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Sample records for meta-analysis identifies metastatic

  1. Survival after Metastasectomy for Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaibhav; Collazo Lorduy, Ana; Stern, Aaron; Fahmy, Omar; Pinotti, Rachel; Galsky, Matthew D.; Gakis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is standard treatment for metastatic urothelial carcinoma; however, the vast majority of patients experience disease progression. As systemic therapy alone is rarely curative for the treatment of metastatic urothelial cancer, not only are new therapies needed but also refinement of general treatment principles. Herein, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the role of metastasectomy in metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature regarding local treatment for metastatic urothelial carcinoma. An online electronic search of the PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to identify peer-reviewed articles. All procedures were performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Information was then extracted including number of patients, gender, the site of the primary urothelial tumor, site of metastasis, chemotherapy before or after metastasectomy, overall survival (OS), and disease specific survival (DSS) after metastasectomy. A meta-analysis was performed with those studies with sufficient survival data to obtain pooled overall survival. The article quality was assessed using the Cochrane Handbook “risk of bias” tool. Results: Seventeen out of 3963 articles were eligible for review between 1990–2015, including a total of 412 patients. The mean time to recurrence after metastasectomy was 14.25 months. The overall survival from time of metastasectomy ranged from 2 to 60 months. Pooled analyses of studies reported survival data revealed an improved overall survival for patients treated with metastasectomy compared with non-surgical treatment of metastatic lesions (HR 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49–0.81). All, except for three studies, were retrospective and non-randomized, leading to a high risk of bias associated with patient selection, patient attrition, and reporting. Such high

  2. Surrogate endpoints for overall survival in metastatic melanoma: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Keith T; Hennig, Michael; Lee, Sandra J; Ascierto, Paolo A; Dummer, Reinhard; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hauschild, Axel; Kefford, Richard; Kirkwood, John M; Long, Georgina V; Lorigan, Paul; Mackensen, Andreas; McArthur, Grant; O'Day, Steven; Patel, Poulam M; Robert, Caroline; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    Recent phase 3 trials have shown an overall survival benefit in metastatic melanoma. We aimed to assess whether progression-free survival (PFS) could be regarded as a reliable surrogate for overall survival through a meta-analysis of randomised trials. We systematically reviewed randomised trials comparing treatment regimens in metastatic melanoma that included dacarbazine as the control arm, and which reported both PFS and overall survival with a standard hazard ratio (HR). We correlated HRs for overall survival and PFS, weighted by sample size or by precision of the HR estimate, assuming fixed and random effects. We did sensitivity analyses according to presence of crossover, trial size, and dacarbazine dose. After screening 1649 reports and meeting abstracts published before Sept 8, 2013, we identified 12 eligible randomised trials that enrolled 4416 patients with metastatic melanoma. Irrespective of weighting strategy, we noted a strong correlation between the treatment effects for PFS and overall survival, which seemed independent of treatment type. Pearson correlation coefficients were 0·71 (95% CI 0·29-0·90) with a random-effects assumption, 0·85 (0·59-0·95) with a fixed-effects assumption, and 0·89 (0·68-0·97) with sample-size weighting. For nine trials without crossover, the correlation coefficient was 0·96 (0·81-0·99), which decreased to 0·93 (0·74-0·98) when two additional trials with less than 50% crossover were included. Inclusion of mature follow-up data after at least 50% crossover (in vemurafenib and dabrafenib phase 3 trials) weakened the PFS to overall survival correlation (0·55, 0·03-0·84). Inclusion of trials with no or little crossover with the random-effects assumption yielded a conservative statement of the PFS to overall survival correlation of 0·85 (0·51-0·96). PFS can be regarded as a robust surrogate for overall survival in dacarbazine-controlled randomised trials of metastatic melanoma; we postulate that this

  3. Outcomes of patients with metastatic phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Oksana; Young, William F; Gruber, Lucinda; Smestad, John; Yan, Qi; Ponce, Oscar J; Prokop, Larry; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Bancos, Irina

    2017-07-26

    The outcomes of patients with metastatic phaeochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL) are unclear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of baseline characteristics and mortality rates of patients with metastatic PHEO and PGL (PPGL). Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Scopus, Web of Science, and references of key articles were searched from inception to 2016. Studies comprised ≥20 patients with metastatic PPGL and reported baseline characteristics and follow-up data. Reviewers extracted standardized data and assessed risk of bias using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa tool. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool event rates across studies. Twenty retrospective noncomparative studies reported on 1338 patients with metastatic PHEO (685/1296, 52.9%) and PGL (611/1296, 47.1%), diagnosed at a mean age of 43.9 ± 5.2 years. Mean follow-up was 6.3 ± 3.2 years. Of 532 patients with reported data, 40.4% had synchronous metastases. Five-year (7 studies, n = 738) and 10-year (2 studies, n = 55) mortality rates for patients with metastatic PPGL were 37% (95% CI, 24%-51%) and 29% (95% CI, 17%-42%), respectively. Higher mortality was associated with male sex (RR 1.50; 95% CI, 1.11-2.02) and synchronous metastases (RR 2.43; 95% CI, 1.01-5.85). Available low-quality evidence from heterogeneous studies suggests low mortality rates of patients with metastatic PPGL. Male sex and synchronous metastases correlated with increased mortality. The outcomes of patients with metastatic PPGL have been inadequately assessed, indicating the need for carefully planned prospective studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To perform a one-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and explore functional consequences of new susceptibility loci. Methods We synthesized 7 MS GWAS. Each dataset was imputed using HapMap phase II and a per-SNP meta-analysis was performed across the 7 datasets. We explored RNA expression data using a quantitative trait analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 228 subjects with demyelinating disease. Results We meta-analyzed 2,529,394 unique SNPs in 5,545 cases and 12,153 controls. We identified three novel susceptibility alleles: rs170934T at 3p24.1 (OR=1.17, P = 1.6 × 10−8) near EOMES, rs2150702G in the second intron of MLANA on chromosome 9p24.1 (OR = 1.16, P = 3.3 × 10−8), and rs6718520A in an intergenic region on chromosome 2p21, with THADA as the nearest flanking gene (OR = 1.17, P = 3.4 × 10−8). The three new loci do not have a strong “cis” effect on RNA expression in PBMCs. Ten other susceptibility loci had a suggestive P<1×10−6, some of which have evidence of association in other inflammatory diseases, i.e. IL12B, TAGAP, PLEK, and ZMIZ1. Interpretation We have performed a meta-analysis of GWAS in MS that more than doubles the size of previous gene discovery efforts and highlights three novel MS susceptibility loci. These and additional loci with suggestive evidence of association are excellent candidates for further investigations to refine and validate their role in the genetic architecture of MS. PMID:22190364

  5. Targeting VEGFR-2 in Metastatic Gastric Cancer: Results From a Literature-Based Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Polom, Karol; Roviello, Franco; Marrelli, Daniele; Multari, Andrea Giovanni; Paganini, Giovanni; Pacifico, Chiara; Generali, Daniele

    2017-02-06

    Angiogenesis is a key process in cancer development. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of the novel VEGFR-2 inhibitors in patients with metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer. A literature-based meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. The primary outcome was the overall survival. The pooled analysis from RCTs on anti-VEGFR-2 inhibitors revealed a significant increase in overall survival (hazard ratio for death: 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.55-0.87; p = .002). This study confirms the efficacy of novel anti-VEGFR-2 inhibitors. The future studies of these agents will evaluate alone and in combination with chemotherapy the early line of treatment along with the identification of proper predictive biomarker.

  6. Strategies of sequential therapies in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Asmis, T; Berry, S; Cosby, R; Chan, K; Coburn, N; Rother, M

    2014-12-01

    Before the emergence of first-line combination chemotherapy, the standard of care for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mcrc) was first-line monotherapy with modulated 5-fluorouracil. Several large phase iii randomized controlled trials, now completed, have assessed whether a planned sequential chemotherapy strategy-beginning with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy until treatment failure, followed by another regimen (either monotherapy or combination chemotherapy) until treatment failure-could result in the same survival benefit produced with an upfront combination chemotherapy strategy, but with less toxicity for patients. The medline and embase databases, and abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology, were searched for reports comparing a sequential strategy of chemotherapy with an upfront combination chemotherapy in adult patients with mcrc. Publications that reported efficacy or toxicity data (or both) were included. The five eligible trials that were identified included 4532 patients. A meta-analysis of those trials demonstrates a statistically significant survival advantage for combination chemotherapy (hazard ratio: 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 0.99). However, the median survival advantage (3-6 weeks in most trials) is small and of questionable clinical significance. Three trials reported first-line toxicities. Upfront combination chemotherapy results in significantly more neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and sensory neuropathy. Sequential chemotherapy results in significantly more hand-foot syndrome. Given the small survival advantage associated with upfront combination chemotherapy, planned sequential chemotherapy and upfront combination chemotherapy can both be considered treatment strategies. Treatment should be chosen on an individual basis considering patient and tumour characteristics, toxicity of each strategy, and

