can generate library diversities on the order of 10(10-14). However, in mRNA and cDNA display methods, the end use diversity is two orders of magnitude lower than initial diversity and is dependent on the downstream processes that act as limiting factors. We found that in our previous cDNA display protocol, the purification of protein fusions by the use of streptavidin matrices from cell-free translation mixtures had poor efficiency (∼10-15%) that seriously affected the diversity of the purified library. Here, we have investigated and optimized the protocols that provided remarkable purification efficiencies. The stalled ribosome in the mRNA-ribosome complex was found to impede this purification efficiency. Among the various conditions tested, destabilization of ribosomes by appropriate concentration of metal chelating agents in combination with an optimal temperature of 30°C were found to be crucial and effective for nearly complete isolation of protein fusions from the cell-free translation system. Thus, this protocol provided 8- to 10-fold increased efficiency of purification over the previous method and results in retaining the diversity of the library by approximately an order of magnitude-important for directed evolution. We also discuss the possible effects in the fabrication of protein chips.

  2. Colored petri net modeling of small interfering RNA-mediated messenger RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nickaeen, Niloofar; Moein, Shiva; Heidary, Zarifeh; Ghaisari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mathematical modeling of biological systems is an attractive way for studying complex biological systems and their behaviors. Petri Nets, due to their ability to model systems with various levels of qualitative information, have been wildly used in modeling biological systems in which enough qualitative data may not be at disposal. These nets have been used to answer questions regarding the dynamics of different cell behaviors including the translation process. In one stage of the translation process, the RNA sequence may be degraded. In the process of degradation of RNA sequence, small-noncoding RNA molecules known as small interfering RNA (siRNA) match the target RNA sequence. As a result of this matching, the target RNA sequence is destroyed. Materials and Methods: In this context, the process of matching and destruction is modeled using Colored Petri Nets (CPNs). The model is constructed using CPNs which allow tokens to have a value or type on them. Thus, CPN is a suitable tool to model string structures in which each element of the string has a different type. Using CPNs, long RNA, and siRNA strings are modeled with a finite set of colors. The model is simulated via CPN Tools. Results: A CPN model of the matching between RNA and siRNA strings is constructed in CPN Tools environment. Conclusion: In previous studies, a network of stoichiometric equations was modeled. However, in this particular study, we modeled the mechanism behind the silencing process. Modeling this kind of mechanisms provides us with a tool to examine the effects of different factors such as mutation or drugs on the process. PMID:27376039

  3. MicroRNA Seed Region Length Impact on Target Messenger RNA Expression and Survival in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Wolff, Roger K; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNA) repress messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally through binding to the 3' UTR of the mRNA with the miRNA seed region. It has been purported that longer seed regions have a greater efficacy on mRNA repression. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating differential expression of miRNAs involved in regulating the immune response, an important mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC), by seed length category. We subsequently evaluated differential expression of these miRNAs' targets in colonic tissue and the impact of these miRNAs on CRC survival. We determined sequence complementarity between each miRNA seed region and the 3' UTR of each experimentally verified mRNA target gene. We classified miRNAs into groups based on seed regions matching perfectly to a mRNA UTR with six bases beginning at position two, seven bases beginning at position one, seven bases beginning at position two, or eight bases beginning at position one. We analyzed these groups in terms of miRNA differential expression between carcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa, differential colonic target mRNA expression, and risk of dying from CRC. After correction for multiple comparisons, the proportion of the miRNAs that were associated with differential mRNA expression was 0% for the 6-mer, 13.64% for the 7α-mer group, 12.82% for the 7β-mer group, and 8.70% for the 8-mer group. The proportion of miRNAs associated with survival was 20% for the 6-mer group, 27.27% for the 7α-mer group, 10.23% for the 7β-mer group, and 21.74% for the 8-mer group. We did not see a linear relationship between seed length and miRNA expression dysregulation, mRNA expression, or survival. Our findings do not support the hypothesis the seed region length alone influences mRNA repression.

  4. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B; Karmali, Priya P; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M

    2017-03-07

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4-6 h) that remains stable for up to 4-6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA-LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable.

  5. Unusual stability of messenger RNA in snake venom reveals gene expression dynamics of venom replenishment.

    PubMed

    Currier, Rachel B; Calvete, Juan J; Sanz, Libia; Harrison, Robert A; Rowley, Paul D; Wagstaff, Simon C

    2012-01-01

    Venom is a critical evolutionary innovation enabling venomous snakes to become successful limbless predators; it is therefore vital that venomous snakes possess a highly efficient venom production and delivery system to maintain their predatory arsenal. Here, we exploit the unusual stability of messenger RNA in venom to conduct, for the first time, quantitative PCR to characterise the dynamics of gene expression of newly synthesised venom proteins following venom depletion. Quantitative PCR directly from venom enables real-time dynamic studies of gene expression in the same animals because it circumvents the conventional requirement to sacrifice snakes to extract mRNA from dissected venom glands. Using qPCR and proteomic analysis, we show that gene expression and protein re-synthesis triggered by venom expulsion peaks between days 3-7 of the cycle of venom replenishment, with different protein families expressed in parallel. We demonstrate that venom re-synthesis occurs very rapidly following depletion of venom stores, presumably to ensure venomous snakes retain their ability to efficiently predate and remain defended from predators. The stability of mRNA in venom is biologically fascinating, and could significantly empower venom research by expanding opportunities to produce transcriptomes from historical venom stocks and rare or endangered venomous species, for new therapeutic, diagnostic and evolutionary studies.

  6. The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: Probing interactions with protein and RNA binding partners using cyclic dinucleotide analogs

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Carly A.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to adapt to a changing environment is essential for their survival. One mechanism used to facilitate behavioral adaptations is the second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). c-di-GMP is widespread throughout the bacterial domain and plays a vital role in regulating the transition between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state. This second messenger also controls the virulence response of pathogenic organisms and is thought to be connected to quorum sensing, the process by which bacteria communicate with each other. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is tightly regulated by the opposing enzymatic activities of diguanlyate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which synthesize and degrade the second messenger, respectively. The change in the intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is directly sensed by downstream targets of the second messenger, both protein and RNA, which induce the appropriate phenotypic response. This review will summarize our current state of knowledge of c-di-GMP signaling in bacteria with a focus on protein and RNA binding partners of the second messenger. Efforts towards the synthesis of c-di-GMP and its analogs are discussed as well as studies aimed at targeting these macromolecular effectors with chemically synthesized cyclic dinucleotide analogs. PMID:23108253

  7. The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: probing interactions with protein and RNA binding partners using cyclic dinucleotide analogs.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Carly A; Strobel, Scott A

    2012-12-14

    The ability of bacteria to adapt to a changing environment is essential for their survival. One mechanism used to facilitate behavioral adaptations is the second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). c-di-GMP is widespread throughout the bacterial domain and plays a vital role in regulating the transition between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state. This second messenger also controls the virulence response of pathogenic organisms and is thought to be connected to quorum sensing, the process by which bacteria communicate with each other. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is tightly regulated by the opposing enzymatic activities of diguanlyate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which synthesize and degrade the second messenger, respectively. The change in the intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is directly sensed by downstream targets of the second messenger, both protein and RNA, which induce the appropriate phenotypic response. This review will summarize our current state of knowledge of c-di-GMP signaling in bacteria with a focus on protein and RNA binding partners of the second messenger. Efforts towards the synthesis of c-di-GMP and its analogs are discussed as well as studies aimed at targeting these macromolecular effectors with chemically synthesized cyclic dinucleotide analogs.

  8. RNA Trans-Splicing Targeting Endogenous β-Globin Pre-Messenger RNA in Human Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoya; Washington, Kareem N; Mozer, Brian; Platner, Charlotte; Ballantine, Josiah; Skala, Luke P; Raines, Lydia; Shvygin, Anna; Hsieh, Matthew M; Mitchell, Lloyd G; Tisdale, John F

    2017-02-14

    Sickle cell disease results from a point mutation in exon 1 of the β-globin gene (total 3 exons). Replacing sickle β-globin exon 1 (and exon 2) with a normal sequence by trans-splicing is a potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, this study sought to develop trans-splicing targeting β-globin pre-messenger RNA among human erythroid cells. Binding domains from random β-globin sequences were comprehensively screened. Six candidates had optimal binding, and all targeted intron 2. Next, lentiviral vectors encoding RNA trans-splicing molecules were constructed incorporating a unique binding domain from these candidates, artificial 5' splice site, and γ-globin cDNA, and trans-splicing was evaluated in CD34(+) cell-derived erythroid cells from healthy individuals. Lentiviral transduction was efficient, with vector copy numbers of 9.7 to 15.3. The intended trans-spliced RNA product, including exon 3 of endogenous β-globin and γ-globin, was detected at the molecular level. Trans-splicing efficiency was improved to 0.07-0.09% by longer binding domains, including the 5' splice site of intron 2. In summary, screening was performed to select efficient binding domains for trans-splicing. Detectable levels of trans-splicing were obtained for endogenous β-globin RNA in human erythroid cells. These methods provide the basis for future trans-splicing directed gene therapy.

  9. The use of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; Xu, Haodong

    2011-03-01

    The histologic distinction between reactive processes and malignant neoplasms and between low-grade and high-grade tumors is not always straightforward and is sometimes extremely challenging. This is especially the case when the diagnostic material is a small biopsy specimen or a cytology specimen with scant cellularity. In addition, suboptimal processing and crush artifact may limit accurate diagnosis. A reliable diagnostic biomarker that preferentially highlights malignant processes and high-grade tumors would be very valuable in segregating these entities from reactive processes and low-grade lesions. Recent extensive studies have shown that an oncoprotein, insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3, is not only a prognostic biomarker but also a diagnostic molecule. This review focuses on discussing the value of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in diagnostic pathology, with a focus on utilization of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in the discrimination of benign effusions from malignant effusions, malignant mesothelioma from mesothelial hyperplasia, carcinoids from high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas, low-grade dysplasia from high-grade dysplasia, hepatocellular carcinoma from hepatic adenoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic pancreatic ductal carcinoma from benign bile duct lesions, melanoma from nevi, and follicular thyroid carcinoma from follicular adenoma of the thyroid, as well as examining insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 expression in lymphomas of germinal center origin.

  10. Seasonal effect on sperm messenger RNA profile of domestic swine (Sus Scrofa).

    PubMed

    Yang, C C; Lin, Y S; Hsu, C C; Tsai, M H; Wu, S C; Cheng, W T K

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal infertility is a well-known problem in the modern swine (Sus scrofa) industry. The molecular mechanisms responsible for thermal effects on spermatogenesis are, however, just beginning to be elucidated. The existence of specific messenger RNA (mRNA) remnants contained within freshly ejaculated sperm has been identified in several species. Investigators have obtained differential RNA profiles of infertile men compared with fertile individuals; however, there are limited to the probes, which are mostly derived from nucleic acids of testicular tissues of either human or mice. The objective of this study was to investigate mRNA remnants from ejaculated sperm of the domestic swine and uncover important clues regarding the molecular regulation of spermatogenesis under environmental thermo-impacts. We utilized the remnant mRNA collected from swine ejaculated sperm as the target source to detect the global gene expression in summer and in winter by swine sperm-specific oligonucleotide microarray. Sixty-seven transcripts were differentially expressed with statistical differences between seasons of sperm samples collected, including forty-nine in winter (49/67) and eighteen in summer (18/67). There were only 33 of these transcripts that could be annotated to gene ontology hierarchy with the database of Homo sapiens and their functions mostly were involved in variety of metabolic processes. Moreover, these studies also confirmed that significant differences of gene expression profiles were found in swine sperm when comparisons were made between ejaculates collected during the winter and the summer season under the subtropical area such as Taiwan. Even though most of the genes found in our experiments are still poorly understood in terms of their true functions in spermatogenesis, bioinformatics analysis suggested that they are involved in a broad spectrum of biochemical processes including gamete generation. These concordant profiles should permit the development of a

  11. The neurofibromatosis type I messenger RNA undergoes base-modification RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Skuse, G R; Cappione, A J; Sowden, M; Metheny, L J; Smith, H C

    1996-01-01

    A functional mooring sequence, known to be required for apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA editing, exists in the mRNA encoding the neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) tumor suppressor. Editing of NF1 mRNA modifies cytidine in an arginine codon (CGA) at nucleotide 2914 to a uridine (UGA), creating an in frame translation stop codon. NF1 editing occurs in normal tissue but was several-fold higher in tumors. In vitro editing and transfection assays demonstrated that apoB and NF1 RNA editing will take place in both neural tumor and hepatoma cells. Unlike apoB, NF1 editing did not demonstrate dependence on rate-limiting quantities of APOBEC-1 (the apoB editing catalytic subunit) suggesting that different trans-acting factors may be involved in the two editing processes. PMID:8602361

  12. Integrated microRNA and messenger RNA analysis in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Sean; Williams, Michael J. A.; Phillips, L. Vicky; Galvin, Ivor F.; Bunton, Richard W.; Jones, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with no effective medical therapies. Investigation into the underlying biology of AS in humans is limited by difficulties in obtaining healthy valvular tissue for use as a control group. However, micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are stable in post-mortem tissue. We compared valve specimens from patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for AS to non-diseased cadaveric valves. We found 106 differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05, adjusted for multiple comparisons) on microarray analysis, with highly correlated expression among up- and down-regulated miRNAs. Integrated miRNA/gene expression analysis validated the microarray results as a whole, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed downregulation of miR-122-5p, miR-625-5p, miR-30e-5p and upregulation of miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p. Pathway analysis of the integrated miRNA/mRNA network identified pathways predominantly involved in extracellular matrix function. A number of currently available therapies target products of upregulated genes in the integrated miRNA/mRNA network, with these genes being predominantly more peripheral members of the network. The identification of a group of tissue miRNA associated with AS may contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to AS. This study highlights the importance of systems biology-based approaches to complex diseases. PMID:27876829

  13. Integrated microRNA and messenger RNA analysis in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Sean; Williams, Michael J A; Phillips, L Vicky; Galvin, Ivor F; Bunton, Richard W; Jones, Gregory T

    2016-11-23

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with no effective medical therapies. Investigation into the underlying biology of AS in humans is limited by difficulties in obtaining healthy valvular tissue for use as a control group. However, micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are stable in post-mortem tissue. We compared valve specimens from patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for AS to non-diseased cadaveric valves. We found 106 differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05, adjusted for multiple comparisons) on microarray analysis, with highly correlated expression among up- and down-regulated miRNAs. Integrated miRNA/gene expression analysis validated the microarray results as a whole, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed downregulation of miR-122-5p, miR-625-5p, miR-30e-5p and upregulation of miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p. Pathway analysis of the integrated miRNA/mRNA network identified pathways predominantly involved in extracellular matrix function. A number of currently available therapies target products of upregulated genes in the integrated miRNA/mRNA network, with these genes being predominantly more peripheral members of the network. The identification of a group of tissue miRNA associated with AS may contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to AS. This study highlights the importance of systems biology-based approaches to complex diseases.

  14. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  15. Comparison of circulating, hepatocyte specific messenger RNA and microRNA as biomarkers for chronic hepatitis B and C.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Zhanqing; Dai, Fahui; Shi, Bisheng; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xinxin; Zang, Guoqing; Zhang, Jiming; Chen, Xiaorong; Qian, Fangxing; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs have been widely recognized as a novel category of biomarker in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. Other reports revealed that fragments of organ specific messenger RNAs are also detectable in serum/plasma and can be utilized as sensitive indicators of liver pathology and cancer. In order to assess the sensitivity and reliability of these two class of RNAs as marker of hepatitis B or C induced chronic liver disease, we collected plasma samples from 156 chronic hepatitis B or C patients (HBV active n = 112, HBV carrier n = 19, hepatitis C n = 25) and 22 healthy donors and quantified their circulating mRNA for albumin, HP (haptoglobin), CYP2E1 (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily E) and ApoA2 (Apolipoprotein A2) in conjunction with microRNA-122, a well established marker for acute and chronic liver injury. We found that plasma microRNA-122 level is significantly elevated in patients with active HBV but not in HBV carriers. Furthermore, microRNA-122 is not elevated in HCV patients even though their median serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) was three fold of the healthy donors. Nevertheless, circulating mRNAs, especially albumin mRNA, showed much more sensitivity in distinguishing active hepatitis B, hepatitis B carrier or HCV patients from healthy control. Correlation and multiple linear regression analysis suggested that circulating mRNAs and miRNAs are much more related to HBsAg titre than to sALT. Immunoprecipitation of HBsAg in HBV patients' plasma resulted in enrichment of albumin and HP mRNA suggesting that fragments of liver specific transcripts can be encapsidated into HBsAg particles. Taken together, our results suggest that hepatocyte specific transcripts in plasma like albumin mRNA showed greater sensitivity and specificity in differentiating HBV or HCV induced chronic liver disease than microRNA-122. Circulating mRNA fragments merit more attention in the quest of next generation biomarkers for

  16. DNA-water interactions distinguish messenger RNA genes from transfer RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Garima; Jayaram, B

    2012-05-30

    Physicochemical properties of DNA sequences as a guide to developing insights into genome organization has received little attention. Here, we utilize the energetics of DNA to further advance the knowledge on its language at a molecular level. Specifically, we ask the question whether physicochemical properties of different functional units on genomes differ. We extract intramolecular and solvation energies of different DNA base pair steps from a comprehensive set of molecular dynamics simulations. We then investigate the solvation behavior of DNA sequences coding for mRNAs and tRNAs. Distinguishing mRNA genes from tRNA genes is a tricky problem in genome annotation without assumptions on length of DNA and secondary structure of the product of transcription. We find that solvation energetics of DNA behaves as an extremely efficient property in discriminating 2,063,537 genes coding for mRNAs from 56,251 genes coding for tRNAs in all (~1500) completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes.

  17. Genome-Wide Scleral Micro- and Messenger-RNA Regulation During Myopia Development in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Metlapally, Ravikanth; Park, Han Na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Wang, Kevin K.; Tan, Christopher C.; Light, Jacob G.; Pardue, Machelle T.; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNA (miRNAs) have been previously implicated in scleral remodeling in normal eye growth. They have the potential to be therapeutic targets for prevention/retardation of exaggerated eye growth in myopia by modulating scleral matrix remodeling. To explore this potential, genome-wide miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) scleral profiles in myopic and control eyes from mice were studied. Methods C57BL/6J mice (n = 7; P28) reared under a 12L:12D cycle were form-deprived (FD) unilaterally for 2 weeks. Refractive error and axial length changes were measured using photorefraction and 1310-nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, respectively. Scleral RNA samples from FD and fellow control eyes were processed for microarray assay. Statistical analyses were performed using National Institute of Aging array analysis tool; group comparisons were made using ANOVA, and gene ontologies were identified using software available on the Web. Findings were confirmed using quantitative PCR in a separate group of mice (n = 7). Results Form-deprived eyes showed myopic shifts in refractive error (−2.02 ± 0.47 D; P < 0.01). Comparison of the scleral RNA profiles of test eyes with those of control eyes revealed 54 differentially expressed miRNAs and 261 mRNAs fold-change >1.25 (maximum fold change = 1.63 and 2.7 for miRNAs and mRNAs, respectively) (P < 0.05; minimum, P = 0.0001). Significant ontologies showing gene over-representation (P < 0.05) included intermediate filament organization, scaffold protein binding, detection of stimuli, calcium ion, G protein, and phototransduction. Significant differential expression of Let-7a and miR-16-2, and Smok4a, Prph2, and Gnat1 were confirmed. Conclusions Scleral mi- and mRNAs showed differential expression linked to myopia, supporting the involvement of miRNAs in eye growth regulation. The observed general trend of relatively small fold-changes suggests a tightly controlled, regulatory mechanism for scleral gene expression. PMID

  18. Parathyroid hormone induces c-fos and c-jun messenger RNA in rat osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    PTH is a potent regulator of osteoblast gene expression, yet the nuclear events that mediate PTH action are poorly understood. We were interested in identifying immediate early genes which may regulate PTH-altered gene expression in the osteoblast. Therefore, we examined the effects of PTH on c-fos and c-jun gene expression in a rat osteoblastic cell line (UMR 106-01). Under control conditions, c-fos and c-jun mRNAs were present at low basal levels. After PTH treatment, c-fos mRNA abundance dramatically increased, with a maximal and transient response at 30 min. PTH also stimulated an increase in c-jun mRNA, but in a biphasic manner, with maximal levels at 30 min and 2 h. These responses were dose dependent, not altered by cotreatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and preceded PTH-induced expression of matrix metallo-proteinase-1 mRNA. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of c-fos and c-jun transcription after PTH exposure. To determine the signal transduction pathways involved, second messenger analogs were tested for their ability to mimic the effects of PTH. 8-Bromo-cAMP and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused increases in the abundance of c-fos and c-jun transcripts. Ionomycin had no effect on the expression of these genes. Pretreatment of the cells with PMA resulted in a decrease in basal c-jun expression, but did not alter the PTH-mediated increase in c-fos, c-jun, or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. Profiling of differential expression of messenger RNA in normal, benign, and metastatic prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Robles, Liza D; Gibson, Jane; Muroski, Megan

    2002-12-01

    To understand the phenotypic changes associated with prostate cancer development and metastasis, we investigated differential gene expression in primary and established prostate cell lines used as models. We have used a differential display of messenger RNA (DDRT-PCR) technique using 168 primer combinations and total RNA from BPH-1, LNCaP, and PC3 cells to identify filter-based cDNA microarrays containing 18,376 nonredundant clones of genes and expressed sequence tags (EST) using mRNA from PrEC and MDAPCa2a cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed in normal, benign, and cancerous prostate cell lines. Twenty-five cDNA with a significant difference in expression of 76 candidate cDNA, as identified by DDRT-PCR and confirmed by slot-blot analysis, were selected for sequence analysis. Of these, 14 cDNA were further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data showed that a variety of genes/EST were up- or down-regulated in the metastatic prostate tumor cells and a majority of these genes encode cytoskeletal proteins and proteins with regulatory function. Expression profile of two EST was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We also have identified a number of genes exhibiting differential expression in prostate cancer cells, which were not known earlier to be involved in prostate cancer. This report provides a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and a foundation to facilitate in-depth studies on the mechanism of prostate cancer development and metastasis.

  20. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M.; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-01-01

    fAter being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22°C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes. PMID:12473688

  1. Cancer-Associated Perturbations in Alternative Pre-messenger RNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Bell, Brendan; Revil, Timothée; Venables, Julian P; Prinos, Panagiotis; Elela, Sherif Abou; Chabot, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    For most of our 25,000 genes, the removal of introns by pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing represents an essential step toward the production of functional messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Alternative splicing of a single pre-mRNA results in the production of different mRNAs. Although complex organisms use alternative splicing to expand protein function and phenotypic diversity, patterns of alternative splicing are often altered in cancer cells. Alternative splicing contributes to tumorigenesis by producing splice isoforms that can stimulate cell proliferation and cell migration or induce resistance to apoptosis and anticancer agents. Cancer-specific changes in splicing profiles can occur through mutations that are affecting splice sites and splicing control elements, and also by alterations in the expression of proteins that control splicing decisions. Recent progress in global approaches that interrogate splicing diversity should help to obtain specific splicing signatures for cancer types. The development of innovative approaches for annotating and reprogramming splicing events will more fully establish the essential contribution of alternative splicing to the biology of cancer and will hopefully provide novel targets and anticancer strategies. Metazoan genes are usually made up of several exons interrupted by introns. The introns are removed from the pre-mRNA by RNA splicing. In conjunction with other maturation steps, such as capping and polyadenylation, the spliced mRNA is then transported to the cytoplasm to be translated into a functional protein. The basic mechanism of splicing requires accurate recognition of each extremity of each intron by the spliceosome. Introns are identified by the binding of U1 snRNP to the 5' splice site and the U2AF65/U2AF35 complex to the 3' splice site. Following these interactions, other proteins and snRNPs are recruited to generate the complete spliceosomal complex needed to excise the intron. While many introns are constitutively

  2. RNA toxins: mediators of stress adaptation and pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Zhabokritsky, Alice; Kutky, Meherzad; Burns, Lydia A; Karran, Rajita A; Hudak, Katalin A

    2011-01-01

    RNA toxins are a group of enzymes primarily synthesized by bacteria, fungi, and plants that either cleave or depurinate RNA molecules. These proteins may be divided according to their RNA substrates: ribotoxins are nucleases that cleave ribosomal RNA (rRNA), ribosome inactivating proteins are glycosidases that remove a base from rRNA, messenger RNA (mRNA) interferases are nucleases that cleave mRNAs, and anticodon nucleases cleave transfer RNAs (tRNAs). These modifications to the RNAs may substantially alter gene expression and translation rates. Given that some of these enzymes cause cell death, it has been suggested that they function mainly in defense, either to kill competing cells or to elicit suicide and thereby limit pathogen spread from infected cells. Although good correlations have been drawn between their enzymatic functions and toxicity, recent work has shown that some RNA toxins cause apoptosis in the absence of damage to RNA and that defense against pathogens can be achieved without host cell death. Moreover, a decrease in cellular translation rate, insufficient to cause cell death, allows some organisms to adapt to stress and environmental change. Although ascribing effects observed in vitro to the roles of these toxins in nature has been challenging, recent results have expanded our understanding of their modes of action, and emphasized the importance of these toxins in development, adaptation to stress and defense against pathogens.

  3. Gap junctional communication between vascular cells. Induction of connexin43 messenger RNA in macrophage foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Polacek, D.; Lal, R.; Volin, M. V.; Davies, P. F.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and function of blood vessels depend on the ability of vascular cells to receive and transduce signals and to communicate with each other. One means by which vascular cells have been shown to communicate is via gap junctions, specifically connexin43. In atherosclerosis, the normal physical patterns of communication are disrupted by the subendothelial infiltration and accumulation of blood monocytes, which in turn can differentiate into resident foam cells. In this paper we report that neither freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes nor differentiated monocytes/macrophages exhibit functional gap junctional dye transfer in homo-cellular culture or in co-culture with endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells. By Northern analysis, neither freshly isolated blood monocytes nor pure cultures of differentiated monocyte/macrophages expressed gap junction messenger RNA. However, immunohistochemical staining followed by in situ hybridization on sections of human atherosclerotic carotid arteries revealed strong expression of gap junction connexin43 messenger RNA by macrophage foam cells. These results suggest that tissue-specific conditions present in atherosclerotic arteries induce expression of connexin43 messenger RNA in monocyte/macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8382009

  4. PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin biopsies: testing the effectiveness of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A biomarker.

    PubMed

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Visigalli, Davide; Radice, Davide; Fiorina, Elisabetta; Solari, Alessandra; Lauria, Giuseppe; Reilly, Mary M; Santoro, Lucio; Schenone, Angelo; Pareyson, Davide

    2014-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with increased gene dosage for PMP22. Therapeutic approaches are currently aiming at correcting PMP22 over-expression. It is unknown whether PMP22 can be used as a biological marker of disease progression and therapy efficacy. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsies of 45 patients with CMT1A, obtained at study entry and after 24-months of treatment either with ascorbic acid or placebo. Data of a subgroup of patients were also compared with matched healthy subjects. Finally, we analysed PMP22 messenger RNA levels in sural nerve biopsies. We did not find significant differences in the levels of any known PMP22 transcripts in treated or untreated patients with CMT1A, thus confirming that ascorbic acid does not impact on the molecular features of CMT1A. Most importantly, we did not observe any correlation between PMP22 messenger RNA levels and the different clinical and electrophysiological outcome measures, underscoring the weakness of PMP22 to mirror the phenotypic variability of patients with CMT1A. We did not find increased PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin and sural nerve biopsies of patients with CMT1A compared with relative controls. In conclusion, this study shows that ascorbic acid does not impact on PMP22 transcriptional regulation and PMP22 is not a suitable biomarker for CMT1A.

  5. Human bitter perception correlates with bitter receptor messenger RNA expression in taste cells123

    PubMed Central

    Lipchock, Sarah V; Mennella, Julie A; Spielman, Andrew I; Reed, Danielle R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alleles of the receptor gene TAS2R38 are responsible in part for the variation in bitter taste perception of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and structurally similar compounds (eg, glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables). At low concentrations, people with the PAV (“taster” amino acid sequence) form of TAS2R38 perceive these bitter compounds, whereas most with the AVI (“nontaster” amino acid sequence) form do not; heterozygotes (PAV/AVI) show the widest range of bitter perception. Objectives: The objectives were to examine individual differences in expression of PAV-TAS2R38 messenger RNA (mRNA) among heterozygotes, to test the hypotheses that the abundance of allele-specific gene expression accounts for the variation in human bitter taste perception, and to relate to dietary intake of bitter-tasting beverages and foods. Design: Heterozygous individuals (n = 22) provided psychophysical evaluation of the bitterness of PROP, glucosinolate-containing broccoli juice, non–glucosinolate-containing carrot juice, and several bitter non-TAS2R38 ligands as well as dietary recalls. Fungiform taste papillae were examined for allele-specific TAS2R38 expression by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: PAV-TAS2R38 mRNA expression was measured in 18 of 22 heterozygous subjects. Relative expression varied widely and positively correlated with ratings of bitterness intensity of PROP (P = 0.007) and broccoli juice (P = 0.004) but not of the control solutions carrot juice (P = 0.26), NaCl (P = 0.68), caffeine (P = 0.24), or urea (P = 0.47). Expression amounts were related to self-reported recent and habitual caffeine intake (P = 0.060, P = 0.005); vegetable intake was too low to analyze. Conclusions: We provide evidence that PAV-TAS2R38 expression amount correlates with individual differences in bitter sensory perception and diet. The nature of this correlation calls for additional research on the molecular mechanisms associated with some individual

  6. Steroid hormone receptor gene expression in human breast cancer cells: inverse relationship between oestrogen and glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, R E; Lee, C S; Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Clarke, C L; Sutherland, R L

    1990-12-15

    The relative expression in human breast cancer cells of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) encoding different steroid hormone receptors is unknown. Accordingly, mRNA levels in total RNA extracted from 13 human breast cancer cell lines were measured by Northern analysis employing complementary DNA probes for the human oestrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), androgen (AR), vitamin D3 (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR). The 7 ER+ lines expressed a single 6.4 kilobases (kb) ER mRNA. Interestingly, low concentrations of ER mRNA were detected in the ER- cell lines, MDA-MB-330 and BT 20. PR mRNA, predominantly a 13.5 kb species, was expressed in the 6 lines known to be ER+, PR+ by radioligand binding; however, one ER+ cell line, MDA-MB-134, failed to express PR mRNA. A 10.5 kb AR mRNA was expressed at significantly higher levels in ER+ than ER- cell lines. All cell lines expressed a single 4.6 kb mRNA for VDR and a single 7.4 kb mRNA for GR. ER and PR mRNA levels were positively correlated (p = 0.011) and each was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels (p less than or equal to 0.009). ER, PR and AR mRNAs were negatively associated with GR levels (p less than or equal to 0.012), while ER and AR mRNA levels were negatively correlated with mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor. In contrast, levels of VDR mRNA were unrelated to the concentration of any other steroid receptor mRNA. Our data demonstrate the coordinate expression of ER, PR and AR genes, and an inverse relationship between sex steroid hormone receptor and GR gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

  7. Regulation of antifreeze protein messenger RNA and a female-specific messenger RNA in winter flounder: Evidence for temperature and photoperiod effects

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Northern blot hybridizations showed that mRNA{sub f} is female-specific, and that both mRNAs are liver-specific and expressed at high levels only during the fall and winter in the wild. When warm-acclimated flounder (18C) were acclimated over 2 days to low temperature (4 C) and short photoperiod in July and October, high levels of AF mRNA accumulated within 4-10 days. Low levels were found in fish at high temperature at any time, on long photoperiod after acclimation to low temperature in July, or continuously at 4 C from March until September. A temperature increase in January resulted in a dramatic decrease in the levels of AF mRNA within 5 days. Beta actin mRNA, mRNA{sub f} and most mRNAs translated in a reticulocyte lysate did not change in abundance after temperature increases or decreases. Synthesis of AF mRNA in liver slices was investigated by Northern blot hybridization and hybridization of {sup 32}P-labeled RNA to AF cDNA. Liver slices from cold-acclimated January fish expressed high levels of AF mRNA initially at 4 C and lower levels at 18 C. AF mRNA expression was turned off in tissue from warm-acclimated fish but was progressively induced after long 4 C incubations in vitro in livers from fall fish but not from spring fish. Temperature and photoperiod act either as zeitgebers, which set the phase of an endogenous rhythm, or as more direct signals that stimulate a transient accumulation of AF mRNA.

  8. Content of N-6 methyl adenylic acid in heterogeneous nuclear and messenger RNA of HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, U; Fernandez-Muñoz, R; Darnell, J E

    1977-01-01

    With the aid of a suitable thin layer chromatographic procedure, the N-6 methyl adenylic acid (m6A), content of a variety of 32P labeled RNA species from HeLa cells has been measured. Poly(A)-containing (poly(A)+) cytoplasmic RNA has on the average one m6Ap per 800 to 900 nucleotides. This value is independent of the length of the molecules. The proportion of m6Ap in poly(A)+ cytoplasmic RNA does not change between 4 and 18 hours of labeling with 32P, suggesting that the majority of the messenger RNA molecules may have a similar level of internal methylation regardless of their half-life. The non-polyadenylated, non-ribosomal cytoplasmic RNA fraction sedimenting from 10S TO 28S is less methylated with approximately one m6A per 2,700 nucleotides. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA molecules (DMSO treated) which sediment from 28S to 45S have approximately one m6Ap per 3,000 nucleotides. The hnRNA molecules sedimenting from 10S to 28S have one m6Ap per 1,800 nucleotides. Poly(A)+ nuclear RNA is enriched in m6A, containing 1 residue of m6A per 700 to 800 nucleotides, a value close to that obtained for the polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA. Images PMID:866178

  9. Single-cell messenger RNA sequencing reveals rare intestinal cell types.

    PubMed

    Grün, Dominic; Lyubimova, Anna; Kester, Lennart; Wiebrands, Kay; Basak, Onur; Sasaki, Nobuo; Clevers, Hans; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-09-10

    Understanding the development and function of an organ requires the characterization of all of its cell types. Traditional methods for visualizing and isolating subpopulations of cells are based on messenger RNA or protein expression of only a few known marker genes. The unequivocal identification of a specific marker gene, however, poses a major challenge, particularly if this cell type is rare. Identifying rare cell types, such as stem cells, short-lived progenitors, cancer stem cells, or circulating tumour cells, is crucial to acquire a better understanding of normal or diseased tissue biology. To address this challenge we first sequenced the transcriptome of hundreds of randomly selected cells from mouse intestinal organoids, cultured self-organizing epithelial structures that contain all cell lineages of the mammalian intestine. Organoid buds, like intestinal crypts, harbour stem cells that continuously differentiate into a variety of cell types, occurring at widely different abundances. Since available computational methods can only resolve more abundant cell types, we developed RaceID, an algorithm for rare cell type identification in complex populations of single cells. We demonstrate that this algorithm can resolve cell types represented by only a single cell in a population of randomly sampled organoid cells. We use this algorithm to identify Reg4 as a novel marker for enteroendocrine cells, a rare population of hormone-producing intestinal cells. Next, we use Reg4 expression to enrich for these rare cells and investigate the heterogeneity within this population. RaceID confirmed the existence of known enteroendocrine lineages, and moreover discovered novel subtypes, which we subsequently validated in vivo. Having validated RaceID we then applied the algorithm to ex vivo-isolated Lgr5-positive stem cells and their direct progeny. We find that Lgr5-positive cells represent a homogenous abundant population of stem cells mixed with a rare population of Lgr5

  10. Recombinant messenger RNA technology and its application in cancer immunotherapy, transcript replacement therapies, pluripotent stem cell induction, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vallazza, Britta; Petri, Sebastian; Poleganov, Marco A; Eberle, Florian; Kuhn, Andreas N; Sahin, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in using messenger RNA (mRNA) as a therapeutic means to tackle different diseases has enormously increased. This holds true not only for numerous preclinical studies, but mRNA has also entered the clinic to fight cancer. The advantages of using mRNA compared to DNA were recognized very early on, e.g., the lack of risk for genomic integration, or the expression of the encoded protein in the cytoplasm without the need to cross the nuclear membrane. However, it was generally assumed that mRNA is just not stable enough to give rise to sufficient expression of the encoded protein. Yet, an initially small group of mRNA aficionados could demonstrate that the stability of mRNA and the efficiency, by which the encoded protein is translated, can be significantly increased by selecting the right set of cis-acting structural elements (including the 5'-cap, 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, poly(A)-tail, and modified building blocks). In parallel, significant advances in RNA packaging and delivery have been made, extending the potential for this molecule. This paved the way for further work to prove mRNA as a promising therapeutic for multiple diseases. Here, we review the developments to optimize mRNA regarding stability, translational efficiency, and immune-modulating properties to enhance its functionality and efficacy as a therapeutic. Furthermore, we summarize the current status of preclinical and clinical studies that use mRNA for cancer immunotherapy, for the expression of functional proteins as so-called transcript (or protein) replacement therapy, as well as for induction of pluripotent stem cells.

  11. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bujarski, Jozef J

    2013-01-01

    RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+)-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings) along with non-replicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (1) How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (2) What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (3) Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (4) Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (5) What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  12. The cytoskeletal framework of sea urchin eggs and embryos: developmental changes in the association of messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Moon, R T; Nicosia, R F; Olsen, C; Hille, M B; Jeffery, W R

    1983-02-01

    Extraction of sea urchin eggs and embryos with Triton X-100 generated a cytoskeletal framework (CSK) composed of a cortical filamentous network and an internal system of filaments associated with ribosomes. The CSK contained only 10-20% of the cellular protein, RNA, and lipid. A specific subset of proteins was enriched in the CSK. Several lines of evidence suggest that mRNA is a component of the CSK of both eggs and embryos. First, the CSK contained poly(A) sequences which hybridized with [3H]poly(U). Second, the CSK contained polyribosomes. Finally, RNA extracted from the CSK showed translational activity in an in vitro system. The nonhistone messages present in the CSK were qualitatively similar to those solubilized by detergent, as determined by separation on polyacrylamide gels of the products of in vitro translation. In the unfertilized egg, most mRNA was present as nonpolyribosomal messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes which, along with monoribosomes, were efficiently extracted by Triton X-100. The converse was found in blastulae, as most of the mRNA was present as polyribosomes associated with the CSK, although monoribosomes were still efficiently extracted by detergent. These results indicate a correlation between the activation of protein synthesis in eggs and the association of polyribosomes with the CSK.

  13. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation.

  14. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that increased growth in channel catfish is associated with expression of the genes that code for uncoupling proteins (UCP) 2 and 3, members of the mitochondrial channel proteins involved in nutrient sensing and metabolism. The specific objective was to contrast the levels of UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in fast vs slow growing catfish as well as in fed vs fasted catfish. Two distinct UCP2 transcripts were identified and named UCP2a and UCP2b, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of catfish UCP2s were highly similar to UCP2 and other UCPs from other fish and mammals (>75%). Expression of UCP2a mRNA was detectable at very low levels in various metabolically active tissues, whereas the expression of UCP2b mRNA was readily detectable in the muscle and heart. In a 21-wk feeding study, fish that grew faster had a greater percent body fat at the end of the study (P < 0.01). Expression of UCP2b mRNA tended to be lower (P < 0.10) in fast growing fish in the middle of the study although levels were similar at the beginning and the end of the study. In the fed vs fasted study, expression of UCP2b mRNA in muscle was increased (P < 0.05) in fish assigned to 30 d of fasting. Our results suggest that, based on the nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities and tissue mRNA distribution, catfish UCP2b may be the analog to UCP3. Moreover, our results suggest selection toward growth and associated fat accumulation appears to be independent of muscle UCP2b mRNA expression and UCP2b-mediated mechanisms.

  15. Regulation of neurotrophin and trkA, trkB and trkC tyrosine kinase receptor messenger RNA expression in kindling.

    PubMed

    Bengzon, J; Kokaia, Z; Ernfors, P; Kokaia, M; Leanza, G; Nilsson, O G; Persson, H; Lindvall, O

    1993-03-01

    Levels of messenger RNA for nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, and the tyrosine kinase receptors trkA, trkB and trkC have been studied using in situ hybridization in the rat brain 2 h and four weeks after kindling-induced seizures. Epileptiform activity evoked by hippocampal stimulation and exceeding 70 s lead to a concomitant and transient increase of brain- derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, trkB and trkC messenger RNA expression in dentate granule cells after both focal and generalized seizures. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA levels were also increased bilaterally in the CA1-CA3 regions, amygdala and the piriform, entorhinal, perirhinal, retrosplenial and temporal cortices after generalized seizures. The magnitude of the increases was similar throughout the development of kindling and in the fully kindled brain. No changes of trkA messenger RNA were observed. In amygdalar kindling, elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA levels developed more rapidly in the amygdala-piriform cortex than after stimulation in the hippocampus but changes in the hippocampal formation were only seen in few animals. Intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine or a bilateral fimbria-fornix lesion did not alter basal expression or seizure-evoked changes in messenger RNA levels for neurotrophins or trk receptors but increased the number of animals exhibiting elevated levels after the first stimulation, probably due to a prolongation of seizure activity. Both in sham-operated and fimbria-fornix-lesioned rats seizure activity caused a marked reduction of neurotrophin-3 messenger RNA levels in dentate granule cells. The results indicate that activation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene, at least in dentate granule cells, is an "all-or-none" type of response and dependent on the duration but not the severity of seizures or the stage of kindling epileptogenesis. Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic

  16. Whole blood cells loaded with messenger RNA as an anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kyle K L; Boczkowski, David; Dannull, Jens; Pruitt, Scott; Leong, Kam W; Nair, Smita K

    2014-06-01

    The use of a cell-based vaccine composed of autologous whole blood cells loaded with mRNA is described. Mice immunized with whole blood cells loaded with mRNA encoding antigen develop anti-tumor immunity comparable to DC-RNA immunization. This approach offers a simple and affordable alternative to RNA-based cellular therapy by circumventing complex, laborious and expensive ex vivo manipulations required for DC-based immunizations.

  17. Messenger RNA delivery of a cartilage-anabolic transcription factor as a disease-modifying strategy for osteoarthritis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aini, Hailati; Itaka, Keiji; Fujisawa, Ayano; Uchida, Hirokuni; Uchida, Satoshi; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kataoka, Kazunori; Saito, Taku; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease and a major health problem in the elderly population. No disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) has been made available for clinical use. Here we present a disease-modifying strategy for OA, focusing on messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery of a therapeutic transcription factor using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer-based polyplex nanomicelles. When polyplex nanomicelles carrying the cartilage-anabolic, runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 mRNA were injected into mouse OA knee joints, OA progression was significantly suppressed compared with the non-treatment control. Expressions of cartilage-anabolic markers and proliferation were augmented in articular chondrocytes of the RUNX1-injected knees. Thus, this study provides a proof of concept of the treatment of degenerative diseases such as OA by the in situ mRNA delivery of therapeutic transcription factors; the presented approach will directly connect basic findings on disease-protective or tissue-regenerating factors to disease treatment. PMID:26728350

  18. Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Dai, Ziyu; Chen, Baowei; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-12-01

    We describe a novel electrochemical branched-DNA (bDNA) assay for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free detection and quantification of p185 BCR-ABL leukemia fusion transcript in the population of messenger RNA (mRNA) extracted from cell lines. The bDNA amplifier carrying high loading of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) tracers was used to amplify targets signal. The targets were captured on microplate well surfaces through cooperative sandwich hybridization prior to the labeling of bDNA. The activity of captured ALP was monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis of the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 1-napthyl-phosphate. The specificity and sensitivity of assay enabled direct detection of target transcript in as little as 4.6 ng mRNA without PCR amplification. In combination with the use of a well-quantified standard, the electrochemical bDNA assay was capable of direct use for a PCR-free quantitative analysis of target transcript in total mRNA population. The approach thus provides a simple, sensitive, accurate and quantitative tool alternate to the RQ-PCR for early disease diagnosis.

  19. Messenger RNA delivery of a cartilage-anabolic transcription factor as a disease-modifying strategy for osteoarthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Aini, Hailati; Itaka, Keiji; Fujisawa, Ayano; Uchida, Hirokuni; Uchida, Satoshi; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kataoka, Kazunori; Saito, Taku; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2016-01-05

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease and a major health problem in the elderly population. No disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) has been made available for clinical use. Here we present a disease-modifying strategy for OA, focusing on messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery of a therapeutic transcription factor using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer-based polyplex nanomicelles. When polyplex nanomicelles carrying the cartilage-anabolic, runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 mRNA were injected into mouse OA knee joints, OA progression was significantly suppressed compared with the non-treatment control. Expressions of cartilage-anabolic markers and proliferation were augmented in articular chondrocytes of the RUNX1-injected knees. Thus, this study provides a proof of concept of the treatment of degenerative diseases such as OA by the in situ mRNA delivery of therapeutic transcription factors; the presented approach will directly connect basic findings on disease-protective or tissue-regenerating factors to disease treatment.