  7. Strategies of sequential therapies in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asmis, T.; Berry, S.; Cosby, R.; Chan, K.; Coburn, N.; Rother, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Before the emergence of first-line combination chemotherapy, the standard of care for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mcrc) was first-line monotherapy with modulated 5-fluorouracil. Several large phase iii randomized controlled trials, now completed, have assessed whether a planned sequential chemotherapy strategy—beginning with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy until treatment failure, followed by another regimen (either monotherapy or combination chemotherapy) until treatment failure—could result in the same survival benefit produced with an upfront combination chemotherapy strategy, but with less toxicity for patients. Methods The medline and embase databases, and abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology, were searched for reports comparing a sequential strategy of chemotherapy with an upfront combination chemotherapy in adult patients with mcrc. Publications that reported efficacy or toxicity data (or both) were included. Results The five eligible trials that were identified included 4532 patients. A meta-analysis of those trials demonstrates a statistically significant survival advantage for combination chemotherapy (hazard ratio: 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 0.99). However, the median survival advantage (3–6 weeks in most trials) is small and of questionable clinical significance. Three trials reported first-line toxicities. Upfront combination chemotherapy results in significantly more neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and sensory neuropathy. Sequential chemotherapy results in significantly more hand–foot syndrome. Conclusions Given the small survival advantage associated with upfront combination chemotherapy, planned sequential chemotherapy and upfront combination chemotherapy can both be considered treatment strategies. Treatment should be chosen on an individual basis considering patient and tumour

  8. The efficacy and toxicity profile of metronomic chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinyan; Dai, Xiaomeng; Wan, Chao; Hong, Xiaohua; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The current meta-analysis aimed to summarize the available evidence for the efficacy and serious adverse events (AEs) associated with use of metronomic chemotherapy (MCT) in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Method Electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE database, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane database) were systematically searched for articles related to the use of MCT in MBC patients. Eligible studies included clinical trials of MBC patients treated with MCT that presented sufficient data related to tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and grade 3/4 AEs. A meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model. Results This meta-analysis consists of 22 clinical trials with 1360 patients. The pooled objective response rate and clinical benefit rate of MCT were 34.1% (95% CI 27.4–41.5) and 55.6% (95% CI 49.2–61.9), respectively. The overall 6-month PFS, 12-month OS, and 24-month OS rates were 56.8% (95% CI 48.3–64.9), 70.3% (95% CI 62.6–76.9), and 40.0% (95% CI 30.6–50.2), respectively. The pooled incidence of grade 3/4 AEs was 29.5% (95% CI 21.1–39.5). There was no statistically significant difference observed in any endpoint between subgroups defined by concomitant anti-cancer therapies or chemotherapy regimens. After excluding one controversial study, we observed a trend showing lower toxicity rates with the use of MCT alone compared to use of MCT with other anti-cancer therapies (P = 0.070). Conclusions Metronomic chemotherapy may be effective for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer. MCT used alone is possibly equally effective and less toxic than combination therapies. Well-designed RCTs are needed to obtain more evidence. PMID:28296916

  9. The Impact of Bevacizumab (Avastin) on Survival in Metastatic Solid Tumors - A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Limor; Ben-Aharon, Irit; Vidal, Liat; Leibovici, Leonard; Stemmer, Salomon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of Bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy on overall survival of patients with metastatic solid tumors. Design A systematic literature search to identify randomized trials comparing chemotherapy with and without Bevacizumab in metastatic cancer. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) and the secondary end points were progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. A meta-analysis was performed for each tumor type and for the combination of all tumors. Results 24 randomized trials with 8 different types of malignancies were included in this meta-analysis. Patients treated with Bevacizumab had an OS benefit, hazard ratio (HR) 0.89 (95% CI 0.84–0.93, P<0.00001 I2-4%). The combined analysis showed a PFS benefit with a HR 0.71 (95% CI 0.68–0.74, P<0.00001, I2-54%). The toxicity analysis showed a statistically significant increase in fatal adverse events (FAEs) in the Bevacizumab treatment arm, risk ratio (RR) 1.47 (95% CI 1.1–1.98). A separate analysis of the lung cancer trials showed an increased risk of fatal pulmonary hemorrhage with a RR of 5.65 (95% CI 1.26–25.26). The risk of G3–4 adverse events was increased: RR 1.2 (95% CI 1.15–1.24). Conclusion in this combined analysis Bevacizumab improved OS (with little heterogeneity) and PFS. These results should be considered in the light of lack of markers predictive of response and the increased severe and fatal toxicity seen with Bevacizumab treatment. PMID:23349675

  10. Identifying Effective Psychological Treatments of Insomnia: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtagh, Douglas R. R.; Greenwood, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    Clarified efficacy of psychological treatments for insomnia through a meta-analysis of 66 outcome studies representing 139 treatment groups. Psychological treatments produced considerable enhancement of both sleep patterns and the subjective experience of sleep. Participants who were clinically referred and who did not regularly use sedatives…

  11. Identifying Effective Psychological Treatments of Insomnia: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtagh, Douglas R. R.; Greenwood, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    Clarified efficacy of psychological treatments for insomnia through a meta-analysis of 66 outcome studies representing 139 treatment groups. Psychological treatments produced considerable enhancement of both sleep patterns and the subjective experience of sleep. Participants who were clinically referred and who did not regularly use sedatives…

  12. Network meta-analysis of the efficacy and adverse effects of several treatments for advanced/metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Wei-Kang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Jian-He; Jiang, Yong-Ming; Fang, Ke-Wei

    2017-08-29

    This network meta-analysis was conducted to compare the efficacy and adverse effects of several treatments for advanced/metastatic prostate cancer (PC). The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of treatments for advanced/metastatic PC. Eighteen studies covering 6,340 patients were included in this analysis. The calculated were odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and the surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) curve. Pairwise meta-analysis showed that overall survival rates achieved with radiotherapy or endocrine therapy were lower than obtained with radiotherapy + endocrine therapy. The endocrine therapy includes estrogen therapy, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRH-A), anti-androgen therapy (ADT), ADT + LHRH-A and estrogen therapy + LHRH-A, and its SUCRA values indicated that for overall response rate, estrogen therapy + LHRH-A ranked the highest (92.6%); for overall survival rate, ADT ranked the highest (75.2%); for anemia, estrogen therapy ranked the highest (88.2%); and for diarrhea and hot flushes, ADT ranked the highest (diarrhea, 87.4%; hot flushes, 89.3%). Cluster analysis on the endocrine therapy showed that ADT + LHRH-A achieved the highest overall survival and overall response rates in the treatment of advanced/metastatic PC. Estrogen therapy and ADT had the lowest incidences of diarrhea and anemia. Thus, combined radiotherapy + endocrine therapy had higher overall survival rate, and among the endocrine therapy, in terms of overall response rate and overall survival rate, ADT + LHRH-A may be a better regimen in the treatment of advanced or metastatic PC.

  13. Effectiveness and safety of monoclonal antibodies for metastatic colorectal cancer treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bruno; de Jesus, Jose Paulo; de Mello, Eduardo L; Cesar, Daniel; Correia, Mauro M

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of chemotherapy (CT) for select cases of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) has been well established in the literature, however, it provides limited benefits and in many cases constitutes a treatment with high toxicity. The use of specific molecular biological treatments with monoclonal antibodies (MA) has been shown to be relevant, particularly for its potential for increasing the response rate of the host to the tumour, as these have molecular targets present in the cancerous cells and their microenvironment thereby blocking their development. The combination of MA and CT can bring a significant increase in the rate of resectability of metastases, the progression-free survival (PFS), and the global survival (GS) in MCRC patients. Objective To assess the effectiveness and safety of MA in the treatment of MCRC. Methods A systematic review was carried out with a meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing the use of cetuximab, bevacizumab, and panitumumab in the treatment of MCRC. Results Sixteen randomised clinical trials were selected. The quality of the evidence on the question was considered moderate and data from eight randomised clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. The GS and PFS were greater in the groups which received the MA associated with CT, however, the differences were not statistically significant between the groups (mean of 17.7 months versus 17.1 months; mean difference of 1.09 (CI: 0.10–2.07); p = 0.84; and 7.4 versus 6.9 months. mean difference of 0.76 (CI: 0.08–1.44); p = 0.14 respectively). The meta-analysis was not done for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusion The addition of MA to CT for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer does not prolong GS and PFS. PMID:26557880

  14. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J C; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Harold, D; Naj, A C; Sims, R; Bellenguez, C; DeStafano, A L; Bis, J C; Beecham, G W; Grenier-Boley, B; Russo, G; Thorton-Wells, T A; Jones, N; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Thomas, C; Ikram, M A; Zelenika, D; Vardarajan, B N; Kamatani, Y; Lin, C F; Gerrish, A; Schmidt, H; Kunkle, B; Dunstan, M L; Ruiz, A; Bihoreau, M T; Choi, S H; Reitz, C; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Craig, D; Amin, N; Berr, C; Lopez, O L; De Jager, P L; Deramecourt, V; Johnston, J A; Evans, D; Lovestone, S; Letenneur, L; Morón, F J; Rubinsztein, D C; Eiriksdottir, G; Sleegers, K; Goate, A M; Fiévet, N; Huentelman, M W; Gill, M; Brown, K; Kamboh, M I; Keller, L; Barberger-Gateau, P; McGuiness, B; Larson, E B; Green, R; Myers, A J; Dufouil, C; Todd, S; Wallon, D; Love, S; Rogaeva, E; Gallacher, J; St George-Hyslop, P; Clarimon, J; Lleo, A; Bayer, A; Tsuang, D W; Yu, L; Tsolaki, M; Bossù, P; Spalletta, G; Proitsi, P; Collinge, J; Sorbi, S; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Fox, N C; Hardy, J; Deniz Naranjo, M C; Bosco, P; Clarke, R; Brayne, C; Galimberti, D; Mancuso, M; Matthews, F; Moebus, S; Mecocci, P; Del Zompo, M; Maier, W; Hampel, H; Pilotto, A; Bullido, M; Panza, F; Caffarra, P; Nacmias, B; Gilbert, J R; Mayhaus, M; Lannefelt, L; Hakonarson, H; Pichler, S; Carrasquillo, M M; Ingelsson, M; Beekly, D; Alvarez, V; Zou, F; Valladares, O; Younkin, S G; Coto, E; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Gu, W; Razquin, C; Pastor, P; Mateo, I; Owen, M J; Faber, K M; Jonsson, P V; Combarros, O; O'Donovan, M C; Cantwell, L B; Soininen, H; Blacker, D; Mead, S; Mosley, T H; Bennett, D A; Harris, T B; Fratiglioni, L; Holmes, C; de Bruijn, R F; Passmore, P; Montine, T J; Bettens, K; Rotter, J I; Brice, A; Morgan, K; Foroud, T M; Kukull, W A; Hannequin, D; Powell, J F; Nalls, M A; Ritchie, K; Lunetta, K L; Kauwe, J S; Boerwinkle, E; Riemenschneider, M; Boada, M; Hiltuenen, M; Martin, E R; Schmidt, R; Rujescu, D; Wang, L S; Dartigues, J F; Mayeux, R; Tzourio, C; Hofman, A; Nöthen, M M; Graff, C; Psaty, B M; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Holmans, P A; Lathrop, M; Pericak-Vance, M A; Launer, L J; Farrer, L A; van Duijn, C M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Moskvina, V; Seshadri, S; Williams, J; Schellenberg, G D; Amouyel, P