  20. Efficient ex vivo delivery of chemically modified messenger RNA using lipofection and magnetofection.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Zohreh Sadat; Pasewald, Tamara; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2017-01-22

    Recently, chemically modified mRNA (cmRNA) therapeutics have been the subject of extensive application-oriented research in both academia and industry as a safer alternative for gene and recombinant protein therapies. However, the lack of an efficient delivery system hinders widespread application. Here we used ∼100-nm lipoplexes and magnetic lipoplexes that can protect cmRNA from RNases and efficiently deliver it into muscle and fat tissues as well as to the endothelium of the carotid artery. Establishing magnetofection for ex vivo cmRNA delivery for the first time, we suggest this method for potential enhanced and targeted delivery of cmRNA. This study introduces optimal cmRNA complexes with high ex vivo efficiency as good candidates for further in vivo cmRNA delivery.

  1. Physical change in cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoproteins in cells treated with inhibitors of mRNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyfuss, G.; Adam, S.A.; Choi, Y.D.

    1984-03-01

    Exposure of intact cells to UV light brings about cross-linking of polyadenylated mRNA to a set of cytoplasmic proteins which are in direct contact with the mRNA in vivo. Substantial amounts of an additional protein of molecular weight 38,000 become cross-linked to the mRNA when cells are treated with inhibitors of mRNA synthesis (actinomycin D, camptothecin, and 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole) or after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. Cordycepin, which inhibits polyadenylation but not mRNA synthesis, has no such effect. Inhibitors of protein synthesis and of rRNA synthesis are also without effect on 38K cross-linking to mRNA. The onset of the effect of inhibitors of mRNA synthesis on the UV cross-linkable interaction between mRNA and 38K is rapid and reaches a maximal level in less than 60 min, and it is completely and rapidly reversible. In cells treated with actinomycin D, the amount of 38K which becomes cross-linked to mRNA is proportional to the extent of inhibition of mRNA synthesis. The association of 38K with mRNA during transcriptional arrest does not require protein synthesis because simultaneous treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor emetine does not interfere with it. The effectors which promote the interaction of 38K with mRNA do not affect the proteins which are in contact with polyadenylated heterogeneous nuclear RNA and do not markedly affect protein synthesis in the cell. The 38K protein can be isolated with the polyribosomal polyadenylated fraction from which it was purified, and monoclonal antibodies against it were prepared.

  2. A quantitative method to identify microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a 3′UTR RNA affinity technique

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that target a given messenger RNA (mRNA) is essential for studies in gene regulation, but the available bioinformatic software programs are often unreliable. We have developed a unique experimental miRNA affinity assay whereby a 3′UTR RNA is end-labeled with biotin, immobilized, and then used as a bait sequence for affinity pull-down of miRNAs. After washes and release, cloning and sequencing identify the miRNAs. Binding affinity is quantitated by quantitatvie polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), comparing released and original input concentrations. As an initial demonstration, the TCF8/ZEB1 mRNA affinity pull-down yielded miR-200 family member miRs in the majority of clones, and binding affinity was approximately 100%; virtually all copies of miR-200c bound the immobilized mRNA transcript. For validation in cells, miR-200c strongly inhibited expression of a TCF8 luciferase reporter, native TCF8 mRNA, and protein levels, which contrasted with other recovered miRNAs with lower binding affinities. For Smad4 mRNA, miR-150 (and others) displayed a binding affinity of 39% (or less) yet did not inhibit a Smad4 reporter, native Smad4 mRNA, or protein levels. These results were not predicted by available software. This work demonstrates this miRNA binding affinity assay to be a novel yet facile experimental means of identification of miRNAs targeting a given mRNA. PMID:23938772

  3. Affinity Purification of Binding miRNAs for Messenger RNA Fused with a Common Tag

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ke; Yan, Feng; Xiao, Hui; Yang, Xiaoxu; Xie, Guie; Xiao, Ye; Wang, Tingting; Xun, Yu; Huang, Zhaoqin; Han, Mei; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microRNA–mRNA interaction typically relies on bioinformatic methods, but these methods only suggest the possibility of microRNA binding and may miss important interactions as well as falsely predict others. A major obstacle to the miRNA research has been the lack of experimental procedures for the identification of miRNA–mRNA interactions. Recently, a few studies have attempted to explore experimental methods to isolate and identify miRNA targets or miRNAs targeting a single gene. Here, we developed an more convenient experimental approach for the isolation and identification of miRNAs targeting a single gene by applying short biotinylated DNA anti-sense oligonucleotides mix to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) mRNA which was fused to target gene mRNA. This method does not require a design of different anti-sense oligonucleotides to any mRNA. This is a simple and an efficient method to potentially identify miRNAs targeting specific gene mRNA combined with chip screen. PMID:25153630

  4. Identification of genes expressed in response to phytoplasma infection in leaves of Prunus armeniaca by messenger RNA differential display.

    PubMed

    Carginale, Vincenzo; Maria, Giovanna; Capasso, Clemente; Ionata, Elena; La Cara, Francesco; Pastore, Maria; Bertaccini, Assunta; Capasso, Antonio

    2004-05-12

    The messenger RNA (mRNA) differential display technique was applied to the identification and isolation of genes whose transcription was altered in leaves of Prunus armeniaca infected by European stone fruit yellows (ESFY) phytoplasma belonging to ribosomal subgroup 16SrX-B. Four genes whose steady-state levels of expression significantly changed in response to phytoplasma infection were isolated and identified. The results obtained show that two group of genes are affected by phytoplasma infection in apricot leaves. The first group comprises genes that are up-regulated by phytoplasma presence: in particular, a gene encoding the heat-shock protein HSP-70, a gene encoding a metallothionein (MT) and another homologous to the EST 673 cDNA clone of P. armeniaca, whose function was unknown. The other gene identified in our analysis is down-regulated by phytoplasma presence. It encodes a protein having homology to an amino acid transporter of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of mRNA differential display approach for the detection of plant metabolic pathways affected by phytoplasma infection.

  5. Cotranscriptional coupling of splicing factor recruitment and precursor messenger RNA splicing in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Listerman, Imke; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2006-09-01

    Coupling between transcription and RNA processing is a key gene regulatory mechanism. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation to detect transcription-dependent accumulation of the precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing factors hnRNP A1, U2AF65 and U1 and U5 snRNPs on the intron-containing human FOS gene. These factors were poorly detected on intronless heat-shock and histone genes, a result that opposes direct recruitment by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) or the cap-binding complex in vivo. However, an observed RNA-dependent interaction between U2AF65 and active forms of Pol II may stabilize U2AF65 binding to intron-containing nascent RNA. We establish chromatin-RNA immunoprecipitation and show that FOS pre-mRNA is cotranscriptionally spliced. Notably, the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, which stalls elongating Pol II, increased cotranscriptional splicing factor accumulation and splicing in parallel. This provides direct evidence for a kinetic link between transcription, splicing factor recruitment and splicing catalysis.

  6. Progestin regulation of estrogen receptor messenger RNA in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Sutherland, R L

    1990-06-01

    Progestin antagonism of estrogen action is thought to be due, at least in part, to progestin down-regulation of the estrogen receptor (ER). The molecular mechanisms subserving this effect, and the functional consequences in terms of target cell sensitivity to estrogens, are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to address these issues with particular emphasis on progestin regulation of ER gene expression at the mRNA level. The T-47D human breast cancer cell line was treated with the synthetic progestin, ORG 2058, and the resultant changes in ER mRNA and ER levels determined by Northern analysis and radioligand binding, respectively. Treatment of T-47D cells with ORG 2058 resulted in rapid down-regulation of ER mRNA levels to a nadir of 35-40% of control by 6 h. This fall in ER mRNA levels was accompanied by a slower but more sustained fall in ER binding to a nadir of 20% of control at 24 h. Between 12 and 24 h ER mRNA levels recovered partially while ER ligand binding continued to fall. At 48 h both ER mRNA and ER concentrations remained depressed, although the latter to a greater extent. ER mRNA half-life was determined by [3H]uridine incorporation to be approximately 60 min and was unaffected by progestin treatment during the early rapid phase of ER mRNA down-regulation. These data demonstrate that progestins cause rapid down-regulation of the ER mRNA and suggest that during the early rapid phase of this effect, reduced transcription of the ER gene rather than altered ER mRNA half-life mediate this effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Analysis of messenger RNA expression by in situ hybridization using RNA probes synthesized via in vitro transcription

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Bradley S.; Fletcher, Jonathan S.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the spatial patterning of mRNA expression is critically important for assigning functional and physiological significance to a given gene product. Given the tens of thousands of mRNAs in the mammalian genome, a full assessment of individual gene functions would ideally be overlaid upon knowledge of the specific cell types expressing each mRNA. In situ hybridization approaches represent a molecular biological/histological method that can reveal cellular patterns of mRNA expression. Here, we present detailed procedures for the detection of specific mRNAs using radioactive RNA probes in tissue sections followed by autoradiographic detection. These methods allow for the specific and sensitive detection of spatial patterns of mRNA expression, thereby linking mRNA expression with cell type and function. Radioactive detection methods also facilitate semi-quantitative analyses of changes in mRNA gene expression. PMID:20699122

  8. Atherogenic diet increases cholesteryl ester transfer protein messenger RNA levels in rabbit liver.

    PubMed

    Quinet, E M; Agellon, L B; Kroon, P A; Marcel, Y L; Lee, Y C; Whitlock, M E; Tall, A R

    1990-02-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer activity is increased in plasma of cholesterol-fed rabbits. To investigate the mechanisms leading to changes in activity, we measured cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mass by RIA and CETP mRNA abundance by Northern and slot blot analysis using a human CETP cDNA probe in control (n = 8) and cholesterol-fed rabbits (n = 10). Cholesterol feeding (chow plus 0.5% cholesterol, 10% corn oil) for 30 d increased CETP mass in plasma 3.2-fold in the cholesterol-fed rabbits (12.45 +/- 0.82 micrograms/ml) compared with controls (3.86 +/- 0.38 micrograms/ml). In the hypercholesterolemic rabbit, liver CETP mRNA levels were increased 2.8 times control mRNA levels. Actin, apo E, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, and albumin mRNA abundances were unchanged. In contrast to the widespread tissue distribution in humans, CETP mRNA was not detected in extrahepatic tissues of either control or cholesterol-fed animals. Using a sensitive RNase protection assay, the increase in liver CETP mRNA was detectable within 3 d of beginning the high cholesterol diet. Thus, in response to the atherogenic diet there is an early increase in liver CETP mRNA, probably causing increased CETP synthesis and secretion, and increased plasma CETP. The results indicate that the CETP gene may be regulated by diet-induced changes in lipid metabolism.

  9. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    SciTech Connect

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  10. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  11. Improvements in immunoprecipitation of specific messenger RNA. Isolation of highly purified conalbumin mRNA in high yield.

    PubMed

    Payvar, F; Schimke, R T

    1979-11-01

    We have described previously procedures for the isolation of specific mRNA employing immunoprecipitation of polysomes. In spite of our success with ovalbumin mRNA in the chicken oviduct, we have had considerable difficulties in applying these same published techniques to the immunopurification of conalbumin mRNA, despite the fact that the chicken oviduct synthesizes up to 10% of protein as conalbumin. Here we describe a number of modifications and refinements which have proved essential in obtaining intact conalbumin mRNA in high purity and high yields. These refinements include: (a) improved purification of conalbumin in order to remove contaminating proteins that result in impure antibodies; (b) improved isolation of specific conalbumin antibody in high yields; (c) improved methods for reducing contamination by non-specific polysomes; (d) improved techniques for isolation of RNA from immunoprecipitates resulting in less degradation and higher recovery of conalbumin mRNA; (E) improved techniques for efficient translation of conalbumin mRNA involving treatment of the RNA with methylmercury prior to translation. We conclude that problems involved in the immunoprecipitation of different mRNAs may differ, and that various refinements in techniques may be required for obtaining highly purified preparations of intact mRNA in high yields.

  12. All histological types of primary human rhabdomyosarcoma express alpha-cardiac and not alpha-skeletal actin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, W.; Bochaton-Piallat, M. L.; Geinoz, A.; d'Amore, E.; Laurini, R. N.; Cintorino, M.; Bégin, L. R.; Boivin, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    Eleven human primary rhabdomyosarcomas (RMSs), including all histological variants, were analyzed morphologically, immunohistochemically for intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms, and by means of Northern blots with probes specific for total actin, alpha-skeletal (SK), alpha-cardiac (CARD), and alpha-smooth muscle actin messenger (m)RNAs. All tumors disclosed ultrastructural evidence of skeletal muscle features with terminal differentiation in three cases. The RMSs contained immunohistochemically the intermediate filament proteins vimentin and desmin and reacted positively with the alpha-sarcomeric actin antibody, which recognizes alpha-SK and alpha-CARD actin isoforms. All RMSs reacted with the total actin probe, recognizing at 2.1 kb cytoplasmic actin mRNAs and at 1.7 kb alpha-actin mRNAs. With the specific probes, all RMSs expressed alpha-CARD actin mRNA, four neoplasms expressed also alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, whereas the probe for alpha-SK actin mRNA never produced a signal except in one case, in which the tumor masses were intermingled with non-neoplastic preexistent striated muscle fibers. Because alpha-CARD and alpha-smooth muscle actins are transiently expressed during normal skeletal muscle development, RMSs seem to follow normal skeletal myogenesis without completing the final step, consisting of alpha-SK actin mRNA expression. The use of Northern blots for alpha-CARD actin as an adjunct to conventional techniques may be helpful for the precise identification of primary RMSs compared to other soft tissue neoplasms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8160781

  13. Frequency distribution of pre-messenger RNA sequences in polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated nuclear RNA from Friend cells.

    PubMed Central

    Balmain, A; Minty, A J; Birnie, G D

    1980-01-01

    Hybridisation of cDNA probes for abundant and rare polysomal polyadenylated RNAs with polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated nuclear RNA from Friend cells indicated that the abundant polysomal polyadenylated RNA sequences were present at a higher concentration in the nucleus than rare polysomal sequences, but at a reduced range of concentrations. The ratio of the concentrations of abundant and rare sequences was about 3 in non-polyadenylated nuclear RNA, 9 in polyadenylated nuclear RNA and 13 in polysomal polyadenylated RNA. This suggests that polyadenylation may play a role in the quantitative selection of sequences for transport to the cytoplasm. Polyadenylation cannot be the only signal for transport, since a highly complex population of nucleus-confined polyadenylated molecules exists, each of which is present on average at less than one copy per cell. PMID:7433127

  14. Translation of thyroglobulin 33S messenger RNA as a means of determining thyroglobulin quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Vassart, G; Refetoff, S; Brocas, H; Dinsart, C; Dumont, J E

    1975-10-01

    Thyroglobulin is a 19S protein of approximately 660,000 daltons and unknown quaternary structure. We have previously shown that a 33S mRNA purified from mammalian thyroids promoted synthesis in the Xenopus oocyte of a peptide immunologically related to thyroglobulin. Chemical identity to the native protein is now presented by means of a tryptic peptide analysis. Moreover, the 33S mRNA is shown to contain all the information required for the synthesis of a complete 19S thyroglobulin molecule. Gel filtration in Sepharose under denaturing conditions indicates that the reduced polypeptide encoded by the 33S mRNA is larger than 210,000 daltons. A model of a dimeric thyroglobulin with about 300,000 dalton subunits is presented.

  15. Thyroglobulin messenger RNA: translation of a 33-S mRNA into a peptide immunologically related to thyroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Vassart, G; Brocas, H; Lecocq, R; Dumont, J E

    1975-06-16

    Poly(UC)--Sepharose chromatography of the RNA extracted from a thyroid fraction sedimenting between 800 X g and 27000 X g allows the purification of two RNA fractions amounting each to 1% of the applied material. The first one is loosely bound to the column from which it is eluted at 25 degrees C. It is mainly composed of 16-S and 12-S RNA comprising no poly(A) sequences. This could correspond to mitochondrial rRNA. The second one, which is eluted at 50 degrees C, is poly(A)-rich and represents 33-S and 17--18-S RNA species. The 33-S RNA resists heating at 80 degrees C, suggesting that it is composed of one polynucleotide chain. When injected into Xenopus oocytes, the 33-S RNA specifically promotes the synthesis of a peptide with an apparent molecular weight of 185000 and an apparent sedimentation coefficient of 10-S. This peptide is immunologically related to thyroglobulin and could represent its main precursor. Under the conditions tested it does not polymerize spontaneously into 19-S thyroglobulin, suggesting that assembly of the molecule could require specific, post-translational alterations of the precursor and/or the presence of additional lighter subunits.

  16. Correlation of transforming growth factor-β messenger RNA (TGF-β mRNA) expression with cellular immunoassays in Triamcinolone-treated captive hybrid striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harms, Craig A.; Ottinger, Christopher A.; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S.

    2000-01-01

    Assessing fish immune status with molecular markers has been hampered by a lack of specific reagents. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method (reverse transcription quantitative–competitive PCR, RT-qcPCR) for measuring transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) transcription from a broad range of teleost fish has recently been developed. The quantitative PCR now permits monitoring production of this important immunosuppressive cytokine in response to immunomodulating agents and conditions. We examined anterior kidney and spleen mononuclear cells from hybrid striped bass (female striped bass Morone saxatilis× male white bass M. chrysops) for production of TGF-β messenger RNA (mRNA) in response to administration of the synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone. We also compared TGF-β transcription with anterior kidney macrophage bactericidal activity and splenic lymphocyte blastogenesis. Anterior kidney mononuclear cell TGF-β mRNA levels decreased, whereas bactericidal activity increased. Spleen TGF-β mRNA levels did not change significantly, and splenic lymphocyte pokeweed mitogen stimulation index increased in triamcinolone-treated fish. Since triamcinolone is used therapeutically as a suppressive immunomodulator, the enhanced immune functions indicated by the cellular immunoassays were unexpected; however, the inverse response of TGF-β production and macrophage bactericidal activity was consistent with the known relationship between TGF-β and macrophage activation in mammals. Induced immunomodulation in hybrid striped bass was detectable by both traditional cellular immunoassays and the new RT-qcPCR for TGF-β.

  17. Nucleotide sequence from the coding region of rabbit β-globin messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    A sequence of 89 nucleotides from rabbit β-globin mRNA has been determined and is shown to code for residues 107 to 137 of the β-globin protein. In addition, a sequence heterogeneity has been identified within this 89 nucleotide long sequence which corresponds to a known polymorphic variant of rabbit β-globin. Images PMID:61580

  18. Rational design of avian metapneumovirus live attenuated vaccines by inhibiting viral messenger RNA cap methyltransferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), also known as avian pneumovirus or turkey rhinotracheitis, is a non-segmented negative-sense RNA virus belonging to the family of Paramyxoviridae, the subfamily Pneumovirinae, and the genus Metapneumovirus. aMPV is the causative agent of respiratory tract infection and ...

  19. Polysomes, messenger RNA, and growth in soybean stems during development and water deficit. [Glycine max (L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, H.S.; Mullet, J.E.; Boyer, J.S. )

    1988-01-01

    The polysome status and populations of polysomal mRNA were examined in different regions of dark-grown soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) stems that contained either dividing, elongating, or mature (non-growing) cells. There was a developmental gradient of polysome content in which the dividing tissue had the highest levels and the mature tissue the lowest. A few hours after transplanting the seedlings to vermiculite having low water content (water potential {psi}{sub w} = {minus}0.29 megapascals), stem growth rate decreased to 30% of well-watered controls and the polysome content decreased most in the dividing and elongating tissues. After 24 to 36 hours, stem growth and polysome content recovered gradually. In vitro translation products of polysomal mRNA from dividing, elongating or mature tissue were examined on two-dimensional gels. In well-watered controls, each of the stem regions was enriched in a small subset of the polysomal mRNA population, probably because of developmentally regulated gene expression. Exposing plants to low {psi}{sub w} for 24 hours induced a change in the relative abundance of a small number of polysomal mRNAs in the elongating and mature tissues, but not in the dividing tissue. After 24 to 72 hours at low {psi}{sub w}, the changes in polysomal mRNA population were reversed in the elongating tissue.

  20. Prolactin increases hepatic Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity and messenger RNA post partum.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, T C; Liu, Y; Hyde, J F; Hagenbuch, B; Meier, P J; Vore, M

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity is decreased in pregnancy, but rebounds post partum relative to non-pregnant controls, and that activity can be increased by treatment with ovine prolactin [Ganguly, Hyde and Vore (1993) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 267, 82-87]. To determine the basis for these effects, Na+/taurocholate co-transport was determined in purified basolateral liver plasma-membrane (bLPM) vesicles and compared with steady-state mRNA levels encoding the Na+/taurocholate-co-transporting polypeptide (Ntcp) in non-pregnant controls, pregnant rats (19-20 days pregnant), rats post partum (48 h post partum) and rats post partum treated with bromocriptine to inhibit prolactin secretion. Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity (nmol/5 s per mg of protein) in bLPM was decreased from 10.4 +/- 1.8 in non-pregnant controls to 7.9 +/- 0.6 in bLPM in pregnant rats, but rebounded to 17.5 +/- 1.3 post partum; treatment of rats post partum with bromocriptine to inhibit prolactin secretion decreased activity to 14.1 +/- 0.9. Northern and slot-blot analyses revealed similar changes in mRNA for Ntcp, so that a positive correlation was observed between Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity and Ntcp mRNA. Furthermore, treatment of ovariectomized rats with ovine prolactin increased Ntcp mRNA 10-fold compared with solvent-treated controls, consistent with the 2-fold increase in Vmax, for Na+/taurocholate co-transport in isolated hepatocytes. These data are the first to demonstrate endogenous physiological regulation by prolactin of Ntcp mRNA in parallel with Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:7945260

  1. ATP-dependent unwinding of messenger RNA structure by eukaryotic initiation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, B.K.; Lawson, T.G.; Kramer, J.C.; Cladaras, M.H.; Grifo, J.A.; Abramson, R.D.; Merrick, W.C.; Thach, R.E.

    1985-06-25

    Interaction of protein synthesis initiation factors with mRNA has been studied in order to characterize early events in the eukaryotic translation pathway. Individual reovirus mRNAs labeled with /sup 32/P in the alpha position relative to the m7G cap and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)-4A, -4B, and -4F purified from rabbit reticulocytes were employed. It was found that eIF-4A causes a structural change in mRNA, as evidenced by a nuclease sensitivity test: addition of high concentrations of eIF-4A greatly increase the nuclease sensitivity of the mRNA, suggesting that this factor can melt or ''unwind'' mRNA structure. ATP is required for this reaction. At low concentrations of eIF-4A, addition of eIF-4B is required for maximal unwinding activity. Thus eIF-4B enhances eIF-4A activity. Addition of eIF-4F also makes the mRNA sensitive to nuclease indicating a similar unwinding role to that of eIF-4A. Stoichiometric comparisons indicate that eIF-4F is more than 20-fold more efficient than eIF-4A in catalyzing this reaction. The unwinding activity of eIF-4F is inhibited by m7GDP, while that of eIF-4A is not. This suggests that eIF-4A functions independent of the 5' cap structure. These results also suggest that the unwinding activity of eIF-4F is located in the 46,000-dalton polypeptide of this complex, which has shown by others to be similar or identical to eIF-4A.

  2. Polysomes, Messenger RNA, and Growth in Soybean Stems during Development and Water Deficit 1

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Hugh S.; Mullet, John E.; Boyer, John S.

    1988-01-01

    The polysome status and populations of polysomal mRNA were examined in different regions of dark-grown soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) stems that contained either dividing, elongating, or mature (nongrowing) cells. There was a developmental gradient of polysome content in which the dividing tissue had the highest levels and the mature tissue the lowest. A few hours after transplanting the seedlings to vermiculite having low water content (water potential Ψw = −0.29 megapascals), stem growth rate decreased to 30% of well-watered controls and the polysome content decreased most in the dividing and elongating tissues. After 24 to 36 hours, stem growth and polysome content recovered gradually. In vitro translation products of polysomal mRNA from dividing, elongating or mature tissue were examined on two-dimensional gels. In well-watered controls, each of the stem regions was enriched in a small subset of the polysomal mRNA population, probably because of developmentally regulated gene expression. Exposing plants to low Ψw for 24 hours induced a change in the relative abundance of a small number of polysomal mRNAs in the elongating and mature tissues, but not in the dividing tissue. After 24 to 72 hours at low Ψw, the changes in polysomal mRNA population were reversed in the elongating tissue. The data indicate that changes in stem growth at low water potential are associated with changes in polysome status and polysomal mRNA in the elongating tissue. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16665977

  3. Basic fibroblast growth factor messenger RNA is expressed strongly at the acute stage of cerebral contusion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Y; Yamaki, T; Murakami, N; Sugawa, N; Yoshino, E; Ueda, S; Nosaka, K; Nishino, H; Iwashima, A

    1994-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has a neurotrophic effect both in vitro and in vivo, and is considered to play an important role in the maintenance of neuronal functions in the normal brain. Neural damage in brain contusion progresses after the primary injury of trauma because of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic impairment including intracranial hemorrhage and/or brain swelling. Northern blot analysis of bFGF mRNA was performed in rats after cerebral contusion produced by our modified fluid percussion device. Expression of bFGF mRNA increased significantly on the second day after trauma. A possible role of bFGF is functioning to protect the critical neurons from secondary neural damage in cerebral contusion.

  4. The selective elimination of messenger RNA underlies the mitosis-meiosis switch in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    The cellular programs for meiosis and mitosis must be strictly distinguished but the mechanisms controlling the entry to meiosis remain largely elusive in higher organisms. In contrast, recent analyses in yeast have shed new light on the mechanisms underlying the mitosis-meiosis switch. In this review, the current understanding of these mechanisms in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is discussed. Meiosis-inducing signals in this microbe emanating from environmental conditions including the nutrient status converge on the activity of an RRM-type RNA-binding protein, Mei2. This protein plays pivotal roles in both the induction and progression of meiosis and has now been found to govern the meiotic program in a quite unexpected manner. Fission yeast contains an RNA degradation system that selectively eliminates meiosis-specific mRNAs during the mitotic cell cycle. Mmi1, a novel RNA-binding protein of the YTH-family, is essential for this process. Mei2 tethers Mmi1 and thereby stabilizes the transcripts necessary for the progression of meiosis.

  5. Effect of ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolation methods on putative reference genes messenger RNA abundance in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barragán, M; Martínez, A; Llonch, S; Pujol, A; Vernaeve, V; Vassena, R

    2015-07-01

    Although the male gamete participates in a significant proportion of infertility cases, there are currently no proven molecular markers of sperm quality. The search for significant gene expression markers is partially hindered by the lack of a recognized set of reference genes (RGs) to normalize reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) data across studies. The aim of this study is to define a set of RGs in assisted reproduction patients undergoing different sample collection and RNA isolation methods. Twenty-two normozoospermic men were included in the study. From each man, semen was either cryopreserved by slow freezing or analyzed fresh, and, for each, RNA was extracted with either phenol-free or phenol-based methods. In two cases, both methods were used to isolate RNA. Twenty putative RGs were analyzed and their mRNA abundance across samples was estimated by RT-qPCR. To determine the genes whose steady-state mRNA abundance remains unchanged, three different algorithms (geNorm, BestKeeper and NormFinder) were applied to the qPCR data. We found that RGs such as GAPDH or ACTB, useful in other biological contexts, cannot be used as reference for human spermatozoa. It is possible to compare gene expression from fresh and cryopreserved sperm samples using the same isolation method, while the mRNA abundance of expressed genes becomes different depending on the RNA isolation technique employed. In our conditions, the most appropriate RGs for RT-qPCR analysis were RPLP1, RPL13A, and RPLP2. Published discrepancies in gene expression studies in human spermatozoa may be due in part to inappropriate RGs selection, suggesting a possible different interpretation of PCR data in several reports, which were normalized using unstable RGs.

  6. Ribosomal Protein S12 and Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Modulate A-site mRNA Cleavage and Transfer-Messenger RNA Activity in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Holberger, Laura E.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)·SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pausing during termination. Streptomycin did not inhibit A-site cleavage in rpsL mutants, which express streptomycin-resistant variants of ribosomal protein S12. However, rpsL strains exhibited reduced A-site mRNA cleavage compared with rpsL+ cells. Additionally, tmRNA·SmpB-mediated SsrA peptide tagging was significantly reduced in several rpsL strains but could be fully restored in a subset of mutants when treated with streptomycin. The streptomycin-dependent rpsL(P90K) mutant also showed significantly lower levels of A-site cleavage and tmRNA·SmpB activity. Mutations in rpsD (encoding ribosomal protein S4), which suppressed streptomycin dependence, were able to partially restore A-site cleavage to rpsL(P90K) cells but failed to increase tmRNA·SmpB activity. Taken together, these results show that perturbations to A-site structure and function modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and tmRNA·SmpB activity. We propose that tmRNA·SmpB binds to streptomycin-resistant rpsL ribosomes less efficiently, leading to a partial loss of ribosome rescue function in these mutants. PMID:19776006

  7. Expression profile, clinical significance, and biological function of insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA-binding proteins in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run; Yu, Xinnian; Wang, Yajing; Sun, Jing; Sun, Qi; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Wang, Anpeng; Gao, Zhaojia; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Lin

    2017-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA-binding proteins have been described to associate with malignant process in many cancers. However, the role of insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA-binding protein family has not been thoroughly elucidated in non-small cell lung cancer. This study was to investigate the expression profile, clinical significance, and biological function of insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA-binding proteins family in non-small cell lung cancer. The expression levels of IGF2BP1-IGF2BP3 in tumor and adjacent normal tissues were determined, and association with clinicopathological features and overall survival was investigated by analyzing The Cancer Genome Atlas lung cancer database. Proliferation, migration, invasion assays, and flow-cytometry analysis were used to investigate the biological function in vitro. Insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA-binding protein expression levels were significantly increased in non-small cell lung cancer compared to adjacent normal lung tissues. Chi-square test indicated that IGF2BP1 and IGF2BP3 expressions correlated with some meaningful clinical characteristics in non-small cell lung cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that high-level expression of IGF2BP1 or IGF2BP3 predicted poor overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that high level of IGF2BP3 was an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients (hazard ratio = 1.616, p = 0.017). In vitro, knockdown of IGF2BP3 inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and undermined abilities of migration and invasion, and overexpression of IGF2BP3 could promote malignant phenotypes in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Our study revealed that expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 messenger RNA-binding proteins was widely upregulated and correlated with some certain clinicopathological features in non-small cell

  8. A Novel Pathogenic BRCA1 Splicing Variant Produces Partial Intron Retention in the Mature Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Maria Valeria; Nunziato, Marcella; Starnone, Flavio; Telese, Antonella; Calabrese, Alessandra; D’Aiuto, Giuseppe; Pucci, Pietro; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Baralle, Francisco; D’Argenio, Valeria; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of all breast cancers arise from hereditary mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers; and about 25% of these are associated with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations can enable physicians to better tailor the clinical management of patients; and to initiate preventive measures in healthy carriers. The pathophysiological significance of newly identified variants poses challenges for genetic counseling. We characterized a new BRCA1 variant discovered in a breast cancer patient during BRCA1/2 screening by next-generation sequencing. Bioinformatic predictions; indicating that the variant is probably pathogenetic; were verified using retro-transcription of the patient’s RNA followed by PCR amplifications performed on the resulting cDNA. The variant causes the loss of a canonic donor splice site at position +2 in BRCA1 intron 21; and consequently the partial retention of 156 bp of intron 21 in the patient’s transcript; which demonstrates that this novel BRCA1 mutation plays a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. These findings enabled us to initiate appropriate counseling and to tailor the clinical management of this family. Lastly; these data reinforce the importance of studying the effects of sequence variants at the RNA level to verify their potential role in disease onset. PMID:28009814

  9. Structural analysis of the messenger RNA cap-binding protein: presence of phosphate, sulfhydryl, and disulfide groups

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    The messenger-RNA cap-binding protein (CBP) was isolated from human erythrocyte, rabbit erythrocyte, and rabbit reticulocyte lysate by affinity chromatography on 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate-Sepharose. The specific activity of binding to capped oligonucleotides was similar for the human erythrocyte and rabbit reticulocyte CBPs. Isoelectric focusing of human and rabbit preparations revealed that each was composed of up to five species. The pI values of human and rabbit CBPs ranged from 5.7 to 6.5. The predominant form in erythrocytes had a pI of 6.3 while in reticulocytes, two major species, having pI values of 5.9 and 6.3, were present. Labeling of rabbit reticulocytes with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate revealed that the pI 5.9 but not the pI 6.3 form contained phosphate. All of the phosphate was found in phosphoserine residues. The amino acid compositions of human erythrocyte and rabbit reticulocyte CBPs were quite similar. Both proteins had 7 tryptophanyl and 6 cysteinyl residues. Labeling with (1-/sup 14/C)iodoacetic acid under native and denaturing conditions provided evidence that 2 of the cysteinyl residues are present in the reduced form and 4 in disulfide bridges.

  10. Leishmania pifanoi: kinetics of messenger RNA expression during amastigote to promastigote transformation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S M; Rainey, P M

    1993-08-01

    Conditions have been developed which induce axenically grown Leishmania pifanoi amastigotes to transform into the promastigote stage in a highly reproducible fashion. Transformation was induced by a temperature shift from 31 to 22 degrees C, was inhibited by high cell concentration (> or = 40 x 10(6) cells/ml), and was unaffected by pH from 5.5-7.2. Morphologic transformation was first evident at 8 hr after induction, had occurred in > 50% of cells by 24 hr, and was > 90% complete by 48 hr. This system enabled study of the kinetics of mRNA expression during the transformation of Leishmania. The differentially expressed mRNAs for ATPase 1a and 1b, alpha- and beta-tubulin, P100/11E, Pro-1, and pLm 2, 7, 14, and 16 exhibited complex patterns of temporal expression, suggesting a highly regulated process. Differentiation on the biochemical level was evident within an hour and continued throughout the course of morphologic transformation. In addition, transformed L. pifanoi promastigotes in the plateau growth phase expressed genes characteristic of metacyclic promastigotes. Axenically cultured L. pifanoi should provide an excellent model for the study of differentiation in Leishmania.

  11. Induction of hepatic metallothioneins determined at isoprotein and messenger RNA levels in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Lehman-McKeeman, L D; Andrews, G K; Klaassen, C D

    1988-01-01

    Induction of metallothionein-I (MT-I) and metallothionein-II (MT-II) by glucocorticoids was determined by h.p.l.c. analysis of proteins and Northern-blot analysis of MT mRNAs. Rats were injected with dexamethasone (0.03-10 mumol/kg) and hepatic concentrations of MTs were determined 24 h later. In control rats, only MT-II was detected (9.4 +/- 2.5 micrograms/g of liver), whereas the hepatic concentration of MT-I was below the detection limit (5 micrograms of MT/g). Dexamethasone did not increase MT-I above the detection limit at any dosage tested, but MT-II increased to 2.5 times control values at dosages of 0.30 mumol/kg and higher. Time-course experiments indicated that MT-II reached a maximum at 24 h after a single dosage of dexamethasone and returned to control values by 48 h. To determine whether dexamethasone increased MT-I in liver, samples were saturated with 109Cd, after which the amount of 109Cd in MT-I and MT-II was determined. Results indicated that, by this approach, MT-I and MT-II could be detected in control rats, and there was approx. 1.8 times more 109Cd in MT-II than in MT-I. At 24 h after administration of dexamethasone (1 mumol/kg), there was a small increase in the amount of 109Cd bound to MT-I, whereas the amount of 109Cd bound to MT-II increased to more than 2 times control values. Northern-blot hybridization with mouse cRNA probes indicated that MT-I and MT-II mRNAs increased co-ordinately after administration of dexamethasone. Thus, although glucocorticoids increase both MT-I and MT-II mRNAs, MT-II preferentially accumulates after administration of dexamethasone. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3342021

  12. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  13. Plant serine/arginine-rich proteins: roles in precursor messenger RNA splicing, plant development, and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anireddy S N; Shad Ali, Gul

    2011-01-01

    Global analyses of splicing of precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) have revealed that alternative splicing (AS) is highly pervasive in plants. Despite the widespread occurrence of AS in plants, the mechanisms that control splicing and the roles of splice variants generated from a gene are poorly understood. Studies on plant serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, suggest their role in both constitutive splicing and AS of pre-mRNAs. SR proteins have a characteristic domain structure consisting of one or two RNA recognition motifs at the N-terminus and a C-terminal RS domain rich in arginine/serine dipeptides. Plants have many more SR proteins compared to animals including several plant-specific subfamilies. Pre-mRNAs of plant SR proteins are extensively alternatively spliced to increase the transcript complexity by about six-fold. Some of this AS is controlled in a tissue- and development-specific manner. Furthermore, AS of SR pre-mRNAs is altered by various stresses, raising the possibility of rapid reprogramming of the whole transcriptome by external signals through regulation of the splicing of these master regulators of splicing. Most SR splice variants contain a premature termination codon and are degraded by up-frameshift 3 (UPF3)-mediated nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), suggesting a link between NMD and regulation of expression of the functional transcripts of SR proteins. Limited functional studies with plant SRs suggest key roles in growth and development and plant responses to the environment. Here, we discuss the current status of research on plant SRs and some promising approaches to address many unanswered questions about plant SRs.

  14. In vitro Study of a Novel Stent Coating Using Modified CD39 Messenger RNA to Potentially Reduce Stent Angioplasty-Associated Complications

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Meike-Kristin; Nolte, Andrea; Reus, Rebekka; Behring, Andreas; Zengerle, Diane; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Hohmann, Jan David; Peter, Karlheinz; Schlensak, Christian; Wendel, Hans Peter; Krajewski, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Stent angioplasty provides a minimally invasive treatment for atherosclerotic vessels. However, no treatment option for atherosclerosis-associated endothelial dysfunction, which is accompanied by a loss of CD39, is available, and hence, adverse effects like thromboembolism and restenosis may occur. Messenger RNA (mRNA)-based therapy represents a novel strategy, whereby de novo synthesis of a desired protein is achieved after delivery of a modified mRNA to the target cells. Methods and Findings Our study aimed to develop an innovative bioactive stent coating that induces overexpression of CD39 in the atherosclerotic vessel. Therefore, a modified CD39-encoding mRNA was produced by in vitro transcription. Different endothelial cells (ECs) were transfected with the mRNA, and CD39 expression and functionality were analyzed using various assays. Furthermore, CD39 mRNA was immobilized using poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA), and the transfection efficiency in ECs was analyzed. Our data show that ECs successfully translate in vitro-generated CD39 mRNA after transfection. The overexpressed CD39 protein is highly functional in hydrolyzing ADP and in preventing platelet activation. Furthermore, PLGA-immobilized CD39 mRNA can be delivered to ECs without losing its functionality. Summary In summary, we present a novel and promising concept for a stent coating for the treatment of atherosclerotic blood vessels, whereby patients could be protected against angioplasty-associated complications. PMID:26381750

  15. Coordinated microRNA and messenger RNA expression profiles for understanding sexual dimorphism of gonads and the potential roles of microRNA in the steroidogenesis pathway in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Wenzhong; Liu, Qing; Li, Baojun; An, Lixia; Hao, Ruirong; Zhao, Jinliang; Liu, Shaozhen; Song, Jing

    2016-03-15

    Sexual dimorphism is a widespread phenomenon in animals. However, the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating this dimorphism is not fully understood. In our study, we used an integrated approach to identify functional targets of miRNA by combining the paired expression profiles of miRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in ovaries and testes of young Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. The results revealed that 67 upregulated and nine downregulated miRNAs and 2299 upregulated and 3260 downregulated genes were identified in the ovary compared with those in the testis (P < 0.01). The target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted and overlapped with the differentially expressed mRNAs. Furthermore, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses were conducted in these coincident genes. By correlating miRNA-mRNA and predicting computational target, two types of negatively regulatory miRNA-mRNA correlations (upregulated or downregulated miRNA and downregulated or upregulated mRNA) were obtained. Seven functional miRNA-target gene pairs, miR-17-5p/DMRT1, miR-20a/DMRT1, miR-138/CYP17A2, miR-338/CYP17A2, miR-200a/CYP17A2, miR-456/AMH, and miR-138/AMH, were predicted at the sequence level and further detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction on the basis of the significantly negative relationships. Our results suggest that the integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling can provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of sexual dimorphism.

  16. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  17. Protein and messenger RNA expression of interleukin 1 system members in bovine ovarian follicles and effects of interleukin 1β on primordial follicle activation and survival in vitro.

    PubMed

    Passos, J R S; Costa, J J N; da Cunha, E V; Silva, A W B; Ribeiro, R P; de Souza, G B; Barroso, P A A; Dau, A M P; Saraiva, M V A; Gonçalves, P B D; van den Hurk, R; Silva, J R V

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression of interleukin 1 (IL-1) system members (proteins and messenger RNA of ligands and receptors) and its distribution in ovarian follicles of cyclic cows and to evaluate the effects of IL-1β on the survival and activation of primordial follicles in vitro. The ovaries were processed for localization of IL-1 system in preantral and antral follicles by immunohistochemical, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. For in vitro studies, ovarian fragments were cultured in α-MEM(+) supplemented with IL-1β (0, 1, 10, 50, or 100 ng/mL), and after 6 d, the cultured tissues were processed for histologic analysis. Immunohistochemical results showed that the IL-1 system proteins IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-1RI, and IL-1RII were detected in the cytoplasm of oocytes and granulosa cells from all follicular categories and theca cells of antral follicles. Variable levels of messenger RNA for the IL-1 system members were observed at different stages of development. After 6 d of culture, the presence of IL-1β (10 or 50 ng/mL) was effective in maintaining the percentage of normal follicles and in promoting primordial follicle activation. In conclusion, IL-1 system members are differentially expressed in ovarian follicles according to their stage of development. Moreover, IL-1β promotes the development of primordial follicles. These results indicate an important role of the IL-1 system in the regulation of bovine folliculogenesis.

  18. Involvement of second messengers in the signaling pathway of vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone and their effects on vitellogenin mRNA expression in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sun-Hye; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Kang, Bong Jung; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wilder, Marcy N

    2017-01-03

    We incubated fragments of Litopenaeus vannamei ovary to investigate second messengers involved in the regulation of vitellogenin (vg) mRNA levels. The use of 100nM recombinant vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) (corresponding to recombinant L. vannamei sinus gland peptide-G: rLiv-SGP-G) significantly reduced vg mRNA expression in sub-adults after 8h incubation to less than 20% of the control. The concentration of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) increased 3.2-fold relative to the control after 2h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G. However, it reached levels 18-fold relative to the control after 0.5h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G where 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was also added. Moreover, vg mRNA expression was significantly reduced to less than 50% of the control after 24h incubation with 1μM A23187 (a calcium ionophore). Thus, rLiv-SGP-G and calcium ionophore reduced vg mRNA expression in in vitro-cultured ovary, and cGMP may be involved in the signaling pathway of VIH. Overall, the above results suggest that vg mRNA expression might be inhibited in vitro by increasing intracellular cGMP and Ca(2+) in L. vannamei ovary.

  19. Labeling of eukaryotic messenger RNA 5' terminus with phosphorus -32: use of tobacco acid pyrophosphatase for removal of cap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lockard, R.E.; Rieser, L.; Vournakis, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation of the potential applications of 5'-/sup 32/P-end-labeled mRNA, not only for screening recombinant clones and mapping gene structure, but also for revealing possible nucleotide sequence and structural signals within mRNA molecules themselves, which may be important for eukaryotic mRNA processing and turnover and for controlling differential rates of translational initiation. Three major problems, however, have retarded progress in this area, lack of methods for efficient and reproducible removal of m7G5ppp5'-cap structures, which maintain the integrity of an RNA molecule; inability to generate a sufficient amount of labeled mRNA, owing to the limited availability of most pure mRNA species; and the frequent problem of RNA degradation during in vitro end-labeling owing to RNAse contamination. The procedures presented here permit one to decap and label minute quantities of mRNA, effectively. Tobacco acid pyrophosphatase is relatively efficient in removing cap structures from even nanogram quantities of available mRNA, and enough radioactivity can be easily generated from minute amounts ofintact mRNA with very high-specific-activity (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP and the inhibition of ribonuclease contamination with diethylpyrocarbonate. These procedures can be modified and applied to almost any other type of RNA molecule as well. In Section III of this volume, we explore in detail how effectively 5'-end-labeled mRNA can be used not only for nucleotide sequence analysis, but also for mapping mRNA secondary structure.

  20. Erythropoietin messenger RNA levels in developing mice and transfer of /sup 125/I-erythropoietin by the placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Koury, M.J.; Bondurant, M.C.; Graber, S.E.; Sawyer, S.T.

    1988-07-01

    Erythropoietin (EP) mRNA was measured in normal and anemic mice during fetal and postnatal development. Normal fetal livers at 14 d of gestation contained a low level of EP mRNA. By day 19 of gestation, no EP mRNA was detected in normal or anemic fetal livers or normal fetal kidneys, but anemic fetal kidneys had low levels of EP mRNA. Newborn through adult stage mice responded to anemia by accumulating renal and hepatic EP mRNA. However, total liver EP mRNA was considerably less than that of the kidneys. Juvenile animals, 1-4 wk old, were hyperresponsive to anemia in that they produced more EP mRNA than adults. Moreover, nonanemic juveniles had readily measured renal EP mRNA, whereas the adult level was at the lower limit of detection. Because of the very low level of fetal EP mRNA, placental transfer of EP was evaluated. When administered to the pregnant mouse, /sup 125/I-EP was transferred in significant amounts to the fetuses. These results indicate that in mice the kidney is the main organ of EP production at all stages of postnatal development and that adult kidney may also play some role in providing EP for fetal erythropoiesis via placental transfer of maternal hormone.

  1. Gap junctional connexin messenger RNA expression in the ovine uterus and placenta: effects of estradiol-17β-treatment, early pregnancy stages, and embryo origin.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M L; Redmer, D A; Reynolds, L P; Grazul-Bilska, A T

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions play a major role in direct, contact-dependent cell-cell communication, and they have been implicated in the regulation of cellular metabolism and the coordination of cellular functions during growth and differentiation of organs and tissues. Gap junctional channels, composed of connexin (Cx) proteins, have been detected and shown to be influenced by hormones (eg, estrogen and progesterone) in uterine and placental tissues in several species. We hypothesized that (1) the messenger RNA (mRNA) for Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, and Cx43 is expressed in the uterus of ovariectomized sheep treated with estradiol-17β (E2) and in ovine placenta during early pregnancy, (2) E2-treatment of ovariectomized ewes would cause time-specific changes in Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression (experiment 1), and (3) expression of these 4 Cx would vary across the days of early pregnancy (experiment 2) and will be affected by embryo origin (ie, after application of assisted reproductive technologies [ARTs]; experiment 3). Thus, we collected uterine tissues at 0 to 24 h after E2 treatments (experiment 1), and placental tissues during days 14 to 30 of early pregnancy after natural (NAT) breeding (experiment 2) and on day 22 of early pregnancy established after transfer of embryos generated through natural breeding (NAT-ET), in vitro fertilization (IVF), or in vitro activation (IVA, parthenotes; experiment 3). In experiment 1, the expression of Cx26, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA increased (P < 0.05) and Cx32 mRNA decreased (P < 0.06) in both caruncular and intercaruncular tissues after E2 treatment. In experiment 2, during early pregnancy, there were significant changes (P < 0.01) across days in the expression of Cx26, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA in the maternal placenta, accompanied by changes (P < 0.001) in Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA in the fetal placenta. In experiment 3, in maternal placenta, Cx32 mRNA expression was decreased (P < 0.001) in NAT-ET, IVF, and IVA groups compared to the NAT group; but

  2. Messenger RNA stability of parathyroid hormone-related protein regulated by transforming growth factor-beta1.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R S; Capen, C C; Rosol, Thomas J

    2002-02-25

    Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with epithelial cancers, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is due to expression and secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1), expressed by many tumors, has been demonstrated in vitro to increase the half-life of PTHrP mRNA. In this study, oral squamous carcinoma cells (SCC2/88) had a two-fold increase in PTHrP mRNA stability (from 45 to 90 min) in response to treatment with TGFbeta1. In order to examine the mechanism of TGFbeta1-mediated PTHrP mRNA stability, a cell-free assay of mRNA degradation was utilized in which the degradation of in vitro-transcribed mRNA incubated with cytoplasmic protein extracts from SCC2/88 treated with vehicle or TGFbeta1 was measured. In this assay, full-length PTHrP mRNA was not significantly stabilized in TGFbeta1-treated samples when compared to vehicle treated samples. However, there was a striking (>5-fold) increase in PTHrP mRNA half-life in TGFbeta1-treated samples when PTHrP mRNA lacked the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). In contrast, the degradation of 3'-UTR-truncated PTHrP mRNA using the cell-free assay was not altered in vehicle-treated samples. UV cross-linking of PTHrP mRNA and cytoplasmic proteins from cells treated with either vehicle or TGFbeta1 revealed numerous mRNA-binding proteins. TGFbeta1 treatment resulting in decreased binding of 33, 31, 27, 20 and 18 kDa binding proteins to the terminal coding region. These studies revealed that TGFbeta1-induced PTHrP mRNA stability might be, in part, the result of cis-acting sequences within the coding region of the PTHrP mRNA.

  3. IRES-mediated translation of cellular messenger RNA operates in eIF2α- independent manner during stress

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Nehal; Holcik, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Physiological and pathophysiological stress attenuates global translation via phosphorylation of eIF2α. This in turn leads to the reprogramming of gene expression that is required for adaptive stress response. One class of cellular messenger RNAs whose translation was reported to be insensitive to eIF2α phosphorylation-mediated repression of translation is that harboring an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES). IRES-mediated translation of several apoptosis-regulating genes increases in response to hypoxia, serum deprivation or gamma irradiation and promotes tumor cell survival and chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanism that allows IRES-mediated translation to continue in an eIF2α-independent manner is not known. Here we have used the X-chromosome linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis, XIAP, IRES to address this question. Using toeprinting assay, western blot analysis and polysomal profiling we show that the XIAP IRES supports cap-independent translation when eIF2α is phosphorylated both in vitro and in vivo. During normal growth condition eIF2α-dependent translation on the IRES is preferred. However, IRES-mediated translation switches to eIF5B-dependent mode when eIF2α is phosphorylated as a consequence of cellular stress. PMID:21917851

  4. Hypocalcemia increases and hypercalcemia decreases the steady-state level of parathyroid hormone messenger RNA in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, M; Igarashi, T; Muramatsu, M; Fukagawa, M; Motokura, T; Ogata, E

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effects of serum calcium concentrations on PTH biosynthesis, rats were made hyper- (serum total calcium, approximately 3.5 mM) or hypocalcemic (approximately 1.25 mM) and steady-state levels of PTH mRNA in parathyroid cells were measured by the primer extension method using a 32P-labeled synthetic oligomer. PTH mRNA levels increased about twofold in the rats made slightly hypocalcemic by infusion of calcium-free solution and decreased slightly in those made hypercalcemic by CaCl2 infusion (120-150 mumol/h) compared with the levels present in nonfasting control rats. Infusion of calcitonin (0.5 U/h) or EGTA (90 mumol/h) with calcium-free solution increased PTH mRNA levels further (two- to sevenfold) above the levels present in animals infused with calcium-free solution alone. These changes in PTH mRNA levels were observed after 48- but not 24-h infusion, and there was an inverse correlation between PTH mRNA levels and serum calcium concentrations. The results suggest that changes in serum calcium concentrations in the near physiological range regulate the biosynthesis of PTH by affecting steady-state levels of PTH mRNA when hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia continues for a relatively long period. Images PMID:2493484

  5. Destabilization of ERBB2 transcripts by targeting 3' untranslated region messenger RNA associated HuR and histone deacetylase-6.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gary K; Marx, Corina; Berger, Crystal E; Saunders, Laura R; Verdin, Eric; Schäfer, Stefan; Jung, Manfred; Benz, Christopher C

    2008-07-01

    In addition to repressing ERBB2 promoter function, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce the accelerated decay of mature ERBB2 transcripts; the mechanism mediating this transcript destabilization is unknown but depends on the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of ERBB2 mRNA. Using ERBB2-overexpressing human breast cancer cells (SKBR3), the mRNA stability factor HuR was shown to support ERBB2 transcript integrity, bind and endogenously associate with a conserved U-rich element within the ERBB2 transcript 3' UTR, coimmunoprecipitate with RNA-associated HDAC activity, and colocalize with HDAC6. HDAC6 also coimmunoprecipitates with HuR in an RNA-dependent manner and within 6 hours of exposure to a pan-HDAC inhibitor dose, that does not significantly alter cytosolic HuR levels or HuR binding to ERBB2 mRNA. Cellular ERBB2 transcript levels decline while remaining physically associated with HDAC6. Knockdown of HDAC6 protein by small interfering RNA partially suppressed the ERBB2 transcript decay induced by either pan-HDAC or HDAC6-selective enzymatic inhibitors. Three novel hydroxamates, ST71, ST17, and ST80 were synthesized and shown to inhibit HDAC6 with 14-fold to 31-fold greater selectivity over their binding and inhibition of HDAC1. Unlike more potent pan-HDAC inhibitors, these HDAC6-selective inhibitors produced dose-dependent growth arrest of ERBB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells by accelerating the decay of mature ERBB2 mRNA without repressing ERBB2 promoter function. In sum, these findings point to the therapeutic potential of HuR and HDAC6-selective inhibitors, contrasting ERBB2 stability effects induced by HDAC6 enzymatic inhibition and HDAC6 protein knockdown, and show that ERBB2 transcript stability mechanisms include exploitable targets for the development of novel anticancer therapies.

  6. Follicular progesterone concentrations and messenger RNA expression of MATER and OCT-4 in immature bovine oocytes as predictors of developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Urrego, R; Herrera-Puerta, E; Chavarria, N A; Camargo, O; Wrenzycki, C; Rodriguez-Osorio, N

    2015-04-15

    The ability of bovine embryos to develop to the blastocyst stage and to implant and generate healthy offspring depends greatly on the competence of the oocyte. Oocyte competence is attributed to its close communication with the follicular environment and to its capacity to synthesize and store substantial amounts of messenger RNA. Higher developmental competence of bovine oocytes has been associated with both the expression of a cohort of developmental genes and the concentration of sex steroids in the follicular fluid. The aim of this study was to identify differences in the expression of FST in cumulus cells and OCT-4 and MATER in oocytes and the influence of the follicular progesterone and follicular estrogen concentration on the competence of bovine oocytes retrieved 30 minutes or 4 hours after slaughter. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were left in postmortem ovaries for 30 minutes (group I) or 4 hours (group II) at 30 °C. Aspirated oocytes were then subjected to IVM, IVF, and IVC or were evaluated for MATER and OCT-4 messenger RNA abundance by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Total RNA was isolated from pools of 100 oocytes for each experimental replicate. Progesterone and estradiol concentration in follicular fluid was evaluated by immunoassay using an IMMULITE 2000 analyzer. Three repeats of in vitro embryo production were performed with a total of 455 (group I) and 470 (group II) COCs. There were no significant differences between the cleavage rates (72 hours postinsemination [hpi]) between both groups (63.5% vs. 69.1%). However, blastocyst (168 hpi) and hatching (216 hpi) rates were higher (P < 0.05) in group II compared with those of group I (21.3% vs. 30.7% and 27.6% vs. 51.5%, respectively). Group II oocytes exhibited the highest MATER and OCT-4 abundance (P < 0.05). Follicular estradiol concentration was not different between both the groups, whereas the progesterone concentration was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in group II follicles. These

  7. Nucleotide sequence of the 5' end of araBAD operon messenger RNA in Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Lee, N; Carbon, J

    1977-01-01

    The transcription reaction in vitro provides a means of analyzing the nucleotide sequence of the mRNA of the araBAD operon. By controlling the time of synthesis, we obtained araBAD mRNA of varying lengths beginning from the 5' end. These 5' fragments were freed of lambda RNA transcripts by successive hybridizations to the sense strands of a pair of lambda ara transducing phages that carry ara genes in opposite orientations. The purified 5' fragments were ordered by their times of appearance during synchronized RNA elongation and by nearest neighbor analyses. The results, when combined with the knowledge of the NH2-terminal sequence of the product of the first cistron (L-ribulokinase gene araB), establish the nucleotide sequence of the first 69 bases at the 5' end of the araBAD operon mRNA. The AUG starter codon for L-ribulokinase is located at positions 29-31. The sequence is: 5' A-C-C-C-G-U-U-U-U-U-U-U-U-G-G-A-U-G-G-A-G-U-G-A-A-A-C-G-A-U-G-G-C-G-A-U-U-G-C-A-A-U-U-G-G-C-C-U-C-G-A-U-U-U-U-G-C-A-G-U-G-A-U-U-C-U-G-(U)-. . .3'.

  8. Development and regional expression of beta nerve growth factor messenger RNA and protein in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, S R; Ebendal, T; Lärkfors, L; Olson, L; Seiger, A; Strömberg, I; Persson, H

    1986-01-01

    The presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA and protein in the rat central nervous system is documented. Blot-hybridization analysis showed an abundance of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and olfactory bulb. Enzyme immunoassay confirmed significant levels of a NGF-like protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Bioassay of a NGF-like immunoaffinity-purified protein from these regions was physiologically indistinguishable from NGF. Immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread distribution of NGF-like reactivity in the adult brain, preferentially in fiber tracts. NGF mRNA accumulation began at birth, with adult levels reached 3 weeks postnatally. Enzyme immunoassay detected the presence of a NGF-like protein in the embryonic rat brain. Postnatally, the level of NGF-like protein reached a maximum at 3 weeks. Additionally, a distinct fetal form of NGF may exist. Images PMID:3456170

  9. Inhibition of transcription and translation of globin messenger RNA in dimethyl sulfoxide-stimulated Friend erythroleukemic cells treated with interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, G B; Dolei, A; Cioé, L; Benedetto, A; Matarese, G P; Belardelli, F

    1977-01-01

    The addition of appropriate doses of interferon (IF) to cultures of Friend erythroleukemic cells inhibits dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO)-stimulated erythroid differentiation. In this study, the synthesis of heme, hemoglobin, and globin mRNA in Me2SO-stimulated cultures, with or without IF added, was compared. Although the hemoglobin content in Me2SO+IF-treated cultures was reduced 6- to 9-fold compared to that of cultures treated with Me2SO alone, there was less than a 2-fold decrease in the amount of heme accumulated. Globin mRNA, although unchanged in size or base sequence, was reduced in content in the Me2SO+IF cultures. The level of reduction of globin mRNA was insufficient to account for the lack of globin synthesis. Thus, it appears that IF may operate on two levels--one involving the transcription of globin mRNA and the other involving its translation. PMID:266723

  10. Association of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) Messenger RNA Level, Food Intake, and Growth in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cocaine-and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) is a potent hypothalamic anorectic peptide in mammals and fish. We hypothesized that increased food intake is associated with changes in expression of CART mRNA within the brain of channel catfish. Objectives were to clone the CART gene, examine ...

  11. Gifsy-1 Prophage IsrK with Dual Function as Small and Messenger RNA Modulates Vital Bacterial Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Hershko-Shalev, Tal; Odenheimer-Bergman, Ahuva; Elgrably-Weiss, Maya; Ben-Zvi, Tamar; Govindarajan, Sutharsan; Seri, Hemda; Papenfort, Kai; Vogel, Jörg; Altuvia, Shoshy

    2016-01-01

    While an increasing number of conserved small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are known to function in general bacterial physiology, the roles and modes of action of sRNAs from horizontally acquired genomic regions remain little understood. The IsrK sRNA of Gifsy-1 prophage of Salmonella belongs to the latter class. This regulatory RNA exists in two isoforms. The first forms, when a portion of transcripts originating from isrK promoter reads-through the IsrK transcription-terminator producing a translationally inactive mRNA target. Acting in trans, the second isoform, short IsrK RNA, binds the inactive transcript rendering it translationally active. By switching on translation of the first isoform, short IsrK indirectly activates the production of AntQ, an antiterminator protein located upstream of isrK. Expression of antQ globally interferes with transcription termination resulting in bacterial growth arrest and ultimately cell death. Escherichia coli and Salmonella cells expressing AntQ display condensed chromatin morphology and localization of UvrD to the nucleoid. The toxic phenotype of AntQ can be rescued by co-expression of the transcription termination factor, Rho, or RNase H, which protects genomic DNA from breaks by resolving R-loops. We propose that AntQ causes conflicts between transcription and replication machineries and thus promotes DNA damage. The isrK locus represents a unique example of an island-encoded sRNA that exerts a highly complex regulatory mechanism to tune the expression of a toxic protein. PMID:27057757

  12. Distribution of C-type natriuretic peptide and its messenger RNA in rat central nervous system and peripheral tissue.

    PubMed

    Minamino, N; Aburaya, M; Kojima, M; Miyamoto, K; Kangawa, K; Matsuo, H

    1993-11-30

    In rat, the highest concentration of immunoreactive (ir-) C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) was found in the central nervous system, as is the case in pig and human. Although its concentration in peripheral tissue was much lower than that in brain, CNP was present mainly as CNP-53 in ileum-jejunum, colon-cecum, stomach, kidney, lung, testis and submaxillary gland, but not in heart. By Northern blot analysis, CNP mRNA was detected in ileum-jejunum, testis, thymus, adrenal gland and submaxillary gland as well as in brain and spinal cord. CNP mRNA was further verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to be present in most peripheral tissue, including aorta and bone marrow. These results indicate that CNP is synthesized in peripheral tissue and possibly functions as a local regulator in addition to acting as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system.

  13. Distribution of precursor amyloid-. beta. -protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid ..beta.. protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid ..beta.. proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid ..beta.. protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein.

  14. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in experimental alcoholic liver disease: relationship to endotoxemia and TNF alpha messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Nanji, A A; Griniuviene, B; Yacoub, L K; Fogt, F; Tahan, S R

    1995-02-01

    We used the intragastric feeding rat model for alcoholic liver disease to evaluate the relationship among intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), plasma endotoxin, and inflammatory changes in the liver. Rats were fed different dietary fats (saturated fat, corn oil, and fish oil) with ethanol; control rats were fed isocaloric amounts of dextrose instead of ethanol. At sacrifice the following were evaluated: liver pathologic changes, TNF-alpha mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, plasma endotoxin, and ICAM-1 by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis. Upregulation of ICAM-1 in endothelial lining cells in central and portal veins was observed in rats showing evidence of pathologic changes. Rats fed fish oil and ethanol, which exhibited the most severe inflammation, also showed hepatocyte ICAM-1 staining. The presence of ICAM-1 staining, in general, correlated with the level of TNF-alpha mRNA expression and plasma endotoxin levels. Upregulation of ICAM-1 in rats fed ethanol may contribute to the inflammatory changes seen in this model. The association between ICAM-1 upregulation and endotoxin and TNF-alpha mRNA suggests a role for these mediators in the inflammatory process in alcoholic liver injury.

  15. Translational recognition of the 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine of globin messenger RNA as a function of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Chu, L Y; Rhoads, R E

    1978-06-13

    The translation of rabbit globin mRNA in cell-free systems derived from either wheat germ or rabbit reticulocyte was studied in the presence of various analogues of the methylated 5' terminus (cap) as a function of ionic strength. Inhibition by these analogues was strongly enhanced by increasing concentrations of KCl, K(OAc), Na(OAc), or NH4(OAc). At appropriate concentrations of K(OAc), both cell-free systems were equally sensitive to inhibition by m7GTP. At 50 mM K(OAc), the reticulocyte system was not sensitive to m7GMP or m7GTP, but at higher concentrations up to 200 mM K(OAc), both nucleotides caused strong inhibition. The compound in m7G5'ppp5'Am was inhibitory at all concentrations of K(OAc) ranging from 50 to 200 mM, although more strongly so at the higher concentrations. Over the same range of nucleotide concentrations, the compounds GMP, GTP, and G5'ppp5'Am were not inhibitors. The mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis of the translation product was that of globin at all K(OAc) concentrations in the presence of m7GTP. Globin mRNA from which the terminal m7GTP group had been removed by chemical treatment (periodate-cyclohexylamine-alkaline phosphatase) or enzymatic treatment (tobacco acid pyrophosphatase-alkaline phosphatase) was translated less efficiently than untreated globin mRNA at higher K(OAc) concentrations, but retained appreciable activity at low K(OAc) concentrations.

  16. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P < .05) decrease in serum iron and ferritin levels by 57% and 40%, respectively, as compared with nondepleted control animals. Significant changes in the expression (0.5- to100-fold) of liver hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin, transferrin receptor-2, hemochromatosis type 2, ferroportin 1, ceruloplasmin, and ferritin-H were recorded in iron-depleted and iron-repleted rats, as compared with nondepleted rats (P < .05). Dietary iron from Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency.

  17. Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen: partial characterization by in vivo labeling and isolation of its messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Heinsohn, S.; Kabisch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) antigen (CALLA)-like proteins were detected by in vivo labeling experiments carried out with human lymphoblastoid cell line KM3 and also in cell-free translation, directed by CALLA-specific mRNA prepared from immunoadsorbed KM3 polysomes. The CALLA-like structure found in both systems shows an Mr of 95kDa. Additional CALLA-like proteins could be identified in the in vivo experiments with calculated Mrs of 40kDa in the cells and 85 and 38kDa in the culture medium. In the cell-free translation system, an additional product of Mr 80kDa could be detected.

  18. Isolation and characterization of the messenger RNA and the gene coding for a proline-rich zein from corn endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-zein, a proline-rich protein from corn endosperm, was investigated at the molecular level. Immunological and electrophoretic data indicated that gamma-zein was deposited into protein bodies in corn endosperm. Both isolated polysomes and poly(A)/sup +/ mRNA were found to direct into vitro synthesis of gamma-zein in a wheat germ system. In vitro synthesized gamma-zein was immunoprecipitated from the total in vitro translation products. A cDNA expression library was constructed by reverse transcription of total poly(A)/sup +/ mRNA using pUC8 plasmid as vector and E. coli strain DH1 as host. The library was screened for the expression of gamma-zein and alpha-zein by specific antibodies. The library was also screened with /sup 32/P-labeled gamma-zein and alpha-zein cDNA probes. The results indicated that gamma-zein and its fragments were readily expressed in E. coli while alpha-zein was not. Seven independently selected clones, six of which were selected by antibody and one by a cDNA probe, were sequenced. A comparison of sequence information from seven clones revealed that their overlapping regions were identical. This suggests that gamma-zein is encoded by a single gene. This finding is in conflict with what was expected on the basis of extensive charge heterogeneity of gamma-zein in isoelectric focusing. Individual bands cut from an IEF gel were rerun and shown to give several bands suggesting that the charge heterogeneity of gamma-zein may be an artifact. Sequence information of gamma-zein indicated that the gene encodes a mature protein whose primary structure includes 204 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 21,824 daltons.

  19. Messenger RNA encoding constitutively active Toll-like receptor 4 enhances effector functions of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pato, A; Eisenberg, G; Machlenkin, A; Margalit, A; Cafri, G; Frankenburg, S; Merims, S; Peretz, T; Lotem, M; Gross, G

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy of cancer employs a large number of ex-vivo-propagated T cells which recognize their targets either by virtue of their endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) or via genetic reprogramming. However, both cell-extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms often diminish the in-vivo potency of these therapeutic T cells, limiting their clinical efficacy and broader use. Direct activation of human T cells by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induces T cell survival and proliferation, boosts the production of proinflammatory cytokines and augments resistance to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Removal of the TLR ligand-binding region results in constitutive signalling triggered by the remaining cytosolic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The use of such TIR domains therefore offers an ideal means for equipping anti-tumour T cells with the arsenal of functional attributes required for improving current clinical protocols. Here we show that constitutively active (ca)TLR-4 can be expressed efficiently in human T cells using mRNA electroporation. The mere expression of caTLR-4 mRNA in polyclonal CD8 and CD4 T cells induced the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, triggered the surface expression of CD25, CD69 and 4-1BB and up-regulated a panel of cytokines and chemokines. In tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from melanoma patients, caTLR-4 induced robust IFN-γ secretion in all samples tested. Furthermore, caTLR-4 enhanced the anti-melanoma cytolytic activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and augmented the secretion of IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for at least 4 days post-transfection. Our results demonstrate that caTLR-4 is capable of exerting multiple T cell-enhancing effects and can potentially be used as a genetic adjuvant in adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26212048

  20. Messenger RNA expression and immunolocalization of psoriasin in the goat mammary gland and its milk concentration after an intramammary infusion of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G W; Lai, S J; Yoshimura, Y; Isobe, N

    2014-10-01

    Psoriasin (S100A7) is a member of the S100 protein family of calcium-binding proteins and plays a crucial role in local host defenses. The present study aimed to identify the expression of S100A7 in the goat mammary gland and in milk. The goat S100A7 coding DNA sequence was identified using direct sequencing. An S100A7 antibody was raised in rabbits by immunization with a synthetic S100A7 peptide consisting of 13 amino acids. Messenger RNA expression and protein localization in different regions of a healthy mammary gland were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Changes in the concentration of S100A7 in the milk after an intramammary infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined by an enzyme immunoassay. The goat S100A7 peptide had 98% and 86% sequence similarity to that of sheep and bovines, respectively. The S100A7 mRNA expression was higher in the teat and udder skin than in the cistern and parenchyma of the mammary gland. Immunoreactive S100A7 was localized in the epithelial cells of the alveolus and gland cistern, and stratified squamous epithelium of the teat. Psoriasin as a secreted protein was detectable in healthy milk, and an intramammary LPS infusion increased the concentration of S100A7 in the milk. The results suggest that S100A7 is produced in the epithelial cells of the mammary gland and is secreted into the milk.

  1. An RNA pseudoknot and an optimal heptameric shift site are required for highly efficient ribosomal frameshifting on a retroviral messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, M; Parkin, N; Varmus, H E

    1992-01-01

    Synthesis of the pol gene products of most retroviruses requires ribosomes to shift frame once or twice in the -1 direction while translating gag-pol mRNA. The viral signals for frameshifting include a heptanucleotide sequence on which the shift occurs and higher-order RNA structure just downstream of the shift site. We have made site-directed mutations in two stems (S1 and S2) of a putative RNA pseudoknot that begins 7 nucleotides 3' of the previously identified shift site (A AAA AAC) in the gag-pro region of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) RNA. The mutants confirm the predicted structure, show that loss of either S1 or S2 impairs frameshifting, and exclude alternative RNA structures as significant for frameshifting. The importance of the MMTV pseudoknot has been further demonstrated by showing that shift sites from two other retroviruses function more efficiently in the position of the MMTV site than in their native contexts. However, the MMTV pseudoknot cannot promote detectable frameshifting in the absence of a recognizable upstream shift site. In addition, the species of tRNA that reads the second codon in the shift site appears to be a critical determinant, since changing the 7th nucleotide in the MMTV gag-pro shift site from C to A, U, or G severely impairs frameshifting. Images PMID:1309954

  2. An energy-rich diet enhances expression of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 and 3 messenger RNA in rumen epithelium of goat.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Shen, Z; Martens, H

    2012-01-01

    exposure to pH of 7.4 or the absence of SCFA. A combination of reduced pH (6.8) and SCFA (20 mM) further enhanced (P < 0.05) NHE1 and NHE3 mRNA expression, indicating synergism between an increased concentration of SCFA and low pH (P < 0.05). Messenger RNA expression of NHE2 did not vary in vitro with pH (6.8) or SCFA (20 mM) or in vivo in Exp. 1 and 2. Thus, diet-dependent rumen epithelial NHE1 and NHE3 expression is probably related to ruminal SCFA concentration and pH, but that is not the case with NHE2.

  3. Onapristone (ZK299) and mifepristone (RU486) regulate the messenger RNA and protein expression levels of the progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in the bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Rekawiecki, Robert; Kowalik, Magdalena K; Kotwica, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether progesterone (P(4)) and its antagonists, onapristone (ZK299) and mifepristone (RU486), affect the levels of PGRA and PGRB messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in the cow uterus which may be important in understanding whether the final physiological effect evoked by an antagonist depends on PGR isoform bound to the antagonist. Endometrial slices on Days 6 to 10 and 17 to 20 of the estrous cycle were treated for 6 or 24 hours for mRNA and protein expression analysis, respectively, with P4, ZK299, or RU486 at a dose of 10(-4), 10(-5), or 10(-6) M. In the samples on Days 6 to 10 of the estrous cycle, PGRAB mRNA was stimulated by P(4) (10(-4) M; P < 0.01) and RU486 (10(-6); P < 0.001) and was decreased by ZK299 (10(-5); P < 0.05). In contrast, PGRB mRNA was decreased by the all P(4) (P < 0.01) and ZK299 (P < 0.001) doses and by two of the RU486 doses (10(-4) M; P < 0.01 and 10(-5) M; P < 0.01). In samples on Days 17 to 20 of the estrous cycle, PGRAB mRNA was stimulated by RU486 (10(-5) M; P < 0.001). PGRB mRNA was decreased by P(4) (10(-4) and 10(-5) M; P < 0.001), ZK299 (10(-4) and 10(-5) M; P < 0.001), and RU486 (10(-4) M; P < 0.01 and 10(-6) M; P < 0.001) and was increased by ZK299 (10(-6) M; P < 0.001) and RU486 (10(-5) M; P < 0.001). In samples on Days 6 to 10 of the estrous cycle, PGRB protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by all three ZK299 doses and by two of the RU486 doses (10(-4) M; P < 0.05 and 10(-5) M; P < 0.01). In contrast, in samples on Days 17 to 20, both PGRA and PGRB protein levels were decreased by ZK299 stimulation (10(-5) M; P < 0.05 and 10(-5) M; P < 0.01, respectively), whereas only PGRA protein levels were increased by RU486 (10(-5) M; P < 0.01). Both ZK299 and RU486 may exhibit both agonist and antagonist properties depending on which receptor isoform they affect. As a result, an increase or decrease in the expression of a particular PGR isoform will be observed.

  4. Gauge Messenger Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Do

    2006-11-28

    We consider gauge messenger models in which X and Y gauge bosons and gauginos are messengers of supersymmetry breaking. In simple gauge messenger models, all the soft parameters except {mu} and B{mu} are calculated in terms of a single scale parameter MSUSY which is proportional to F / MGUT. Unique prediction on dark matter in gauge messenger models is discussed. (Based on hep-ph/0601036 and hep-ph/0607169)

  5. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    PubMed

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress.

  6. Regional age-related changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), messenger RNA levels and activity in SAMP8 brain

    PubMed Central

    Colas, Damien; Gharib, Abdallah; Bezin, Laurent; Morales, Anne; Guidon, Gérard; Cespuglio, Raymond; Sarda, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional molecule synthesized by three isozymes of the NO synthase (NOSs) acting as a messenger/modulator and/or a potential neurotoxin. In rodents, the role of NOSs in sleep processes and throughout aging is now well established. For example, sleep parameters are highly deteriorated in senescence accelerated-prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a useful animal model to study aging or age-associated disorders, while the inducible form of NOS (iNOS) is down-regulated within the cortex and the sleep-structures of the brainstem. Evidence is now increasing for a role of iNOS and resulting oxidative stress but not for the constitutive expressed isozyme (nNOS). To better understand the role of nNOS in the behavioural impairments observed in SAMP8 versus SAMR1 (control) animals, we evaluated age-related variations occurring in the nNOS expression and activity and nitrites/nitrates (NOx-) levels, in three brain areas (n = 7 animals in each group). Calibrated reverse transcriptase (RT) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and biochemical procedures were used. Results We found that the levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in the cortex and the hippocampus of 8- vs 2-month-old animals followed by an increase in 12-vs 8-month-old animals in both strains. In the brainstem, levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in an age-dependent manner in SAMP8, but not in SAMR1. Regional age-related changes were also observed in nNOS activity. Moreover, nNOS activity in hippocampus was found lower in 8-month-old SAMP8 than in SAMR1, while in the cortex and the brainstem, nNOS activities increased at 8 months and afterward decreased with age in SAMP8 and SAMR1. NOx- levels showed profiles similar to nNOS activities in the cortex and the brainstem but were undetectable in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. Finally, NOx- levels were higher in the cortex of 8 month-old SAMP8 than in age-matched SAMR1. Conclusion Concomitant variations occurring in NO levels derived from n

  7. Heterogeneous cationic liposomes modified with 3β-{N-[(N',N'-dimethylamino)ethyl]carbamoyl}cholesterol can induce partial conformational changes in messenger RNA and regulate translation in an Escherichia coli cell-free translation system.

    PubMed

    Suga, Keishi; Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-12

    The effect of cationic liposomes (CLs) on messenger RNA(mRNA) conformation and translation was studied, focusing on membrane heterogeneity. CLs, composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dioleoyl-3-timethylammonium propane (DOPC/DOTAP) and DOPC/3β-{N-[(N',N'-dimethylamino)ethyl]carbamoyl}cholesterol (DOPC/DC-Ch), inhibited mRNA translation in an Escherichia coli cell-free translation system. Analysis of the membrane fluidity and polarity indicated a heterogeneous DOPC/DC-Ch (70/30) membrane, while other CLs exhibited homogeneous disordered membranes. mRNA adsorbed onto DOPC/DC-Ch liposomes showed translational activity, while DOPC/DOTAP liposomes inhibited mRNA translation in proportion to its adsorption onto membranes. Dehydration of DOPC/DOTAP (70/30) and DOPC/DC-Ch (70/30) was observed in the presence of mRNA but not in the case of zwitterionic DOPC liposomes, indicating that mRNA binds in regions between the phosphate [-PO(2)(-)-] and carbonyl [-C=O-] moieties of lipids. UV resonance Raman spectroscopy suggests that adenine, cytosine, and guanine interact with DOPC/DOTAP (70/30) and DOPC/DC-Ch (70/30) but not with DOPC. Circular dichroism indicates that DOPC/DOTAP (70/30) extensively denatured the mRNA. In contrast, heterogeneous DOPC/DC-Ch (70/30) induced partial conformational changes but maintained the translational activity of mRNA.

  8. Induction of differentiation of the human myeloid cell line, ML3, by tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma is accompanied by enhanced expression of the CD4 protein and messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Cassatella, M A; Trinchieri, G; Hassan, N F; Hartman, L; Sorio, C; Berton, G

    1992-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) induce differentiation of human myeloid cell lines along the monocytic lineage. In this study we investigated the effects of TNF and IFN-gamma on the expression of the CD4 protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) in the two myeloid cell lines, ML3 and HL-60. We observed that CD4 antigen expression on ML3 cells is almost undetectable and that TNF and IFN-gamma induced CD4 antigen expression on these cells. HL-60 cells express surface CD4 antigen at high density and treatment with TNF and IFN-gamma caused a decrease of CD4 expression. We also investigated the expression of CD4 mRNA in ML3 and HL-60 cells. ML3 constitutively express, albeit at low levels, CD4 mRNA. TNF induced CD4 mRNA in ML3 cells and IFN-gamma synergistically potentiated the effect of TNF, thus indicating that the enhanced expression of the CD4 protein on ML3 cells is due, at least in part, to an enhanced accumulation of the CD4 mRNA. CD4 mRNA is constitutively expressed in HL-60 cells at high levels. TNF and IFN-gamma, alone or in combination, did not cause any significant change of CD4 mRNA expression in HL-60 cells, thus indicating that decrease of surface CD4, which accompanies differentiation with these cytokines, is likely due to alterations of the CD4 protein synthesis and/or transport to the plasma membrane. These results provide evidence that myeloid cell lines are heterogeneous in expression of CD4, and that in ML3 cells, which constitutively express low levels of CD4 mRNA and undetectable amounts of surface CD4, the predominant effect of the two cytokines is to induce both CD4 mRNA and protein.

  9. MESSENGER Laser Altimeter

    NASA Video Gallery

    MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter sends out laser pulses that hit the ground and return to the instrument. The amount of light that returns for each pulse gives the reflectance at that point on t...

  10. Expression of messenger RNA for transforming growth factor-beta1 and for transforming growth factor-beta receptors in peripheral blood of systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated with low doses of quinagolide.

    PubMed

    Hrycek, Antoni; Kusmierz, Dariusz; Dybała, Tomasz; Swiatkowska, Longina

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 messenger RNA (TGF-beta1 mRNA) and the expression of mRNA for TGF-beta receptors (TGF-beta Rs mRNA) in whole peripheral blood of consecutive (treated from several months to several years) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients (21 women). A further aim of this study was to evaluate the association between expression of the above mentioned parameters in relation to the form of applied therapy (9 patients treated with quinagolide and 12 with quinagolide plus prednisone, azathioprine or cyclosporine A). The control group consisted of 15 healthy women. Most of the patients had mild SLE with SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score < 10 at time when blood samples were collected. Laboratory measurements included real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR). The expression levels of TGF-beta1 mRNA and mRNA for TGF-beta RII and RIII were significantly lower in patients whereas the expression level of TGF-beta RI was statistically significantly higher in SLE patients than in the controls. A very high positive correlation between TGF-beta1 mRNA expression and expression levels of TGF-beta Rs mRNA was found. In compared subgroups selected according to the form of the applied therapy no statistically significant differences were observed. We conclude that the TGF-beta signaling pathway can be altered in circulating leukocytes derived from treated patients with SLE and that the assumed forms of the applied therapy in the group of patients under consideration are accompanied by similarity in the expression level of transcripts for TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta Rs determined in whole blood. In our investigations, we cannot exclude the influence of the disease itself on the obtained results.

  11. Olive leaf extract suppresses messenger RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances insulin receptor substrate 1 expression in the rats with streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Jung, Ji-Hye; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, HyunSook

    2014-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, is a metabolic disease resulting from defects in both insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Recently, olive leaf has been reported as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antidiabetic agent. This study sought to investigate whether olive leaf extract can improve the insulin resistance and inflammation response in rats with type 2 diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin. After administering olive leaf extract for 8 weeks (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight), rats given the higher dose showed significantly lower blood glucose, serum total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared with those of diabetic control rats (P < .05). Results of oral glucose tolerance tests, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL) 6 in the liver show significantly decreased glucose level in rats given either dose of olive leaf extract (P < .05). Both olive leaf extract-treated groups showed significantly increased insulin receptor substrate 1 expression (P < .05). Tumor necrosis factor α, IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expressions in epididymis adipose tissue were significantly lower in rats that received higher dose of olive leaf extract (P < .05). Lymphocyte infiltration was not observed in these rats. The results suggest that olive leaf extract may attenuate insulin resistance by suppressing mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and elevating of insulin receptor substrate 1 expression.

  12. High-fat diet-induced reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α messenger RNA levels and oxidative capacity in the soleus muscle of rats with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Takeda, Isao; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Animal models of type 2 diabetes exhibit reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, which are associated with decreased oxidative capacity, in skeletal muscles. In contrast, animal models with metabolic syndrome show normal PGC-1α mRNA levels. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet decreases PGC-1α mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of rats with metabolic syndrome, reducing muscle oxidative capacity and accelerating metabolic syndrome or inducing type 2 diabetes. We examined mRNA levels and fiber profiles in the soleus muscles of rats with metabolic syndrome (SHR/NDmcr-cp [cp/cp]; CP) fed a high-fat diet. Five-week-old CP rats were assigned to a sedentary group (CP-N) that was fed a standard diet (15.1 kJ/g, 23.6% protein, 5.3% fat, and 54.4% carbohydrates) or a sedentary group (CP-H) that was fed a high-fat diet (21.6 kJ/g, 23.6% protein, 34.9% fat, and 25.9% carbohydrates) and were housed for 10 weeks. Body weight, energy intake, and systolic blood pressure were higher in the CP-H group than in the CP-N group. Nonfasting glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and leptin levels were higher in the CP-H group than in the CP-N group. There was no difference in insulin levels between the CP-N and CP-H groups. Muscle PGC-1α mRNA levels and succinate dehydrogenase activity were lower in the CP-H group than in the CP-N group. We concluded that a high-fat diet reduces PGC-1α mRNA levels and oxidative capacity in skeletal muscles and accelerates metabolic syndrome.

  13. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger RNA in blood using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to predict recurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The existence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood as an indicator of tumor recurrence has not been clearly established, particularly for gastric cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the relationship between CTCs in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis and clinicopathologic findings in patients with gastric carcinoma. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 123 gastric carcinoma patients at initial diagnosis. mRNA was extracted and amplified for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA detection using real-time RT-PCR. Periodic 3-month follow-up examinations included serum CEA measurements and imaging. Results The minimum threshold for corrected CEA mRNA score [(CEA mRNA/GAPDH mRNA) × 106] was set at 100. Forty-five of 123 patients (36.6%) were positive for CEA mRNA expression. CEA mRNA expression significantly correlated with T stage and postoperative recurrence status (P = 0.001). Recurrent disease was found in 44 of 123 cases (35.8%), and 25 of these (56.8%) were positive for CEA mRNA. Of these patients, CEA mRNA was more sensitive than serum CEA in indicating recurrence. Three-year disease-free survival of patients positive for CEA mRNA was significantly poorer than of patients negative for CEA mRNA (P < 0.001). Only histological grade and CEA mRNA positivity were independent factors for disease-free survival using multivariate analysis. Conclusions CEA mRNA copy number in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Real-time RT-PCR detection of CEA mRNA levels at initial diagnosis appears to be a promising predictor for disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:21040522

  14. Effect of repeated alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent on messenger RNA levels for interleukin-1β, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, and interleukin 10 in the developing rat brain after injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Topper, Lauren A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Microglia undergo maturation during the third trimester of human development (equivalent to the first 1-2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents), during which these cells may be particularly sensitive to insult. Alcohol exposure during this period can activate the neuroimmune system, an effect that may contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Here, we investigated whether repeated alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent in rats has a priming effect on the neuroimmune response to injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pups were exposed to alcohol in vapor chambers for 4 h daily from postnatal day (PD)2 to PD16 (peak blood alcohol concentrations ∼150 mg/dL). On PD17, rats were injected with either saline or LPS (50 μg/kg) and the frontal cortex, cerebellar vermis, and dentate gyrus were collected 2 h later. Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the pro-inflammatory agents interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2), as well as levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10), were measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. LPS consistently increased IL-1β and CCL2 mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum of both male and female rats. Furthermore, the LPS-induced increase of IL-1β mRNA levels was significantly blunted in the frontal cortex of alcohol-exposed female rats. Conversely, LPS only minimally affected IL-10 mRNA expression and there were no significant differences between air- and alcohol-exposed rats. Taken together with the literature regarding the effect of third-trimester alcohol exposure on the neuroimmune system, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to lower levels is less disruptive to the neuroimmune system than binge-like exposure to high doses of alcohol.

  15. Placental development during early pregnancy in sheep: estrogen and progesterone receptor messenger RNA expression in pregnancies derived from in vivo-produced and in vitro-produced embryos.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L P; Haring, J S; Johnson, M L; Ashley, R L; Redmer, D A; Borowicz, P P; Grazul-Bilska, A T

    2015-10-01

    Sex steroids are important regulators of angiogenesis and growth in reproductive tissues, including the placenta. In experiment (exp.) 1, to examine the expression of a suite of sex steroid receptors throughout early pregnancy, maternal (caruncular [CAR]) and fetal (fetal membranes [FM]) placental tissues were collected on days 14 to 30 after mating and on day 10 after estrus (nonpregnant controls). In exp. 2, to examine the hypothesis that assisted reproductive technology would affect the expression of the same suite of sex steroid receptors, pregnancies were achieved through natural mating (NAT) or transfer of embryos from natural mating (NAT-ET), in vitro fertilization (IVF), or in vitro activation (IVA), and CAR and FM were collected on day 22. In exp. 1, for CAR messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of estrogen receptors (ESR) 1 and 2, nuclear (n) progesterone receptors (PGR) and membrane (m) PGRα, β, and γ were affected (P < 0.02) by pregnancy stage, as were ESR1, nPGR, and mPGRα, β, and γ for FM (P < 0.03). In exp. 2, for CAR, mRNA expression of ESR1 and nPGR was decreased (P < 0.001) in NAT-ET, IVF, and IVA groups compared with NAT. For FM, mRNA expression of ESR1 tended to be greater (P = 0.10) in the IVA group compared with NAT and NAT-ET, and GPER1 was greater (P < 0.05) in NAT-ET and IVF compared with NAT. These data establish the normal pattern of sex steroid receptor mRNA expression in maternal and fetal placenta during early pregnancy in sheep, and in addition, suggest that altered expression of placental sex steroid receptors may be an early event leading to poor placental vascularization and growth after assisted reproductive technology.

  16. Translation of globin messenger RNA modified by benzo(a)pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol 9,10-oxide in a wheat germ cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Grunberger, D.; Pergolizzi, R.G.; Jones, R.E.

    1980-01-25

    Poly(U/sub 3/G) and rabbit globin mRNA were modified with the active carcinogenic metabolite of benzo(a)pyrene, (+-)-7..beta..,8..cap alpha..-dihydroxy-9..cap alpha..,10..cap alpha..-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene, and the effects of modification on translation in a cell-free protein synthesizing system were studied. High performance liquid chromatography of modified nucleosides from enzymatically hydrolyzed globin mRNA reveals that the active carcinogen formed two adducts with guanosine, four adducts with adenosine, and one adduct probably with cytidine residues. When globin mRNA with 0.4 carcinogen residues/molecule is used as a template, incorporation of amino acids into proteins is inhibited by 50%, and mRNA with 2.4 residues has only 10% of the template activity compared to unmodified molecules. On the other hand, modification of poly(U/sub 3/G) has no effect on its template activity. Since no significant formation of smaller peptides in the protein synthesizing system programmed with modified mRNA is detected, it is suggested that the carcinogen does not block the elongation step in mRNA translation. However, glycerol gradient centrifugation of initiation complexes reveals that modified globin mRNA does not form initiation complexes with ribosomes as effectively as does the unmodified globin mRNA. These results suggest that modification significantly reduces the ability of mRNA to be translated by affecting the initiation step in protein synthesis.