    2013-12-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer's disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2, 11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer's disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kubicka, S.; Falcone, A.; Burkholder, I.; Hacker, U. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i) in subgroups, (ii) in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors), and (iii) on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients) were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75) and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89). PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58). Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:27656206

  16. A Comprehensive Gene Expression Meta-analysis Identifies Novel Immune Signatures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Vishwakarma, Sandeep; Naz, Saima; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Khan, Nooruddin

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a symmetric polyarticular arthritis, has long been feared as one of the most disabling forms of arthritis. Identification of gene signatures associated with RA onset and progression would lead toward development of novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. This study was undertaken to identify unique gene signatures of RA patients through large-scale meta-profiling of a diverse collection of gene expression data sets. We carried out a meta-analysis of 8 publicly available RA patients’ (107 RA patients and 76 healthy controls) gene expression data sets and further validated a few meta-signatures in RA patients through quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). We identified a robust meta-profile comprising 33 differentially expressed genes, which were consistently and significantly expressed across all the data sets. Our meta-analysis unearthed upregulation of a few novel gene signatures including PLCG2, HLA-DOB, HLA-F, EIF4E2, and CYFIP2, which were validated in peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples of RA patients. Further, functional and pathway enrichment analysis reveals perturbation of several meta-genes involved in signaling pathways pertaining to inflammation, antigen presentation, hypoxia, and apoptosis during RA. Additionally, PLCG2 (phospholipase Cγ2) popped out as a novel meta-gene involved in most of the pathways relevant to RA including inflammasome activation, platelet aggregation, and activation, thereby suggesting PLCG2 as a potential therapeutic target for controlling excessive inflammation during RA. In conclusion, these findings highlight the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease onset, progression and possibly lead toward the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic interventions against RA. PMID:28210261

  17. A Comprehensive Gene Expression Meta-analysis Identifies Novel Immune Signatures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Vishwakarma, Sandeep; Naz, Saima; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Khan, Nooruddin

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a symmetric polyarticular arthritis, has long been feared as one of the most disabling forms of arthritis. Identification of gene signatures associated with RA onset and progression would lead toward development of novel diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. This study was undertaken to identify unique gene signatures of RA patients through large-scale meta-profiling of a diverse collection of gene expression data sets. We carried out a meta-analysis of 8 publicly available RA patients' (107 RA patients and 76 healthy controls) gene expression data sets and further validated a few meta-signatures in RA patients through quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). We identified a robust meta-profile comprising 33 differentially expressed genes, which were consistently and significantly expressed across all the data sets. Our meta-analysis unearthed upregulation of a few novel gene signatures including PLCG2, HLA-DOB, HLA-F, EIF4E2, and CYFIP2, which were validated in peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples of RA patients. Further, functional and pathway enrichment analysis reveals perturbation of several meta-genes involved in signaling pathways pertaining to inflammation, antigen presentation, hypoxia, and apoptosis during RA. Additionally, PLCG2 (phospholipase Cγ2) popped out as a novel meta-gene involved in most of the pathways relevant to RA including inflammasome activation, platelet aggregation, and activation, thereby suggesting PLCG2 as a potential therapeutic target for controlling excessive inflammation during RA. In conclusion, these findings highlight the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease onset, progression and possibly lead toward the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic interventions against RA.

  18. Meta-analysis on the association of VEGFR1 genetic variants with sunitinib outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Swen, Jesse J.; Boven, Epie; Castellano, Daniel; Gelderblom, Hans; Mathijssen, Ron H.J.; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; García-Donas, Jesus; Rini, Brian I.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2017-01-01

    VEGFR1 rs9582036 and rs9554320 were previously reported the association with sunitinib progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Hereafter, the association of both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with PFS/OS was confirmed in two independent mRCC cohorts. The aim of the current study was to validate the associations of both SNPs with sunitinib outcome in three independent well-characterized cohorts (SUTOX, CCF and SOGUG) including 286 sunitinib-treated mRCC patients, as well as to perform a meta-analysis of current and published data combined. We found that rs9582036 and rs9554320 showed a significant association with sunitinib PFS in the CCF cohort (HR: 0.254, 95%CI: 0.092-0.703; P=0.008 and HR: 0.430, 95%CI: 0.200-0.927; P=0.031, respectively). Patients with the variant genotype of rs9582036 and rs9554320 had a shorter median PFS. No significant association of both SNPs with sunitinib PFS or OS was detected in either the SUTOX or SOGUG cohort. After the combination of all available data into a meta-analysis, the association of both SNPs with sunitinib PFS or OS did not achieve the threshold for statistical significance. Our findings suggest that, although VEGFR1 rs9582036 and rs9554320 are involved in sunitinib therapy outcome, its clinical use as biomarkers for prediction of sunitinib outcome in mRCC patients is limited, due to inconsistent findings when analyzing all existing studies together. PMID:27901483

  19. A User's Guide to the Meta-Analysis of Research Studies. Meta-Stat: Software To Aid in the Meta-Analysis of Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Glass Gene V.; Evartt, David L.; Emery, Patrick J.

    This manual and the accompanying software are intended to provide a step-by-step guide to conducting a meta-analytic study along with references for further reading and free high-quality software, "Meta-Stat.""Meta-Stat" is a comprehensive package designed to help in the meta-analysis of research studies in the social and behavioral sciences.…

  20. Meta-analysis of transcriptomic datasets identifies genes enriched in the mammalian circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laurence A; Williams, John; Taylor, Lewis; Thomson, Ross J; Nolan, Patrick M; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2017-09-29

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) which regulate physiology and behaviour, as well as coordinating peripheral clocks throughout the body. Investigating the function of the SCN has often focused on the identification of rhythmically expressed genes. However, not all genes critical for SCN function are rhythmically expressed. An alternative strategy is to characterize those genes that are selectively enriched in the SCN. Here, we examined the transcriptome of the SCN and whole brain (WB) of mice using meta-analysis of publicly deposited data across a range of microarray platforms and RNA-Seq data. A total of 79 microarrays were used (24 SCN and 55 WB samples, 4 different microarray platforms), alongside 17 RNA-Seq data files (7 SCN and 10 WB). 31 684 MGI gene symbols had data for at least one platform. Meta-analysis using a random effects model for weighting individual effect sizes (derived from differential expression between relevant SCN and WB samples) reliably detected known SCN markers. SCN-enriched transcripts identified in this study provide novel insights into SCN function, including identifying genes which may play key roles in SCN physiology or provide SCN-specific drivers. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Meta-CART: A tool to identify interactions between moderators in meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinru; Dusseldorp, Elise; Meulman, Jacqueline J

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of meta-analysis, moderator analysis is usually performed only univariately. When several study characteristics are available that may account for treatment effect, standard meta-regression has difficulties in identifying interactions between them. To overcome this problem, meta-CART has been proposed: an approach that applies classification and regression trees (CART) to identify interactions, and then subgroup meta-analysis to test the significance of moderator effects. The previous version of meta-CART has its shortcomings: when applying CART, the sample sizes of studies are not taken into account, and the effect sizes are dichotomized around the median value. Therefore, this article proposes new meta-CART extensions, weighting study effect sizes by their accuracy, and using a regression tree to avoid dichotomization. In addition, new pruning rules are proposed. The performance of all versions of meta-CART was evaluated via a Monte Carlo simulation study. The simulation results revealed that meta-regression trees with random-effects weights and a 0.5-standard-error pruning rule perform best. The required sample size for meta-CART to achieve satisfactory performance depends on the number of study characteristics, the magnitude of the interactions, and the residual heterogeneity.

  2. Enhanced meta-analysis and replication studies identify five new psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Tsoi, Lam C; Spain, Sarah L; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stuart, Philip E; Capon, Francesca; Knight, Jo; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Kang, Hyun M; Allen, Michael H; Lambert, Sylviane; Stoll, Stefan; Weidinger, Stephan; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Koks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Esko, Tonu; Das, Sayantan; Metspalu, Andres; Weichenthal, Michael; Enerback, Charlotta; Krueger, Gerald G.; Voorhees, John J; Chandran, Vinod; Rosen, Cheryl F; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Reis, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Franke, Andre; Barker, Jonathan NWN; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Trembath, Richard C; Elder, James T

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease with complex genetic architecture. Previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) and a recent meta-analysis using Immunochip data have uncovered 36 susceptibility loci. Here, we extend our previous meta-analysis of European ancestry by refined genotype calling and imputation and by the addition of 5,033 cases and 5,707 controls. The combined analysis, consisting of over 15,000 cases and 27,000 controls, identifies five new psoriasis susceptibility loci at genomewide significance (p < 5 × 10−8). The newly identified signals include two that reside in intergenic regions (1q31.1 and 5p13.1) and three residing near PLCL2 (3p24.3), NFKBIZ (3q12.3), and CAMK2G (10q22.2). We further demonstrate that NFKBIZ is a TRAF3IP2–dependent target of IL-17 signaling in human skin keratinocytes, thereby functionally linking two strong candidate genes. These results further integrate the genetics and immunology of psoriasis, suggesting new avenues for functional analysis and improved therapies. PMID:25939698

  3. Meta-analysis of global metabolomic data identifies metabolites associated with life-span extension.

    PubMed

    Patti, Gary J; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Johannsen, Darcy; Kalisiak, Ewa; Ravussin, Eric; Brüning, Jens C; Dillin, Andrew; Siuzdak, Gary

    2014-08-01

    The manipulation of distinct signaling pathways and transcription factors has been shown to influence life span in a cell-non-autonomous manner in multicellular model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. These data suggest that coordination of whole-organism aging involves endocrine signaling, however, the molecular identities of such signals have not yet been determined and their potential relevance in humans is unknown. Here we describe a novel metabolomic approach to identify molecules directly associated with extended life span in C. elegans that represent candidate compounds for age-related endocrine signals. To identify metabolic perturbations directly linked to longevity, we developed metabolomic software for meta-analysis that enabled intelligent comparisons of multiple different mutants. Simple pairwise comparisons of long-lived glp-1, daf-2, and isp-1 mutants to their respective controls resulted in more than 11,000 dysregulated metabolite features of statistical significance. By using meta-analysis, we were able to reduce this number to six compounds most likely to be associated with life-span extension. Mass spectrometry-based imaging studies suggested that these metabolites might be localized to C. elegans muscle. We extended the metabolomic analysis to humans by comparing quadricep muscle tissue from young and old individuals and found that two of the same compounds associated with longevity in worms were also altered in human muscle with age. These findings provide candidate compounds that may serve as age-related endocrine signals and implicate muscle as a potential tissue regulating their levels in humans.

  4. Acquired Hypothyroidism as a Predictive Marker of Outcome in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: A Literature-Based Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nearchou, Andreas; Valachis, Antonis; Lind, Pehr; Akre, Olof; Sandström, Per

    2015-08-01

    Hypothyroidism in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) during treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sunitinib and sorafenib is a well-established side effect. Furthermore, the potential role of hypothyroidism as predictive marker of outcome has been studied but with conflicting results. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the predictive value of hypothyroidism for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with mRCC during TKI therapy. We searched PubMed and the electronic abstract databases of the major international congresses' proceedings to identify all eligible studies that reported a correlation between the development of hypothyroidism during TKI treatment and outcome in patients with mRCC. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PFS and OS were obtained from these publications and pooled in a meta-analysis. Eleven studies with a total of 500 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We found no statistical significant difference in PFS between patients who developed hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy and unaffected patients (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.59-1.13; P = .22; 6 studies; 250 patients). The HR for OS was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.31-0.87; P = .01) for patients who developed hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy compared with patients who did not (4 studies; 147 patients). The development of hypothyroidism during TKI therapy is not clearly shown to be predictive of efficacy in patients with mRCC. The observed advantage in OS for the patients with acquired hypothyroidism should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Impact of local treatment on overall survival of patients with metastatic prostate cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Arie; Baccaglini, Willy; Glina, Felipe P.A.; Kayano, Paulo P.; Nunes, Victor M.; Smaletz, Oren; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Carvalho, Icaro Thiago; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Context Currently, standard treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer (MPCa) is androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Recent studies suggested that local treatment of MPCa is related to increase of survival of those patients, as observed in other tumors. Objective To evaluate the impact of local treatment on overall survival and cancer specific survival in 3 and 5 years in patients with MPCa. Materials and Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis of population studies published at PubMed, Scielo, Lilacs, Cochrane and EMBASE databases until June 2016. Several large cohorts and Post-Roc studies were included, that evaluated patients with MPCa submitted to local treatment (LT) using radiotherapy (RDT), surgery (RP) or brachytherapy (BCT) or not submitted to local treatment (NLT). Results 34.338 patients were analyzed in six included papers, 31.653 submitted to NLT and 2.685 to LT. Overall survival in three years was significantly higher in patients submitted to LT versus NLT (64.2% vs. 44.5%; RD 0.19, 95% CI, 0.17-0.21; p<0.00001; I2=0%), as well as in five years (51.9% vs. 23.6%; RD 0.30, 95% CI, 0.11-0.49; p<0.00001; I2=97%). Sensitive analysis according to type of local treatment showed that surgery (78.2% and 45.0%; RD 0.31, 95% CI, 0.26-0.35; p<0.00001; I2=50%) and radiotherapy (60.4% and 44.5%; RD 0.17, 95% CI, 0.12-0.22; p<0.00001; I2=67%) presented better outcomes. Conclusion LT using RDT, RP or BCT seems to significantly improve overall survival and cancer-specific survival of patients with metastatic prostatic cancer. Prospective and randomized studies must be performed in order to confirm our results. PMID:27802009

  6. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-analysis across 32 Studies Identifies Multiple Lipid Loci

    PubMed Central

    Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guo, Yiran; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Tragante, Vinicius; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Lange, Leslie A.; Almoguera, Berta; Appelman, Yolande E.; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gong, Yan; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Mingyao; Li, Yun R.; Liu, Kiang; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Middelberg, Rita P.S.; Musunuru, Kiran; Nelson, Christopher P.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Smith, Erin N.; Tischfield, Sam E.; van der Most, Peter J.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Volcik, Kelly A.; Zhang, Li; Bailey, Kent R.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bauer, Florianne; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Braund, Peter S.; Burt, Amber; Burton, Paul R.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; deJong, Jonas S.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Fornage, Myriam; Furlong, Clement E.; Glazer, Nicole; Gums, John G.; Hastie, Claire; Holmes, Michael V.; Illig, Thomas; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kumari, Meena; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mallela, Laya; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Ordovas, Jose; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Post, Wendy S.; Saxena, Richa; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Shah, Tina; Shields, Denis C.; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Topol, Eric J.; Toskala, Elina; van Pelt, Joost L.; van Setten, Jessica; Yusuf, Salim; Whittaker, John C.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Anand, Sonia S.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Clarke, Robert; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Davidson, Karina W.; Day, Ian N.M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kaess, Bernhard M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A.; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Murray, Sarah S.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce; Redline, Susan; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schunkert, Heribert; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Stanton, Alice; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Watkins, Hugh; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Whitfield, John B.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Reilly, Muredach P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wilson, James G.; Rader, Daniel J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elbers, Clara C.; Keating, Brendan J.; Drenos, Fotios

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TGs), can be identified by a dense gene-centric approach. Our meta-analysis of 32 studies in 66,240 individuals of European ancestry was based on the custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) covering ∼2,000 candidate genes. SNP-lipid associations were replicated either in a cohort comprising an additional 24,736 samples or within the Global Lipid Genetic Consortium. We identified four, six, ten, and four unreported SNPs in established lipid genes for HDL-C, LDL-C, TC, and TGs, respectively. We also identified several lipid-related SNPs in previously unreported genes: DGAT2, HCAR2, GPIHBP1, PPARG, and FTO for HDL-C; SOCS3, APOH, SPTY2D1, BRCA2, and VLDLR for LDL-C; SOCS3, UGT1A1, BRCA2, UBE3B, FCGR2A, CHUK, and INSIG2 for TC; and SERPINF2, C4B, GCK, GATA4, INSR, and LPAL2 for TGs. The proportion of explained phenotypic variance in the subset of studies providing individual-level data was 9.9% for HDL-C, 9.5% for LDL-C, 10.3% for TC, and 8.0% for TGs. This large meta-analysis of lipid phenotypes with the use of a dense gene-centric approach identified multiple SNPs not previously described in established lipid genes and several previously unknown loci. The explained phenotypic variance from this approach was comparable to that from a meta-analysis of GWAS data, suggesting that a focused genotyping approach can further increase the understanding of heritability of plasma lipids. PMID:23063622

  7. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M Arfan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Stam, Anine H; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schürks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M; Buring, Julie E; Ridker, Paul M; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A; Evans, David M; Ring, Susan M; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Borck, Guntram; Göbel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Heinze-Kuhn, Katja; Williams, Frances M K; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; van den Ende, Joyce; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vink, Jacqueline M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Alexander, Michael; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, Heinz Erich; Aromaa, Arpo; Eriksson, Johan G; Traynor, Bryan J; Trabzuni, Daniah; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Gibbs, J Raphael; Birney, Ewan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Penninx, Brenda W; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia; Raitakari, Olli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zwart, John-Anker; Cherkas, Lynn; Strachan, David P; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Daly, Mark J; Nyholt, Dale R; Chasman, Daniel I; Palotie, Aarno

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci associated with migraine susceptibility (P<5×10(-8)). Five loci are new: near AJAP1 at 1p36, near TSPAN2 at 1p13, within FHL5 at 6q16, within C7orf10 at 7p14 and near MMP16 at 8q21. Three of these loci were identified in disease subgroup analyses. Brain tissue expression quantitative trait locus analysis suggests potential functional candidate genes at four loci: APOA1BP, TBC1D7, FUT9, STAT6 and ATP5B.