  17. Translational feedback regulation of the gene for L35 in Escherichia coli requires binding of ribosomal protein L20 to two sites in its leader mRNA: a possible case of ribosomal RNA-messenger RNA molecular mimicry.

    PubMed Central

    Guillier, Maude; Allemand, Frédéric; Raibaud, Sophie; Dardel, Frédéric; Springer, Mathias; Chiaruttini, Claude

    2002-01-01

    In addition to being a component of the large ribosomal subunit, ribosomal protein L20 of Escherichia coli also acts as a translational repressor. L20 is synthesized from the IF3 operon that contains three cistrons coding for IF3, and ribosomal proteins L35 and L20. L20 directly represses the expression of the gene encoding L35 and the expression of its own gene by translational coupling. All of the cis-acting sequences required for repression by L20, called the operator, are found on an mRNA segment extending from the middle of the IF3 gene to the start of the L35 gene. L20-mediated repression requires a long-range base-pairing interaction between nucleotide residues within the IF3 gene and residues just upstream of the L35 gene. This interaction results in the formation of a pseudoknot. Here we show that L20 causes protection of nucleotide residues in two regions of the operator in vitro. The first region is the pseudoknot itself and the second lies in an irregular stem located upstream of the L35 gene. By primer extension analysis, we show that L20 specifically induces reverse transcriptase stops in both regions. Therefore, these two regions define two L20-binding sites in the operator. Using mutations and deletions of rpml'-'lacZ fusions, we show that both sites are essential for repression in vivo. However L20 can bind to each site independently in vitro. One site is similar to the L20-binding site on 23S rRNA. Here we propose that L20 recognizes its mRNA and its rRNA in similar way. PMID:12166643

  18. Changes in brain ribonuclease (BRB) messenger RNA in granulosa cells (GCs) of dominant vs subordinate ovarian follicles of cattle and the regulation of BRB gene expression in bovine GCs.

    PubMed

    Dentis, J L; Schreiber, N B; Gilliam, J N; Schutz, L F; Spicer, L J

    2016-04-01

    Brain ribonuclease (BRB) is a member of the ribonuclease A superfamily that is constitutively expressed in a range of tissues and is the functional homolog of human ribonuclease 1. This study was designed to characterize BRB gene expression in granulosa cells (GCs) during development of bovine dominant ovarian follicles and to determine the hormonal regulation of BRB in GCs. Estrous cycles of Holstein cows (n = 18) were synchronized, and cows were ovariectomized on either day 3 to 4 or day 5 to 6 after ovulation during dominant follicle growth and selection. Ovaries were collected, follicular fluid (FFL) was aspirated, and GCs were collected for RNA isolation and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Follicles were categorized as small (1-5 mm; pooled per ovary), medium (5-8 mm; individually collected), or large (8.1-17 mm; individually collected) based on surface diameter. Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in FFL. Abundance of BRB messenger RNA (mRNA) in GCs was 8.6- to 11.8-fold greater (P < 0.05) in small (n = 31), medium (n = 66), and large (n = 33) subordinate E2-inactive (FFL E2 < P4) follicles than in large (n = 16) dominant E2-active (FFL E2 > P4) follicles. In the largest 4 follicles, GCs BRB mRNA abundance was negatively correlated (P < 0.01) with FFL E2 (r = -0.65) and E2:P4 ratio (r = -0.46). In experiment 2, GCs from large (8-22 mm diameter) and small (1-5 mm diameter) follicles were treated with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1; 0 or 30 ng/mL) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (0 or 30 ng/mL); IGF1 increased (P < 0.05) BRB mRNA abundance, and tumor necrosis factor alpha decreased (P < 0.001) the IGF1-induced BRB mRNA abundance in large-follicle GCs. In experiment 3 to 6, E2, follicle-stimulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 9, cortisol, wingless 3A, or sonic hedgehog did not affect (P > 0.10) abundance of BRB mRNA in GCs; thyroxine and luteinizing hormone increased (P < 0.05), whereas

  19. Messenger RNA levels of estrogen receptors alpha and beta and progesterone receptors in the cyclic and inseminated/early pregnant sow uterus.

    PubMed

    Sukjumlong, S; Persson, E; Dalin, A-M; Janson, V; Sahlin, L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in the expression of mRNAs for ERalpha, ERbeta and PR in the sow uterus at different stages of the estrous cycle as well as in inseminated sows at estrus and during early pregnancy by use of solution hybridization and in relation to plasma levels of estradiol and progesterone. Uterine samples were collected at different stages of the estrous cycle and after insemination/early pregnancy. In the endometrium, the expression of ERalpha mRNA and PR mRNA was similar for cyclic and early pregnant groups. Both were highest at early diestrus/70 h after ovulation and ERalpha mRNA was lowest at late diestrus/d 19 while PR mRNA was lowest at diestrus and late diestrus/d 11 and d 19. The expression of endometrial ERbeta was constantly low during the estrous cycle but higher expression was found in inseminated/early pregnant sows at estrus and 70 h after ovulation. In the myometrium, high expression of ERalpha mRNA and PR mRNA was observed at proestrus and estrus in cyclic sows and at estrus in newly inseminated sows. Higher expression of myometrial ERbeta mRNA was found in inseminated/early pregnant sows compared with cyclic sows, although significant only at estrus. In conclusion, the expression of mRNAs for ERalpha, ERbeta and PR in the sow uterus differed between endometrium and myometrium as well as with stages of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. In addition to plasma steroid levels, the differences between cyclic and inseminated/early pregnant sows suggest that other factors, e.g. insemination and/or the presence of embryos, influence the expression of these steroid receptor mRNAs in the sow uterus.

  20. Messenger RNA encoding a glutathione-S-transferase responsible for herbicide tolerance in maize is induced in response to safener treatment.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, R C; Shah, D M; Mozer, T J; Harding, E I; Diaz-Collier, J; Saunders, C; Jaworski, E G; Tiemeier, D C

    1986-07-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GST's) in maize represent a family of enzymes which conjugate glutathione to several major classes of pre-emergent, selective herbicides. Chemicals termed safeners have been demonstrated to increase the tolerance of maize toward such herbicides when the maize seed has been previously treated with safeners. It has subsequently been shown that corresponding increases in glutathione-S-transferase species occur. To determine whether these compounds act at a transcriptional level we have used synthetic oligonucleotide probes to isolate cDNA clones encoding the major GST polypeptide subunit, designated GST A. The identity of the clones has been confirmed by hybrid-selected mRNA translation and immunoprecipitation using antibodies made against this GST species as well as by production of active GST in yeast cells transformed with an expression vector containing the cloned DNA. GST A has been found to be encoded in a mRNA of 1.1 kb. Sequencing of cDNA products obtained by primer extension of maize mRNA using our oligonucleotide probes is consistent with this mRNA corresponding to the isolated cDNA clone. Using the clone as a probe for Northern analysis we have found a three to four-fold increase in the steady state level of this mRNA in maize tissue grown from safener-treated seeds. The level of safener which gives this induction is comparable to that required to obtain herbicide tolerance in the field.

  1. Proteasomal Activity Is Required to Initiate and to Sustain Translational Activation of Messenger RNA Encoding the Stem-Loop-Binding Protein During Meiotic Maturation in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qin; Allard, Patrick; Huang, Michael; Zhang, Wenling; Clarke, Hugh J.

    2009-01-01

    Developmentally regulated translation plays a key role in controlling gene expression during oogenesis. In particular, numerous mRNA species are translationally repressed in growing oocytes and become translationally activated during meiotic maturation. While many studies have focused on a U-rich sequence, termed the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE), located in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) and the CPE-binding protein (CPEB) 1, multiple mechanisms likely contribute to translational control in oocytes. The stem-loop-binding protein (SLBP) is expressed in growing oocytes, where it is required for the accumulation of nonpolyadenylated histone mRNAs, and then accumulates substantially during meiotic maturation. We report that, in immature oocytes, Slbp mRNA carries a short poly(A) tail, and is weakly translated, and that a CPE-like sequence in the 3′-UTR is required to maintain this low activity. During maturation, Slbp mRNA becomes polyadenylated and translationally activated. Unexpectedly, proteasomal activity is required both to initiate and to sustain translational activation. This proteasomal activity is not required for the polyadenylation of Slbp mRNA during early maturation; however, it is required for a subsequent deadenylation of the mRNA that occurs during late maturation. Moreover, although CPEB1 is degraded during maturation, inhibiting its degradation by blocking mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 activity does not prevent the accumulation of SLBP, indicating that CPEB1 is not the protein whose degradation is required for translational activation of Slbp mRNA. These results identify a new role for proteasomal activity in initiating and sustaining translational activation during meiotic maturation. PMID:19759367

  2. In situ nucleic acid hybridization of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 in primary biliary cirrhosis: pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 messenger RNA is expressed in hepatocytes but not in biliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Van de Water, J; Leung, P S; Coppel, R L; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1997-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2, or a cross-reactive molecule, has been shown by a variety of immunohistochemical methods to be present in increased amounts in biliary epithelial cells (BEC) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In this study, to further understand the nature of the immunoreactive molecule in BEC, we examined the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 (PDC-E2) messenger RNA (mRNA) and PDC-E2 protein in sections of livers from patients and controls to help identify the molecule found in BEC. We performed in situ hybridization using an antisense probe against the major epitope of PDC-E2. The data were very striking and suggested that there was no increased production of PDC-E2 in BEC. For example, in livers from patients with PBC, PDC-E2 mRNA was found in periportal hepatocytes in 16 of 17 cases (94%). In contrast, interlobular bile ducts and septal bile ducts had detectable levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in only 1 of 17 (6%) and 3 of 8 (38%) cases, respectively. Interestingly, proliferating bile ductules contained detectable levels of mRNA in 12 of 15 cases (80%). In control liver, periportal hepatocytes were positive in 15 of 17 cases (88%). Interlobular bile ducts, septal bile ducts, and proliferating bile ductules expressed mRNA signals in 4 of 17 (24%), 2 of 10 (20%), and 14 of 16 (88%), respectively. When formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were examined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-PDC-E2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) C355.1, the interlobular bile ducts showed typical aberrant apical staining in all 10 PBC cases, but 0 of 9 liver controls. Periportal hepatocytes, proliferating bile ductules and infiltrating mononuclear cells stained with C355.1 but in a characteristic mitochondrial staining pattern. The presence of a PDC-E2-like molecule recognized by C355.1 is not reflected by the expression levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in the BEC of patients with PBC.

  3. Regulation of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit variants in human myasthenia gravis. Quantification of steady-state levels of messenger RNA in muscle biopsy using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, T; Levasseur, P; Truffault, F; Cottin, C; Gaud, C; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1994-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by auto-antibodies that attack the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the decrease in AChR levels at the neuromuscular junction, we investigated the regulation of AChR expression by analyzing mRNA of the two AChR alpha subunit isoforms (P3A+ and P3A-) in muscle samples from myasthenic patients relative to controls. We applied a quantitative method based on reverse transcription of total RNA followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using an internal standard we constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. An increased expression of mRNA coding for the alpha subunit of the AChR isoforms was observed in severely affected patients (P < 0.003 versus controls) but not in moderately affected patients, independently of the anti-AChR antibody titer. Study of mRNA precursor levels indicates a higher expression in severely affected patients compared to controls, suggesting an enhanced rate of transcription of the message coding for the alpha subunit isoforms in these patients. We have also reported that mRNA encoding both isoforms are expressed at an approximate 1:1 ratio in controls and in patients. We have thus identified a new biological parameter correlated with disease severity, and provide evidence of a compensatory mechanism to balance the loss of AChR in human myasthenia gravis, which is probably triggered only above a certain degree of AChR loss. Images PMID:8040257

  4. Altered microtubule-associated tau messenger RNA isoform expression in livers of griseofulvin- and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1, 4-dihydrocollidine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Kenner, L; Zatloukal, K; Stumptner, C; Eferl, R; Denk, H

    1999-03-01

    Tau proteins belong to the family of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), which so far have been mostly detected in neuronal cells. Different domains on the protein serve different functions. By alternative splicing, several mRNAs and tau isoforms are created from one gene, which contain these functionally important domains to various degrees, and thus differ in their microtubule-related properties. In the present article, several novel observations are reported. Tau mRNA and proteins have been identified and further characterized in mouse liver. It is shown on the basis of mRNA determinations that at least three tau isoforms differing particularly with respect to their amino-terminal domains are present in mouse liver. The major and predominant isoform (isoform 1) lacks portions encoded by exons 2 and 3, which are responsible for cross-talk of microtubules with their environment ("projection domain"). Moreover, mRNA encoding tau protein with four repeats of the microtubule binding domain predominate in embryonal as well as adult mouse liver in contrast to brain, in which a shift from the predominant three-repeat isoform to the four-repeat isoform characterizes the transition from the embryonic to the adult stage. Intoxication with griseofulvin (GF) or 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1, 4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) significantly affects in a reversible manner the levels of tau mRNA as well as isoform ratios in mouse liver, but not in mouse brain. Tau mRNAs are significantly increased in intoxicated mouse livers. Moreover, a shift to isoform 1 lacking exons 2 and 3 occurs. However, the increase in liver tau protein was less than expected from increased mRNA levels, which could be the result of translational or posttranslational regulation. The consequences on microtubular function are as yet unclear, but impairment can be expected because the overexpressed tau mRNA isoform lacks the domain that mediates interaction of microtubules with their environment. On the other hand, the

  5. Diphosphoinositol Polyphosphates: Metabolic Messengers?

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    The diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (“inositol pyrophosphates”) are a specialized subgroup of the inositol phosphate signaling family. This review proposes that many of the current data concerning the metabolic turnover and biological effects of the diphosphoinositol polyphosphates are linked by a common theme: these polyphosphates act as metabolic messengers. This review will also discuss the latest proposals concerning possible molecular mechanisms of action of this intriguing class of molecules. PMID:19439500

  6. Messenger RNA Detection in Leukemia Cell lines by Novel Metal-Tagged in situ Hybridization using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Baranov, Vladimir I; Bandura, Dmitry R; Tanner, Scott D; Dick, John

    2006-01-01

    Conventional gene expression profiling relies on using fluorescent detection of hybridized probes. Physical characteristics of fluorophores impose limitations on achieving a highly multiplex gene analysis of single cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using metal-tagged in situ hybridization for mRNA detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS as an analytical detector has a number of unique and relevant properties: 1) metals and their stable isotopes generate non-overlapping distinct signals that can be detected simultaneously; 2) these signals can be measured over a wide dynamic range; 3) ICP-MS is quantitative and very sensitive. We used commercial antibodies conjugated to europium (Eu) and gold together with biotinylated oligonucleotide probes reacted with terbium-labeled streptavidin to demonstrate simultaneous mRNA and protein detection by ICP-MS in leukemia cells.

  7. Severe deficiency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator messenger RNA carrying nonsense mutations R553X and W1316X in respiratory epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hamosh, A; Trapnell, B C; Zeitlin, P L; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Rosenstein, B J; Crystal, R G; Cutting, G R

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common, lethal inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. We have recently reported two African-American patients with nonsense mutations in each CF gene and severe pancreatic disease, but mild pulmonary disease. In order to examine the effect of these nonsense mutations on CF gene expression, bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were obtained from one of these patients (no. 246), a compound heterozygote for nonsense mutations R553X and W1316X; a healthy normal individual; a patient (no. 528) homozygous for the common CF mutation (delta F508); and a CF patient (no. 272) who carries the R553X mutation and a missense mutation, S549N. When mRNA from bronchial cells of the normal individual, the delta F508 homozygote, and the S549N/R553X compound heterozygote was reverse transcribed and amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers derived from the CF gene, DNA fragments of the predicted size were observed. However, patient no. 246 with nonsense mutations in each CF gene has no detectable cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) messenger RNA, and therefore should have severely diminished, and possibly absent, CFTR protein. Furthermore, less than 2% of the CFTR transcripts in nasal epithelial cells from patient no. 272 (S549N/R553X) were derived from the gene with the nonsense mutation. We conclude that severe reduction in CFTR mRNA causes CF, but can have different consequences in the lung and pancreas. Images PMID:1721624

  8. Influences of sex, incubation temperature, and environmental quality on gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor messenger RNA expression in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Milnes, Matthew R; Kohno, Satomi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2010-01-01

    Gonadal steroid hormone receptors play a vital role in transforming ligand signals into gene expression. We have shown previously that gonads from wild-caught juvenile alligators express greater levels of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) than estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2). Furthermore, sexually dimorphic ESR2 mRNA expression (female > male) observed in animals from the reference site (Lake Woodruff, FL, USA) was lost in alligators from the contaminated Lake Apopka (FL, USA). We postulated that environmental contaminant exposure could influence gonadal steroid hormone receptor expression. Here, we address questions regarding gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in 1-yr-old, laboratory-raised alligators. What are relative expression levels within gonads? Do these levels vary between sexes or incubation temperatures? Can contaminant exposure change these levels? We observed a similar pattern of expression (ESR1 > AR > ESR2) in ovary and testis. However, both incubation temperature and environment modulated expression. Males incubated at 33.5 degrees C expressed greater AR levels than females incubated at 30 degrees C; dimorphic expression was not observed in animals incubated at 32 degrees C. Compared to Lake Woodruff alligators, Lake Apopka animals of both sexes showed lesser ESR2 mRNA expression levels. Employing cluster analyses, we integrated these receptor expression patterns with those of steroidogenic factors. Elevated ESR2 and CYP19A1 expressions were diagnostic of alligator ovary, whereas elevated HSD3B1, CYP11A1, and CYP17A1 expressions were indicative of testis. In contrast, AR, ESR1, and NR5A1 showed variable expressions that were not entirely associated with sex. These findings demonstrate that the mRNA expression of receptors required for steroid hormone signaling are modified by exposure to environmental factors, including temperature and contaminants.

  9. Taurine and beta-alanine act on both GABA and glycine receptors in Xenopus oocyte injected with mouse brain messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, T; Asanuma, A; Yanagisawa, K; Anzai, K; Goto, S

    1988-09-01

    The responding pathway (process from agonist binding to channel opening) of taurine and beta-alanine was investigated in Xenopus oocytes injected with mouse brain poly(A)+ RNA. Responses to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, taurine and beta-alanine were induced in oocytes injected with poly(A)+ RNA extracted from 3 regions, cerebrum, cerebellum and brainstem of the mouse brain. From comparison, responses to these 4 inhibitory amino acids in each regional poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes were categorized into at least 3 groups: (1) GABA, (2) glycine, and (3) taurine and beta-alanine. No cross-desensitization was observed between GABA response and glycine response, but taurine and beta-alanine responses cross-desensitized both the GABA and glycine responses. Taurine and beta-alanine responses were partially inhibited by the GABA antagonist, bicuculline, and also by the glycine antagonist, strychnine. The results suggest that the taurine or the beta-alanine response in the brain is caused through both the GABA receptor and the glycine receptor.

  10. Appropriateness of reference genes for normalizing messenger RNA in mouse 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis using quantitative real time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Nour; Kermarrec, Laëtitia; Hussein, Hayam; Bernstein, Charles N.; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2017-01-01

    2,4-Dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis is an experimental model that mimics Crohn’s disease. Appropriateness of reference genes is crucial for RT-qPCR. This is the first study to determine the stability of reference gene expression (RGE) in mice treated with DNBS. DNBS experimental Colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice. RNA was extracted from colon tissue and comprehensive analysis of 13 RGE was performed according to predefined criteria. Relative colonic TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels were calculated. Colitis significantly altered the stability of mucosal RGE. Commonly used glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh), β-actin (Actb), or β2-microglobulin (β2m) showed the highest fluctuation within the inflamed and control groups. Conversely, ribosomal protein large P0 (Rplp0), non-POU domain containing (Nono), TATA-box-binding protein (Tbp) and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (Eef2) were not affected by inflammation and were the most stable genes. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels was dependent on the reference gene used and varied from significant when the most stable genes were used to non-significant when the least stable genes were used. The appropriate choice of RGE is critical to guarantee satisfactory normalization of RT-qPCR data when using DNBS-Model. We recommend using Rplp0, Nono, Tbp, Hprt and Eef2 instead of common reference genes. PMID:28186172

  11. Gene expression in macrophage-rich human atherosclerotic lesions. 15-lipoxygenase and acetyl low density lipoprotein receptor messenger RNA colocalize with oxidation specific lipid-protein adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Rosenfeld, M E; Parthasarathy, S; Sigal, E; Särkioja, T; Witztum, J L; Steinberg, D

    1991-01-01

    Oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (LDL) exhibits several potentially atherogenic properties, and inhibition of LDL oxidation in rabbits decreases the rate of the development of atherosclerotic lesions. In vitro studies have suggested that cellular lipoxygenases may be involved in LDL oxidation, and we have shown previously that 15-lipoxygenase and oxidized LDL are present in rabbit atherosclerotic lesions. We now report that epitopes of oxidized LDL are also found in macrophage-rich areas of human fatty streaks as well as in more advanced human atherosclerotic lesions. Using in situ hybridization and immunostaining techniques, we also report that 15-lipoxygenase mRNA and protein colocalize to the same macrophage-rich areas. Moreover, these same lesions express abundant mRNA for the acetyl LDL receptor but no detectable mRNA for the LDL receptor. We suggest that atherogenesis in human arteries may be linked to macrophage-induced oxidative modification of LDL mediated by 15-lipoxygenase, leading to subsequent enhanced macrophage uptake, partly by way of the acetyl LDL receptor. Images PMID:2010531

  12. Atrazine inhibits pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release without altering GnRH messenger RNA or protein levels in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Foradori, Chad D; Zimmerman, Arthur D; Hinds, Laura R; Zuloaga, Kristen L; Breckenridge, Charles B; Handa, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a commonly used pre-emergence/early postemergence herbicide. Previous work has shown that exposure to high doses of ATR in rats results in blunting of the hormone-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) surge and inhibition of pulsatile LH release without significantly reducing pituitary sensitivity to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist. Accompanying the reduction in the LH surge was an attenuation of GnRH neuronal activation. These findings suggest that ATR exposure may be acting to inhibit GnRH release. In this study, we examined GnRH directly to determine the effect of high doses of ATR on GnRH pulsatile release, gene expression, and peptide levels in the female rat. Ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats were treated with ATR (200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 4 days via gavage. Following the final treatment, GnRH release was measured from ex vivo hypothalamic explants for 3 h. In another experiment, animals were administered either vehicle or ATR (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) daily for 4 days. Following treatment, in situ hybridization was performed to examine total GnRH mRNA and the primary GnRH heterogeneous nuclear RNA transcript. Finally, GnRH immunoreactivity and total peptide levels were measured in hypothalamic tissue of treated animals. ATR treatment resulted in no changes to GnRH gene expression, peptide levels, or immunoreactivity but a reduction in GnRH pulse frequency and an increased pulse amplitude. These findings suggest that ATR acts to inhibit the secretory dynamics of GnRH pulses without interfering with GnRH mRNA and protein synthesis.

  13. Temporal Variation for the Expression of Catalase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Correlations between Rates of Enzyme Synthesis and Levels of Translatable Catalase-Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Glenn C.; Mackay, William J.; Cook, Julia L.

    1986-01-01

    Two variants that alter the temporal expression of catalase have been isolated from a set of third chromosome substitution lines. Each variant has been mapped to a cytogenetic interval flanked by the visible markers st (3-44.0) and cu (3-50.0) at a map position of 47.0, which is within or near the interval 75D-76A previously identified as containing the catalase structural gene on the bases of dosage responses to segmental aneuploidy. Each variant operates by modulating the rate of enzyme synthesis and the level of translatable catalase-mRNA. PMID:3091448

  14. RNA-based fluorescent biosensors for live cell imaging of second messengers cyclic di-GMP and cyclic AMP-GMP.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Wilson, Stephen C; Sales-Lee, Jade; Hammond, Ming C

    2013-04-03

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an important class of signaling molecules that regulate a wide variety of pathogenic responses in bacteria, but tools for monitoring their regulation in vivo are lacking. We have designed RNA-based fluorescent biosensors for cyclic di-GMP and cyclic AMP-GMP by fusing the Spinach aptamer to variants of a natural GEMM-I riboswitch. In live cell imaging experiments, these biosensors demonstrate fluorescence turn-on in response to cyclic dinucleotides, and they were used to confirm in vivo production of cyclic AMP-GMP by the enzyme DncV.

  15. A carvacrol-thymol blend decreased intestinal oxidative stress and influenced selected microbes without changing the messenger RNA levels of tight junction proteins in jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Wei, H-K; Xue, H-X; Zhou, Z X; Peng, J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that intestinal oxidative stress and microbiota imbalance is involved in weaning-induced intestinal dysfunction in piglets. We have investigated the effect of feeding a carvacrol-thymol blend supplemented diet on intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations and the intestinal barrier in weaning piglets. The piglets (weaned at 21 days of age) were randomly allocated to two groups with six pens per treatment and 10 piglets per pen. At weaning day (21 days of age), six piglets were sacrificed before weaning to serve as the preweaning group. The weaned group was fed with a basal diet, while the weaned-CB group was fed with the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg carvacrol-thymol (1 : 1) blend for 14 days. On day 7 post-weaning, six piglets from each group were sacrificed to determine intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations, messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of intestinal barrier function. Weaning resulted in intestinal oxidative stress, indicated by the increased concentration of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances present in the intestine. Weaning also reduced the population of Lactobacillus genus and increased the populations of Enterococcus genus and Escherichia coli in the jejunum, and increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In addition, decreased mRNA levels of zonula occludens and occludin in the jejunal mucosa and increased plasma diamine oxidase concentrations indicated that weaning induced dysfunction of the intestinal barrier. On day 7 post-weaning, supplementation with the carvacrol-thymol blend restored weaning-induced intestinal oxidative stress. Compared with the weaned group, the weaned-CB group had an increased population of Lactobacillus genus but reduced populations of Enterococcus genus and E. coli in the jejunum and decreased mRNA levels of TNF-α. The

  16. CTLA-8, cloned from an activated T cell, bearing AU-rich messenger RNA instability sequences, and homologous to a herpesvirus saimiri gene.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Mattéi, M G; Denizot, F; Golstein, P

    1993-06-15

    To detect novel molecules involved in immune functions, a subtracted cDNA library between closely related murine lymphoid cells was prepared using improved technology. Differential screening of this library yielded several clones with a very restricted tissue specificity, including one that we named CTLA-8. CTLA-8 transcripts could be detected only in T cell hybridoma clones related to the one used to prepare the library. Southern blots showed that the CTLA-8 gene was single copy in mice, rats, and humans. By radioactive in situ hybridization, the CTLA-8 gene was mapped at a single site on mouse chromosome 1A and human chromosome 2q31, in a known interspecific syntenic region. The CTLA-8 cDNA sequence indicated the presence, in the 3'-untranslated region of the mRNA, of AU-rich repeats previously found in the mRNA of various cytokines, growth factors, and oncogenes. The CTLA-8 cDNA contained an open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 150 amino acids. This protein was 57% homologous to the putative protein encoded by the ORF13 gene of herpesvirus Saimiri, a T lymphotropic virus. These findings are discussed in the context of other genes of this herpesvirus homologous to known immunologically active molecules. More generally, CTLA-8 may belong to the growing set of virus-captured functionally important cellular genes related to the immune system or to cell death and cell survival.

  17. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Šišková, Katarína; Bezáková, Lýdia

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  18. Somatostatin inhibits stem cell factor messenger RNA expression by Sertoli cells and stem cell factor-induced DNA synthesis in isolated seminiferous tubules.

    PubMed

    Goddard, I; Bauer, S; Gougeon, A; Lopez, F; Giannetti, N; Susini, C; Benahmed, M; Krantic, S

    2001-12-01

    Immature porcine Sertoli cells have been reported to be targets for the regulatory peptide somatostatin (SRIF), which inhibits the basal and FSH-induced proliferation of Sertoli cells through a decrease of cAMP production. In the present study, we show that SRIF inhibits both basal and FSH-stimulated expression of the stem cell factor (SCF), a Sertoli cell-specific gene. The SRIF-mediated inhibition of forskolin-triggered, but not of 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP-triggered, SCF mRNA expression demonstrates the involvement of adenylyl cyclase in underlying peptide actions. Moreover, these effects require functional coupling of specific plasma membrane receptors to adenylyl cyclase via inhibitory G proteins, because pertussis toxin prevents SRIF-mediated inhibition of SCF mRNA expression. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assays suggest the involvement of sst2 receptors in SRIF actions on Sertoli cells. The biological relevance of these data is supported by an SRIF-mediated decrease in SCF-induced incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine in isolated seminiferous tubules. In situ hybridization and confocal microscopy show that, in seminiferous tubules only, spermatogonia display both c-kit and sst2 receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that SCF-stimulated DNA synthesis can be inhibited by SRIF in spermatogonia, but not in Sertoli and peritubular cells. Combined RT-PCR and immunohistochemical approaches point toward spermatogonia and Leydig cells as the source of testicular SRIF. These data argue in favor of paracrine/autocrine SRIF actions in testis.

  19. MESSENGER: Science payload status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R.; Solomon, S.; Gold, R.

    2003-04-01

    MESSENGER is a NASA Discovery mission to reach Mercury and orbit that planet for an Earth year, gathering data with a miniaturized scientific payload. The MESSENGER project is now entering the integration and test phase as the spacecraft is assembled and the instruments are calibrated and delivered to the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray and Neutron spectrometer (GRNS) and X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) experienced detector changes in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (based upon more experience with similar instrumentation on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous, NEAR-Shoemaker, mission and on Mars Odyssey). The gamma-ray portion of GRNS uses a high-purity germanium crystal cooled to ˜90K and surrounded by an active shield to detect characteristic gamma-rays from the planet. The neutron spectrometer uses Li-glass and plastic scintillators to detect and separate thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. The XRS spectrometer uses three gas-filled proportional counters looking at the planet and a solar monitor to measure X-ray fluorescence lines from the planet's surface. These instruments thus provide information on elemental abundances. The optical remote-sensing instruments map the planet in several spectral bands (Mercury Dual Imaging System -- MDIS), measure surface spectral reflectance in the visible and infra-red and exospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet and visible (Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer -- MASCS), and measure surface topography (Mercury Laser Altimeter -- MLA). The combination of altimetry with MLA and radio-science (RS) measurements will allow maps of the gravitational field of the planet and inference of the planet's obliquity and physical amplitude. The combination of boom-mounted magnetometer (MAG) and combined Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) allows internal and external sources of magnetic field to be separated, providing knowledge of both Mercury's internal structure and its magnetosphere and

  20. Relative messenger RNA abundance in bovine oocytes collected in vitro or in vivo before and 20 hr after the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Patrick; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Rizos, Dimitrios; Pintado, Belen; de la Fuente, Julio; Boland, Maurice P

    2003-11-01

    In the cyclic cow, final maturation of the ovulatory follicle is initiated by the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. During the subsequent 24 hr period, the oocyte nucleus undergoes meiotic progression to metaphase II and several changes in cytoplasmic organization take place. We have previously shown that oocytes recovered at the time of the LH peak and matured in vitro are less competent to reach the blastocyst stage than their counterparts recovered 20 hr later following in vivo maturation, despite both groups undergoing IVF and culture in parallel. The objective of this study was to compare, using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, the relative abundance of various developmentally important gene transcripts in these oocytes. The groups used were mature bovine oocytes originating from: (1) 2-6 mm follicles from slaughterhouse ovaries; (2) preovulatory follicles punctured by ovum pick-up just before the LH surge (i.e., immature) and matured in vitro; or (3) preovulatory follicles punctured 20 hr later, just prior to ovulation (i.e., in vivo matured). In addition, immature oocytes from 2-6 mm follicles were examined. We examined the relative mRNA expression of five enzymes involved in protection against free oxygen radicals (mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase, MnSOD, cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, Cu/ZnSOD, gamma-glutamyl-cysteine transferase, GCS, glutathione peroxidase, GPX, sarcosine oxidase, SOX), a transcript involved in follicular development (growth differentiation factor-9, GDF-9), transcripts involved in glucose metabolism (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, G6PDH, glucose transporter type-1 and -8, Glut-1, Glut-8) and genes involved in cell cycle events, Cyclin A and B, and poly(A) polymerase (PAP). Transcripts for all genes were detected, irrespective of oocyte origin. While differences were not significant in all cases, variations in levels of transcript abundance between the groups were related to developmental competence. In

  1. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  2. Cloning and characterization of mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) complementary DNA: increased GRH messenger RNA levels in the growth hormone-deficient lit/lit mouse.

    PubMed

    Frohman, M A; Downs, T R; Chomczynski, P; Frohman, L A

    1989-10-01

    We have isolated and cloned the full length cDNA for mouse GH-releasing hormone (mGRH) from mouse hypothalamus using a recently described strategy involving the polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were selected based on short (six amino acids) conserved regions in the human and rat GRH peptides that would recognize DNA sequences encoding similar amino acids regardless of codon usage. Primer-extended cDNA was amplified by PCR on cDNA templates prepared by reverse transcribing total mouse hypothalamic RNA. After cloning and sequencing the initial product, the 3' and 5' ends of mGRH were generated using a separate PCR strategy (RACE protocol). The mGRH cDNA encodes a 103-amino acid reading frame, structurally similar to the human and rat GRH genes, containing a signal sequence, a 42-residue GRH peptide, and a 31-residue C-terminal region. Although the structures of mouse and rat GRH are highly conserved in the signal peptide and C-terminal region, there is considerable diversity in the GRH region, which exhibits nearly comparable homology with the rat (68%) and human (62%) structures. Differences between mouse and rat GRH were also found in the amino acid cleavage sites at the 5' and 3' ends of the mature peptide and at the polyadenylation signal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  4. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  5. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  6. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  7. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  8. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  9. Messenger RNA-based therapeutics for brain diseases: An animal study for augmenting clearance of beta-amyloid by intracerebral administration of neprilysin mRNA loaded in polyplex nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Perche, Federico; Ikegami, Masaru; Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2016-08-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is considered to be the metabolic imbalance between anabolism and clearance of amyloid-beta (Aβ), and the strategy of breaking the equilibrium between soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ is likely to help prevent the progression of AD. Neprilysin (NEP) plays a major role in the clearance of Aβ in the brain, and its supplementation using viral vectors has shown to decrease Aβ deposition and prevent pathogenic changes in the brain. In this study, we developed a new therapeutic strategy by mRNA-based gene introduction. mRNA has the advantages of negligible risk of random integration into genome and not needing to be transcribed precludes the need for nuclear entry. This allows efficient protein expression in slowly-dividing or non-dividing cells, such as neural cells. We constructed mRNA encoding the mouse NEP protein and evaluated its ability degrade Aβ. In vitro transfection of NEP mRNA to primary neurons exhibited Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) degradation activity superior to that of NEP encoding plasmid DNA. We then evaluated the in vivo activity of NEP mRNA by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion using a cationic polymer-based PEGylated nanocarrier to form polyplex nanomicelles, which have been shown to have a high potential to deliver mRNA to various target tissues and organs. Nanomicelles carrying a GFP-NEP fusion mRNA produced efficient protein expression in a diffuse manner surrounding the ventricular space. An ELISA evaluation revealed that the mRNA infusion significantly augmented NEP level and effectively reduced the concentration of Aβ that had been supplemented in the mouse brain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of introducing exogenous mRNA for the treatment of brain diseases, opening the new era of mRNA-based therapeutics.

  10. The MESSENGER science payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Robert E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; MESSENGER Team

    2003-11-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft will orbit Mercury and gather data for one Earth year with a miniaturized scientific payload. The MESSENGER project is in the integration and test phase in mid 2003. Seven assembled and calibrated instruments are mounted on the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer has a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer to measure atomic composition with a high-purity germanium detector and a Neutron Spectrometer that uses lithium-glass and boron-loaded plastic scintillators for sensing thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. The X-Ray Spectrometer measures Mercury surface elemental abundances by examining solar-flare-induced X-ray fluorescence lines. Three gas-filled proportional counters detect the X-ray fluorescence lines from the planet's surface, and a solid-state solar monitor measures the X-ray input to the planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) has both wide-field and narrow-field cameras to map the surface of the planet. MDIS is also multi-spectral, with a 12-position filter wheel for the wide-field camera. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measures both surface spectral reflectance in the visible and near infrared and exospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet and visible. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) determines the range to the planet with a resolution of 0.3 m. MLA will be combined with the radio-science investigation to map the gravitational field of the planet and determine the obliquity and physical libration amplitude. A magnetometer, mounted on a 3.6-m boom, will map the internal and external magnetic field. The Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer will measure particles accelerated in the magnetosphere and the interactions of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. MDIS has its own pivot platform. All of the other instruments are fixed to the spacecraft. Pointing is accomplished by steering the entire spacecraft. All of the instruments are designed to deal with the extreme thermal

  11. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Hazra, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  12. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions targeting the messenger RNA of icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes to detect viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathy, Dhanurekha; Kulandai, Lily Therese; Ramasubban, Gayathri; Hajib Narahari Rao, Madhavan; Rathinam, Sridhar; Narasimhan, Meenakshi

    2015-12-01

    There is an urgent need for a rapid and reliable test to detect actively multiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens for an early initiation of the appropriate antituberculous treatment. This study was aimed at the optimization and application of nested reverse transcriptase-PCR (nRT-PCR) targeting the messenger RNA of the icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes directly from sputum specimens, and their evaluation against the culture by the BACTEC MicroMGIT mycobacterial culture system. 203 Sputum samples from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients and 30 control specimens (clinically proven viral or bacterial infections other than tuberculosis) were included in this study. The mycobacterial culture was performed by the BACTEC MicroMGIT system following the manufacturer's instructions. The primers for nRT-PCRs targeting icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes were indigenously designed using the Primer-BLAST software, and optimized for sensitivity and specificity. The icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes were able to pick up 63.9%, 67.2%, and 58.75%, respectively, of culture-negative sputum specimens collected from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients. However, three (1.4%) were negative for nRT-PCR, but M. tuberculosis culture positive. All the 30 controls were negative for culture by the BACTEC MicroMGIT method and all three nRT-PCR. The novel nRT-PCRs targeting icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes developed in this study are rapid and reliable diagnostic tools to detect viable M. tuberculosis directly from sputum specimens. However, further study by including a larger number of sputum specimens needs to be carried out to ascertain the diagnostic utility of the novel nRT-PCRs optimized in the study.

  13. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all

  14. MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  15. NASA Now: MESSENGER in Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Larry Evans, Senior Scientist for MESSENGER, discusses the difficulty of getting to Mercury, the challenges of visiting a planet so close to the sun and what we hope to discover when the spacec...

  16. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuña, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Livi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2007-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet’s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury’s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only ˜1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere, allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury’s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury’s interior. In addition, Mercury’s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted beneath the solid surface as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, ˜1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury’s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury’s proximity to the sun, 0.3-0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and recycling of neutrals and ions among the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury’s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection, and pick-up of planetary ions all playing roles in the generation of field-aligned electric currents. However, these field

  17. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  18. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  19. Alterations in polyribosome and messenger ribonucleic acid metabolism and messenger ribonucleoprotein utilization in osmotically stressed plant seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Polyribosome aggregation state in growing tissues of barley and wheat leaf of stems of pea and squash was studied in relation to seedling growth and water status of the growing tissue in plants at various levels of osmotic stress. It was found to be highly correlated with water potential and osmotic potential of the growing tissue and with leaf of stem elongation rate. Stress rapidly reduced polyribosome content and water status in growing tissues of barley leaves; changes were slow and slight in the non-growing leaf blade. Membrane-bound and free polyribosomes were equally sensitive to stress-induced disaggregation. Incorporation of /sup 32/PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ into ribosomal RNA was rapidly inhibited by stress, but stability of poly(A)/sup +/RNA relative to ribosomal RNA was similar in stressed and unstressed tissues, with a half-life of about 12 hours. Stress also caused progressive loss of poly(A)/sup +/RNA from these tissues. Quantitation of poly(A) and in vitro messenger template activity in polysome gradient fractions showed a shift of activity from the polysomal region to the region of 20-60 S in stressed plants. Messenger RNA in the 20-60 S region coded for the same peptides as mRNA found in the polysomal fraction. Nonpolysomal and polysome-derived messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes (mRNP) were isolated, and characteristic proteins were found associated with either fraction. Polysomal mRNP from stressed or unstressed plants were translated with similar efficiency in a wheat germ cell-free system. It was concluded that no translational inhibitory activity was associated with nonpolysomal mRNP from barley prepared as described.

  20. Melatonin: a universal time messenger.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-01-01

    Temporal organization plays a key role in humans, and presumably all species on Earth. A core building block of the chronobiological architecture is the master clock, located in the suprachi asmatic nuclei [SCN], which organizes "when" things happen in sub-cellular biochemistry, cells, organs and organisms, including humans. Conceptually, time messenging should follow a 5 step-cascade. While abundant evidence suggests how steps 1 through 4 work, step 5 of "how is central time information transmitted througout the body?" awaits elucidation. Step 1: Light provides information on environmental (external) time; Step 2: Ocular interfaces between light and biological (internal) time are intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells [ipRGS] and rods and cones; Step 3: Via the retinohypothalamic tract external time information reaches the light-dependent master clock in the brain, viz the SCN; Step 4: The SCN translate environmental time information into biological time and distribute this information to numerous brain structures via a melanopsin-based network. Step 5: Melatonin, we propose, transmits, or is a messenger of, internal time information to all parts of the body to allow temporal organization which is orchestrated by the SCN. Key reasons why we expect melatonin to have such role include: First, melatonin, as the chemical expression of darkness, is centrally involved in time- and timing-related processes such as encoding clock and calendar information in the brain; Second, melatonin travels throughout the body without limits and is thus a ubiquitous molecule. The chemial conservation of melatonin in all tested species could make this molecule a candidate for a universal time messenger, possibly constituting a legacy of an all-embracing evolutionary history.

  1. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second and third flybys of Mercury on October 6, 2008 and September 29, 2009, respectively, southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced intense reconnection signatures in the dayside and nightside magnetosphere and markedly different system-level responses. The IMF during the second flyby was continuously southward and the magnetosphere appeared very active, with large magnetic field components normal to the magnetopause and the generation of flux transfer events at the magnetopause and plasmoids in the tail current sheet every 30 to 90 s. However, the strength and direction of the tail magnetic field was stable. In contrast, the IMF during the third flyby varied from north to south on timescales of minutes. Although the MESSENGER measurements were limited during that encounter to the nightside magnetosphere, numerous examples of plasmoid release in the tail were detected, but they were not periodic. Instead, plasmoid release was highly correlated with four large enhancements of the tail magnetic field (i.e. by factors > 2) with durations of approx. 2 - 3 min. The increased flaring of the magnetic field during these intervals indicates that the enhancements were caused by loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. New analyses of the second and third flyby observations of reconnection and its system-level effects provide a basis for comparison and contrast with what is known about the response of the Earth s magnetosphere to variable versus steady southward IMF.

  2. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  3. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  4. Chicken granulosa cells show differential expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor messenger RNA and differential responsiveness to EGF and LH dependent upon location of granulosa cells to the germinal disc.

    PubMed

    Yao, H H; Bahr, J M

    2001-06-01

    Granulosa cells in the chicken follicle exhibit different phenotypes according to their location relative to the germinal disc (GD). Granulosa cells proximal to the GD (referred to as proximal granulosa cells) are more proliferative, whereas granulosa cells distal to the GD (referred to as distal granulosa cells) are more differentiated. We have shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) derived from the GD stimulated proliferation of granulosa cells proximal to the GD, whereas extraovarian LH promoted differentiation. We tested the hypothesis that phenotypic differences of granulosa cells are the result of differential responsiveness of granulosa cells to EGF and LH. We found that both granulosa and theca layers of chicken preovulatory follicles expressed mRNA for EGF receptor (EGFr) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. However, only the granulosa layer showed differential expression of EGFr and LH receptor (LHr) mRNA. Competitive reverse transcription-PCR revealed that proximal granulosa cells expressed more EGFr mRNA but less LHr mRNA than distal granulosa cells. In addition, proximal granulosa cells proliferated more in response to EGF than their distal counterparts. We further demonstrated that EGF decreased LHr mRNA expression by granulosa cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas EGF and LH had no effect on EGFr mRNA expression except at one dose of LH (15 ng/ml) that stimulated EGFr mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that EGF derived from the GD influences the phenotypes of granulosa cells. Granulosa cells proximal to the GD exhibit a proliferative phenotype possibly because they are exposed to and are more responsive to GD-derived EGF. Furthermore, GD-derived EGF decreases LHr mRNA expression by proximal granulosa cells and therefore results in less differentiated granulosa cell phenotype. In contrast, granulosa cells distal to the GD are not under the influence of EGF and exhibit a more differentiated phenotype.

  5. Neutralino Dark Matter in Gauge Messenger Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Kyu Jung

    2008-11-23

    The lightest neutralino is one of the best candidate for dark matter. In gauge messenger models, It is generic that bino and wino masses are almostly degenerate. Because of this, neutralino annihilation becomes more efficient. Also, gauge messenger models have squeezed mass spectrum so that there are many resonance and co-annihilation regions, and can give correct amount of neutralino relic density.

  6. Purification of Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particles via a Tagged Nascent Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Inchaustegui Gil, Diana P.; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic fates of mRNAs are influenced by interactions between RNA-binding proteins and cis regulatory motifs. In the cytoplasm, mRNAs are present as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles, which include not only proteins that bind directly to the mRNA, but also additional proteins that are recruited via protein-protein interactions. Many labs have sought to purify such particles from cells, with limited success. We here describe a simple two-step procedure to purify actively translated mRNAs, with their associated proteins, from polysomes. We use a reporter mRNA that encodes a protein with three streptavidin binding peptides at the N-terminus. The polysomal reporter mRNA, with associated proteins, is purified via binding to a streptavidin matrix. The method takes four days, and can be applied in any cell that can be genetically manipulated. Using Trypanosoma brucei as a model system, we routinely purified 8% of the input reporter mRNA, with roughly 22-fold enrichment relative to un-tagged mRNAs, a final reporter-mRNA:total-mRNA ratio of about 1:10, and a protein purification factor of slightly over 1000-fold. Although the overall reporter mRNP composition is masked by the presence of proteins that are associated with many polysomal mRNAs, our method can be used to detect association of an RNA-binding protein that binds to specifically to a reporter mRNA. PMID:26808308

  7. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  8. MESSENGER: Exploring the Innermost Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of Earth's closest planetary neighbors, Mercury remained comparatively unexplored for the more than three decades that followed the three flybys of the innermost planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-75. Mariner 10 imaged 45% of Mercury's surface at about 1 km/pixel average resolution, confirmed Mercury's anomalously high bulk density and implied large fractional core size, discovered Mercury's internal magnetic field, documented that H and He are present in the planet's tenuous exosphere, and made the first exploration of Mercury's magnetosphere and solar wind environment. Ground-based astronomers later reported Na, K, and Ca in Mercury's exosphere; the presence of deposits in the floors of polar craters having radar characteristics best matched by water ice; and strong evidence from the planet's forced libration amplitude that Mercury has a fluid outer core. Spacecraft exploration of Mercury resumed with the selection for flight, under NASA's Discovery Program, of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury in March of this year. MESSENGER's first chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction differs from those of the other inner planets, with a low-Fe surface composition intermediate between basalts and ultramafic rocks and best matched among terrestrial rocks by komatiites. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most planetary formation models. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images (to resolutions of 10 m/pixel) reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile

  9. The Magnetometer Instrument on MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Acuña, Mario H.; Lohr, David A.; Scheifele, John; Raval, Asseem; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.

    2007-08-01

    The Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is a low-noise, tri-axial, fluxgate instrument with its sensor mounted on a 3.6-m-long boom. The boom was deployed on March 8, 2005. The primary MAG science objectives are to determine the structure of Mercury’s intrinsic magnetic field and infer its origin. Mariner 10 observations indicate a planetary moment in the range 170 to 350 nT R {M/3} (where R M is Mercury’s mean radius). The uncertainties in the dipole moment are associated with the Mariner 10 trajectory and variability of the measured field. By orbiting Mercury, MESSENGER will significantly improve the determination of dipole and higher-order moments. The latter are essential to understanding the thermal history of the planet. MAG has a coarse range, ±51,300 nT full scale (1.6-nT resolution), for pre-flight testing, and a fine range, ±1,530 nT full scale (0.047-nT resolution), for Mercury operation. A magnetic cleanliness program was followed to minimize variable and static spacecraft-generated fields at the sensor. Observations during and after boom deployment indicate that the fixed residual field is less than a few nT at the location of the sensor, and initial observations indicate that the variable field is below 0.05 nT at least above about 3 Hz. Analog signals from the three axes are low-pass filtered (10-Hz cutoff) and sampled simultaneously by three 20-bit analog-to-digital converters every 50 ms. To accommodate variable telemetry rates, MAG provides 11 output rates from 0.01 s-1 to 20 s-1. Continuous measurement of fluctuations is provided with a digital 1-10 Hz bandpass filter. This fluctuation level is used to trigger high-time-resolution sampling in eight-minute segments to record events of interest when continuous high-rate sampling is not possible. The MAG instrument will provide accurate characterization of the intrinsic planetary field, magnetospheric structure, and

  10. The Mercury exosphere after MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, Rosemary; McClintock, William; Vervack, Ronald; Merkel, Aimee; Burger, Matthew; Cassidy, Timothy; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2016-07-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed sodium, calcium and magnesium emisison in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis for >16 Mercury years. The MASCS observations showed that calcium in Mercury's exosphere is persistently concentrated in the dawn hemisphere and is of extreme temperature (>50,000 K). The column abundance varies seasonally, and is extremely repeatable each Mercury year. In addition, the calcium exhibits a persistent maximum not at perihelion but 20° after perihelion, an enhancement that was shown to be coincident with the probable intersection of Mercury's orbit with a dust stream originating at Comet Encke. Any mechanism producing the Mercurian Ca exosphere must explain the facts that the Ca is extremely hot, that it is seen almost exclusively on the dawnside of the planet, and that its content varies seasonally, not sporadically. Energization of the Ca atoms was suggested to originate through dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules ejected by meteoritic impacts. Magnesium was also observed on a daily basis throughout the MESSENGER orbital phase. Mg has its own spatial and temporal pattern, peaking at mid-morning instead of early morning like Ca, and exhibiting a warm thermal profile, about 5000 K, unlike the extreme temperature of Ca which is an order of magnitude hotter. Although Mercury's sodium exosphere has been observed from the ground for many decades, the MASCS observations showed that, like calcium, the sodium exosphere is dominated by seasonal variations, not sporadic variations. However a conundrum exists as to why ground-based observations show highly variable high-latitude variations that eluded the MASCS. The origin of a persistent south polar enhancement has not been explained. The more volatile element, Na, is again colder, about 1200 K, but not thermally accommodated to the surface temperature. A

  11. MESSENGER'S First and Second Flybys of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only approximately 1000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th and October 6th, 2008 close flybys of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  12. Characterization of messenger-like ribonucleic acid from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the use of chromatography on methylated albumin–kieselguhr

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roger

    1970-01-01

    Chromatography on methylated albumin–kieselguhr of RNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to separate stable RNA from a tenaciously bound DNA-like RNA fraction. The tenaciously bound RNA, which was eluted with a dilute solution of sodium dodecyl sulphate, was characterized as messenger-like RNA by its sedimentation behaviour, nucleotide composition, lack of methylated bases and labelling kinetics. Chromatography of purified ribosomal RNA indicated a minor contamination of the tenaciously bound fraction with ribosomal RNA. On the other hand, a large portion of pulse-labelled polyribosomal RNA from protoplasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tenaciously bound to the columns. The `chase' of isotopic label from the messenger-like RNA was found to be retarded during inhibition of protein synthesis both by cycloheximide and by starvation for a carbon source. PMID:4321853

  13. An evaluation of the etiology of reduced CYP1A1 messenger RNA expression in the Atlantic tomcod from the Hudson River, New York, USA, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Roy, N K; Courtenay, S; Yuan, Z; Ikonomou, M; Wirgin, I

    2001-05-01

    Adult Atlantic tomcod, Microgadus tomcod, from the Hudson River, New York State, USA, exhibit reduced inducibility of hepatic cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) mRNA compared with adult tomcod from the cleaner Miramichi River, New Brunswick, Canada, when treated with coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. In contrast, little difference in CYP1A1 inducibility is observed between tomcod from these two rivers when treated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We sought to determine if impaired hepatic CYP1A1 inducibility in Hudson River tomcod results from a multigenerational, genetic adaptation or a single generational, physiological acclimation. Embryos and larvae from controlled experimental crosses of Hudson River and Miramichi River parents were exposed for 24 h to water-borne PCB congener 77 (10 ppm), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP; 10 ppm), or dimethysulfoxide, and CYP1A1 expression was assessed in individual larva using competitive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The CYP1A1 mRNA was significantly induced in larvae from both populations by BaP (47- and 52-fold) and PCB 77 (9- and 22-fold), although levels of expression were higher in offspring of Miramichi matings. Most important, CYP1A1 mRNA was significantly induced by PCB 77 in larvae from Hudson River parents. Concentrations of dioxin, furan, and PCB congeners were measured in livers and eggs of female tomcod from these two locales to quantify the extent of maternal transfer of contaminants. For both rivers, wet-weight contaminant concentrations were significantly higher (4-7 times) in livers than in eggs of the same females, suggesting that a threshold level of contaminants may have to be reached before CYP1A1 transcription is impaired. We conclude that reduced inducibility of hepatic CYP1A1 mRNA in adult tomcod from the Hudson River is most consistent with single-generational acclimation.

  14. Recognition of the bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanylate by its cognate riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshina, Nadia; Baird, Nathan J.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2009-12-03

    The cyclic diguanylate (bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate, c-di-GMP) riboswitch is the first known example of a gene-regulatory RNA that binds a second messenger. c-di-GMP is widely used by bacteria to regulate processes ranging from biofilm formation to the expression of virulence genes. The cocrystal structure of the c-di-GMP responsive GEMM riboswitch upstream of the tfoX gene of Vibrio cholerae reveals the second messenger binding the RNA at a three-helix junction. The two-fold symmetric second messenger is recognized asymmetrically by the monomeric riboswitch using canonical and noncanonical base-pairing as well as intercalation. These interactions explain how the RNA discriminates against cyclic diadenylate (c-di-AMP), a putative bacterial second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering and biochemical analyses indicate that the RNA undergoes compaction and large-scale structural rearrangement in response to ligand binding, consistent with organization of the core three-helix junction of the riboswitch concomitant with binding of c-di-GMP.

  15. Cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) in the hen ovary. I. Regulation of P450scc messenger RNA levels and steroidogenesis in theca cells of developing follicles.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, K I; Tilly, J L; Johnson, A L

    1991-12-01

    We have recently shown that granulosa cells from hen ovarian follicles, collected at a stage of development 2-3 wk prior to ovulation (e.g. 6-8 mm in diameter) are steroidogenically inactive. Therefore, the hypothesis tested in the present studies was that theca cells from follicles at this stage of development must contain sufficient levels of functional cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme to produce the progestin precursor required for the synthesis of androgens and estrogens. Northern blot analysis of total theca RNA collected from 6-8-mm follicles indicated the presence of a single P450scc mRNA transcript of approximately 2 kb whose expression was increased following an 8-h preincubation with 200 ng/ml ovine LH (oLH) or 10 microM forskolin. Western blot analysis of crude mitochondrial protein revealed a band of immunoreactive P450scc protein of approximately 53 kDa that was determined to be capable of converting 25-hydroxycholesterol to pregnenolone in a cell-free system. In the second set of studies, conducted to examine the cellular regulation of steroidogenesis in isolated theca cells of 6-8-mm follicles, theca cells were found to produce measurable basal levels of cAMP, progesterone, androstenedione, and estradiol following a 3-h incubation of 5 x 10(5) cells. Furthermore, significant dose-dependent increases in steroidogenesis were observed in response to oLH (0.2-200 ng/ml), chicken FSH (cFSH; 20-200 ng/ml), cholera toxin (0.002-20 ng/ml), and 8-bromo-cAMP (0.1-3.33 mM). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 10-167 nM) also stimulated dose-dependent increases in basal progesterone, androstenedione, and estradiol production. In addition, while PMA had no effect on oLH (200 ng/ml)-promoted cAMP accumulation, or on oLH (20 ng/ml)- or 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM)-stimulated progesterone production, it attenuated oLH-induced and 8-bromo-cAMP-induced androstenedione and estradiol accumulation. We conclude that theca cells from 6-8-mm follicles possess mRNA

  16. Stable expression of human H1-histamine-receptor cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pharmacological characterisation of the protein, tissue distribution of messenger RNA and chromosomal localisation of the gene.

    PubMed

    Moguilevsky, N; Varsalona, F; Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Guillaume, J P; Garcia, L; Szpirer, C; Szpirer, J; Bollen, A

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA clone for the histamine H1 receptor was isolated from a human lung cDNA library; it encoded a protein of 487 amino acids which showed characteristic features of G-protein-coupled receptors. The percentages of identity of the deduced amino acid sequence with bovine, rat and guinea pig H1 histamine receptors were 82.6%, 79.4% and 73.3%, respectively, whereas these percentages decreased to 74.6%, 66% and 56.7% for the amino acid sequence of the third intracellular loop. The human H1-receptor cDNA was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) via an eukaryotic expression vector; the receptor protein present on cell membranes specifically bound [3H]mepyramine with a Kd of 3.7 nM. The binding was displaced by H1-histamine-receptor antagonists and histamine. Northern blot analysis indicated the presence of two histamine H1 receptor mRNAs of 3.5 kb and 4.1 kb in various human tissues and an additional mRNA of 4.8 kb restricted to the human brain. Finally, by means of somatic cell hybrids segregating either human or rat chromosomes, the gene for histamine H1 receptor was found to reside on human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 4.

  17. The Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 6 (CPSF6) Subunit of the Capsid-recruited Pre-messenger RNA Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) Complex Mediates HIV-1 Integration into Genes.

    PubMed

    Rasheedi, Sheeba; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Serrao, Erik; Sowd, Gregory A; Qian, Juan; Hao, Caili; Dasgupta, Twishasri; Engelman, Alan N; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-05-27

    HIV-1 favors integration into active genes and gene-enriched regions of host cell chromosomes, thus maximizing the probability of provirus expression immediately after integration. This requires cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA 3' end processing that binds HIV-1 capsid and connects HIV-1 preintegration complexes to intranuclear trafficking pathways that link integration to transcriptionally active chromatin. CPSF6 together with CPSF5 and CPSF7 are known subunits of the cleavage factor I (CFIm) 3' end processing complex; however, CPSF6 could participate in additional protein complexes. The molecular mechanisms underpinning the role of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection remain to be defined. Here, we show that a majority of cellular CPSF6 is incorporated into the CFIm complex. HIV-1 capsid recruits CFIm in a CPSF6-dependent manner, which suggests that the CFIm complex mediates the known effects of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection. To dissect the roles of CPSF6 and other CFIm complex subunits in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed virologic and integration site targeting properties of a CPSF6 variant with mutations that prevent its incorporation into CFIm We show, somewhat surprisingly, that CPSF6 incorporation into CFIm is not required for its ability to direct preferential HIV-1 integration into genes. The CPSF5 and CPSF7 subunits appear to have only a minor, if any, role in this process even though they appear to facilitate CPSF6 binding to capsid. Thus, CPSF6 alone controls the key molecular interactions that specify HIV-1 preintegration complex trafficking to active chromatin.

  18. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byakti, Pritibhajan; Khosa, Charanjit K.; Mummidi, V. S.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, A t , relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models [1, 2] so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 9 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses significantly. The successful models have stop masses ˜1.5 TeV with small or negligible mixing and yet a light CP even Higgs at 125 GeV.

  19. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-05-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenological effective Lagrangian of weak scale supersymmetry with a certain set of natural assumptions. This framework is designed to avoid problems in low-energy phenomenology and cosmology of supersymmetric models. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation, whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 105 GeV ≲Mmess ≲1010 GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields Nmess are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  20. Sweet Spot Supersymmetry and Composite Messengers

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2007-10-30

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenologically and cosmologically perfect framework to realize a supersymmetric world at short distance. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 10{sup 5} GeV {approx}< M{sub mess} {approx}< 10{sup 10} GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields N{sub mess} are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  1. An allosteric self-splicing ribozyme triggered by a bacterial second messenger.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine R; Baker, Jenny L; Weinberg, Zasha; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Breaker, Ronald R

    2010-08-13

    Group I self-splicing ribozymes commonly function as components of selfish mobile genetic elements. We identified an allosteric group I ribozyme, wherein self-splicing is regulated by a distinct riboswitch class that senses the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP. The tandem RNA sensory system resides in the 5' untranslated region of the messenger RNA for a putative virulence gene in the pathogenic bacterium Clostridium difficile. c-di-GMP binding by the riboswitch induces folding changes at atypical splice site junctions to modulate alternative RNA processing. Our findings indicate that some self-splicing ribozymes are not selfish elements but are harnessed by cells as metabolite sensors and genetic regulators.

  2. Evaluation of ribosomal RNA removal protocols for Salmonella RNA-Seq projects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing is a powerful technology and its application to sequencing entire RNA populations of food-borne pathogens will provide valuable insights. A problem unique to prokaryotic RNA-Seq is the massive abundance of ribosomal RNA. Unlike eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), bacterial ...

  3. Intercultural Learning via Instant Messenger Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Li; Erben, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating the viability of instant messenger (IM) interaction to facilitate intercultural learning in a foreign language class. Eight students in a Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) class participated in the study. Each student was paired with a native speaker (NS) of Chinese, and each pair…

  4. (Dicer)phering roles of microRNA in platelets.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-04-07

    In this issue of Blood, Rowley et al report that noncoding RNAs precisely regulate the messenger RNA (mRNA) profile in platelets. Interfering in this process using genetically engineered mice affects hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets.

  5. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early orbital operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.; MESSENGER Team

    2014-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  6. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Slavin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission angles

  7. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Philips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, M. T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  8. Attitude Sensor and Gyro Calibration for Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Pittelkau, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit Attitude Determination/Calibration (RADICAL(TM)) filter was used to estimate star tracker and gyro calibration parameters using MESSENGER telemetry data from three calibration events. We present an overview of the MESSENGER attitude sensors and their configuration is given, the calibration maneuvers are described, the results are compared with previous calibrations, and variations and trends in the estimated calibration parameters are examined. The warm restart and covariance bump features of the RADICAL(TM) filter were used to estimate calibration parameters from two disjoint telemetry streams. Results show that the calibration parameters converge faster with much less transient variation during convergence than when the filter is cold-started at the start of each telemetry stream.

  9. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  10. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, J.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  11. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-10-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft to infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The hot portion of the source appears to be highly variable. The authors acknowledge support from NASA through the MESSENGER Participating Scientist Program and Planetary Atmospheres research grants.

  12. MESSENGER: The Discovery Mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.; Gold, R. E.; Domingue, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochenistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched on 3 August 2004, has begun its voyage to initiate a new era in our understanding of the terrestrial planets. The mission, spacecraft, and payload are designed to answer six fundamental questions regarding the innermost planet: What planetary formational processes led to Mercury's high metal/silicate ratio? What is the geological history of Mercury? What are the nature and origin of Mercury's magnetic field? What are the structure and state of Mercury's core? What are the radar-reflective materials at Mercury's poles? What are the important volatile species and their sources and sinks on and near Mercury? Planet formational hypotheses will be tested by measuring the surface abundances of major elements by X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. The geological history will be determined from high-resolution color imaging of the heavily cratered highlands, intercrater plains, and smooth plains. MESSENGER will provide detailed views of both the Caloris basin and its antipodal terrain. Topographic, mineralogical, and elemental abundance data will be used to seek evidence of volcanic features and units. Measurement of Mercury's magnetic field and its interaction with the solar wind will distinguish the intrinsic dipole and quadrupole components while separating these from the current systems driven by solar-wind-induced convection. The structure of the internal field will put constraints on dynamo models. Such models will also be constrained by measuring Mercury's libration to determine the extent of a fluid outer core. Both water ice and sulfur have been postulated as major constituents of the high-radar-backscatter polar deposits. MESSENGER will combine gamma-ray and neutron spectrometry of the surface with ultraviolet spectrometry and in situ particle measurements to detect both neutral and charged species originating from the surface. Such measurements will address the

  13. MicroRNA expression analysis using the Affymetrix Platform.

    PubMed

    Dee, Suzanne; Getts, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have been used extensively for messenger RNA expression monitoring. Recently, microarrays have been designed to interrogate expression levels of noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe methods for RNA labeling and the use of a miRNA array to identify and measure microRNA present in RNA samples.

  14. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  15. Unsupervised Classification of MESSENGER MASC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sanctis, M. Cristina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2010-05-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft flew by Mercury as part of its journey to Mercury orbit insertion. The Mercury At-mospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) observed Mercury during the first two flybys, includ-ing high-spatial-and spectral-resolution visible to near-infrared (IR) spectra of the Mercury surface. The Visible and InfraRed Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS consists of two linear photodiode arrays covering a spectral range 320-1450 nm. We applied classification method to MASCS data in order to extract information on the mineralogy of Mercury. The classification of the Messenger data will permit to obtain maps of Mercury surface, giving us indication of the different mineralogy and maturity present on the Hermean surface. The data were pre-processed applying photometric correction and the VIS and NIR data were collected in a single spectrum. The data set show very similar featureless spectra. The main differences are in the reflectance levels and in the spectral slopes. To emphasize the spectral differences we have normalized the spectra to an average reflectance spectrum for each flyby. This allows to point out variation of different regions with respect to the aver-age spectral behaviour. Two different approaches have been used to analyze MASCS data of the two Messenger flybys: ISODATA unsupervised classification and a classification based on three different spectral slopes (in the wavelengths' ranges 0.3-0.55, 0.55-0.8 and 0.95-1.49 µm). The identified classes shows differences linked with slopes and reflectance's level: the proposed methods allows to correlate the most important classes with different morphological features on Mercury's surface which differ for weathering, maturity and composition. Our analysis is done in order to test and verify these classification methods that shall be necessary to analyze similar data harvested by SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI (Visible and Infrared Hyper-spectral Imager) aboard the future ESA's BepiColombo mission

  16. [Pathophysiological implications of the chemical messengers].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Fernández, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    To maintain a physical organization and a different composition of its surroundings environment, living beings use a great part of the energy that they produce. Vital processes require an elevated number of reactions which are regulated and integrated by chemical messengers. They use autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and synaptic signals through receptors of cell surface, nuclear or associated with ionic chanels, enzymes, trimeric G proteins and to intracellular kinases. Through these mechanisms pheromones play an important role in the relationships between different individuals, and hormones are able to regulate the integrative functions of our organism. In the nervous system, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, sensors and receptors between other messengers, play functions of great relevance, while growth factors stimulate cell proliferation and cytokines have many effects but the most important is the ones related with the control of the immflamatory process. Alterations of these messengers permit us a better understanding of the diseases and possibly of its treatments in a near future. Modifications of the expression of genes from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomas are responsible of monogenic, polygenic and mitochondrial diseases, while alterations in the activities of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters are related with schizophrenia, Parkinson disease and depression, respectively. Other example is the hyperthyroidism of the Graves-Bassedow disease due to the competitive interference of the LATS immunoglobulin with TSH at the level of the folicular cells producing thyroid hormones Twenty five years ago in the reviews on the mechanisms of insulin action, there was presentations in which the insulin receptor was located in the plasma membrane of the target cells while in the cytoplasm only a big interrogative was observed, that at present is replaced by chemical mediators cascades responsible of the multiple effects of insulin. This finding is similar to

  17. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  18. Multi-messenger aspects of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The recent observation of TeV-PeV neutrinos by IceCube has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. I will discuss this signal in the context of multi-messenger astronomy. For extragalactic source scenarios the corresponding gamma-rays are not directly observable due to interactions with the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma ray background observed by Fermi-LAT contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. Interestingly, the overall energy density of the observed neutrino flux is close to a theoretical limit for neutrino production in ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources and might indicate a common origin of these phenomena. I will highlight various multi-messenger relations and their implications for neutrino source scenarios. This article is an excerpt from an ICRC 2015 proceedings contribution [1].

  19. MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    On 18 March 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, providing a new opportunity to study the outer boundary of the innermost planet's magnetosphere - the magnetopause. The 12-hour orbital period yields a minimum of four magnetopause crossings per day, which facilitates the investigation of the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the magnetopause structure. Here we use data from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) to characterize the magnetopause. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) is executed to transform the MAG data into current-sheet coordinates. In this new coordinate system we determine (1) the temporal duration and, with assumptions, the thickness of the magnetopause, (2) the magnetic shear angle across the boundary, and (3) the normal magnetic field across the current sheet, from which we infer the rate of reconnection. FIPS measurements provide a validation of the structure of the magnetopause determined from the MAG data, i.e., whether the magnetopause is magnetically open or closed, on the basis of its permeability to solar wind ions. The results of our analysis indicate that the structure of Mercury's magnetopause is highly responsive to IMF direction and, whenever the shear angle is greater than 90°, is generally open to the solar wind plasma under normal magnetic field components of order 1-10 nT.

  20. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Al Asad, Manar M. H.; Slavin, James A.; Alexeev, Igor. I.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-12-01

    We present a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere, derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer data from 24 March to 12 December 2011, comprising the spacecraft's first three Mercury years in orbit around the innermost planet. The model, constructed under the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid of revolution, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field and allows for reconnection. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital Magnetometer data to estimate all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the paraboloid magnetospheric model, and the sole remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated as 190 nT RM3 from a grid search. We verify that the best fit dipole moment is insensitive to changes in the other parameters within their determined ranges. The model provides an excellent first-order fit to the MESSENGER observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The results show that the magnetopause field strength ranges from 10% to 50% of the dipole field strength at observation locations on the dayside and at nightside latitudes north of 60°N. Globally, the residual signatures observed to date are dominated by the results of magnetospheric processes, confirming the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  1. Addition of Polyadenylate Sequences to Virus-Specific RNA during Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, L.; Wall, R.; Glickman, G.; Darnell, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Adenovirus-specific nuclear and polysomal RNA, both early and late in the infectious cycle, contain a covalently linked region of polyadenylic acid 150-250 nucleotides long. A large proportion of the adenovirus-specific messenger RNA contains poly(A). As revealed by hybridization experiments, the poly(A) is not transcribed from adenovirus DNA. Furthermore, an adenosine analogue, cordycepin, blocks the synthesis of poly(A) and also inhibits the accumulation of adenovirus messenger RNA on polysomes. Addition of poly(A) to viral RNA may involve a host-controlled mechanism that regulates the processing and transport of messenger RNA. PMID:5315962

  2. Addition of polyadenylate sequences to virus-specific RNA during adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Philipson, L; Wall, R; Glickman, G; Darnell, J E

    1971-11-01

    Adenovirus-specific nuclear and polysomal RNA, both early and late in the infectious cycle, contain a covalently linked region of polyadenylic acid 150-250 nucleotides long. A large proportion of the adenovirus-specific messenger RNA contains poly(A). As revealed by hybridization experiments, the poly(A) is not transcribed from adenovirus DNA. Furthermore, an adenosine analogue, cordycepin, blocks the synthesis of poly(A) and also inhibits the accumulation of adenovirus messenger RNA on polysomes. Addition of poly(A) to viral RNA may involve a host-controlled mechanism that regulates the processing and transport of messenger RNA.

  3. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-24

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the “penetrating” component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  4. Mercury's magnetosphere after MESSENGER's first flyby.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Acuña, Mario H; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Killen, Rosemary M; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Raines, Jim M; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Starr, Richard D; Trávnícek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2008-07-04

    Observations by MESSENGER show that Mercury's magnetosphere is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions. The most abundant, Na+, is broadly distributed but exhibits flux maxima in the magnetosheath, where the local plasma flow speed is high, and near the spacecraft's closest approach, where atmospheric density should peak. The magnetic field showed reconnection signatures in the form of flux transfer events, azimuthal rotations consistent with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetopause, and extensive ultralow-frequency wave activity. Two outbound current sheet boundaries were observed, across which the magnetic field decreased in a manner suggestive of a double magnetopause. The separation of these current layers, comparable to the gyro-radius of a Na+ pickup ion entering the magnetosphere after being accelerated in the magnetosheath, may indicate a planetary ion boundary layer.

  5. Gauge mediation models with adjoint messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Mustafayev, Azar; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2016-10-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the standard model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a nonzero U (1 )B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  6. [Irisin: a messenger from the gods?].

    PubMed

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need to understand the basis of the metabolic benefits of exercise, irisin was discovered a few years ago. This cytokine, secreted by skeletal muscle due to exercise, should have positive effects on energetic metabolism. In particular, it could act as a messenger on white adipose tissue, modifying its phenotype into the beige adipocyte, and increasing its thermogenic capacity. Since it was described, there have been numerous studies led to depict its function, with the aim of determining if irisin could become a therapeutic target in the context of diseases associated with a caloric excess, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, the irisin discovery is summarized, along with its in vitro and in vivo effects described up until now.

  7. Current Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere before MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    The MESSENGER spacecraft is scheduled to be launched mid-May, 2004 on a trajectory that includes two flybys (October 07, July 08) and eventual orbit insertion in July 2009 around the planet Mercury. Embedded in its payload are instruments to examine the basic properties of the planet's magnetosphere, including magnetometer, plasma, and energetic particle measurements (Gold et al, 2001). Our present knowledge of Mercury's magnetosphere is derived from two nightside Mariner 10 flybys in 1974, 1975 that established the presence of an intrinsic magnetic field and some energetic particles. Unfortunately not even the magnetic dipole term was well-resolved, and the fluxes and identity of energetic particles have been a subject of extensive discussion and varying interpretations (e.g. Armstrong et al, 1975, Christon, 1989). There has been evidence of field-aligned currents (e.g. Slavin et al, 1997), but alternative interpretations of magnetic signatures suggest that the magnetosphere may be driven by changing external boundary conditions (Luhman et al, 1998). These uncertainties, coupled with the observed presence of volatiles (H, He, O, Na, K, Ca) raise obvious questions on current closure, hot plasma injection and acceleration, the frequency with which the planetary surface is exposed to the solar wind, and potential sputtering of material due to particle impingement on the regolith. The talk will review our current knowledge and describe the measurements expected from MESSENGER that will address some of the key science questions. Armstrong et al, JGR, 80, 4015, 1975 Gold et al, Planet and Space Sci, 49, 1467, 2001 Christon, S.P., JGR, 94, 6481, 1989 Slavin et al, Planet and Space Sci, 45, 133, 1997 Luhman et al, JGR, 103, 9113, 1998

  8. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters with Mercury have provided new measurements dynamic variations in the coupled atmosphere magnetosphere system. The two flybys took place under very different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The northward IMF during the first encounter produced a very quiet, stable magnetosphere. Neutral sodium atoms and photo-ions were observed to high altitudes ; > 2000 km, even in the subsolar region demonstrating the important role played by more energetic neutral atom production processes such as sputtering. Consistent with predictions of magnetospheric models for northward IMF, the neutral atmosphere was observed to have its strongest sources in the high latitude northern hemisphere for the first flyby. The southward IMF for the second encounter revealed a highly dynamic magnetosphere. Reconnection between the interplanetary and planetary magnetic fields is known to control the rate of energy transfer from the solar wind and to drive magnetospheric convection. The MESSENGER magnetic field measurements revealed that the rate at which interplanetary magnetic fields were reconnecting to planetary fields was a factor of 10 greater than is usually observed at Earth. This extremely high reconnection results in a large magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause and the formation of flux transfer events that are much larger relative to the size of the forward magnetosphere than is observed at Earth. The resulting magnetospheric configuration allows the solar wind access to much of the dayside surface of the Mercury. This widespread impingement of the solar wind on Mercury's surface is a likely source of the less structured sodium exosphere imaged during the second flyby and quite possibly the high degree of exospheric temporal variability observed by ground-based telescopes.

  9. Extracellular RNA in aging.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Douglas F; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Evans, Michele K

    2017-03-01

    Since the discovery of extracellular RNA (exRNA) in circulation and other bodily fluids, there has been considerable effort to catalog and assess whether exRNAs can be used as markers for health and disease. A variety of exRNA species have been identified including messenger RNA and noncoding RNA such as microRNA (miRNA), small nucleolar RNA, transfer RNA, and long noncoding RNA. Age-related changes in exRNA abundance have been observed, and it is likely that some of these transcripts play a role in aging. In this review, we summarize the current state of exRNA profiling in various body fluids and discuss age-related changes in exRNA abundance that have been identified in humans and other model organisms. miRNAs, in particular, are a major focus of current research and we will highlight and discuss the potential role that specific miRNAs might play in age-related phenotypes and disease. We will also review challenges facing this emerging field and various strategies that can be used for the validation and future use of exRNAs as markers of aging and age-related disease. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1385. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. Active transport of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in a reconstituted cell-free system.

    PubMed

    French, B T; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1987-08-01

    The ability of a reconstituted cell-free system to transport mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein particle has been examined. Poly(A) messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), UV cross-linked after release from isolated liver nuclei in a cell-free system, exhibited a buoyant density of 1.33 g/cm3 in cesium sulfate and 1.47 g/cm3 in cesium chloride, values identical to those of poly(A) mRNP isolated directly from liver polysomes. Furthermore, the in vivo and in vitro transported mRNP showed a similar degree of resistance to RNase digestion and had sedimentation coefficients approximately 2.5 times that of the isolated mRNA. Release of both total mRNA and alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was proportional to the concentration of a specific cytoplasmic protein. Removal of the transport proteins from the cytosol with streptomycin sulfate provided a basal system incapable of supporting the active transport of alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA. Hybridization of released RNA with a recombinant probe specific for intron 6 of alpha 2 mu-globulin showed that intron sequences were retained within the nucleus under optimal alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA transport conditions and that the transported alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was of mature size.

  11. Evidence of direct complementary interactions between messenger RNAs and their cognate proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polyansky, Anton A.; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the ability to interact with messenger RNA (mRNA) has been reported for a number of known RNA-binding proteins, but surprisingly also for different proteins without recognizable RNA binding domains including several transcription factors and metabolic enzymes. Moreover, direct binding to cognate mRNAs has been detected for multiple proteins, thus creating a strong impetus to search for functional significance and basic physico-chemical principles behind such interactions. Here, we derive interaction preferences between amino acids and RNA bases by analyzing binding interfaces in the known 3D structures of protein–RNA complexes. By applying this tool to human proteome, we reveal statistically significant matching between the composition of mRNA sequences and base-binding preferences of protein sequences they code for. For example, purine density profiles of mRNA sequences mirror guanine affinity profiles of cognate protein sequences with quantitative accuracy (median Pearson correlation coefficient R = −0.80 across the entire human proteome). Notably, statistically significant anti-matching is seen only in the case of adenine. Our results provide strong evidence for the stereo-chemical foundation of the genetic code and suggest that mRNAs and cognate proteins may in general be directly complementary to each other and associate, especially if unstructured. PMID:23868089

  12. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance.

    PubMed

    Wilbert, Melissa L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chen, Stella X; Yan, Bernice Y; Nathanson, Jason L; Hutt, Kasey R; Lovci, Michael T; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-10-26

    LIN28 is a conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming, and oncogenesis. It was previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, but here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28-binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions.

  13. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance

    PubMed Central

    Wilbert, Melissa L.; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Chen, Stella X.; Yan, Bernice Y.; Nathanson, Jason L.; Hutt, Kasey R.; Lovci, Michael T.; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B.; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY LIN28 is a conserved RNA binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming and oncogenesis. Previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through cross-linking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28 binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions. PMID:22959275

  14. Exosomes as divine messengers: are they the Hermes of modern molecular oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Braicu, C; Tomuleasa, C; Monroig, P; Cucuianu, A; Berindan-Neagoe, I; Calin, G A

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles that convey key elements with the potential to modulate intercellular communication. They are known to be secreted from all types of cells, and are crucial messengers that can regulate cellular processes by ‘trafficking' molecules from cells of one tissue to another. The exosomal content has been shown to be broad, composed of different types of cytokines, growth factors, proteins, or nucleic acids. Besides messenger RNA (mRNA) they can also contain noncoding transcripts such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small endogenous cellular regulators of protein expression. In diseases such as cancer, exosomes can facilitate tumor progression by altering their vesicular content and supplying the tumor niche with molecules that favor the progression of oncogenic processes such as proliferation, invasion and metastasis, or even drug resistance. The packaging of their molecular content is known to be tissue specific, a fact that makes them interesting tools in clinical diagnostics and ideal candidates for biomarkers. In the current report, we describe the main properties of exosomes and explain their involvement in processes such as cell differentiation and cell death. Furthermore, we emphasize the need of developing patient-targeted treatments by applying the conceptualization of exosomal-derived miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:25236394

  15. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee; Vervack, Ronald J.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere comprised of atomic species including hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and likely oxygen. Because it is collisionless. the exosphere's composition represents a balance of the active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface. Space ENvironment. GEochemistry. and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data has been the substantial differences in the spatial distribution of each species, Our modeling demonstrates that these differences cannot be due to post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure. but instead point to differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry. with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere significantly greater than over the dusk. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced in a molecular exosphere (e.g., one consisting of CaO). Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Preliminary results suggest a high temperature ( I-2x 10(exp 4) K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. The high temperature is consistent with the dissociation of CaO in a near-surface exosphere with scale height <= 100 km, which imparts 2 eV to the freshly produced Ca atom. This

  16. Mercury's interior from MESSENGER geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed more than 4 years of operations in orbit about Mercury. One of the main mission goals was the determination of the interior structure of Mercury enabled by geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, rotation, and tides by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system. MLA acquired over 25 million individual measurements of Mercury's shape that are mostly limited to the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. However, the lack of laser altimetry in the southern hemisphere has been partly compensated by ˜400 occultations of spacecraft radio signals. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2. The combination of altimetry and radio measurements provides a powerful tool for the investigation of Mercury's orientation and tides, which enable a better understanding of the interior structure of the planet. The MLA measurements have been assembled into a digital elevation model (DEM) of the northern hemisphere. We then used individual altimetric measurements from the spacecraft for orbit determination, together with the radio tracking, over a continuous span of time using a batch least-squares filter. All observations were combined to recover directly the gravity field coefficients, obliquity, librations, and tides by minimizing the discrepancies between the computed observables and actual measurements. We will present the estimated 100×100 gravity field model, the obliquity, the Love number k2, and, for the first time, the tidal phase lag φ and the amplitude of the longitudinal libration from radio and altimetry data. The k2 phase provides information on Mercury's dissipation and mantle viscosity and allows a determination of the Q factor. A refinement of

  17. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  18. Messenger Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, M.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14.2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER'S Magnetometer (MAG) (2.3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury.

  19. Differential regulation of catalytic and non-catalytic trkB messenger RNAs in the rat hippocampus following seizures induced by systemic administration of kainate.

    PubMed

    Dugich-Djordjevic, M M; Ohsawa, F; Okazaki, T; Mori, N; Day, J R; Beck, K D; Hefti, F

    1995-06-01

    Ribonuclease protection analysis and quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry were used to investigate the coordination and regional expression of catalytic and non-catalytic trkB messenger RNAs in the adult rat hippocampus following systemic kainate-induced seizures. Changes in trkB expression were compared with the messenger RNA expression of its neurotrophic ligands, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3. TrkB messenger RNA expression was increased in the dentate granule cells at 1-4 h following the onset of seizures, and returned to control levels 16-24 h thereafter. In addition, seizures also induced expression of trkB messenger RNA in putative non-neuronal cells at four to seven days in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA1 region. Hybridization with probes specific for the non-catalytic trkB receptor and the catalytic trkB receptor revealed that the increases at four and seven days in the molecular layers of the hippocampus reflected an up-regulation of only the non-catalytic form of the receptor. Furthermore, the neuronal increases observed 1-4 h were due to an up-regulation of both trkB TK- and trkB TK+ messenger RNAs. It was established that systemic administration of kainate increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA levels in the pyramidal and granule cell regions of the hippocampus 1-4 h following the onset of behaviorally manifested seizure activity. Early changes in neuronal expression of trkB TK- and trkB TK+ messenger RNA paralleled changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA in the dentate granule cell and CA1 pyramidal cell layers, but not in the CA3 subregion. These data suggest that concomitant regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its cognate receptor may play a role in the selective vulnerability of hippocampal subregions to kainate-induced neuropathology. Furthermore, these data suggest a dual function for trkB receptor

  20. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  1. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variation but there is little or no year-to-year variation; we do not see the episodic variability reported by ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere is about 1200 K, much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  2. Neutrinos as the messengers of CPT violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, Liubomir Anguelov

    CPT violation has the potential to explain all three existing neutrino oscillation signals without enlarging the neutrino sector. CPT violation in the Dirac mass terms of the three neutrino flavors preserves Lorentz invariance, but generates in dependent masses for neutrinos and antineutrinos. This specific signature can be motivated by braneworld scenarios with extra dimensions, where neutrinos are the natural messengers for Standard Model physics of CPT violation in the bulk. A simple model of maximal CPT violation is sufficient to explain the exisiting neutrino data, while accommodating the recent results from the KamLAND experiment and making dramatic predictions for the ongoing MiniBooNE experiment. In addition, the model fits the existing SuperKamiokande data, at least as well as the standard atmospheric neutrino oscillation models. Another attractive feature of the presented model is that it provides a new promising mechanism for baryogenesis, which obviates two of the three Sakharov conditions necessary to generate the baryon asymmetry of the universe. CPT-violating scenarios can give new insights about the possible nature of neutrinos. Majorana neutrino masses are still allowed, but in general, there are no longer Majorana neutrinos in the conventional sense. However, CPT-violating models still have interesting consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay. Compared to the usual case, while the larger mass scale (from LSND) may appear, a greater degree of suppression can also occur.

  3. Biogenesis, assembly, and export of viral messenger ribonucleoproteins in the influenza A virus infected cell.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Fodor, Ervin

    2013-08-01

    The flow of genetic information from sites of transcription within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translational machinery of eukaryotic cells is obstructed by a physical blockade, the nuclear double membrane, which must be overcome in order to adhere to the central dogma of molecular biology, DNA makes RNA makes protein. Advancement in the field of cellular and molecular biology has painted a detailed picture of the molecular mechanisms from transcription of genes to mRNAs and their processing that is closely coupled to export from the nucleus. The rules that govern delivering messenger transcripts from the nucleus must be obeyed by influenza A virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae that has adopted a nuclear replication cycle. The negative-sense genome of influenza A virus is segmented into eight individual viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and single-stranded RNA encapsidated in viral nucleoprotein. Influenza A virus mRNAs fall into three major categories, intronless, intron-containing unspliced and spliced. During evolutionary history, influenza A virus has conceived a way of negotiating the passage of viral transcripts from the nucleus to cytoplasmic sites of protein synthesis. The major mRNA nuclear export NXF1 pathway is increasingly implicated in viral mRNA export and this review considers and discusses the current understanding of how influenza A virus exploits the host mRNA export pathway for replication.

  4. 3. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue or date known) Photographer and date unknown INTERIOR, STAIRWAY - Swain-Vincent House, 824 Third Avenue, South, Fort Dodge, Webster County, IA

  5. 5. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue or date known) Photographer and date unknown INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, SITTING ROOM, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE - Swain-Vincent House, 824 Third Avenue, South, Fort Dodge, Webster County, IA

  6. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sarantos, M.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury will provide the first new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet since the Mariner 10 flybys that took place over 30 years ago. The closest approach distance for this first MESSENGER flyby is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 km and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries observed by MESSENGER will be examined and compared against those found in the earlier Mariner 10 measurements and the predictions of theoretical models and numerical simulations. The structure of the magnetopause will be investigated for the presence of flux transfer events or other evidence of magnetic reconnection as will the more general implications of these new MESSENGER bow shock and magnetopause observations for the global solar wind interaction with Mercury.

  7. microRNA Decay: Refining microRNA Regulatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Genevieve; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short 19-25 nucleotide RNA molecules that impact on most biological processes by regulating the efficiency of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. To date, most research activities have been focused on the control of miRNA expression and its functional consequences. Nonetheless, much remains unknown about the mechanisms affecting the level of specific miRNAs in the cell, a critical feature impacting their regulatory activity. This review focuses on the factors that regulate the abundance of miRNAs, including synthesis, post-transcriptional modifications, nucleases, target binding, and secretion.

  8. Neutrino-Gamma Multi-Messenger Source Detection via the Astrophysical Multi-Messenger Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixelle, Josh; Miles, S.; AMON

    2014-01-01

    The idea of multi-messenger event detection has long been explored in the context of above-threshold analysis performed by the IceCube collaboration using Swift BAT and by the Amanda collaboration using BATSE. While these investigations produced null results, they left the event space of sub-threshold events untouched. This untapped event space, combined with the addition of new observatories for various bands and messenger types, provides the obvious niche for a GBN style network to exist: AMON. We consider Monte-carlo models of pair-wise detection between sub-threshold IceCube neutrino doublets, sub-threshold neutrino-gamma doublets with Swift BAT, and with sub-threshold higher multiplicity neutrino-gamma coincidences with Fermi LAT. Several detection methods were considered and compared to the status quo analyses of neutrino doublets by IceCube, demonstrating significant sensitivity gain. The MC model analysis was followed by an archival doublet analysis between IceCube-40 and Fermi LAT data within their co-temporal window of observation. Several methods for detecting statistical signal excess in the archival analysis were considered, providing an upper limit on source population parameters for the given analysis sensitivity.