  8. Blood Transcriptomic Meta-analysis Identifies Dysregulation of Hemoglobin and Iron Metabolism in Parkinson' Disease.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2017-01-01

    Disrupted iron metabolism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that severely affects movement and coordination, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying this association remain unknown. To this end, we performed a transcriptomic meta-analysis of four blood microarrays in PD. We observed a significant downregulation of genes related to hemoglobin including, hemoglobin delta (HBD), alpha hemoglobin stabilizing protein (ASHP), genes implicated in iron metabolism including, solute carrier family 11 member 2 (SLC11A2), ferrochelatase (FECH), and erythrocyte-specific genes including erythrocyte membrane protein (EPB42), and 5'-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (ALAS2). Pathway and network analysis identified enrichment in processes related to mitochondrial membrane, oxygen transport, oxygen and heme binding, hemoglobin complex, erythrocyte development, tetrapyrrole metabolism and the spliceosome. Collectively, we identified a subnetwork of genes in blood that may provide a molecular explanation for the disrupted hemoglobin and iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of PD.

  9. A meta-analysis to identify animal and management factors influencing gestating sow efficiency.

    PubMed

    Douglas, S L; Szyszka, O; Stoddart, K; Edwards, S A; Kyriazakis, I

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis on the effects of management and animal-based factors on the reproductive efficiency of gestating sows can provide information on single-factor and interaction effects that may not have been detected in individual studies. This study analyzed the effects of such factors on the number of piglets born alive per litter (BA), piglet birth weight (BiW) and weaning weight (WW), and number of piglets born alive per kilogram of sow feed intake during gestation (BA/FI). A total of 51 papers and 7 data sources were identified for the meta-analysis, out of which 23 papers and 5 sets of production data were useable (a total of 121 treatments). The information gathered included the dependent variables as well as information regarding animal, management, and feed characteristics. While a number of factors were individually significant, the multivariate models identified significant effects only of 1) floor type (P=0.003), sow BW at the end of gestation (P=0.002), and housing (stalls vs. loose; P=0.004) on BA; as floor type and housing were confounded, they were included in 2 separate models. The BA was higher on solid (12.1) in comparison to partly slatted (11.4) and fully slatted floors (10.2); 2) sow gestation environment (P=0.017) and gestation feed allowance (P=0.046) on BiW, with BiW of pigs higher for sows kept outdoors rather than indoors (1.75 versus 1.49 kg); 3) parity number (P=0.003) and feed intake during gestation (P=0.017) on WW; in addition there was an interaction between parity number×feed ME and parity number×feed CP content of feed during gestation on WW, with the positive effects of feed ME and CP contents seen during early rather than later parities; and 4) floor type (P=0.019) and feed crude fiber (P=0.003) for BA/FI with a greater number for those kept on solid floors (5.11) versus partially and fully slatted floors (4.07 and 4.05). The meta-analysis confirmed the significant effect of several well-known factors on the efficiency of

  10. Risk factors for delay of adjuvant chemotherapy in non-metastatic breast cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis involving 186982 patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hailin; Wang, Jin; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Xie, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Delay performance of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) after surgery has been presented to affect survival of breast cancer patients adversely, but the risk factors for delay in initiation remain controversial. Therefore, we conducted this systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis aiming at identifying the risk factors for delay of adjuvant chemotherapy (DAC) in non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Methods The search was performed on PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang Database from inception up to July 2016. DAC was defined as receiving AC beyond 8-week after surgery. Data were combined and analyzed using random-effects model or fixed-effects model for risk factors considered by at least 3 studies. Heterogeneity was analyzed with meta-regression analysis of year of publication and sample size. Publication bias was studied with Egger’s test. Results A total of 12 observational studies including 186982 non-metastatic breast cancer patients were eligible and 12 risk factors were analyzed. Combined results demonstrated that black race (vs white; OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01–1.39), rural residents (vs urban; OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.27–2.03) and receiving mastectomy (vs breast conserving surgery; OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.00–1.83) were significantly associated with DAC, while married patients (vs single; OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38–0.89) was less likely to have a delay in initiation. No significant impact from year of publication or sample size on the heterogeneity across studies was found, and no potential publication bias existed among the included studies. Conclusions Risk factors associated with DAC included black race, rural residents, receiving mastectomy and single status. Identifying of these risk factors could further help decisions making in clinical practice. PMID:28301555

  11. Meta-analysis of gene expression data identifies causal genes for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Hao, Jian-Wei; Zhou, Rui-Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Yan, Tian-Zhong; Ding, De-Gang; Shan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death in male populations across the globe. With the advent of gene expression arrays, many microarray studies have been conducted in prostate cancer, but the results have varied across different studies. To better understand the genetic and biologic mechanisms of prostate cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of two studies on prostate cancer. Eight key genes were identified to be differentially expressed with progression. After gene co-expression analysis based on data from the GEO database, we obtained a co- expressed gene list which included 725 genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these genes are involved in actin filament-based processes, locomotion and cell morphogenesis. Further analysis of the gene list should provide important clues for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets.

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness of preoperative embolization in surgery for metastatic spine disease.

    PubMed

    Luksanapruksa, Panya; Buchowski, Jacob M; Tongsai, Sasima; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Jennings, Jack W

    2017-09-16

    Preoperative embolization (PE) may decrease intraoperative blood loss (IBL) in decompressive surgery of hypervascular spinal metastases. However, no consensus has been found in other metastases and no meta-analysis which reviewed the benefit of PE in spinal metastases has been conducted. To assess IBL in spinal metastases surgery in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and cohort studies comparing PE and a control group of non-embolized patients. A systematic search of relevant publications in PubMed and EMBASE was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were RCTs and observational studies in patients with spinal metastases who underwent spine surgery and reported IBL. Meta-analysis was performed using standardized mean difference (SMD) and mean difference (MD) of IBL. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) statistic. A total of 265 abstracts (126 from PubMed and 139 from Embase) were identified through database searching. The reviewers selected six studies for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis. The pooled SMD of the included studies was 0.58 (95% CI -0.10 to 1.25, p=0.09). Sensitivity analysis revealed that, if the study by Rehak et al was omitted, the pooled SMD was significantly changed to 0.88 (95% CI 0.39 to 1.36, p<0.001) and PE reduced the IBL significantly. The pooled MD was 708.3 mL (95% CI -224.4 to 1640.9 mL, p=0.14). If the results of the Rehak et al study were omitted, the pooled MD was significantly changed to 1226.9 mL (95% CI 345.8 to 2108.1 mL, p=0.006). PE can be effective in reducing IBL in spinal metastases surgery in both renal cell carcinoma and mixed primary tumor groups. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of Ber-EP4 for metastatic adenocarcinoma in serous effusions: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Diandian; Ou, Xuemei; Yi, Qun; Feng, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the utility of Ber-EP4 in differentiating metastatic adenocarcinoma (MAC) from malignant epithelial mesothelioma (MM) and/or reactive mesothelial cells (RM) in serous effusions. However, the results remain controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the overall accuracy of Ber-EP4 in serous effusions for MAC through a meta-analysis of published studies. Publications addressing the accuracy of Ber-EP4 in the diagnosis of MAC were selected from the Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane Library. Data from selected studies were pooled to yield summary sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Statistical analysis was performed by Meta-Disc 1.4 and STATA 12.0 softwares. 29 studies, based on 2646 patients, met the inclusion criteria and the summary estimating for Ber-EP4 in the diagnosis of MAC were: sensitivity 0.8 (95% CI: 0.78-0.82), specificity 0.94 (95% CI: 0.93-0.96), positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 12.72 (95% CI: 8.66-18.7), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.18 (95% CI: 0.12-0.26) and diagnostic odds ratio 95.05 (95% CI: 57.26-157.77). The SROC curve indicated that the maximum joint sensitivity and specificity (Q-value) was 0.91; the area under the curve was 0.96. Our findings suggest that BER-EP4 may be a useful diagnostic adjunctive tool for confirming MAC in serous effusions.

  14. Identifying Effective Education Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Meta-Analysis of Rigorous Impact Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to identify effective educational interventions in Sub-Saharan African with an impact on student learning. This is the first meta-analysis in the field of education conducted for Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper takes an in-depth look at twelve different types of education interventions or programs and attempts to not…

  15. Identifying Effective Education Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Meta-Analysis of Rigorous Impact Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to identify effective educational interventions in Sub-Saharan African with an impact on student learning. This is the first meta-analysis in the field of education conducted for Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper takes an in-depth look at twelve different types of education interventions or programs and attempts to not…

  16. Variants identified in a GWAS meta-analysis for blood lipids are associated with the lipid response to fenofibrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A recent large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide studies has identified 95 loci, 59 of them novel, as statistically significant predictors of blood lipid traits; we tested whether the same loci explain the observed heterogeneity in response to lipid-lowering therapy with fenofibrate. Using data fro...

  17. Meta-analysis identifies common variants associated with body mass index in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wanqing; Cho, Yoon Shin; Zheng, Wei; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Kato, Norihiro; Qi, Lu; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Delahanty, Ryan J.; Okada, Yukinori; Tabara, Yasuharu; Gu, Dongfeng; Zhu, Dingliang; Haiman, Christopher A.; Mo, Zengnan; Gao, Yu-Tang; Saw, Seang Mei; Go, Min Jin; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Chang, Li-Ching; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Liang, Jun; Hao, Mei; Marchand, Loic Le; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Yanling; Wong, Tien Yin; Long, Jirong; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kubo, Michiaki; Yamamoto, Ken; Su, Mei-Hsin; Miki, Tetsuro; Henderson, Brian E.; Song, Huaidong; Tan, Aihua; He, Jiang; Ng, Daniel P.-K.; Cai, Qiuyin; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Iwai, Naoharu; Chen, Gary K.; Shi, Jiajun; Xu, Jianfeng; Sim, Xueling; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Maeda, Shiro; Ong, Rick T.H.; Li, Chun; Nakamura, Yusuke; Aung, Tin; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Liu, Jian Jun; Lu, Wei; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Seielstad, Mark; Fann, Cathy S.J.; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Lee, Jong-Young; Hu, Frank B.; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Tai, E. Shyong; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic loci associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI) have been identified through genome-wide association studies conducted predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis of associations between BMI and approximately 2.4 million SNPs in 27,715 East Asians, followed by in silico and de novo replication in 37,691 and 17,642 additional East Asians, respectively. We identified ten BMI-associated loci at the genome-wide significance level (P<5.0×10−8), including seven previously identified loci (FTO, SEC16B, MC4R, GIPR/QPCTL, ADCY3/RBJ, BDNF, and MAP2K5) and three novel loci in or near the CDKAL1,PCSK1, and GP2 genes. Three additional loci nearly reached the genome-wide significance threshold, including two previously identified loci in the GNPDA2 and TFAP2B genes and a new locus near PAX6, which all had P<5.0×10−7. Findings from this study may shed light on new pathways involved in obesity and demonstrate the value of conducting genetic studies in non-European populations. PMID:22344219

  18. Genome-Wide Association Scan Meta-Analysis Identifies Three Loci Influencing Adiposity and Fat Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Chambers, John C.; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W.; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C.; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Scott, Laura J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D.; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strachan, David P.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins for the PROCARDIS consortia, Hugh; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L.; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy for the GIANT consortium, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist–hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9×10−11) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9×10−9). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6×10−8). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity. PMID:19557161

  19. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Cecilia M; Heid, Iris M; Randall, Joshua C; Lamina, Claudia; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J; Herrera, Blanca M; Jackson, Anne U; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Chambers, John C; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J; Zillikens, M Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S F; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Scott, Laura J; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G Bragi; Weedon, Michael N; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Franks, Paul W; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J; Spector, Timothy D; Strachan, David P; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nicholas J; Hugh Watkins; Waterworth, Dawn M; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Loos, Ruth J F; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I

    2009-06-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11)) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9)). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8)). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  20. Combination of meta-analysis and graph clustering to identify prognostic markers of ESCC.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyun; Wang, Lishan; Cui, Shitao; Wang, Mingsong

    2012-04-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most malignant gastrointestinal cancers and occurs at a high frequency rate in China and other Asian countries. Recently, several molecular markers were identified for predicting ESCC. Notwithstanding, additional prognostic markers, with a clear understanding of their underlying roles, are still required. Through bioinformatics, a graph-clustering method by DPClus was used to detect co-expressed modules. The aim was to identify a set of discriminating genes that could be used for predicting ESCC through graph-clustering and GO-term analysis. The results showed that CXCL12, CYP2C9, TGM3, MAL, S100A9, EMP-1 and SPRR3 were highly associated with ESCC development. In our study, all their predicted roles were in line with previous reports, whereby the assumption that a combination of meta-analysis, graph-clustering and GO-term analysis is effective for both identifying differentially expressed genes, and reflecting on their functions in ESCC.

  1. A study-level meta-analysis of efficacy data from head-to-head first-line trials of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors versus bevacizumab in patients with RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Volker; Rivera, Fernando; O'Neil, Bert H; Stintzing, Sebastian; Koukakis, Reija; Terwey, Jan-Henrik; Douillard, Jean-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Head-to-head trials comparing first-line epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (EGFRI) versus vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor (bevacizumab) therapy yielded differing results, and debate remains over optimal first-line therapy for patients with RAS wild-type (WT) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A PubMed search identified first-line mCRC trials comparing EGFRI plus chemotherapy versus bevacizumab plus chemotherapy; data were subsequently updated using recent congress presentations. This study-level meta-analysis estimated the overall survival (OS) treatment effect of first-line chemotherapy plus EGFRIs or bevacizumab in patients with RAS WT mCRC. Secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), resection rate and safety. Early tumour shrinkage (ETS) of ≥20% at week 8 was an exploratory end-point. Three trials comprising data from 1096 patients with RAS WT mCRC were included. OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.93]), ORR (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57) and ETS (OR: 0.48) favoured EGFRIs plus chemotherapy versus bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. PFS (HR: 0.98) and resections (OR: 0.93) were similar between treatments. For patients with KRAS exon 2 WT/'other' RAS mutant mCRC the OS HR was 0.70. A safety meta-analysis was not possible due to a lack of data; in the individual studies, skin toxicities and hypomagnesaemia were more common with EGFRIs, nausea and hypertension were more common with bevacizumab. This meta-analysis supports a potential benefit for first-line EGFRI plus chemotherapy versus bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with respect to OS, ORR and ETS in patients with RAS WT mCRC. A patient-level meta-analysis is awaited. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Meta-analysis of grain yield QTL identified during agricultural drought in grasses showed consensus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the last few years, efforts have been made to identify large effect QTL for grain yield under drought in rice. However, identification of most precise and consistent QTL across the environments and genetics backgrounds is essential for their successful use in Marker-assisted Selection. In this study, an attempt was made to locate consistent QTL regions associated with yield increase under drought by applying a genome-wide QTL meta-analysis approach. Results The integration of 15 maps resulted in a consensus map with 531 markers and a total map length of 1821 cM. Fifty-three yield QTL reported in 15 studies were projected on a consensus map and meta-analysis was performed. Fourteen meta-QTL were obtained on seven chromosomes. MQTL1.2, MQTL1.3, MQTL1.4, and MQTL12.1 were around 700 kb and corresponded to a reasonably small genetic distance of 1.8 to 5 cM and they are suitable for use in marker-assisted selection (MAS). The meta-QTL for grain yield under drought coincided with at least one of the meta-QTL identified for root and leaf morphology traits under drought in earlier reports. Validation of major-effect QTL on a panel of random drought-tolerant lines revealed the presence of at least one major QTL in each line. DTY12.1 was present in 85% of the lines, followed by DTY4.1 in 79% and DTY1.1 in 64% of the lines. Comparative genomics of meta-QTL with other cereals revealed that the homologous regions of MQTL1.4 and MQTL3.2 had QTL for grain yield under drought in maize, wheat, and barley respectively. The genes in the meta-QTL regions were analyzed by a comparative genomics approach and candidate genes were deduced for grain yield under drought. Three groups of genes such as stress-inducible genes, growth and development-related genes, and sugar transport-related genes were found in clusters in most of the meta-QTL. Conclusions Meta-QTL with small genetic and physical intervals could be useful in Marker-assisted selection individually and in

  3. Correlation of bevacizumab-induced hypertension and outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jun; Ma, Hong; Huang, Fang; Zhu, Dichao; Bi, Jianping; Ke, Yang; Zhang, Tao

    2013-11-28

    With the wide application of targeted drug therapies, the relevance of prognostic and predictive markers in patient selection has become increasingly important. Bevacizumab is commonly used in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, there are currently no predictive or prognostic biomarkers for bevacizumab. Several clinical studies have evaluated bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis was performed to better determine the association of bevacizumab-induced hypertension with outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and to assess whether bevacizumab-induced hypertension can be used as a prognostic factor in these patients. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on seven published studies to investigate the relationship between hypertension and outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with bevacizumab. Our primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and overall response rate (ORR). Hazard ratios (HRs) for PFS and OS were extracted from each trial, and the log of the relative risk ratio (RR) was estimated for ORR. The occurrence of bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients was highly associated with improvements in PFS (HR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.46-0.72; P <0.001), OS (HR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.37-0.68; P <0.001), and ORR (RR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.07-2.30, P <0.05), as compared to patients without hypertension. Bevacizumab-induced hypertension may represent a prognostic factor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Correlation of bevacizumab-induced hypertension and outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the wide application of targeted drug therapies, the relevance of prognostic and predictive markers in patient selection has become increasingly important. Bevacizumab is commonly used in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, there are currently no predictive or prognostic biomarkers for bevacizumab. Several clinical studies have evaluated bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis was performed to better determine the association of bevacizumab-induced hypertension with outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and to assess whether bevacizumab-induced hypertension can be used as a prognostic factor in these patients. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on seven published studies to investigate the relationship between hypertension and outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with bevacizumab. Our primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and overall response rate (ORR). Hazard ratios (HRs) for PFS and OS were extracted from each trial, and the log of the relative risk ratio (RR) was estimated for ORR. Results The occurrence of bevacizumab-induced hypertension in patients was highly associated with improvements in PFS (HR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.46–0.72; P <0.001), OS (HR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.37–0.68; P <0.001), and ORR (RR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.07–2.30, P <0.05), as compared to patients without hypertension. Conclusions Bevacizumab-induced hypertension may represent a prognostic factor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:24283603

  5. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions.