  9. Mercury's global evolution: New views from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, S. A., II; Byrne, P. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Grott, M.; McCoy, T.; Stanley, S.

    2015-12-01

    MESSENGER's exploration of Mercury has revealed the planet's rich and dynamic history and provided new constraints on the processes that control its internal evolution. Mercury's surface records evidence of an extensive geological history. This evidence includes resurfacing by impacts and volcanism prior to the end of the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and a subsequent rapid waning of effusive volcanism. Volcanism is an important indicator of the history of melt production. Thousands of globally distributed, contractional tectonic landforms collectively have accommodated a decrease in Mercury's radius of 5-7 km since the end of the LHB. Such contraction results from planetary cooling and crystallization within Mercury's metallic core. Measurements of surface chemistry have provided constraints on internal radiogenic heat production necessary to understand more fully Mercury's thermal evolution. Elemental abundances also reveal that Mercury is strongly chemically reduced, suggesting that the core's iron is alloyed with silicon as well as sulfur, which constrains the dynamics and crystallization of the metallic core. Magnetometer observations show that Mercury's dynamo-generated, dominantly dipolar field is displaced ~500 km northward along the rotation axis. Low-altitude magnetic field observations late in the mission led to the discovery of crustal magnetization in Mercury's ancient crust, dating to at least 3.7 Ga, which places a new constraint on the timing of the dynamo. Monte Carlo parameterized mantle convection models, constrained by these observations, indicate that for global contraction of 7 km or less, mantle convection persists to the present ~40% of the time, with the likelihood of modern convection decreasing with less global contraction. Slow present cooling in these models indicates that dynamo generation is strongly influenced by both a static layer at the top of the core and convective motions within the core driven by compositional buoyancy.

  10. Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.

    1999-05-01

    Smith College has recently established the Louise B. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute to foster interdisciplinary scholarship among the faculty. In the 1999-2000 academic year, the Kahn Institute is sponsoring a project entitled "Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium." The project will explore the impact of the astronomical discoveries of Galileo and his contemporaries on the Renaissance world-view and also use Galileo's experience as a lens for examining scientific and cultural developments at the symbolic juncture represented by the year 2000. Seven faculty fellows and 10-12 student fellows will participate in a year-long colloquium pursuing these themes, aided by the participation of some five Visiting Fellows. The inaugural public event will be a symposium on the historical Galileo, with presentation by three noted scholars, each of whom will return to campus for a second meeting with the Kahn colloquium. Additional events will include an exhibit of prints, artifacts, and rare books related to Galileo and his time, an early music concert featuring music composed by Galileo's father, and a series of other events sponsored by diverse departments and programs, all related to the broad themes of the Galileo project. The culminating events will be the premiere of a new music theater work, which will encapsulate the insights of the colloquium about human reactions to novel insights about the world, and a symposium presenting the research results of faculty and student fellows. The symposium will feature a capstone lecture by an visionary scholar projecting the implication of historical and contemporary trends into the future.

  11. MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Raines, J. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-04-01

    MESSENGER Magnetometer (MAG) data from the first series of "hot-season" orbits at Mercury, when periapsis was positioned over the subsolar region, have been used to augment our initial studies to characterize the magnetopause structure as a function of local time. Minimum variance analysis (MVA) was applied to transform the MAG data into boundary-normal coordinates in order to determine (1) the thickness of the magnetopause, (2) the magnetic shear angle across the boundary, and (3) the normal magnetic field, BN, across the current sheet and, by inference, the rate of reconnection and the magnetosphere electric potential. We applied the MVA to all distinct magnetopause crossings within the subsolar region between 0800 and 1600 local time and within ± 25° latitude. A well-defined normal direction, specified by a ratio of the eigenvalue for intermediate variance to that for minimum variance that is greater than 8, was determined for 72 crossings. For this data set, 72.2% of the magnetopause traversals had a substantial normal component (i.e., BN > 4 nT). For a mean boundary motion velocity of 10 km s-1, the average current sheet thickness was 29 km, which is comparable to 2 gyroradii for solar wind protons. The mean ratio of the normal magnetic field component to the total field magnitude, a measure of the reconnection rate, was 0.2 and is independent of magnetic field shear angle across the magnetopause. We conclude that Mercury's magnetopause structure is generally open to the solar wind plasma under a wide range of interplanetary magnetic field shear angles.

  12. Structural features of the tmRNA-ribosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Bugaeva, Elizaveta Y; Surkov, Serhiy; Golovin, Andrey V; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Skoglund, Ulf; Isaksson, Leif A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Shpanchenko, Olga V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2009-12-01

    Trans-translation is a process which switches the synthesis of a polypeptide chain encoded by a nonstop messenger RNA to the mRNA-like domain of a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). It is used in bacterial cells for rescuing the ribosomes arrested during translation of damaged mRNA and directing this mRNA and the product polypeptide for degradation. The molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Earlier, we developed an approach that allowed isolation of tmRNA-ribosomal complexes arrested at a desired step of tmRNA passage through the ribosome. We have here exploited it to examine the tmRNA structure using chemical probing and cryo-electron microscopy tomography. Computer modeling has been used to develop a model for spatial organization of the tmRNA inside the ribosome at different stages of trans-translation.

  13. A Spectral Map Of Mercury From MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Pahsai, P.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Goudge, T. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Mercury Surface and Atmospheric Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Visible and Near Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study subtle compositional variations across the surface of Mercury. VIRS reflectance spectra obtained from orbit allow identification and classification of spectral units, many of which collocate with geologic features such as pyroclastic deposits; low-reflectance material (LRM); bright, fresh-appearing impact craters; and hollows. The vast majority of the surface is composed of plains units with brightness and spectral reflectance ratios (e.g., 415 nm / 750 nm and 310 nm / 390 nm) that vary within a small range about mean values for the planet. Analysis of VIRS reflectance data in the context of Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) color and high-resolution images enables identification of large regions with similar spectral properties. Our spectral map of Mercury covers approximately 70% of the planet (excluding polar regions and two regions for which calibration refinement is pending). On the basis of brightness, spectral ratio variations, and superposition relationships in the image data, we define four large-scale spectral units in Mercury plains, as well as six additional spectral units of smaller area. The four large-scale spectral units cover (1) 48.7% (brightness and spectral ratio parameters within a few percent of planetary mean values) (2) 31.6% (higher reflectance, higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean), (3) 12.9% (higher reflectance, lower 415 nm / 750 nm values than mean), and (4) 6.8% (lower reflectance and higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean) of the mapped area. Spectrally defined plains units correspond broadly to plains units defined by morphology and color imaging; e.g., unit 2 corresponds to the previously defined high-reflectance red plains (HRP), unit 3 to the northern smooth plains and the smooth plains

  14. Retinoic acid stimulates interstitial collagenase messenger ribonucleic acid in osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, T. J.; Clohisy, J. C.; Shilt, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Partridge, N. C.; Quinn, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 secretes interstitial collagenase in response to retinoic acid (RA). The present study demonstrates by Northern blot analysis that RA causes an increase in collagenase messenger RNA (mRNA) at 6 h, which is maximal at 24 h (20.5 times basal) and declines toward basal level by 72 h. This stimulation is dose dependent, with a maximal response at 5 x 10(-7) M RA. Nuclear run-on assays show a greater than 20-fold increase in the rate of collagenase mRNA transcription between 12-24 h after RA treatment. Cycloheximide blocks RA stimulation of collagenase mRNA, demonstrating the need for de novo protein synthesis. RA not only causes an increase in collagenase secretion, but is known to decrease collagen synthesis in UMR 106-01 cells. In this study, the increase in collagenase mRNA is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA, which is maximal at 24 h (70% decrease), with a return to near-control levels by 72 h. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that the decrease in alpha 1 (I) procollagen expression does not have a statistically significant transcriptional component. RA did not statistically decrease the stability of alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA (calculated t1/2 = 8.06 +/- 0.30 and 9.01 +/- 0.62 h in the presence and absence of RA, respectively). However, transcription and stability together probably contribute to the major decrease in stable alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA observed. Cycloheximide treatment inhibits basal level alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA accumulation, demonstrating the need for on-going protein synthesis to maintain basal expression of this gene.

  15. Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Nathalie C.; Hauck, Steven A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Roberts, James H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2013-05-01

    observations of Mercury by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft provide new constraints on that planet's thermal and interior evolution. Specifically, MESSENGER observations have constrained the rate of radiogenic heat production via measurement of uranium, thorium, and potassium at the surface, and identified a range of surface compositions consistent with high-temperature, high-degree partial melts of the mantle. Additionally, MESSENGER data have placed new limits on the spatial and temporal variation in volcanic and tectonic activity and enabled determination that the planet's core is larger than previously estimated. Because Mercury's mantle layer is also thinner than previously thought, this result gives greater likelihood to the possibility that mantle convection is marginally supercritical or even that the mantle is not convecting. We simulate mantle convection and magma generation within Mercury's mantle under two-dimensional axisymmetry and a broad range of conditions to understand the implications of MESSENGER observations for the thermal evolution of the planet. These models demonstrate that mantle convection can persist in such a thin mantle for a substantial portion of Mercury's history, and often to the present, as long as the mantle is thicker than ~300 km. We also find that magma generation in Mercury's convecting mantle is capable of producing widespread magmas by large-degree partial melting, consistent with MESSENGER observations of the planet's surface chemistry and geology.

  16. MESSENGER Measurements of Mercury's Magnetic Field during the First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    On 14 January 2008 the MESSENGER spacecraft will encounter Mercury for the first time. Depending upon the solar wind conditions, this initial flyby will return Magnetometer measurements of Mercury's magnetic field over a time interval lasting between - 30 md 60 min. Closest approach for MESSENGER is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 krn and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. Furthermore, the differences in the MESSENGER and Mariner 10 encounter trajectories, with respect both to magnetospheric and body-fixed coordinates are highly complementary and expected to lead to significant improvements in our knowledge of Mercury's magnetic field. We present an overview of the MESSENGER magnetic field observations, an initial subtraction of the magnetic fields attributable to magnetospheric current systems from the total measured magnetic field, and an improved model of Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field. We also discuss the expected advances afforded by the two additional MESSENGER flybys, which occur in October 2008 and September 2009, as well as the orbital phase that will begin in March 201 1.

  17. The tmRNA website

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism.

  18. The tmRNA website

    DOE PAGES

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from themore » same organism.« less

  19. The tmRNA website

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism. PMID:25378311

  20. The tmRNA website.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Corey M; Williams, Kelly P

    2015-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism.

  1. Imaging second messenger dynamics in developing neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Timothy A.; Feller, Marla B.

    2010-01-01

    A characteristic feature of developing neural circuits is that they are spontaneously active. There are several examples, including the retina, spinal cord and hippocampus, where spontaneous activity is highly correlated amongst neighboring cells, with large depolarizing events occurring with a periodicity on the order of minutes. One likely mechanism by which neurons can “decode” these slow oscillations is through activation of second messengers cascades that either influence transcriptional activity or drive posttranslational modifications. Here we describe recent experiments where imaging has been used to characterize slow oscillations in the cAMP/PKA second messenger cascade in retinal neurons. We review the latest techniques in imaging this specific second messenger cascade, its intimate relationship with changes in intracellular calcium concentration, and several hypotheses regarding its role in neurodevelopment. PMID:18383551

  2. How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshon, B.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach (Epo) Team

    2010-12-01

    How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science In the film The Last Starfighter, an alien civilization grooms their future champion—a kid on Earth—using a video game. As he gains proficiency in the game, he masters the skills he needs to pilot a starship and save their civilization. The NASA MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is using the same tactic to train citizen scientists to help the Science Team explore the planet Mercury. We are building a new series of games that appear to be designed primarily for fun, but that guide players through a knowledge and skill set that they will need for future science missions in support of MESSENGER mission scientists. As players score points, they gain expertise. Once they achieve a sufficiently high score, they will be invited to become participants in Mercury Zoo, a new program being designed by Zooniverse. Zooniverse created Galaxy Zoo and Moon Zoo, programs that allow interested citizens to participate in the exploration and interpretation of galaxy and lunar data. Scientists use the citizen interpretations to further refine their exploration of the same data, thereby narrowing their focus and saving precious time. Mercury Zoo will be designed with input from the MESSENGER Science Team. This project will not only support the MESSENGER mission, but it will also add to the growing cadre of informed members of the public available to help with other citizen science projects—building on the concept that engaged, informed citizens can help scientists make new discoveries. The MESSENGER EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for Educational Resources (CERES) at Montana State University (MSU) - Bozeman; National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE); Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL); National Air and Space Museum (NASM); Science

  3. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  4. Differential regulation of host mRNA translation during obligate pathogen-plant interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus infection reprograms the plant messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptome by activating or interfering with a variety of signaling pathways, but the effects on host mRNA translation have not been explored on a genome-wide scale. To address this issue, Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA transcripts were quantif...

  5. RNomics in Drosophila melanogaster: identification of 66 candidates for novel non-messenger RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guozhong; Klämbt, Christian; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre; Brosius, Jürgen; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    By generating a specialised cDNA library from four different developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified 66 candidates for small non-messenger RNAs (snmRNAs) and have confirmed their expression by northern blot analysis. Thirteen of them were expressed at certain stages of D.melanogaster development, only. Thirty-five species belong to the class of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), divided into 15 members from the C/D subclass and 20 members from the H/ACA subclass, which mostly guide 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively, of rRNA and snRNAs. These also include two outstanding C/D snoRNAs, U3 and U14, both functioning as pre-rRNA chaperones. Surprisingly, the sequence of the Drosophila U14 snoRNA reflects a major change of function of this snoRNA in Diptera relative to yeast and vertebrates. Among the 22 snmRNAs lacking known sequence and structure motifs, five were located in intergenic regions, two in introns, five in untranslated regions of mRNAs, eight were derived from open reading frames, and two were transcribed opposite to an intron. Interestingly, detection of two RNA species from this group implies that certain snmRNA species are processed from alternatively spliced pre-mRNAs. Surprisingly, a few snmRNA sequences could not be found on the published D.melanogaster genome, which might suggest that more snmRNA genes (as well as mRNAs) are hidden in unsequenced regions of the genome. PMID:12736298

  6. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells.

  7. Expression of 10 GABA(A) receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the motor-related thalamic nuclei and basal ganglia of Macaca mulatta studied with in situ hybridization histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kultas-Ilinsky, K; Leontiev, V; Whiting, P J

    1998-07-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry technique with [35S]UTP-labelled riboprobes was used to study the expression pattern of 10 GABA(A) receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the basal ganglia and motor thalamic nuclei of rhesus monkey. Human transcripts were used for the synthesis of alpha2, alpha4, beta2, beta3, gamma1 and delta subunit messenger RNA probes. Rat complementary DNAs were used for generating alpha1, alpha3, beta1 and gamma2 subunit messenger RNA probes. Nigral, pallidal and cerebellar afferent territories in the ventral tier thalamic nuclei all expressed alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, beta1, beta2, beta3, delta and gamma2 subunit messenger RNAs but at different levels. Each intralaminar nucleus displayed its own unique expression pattern. In the thalamus, gamma1 subunit messenger RNA was detected only in the parafascicular nucleus. Comparison of the expression patterns with the known organization of GABA(A) connections in thalamic nuclei suggests that (i) the composition of the receptor associated with reticulothalamic synapses, except for those in the intralaminar nuclei, may be alpha1alpha4beta2delta, (ii) receptors of various other subunit compositions may operate in the local GABAergic circuits, and (iii) the composition of receptors at nigro- and pallidothalamic synapses may differ, with those at nigrothalamic probably containing beta1 and gamma2 subunits. In the medial and lateral parts of the globus pallidus, the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra pars reticularis, the alpha1, beta2 and gamma2 messenger RNAs were co-expressed at a high level suggesting that this subunit composition was associated with all GABAergic synapses in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways. Various other subunit messenger RNAs were also expressed but at a lower level. In the substantia nigra pars compacta the most highly expressed messenger RNAs were alpha3, alpha4 and beta3; all other subunit messenger RNAs studied, except for gamma1, alpha1 and

  8. Identification and localization of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) messenger RNAs in human hair follicle dermal papilla.

    PubMed

    Batch, J A; Mercuri, F A; Werther, G A

    1996-03-01

    The role of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in hair follicle biology has recently been recognized, although their actions, sites of production, and modulation by the insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) have not to date been defined. IGF-I is essential for normal hair growth and development, and may be important in regulation of the hair growth cycle. In many culture systems, IGF-I actions are modulated by the IGFBPs. Thus, if IGFBPs are produced in the human hair follicle, they may play a role in targeting IGF-I to its receptor or may modulate IGF-I action by interaction with matrix proteins. We have used in situ hybridization to localize messenger RNA for the six IGFBPs in anagen hair follicles. Anti-sense and sense RNA probes for the IGFBPs (IGFBP-1 to -6) were produced, and 5-micrometer sections of adult facial skin were probed. Messenger RNA for IGFBP-3, -4, and -5 were identified, with predominantly IGFBP-3 and -5 mRNA found in the dermal papilla, and to a lesser extent IGFBP-4 mRNA. IGFBP-4 mRNA was also found at the dermal papilla/epithelial matrix border. Messenger RNAs for both IGFBP-4 and -5 were also demonstrated in the dermal sheath surrounding the hair follicle. Messenger RNAs for IGFBP-1, -2, and -6 were not identified. These studies demonstrate specific localization of IGFBP mRNAs in hair follicles, suggesting that they each play specific roles in the local modulation of IGF action during the hair growth cycle.

  9. To Be Connected or Not To Be Connected? Mobile Messenger Overload, Fatigue, and Mobile Shunning.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaewook; Shin, Mincheol

    2016-10-01

    With the increased adoption of mobile devices, mobile communication is all around us and we are connected anywhere, anytime. Mobile communication in general and mobile messenger service in particular make interpersonal communication in Korea so frequent and convenient. However, being connected too much anywhere and anytime via mobile messenger service appears to lead an increasing number of people to feel fatigue and to decrease mobile communication under some conditions. Based on a sample of 334 respondents, this study empirically investigated the relationships among commercial, noncommercial mobile messenger overload, mobile messenger fatigue, relational self-concept, and mobile shunning behavior. The findings show that (a) the effect of noncommercial mobile messenger overload is stronger than that of commercial mobile messenger overload in increasing mobile messenger fatigue although both positively affect mobile messenger fatigue, (b) relational self-concept has moderating effects on the relationship between mobile messenger overload and mobile messenger fatigue, and that (c) mobile messenger fatigue triggers mobile communicators' shunning behavior through which the communicators increase their intention to avoid mobile communication, to change their mobile phone numbers, and to subscribe to dual number service on one mobile device. When confronted with mobile messenger fatigue caused by mobile messenger overload, mobile messaging service users are likely to shun their mobile communication. Being constantly and conveniently connected appears to be a blessing in disguise.

  10. A ceRNA hypothesis: the Rosetta Stone of a hidden RNA language?

    PubMed

    Salmena, Leonardo; Poliseno, Laura; Tay, Yvonne; Kats, Lev; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-08-05

    Here, we present a unifying hypothesis about how messenger RNAs, transcribed pseudogenes, and long noncoding RNAs "talk" to each other using microRNA response elements (MREs) as letters of a new language. We propose that this "competing endogenous RNA" (ceRNA) activity forms a large-scale regulatory network across the transcriptome, greatly expanding the functional genetic information in the human genome and playing important roles in pathological conditions, such as cancer.

  11. Messenger in the Barn: Networking in a Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes the use of a synchronous communication application (MSN Messenger) in a large academic computing environment. It draws on data from interviews, questionnaires and student marks to examine the link between use of the application and success measured through module marks. The relationship is not simple. Total abstainers and…

  12. 4. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue or date known) Photographer and date unknown INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, DETAIL OF ARCHED OPENING BETWEEN LIVING ROOM AND DINING ROOM - Swain-Vincent House, 824 Third Avenue, South, Fort Dodge, Webster County, IA

  13. Instant Messenger in Enrollment Management: Evaluating Use and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalanowski, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This study represented a formal quantitative evaluation of the potential for instant messenger (IM) technology as an outreach tool for undergraduate college admission. Conclusions focused on the popularity of IM, and student use in a formal counselor/student relationship. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  14. MESSENGER Observation of Mercury's Magnetopause: Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Boardsen, S. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Sarantos, M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury has provided new observations of the magnetopause of this small magnetosphere, particularly concerning the effect of the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the structure and dynamics of this boundary. The IMF was northward immediately prior to and following the passage of the MESSENGER spacecraft through Mercury's magnetosphere. However, several-minute episodes of southward IMF were observed in the magnetosheath during the inbound portion of the encounter. Evidence for reconnection at the dayside magnetopause in the form of well-developed flux transfer events (FTEs) was observed in the magnetosheath following some of these southward-B, intervals. The inbound magnetopause crossing seen in the magnetic field measurements is consistent with a transition from the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet. Immediately following MESSENGER'S entry into the magnetosphere, rotational perturbations in the magnetic field similar to those seen at the Earth in association with large-scale plasma sheet vortices driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetotail boundary at the Earth were observed. The outbound magnetopause occurred during northward IMF B(sub z) and had the characteristics of a tangential discontinuity. These new observations by MESSENGER may be combined and compared with the magnetopause measurements collected by Mariner 10 to derive new understanding of the response of Mercury's magnetopause to IMF direction and its effect on the rate of solar wind energy and mass input to this small magnetosphere.

  15. First Laser Altimeter Measurements of Mercury from the MESSENGER Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A.; Cavanaugh, John F.; McGarry, Jan F.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter performed the first laser ranging measurements to Mercury during the Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) flyby in January 2008. The instrument successfully ranged to 600 km at an off-nadir angle >60 and to >1600 km in the nadir direction.

  16. Exosomes and the kidney: blaming the messenger.

    PubMed

    Fang, Doreen Yp; King, Hamish W; Li, Jordan Yz; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane-bound vesicles of endosomal origin, present in a wide range of biological fluids, including blood and urine. They range between 30 and 100 nm in diameter, and consist of a limiting lipid bilayer, transmembrane proteins and a hydrophilic core containing proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNA). Exosomes can act as extracellular vehicles by which cells communicate, through the delivery of their functional cargo to recipient cells, with many important biological, physiological and pathological implications. The exosome release pathway contributes towards protein secretion, antigen presentation, pathogen transfer and cancer progression. Exosomes and exosome-mediated signalling have been implicated in disease processes such as atherosclerosis, calcification and kidney diseases. Circulating levels of exosomes and extracellular vesicles can be influenced by the progression of renal disease. Advances in methods for purification and analysis of exosomes are leading to potential diagnostic and therapeutic avenues for kidney diseases. This review will focus on biophysical properties and biogenesis of exosomes, their pathophysiological roles and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in kidney diseases.

  17. Homologous down-regulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aleppo, G; Moskal, S F; De Grandis, P A; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1997-03-01

    Repeated stimulation of pituitary cell cultures with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) results in diminished responsiveness, a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. One component of GHRH-induced desensitization is a reduction in GHRH-binding sites, which is reflected by the decreased ability of GHRH to stimulate a rise in intracellular cAMP. In the present study, we sought to determine if homologous down-regulation of GHRH receptor number is due to a decrease in GHRH receptor synthesis. To this end, we developed and validated a quantitative RT-PCR assay system that was capable of assessing differences in GHRH-R messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in total RNA samples obtained from rat pituitary cell cultures. Treatment of pituitary cells with GHRH, for as little as 4 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GHRH-R mRNA levels. The maximum effect was observed with 0.1 and 1 nM GHRH, which reduced GHRH-R mRNA levels to 49 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) and 54 +/- 11% of control values, respectively (n = three separate experiments; P < 0.05). Accompanying the decline in GHRH-R mRNA levels was a rise in GH release; reaching 320 +/- 31% of control values (P < 0.01). Because of the possibility that the rise in medium GH level is the primary regulator of GHRH-R mRNA, we pretreated pituitary cultures for 4 h with GH to achieve a concentration comparable with that induced by a maximal stimulation with GHRH (8 micrograms GH/ml medium). Following pretreatment, cultures were stimulated for 15 min with GHRH and intracellular cAMP accumulation was measured by RIA. GH pretreatment did not impair the ability of GHRH to induce a rise in cAMP concentrations. However, as anticipated, GHRH pretreatment (10 nM) significantly reduced subsequent GHRH-stimulated cAMP to 46% of untreated controls. These data suggest that GHRH, but not GH, directly reduces GHRH-R mRNA levels. To determine whether this effect was mediated through cAMP, cultures were treated with forskolin, a direct stimulator of

  18. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  19. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  20. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  1. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  2. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  3. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  4. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  5. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  6. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  7. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  8. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  9. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  10. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  11. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  12. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  13. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  14. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  15. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  16. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  17. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  18. A jack of all trades: the multiple roles of the unique essential second messenger cyclic di-AMP.

    PubMed

    Commichau, Fabian M; Dickmanns, Achim; Gundlach, Jan; Ficner, Ralf; Stülke, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Second messengers are key components of many signal transduction pathways. In addition to cyclic AMP, ppGpp and cyclic di-GMP, many bacteria use also cyclic di-AMP as a second messenger. This molecule is synthesized by distinct classes of diadenylate cyclases and degraded by phosphodiesterases. The control of the intracellular c-di-AMP pool is very important since both a lack of this molecule and its accumulation can inhibit growth of the bacteria. In many firmicutes, c-di-AMP is essential, making it the only known essential second messenger. Cyclic di-AMP is implicated in a variety of functions in the cell, including cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, DNA repair and the control of gene expression. To understand the molecular mechanisms behind these functions, targets of c-di-AMP have been identified and characterized. Interestingly, c-di-AMP can bind both proteins and RNA molecules. Several proteins that interact with c-di-AMP are required to control the intracellular potassium concentration. In Bacillus subtilis, c-di-AMP also binds a riboswitch that controls the expression of a potassium transporter. Thus, c-di-AMP is the only known second messenger that controls a biological process by interacting with both a protein and the riboswitch that regulates its expression. Moreover, in Listeria monocytogenes c-di-AMP controls the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, an enzyme that is required to replenish the citric acid cycle. Here, we review the components of the c-di-AMP signaling system.

  19. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's bow shock and magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuña, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Trávníček, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14, 2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) (2,3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury. Here we present new models of bow shock and magnetopause shape and location that incorporate both the MESSENGER and earlier Mariner 10 measurements of these boundaries. A fast magnetosonic Mach number for the solar wind at Mercury's distance from the Sun of ~ 3 is derived from the shape of the bow shock. This value is consistent with earlier observations at these distances from the Sun by the Helios mission. The shape of Mercury's magnetopause and the thickness of the magnetosheath are found to be similar to that of the Earth, suggesting that the solar wind interaction is dominated by its dipolar magnetic field. MESSENGER measurements near the magnetopause do, however, indicate that internal plasma pressure does contribute to the pressure balance across this boundary. MAG and FIPS measurements are used to estimate the ratio of plasma thermal pressure to magnetic pressure at the dusk flank of the plasma sheet and dawn terminator regions, under the assumption that pressure is balanced across the inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings. To investigate the possible origins of the plasma ions in these regions, we utilize a combination of FIPS measurements and the results of 3-D hybrid [6] and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction with Mercury for the upstream conditions

  20. RNomics: an experimental approach that identifies 201 candidates for novel, small, non-messenger RNAs in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Kiefmann, Martin; Meier-Ewert, Sebastian; O’Brien, John; Lehrach, Hans; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre; Brosius, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    In mouse brain cDNA libraries generated from small RNA molecules we have identified a total of 201 different expressed RNA sequences potentially encoding novel small non-messenger RNA species (snmRNAs). Based on sequence and structural motifs, 113 of these RNAs can be assigned to the C/D box or H/ACA box subclass of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), known as guide RNAs for rRNA. While 30 RNAs represent mouse homologues of previously identified human C/D or H/ACA snoRNAs, 83 correspond to entirely novel snoRNAs. Among these, for the first time, we identified four C/D box snoRNAs and four H/ACA box snoRNAs predicted to direct modifications within U2, U4 or U6 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Furthermore, 25 snoRNAs from either class lacked antisense elements for rRNAs or snRNAs. Therefore, additional snoRNA targets have to be considered. Surprisingly, six C/D box snoRNAs and one H/ACA box snoRNA were expressed exclusively in brain. Of the 88 RNAs not belonging to either snoRNA subclass, at least 26 are probably derived from truncated heterogeneous nuclear RNAs (hnRNAs) or mRNAs. Short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) are located on five RNA sequences and may represent rare examples of transcribed SINEs. The remaining RNA species could not as yet be assigned either to any snmRNA class or to a part of a larger hnRNA/mRNA. It is likely that at least some of the latter will represent novel, unclassified snmRNAs. PMID:11387227

  1. Expression of luteinizing hormone and chorionic gonadotropin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in human corpora lutea during menstrual cycle and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, K; Dunkel, L; Hsueh, A J; Yamoto, M; Nakano, R

    1995-04-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of LH and CG receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) in human corpora lutea (CL) during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Poly(A)-enriched RNA was extracted from CL and analyzed by Northern and slot blots, using a radiolabeled complementary RNA probe derived from the human LH receptor complementary DNA. Northern blot analysis indicated the presence of multiple LH receptor mRNA transcripts with molecular sizes of 8.0, 7.0 and 4.5 kilobases in human CL during the menstrual cycle. The predominant transcript was 4.5 kilobases in size. However, no hybridization signals were observed in nongonadal tissues (heart, liver, and kidney). Densitometric analyses revealed that the levels of LH receptor mRNA increased from early luteal phase to midluteal phase and subsequently decreased during late luteal phase. After the onset of menstruation, the LH receptor mRNA level was undetectable in the regressing CL. Moreover, radioligand receptor assay (RRA) showed a close parallelism between LH receptor mRNA levels and LH receptor content in CL throughout the menstrual cycle. LH receptor mRNA expression was also found in CL during early pregnancy. The level of LH receptor mRNA was relatively high in early pregnancy CL, whereas LH receptor content was low. Using in situ hybridization, LH receptor mRNAs were uniformly expressed in both large and small luteal cells during early and midluteal phase and early pregnancy, but not in regressing CL. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the regulation of LH receptor content in human CL during luteal phase is associated with similar changes in the receptor message levels, suggesting the physiological roles for LH receptor mRNA during the menstrual cycle in the human. In addition, the expression of LH receptor mRNA was demonstrated in human CL during early pregnancy.

  2. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  3. MESSENGER Observations of Large Flux Transfer Events at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Six flux transfer events (FTEs) were encountered during MESSENGER's first two flybys of Mercury (M1 and M2). For M1 the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was predominantly northward and four FTEs with durations of 1 to 6 s were observed in the magnetosheath following southward IMF turnings. The IMF was steadily southward during M2, and an FTE 4 s in duration was observed just inside the dawn magnetopause followed approx. 32 s later by a 7 s FTE in the magnetosheath. Flux rope models were fit to the magnetic field data to determine FTE dimensions and flux content. The largest FTE observed by MESSENGER had a diameter of approx. 1 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury s radius), and its open magnetic field increased the fraction of the surface exposed to the solar wind by 10 - 20 percent and contributed up to approx. 30 kV to the cross-magnetospheric electric potential.

  4. Emerging trend in second messenger communication and myoendothelial feedback

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Welsh, Donald G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, second messenger communication has emerged as one of the intriguing topics in the field of vasomotor control. Of particular interest has been the idea of second messenger flux from smooth muscle to endothelium initiating a feedback response that attenuates constriction. Mechanistic details of the precise signaling cascade have until recently remained elusive. In this perspective, we introduce readers to how myoendothelial gap junctions could enable sufficient inositol trisphosphate flux to initiate endothelial Ca2+ events that activate Ca2+ sensitive K+ channels. The resulting hyperpolarizing current would in turn spread back through the same myoendothelial gap junctions to moderate smooth muscle depolarization and constriction. In discussing this defined feedback mechanism, this brief manuscript will stress the importance of microdomains and of discrete cellular signaling. PMID:25071588

  5. New discoveries from MESSENGER and insights into Mercury's exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervack, R. J.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.

    2016-11-01

    For most of the orbital phase of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, a regular search for weakly emitting or less abundant species in Mercury's exosphere resulted in nondetections. However, during the final Earth year of the mission, emission from multiple lines of manganese, aluminum, and ionized calcium was detected. These observations validate the detection of a single line of ionized calcium during the third MESSENGER Mercury flyby, provide definitive confirmation for weak aluminum detections in ground-based observations, and represent the discovery of manganese in Mercury's exosphere. These detections occurred over a limited range of predawn local times and Mercury true anomaly angles (0°-70°), and each has a distinct spatial distribution. Equally interesting is the absence of detectable emission from oxygen at limits well below the levels reported for Mariner 10.

  6. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers.

    PubMed

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  7. MESSENGER Observations of Large Flux Transfer Events at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Six flux transfer events (FTEs) were encountered during MESSENGER's first two flybys of Mercury (MI and M2). For MI the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was predominantly northward and four FTEs with durations of 1 to 6 s were observed in the magnetosheath following southward 1M F turnings. The IMF was steadily southward during M2, and an FTE 4 s in duration was observed just inside the dawn magnetopause followed approx.32 s later by a 7-s FTE in the magnetosheath. Flux rope models were fit to the magnetic field data to detem11ne PTE dimensions and flux content The largest FTE observed by MESSENGER had a diameter of approx. 1 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury's radius), and its open magnetic field increased the fraction of the surface exposed to the solar wind by 10 - 20 percent and contributed up to approx.30 kV to the cross-magnetospheric electric potential.

  8. Mercury's Atmosphere and Magnetosphere: MESSENGER Third Flyby Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Johnson, Catherine L.; Gloeckler, George; Killen, Rosemary M.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Sprague, Ann L.; Vevack, Ronald J., Jr.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury en route to orbit insertion about the innermost planet took place on 29 September 2009. The earlier 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is highly dipolar and stable over the 35 years since its discovery by Mariner 10; that a structured, temporally variable exosphere extends to great altitudes on the dayside and forms a long tail in the anti-sunward direction; a cloud of planetary ions encompasses the magnetosphere from the dayside bow shock to the downstream magnetosheath and magnetotail; and that the magnetosphere undergoes extremely intense magnetic reconnect ion in response to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field. Here we report on new results derived from observations from MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), Magnetometer (MAG), and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) taken during the third flyby.

  9. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    PubMed

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  10. Prostanoid-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 messenger ribonucleic acid in rat osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Connolly, T. J.; Bergman, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    Individual prostanoids have distinct potencies in activating intracellular signaling pathways and regulating gene expression in osteoblastic cells. The E-series prostaglandins (PGs) are known to stimulate matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) synthesis and secretion in certain rodent and human osteoblastic cells, yet the intracellular events involved remain unclear. To further characterize this response and its signal transduction pathway(s), we examined prostanoid-induced expression of the MMP-1 gene in the rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE1 were very potent stimulators (40-fold) of MMP-1 transcript abundance, PGF2 alpha and prostacyclin were weak stimulators (4-fold), and thromboxane-B2 had no effect. The marked increase in MMP-1 transcript abundance after PGE2 treatment was first detected at 2 h, became maximal at 4 h, and persisted beyond 24 h. This response was dose dependent and elicited maximal and half-maximal effects with concentrations of 10(-6) and 0.6 x 10(-7) M, respectively. Cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, completely blocked this effect of PGE2, suggesting that the expression of other genes is required. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that PGE2 rapidly activates MMP-1 gene transcription, with a maximal increase at 2-4 h. The second messenger analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, mimicked the effects of PGE2 by stimulating a dose-dependent increase in MMP-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, with a maximal effect quantitatively similar to that observed with PGE2. Thus, in UMR 106-01 cells, different prostanoids have distinct potencies in stimulating MMP-1 mRNA abundance. Our data suggest that PGE2 stimulation of MMP-1 synthesis is due to activation of MMP-1 gene transcription and a subsequent marked increase in MMP-1 mRNA abundance. This effect is dependent on de novo protein synthesis and is mimicked by protein kinase-A activation.

  11. The rise of regulatory RNA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K.V.; Mattick, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Discoveries over the last decade portend a paradigm shift in molecular biology. Evidence suggests that RNA is not only functional as a messenger between DNA and protein but also in the regulation of genome organization and gene expression, which is increasingly elaborated in complex organisms. Regulatory RNAs appear to operate at many levels, but in particular to play an important role in the epigenetic processes that control differentiation and development. These discoveries suggest a central role for RNA in human evolution and ontogeny. Here we survey the emergence of the previously unsuspected world of regulatory RNAs from an historical perspective. PMID:24776770

  12. RNA-Seq Experiment and Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hanquan; Zeng, Erliang

    2016-01-01

    With the ability to obtain tens of millions of reads, high-throughput messenger RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data offers the possibility of estimating abundance of isoforms and finding novel transcripts. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to construct an RNA-Seq library for sequencing on Illumina NGS platforms, and a computational pipeline to perform RNA-Seq data analysis. The protocols described in this chapter can be applied to the analysis of differential gene expression in control versus 17β-estradiol treatment of in vivo or in vitro systems.

  13. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations during the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; McClintock, William E.; Benna, Mehdi; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18,2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na. K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29. 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He(+), 0(+), and Na(+),

  14. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Space Weather in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Increasing activity on the Sun is allowing MESSENGER to make its first observations of Mercury's magnetosphere under extreme solar wind conditions. At Earth interplanetary shock waves and coronal mass ejections produce severe "space weather" in the form of large geomagnetic storms that affect telecommunications, space systems, and ground-based power grids. In the case of Mercury the primary effect of extreme space weather in on the degree to which this it's weak global magnetic field can shield the planet from the solar wind. Direct impact of the solar wind on the surface of airless bodies like Mercury results in space weathering of the regolith and the sputtering of atomic species like sodium and calcium to high altitudes where they contribute to a tenuous, but highly dynamic exosphere. MESSENGER observations indicate that during extreme interplanetary conditions the solar wind plasma gains access to the surface of Mercury through three main regions: 1. The magnetospheric cusps, which fill with energized solar wind and planetary ions; 2. The subsolar magnetopause, which is compressed and eroded by reconnection to very low altitudes where the natural gyro-motion of solar wind protons may result in their impact on the surface; 3. The magnetotail where hot plasma sheet ions rapidly convect sunward to impact the surface on the nightside of Mercury. The possible implications of these new MESSENGER observations for our ability to predict space weather at Earth and other planets will be described.

  15. Tomographic Reconstruction of Mercury's Exosphere from MESSENGER Flyby Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The exosphere of Mercury is among the best-studied examples of a common type of atmosphere, a surface-bounded exosphere. Mercury's exosphere was probed in 2008-2009 with Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) measurements obtained during three planetary flybys by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft [1-3]. The measurements detailed the distribution of two previously known metallic constituents of Mercury's exosphere, Na and Ca, and indicated the presence in the gas phase of yet another metallic species, Mg. Such measurements can answer fundamental scientific questions regarding the relative importance of possible source and loss processes for exospheric species ejected from a surface boundary [4]. The trajectory of MESSENGER during the last of its three flybys provided the best spatial coverage prior to orbit insertion. The measurements by MESSENGER of Na, Ca, and Mg during the third flyby have been analyzed with a novel tomographic method. This approach maximizes the amount of information that can be extracted from line-of-sight measurements because it yields three-dimensional distributions of neutrals consistent with the data.

  16. The Morphology of Craters on Mercury: Results from MESSENGER Flybys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin, Oliver S.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Herrick, Robert R.; Chappelow, John E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic data measured from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft were used for investigations of the relationship between depth and diameter for impact craters on Mercury. Results using data from the MESSENGER flybys of the innermost planet indicate that most of the craters measured with MLA are shallower than those previously measured by using Mariner 10 images. MDIS images of these same MLA-measured craters show that they have been modified. The use of shadow measurement techniques, which were found to be accurate relative to the MLA results, indicate that both small bowl-shaped and large complex craters that are fresh possess depth-to-diameter ratios that are in good agreement with those measured from Mariner 10 images. The preliminary data also show that the depths of modified craters are shallower relative to fresh ones, and might provide quantitative estimates of crater in-filling by subsequent volcanic or impact processes. The diameter that defines the transition from simple to complex craters on Mercury based on MESSENGER data is consistent with that reported from Mariner 10 data.

  17. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  18. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations During the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, R. M.; Cassidy, T.; Vervack, R. J.; Burger, M. H.; Merkel, A. W.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.; McClintock, W. E.; Benna, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na, K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29, 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He+, O+, and Na+.

  19. iRNA-PseU: Identifying RNA pseudouridine sites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Tang, Hua; Ye, Jing; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    As the most abundant RNA modification, pseudouridine plays important roles in many biological processes. Occurring at the uridine site and catalyzed by pseudouridine synthase, the modification has been observed in nearly all kinds of RNA, including transfer RNA, messenger RNA, small nuclear or nucleolar RNA, and ribosomal RNA. Accordingly, its importance to basic research and drug development is self-evident. Despite some experimental technologies have been developed to detect the pseudouridine sites, they are both time-consuming and expensive. Facing the explosive growth of RNA sequences in the postgenomic age, we are challenged to address the problem by computational approaches: For an uncharacterized RNA sequence, can we predict which of its uridine sites can be modified as pseudouridine and which ones cannot? Here a predictor called “iRNA-PseU” was proposed by incorporating the chemical properties of nucleotides and their occurrence frequency density distributions into the general form of pseudo nucleotide composition (PseKNC). It has been demonstrated via the rigorous jackknife test, independent dataset test, and practical genome-wide analysis that the proposed predictor remarkably outperforms its counterpart. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, the web-server for iRNA-PseU was established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iRNA-PseU, by which users can easily get their desired results without the need to go through the mathematical details.

  20. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  1. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  2. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  3. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  4. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  5. tRNA fragments in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paul; Ivanov, Pavel

    2014-11-28

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is traditionally considered to be an adaptor molecule that helps ribosomes to decode messenger RNA (mRNA) and synthesize protein. Recent studies have demonstrated that tRNAs also serve as a major source of small non-coding RNAs that possess distinct and varied functions. These tRNA fragments are heterogeneous in size, nucleotide composition, biogenesis and function. Here we describe multiple roles that tRNA fragments play in cell physiology and discuss their relevance to human health and disease.

  6. eIF3 targets cell-proliferation messenger RNAs for translational activation or repression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amy S Y; Kranzusch, Philip J; Cate, Jamie H D

    2015-06-04

    Regulation of protein synthesis is fundamental for all aspects of eukaryotic biology by controlling development, homeostasis and stress responses. The 13-subunit, 800-kilodalton eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) organizes initiation factor and ribosome interactions required for productive translation. However, current understanding of eIF3 function does not explain genetic evidence correlating eIF3 deregulation with tissue-specific cancers and developmental defects. Here we report the genome-wide discovery of human transcripts that interact with eIF3 using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP). eIF3 binds to a highly specific program of messenger RNAs involved in cell growth control processes, including cell cycling, differentiation and apoptosis, via the mRNA 5' untranslated region. Surprisingly, functional analysis of the interaction between eIF3 and two mRNAs encoding the cell proliferation regulators c-JUN and BTG1 reveals that eIF3 uses different modes of RNA stem-loop binding to exert either translational activation or repression. Our findings illuminate a new role for eIF3 in governing a specialized repertoire of gene expression and suggest that binding of eIF3 to specific mRNAs could be targeted to control carcinogenesis.

  7. Mapping the Topography of Mercury with MESSENGER Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E..; Zubor, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter onboard MESSENGER involves unique design elements that deal with the challenges of being in orbit around Mercury. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of seven instruments on NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. MESSENGER was launched on 3 August 2004, and entered into orbit about Mercury on 18 March 2011 after a journey through the inner solar system. This involved six planetary flybys, including three of Mercury. MLA is designed to map the topography and landforms of Mercury's surface. It also measures the planet's forced libration (motion about the spin axis), which helps constrain the state of the core. The first science measurements from orbit taken with MLA were made on 29 March 2011 and continue to date. MLA had accumulated about 8.3 million laser ranging measurements to Mercury's surface, as of 31 July 2012, i.e., over six Mercury years (528 Earth days). Although MLA is the third planetary lidar built at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MLA must endure a much harsher thermal environment near Mercury than the previous instruments on Mars and Earth satellites. The design of MLA was derived in part from that of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on Mars Global Surveyor. However, MLA must range over greater distances and often in off-nadir directions from a highly eccentric orbit. In MLA we use a single-mode diode-pumped Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) laser that is highly collimated to maintain a small footprint on the planet. The receiver has both a narrow field of view and a narrow spectral bandwidth to minimize the amount of background light detected from the sunlit hemisphere of Mercury. We achieve the highest possible receiver sensitivity by employing the minimum receiver detection threshold.