  6. Meta-analysis identifies four new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles C.; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Wang, Zhaoming; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Koster, Roelof; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Kratz, Christian P.; Turnbull, Clare; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Bakken, Anne C.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Cook, Michael B.; Erickson, R. Loren; Fosså, Sophie D.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Korde, Larissa A.; Kraggerud, Sigrid M.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rahman, Nazneen; Skinner, Eila C.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Wu, Xifeng; Yeager, Meredith; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Greene, Mark H.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to identify new loci for testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) susceptibility. In the discovery phase, 931 affected individuals and 1,975 controls from three genome wide association studies (GWAS) were analyzed. Replication was conducted in six independent sample sets totaling 3,211 affected individuals and 7,591 controls. In the combined analysis, TGCT risk was significantly associated with markers at four novel loci: 4q22.2 in HPGDS (per allele odds ratio (OR) 1.19, 95%CI 1.12–1.26, P = 1.11×10−8); 7p22.3 in MAD1L1 (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.14–1.29, P = 5.59×10−9); 16q22.3 in RFWD3 (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.18–1.34, P = 5.15×10−12); and 17q22 (rs9905704; OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.18–1.33; P = 4.32×10−13, and rs7221274; OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.12–1.28 P = 4.04×10−9), a locus which includes TEX14, RAD51C and PPM1E. The new TGCT susceptibility loci contain biologically plausible genes encoding proteins important for male germ cell development, chromosomal segregation and DNA damage response. PMID:23666239

  7. Platelet-Related Variants Identified by Exomechip Meta-analysis in 157,293 Individuals.

    PubMed

    Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Kacprowski, Tim; Nomura, Akihiro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yanek, Lisa R; Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Slater, Andrew J; Pankratz, Nathan; Polfus, Linda; Schurmann, Claudia; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Hill, W David; Pazoki, Raha; Elliot, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gao, He; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Mathias, Rasika A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Burt, Amber; Crosslin, David R; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nikus, Kjell; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Kähönen, Mika; Raitoharju, Emma; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Raffield, Laura M; Quarells, Rakale; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Liu, Dajiang J; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fornage, Myriam; Richard, Melissa; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rioux, John D; Dube, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Smith, Albert Vernon; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Torstenson, Eric S; Liu, Yongmei; Tracy, Russell P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Highland, Heather M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Li, Jin; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Mihailov, Evelin; Mägi, Reedik; Hirschhorn, Joel; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Nalls, Mike A; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Engström, Gunnar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Floyd, James S; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth M; Psaty, Bruce M; Starr, J M; Liewald, David C M; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Greinacher, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Thiele, Thomas; Völzke, Henry; van Rooij, Frank J A; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Kathiresan, Sekar; Faraday, Nauder; Auer, Paul L; Reiner, Alex P; Lettre, Guillaume; Johnson, Andrew D

    2016-07-07

    Platelet production, maintenance, and clearance are tightly controlled processes indicative of platelets' important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are common targets for primary and secondary prevention of several conditions. They are monitored clinically by complete blood counts, specifically with measurements of platelet count (PLT) and mean platelet volume (MPV). Identifying genetic effects on PLT and MPV can provide mechanistic insights into platelet biology and their role in disease. Therefore, we formed the Blood Cell Consortium (BCX) to perform a large-scale meta-analysis of Exomechip association results for PLT and MPV in 157,293 and 57,617 individuals, respectively. Using the low-frequency/rare coding variant-enriched Exomechip genotyping array, we sought to identify genetic variants associated with PLT and MPV. In addition to confirming 47 known PLT and 20 known MPV associations, we identified 32 PLT and 18 MPV associations not previously observed in the literature across the allele frequency spectrum, including rare large effect (FCER1A), low-frequency (IQGAP2, MAP1A, LY75), and common (ZMIZ2, SMG6, PEAR1, ARFGAP3/PACSIN2) variants. Several variants associated with PLT/MPV (PEAR1, MRVI1, PTGES3) were also associated with platelet reactivity. In concurrent BCX analyses, there was overlap of platelet-associated variants with red (MAP1A, TMPRSS6, ZMIZ2) and white (PEAR1, ZMIZ2, LY75) blood cell traits, suggesting common regulatory pathways with shared genetic architecture among these hematopoietic lineages. Our large-scale Exomechip analyses identified previously undocumented associations with platelet traits and further indicate that several complex quantitative hematological, lipid, and cardiovascular traits share genetic factors.

  8. Decoding and Reading Comprehension: A Meta-Analysis to Identify Which Reader and Assessment Characteristics Influence the Strength of the Relationship in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, J. Ricardo; Cain, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The twofold purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the relative importance of decoding skills to reading comprehension in reading development and to identify which reader characteristics and reading assessment characteristics contribute to differences in the decoding and reading comprehension correlation. A meta-analysis of 110 studies…

  9. Adding abiraterone to androgen deprivation therapy in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Burdett, Sarah; Vale, Claire L; Clarke, Noel W; Fizazi, Karim; Kheoh, Thian; Mason, Malcolm D; Miladinovic, Branko; James, Nicholas D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Spears, Melissa R; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tran, NamPhuong; Tierney, Jayne F

    2017-10-01

    There is a need to synthesise the results of numerous randomised controlled trials evaluating the addition of therapies to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC). This systematic review aims to assess the effects of adding abiraterone acetate plus prednisone/prednisolone (AAP) to ADT. Using our framework for adaptive meta-analysis (FAME), we started the review process before trials had been reported and worked collaboratively with trial investigators to anticipate when eligible trial results would emerge. Thus, we could determine the earliest opportunity for reliable meta-analysis and take account of unavailable trials in interpreting results. We searched multiple sources for trials comparing AAP plus ADT versus ADT in men with mHSPC. We obtained results for the primary outcome of overall survival (OS), secondary outcomes of clinical/radiological progression-free survival (PFS) and grade III-IV and grade V toxicity direct from trial teams. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the effects of AAP plus ADT on OS and PFS, Peto Odds Ratios (Peto ORs) for the effects on acute toxicity and interaction HRs for the effects on OS by patient subgroups were combined across trials using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified three eligible trials, one of which was still recruiting (PEACE-1 (NCT01957436)). Results from the two remaining trials (LATITUDE (NCT01715285) and STAMPEDE (NCT00268476)), representing 82% of all men randomised to AAP plus ADT versus ADT (without docetaxel in either arm), showed a highly significant 38% reduction in the risk of death with AAP plus ADT (HR = 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.53-0.71, p = 0.55 × 10(-10)), that translates into a 14% absolute improvement in 3-year OS. Despite differences in PFS definitions across trials, we also observed a consistent and highly significant 55% reduction in the risk of clinical/radiological PFS (HR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.40-0.51, p = 0

  10. Microarray meta-analysis identifies evolutionarily conserved BMP signaling targets in developing long bones.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Paritosh; Yadav, Prem Swaroop; Samarjeet, Fnu; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2014-05-15

    In vertebrates, BMP signaling has been demonstrated to be sufficient for bone formation in several tissue contexts. This suggests that genes necessary for bone formation are expressed in a BMP signaling dependent manner. However, till date no gene has been reported to be expressed in a BMP signaling dependent manner in bone. Our aim was to identify such genes. On searching the literature we found that several microarray experiments have been conducted where the transcriptome of osteogenic cells in absence and presence of BMP signaling activation have been compared. However, till date, there is no evidence to suggest that any of the genes found to be upregulated in presence of BMP signaling in these microarray analyses is indeed a target of BMP signaling in bone. We wanted to utilize this publicly available information to identify candidate BMP signaling target genes in vivo. We performed a meta-analysis of six such comparable microarray datasets. This analysis and subsequent experiments led to the identification of five targets of BMP signaling in bone that are conserved both in mouse and chick. Of these Lox, Klf10 and Gpr97 are likely to be direct transcriptional targets of BMP signaling pathway. Dpysl3, is a novel BMP signaling target identified in our study. Our data demonstrate that Dpysl3 is important for osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells and is involved in cell secretion. We have demonstrated that the expression of Dpysl3 is co-operatively regulated by BMP signaling and Runx2. Based on our experimental data, in silico analysis of the putative promoter-enhancer regions of Bmp target genes and existing literature, we hypothesize that BMP signaling collaborates with multiple signaling pathways to regulate the expression of a unique set of genes involved in endochondral ossification. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Meta-analysis of transcriptome data identifies a novel 5-gene pancreatic adenocarcinoma classifier

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Manoj K.; Ndebele, Kenneth; Bucur, Octavian; Yee, Eric U.; Otu, Hasan H.; Plati, Jessica; Bullock, Andrea; Gu, Xuesong; Castan, Eduardo; Zhang, Peng; Najarian, Robert; Muraru, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is largely incurable due to late diagnosis. Superior early detection biomarkers are critical to improving PDAC survival and risk stratification. Experimental Design Optimized meta-analysis of PDAC transcriptome datasets identified and validated key PDAC biomarkers. PDAC-specific expression of a 5-gene biomarker panel was measured by qRT-PCR in microdissected patient-derived FFPE tissues. Cell-based assays assessed impact of two of these biomarkers, TMPRSS4 and ECT2, on PDAC cells. Results A 5-gene PDAC classifier (TMPRSS4, AHNAK2, POSTN, ECT2, SERPINB5) achieved on average 95% sensitivity and 89% specificity in discriminating PDAC from non-tumor samples in four training sets and similar performance (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 89.6%) in five independent validation datasets. This classifier accurately discriminated PDAC from chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.83), other cancers (AUC = 0.89), and non-tumor from PDAC precursors (AUC = 0.92) in three independent datasets. Importantly, the classifier distinguished PanIN from healthy pancreas in the PDX1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D PDAC mouse model. Discriminatory expression of the PDAC classifier genes was confirmed in microdissected FFPE samples of PDAC and matched surrounding non-tumor pancreas or pancreatitis. Notably, knock-down of TMPRSS4 and ECT2 reduced PDAC soft agar growth and cell viability and TMPRSS4 knockdown also blocked PDAC migration and invasion. Conclusions This study identified and validated a highly accurate 5-gene PDAC classifier for discriminating PDAC and early precursor lesions from non-malignant tissue that may facilitate early diagnosis and risk stratification upon validation in prospective clinical trials. Cell-based experiments of two overexpressed proteins encoded by the panel, TMPRSS4 and ECT2, suggest a causal link to PDAC development and progression, confirming them as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26993610