  8. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MESSENGER data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed Venus Express data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left- and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MESSENGER, Venus Express, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE were examined for multipoint signatures of the catalogued ICMEs. For spacecraft separations below 15° in heliocentric longitude, the second spacecraft observed the ICME flux rope in 82 % of cases; this percentage dropped to 49 % for separations between 15 and 30°, to 18 % for separations between 30 and 45°, and to 12 % for separations between 45 and 60°. As the spacecraft separation increased, it became increasingly likely that only the sheath and not the flux rope of the ICME was observed, in agreement with the notion that ICME flux ropes are smaller in longitudinal extent than the shocks or discontinuities that they often drive. Furthermore, this study has identified 23 ICMEs observed by pairs of spacecraft close to radial alignment. A detailed analysis of these events could lead to a better understanding of how ICMEs evolve during propagation.

  9. Constraints on Mercury's surface composition from MESSENGER neutron spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Taylor, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    The composition of Mercury's surface is poorly known, but the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission has provided a wealth of new data from three flybys. In particular, MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) observations reveal a surface enriched in neutron absorbing elements, consistent with interpretations of color and albedo observations suggesting a surface composition enriched in Fe-Mg-Ti oxides. In this study, we have computed the neutron absorption cross sections for all of the available proposed surface compositions of Mercury and evaluated the plausibility of each surface composition based on the neutron absorption cross section observed by MESSENGER. For identified plausible compositions, the implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury are discussed. The measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of Mercury is inconsistent with a crust formed from partial melting of plausible bulk mantle compositions, flotation in a magma ocean or adiabatic melting of upwelling cumulates during magma ocean overturn. However, the observed neutron absorption is consistent with model compositions of late-stage magma-ocean cumulates and some proposed compositions from spectral modeling and equilibrium modeling. This suggests that the enrichment of neutron absorbing elements may be indicative of the processes that acted to form Mercury's crust. The enrichment in neutron absorbing elements, in combination with spectral observations that constrain FeO in silicates (< 2 wt.%), offers strong evidence of a magma ocean on Mercury since global scale melting appears to be required to concentrate the major neutron absorbing elements while minimizing Fe in silicate minerals. We also find that iron plays a secondary role in the neutron absorption of plausible surface compositions and its variations within different Fe-Mg-Ti oxide solid solution series does not cause any overlap among the various oxide series in neutron

  10. The X-Ray Spectrometer for Mercury MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, R. D.; Ho, G. C.; Schlemm, C.; Gold, R. E.; Goldsten, J. O.; Boynton, W. V.; Trombka, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and because it is so close, it is difficult to study from Earth-based observatories. Its proximity to the Sun has also limited the number of spacecraft to visit this tiny planet to just one, Mariner 10, which flew by Mercury twice in 1974 and once in 1975. Mariner 10 provided a wealth of new information about Mercury, yet much still remains unknown about Mercury's geologic history and the processes that led to its formation. The origin of Mercury's metal-rich composition is just one area of investigation awaiting more and improved data to sort between competing hypotheses. Mercury plays an important role in comparative planetology, and many of the processes that were important during its formation are relevant to the Earth's early history. MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) is a Discovery mission that has been designed to fly by and orbit Mercury. It will launch in March 2004, flyby Mercury in 2007 and 2008 and enter an elliptical orbit in April 2009. During the one-year orbital phase, a suite of instruments on board the MESSENGER spacecraft will study the exosphere, magnetosphere, surface, and interior of Mercury. One of these instruments will be an X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) that will measure surface elemental abundances. Remote X-ray spectroscopy has been accomplished before on the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and more recently on NEAR Shoemaker. The MESSENGER XRS will measure characteristic X-ray emissions induced in the surface of Mercury by the incident solar flux. The Ka lines for the elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe will be detected with spatial resolution on the order of 40 km when counting statistics are not a limiting factor. These measurements can be used to obtain quantitative information on elemental composition.

  11. MESSENGER Observations of Cusp Plasma Filaments at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, G. K.; Slavin, J. A.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jia, X.; Raines, J. M.; Imber, S. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Gershman, D. J.; Zurbuchen, T.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    At Mercury, MESSENGER has documented ~1-2-s-long reductions in the dayside magnetospheric magnetic field with amplitudes up to 90% of the ambient intensity. These field reductions which we have termed cusp filaments are observed from just poleward of the magnetospheric cusp to mid-latitudes. During these events, MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) measured H+ ions with magnetosheath-like energies. Minimum variance analysis of the Magnetometer (MAG) data indicates that the filaments are simple two dimensional flux tubes filled with magnetosheath plasma that has a diamagnetic effect on the local background field. Here we analyze 139 filaments identified in 3 years of MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma data to determine the physical properties of these structures. Our results indicate that cusp filaments are common phenomena for all solar wind conditions. They occur over a range of magnetic latitudes from ~50 to 80oN, with durations of ~0.1-2.5s and magnetic field decreases of ~50-300 nT. If the filaments are associated with flux transfer events (FTEs) and move over the spacecraft at speeds comparable to the flank magnetosheath flow speed of 300 km/s, then these filaments have dimensions of ~30-750 km, which is larger than the gyro-radius of a 1 keV H+ ion, i.e., ~ 23 km. Correlation analyses show no obvious dependence of the duration or magnitude of the diamagnetic decrease on magnetic latitude. Overall, the MAG and FIPS observations analyzed here appear consistent with an origin for cusp plasma filaments by the inflow of magnetosheath plasma associated with the localized magnetopause reconnection process that produces FTEs. Further analysis will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  12. MESSENGER Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin. James A.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER'S second flyby of Mercury on October 6,2008, very intense reconnection was observed between the planet's magnetic field and a steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dawn magnetopause was threaded by a strong magnetic field normal to its surface, approx.14 nT, that implies a rate of reconnection approx.10 times the typical rate at Earth and a cross-magnetospheric electric potential drop of approx.30 kV. The highest magnetic field observed during this second flyby, approx.160 nT, was found at the core of a large dayside flux transfer event (FTE). This FTE is estimated to contain magnetic flux equal to approx.5% that of Mercury's magnetic tail or approximately one order of magnitude higher fraction of the tail flux than is typically found for FTEs at Earth. Plasmoid and traveling compression region (TCR) signatures were observed throughout MESSENGER'S traversal of Mercury's magnetotail with a repetition rate comparable to the Dungey cycle time of approx.2 min. The TCR signatures changed from south-north, indicating tailward motion, to north-south, indicating sunward motion, at a distance approx.2.6 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius) behind the terminator indicating that the near-Mercury magnetotail neutral line was crossed at that point. Overall, these new MESSENGER observations suggest that magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause is very intense relative to what is found at Earth and other planets, while reconnection in Mercury's tail is similar to that in other planetary magnetospheres, but with a very short Dungey cycle time.

  13. Multi-messenger astronomy: gravitational waves, neutrinos, photons, and cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchesi, Marica

    2016-05-01

    In the next decade, multi-messenger astronomy will probe the rich physics of transient phenomena in the sky, such as the mergers of neutron stars and/or black holes, gamma-ray bursts, and core-collapse supernovae. The first observations of gravitational waves from the inspiral and merger of a binary black-hole system by the advanced LIGO interferometers marked the onset of gravitational-wave astronomy. The advanced detectors, LIGO and Virgo, observing together with space and ground-based electromagnetic telescopes, and neutrinos and cosmic-ray detectors will offer the great opportunity to explore the Universe through all its messengers. The paper provides a review of the astrophysical sources expected to emit transient multi-messenger signals and the multi-messenger obervational startegies and analysis. Challenges and perspectives of the multi-messenger astronomy are presented highlighting gravitational waves as new messenger.

  14. Mercury's Complex Exosphere: Results from MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Burger, Matthew H.; Bradley, E. Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal attitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere,

  15. Mercury's Plasma Mantle - a survey of MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Jamie Matthew; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim; DiBraccio, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The plasma mantle is a region of solar wind plasma entry into the nightside high-latitude magnetosphere. We present a survey of plasma mantles identified in particle and magnetic field measurements from four years of MESSENGER spacecraft observations of Mercury's magnetosphere. The two common observational signatures of this region are ion energy latitude dispersions as well as diamagnetic depressions. From these observations we estimate the contribution of plasma from the solar wind via the mantle and infer magnitude and variability in the cross-magnetospheric electric fields present at Mercury's dynamic magnetosphere.

  16. Mercury's complex exosphere: results from MESSENGER's third flyby.

    PubMed

    Vervack, Ronald J; McClintock, William E; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Anderson, Brian J; Burger, Matthew H; Bradley, E Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C; Izenberg, Noam R

    2010-08-06

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal altitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere.

  17. Laser altimeter observations from MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Solomon, Sean C; Phillips, Roger J; Peale, Stanton J; Head, James W; Hauck, Steven A; McNutt, Ralph L; Oberst, Jürgen; Neumann, Gregory A; Lemoine, Frank G; Sun, Xiaoli; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier; Harmon, John K

    2008-07-04

    A 3200-kilometers-long profile of Mercury by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft spans approximately 20% of the near-equatorial region of the planet. Topography along the profile is characterized by a 5.2-kilometer dynamic range and 930-meter root-mean-square roughness. At long wavelengths, topography slopes eastward by 0.02 degrees , implying a variation of equatorial shape that is at least partially compensated. Sampled craters on Mercury are shallower than their counterparts on the Moon, at least in part the result of Mercury's higher gravity. Crater floors vary in roughness and slope, implying complex modification over a range of length scales.

  18. In vitro translation of plant viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Browning, Karen S; Mayberry, Laura

    2006-06-01

    This unit describes the preparation of a wheat germ extract that provides all the soluble components of the plant translational machinery. Many RNA plant viruses have positive-strand genomes and the viral RNA serves as messenger RNA (mRNA). The preparation of mRNA by in vitro transcription is also described. The translation assay requires optimization of the amount of wheat germ extract, level of mRNA, and the concentration of Mg(2+) and K(+) for each mRNA. The translational efficiency of RNAs or mutants may be compared (e.g., capped versus uncapped RNAs to measure cap-independent translation) or the amount/size of the protein product may be determined.

  19. Fasting and leptin modulate adipose and muscle uncoupling protein: divergent effects between messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, W I; Fink, B D; Donohoue, P A

    1999-04-01

    Leptin is believed to act through hypothalamic centers to decrease appetite and increase energy utilization, in part through enhanced thermogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of fasting for 2 days and exogenous s.c. leptin, 200 microg every 8 h for 2 days, on the regulation of uncoupling protein (UCP) subtypes in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gastrocnemius muscle. Northern blot analysis (UCP-1) and ribonuclease protection (UCP-2 and 3) were used for quantitative messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis, and specific antibodies were used to measure UCP-1 and UCP-3 total protein expression. Leptin, compared with vehicle, did not alter BAT UCP-1 or UCP-3 mRNA or protein expression when administered to normal ad libitum fed rats. Fasting significantly decreased BAT UCP-1 and UCP-3 mRNA expression, to 31% and 30% of ad libitum fed controls, respectively, effects which were prevented by administration of leptin to fasted rats. Fasting also significantly decreased BAT UCP-1 protein expression, to 67% of control; however, that effect was not prevented by leptin treatment. Fasting also decreased BAT UCP-3 protein, to 85% of control, an effect that was not statistically significant. Fasting, with or without leptin administration, did not affect BAT UCP-2 mRNA; however, leptin administration to ad libitum fed rats significantly increased BAT UCP-2 mRNA, to 138% of control. Fasting significantly enhanced gastrocnemius muscle UCP-3 mRNA (411% of control) and protein expression (168% of control), whereas leptin administration to fasted rats did not alter either of these effects. In summary, UCP subtype mRNA and protein are regulated in tissue- and subtype-specific fashion by leptin and food restriction. Under certain conditions, the effects of these perturbations on UCP mRNA and protein are discordant.

  20. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  1. MESSENGER observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at Mercury's magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, T.; Boardsen, S. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a survey of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orbit. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. Remarkably, the results show that MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub-sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopause are much larger than at Earth. The wave amplitude was often on the order of 100 nT or more, and the wave periods were ~10-20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is also present in the data, with all of the observed events taking place in the post-noon and the dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is likely related to finite ion-gyroradius effects and is in agreement with the results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. Similar to most terrestrial events, the wave observations were made almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward. Accompanying measurements from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) show that the waves were associated with a substantial transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  2. Modeling MESSENGER Observations of Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew Howard; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sprague, Ann L.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2012-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft has made the first high-spatial-resolution observations of exospheric calcium at Mercury. We use a Monte Carlo model of the exosphere to track the trajectories of calcium atoms ejected from the surface until they are photoionized, escape from the system, or stick to the surface. This model permits an exploration of exospheric source processes and interactions among neutral atoms, solar radiation, and the planetary surface. The MASCS data have suggested that a persistent, high-energy source of calcium that was enhanced in the dawn, equatorial region of Mercury was active during MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury and during the first seven orbits for which MASCS obtained data. The total Ca source rate from the surface varied between 1.2x10(exp 23) and 2.6x10(exp 23) Ca atoms/s, if its temperature was 50,000 K. The origin of this high-energy, asymmetric source is unknown, although from this limited data set it does not appear to be consistent with micrometeoroid impact vaporization, ion sputtering, electron-stimulated desorption, or vaporization at dawn of material trapped on the cold nightside.

  3. MESSENGER observations of substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Slavin, James; Fu, Suiyan; Raines, Jim; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Yao, Zhonghua; Pu, Zuyin; Shi, Quanqi; Poh, Gangkai; Boardsen, Scott; Imber, Suzanne; Sundberg, Torbjörn; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been examined for evidence of substorm activity. A total of 32 events were found during which an Earth-like growth phase was followed by clear near-tail expansion phase signatures. During the growth phase, the lobe of the tail loads with magnetic flux while the plasma sheet thins due to the increased lobe magnetic pressure. MESSENGER is often initially in the plasma sheet and then moves into the lobe during the growth phases. The averaged time scale of the loading is around 1 min, consistent with previous observations of Mercury's Dungey cycle. The dipolarization front that marks the initiation of the substorm expansion phase is only a few seconds in duration. The spacecraft then abruptly enters the plasma sheet due to the plasma sheet expansion as reconnection-driven flow from the near-Mercury neutral line encounters the stronger magnetic fields closer to the planet. Substorm activity in the near tail of Mercury is quantitatively very similar to the Earth despite the very compressed time scale.

  4. Impacts of Center of Mass Shifts on Messenger Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, D. J.; Vaughan, R. M.; Chouinard, T. L., III; Jaekle, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) has successfully completed its first three years of flight operations following launch on August 3, 2004. As part of NASA s Discovery Program, MESSENGER will observe Mercury during flybys in 2008 and 2009, as well as from orbit beginning in March 2011. This paper discusses the impact that center of mass (CM) location changes have had on many mission activities, particularly angular momentum management and maneuver execution. Momentum trends were altered significantly following the first deep-space maneuver, and these changes were related to a change in the CM. The CM location also impacts maneuver execution, and uncertainties in its location led to the significant direction errors experienced at trajectory correction maneuver 11. Because of the spacecraft sensitivity to CM location, efforts to estimate its position are important to momentum and maneuver prediction. This paper summarizes efforts to estimate the CM from flight data, as well as the operational strategy to handle CM uncertainties and their impact on momentum trends and maneuver execution accuracy.

  5. Multi-messenger particle astrophysics with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Justin; Cherenkov Telescope Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a next-generation array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Building on the success of H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS, in an energy range complementary to that of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), CTA will investigate the particle physics of the cosmos through observations of gamma rays between tens of GeV and several hundred TeV. The observatory is especially well suited for follow-up of transient events detected in other wavelengths and messengers including neutrinos and gravitational waves. CTA will feature one array in each hemisphere for full sky coverage. The largest telescopes will have a 20 GeV energy threshold and will be able to quickly (in less than 50 seconds) slew to transient targets. The excellent effective area of CTA (thousands of times greater than that of the Fermi LAT at 20 GeV) will enable it to provide powerful and unique contributions to multi-messenger particle astrophysics.

  6. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: White Dwarf Binaries, LISA and GAIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Michael; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves has ushered in a new era in astronomy. The low-frequency band covered by the future LISA detector provides unprecedented opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy. With the Global Astrometric Interferometer for Astrophysics (GAIA) mission, we expect to discover about 1,000 eclipsing binary systems composed of a WD and a main sequence star - a sizeable increase from the approximately 34 currently known binaries of this type. In advance of the first GAIA data release and the launch of LISA within the next decade, we used the Binary Stellar Evolution (BSE) code simulate the evolution of White Dwarf Binaries (WDB) in a fixed galaxy population of about 196,000 sources. Our goal is to assess the detectability of a WDB by LISA and GAIA using the parameters from our population synthesis, we calculate GW strength h, and apparent GAIA magnitude G. We can then use a scale factor to make a prediction of how many multi- messenger sources we expect to be detectable by both LISA and GAIA in a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. We create binaries 10 times to ensure randomness in distance assignment and average our results. We then determined whether or not astronomical chirp is the difference between the total chirp and the GW chirp. With Astronomical chirp and simulations of mass transfer and tides, we can gather more information about the internal astrophysics of stars in ultra-compact binary systems.

  7. MESSENGER Observations of Reconnection and Its Effects on Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second and third flybys of Mercury on October 6, 2008 and September 29, 2009, respectively, southward interplanetary magnetic fields produced very intense reconnection signatures in the dayside and nightside magnetosphere and very different systemlevel responses. The IMF during the second flyby was continuously southward and the magnetosphere appeared very active with very large magnetic fields normal to the magnetopause and the generation of flux transfer events at the magnetopause and plasmoids in the tail current sheet every 30 s to 90 s. However, the strength and direction of the tail magnetic field was very stable. In contrast the third flyby experienced a variable IMF with it varying from north to south on timescales of minutes. Although the MESSENGER measurements were limited this time to the nightside magnetosphere, numerous examples of plasmoid release in the tail were detected, but they were not periodic. Rather, plasmoid release was highly correlated with the four large enhancements of the tail magnetic field (i.e. by factors > 2) with durations of approx. 2 - 3 min. The increased flaring of the magnetic field during these intervals indicates that the enhancements were caused by loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. New analyses of the second and third flyby observations of reconnection and its system-level effects will be presented. The results will be examined in light of what is known about the response of the Earth's magnetosphere to variable versus steady southward IMF.

  8. Regulation of rat luteinizing hormone subunit messenger ribonucleic acids by gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, S D; Bowers, S M; Need, L R; Chin, W W

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) biosynthesis. We have studied the regulation of LH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels by gonadal-steroid hormones in the rat. In one set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically gonadectomized (GDX) and killed 1, 3, 7, 14, 22, and 31 d postoperatively. In another set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically GDX and were injected subcutaneously with testosterone propionate (500 micrograms/100 g body wt per d) or 17 beta-estradiol 3-benzoate (10 micrograms/100 g body wt per d), respectively, beginning 3 wk postoperatively. Levels of serum LH were determined by radioimmunoassay and levels of LH subunit mRNAs in single pituitary glands were determined by blot hybridization analysis using labeled synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes that correspond to portions of the coding regions of the rat alpha- and LH beta-subunit mRNAs. 4 wk after gonadectomy, serum LH levels rose nine- and 20-fold, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels rose six- and 10-fold, and LH beta-subunit levels rose seven- and 14-fold, compared with controls in males and females, respectively. In gonadal-steroid hormone-treated male and female GDX rats, serum LH levels fell to 8 and 36% of control values, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels declined to 22 and 19%, and LH beta-subunit mRNA levels declined to 6 and 10% of control values, 48 h after injections were initiated, in males and females, respectively. We conclude that gonadal-steroid hormones negatively regulate the levels of both subunit mRNAs in GDX rats in a pattern that parallels the changes in serum LH values. These data suggest that gonadal-steroid hormone regulation of LH biosynthesis occurs, at least in part, at the level of LH subunit mRNAs due to effects at the transcriptional and/or RNA stability levels. Images PMID:2418065

  9. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  10. The Geology of Mercury as Seen by the MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.; Robinson, Mark; Solomon, Sean C.; Strom, Robert; Chapman, Clark; Watters, Thomas; Blewett, David T.; Denevi, Brett; Chabot, Nancy

    The three MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have yielded images of most of the planet's sur-face (including portions unseen by Mariner 10); these data have helped to address a series of questions related to the nature of geological process operating on the planet and its geologi-cal history. Volcanism: New observations show evidence for numerous volcanic vents, in the form of irregularly shaped rimless depressions, around the interior margin of the Caloris basin and elsewhere on the planet, mostly on impact crater floors. Several depressions appear to be sources of explosive volcanism, and one is surrounded by a shield in excess of 100 km in diame-ter. The interior of the Caloris basin is filled with plains units spectrally distinct from the basin rim deposits; impact crater stratigraphy and comparisons to the filling of the lunar Imbrium basin support a volcanic origin. Some smooth plains surrounding the rim of the Caloris basin show distinct differences in ages, color, and morphological properties from their surroundings, supporting a volcanic origin. Impact Cratering: New data show the characteristics and on-set diameters of fresh impact craters and document the nature of peak-ring and multi-ringed basins and their global distribution. The newly discovered 715 km-diameter Rembrandt basin shows an unusual sequence of structures and evidence for interior volcanic fill, and several well-preserved peak-ring basins provide insight into why they are relatively more common on Mercury. Tectonism: The new coverage provides evidence for the nature and global distribu-tion of extensive tectonic scarps and wrinkle ridges, and a set of radial graben discovered in central Caloris basin (Pantheon Fossae) reveals evidence for enigmatic basin-related extensional deformation. Geological History: Impact crater size-frequency distributions and stratigraphic relationships are providing new insight into the temporal relationships of geological processes and the comparative planetological

  11. Gravity, Topography, and Magnetic Field of Mercury from Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier; Ernst, Carolyn; Goosens, Sander; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Margot, Jean-Luc; McNutt, Ralph; Mazarico, Erwan M.; Oberst, Jurgen; Peale, Stanley J.; Perry, Mark; Purucker, Michael E.; Rowlands, David D.; Torrence, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a 12-hour, near-polar orbit around Mercury, with an initial periapsis altitude of 200 km, initial periapse latitude of 60 deg N, and apoapsis at approximately 15,200 km altitude in the southern hemisphere. This orbit has permitted the mapping of regional gravitational structure in the northern hemisphere, and laser altimetry from the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a geodetically controlled elevation model for the same hemisphere. The shape of a planet combined with gravity provides fundamental information regarding its internal structure and geologic and thermal evolution. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a unimodal distribution with a dynamic range of 9.63 km, less than that of the Moon (19.9 km), but consistent with Mercury's higher surface gravitational acceleration. After one Earth-year in orbit, refined models of gravity and topography have revealed several large positive gravity anomalies that coincide with major impact basins. These candidate mascons have anomalies that exceed 100 mGal and indicate substantial crustal thinning and superisostatic uplift of underlying mantle. An additional uncompensated 1000-km-diameter gravity and topographic high at 68 deg N, 33 deg E lies within Mercury's northern volcanic plains. Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is generally thicker at low latitudes than in the polar region. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR2 = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M=3.30 x 10(exp 23) kg and R=2440 km are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of Cm/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. One proposed model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes silicate crust and mantle layers overlying a dense solid (possibly Fe-S) layer, a liquid Fe

  12. MESSENGER Observations of Induced Magnetic Fields at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Heyner, D.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Benna, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study induction signals from Mercury's core. The weak dipole moment (190 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius) yields a mean subsolar magnetopause distance,RSS, from the dipole origin of 1.45 RM. Time variations in Mercury's magnetopause position, and hence in the magnetopause fields, are driven by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure, Pram, and induce currents in Mercury's interior, in particular at the top of the large, highly conductive core. Mercury's eccentric orbit leads to periodic, annual variations in Pram with an amplitude of ˜50% of the mean Pram. Shorter-timescale, higher-amplitude variations in Pram also occur due to variability in the solar wind. We use a model of Mercury's magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER observations together with a two-layer, radial conductivity model to calculate the expected geometry and magnitude of induced field signatures. The inducing field geometry is obtained via a spherical harmonic expansion of the model magnetopause field at distinct RSS values corresponding to the range observed in MESSENGER MAG data. For the two-layer model and time variations in the field with periods longer than ~1 h, the transfer function between the inducing and induced fields depends only on the spherical harmonic degree and on the ratio of the core radius to the planetary radius. We observe two lines of evidence for an annual induced signature at Mercury. First, RSS varies with heliocentric distance, Rh, as Rhb where b < 1/3. Second, a stronger planetary dipole moment is observed at perihelion than at aphelion. The magnitudes of the observed signals are consistent with the recent estimate of Mercury's core radius (2020 × 30 km) derived from gravity and spin-state data, and independently rule out a core radius less than ˜1900 km. Larger amplitude induced signals are observed in association with

  13. Germination Potential of Dormant and Nondormant Arabidopsis Seeds Is Driven by Distinct Recruitment of Messenger RNAs to Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy is a complex evolutionary trait that temporally prevents seed germination, thus allowing seedling growth at a favorable season. High-throughput analyses of transcriptomes have led to significant progress in understanding the molecular regulation of this process, but the role of posttranscriptional mechanisms has received little attention. In this work, we have studied the dynamics of messenger RNA association with polysomes and compared the transcriptome with the translatome in dormant and nondormant seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during their imbibition at 25°C in darkness, a temperature preventing germination of dormant seeds only. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 4,670 and 7,028 transcripts were differentially abundant in dormant and nondormant seeds in the transcriptome and the translatome, respectively. We show that there is no correlation between transcriptome and translatome and that germination regulation is also largely translational, implying a selective and dynamic recruitment of messenger RNAs to polysomes in both dormant and nondormant seeds. The study of 5′ untranslated region features revealed that GC content and the number of upstream open reading frames could play a role in selective translation occurring during germination. Gene Ontology clustering showed that the functions of polysome-associated transcripts differed between dormant and nondormant seeds and revealed actors in seed dormancy and germination. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the essential role of selective polysome loading in this biological process. PMID:26019300

  14. Germination Potential of Dormant and Nondormant Arabidopsis Seeds Is Driven by Distinct Recruitment of Messenger RNAs to Polysomes.

    PubMed

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette

    2015-07-01

    Dormancy is a complex evolutionary trait that temporally prevents seed germination, thus allowing seedling growth at a favorable season. High-throughput analyses of transcriptomes have led to significant progress in understanding the molecular regulation of this process, but the role of posttranscriptional mechanisms has received little attention. In this work, we have studied the dynamics of messenger RNA association with polysomes and compared the transcriptome with the translatome in dormant and nondormant seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during their imbibition at 25 °C in darkness, a temperature preventing germination of dormant seeds only. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 4,670 and 7,028 transcripts were differentially abundant in dormant and nondormant seeds in the transcriptome and the translatome, respectively. We show that there is no correlation between transcriptome and translatome and that germination regulation is also largely translational, implying a selective and dynamic recruitment of messenger RNAs to polysomes in both dormant and nondormant seeds. The study of 5' untranslated region features revealed that GC content and the number of upstream open reading frames could play a role in selective translation occurring during germination. Gene Ontology clustering showed that the functions of polysome-associated transcripts differed between dormant and nondormant seeds and revealed actors in seed dormancy and germination. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the essential role of selective polysome loading in this biological process.

  15. A Study to Find Out the Most Preferred Free Messenger Service Used by University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Bicen, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the messenger usage of students in the technology departments of the Near East University (Cyprus), and also to learn which messenger service the participants prefer. The volunteer participants in this study consisted of 150 undergraduate students attending the technology departments of the Near East…

  16. Insights into the Nature of Mercury's Exosphere: Early Results from the MESSENGER Orbital Mission Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, William E.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft has been making routine observations of Mercury's exosphere since March 29, 2011. Correlations of the spatial distributions of Ca, Mg, and Na with MESSENGER magnetic field and energetic particle distribution data provide insight into the processes that populate the neutral exosphere

  17. "There's a Pony in the Hallway!" A Look at Messages and Messengers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    1995-01-01

    Discusses childrens' interest in messages and messengers; describes the role and impact of messages in a variety of books; and presents ideas for activities for elementary and secondary school students that suggest imaginative ways of using words, symbols, and language to offer children the chance to become messengers and communicators. (36…

  18. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below.

  19. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    On August 9–11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  20. The sweet side of RNA regulation: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a noncanonical RNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael R.; Garcin, Elsa D.

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has a vast array of extraglycolytic cellular functions, including interactions with nucleic acids. GAPDH has been implicated in the translocation of transfer RNA (tRNA), the regulation of cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and translation, as well as the regulation of replication and gene expression of many single-stranded RNA viruses. A growing body of evidence supports GAPDH–RNA interactions serving as part of a larger coordination between intermediary metabolism and RNA biogenesis. Despite the established role of GAPDH in nucleic acid regulation, it is still unclear how and where GAPDH binds to its RNA targets, highlighted by the absence of any conserved RNA-binding sequences. This review will summarize our current understanding of GAPDH-mediated regulation of RNA function. PMID:26564736

  1. Neuronal Chemokines: Versatile Messengers In Central Nervous System Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemokines are generally found under both physiological and pathological conditions. Whereas many reports describe chemokine expression in astrocytes and microglia and their role in the migration of leukocytes into the CNS, only few studies describe chemokine expression in neurons. Nevertheless, the expression of neuronal chemokines and the corresponding chemokine receptors in CNS cells under physiological and pathological conditions indicates that neuronal chemokines contribute to CNS cell interaction. In this study, we review recent studies describing neuronal chemokine expression and discuss potential roles of neuronal chemokines in neuron–astrocyte, neuron–microglia, and neuron–neuron interaction. PMID:17952658

  2. MESSENGER observations of induced magnetic fields in Mercury's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Hauck, Steven A.; Heyner, Daniel; Phillips, Roger J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital data from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow investigation of magnetic fields induced at the top of Mercury's core by time-varying magnetospheric fields. We used 15 Mercury years of observations of the magnetopause position as well as the magnetic field inside the magnetosphere to establish the presence and magnitude of an annual induction signal. Our results indicate an annual change in the internal axial dipole term, g10, of 7.5 to 9.5 nT. For negligible mantle conductivity, the average annual induction signal provides an estimate of Mercury's core radius to within ±90 km, independent of geodetic results. Larger induction signals during extreme events are expected but are challenging to identify because of reconnection-driven erosion. Our results indicate that the magnetopause reaches the dayside planetary surface 1.5-4% of the time.

  3. The Mercury Laser Altimeter Instrument for the MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, John F.; Smith, James C.; Sun, Xiaoli; Bartels, Arlin E.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne marie; McGarry, Jan F.; Trunzo, Raymond; Britt, Jamie L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of the payload science instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, which launched on 3 August 2004. The altimeter will measure the round trip time-of-flight of transmitted laser pulses reflected from the surface of the planet that, in combination with the spacecraft orbit position and pointing data, gives a high-precision measurement of surface topography referenced to Mercury's center of mass. The altimeter measurements will be used to determine the planet's forced librations by tracking the motion of large-scale topographic features as a function of time. MLA's laser pulse energy monitor and the echo pulse energy estimate will provide an active measurement of the surface reflectivity at 1064 nm. This paper describes the instrument design, prelaunch testing, calibration, and results of post-launch testing.

  4. Bicycle messengers: energy expenditure and exposure to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Bernmark, Eva; Wiktorin, Christina; Svartengren, Magnus; Lewné, Marie; Aberg, Samuel

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the level of energy expenditure and exposure to air pollution for bicycle messengers. Relationships between heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake, and between HR and pulmonary ventilation (VE) for each participant were established in laboratory tests. Air pollution and HR were measured during one working day. The total oxygen uptake was then described as the total energy expenditure in Joule (J) and in multiples of the energy expenditure at rest (MET). The mean energy expenditure during a working day (8 h) was 12 MJ, (4.8 MET). The level of air pollution exposure when cycling seemed to be comparable with the levels of exposure when sitting inside a vehicle. The VE during cycling was four times higher than resting value. Increased VE led to increased exposure to air pollution.

  5. NO signaling in plant immunity: a tale of messengers.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Kulik, Anna; Lamotte, Olivier; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Bourque, Stéphane; Nicolas-Francès, Valérie; Rosnoblet, Claire; Besson-Bard, Angélique; Wendehenne, David

    2015-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas involved in a myriad of plant physiological processes including immune responses. How NO mediates its biological effects in plant facing microbial pathogen attack is an unresolved question. Insights into the molecular mechanisms by which it propagates signals reveal the contribution of this simple gas in complex signaling pathways shared with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the second messenger Ca(2+). Understanding of the subtle cross-talks operating between these signals was greatly improved by the recent identification and the functional analysis of proteins regulated through S-nitrosylation, a major NO-dependent post-translational protein modification. Overall, these findings suggest that NO is probably an important component of the mechanism coordinating and regulating Ca(2+) and ROS signaling in plant immunity.

  6. Imaging Mercury's polar deposits during MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Paige, David A.; Nair, Hari; Denevi, Brett W.; Blewett, David T.; Murchie, Scott L.; Deutsch, Ariel N.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-09-01

    Images obtained during the low-altitude campaign in the final year of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission provide the highest-spatial-resolution views of Mercury's polar deposits. Images for distinct areas of permanent shadow within 35 north polar craters were successfully captured during the campaign. All of these regions of permanent shadow were found to have low-reflectance surfaces with well-defined boundaries. Additionally, brightness variations across the deposits correlate with variations in the biannual maximum surface temperature across the permanently shadowed regions, supporting the conclusion that multiple volatile organic compounds are contained in Mercury's polar deposits, in addition to water ice. A recent large impact event or ongoing bombardment by micrometeoroids could deliver water as well as many volatile organic compounds to Mercury. Either scenario is consistent with the distinctive reflectance properties and well-defined boundaries of Mercury's polar deposits and the presence of volatiles in all available cold traps.

  7. Nuclear inositol lipid metabolism: more than just second messenger generation?

    PubMed

    Martelli, Alberto M; Follo, Matilde Yung; Evangelisti, Camilla; Falà, Federica; Fiume, Roberta; Billi, Anna Maria; Cocco, Lucio

    2005-10-01

    A distinct polyphosphoinositide cycle is present in the nucleus, and growing evidence suggests its importance in DNA replication, gene transcription, and apoptosis. Even though it was initially thought that nuclear inositol lipids would function as a source for second messengers, recent findings strongly indicate that lipids present in the nucleus also fulfil other roles. The scope of this review is to highlight the most intriguing advances made in the field over the last few years, such as the possibility that nuclear phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate is involved in maintaining chromatin in a transcriptionally active conformation, the new emerging roles for intranuclear phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5) trisphosphate and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and the evidence which suggests a tight relationship between a decreased level of nuclear phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C-beta1 and the evolution of myelodisplastic syndrome into acute myeloid leukemia.

  8. Mercury's global color mosaic: An update from MESSENGER's orbital observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Murchie, Scott L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2015-09-01

    We report an update to the photometric correction used to produce global color mosaics of Mercury, derived from an analysis of photometric observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER's primary mission. Comparisons between versions of the color mosaic produced with photometric corrections derived from flyby and orbital data indicate that areas imaged at high incidence and emission angles (>50°) are better standardized to a common illumination and viewing geometry with the orbit-derived corrections. Seams between images taken at very different illumination geometries, however, are still present at visually detectable levels. Further improvements to the photometric correction await updates to the radiometric calibration that will enable data retrieval over a larger range of photometric angles.

  9. Gravitational Wave Multi-Messenger Prospects for Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joseph; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) experiments are currently setting limits on the gravitational wave (GW) emission in the nanohertz frequency band. The primary source of GW emission in this band is expected to be a population of binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that form following galactic mergers. This population of binary supermassive black holes is representative of a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. During this process, there is the potential for many electromagnetic tracers to accompany the binary's evolution. In this talk, I will present recent work investigating the potential for jointly detecting a binary's electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. Such `multi-messenger' sources would provide a unique window into a pivotal stage of galaxy evolution, and would revolutionize the understanding of late-stage galaxy evolution.

  10. Gravitational Wave Multi-Messenger Prospects for Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joseph; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) experiments are now setting limits on the gravitational wave (GW) emission in the nanohertz frequency band. The primary source of GW emission in this band is expected to be a population of binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that form following galactic mergers. This population of binary supermassive black holes are representative of a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. During the extended interaction between SMBHs and their host galaxy throughout inspiral, there is the potential for many electromagnetic tracers to accompany the binary's evolution. Using results from a suite of simulations, I will present an investigation of the potential for jointly detecting a binary’s electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. The detection of a single ‘multi-messenger' source would provide a unique window into a pivotal stage of galaxy evolution, and would revolutionize the understanding of late-stage galaxy evolution.

  11. Geology of the Caloris basin, Mercury: a view from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Murchie, Scott L; Watters, Thomas R; Robinson, Mark S; Head, James W; Strom, Robert G; Chapman, Clark R; Solomon, Sean C; McClintock, William E; Prockter, Louise M; Domingue, Deborah L; Blewett, David T

    2008-07-04

    The Caloris basin, the youngest known large impact basin on Mercury, is revealed in MESSENGER images to be modified by volcanism and deformation in a manner distinct from that of lunar impact basins. The morphology and spatial distribution of basin materials themselves closely match lunar counterparts. Evidence for a volcanic origin of the basin's interior plains includes embayed craters on the basin floor and diffuse deposits surrounding rimless depressions interpreted to be of pyroclastic origin. Unlike lunar maria, the volcanic plains in Caloris are higher in albedo than surrounding basin materials and lack spectral evidence for ferrous iron-bearing silicates. Tectonic landforms, contractional wrinkle ridges and extensional troughs, have distributions and age relations different from their counterparts in and around lunar basins, indicating a different stress history.

  12. The Messenger Spacecraft Power System Design and Early Mission Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakermanji, G.; Person, C.; Jenkins, J.; Kennedy, L.; Temkin, D.

    2005-05-01

    The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft was launched on August 3, 2004. The spacecraft will be inserted into Mercury orbit in March 2011 for one year of orbital operation. During the mission, the spacecraft distance to the Sun will vary between approximately 1 and 0.3 Astronomical Units (AU), imposing severe requirements on the spacecraft thermal and power systems design. The spacecraft is maintained behind a sunshade. The two single-axis, gimbaled solar array panels are designed to withstand the expected high temperatures. A peak power tracking system has been selected to allow operation over the widely varying solar array I-V curves. In order to reduce cost and risk while increasing the likelihood of mission success, the approach taken in the power system design, including the solar arrays, was to use conventional design, materials, and fabrication techniques.

  13. New Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere from MESSENGER'S First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Killen, M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, James M.; Schriver, David; Somomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft on 14 January 2008 have revealed new features of the solar system's smallest planetary magnetosphere. The interplanetary magnetic field orientation was unfavorable for large inputs of energy from the solar wind and no evidence of magnetic substorms, internal magnetic reconnection, or energetic particle acceleration was detected. Large-scale rotations of the magnetic field were measured along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere and ultra-tow frequency waves were frequently observed beginning near closest approach. Outbound the spacecraft encountered two current-sheet boundaries across which the magnetic field intensity decreased in a step-like manner. The outer current sheet is the magnetopause boundary. The inner current sheet is similar in structure, but weaker and -1000 km closer to the planet. Between these two current sheets the magnetic field intensity is depressed by the diamagnetic effect of planetary ions created by the photo-ionization of Mercury's exosphere.

  14. MESSENGER observations of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Acuña, Mario H; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Raines, Jim M; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Trávnícek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    Solar wind energy transfer to planetary magnetospheres and ionospheres is controlled by magnetic reconnection, a process that determines the degree of connectivity between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and a planet's magnetic field. During MESSENGER's second flyby of Mercury, a steady southward IMF was observed and the magnetopause was threaded by a strong magnetic field, indicating a reconnection rate ~10 times that typical at Earth. Moreover, a large flux transfer event was observed in the magnetosheath, and a plasmoid and multiple traveling compression regions were observed in Mercury's magnetotail, all products of reconnection. These observations indicate that Mercury's magnetosphere is much more responsive to IMF direction and dominated by the effects of reconnection than that of Earth or the other magnetized planets.

  15. Gravity field and internal structure of Mercury from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Hauck, Steven A; Lemoine, Frank G; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Peale, Stanton J; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L; Torrence, Mark H; Perry, Mark E; Rowlands, David D; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W; Taylor, Anthony H

    2012-04-13

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR(2) = 0.353 ± 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(m)/C = 0.452 ± 0.035. A model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  16. The evolution of Mercury's crust: a global perspective from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Denevi, Brett W; Robinson, Mark S; Solomon, Sean C; Murchie, Scott L; Blewett, David T; Domingue, Deborah L; McCoy, Timothy J; Ernst, Carolyn M; Head, James W; Watters, Thomas R; Chabot, Nancy L

    2009-05-01

    Mapping the distribution and extent of major terrain types on a planet's surface helps to constrain the origin and evolution of its crust. Together, MESSENGER and Mariner 10 observations of Mercury now provide a near-global look at the planet, revealing lateral and vertical heterogeneities in the color and thus composition of Mercury's crust. Smooth plains cover approximately 40% of the surface, and evidence for the volcanic origin of large expanses of plains suggests that a substantial portion of the crust originated volcanically. A low-reflectance, relatively blue component affects at least 15% of the surface and is concentrated in crater and basin ejecta. Its spectral characteristics and likely origin at depth are consistent with its apparent excavation from a lower crust or upper mantle enriched in iron- and titanium-bearing oxides.

  17. The Global Magnetic Field of Mercury from MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Winslow, Reka M.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Raines, Jim M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2011-09-01

    Magnetometer data acquired by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury permit the separation of internal and external magnetic field contributions. The global planetary field is represented as a southward-directed, spin-aligned, offset dipole centered on the spin axis. Positions where the cylindrical radial magnetic field component vanishes were used to map the magnetic equator and reveal an offset of 484 ± 11 kilometers northward of the geographic equator. The magnetic axis is tilted by less than 3° from the rotation axis. A magnetopause and tail-current model was defined by using 332 magnetopause crossing locations. Residuals of the net external and offset-dipole fields from observations north of 30°N yield a best-fit planetary moment of 195 ± 10 nanotesla-RM3, where RM is Mercury’s mean radius.

  18. Lipid metabolites as metabolic messengers in inter-organ communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sihao; Alexander, Ryan K.; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved through coordinated regulation across several tissues. Studies using mouse genetic models have shown that perturbation of specific pathways of lipid metabolism in metabolically active tissues impacts systemic metabolic homeostasis. The use of metabolomic technologies combined with genetic models has helped identify several potential lipid mediators that serve as metabolic messengers to communicate energy status and modulate substrate utilization among tissues. When provided exogenously, these lipid metabolites exhibit biological effects on glucose and lipid metabolism, implicating a therapeutic potential for treating metabolic diseases. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in inter-organ communication through novel mechanisms with a focus on lipid mediators synthesized de novo or derived from dietary sources and discuss challenges and future directions. PMID:24895003

  19. The multi-messenger search programme and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Giulia

    2016-07-01

    The key-word of modern astronomy and astrophysics is multi-messenger: not only photons used as probes for the investigation of the Universe, but also cosmic-rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-messenger approach is important in particular for neutrino detectors: potential astrophysical sources are predicted to emit a very faint neutrino signal and the presence of an isotropic flux of atmospheric background requires the development of effective search strategies. The multi-messenger approach can increase the discovery potential, the statistical significance of the observations and the efficiency of the detection. The advantages of the multi-messenger approach are evident, in particular, when looking at transient or flaring sources. In ANTARES, a wide programme of multi-messenger searches is active; the most relevant results will be presented in this contribution.

  20. MESSENGER Magnetometer Observations of the Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Raines, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Purucker, M. E.; Winslow, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Since insertion of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011, the Magnetometer (MAG) has routinely observed localized reductions of the magnetic field magnitude below the level predicted by a planetary dipole model corrected for magnetospheric magnetic fields. These magnetic depressions are observed on almost every orbit, and the latitude at which they are observed is local-time dependent. The depression signatures are indicators for the presence of enhanced plasma populations, which inflate the magnetic field locally to maintain pressure balance, thus lowering the magnetic flux density. Mapping the magnetic depressions in local time and latitude, the MAG observations provide comprehensive insight into the plasma distribution near the planet, which is complementary to that provided by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS). The spatial distribution shows that magnetic depressions are concentrated in two distinct regions. First, there is a population in the nightside equatorial region extending from dusk to dawn, which is offset northward from the planetary geographic equator by about 10°, commensurate with the offset of the planetary dipole. The extent of this population is indicative of the plasma sheet located in the equatorial magnetotail. A second concentration of magnetic depressions is found at high latitudes, predominantly on the dayside, and is associated with the magnetospheric cusp. The magnitude of the pressures associated with the depressions ranges from 0.1 to 3 nPa in the equatorial region, shows a systematic gradient from dusk to dawn, and reaches 10 nPa at high latitudes. We discuss the MAG observations and interpret the dusk-to-dawn gradient in the derived pressure distribution with a simple paradigm of particle drifts within Mercury's magnetosphere.

  1. MESSENGER observations of the plasma depletion layer in Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Baker, D. N.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements made with the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) and Magnetometer (MAG) are used to determine the properties of the plasma depletion layer (PDL) that is found just exterior to Mercury's dayside magnetopause. PDLs form when interplanetary magnetic flux tubes drape around and are compressed against an obstacle to the solar wind. Such obstacles include not only planetary magnetic fields such as that of Mercury, but also the ionospheres of comets and planets without internal fields such as Venus. It is this compression of the draped flux tubes against the magnetopause that causes the solar wind plasma to flow away from the subsolar region and deplete the flux tubes of plasma. Observations of the PDL at Earth have shown that such properties of this layer as its thickness and its reduction in density are strong functions of the solar wind Alfvénic Mach number and the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The MESSENGER measurements show that a PDL is indeed present at Mercury and confirm the theoretical prediction that the thickness and degree of depletion is enhanced for the very low Alfvénic Mach numbers in the inner Solar System, on average a factor of ~2 smaller than those at Earth. For several transits of the spacecraft through the magnetosheath near local noon, each lasting only a few minutes, the plasma and magnetic field of the PDL have been sampled, capturing a snapshot of the shocked solar wind near the stagnation point. The relative density reduction and thickness of the PDL are examined for each magnetospheric pass and placed into context with the set of available solar wind forcing conditions and IMF orientations in order to study the formation of these layers at Mercury with and without the presence of dayside magnetic reconnection.

  2. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere: What Have We Learned from MESSENGER?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2016-04-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is created by the solar wind interaction with its dipolar, spin-axis aligned, northward offset intrinsic magnetic field. Structurally it resembles that of the Earth in many respects, but the magnetic field intensities and plasma densities are all higher at Mercury due to conditions in the inner solar system. Magnetospheric plasma at Mercury appears to be primarily of solar wind origin, i.e. H+ and He++, but with 10% Na+ derived from the exosphere. Solar wind sputtering and other processes promote neutrals from the regolith into the exosphere where they may be ionized and incorporated into the magnetospheric plasma population. At this point in time, about one year after MESSENGER's impact and one year prior to BepiColombo's launch, we review MESSENGER's observations of magnetospheric dynamics and structure. In doing so we will provide our best answers to the following six questions: Question #1: How do magnetosheath conditions at Mercury differ from what is found at the other planets? Question #2: How do conditions in Mercury's magnetosheath contribute to the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere? How does magnetopause reconnection at Mercury differ from what is seen at Earth? Are flux transfer events (FTEs) a major driver of magnetospheric convection at Mercury? Question #3: Does reconnection ever erode the dayside magnetosphere to the point where the subsolar region of the surface is exposed to direct solar wind impact? To what extent do induction currents driven in Mercury's interior limit the solar wind flux to the surface? Do FTEs contribute significantly to the solar wind flux reaching the surface? Question #4: What effects do heavy planetary ions have on Mercury's magnetosphere? Question #5: Does Mercury's magnetotail store and dissipate magnetic energy in a manner analogous to substorms at Earth? How is the process affected by the lack of an ionosphere and the expected high electrical resistivity of the crust? Question #6: How

  3. MESSENGER Observations of ULF Waves in Mercury's Foreshock Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter J.; Bardsen, Scott; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth s is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury s bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury s foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury s foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the 1-Hz waves in the Earth s foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth s foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  4. A comprehensive study of Mercury and MESSENGER orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-10-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury for more than 4 years. The probe started its science mission in orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system were the instruments dedicated to geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury. X-band radio-tracking range-rate data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2.The extensive range data acquired in orbit around Mercury during the science mission (from April 2011 to April 2015), and during the three flybys of the planet in 2008 and 2009, provide a powerful dataset for the investigation of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession attributable to the gravitational flattening of the Sun (J2) and the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β, which describe the space curvature produced by a unit rest mass and the nonlinearity in superposition of gravity, respectively. Therefore, the estimation of Mercury's ephemeris can provide crucial information on the interior structure of the Sun and Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, the high correlation among J2, γ, and β complicates the combined recovery of these parameters, so additional assumptions are required, such as the Nordtvedt relationship η = 4β - γ - 3.We have modified our orbit determination software, GEODYN II, to enable the simultaneous integration of the spacecraft and central body trajectories. The combined estimation of the MESSENGER and Mercury orbits allowed us to determine a more accurate gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, and the values of GM and J2 for the Sun, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the solar mass

  5. Hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid activity profiles in experimental azotemia in the rat. Relationship to food intake and thyroid function.

    PubMed Central

    Kinlaw, W B; Schwartz, H L; Mariash, C N; Bingham, C; Carr, F E; Oppenheimer, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) activity profile in chronically azotemic rats and sought to determine whether the observed changes could be mediated either by reduced food intake or diminished thyroid function at the tissue level. mRNA activity profiles were produced by two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation of radioactively labeled products of an in vitro reticulocyte lysate system which had been programmed by hepatic RNA. Of the approximately 240 translational products identified in this system, seven sequences were consistently altered in azotemia. In pair-fed animals six of these also decreased, but the alterations in three were depressed to a significantly lesser extent in the pair-fed group. Moreover, analysis of covariance suggested that food intake could account for the differences in only one sequence. The possibility that the mRNA activity profile in azotemia could represent the effects of diminished thyroid function was minimized by the finding that the reductions in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels observed were due largely to reduced plasma protein binding, with maintenance of the mean free T4 and free T3 concentrations within the normal range. The changes in only one mRNA sequence could be related to free T3 levels alone. Our findings, therefore, indicate that although diminished food intake and reduced thyroid function may contribute to some of the observed changes in the mRNA activity profiles, the bulk of alterations in azotemia appear to be mediated by other mechanisms. The striking overlap between the sequences affected by azotemia and pair-feeding raises the speculation that altered gene expression in azotemia may reflect an impaired hepatic response at the pretranslational level to metabolic signals associated with food intake. Images PMID:6511910

  6. 3' UTR length and messenger ribonucleoprotein composition determine endocleavage efficiencies at termination codons.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Volker; Haberman, Nejc; Ottens, Franziska; Ule, Jernej; Gehring, Niels H

    2014-10-23

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) degrades different classes of mRNAs, including transcripts with premature termination codons (PTCs). The NMD factor SMG6 initiates degradation of substrate mRNAs by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we aim to delineate the cascade of NMD-activating events that culminate in endocleavage. We report that long 3' UTRs elicit SMG6-mediated endonucleolytic degradation. The presence of an exon-junction complex (EJC) within the 3' UTR strongly stimulates endocleavage in a distance-independent manner. The interaction of SMG6 with EJCs is not required for endocleavage. Whereas the core NMD component UPF2 supports endonucleolytic decay of long 3' UTR mRNAs, it is mostly dispensable during EJC-stimulated endocleavage. Using high-throughput sequencing, we map endocleavage positions of different PTC-containing reporter mRNAs and an endogenous NMD substrate to regions directly at and downstream of the termination codon. These results reveal how messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) parameters differentially influence SMG6-executed endonucleolysis and uncover central characteristics of this phenomenon associated with translation termination.

  7. Alternate Splicing of CD44 Messenger RNA in Prostate Cancer Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    CT stably knocked down to undetectable levels using anti-CT hammerhead ribozymes [25]. Salmon CT (BAChem, Torrance, CA) was used at a physiologic...called CTR-, derived from PC-3M cells after anti- CT receptor ribozyme knockdown of CTR[18]. CTR- cells have very low levels of CD44v protein[4

  8. Alternate Splicing of CD44 Messenger RNA in Prostate Cancer Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    CT-cells have endog- enous CT stably knocked down to undetectable levels using anti-CT hammerhead ribozymes [25]. Salmon CT (BAChem, Torrance, CA) was...and cells called CTR-, derived from PC-3M cells after anti-CT receptor ribozyme knock- down of CTR[18]. CTR-cells have very low levels of CD44v

  9. Alternate Splicing of CD44 Messenger RNA in Prostate Cancer Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    hammerhead ribozymes .25 Salmon CT (BAChem, Torrance, CA) was used at physiologic 50 nM dose14,16, which effectively alters CD44,6 or at 250 nM. To detect...receptor14), and cells called CTR-, derived from PC-3M cells after anti-CT receptor ribozyme knockdown of CTR.18 CTR- cells have very low levels of

  10. Analysis of imprinted messenger RNA expression in deceased transgenic cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Jia, R X; Zhou, Z R; Zhang, G M; Wang, L Z; Fan, Y X; Wan, Y J; Zhang, Y L; Wang, Z Y; Wang, F

    2016-01-29

    Genomic imprinting is an important epigenetic mechanism that has vital effects on fetal growth and development. We observed the differences in four tissues (heart, spleen, liver, and kidney) from dead transgenic cloned goats using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Eight imprinted genes in the tissues of dead transgenic cloned and normal goats were analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. H&E staining results from the abortion group indicated the lack of obvious morphological changes in heart and spleen tissues, while inflammatory cell infiltration and glomerular nephritis characteristics were observed in liver and kidney tissues, respectively. Compared to the control group, CDKN1C, H19, IGF2R, and SNRPN were significantly (P < 0.05) overexpressed in the heart tissue of the abortion group, while XIST was significantly reduced. In the liver tissues, CDKN1C and DLK1 expression decreased, while GNAS, H19, IGF2R, PEG3, and XIST expression increased significantly. In the spleen tissues, DLK1 expression increased, while GNAS, H19, IGF2R, PEG3, SNRPN, and XIST expression decreased. In the kidney tissues, CDKN1C, DLK1, GNAS, IGF2R, and PEG3 expression increased, while H19 and XIST expression decreased. The overall expression of imprinted genes was abnormal in different tissues of transgenic cloned goats, and the degree of abnormal genomic imprinting was more severe in the abortion group compared to the death and control groups. These results suggest that abnormal expression of imprinted genes may cause developmental defects in transgenic cloned goats. Moreover, abnormal epigenetic modifications may affect the reprogramming of transgenic donor cells.

  11. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin. PMID:25310649

  12. Benzo(A)pyrene induced glycine N-methyltransferase messenger rna expression in Fundulus heteroclitus embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a mediator in the methionine and folate cycles, and is responsible for the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to glycine forming S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sarcosine. All the known DNA methyltransferases use SAM as a methyl donor th...

  13. Microarray based analysis of temperature and oxidative stress induced messenger RNA in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Anthony D.; Imani, Reza A.; Blackburn, Vint R.; Cunningham, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The body’s defense against schistosome infection can take many forms. For example, upon developing acute schistosomiasis, patients often have fever coinciding with larval maturation, migration and early oviposition. As the infection becomes established, the parasite comes under oxidative stress generated by the host immune system. The most common treatment for schistosomiasis is the anti-helminthic drug praziquantel. Its effectiveness, however, is limited due to its inability to kill schistosomes 2 – 4 weeks post-infection. Clearly there is a need for new antischistosomal drugs. We hypothesize that gene products expressed as part of a protective response against heat and/or oxidative stress are potential therapeutic targets for future drug development. Using a 12,166 element oligonucleotide microarray to characterize Schistosoma mansoni genes induced by heat and oxidative stress we found that 1,878 S. mansoni elements were significantly induced by heat stress. These included previously reported heat-shock genes expressing homologs of HSP40, HSP70 and HSP86. One thousand and one elements were induced by oxidative stress including those expressing homologs of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Seventy-two elements were common to both stressors and could potentially be exploited in the development of novel anti-schistosomal therapeutics. PMID:18775750

  14. Melatonin, noncoding RNAs, messenger RNA stability and epigenetics--evidence, hints, gaps and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2014-10-10

    Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin.

  15. Comparison of nucleic acid targets prepared from total RNA or poly(A) RNA for DNA oligonucleotide microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kjell; Oyan, Anne Margrete; Rostad, Kari; Olsen, Sue; Bø, Trond Hellem; Salvesen, Helga B; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bruserud, Oystein; Halvorsen, Ole Johan; Akslen, Lars Andreas; Steen, Vidar M; Jonassen, Inge; Kalland, Karl-Henning

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work was to compare DNA microarray results using either total RNA or affinity-purified poly(A) RNA from the same biological sample for target preparation. The high-density oligonucleotide microarrays of both Agilent Technologies (based on two-color detection) and Applied Biosystems (based on single-color detection) were evaluated. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at different stages of target preparations. Poly(A) RNA versus total RNA target hybridizations exhibited slightly lower correlation coefficients than did self versus self hybridizations (i.e., poly(A) RNA targets vs. poly(A) RNA targets or total RNA targets vs. total RNA targets). Only a small fraction of all transcripts appeared to be significantly over- or underrepresented when total RNA targets or poly(A) RNA targets from the same biological sample were compared. Therefore, the conclusion is that poly(A) affinity purification from total RNA can be omitted during target preparation for routine mRNA expression analysis using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Among consistently overrepresented transcripts in total RNA targets were histone mRNAs known to lack poly(A) tails. Therefore, structurally exceptional RNA species can be identified by comparing targets derived from either poly(A) RNA or total RNA using microarray hybridization.

  16. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  17. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  18. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  19. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  20. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  1. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  2. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  3. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  4. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  5. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  6. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  7. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  8. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  9. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  10. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  11. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  12. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  13. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  14. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  15. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  16. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  17. Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides-ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, and ATP in particular, are cellular signal substances involved in the control of numerous (patho)physiological mechanisms. They provoke nucleotide receptor-mediated mechanisms in select target cells. But nucleotides can considerably expand their range of action. They function as primary messengers in intercellular communication by stimulating the release of other extracellular messenger substances. These in turn activate additional cellular mechanisms through their own receptors. While this applies also to other extracellular messengers, its omnipresence in the vertebrate organism is an outstanding feature of nucleotide signaling. Intercellular messenger substances released by nucleotides include neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors, a considerable variety of other proteins including enzymes, numerous cytokines, lipid mediators, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species. Moreover, nucleotides activate or co-activate growth factor receptors. In the case of hormone release, the initially paracrine or autocrine nucleotide-mediated signal spreads through to the entire organism. The examples highlighted in this commentary suggest that acting as ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release is one of the major functional roles of extracellular nucleotides. While initiation of messenger release by nucleotides has been unraveled in many contexts, it may have been overlooked in others. It can be anticipated that additional nucleotide-driven messenger functions will be uncovered with relevance for both understanding physiology and development of therapy.

  18. Results and prospects in multi-messenger particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    In high-energy particle astrophysics the old days were certainly not better than these. Our field has thrived in the past decade with experiments covering thousands of square kilometers to measure the suppression in the flux of the highest energy cosmic rays ever observed, instrumenting a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice to discover astrophysical neutrinos, and measuring a change in arm length as small as 10-19 m for the ground-breaking direct observation of gravitational waves. Additionally, the current generation of space-borne and ground-based gamma-ray experiments have revealed a plethora of gamma-ray sources, including pulsars, compact binaries, the galactic center, and extragalactic sources such as starburst galaxies and radio galaxies. Before the next generation of instruments bring us yet another order of magnitude in sensitivity, we can combine current observations to probe physics beyond the standard model, and to extend the high-energy frontier well above the energies accessible to laboratory accelerators. One example of this potential is the search for dark-matter annihilation and decay products. To use the multi-messenger approach effectively for probing dark-matter signatures and physics beyond the LHC energy requires understanding the origin (or acceleration mechanism) and the propagation processes. High energy protons and nuclei, neutrinos, gamma-rays, X-rays, and gravitational waves bring new and complementary views of the astrophysical sources. By comparing observations through different windows, we can use the sites of violent phenomena as a laboratory to probe the physical processes under extreme conditions throughout the Universe, and to test the fundamental laws of particle physics and gravitation. As a community we need to engage in a bold synergistic approach to understanding the violent processes that give rise to the high-energy cosmic phenomena in the Universe. In this invited talk, I will present on-going multi-messenger studies to

  19. Navigating the MESSENGER Spacecraft through End of Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, C. G.; Williams, B. G.; Williams, K. E.; Taylor, A. H.; Carranza, E.; Page, B. R.; Stanbridge, D. R.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; O'Shaughnessy, D. J.; McAdams, J. V.; Calloway, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury from March 2011 until the end of April 2015, when it impacted the planetary surface after propellant reserves used to maintain the orbit were depleted. This highly successful mission was led by the principal investigator, Sean C. Solomon, of Columbia University. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) designed and assembled the spacecraft and served as the home for spacecraft operations. Spacecraft navigation for the entirety of the mission was provided by the Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics Practice (SNAFD) of KinetX Aerospace. Orbit determination (OD) solutions were generated through processing of radiometric tracking data provided by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) using the MIRAGE suite of orbital analysis tools. The MESSENGER orbit was highly eccentric, with periapsis at a high northern latitude and periapsis altitude in the range 200-500 km for most of the orbital mission phase. In a low-altitude "hover campaign" during the final two months of the mission, periapsis altitudes were maintained within a narrow range between about 35 km and 5 km. Navigating a spacecraft so near a planetary surface presented special challenges. Tasks required to meet those challenges included the modeling and estimation of Mercury's gravity field and of solar and planetary radiation pressure, and the design of frequent orbit-correction maneuvers. Superior solar conjunction also presented observational modeling issues. One key to the overall success of the low-altitude hover campaign was a strategy to utilize data from an onboard laser altimeter as a cross-check on the navigation team's reconstructed and predicted estimates of periapsis altitude. Data obtained from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on a daily basis provided near-real-time feedback that proved invaluable in evaluating alternative orbit estimation strategies, and

  20. MESSENGER Observations of Magnetopause Structure and Dynamics at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Baker, D. N.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    MESSENGER observations during the first three Mercury years of orbit (one Mercury year equals 88 Earth days) have been used to characterize the structure of Mercury's dayside magnetopause as a function of magnetic field properties in the incident magnetosheath. Measurements collected by MESSENGER's Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer yielded a minimum of two dayside magnetopause encounters per day due to the 12-h orbit of the spacecraft during this interval. After applying a minimum variance analysis (MVA) to all distinct boundary crossings, we further examined only those with an intermediate to minimum eigenvalue ratio greater than 5. For the 43 events meeting this criterion, we determined (1) the normal component of the magnetic field across the current sheet, from which we inferred the rate of reconnection, (2) the temporal duration and, with certain assumptions, the speed and thickness of the magnetopause, and (3) the reconnection rate as a function of magnetic shear angle and plasma beta (the ratio of total thermal pressure to magnetic pressure) across the boundary. In boundary-normal coordinates we identified an average normal magnetic field component of 20 nT, enabling the entry of solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere. The magnetopause velocity is estimated to be on the order of 10 km/s by assuming a current sheet thickness of 7 times the gyroradius of a 1 keV solar wind proton. From this result we infer the average boundary thickness to be 49 ± 7 km, which is comparable to ~3 proton gyroradii. For a magnetosheath flow of 200 km/s and a reconnection X-line length of 3 RM, we calculate an average electric potential drop of 29 kV at the magnetopause. The rate of reconnection, the ratio of the normal magnetic field component to the total field magnitude just inside the magnetopause, is measured to be 0.15 ± 0.02. This rate, which is approximately one order of magnitude larger than typical Earth observations, is determined to be independent

  1. Observations of Mercury's Northern Cusp Region with MESSENGER's Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We have identified Mercury's northern cusp region from orbital observations with the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The cusp is identified from the dayside depression in the total magnetic field after removing the field predicted by a paraboloid magnetospheric model from the data. The model includes long-wavelength fields due to the internal dipole, the magnetopause, and the magnetotail, parameterized by a dipole moment of 195 nT-RM3 (where RM is Mercury's radius), offset northward from the planetary center by 484 km and aligned with the planet's spin axis, a paraboloidal magnetopause with a subsolar standoff distance of 1.4 RM, a distance to the inner edge of the tail current sheet of 1.43 RM, a tail current sheet half-width of 0.1 RM, and tail lobe field of 100 nT. We have confirmed that the cusp identification is robust with respect to changes in the parameters in the baseline magnetospheric model. An increase in the high-frequency (1-10 Hz) variability of the magnetic field is also observed on each pass at these times. A superposed epoch analysis, in which individual profiles are aligned in time on their respective cusp midpoints and stacked, indicates that on average the latitudinal extent of the cusp region is 11°, centered on 71.2° N. Cusp observations extend in local time from 7.1 hr to 17.1 hr. The minimum southerly latitude of the cusp observed to date is 56.5° N, and the maximum is 83.1° N. The general location and dimensions of the high-latitude cusp region are in agreement with those indicated by observations with MESSENGER'S Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer. To date, no clear correlation is observed between the cusp traversal time or the magnitude of the magnetic field depression and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, solar wind density, or solar wind velocity. However, the largest-amplitude magnetic field depressions associated with the cusp are observed

  2. MESSENGER Observations of the Plasma Environment near Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Gloeckler, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft measured the bulk plasma characteristics of Mercury’s magnetosphere and solar wind environment with the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) sensor during three flybys of the planet on 14 January 2008, 6 October 2008, and 29 September 2009. FIPS has a near-hemispheric instantaneous field of view and provides plasma and compositional parameters for particles from 100 eV to 13 keV energy per charge at 8-s time resolution. In combination with magnetic field data, we first identified macroscopic features of Mercury's plasma environment observed during the three flybys, including bow-shock and magnetopause crossings as well as the magnetospheric plasma sheet and lobe. We then devised procedures to recover density and temperature through use of a software instrument model that includes the time-dependent instrument field of view, as well as spacecraft position and velocity coordinates. Finally, we recovered parameters from flow-breaking regions, where magnetospheric flow stagnates. In these regions, recovery is greatly simplified by the assumption of zero plasma velocity toward the planet, thus providing a good place for the first application of our recovery procedure.

  3. Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L.; Torrence, Mark H.; Perry, Mark E.; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W.; Taylor, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/M(R(exp 2) = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(sub m)/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. A model for Mercury s radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  4. Multi-messenger tests of the IceCube excess

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Collaboration has recently found evidence for an excess of high energy neutrinos above atmospheric backgrounds. The origin of this “IceCube excess” is unknown, but multi-messenger relations with cosmic rays (CRs) and γ-rays can help to pinpoint possible candidate sources. The primary CRs associated with the signal are expected to reach energies of about 40 PeV per nucleon which can be satisfied by (extreme) Galactic or extragalactic sources. I discuss possible relations of the IceCube excess with the sources of ultra-high energy CRs and implications of γ-ray observations for various Galactic or extragalactic candidate sources. The contribution of Galactic sources can be tested via primary TeV-PeV γ-rays from the decay of neutral pions produced by the same CRs responsible for the neutrino emission. Hadronuclear interactions of CRs in extragalactic sources can be constrained by the GeV-TeV diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background.

  5. MESSENGER observations of energetic electron acceleration in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Ryan; Slavin, James A.; Baker, Daniel; Raines, Jim; Lawrence, David

    2016-10-01

    Energetic particle bursts within Mercury's magnetosphere have been a source of curiosity and controversy since Mariner 10's flybys. Unfortunately, instrumental effects prevent an unambiguous determination of species, flux, and energy spectrum for the Mariner 10 events. MESSENGER data taken by the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) have now shown that these energetic particle bursts are composed entirely of electrons. EPS made directional measurements of these electrons from ~30 to 300 keV at 3 s resolution, and while the energy of these electrons sometimes exceeded 200 keV, the energy distributions usually exhibited a cutoff near 100 keV. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has also provided measurements of these electron events, at higher time resolution (10 ms) and energetic threshold (> 50 keV) compared to EPS. We focus on GRS electron events near the plasma sheet in Mercury's magnetotail to identify reconnection-associated acceleration mechanisms. We present observations of acceleration associated with dipolarization events (betratron acceleration), flux ropes (Fermi acceleration), and tail loading/unloading (X-line acceleration). We find that the most common source of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetosphere are dipolarization events similar to those first observed by Mariner 10. Further, a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry is found with dipolarization-associated energetic particle bursts being more common on the dawn side of the magnetotail.

  6. Mercury's gravity, tides, and spin from MESSENGER radio science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    We analyze radio tracking data obtained during 1311 orbits of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft in the period March 2011 to April 2014. A least squares minimization of the residuals between observed and computed values of two-way range and Doppler allows us to solve for a model describing Mercury's gravity, tidal response, and spin state. We use a spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field to degree and order 40 and report error bars corresponding to 10 times the formal uncertainties of the fit. Our estimate of the product of Mercury's mass and the gravitational constant, GM = (22031.87404 ± 9×10-4) km3 s-2, is in excellent agreement with published results. Our solution for the geophysically important second-degree coefficients (C¯2,0=-2.25100×10-5±1.3×10-9, C¯2,2=1.24973×10-5±1.2×10-9) confirms previous estimates to better than 0.4% and, therefore, inferences about Mercury's moment of inertia and interior structure. Our estimate of the tidal Love number k2 = 0.464 ± 0.023 indicates that Mercury's mantle may be hotter and weaker than previously thought. Our spin state solution suggests that gravity-based estimates of Mercury's spin axis orientation are marginally consistent with previous measurements of the orientation of the crust.

  7. Topicality and Impact in Social Media: Diverse Messages, Focused Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user’s interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact. PMID:25710685

  8. Attacked from All Sides: RNA Decay in Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    Molleston, Jerome M.; Cherry, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system has evolved a number of sensors that recognize viral RNA (vRNA) to restrict infection, yet the full spectrum of host-encoded RNA binding proteins that target these foreign RNAs is still unknown. The RNA decay machinery, which uses exonucleases to degrade aberrant RNAs largely from the 5′ or 3′ end, is increasingly recognized as playing an important role in antiviral defense. The 5′ degradation pathway can directly target viral messenger RNA (mRNA) for degradation, as well as indirectly attenuate replication by limiting specific pools of endogenous RNAs. The 3′ degradation machinery (RNA exosome) is emerging as a downstream effector of a diverse array of vRNA sensors. This review discusses our current understanding of the roles of the RNA decay machinery in controlling viral infection. PMID:28054965

  9. The emerging role of RNA editing in plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT All true metazoans modify their RNAs by converting specific adenosine residues to inosine. Because inosine binds to cytosine, it is a biological mimic for guanosine. This subtle change, termed RNA editing, can have diverse effects on various RNA-mediated cellular pathways, including RNA interference, innate immunity, retrotransposon defense and messenger RNA recoding. Because RNA editing can be regulated, it is an ideal tool for increasing genetic diversity, adaptation and environmental acclimation. This review will cover the following themes related to RNA editing: (1) how it is used to modify different cellular RNAs, (2) how frequently it is used by different organisms to recode mRNA, (3) how specific recoding events regulate protein function, (4) how it is used in adaptation and (5) emerging evidence that it can be used for acclimation. Organismal biologists with an interest in adaptation and acclimation, but with little knowledge of RNA editing, are the intended audience. PMID:26085659

  10. tRNA--the golden standard in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Barciszewska, Mirosława Z; Perrigue, Patrick M; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) represent a major class of RNA molecules. Their primary function is to help decode a messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence in order to synthesize protein and thus ensures the precise translation of genetic information that is imprinted in DNA. The discovery of tRNA in the late 1950's provided critical insight into a genetic machinery when little was known about the central dogma of molecular biology. In 1965, Robert Holley determined the first nucleotide sequence of alanine transfer RNA (tRNA(Ala)) which earned him the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Today, tRNA is one of the best described and characterized biological molecules. Here we review some of the key historical events in tRNA research which led to breakthrough discoveries and new developments in molecular biology.

  11. The emerging role of RNA editing in plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2015-06-01

    All true metazoans modify their RNAs by converting specific adenosine residues to inosine. Because inosine binds to cytosine, it is a biological mimic for guanosine. This subtle change, termed RNA editing, can have diverse effects on various RNA-mediated cellular pathways, including RNA interference, innate immunity, retrotransposon defense and messenger RNA recoding. Because RNA editing can be regulated, it is an ideal tool for increasing genetic diversity, adaptation and environmental acclimation. This review will cover the following themes related to RNA editing: (1) how it is used to modify different cellular RNAs, (2) how frequently it is used by different organisms to recode mRNA, (3) how specific recoding events regulate protein function, (4) how it is used in adaptation and (5) emerging evidence that it can be used for acclimation. Organismal biologists with an interest in adaptation and acclimation, but with little knowledge of RNA editing, are the intended audience.

  12. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  13. Planetary ephemeris construction and general relativity tests of PPN-formalism with MESSENGER radioscience data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the Mercury orbit. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (β and γ) are most stringent than previous results.

  14. Micro-RNA speciation in fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J

    2007-02-12

    Micro-RNAs constitute a family of small noncoding ribonucleic acids that are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Although micro-RNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neural development, the role of micro-RNAs in brain aging and neurodegeneration is not known. This study examined micro-RNA abundance in the hippocampal region of fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease brain. The data indicate that micro-RNAs encoding miR-9, miR-124a, miR-125b, miR-128, miR-132 and miR-219 are abundantly represented in fetal hippocampus, are differentially regulated in aged brain, and an alteration in specific micro-RNA complexity occurs in Alzheimer hippocampus. These data are consistent with the idea that altered micro-RNA-mediated processing of messenger RNA populations may contribute to atypical mRNA abundance and neural dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease brain.

  15. Early MESSENGER Results for Less Abundant or Weakly Emitting Species in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    Now that the Messenger spacecraft is in orbit about Mercury, the extended observing time enables searches for exospheric species that are less abundant or weakly emitting compared with those for which emission has previously been detected. Many of these species cannot be observed from the ground because of terrestrial atmospheric absorption. We report here on the status of MESSENGER orbital-phase searches for additional species in Mercury's exosphere.

  16. Survival Strategies in the Aquatic and Terrestrial World: The Impact of Second Messengers on Cyanobacterial Processes

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, Marco; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Second messengers are intracellular substances regulated by specific external stimuli globally known as first messengers. Cells rely on second messengers to generate rapid responses to environmental changes and the importance of their roles is becoming increasingly realized in cellular signaling research. Cyanobacteria are photooxygenic bacteria that inhabit most of Earth’s environments. The ability of cyanobacteria to survive in ecologically diverse habitats is due to their capacity to adapt and respond to environmental changes. This article reviews known second messenger-controlled physiological processes in cyanobacteria. Second messengers used in these systems include the element calcium (Ca2+), nucleotide-based guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate (ppGpp or pppGpp, represented as (p)ppGpp), cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), cyclic guanosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cGMP), and cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP), and the gaseous nitric oxide (NO). The discussion focuses on processes central to cyanobacteria, such as nitrogen fixation, light perception, photosynthesis-related processes, and gliding motility. In addition, we address future research trajectories needed to better understand the signaling networks and cross talk in the signaling pathways of these molecules in cyanobacteria. Second messengers have significant potential to be adapted as technological tools and we highlight possible novel and practical applications based on our understanding of these molecules and the signaling networks that they control. PMID:25411927

  17. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  18. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  19. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  20. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  1. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  2. RNA catalyzes nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Fica, Sebastian M.; Tuttle, Nicole; Novak, Thaddeus; Li, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Jun; Koodathingal, Prakash; Dai, Qing; Staley, Jonathan P.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In nuclear pre-messenger RNA splicing, introns are excised by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton machine composed of both proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Over thirty years ago, following the discovery of self-splicing group II intron RNAs, the snRNAs were hypothesized to catalyze splicing. However, no definitive evidence for a role of either RNA or protein in catalysis by the spliceosome has been reported to date. By using metal rescue strategies, here we show that the U6 snRNA catalyzes both splicing reactions by positioning divalent metals that stabilize the leaving groups during each reaction. Strikingly, all of the U6 catalytic metal ligands we identified correspond to the ligands observed to position catalytic, divalent metals in crystal structures of a group II intron RNA. These findings indicate that group II introns and the spliceosome share common catalytic mechanisms, and likely common evolutionary origins. Our results demonstrate that RNA mediates catalysis within the spliceosome. PMID:24196718

  3. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters <50 km in diameter (<20 km in some places) are ascribed to extensive formation of intercrater plains. Estimates of the cratering chronology of Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters <10 km diameter on older plains surfaces. The history of high-velocity bombardment has resulted in the production of abundant impact melts and has churned and processed the regolith, and eroded older topography, more thoroughly than on other Solar System bodies. Although the possible role of Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  4. Limits to Mercury's Magnesium Exosphere from MESSENGER Second Flyby Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Bradley, E. Todd; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery measurements of Mercury's exospheric magnesium, obtained by the MErcury Surface. Space ENvironment, GEochemistry. and Ranging (MESSENGER) probe during its second Mercury flyby, are modeled to constrain the source and loss processes for this neutral species. Fits to a Chamberlain exosphere reveal that at least two source temperatures are required to reconcile the distribution of magnesium measured far from and near the planet: a hot ejection process at the equivalent temperature of several tens of thousands of degrees K, and a competing, cooler source at temperatures as low as 400 K. For the energetic component, our models indicate that the column abundance that can be attributed to sputtering under constant southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions is at least a factor of five less than the rate dictated by the measurements, Although highly uncertain, this result suggests that another energetic process, such as the rapid dissociation of exospheric MgO, may be the main source of the distant neutral component. If meteoroid and micrometeoroid impacts eject mainly molecules, the total amount of magnesium at altitudes exceeding approximately 100 km is found to be consistent with predictions by impact vaporization models for molecule lifetimes of no more than two minutes. Though a sharp increase in emission observed near the dawn terminator region can be reproduced if a single meteoroid enhanced the impact vapor at equatorial dawn, it is much more likely that observations in this region, which probe heights increasingly near the surface, indicate a reservoir of volatile Mg being acted upon by lower-energy source processes.

  5. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  6. MESSENGER observations of flux ropes in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, Gina A.; Slavin, James A.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-09-01

    We report an investigation of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail conducted with MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer measurements during seven "hot seasons" when the periapsis of the spacecraft orbit is on Mercury's dayside. Flux ropes are formed in the cross-tail current sheet by reconnection. We have analyzed 49 flux ropes observed between 1.7 RM and 2.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) down the tail from the center of the planet, for which minimum variance analysis indicates that the spacecraft passed near the central axis of the structure. An average Alfvén speed of 465 km s-1 is measured in the plasma sheet surrounding these flux ropes. Under the assumption that the flux ropes moved at the local Alfvén speed, the mean duration of 0.74±0.15 s determined for these structures implies a typical diameter of ~345 km, or ~0.14 RM, which is comparable to a proton gyroradius in the plasma sheet of ~380 km. We successfully fit the magnetic signatures of 16 flux ropes to a force-free model. The mean radius and core field determined in this manner were ~450 km, or ~0.18 RM, and ~40 nT, respectively. A superposed epoch analysis of the magnetic field during these events shows variations similar to those observed at Earth, including the presence of a post-plasmoid plasma sheet, filled with disconnected magnetic flux, but the timescales are 40 times shorter at Mercury. The results of this flux rope survey indicate that intense magnetic reconnection occurs frequently in the cross-tail current layer of this small but extremely dynamic magnetosphere.

  7. Limits to Mercury's magnesium exosphere from MESSENGER second flyby observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Todd Bradley, E.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.

    2011-12-01

    The discovery measurements of Mercury's exospheric magnesium, obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) probe during its second Mercury flyby, are modeled to constrain the source and loss processes for this neutral species. Fits to a Chamberlain exosphere reveal that at least two source temperatures are required to reconcile the distribution of magnesium measured far from and near the planet: a hot ejection process at the equivalent temperature of several tens of thousands of degrees K, and a competing, cooler source at temperatures as low as 400 K. For the energetic component, our models indicate that the column abundance that can be attributed to sputtering under constant southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions is at least a factor of five less than the rate dictated by the measurements. Although highly uncertain, this result suggests that another energetic process, such as the rapid dissociation of exospheric MgO, may be the main source of the distant neutral component. If meteoroid and micrometeoroid impacts eject mainly molecules, the total amount of magnesium at altitudes exceeding ˜100 km is found to be consistent with predictions by impact vaporization models for molecule lifetimes of no more than two minutes. Though a sharp increase in emission observed near the dawn terminator region can be reproduced if a single meteoroid enhanced the impact vapor at equatorial dawn, it is much more likely that observations in this region, which probe heights increasingly near the surface, indicate a reservoir of volatile Mg being acted upon by lower-energy source processes.

  8. Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from MESSENGER Magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2013-05-01

    We have established the average shape and location of Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from orbital observations by the MESSENGER Magnetometer. We fit empirical models to midpoints of boundary crossings and probability density maps of the magnetopause and bow shock positions. The magnetopause was fit by a surface for which the position R from the planetary dipole varies as [1 + cos(θ)]-α, where θ is the angle between R and the dipole-Sun line, the subsolar standoff distance Rss is 1.45 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius), and the flaring parameter α = 0.5. The average magnetopause shape and location were determined under a mean solar wind ram pressure PRam of 14.3 nPa. The best fit bow shock shape established under an average Alfvén Mach number (MA) of 6.6 is described by a hyperboloid having Rss = 1.96 RM and an eccentricity of 1.02. These boundaries move as PRam and MA vary, but their shapes remain unchanged. The magnetopause Rss varies from 1.55 to 1.35 RM for PRam in the range of 8.8-21.6 nPa. The bow shock Rss varies from 2.29 to 1.89 RM for MA in the range of 4.12-11.8. The boundaries are well approximated by figures of revolution. Additional quantifiable effects of the interplanetary magnetic field are masked by the large dynamic variability of these boundaries. The magnetotail surface is nearly cylindrical, with a radius of ~2.7 RM at a distance of 3 RM downstream of Mercury. By comparison, Earth's magnetotail flaring continues until a downstream distance of ~10 Rss.

  9. Reference surfaces of the planet Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Roohollah; Ardalan, Alireza A.; Farahani, Soheil Vasheghani

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the reference surfaces of the planet Mercury obtained by the MESSENGER mission in order to provide a geodetic reference system (GRS) for the planet. The reference surfaces under consideration are the geoid and the reference ellipsoid. The reference ellipsoid is a triaxial planetocentric equipotential ellipsoid that best fits the geoid. To determine the reference surfaces, two methods are presented. In this line, the shape of the planet is sampled by expanding the global shape model (GSM) GTMES_125V03_SHA only up to the degree strength of the global gravity model (GGM) GGMES_50V06_SHA. The spatial resolution of the sampling points is selected based on the degree strength and the latitude of the location. According to our preferred method, we estimate the values for the semi-major equatorial axis, semi-minor equatorial axis, and polar axis of the reference ellipsoid equal to 2, 439, 422 ± 368m , 2, 439, 304 ± 368m , and 2, 439, 178 ± 368m , respectively. Moreover, we estimate the geoid potential value equal to 9, 032, 044 ± 1361m2 /s2 . The three axes of the reference ellipsoid give the polar and equatorial flattenings equal to (100 ± 213) ×10-6 and (48 ± 213) ×10-6 , respectively. However, we show that the best-fitting ellipsoid gives the polar and equatorial flattenings equal to (896 ± 213) ×10-6 and (426 ± 213) ×10-6 , respectively. The best-fitting ellipsoid is a triaxial ellipsoid that fits the shape of Mercury in a least-squares sense. The significant discrepancy observed between the flattenings of the two ellipsoids is a consequence of Mercury's geophysical characteristics together with its non-hydrostatic equilibrium. The results provided in the present work prove adequate for defining a promised GRS for the planet Mercury.

  10. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  11. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  12. From the RNA world to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Sullenger, Bruce A; Nair, Smita

    2016-06-17

    The study of RNA has continually emphasized the structural and functional versatility of RNA molecules. This versatility has inspired translational and clinical researchers to explore the utility of RNA-based therapeutic agents for a wide variety of medical applications. Several RNA therapeutics, with diverse modes of action, are being evaluated in large late-stage clinical trials, and many more are in early clinical development. Hundreds of patients are enrolled in large trials testing messenger RNAs to combat cancer, small interfering RNAs to treat renal and hepatic disorders, and aptamers to combat ocular and cardiovascular disease. Results from these studies are generating considerable interest among the biomedical community and the public and will be important for the future development of this emerging class of therapeutic agents.

  13. RNA interference in neuroscience: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Miller, Victor M; Paulson, Henry L; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro

    2005-12-01

    1.RNA interference (RNAi) is a recently discovered biological pathway that mediates post-transcriptional gene silencing. The process of RNAi is orchestrated by an increasingly well-understood cellular machinery. 2. The common entry point for both natural and engineered RNAi are double stranded RNA molecules known as short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that mediate the sequence-specific identification and degradation of the targeted messenger RNA (mRNA). The study and manipulation of these siRNAs has recently revolutionized biomedical research. 3. In this review, we first provide a brief overview of the process of RNAi, focusing on its potential role in brain function and involvement in neurological disease. We then describe the methods developed to manipulate RNAi in the laboratory and its applications to neuroscience. Finally, we focus on the potential therapeutic application of RNAi to neurological disease.

  14. Distribution of 5'-triphosphate termini on the mRNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bieger, C D; Nierlich, D P

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the distribution of 5'-nucleoside triphosphates on the RNA in Escherichia coli. These groups represent the initial nucleoside triphosphate incorporated when RNA polymerase initiates transcription. It was estimated that at least 15% of polysome-associated messengers had triphosphates. This was interpreted to mean that removal of the triphosphate or messenger leader is not necessary for the functioning of most mRNAs but that a substantial amount of messenger processing occurs in the polysome pool. We found that the ratio of GTP- to ATP-initiated messengers was about 2 to 1. Since prior work has indicated that G- and A-initiated RNAs decay at the same rate and since a compilation of messenger start sites shows an A preference, this value implies that there is a significant physiological selection of G-initiated transcripts. We also characterized the 5'-terminal groups on RNAs in other fractions. A small amount was found associated with 30S ribosomes, presumably in initiation complexes; such complexes have not previously been detected in situ. In addition, it was concluded that the 5' terminus of rRNA precursors is processed more rapidly than is implied by the current literature. PMID:2464575

  15. Non-viral Methods for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kun; Huang, Leaf

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) as a mechanism to selectively degrade messenger RNA (mRNA) expression has emerged as a potential novel approach for drug target validation and the study of functional genomics. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA) therapeutics has developed rapidly and already there are clinical trials ongoing or planned. Although other challenges remain, delivery strategies for siRNA become the main hurdle that must be resolved prior to the full-scale clinical development of siRNA therapeutics. This article provides an overview of the current delivery strategies for synthetic siRNA, focusing on the targeted, self-assembled nanoparticles which show potential to become a useful and efficient tool in cancer therapy. PMID:19115957

  16. miRNA Inhibition in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Kelsey R.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are noncoding RNA that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has recently motivated expanding efforts toward development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair. PMID:25553957

  17. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels in disrupted human anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ian K Y; Marchuk, Linda; Hart, David A; Frank, Cyril B

    2003-02-01

    Thirty patients had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for ongoing instability. Two groups were defined according to gross morphologic features identified during reconstruction: anterior cruciate ligament disruptions with scars attached to a structure in the joint and disruptions without reattachments. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a subset of extracellular matrix molecules, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors was done on samples of scarred anterior cruciate ligament tissue removed during reconstructive surgery. Results of the nonattached scar group showed significantly increased mRNA levels for Type I collagen, and an increased Type I to Type III collagen ratio compared with that for the attached scar group. In the first year after injury, decorin mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group also were significantly higher than in the attached scar group. Biglycan mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group correlated closely with Type I collagen mRNA levels. These results suggest differences in cellular expression in torn anterior cruciate ligaments that attach to structures in the joint versus those which do not. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been delineated, different molecular signals may influence the gross morphologic features of anterior cruciate ligament disruptions or alternatively, differing gross morphologic features may be subject to different mechanical loads leading to altered molecular expression. However, the finding of endogenous cellular activity in injured anterior cruciate ligaments raises the possibility that this activity may be enhanced to improve outcomes.

  18. Origins of tmRNA: the missing link in the birth of protein synthesis?

    PubMed

    Macé, Kevin; Gillet, Reynald

    2016-09-30

    The RNA world hypothesis refers to the early period on earth in which RNA was central in assuring both genetic continuity and catalysis. The end of this era coincided with the development of the genetic code and protein synthesis, symbolized by the apparition of the first non-random messenger RNA (mRNA). Modern transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is a unique hybrid molecule which has the properties of both mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA). It acts as a key molecule during trans-translation, a major quality control pathway of modern bacterial protein synthesis. tmRNA shares many common characteristics with ancestral RNA. Here, we present a model in which proto-tmRNAs were the first molecules on earth to support non-random protein synthesis, explaining the emergence of early genetic code. In this way, proto-tmRNA could be the missing link between the first mRNA and tRNA molecules and modern ribosome-mediated protein synthesis.

  19. Origins of tmRNA: the missing link in the birth of protein synthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Macé, Kevin; Gillet, Reynald

    2016-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis refers to the early period on earth in which RNA was central in assuring both genetic continuity and catalysis. The end of this era coincided with the development of the genetic code and protein synthesis, symbolized by the apparition of the first non-random messenger RNA (mRNA). Modern transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)