  12. Identifying Predictors of Social Functioning in College Students: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Jennifer Blair

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis draws studies from the literature on college student persistence, need theories, and positive psychology in investigating the strongest predictors of social functioning in college students in the United States and Canada. The predictor categories included background characteristics, measures of personality, mental health…

  13. Identifying Predictors of Social Functioning in College Students: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Jennifer Blair

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis draws studies from the literature on college student persistence, need theories, and positive psychology in investigating the strongest predictors of social functioning in college students in the United States and Canada. The predictor categories included background characteristics, measures of personality, mental health…

  14. Identifying homogenous subgroups for individual patient meta-analysis based on Rough Set Theory.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Kumar, Ambuj; Mhaskar, Rahul; Miladinovic, Branko; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Failure to detect and manage heterogeneity between clinical trials included in meta-analysis may lead to misinterpretation of summary effect estimates. This may ultimately compromise the validity of the results of the meta-analysis. Typically, when heterogeneity between trials is detected, researchers use sensitivity or subgroup analysis to manage it. However, both methods fail to explain why heterogeneity existed in the first place. Here we propose a novel methodology that relies on Rough Set Theory (RST) to detect, explain, and manage the sources of heterogeneity applicable to meta-analysis performed on individual patient data (IPD). The method exploits the RST relations of discernibility and indiscernibility to create homogeneous groups of patients. We applied our methodology on a dataset of 1,111 patients enrolled in 9 randomized controlled trials studying the effect of two transplantation procedures in the management of hematologic malignancies. Our method was able to create three subgroups of patients with remarkably low statistical heterogeneity values (16.8%, 0% and 0% respectively). The proposed methodology has the potential to automatize and standardize the process of detecting and managing heterogeneity in IPD meta-analysis. Future work involves investigating the applications of the proposed methodology in analyzing treatment effects in patients belonging to different risk groups, which will ultimately assist in personalized healthcare decision making.

  15. Further replication studies of the EVE Consortium meta-analysis identifies 2 asthma risk loci in European Americans.

    PubMed

    Myers, Rachel A; Himes, Blanca E; Gignoux, Christopher R; Yang, James J; Gauderman, W James; Rebordosa, Cristina; Xie, Jianming; Torgerson, Dara G; Levin, Albert M; Baurley, James; Graves, Penelope E; Mathias, Rasika A; Romieu, Isabelle; Roth, Lindsey A; Conti, David; Avila, Lydiana; Eng, Celeste; Vora, Hita; LeNoir, Michael A; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Liu, Jinghua; Celedón, Juan C; Galanter, Joshua M; Farber, Harold J; Kumar, Rajesh; Avila, Pedro C; Meade, Kelley; Serebrisky, Denise; Thyne, Shannon; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Borrell, Luisa N; Lemanske, Robert F; Bleecker, Eugene R; Meyers, Deborah A; London, Stephanie J; Barnes, Kathleen C; Raby, Benjamin A; Martinez, Fernando D; Gilliland, Frank D; Williams, L Keoki; Burchard, Esteban G; Weiss, Scott T; Nicolae, Dan L; Ober, Carole

    2012-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies of asthma have implicated many genetic risk factors, with well-replicated associations at approximately 10 loci that account for only a small proportion of the genetic risk. We aimed to identify additional asthma risk loci by performing an extensive replication study of the results from the EVE Consortium meta-analysis. We selected 3186 single nucleotide polymorphisms for replication based on the P values from the EVE Consortium meta-analysis. These single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in ethnically diverse replication samples from 9 different studies, totaling 7202 cases, 6426 controls, and 507 case-parent trios. Association analyses were conducted within each participating study, and the resulting test statistics were combined in a meta-analysis. Two novel associations were replicated in European Americans: rs1061477 in the KLK3 gene on chromosome 19 (combined odds ratio = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10-1.25) and rs9570077 (combined odds ratio =1.20; 95% CI, 1.12-1.29) on chromosome 13q21. We could not replicate any additional associations in the African Americans or Latinos. This extended replication study identified 2 additional asthma risk loci in populations of European descent. The absence of additional loci for African Americans and Latinos highlights the difficulty in replicating associations in admixed populations. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Common Variants Associated with Brachial Circumference: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Day-Williams, Aaron; Franklin, Christopher S.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Albrecht, Eva; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bochud, Murielle; Cadby, Gemma; Ernst, Florian; Evans, David M.; Hayward, Caroline; Hicks, Andrew A.; Huffman, Jennifer; Huth, Cornelia; James, Alan L.; Klopp, Norman; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Musk, Arthur W.; Pehlic, Marina; Pennell, Craig E.; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pourcain, Beate St; Ring, Susan M.; Salvi, Erika; Schipf, Sabine; Staessen, Jan A.; Teumer, Alexander; Timpson, Nicholas; Vitart, Veronique; Warrington, Nicole M.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; An, Ping; Anttila, Verneri; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Holmen, Jostein; Ntalla, Ioanna; Palotie, Aarno; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Wedenoja, Juho; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Province, Michael A.; Zwart, John-Anker; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Cusi, Daniele; Davey Smith, George; Frayling, Timothy M.; Gieger, Christian; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wright, Alan F.; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2012-01-01

    Brachial circumference (BC), also known as upper arm or mid arm circumference, can be used as an indicator of muscle mass and fat tissue, which are distributed differently in men and women. Analysis of anthropometric measures of peripheral fat distribution such as BC could help in understanding the complex pathophysiology behind overweight and obesity. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic variants associated with BC through a large-scale genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis. We used fixed-effects meta-analysis to synthesise summary results across 14 GWAS discovery and 4 replication cohorts comprising overall 22,376 individuals (12,031 women and 10,345 men) of European ancestry. Individual analyses were carried out for men, women, and combined across sexes using linear regression and an additive genetic model: adjusted for age and adjusted for age and BMI. We prioritised signals for follow-up in two-stages. We did not detect any signals reaching genome-wide significance. The FTO rs9939609 SNP showed nominal evidence for association (p<0.05) in the age-adjusted strata for men and across both sexes. In this first GWAS meta-analysis for BC to date, we have not identified any genome-wide significant signals and do not observe robust association of previously established obesity loci with BC. Large-scale collaborations will be necessary to achieve higher power to detect loci underlying BC. PMID:22479309

  17. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Law, Matthew H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Martin, Nicholas G.; Moses, Eric K.; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Kypreou, Katerina P.; Taylor, John C.; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A.; Andresen, Per A.; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M.; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L.; Elder, David E.; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Chen, Wei V.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M.; Mann, Graham J.; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W.; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C.; Craig, Jamie E.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pooley, Karen A.; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Cust, Anne E.; Ward, Sarah V.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M.; Bishop, Julia A. Newton; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5×10–8), as did two previously-reported but un-replicated loci and all thirteen established loci. Novel SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  18. Replication and Meta-Analysis of Candidate Loci Identified Variation at RAB3GAP1 Associated With Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ha Ae; Mills, Richard A. D.; Lindsay, Richard G.; Phillips, Tony; Coster, Douglas J.; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Keratoconus is a common complex corneal ectasia that can lead to severe visual impairment. Although a genetic component is well recognized, the genetic risk factors for keratoconus are yet to be fully elucidated. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) by Li et al. identified 15 potentially associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we aimed to replicate these associations, and conduct a meta-analysis of the current and previous studies. Methods. We genotyped the 15 reported associated SNPs in 524 Australian Caucasian cases with keratoconus and 2761 controls. Association analysis was conducted in PLINK. A meta-analysis of this study with the adjusted P values of the previously published GWAS was conducted using the method of Fisher to combine P values. Results. Our Australian cohort showed association (P < 0.003) at SNPs near RAB3GAP1, KCND3, IMMPL2, and in a gene desert on chromosome 13q33.3, providing evidence of replication of the published results. The meta-analysis showed SNP rs4954218 near RAB3GAP1 gene was associated significantly with keratoconus, with P = 9.26 × 10−9 passing the genome-wide significance level. Conclusions. Although the mechanism of disease association is yet to be determined, SNP rs4954218 is associated consistently with keratoconus and likely tags a functional variant that contributes to disease susceptibility. PMID:23833071

  19. A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies novel loci associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Liu, Xue-Feng; Aragam, Nagesh

    2010-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both have strong inherited components. Recent studies have indicated that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may share more than half of their genetic determinants. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis (combined analysis) for genome-wide association data of the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 to detect genetic variants influencing both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using European-American samples (653 bipolar cases and 1034 controls, 1172 schizophrenia cases and 1379 controls). The best associated SNP rs11789399 was located at 9q33.1 (p=2.38 × 10(-6), 5.74 × 10(-4), and 5.56 × 10(-9), for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively), where one flanking gene, ASTN2 (220kb away) has been associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. The next best SNP was rs12201676 located at 6q15 (p=2.67 × 10(-4), 2.12 × 10(-5), 3.88 × 10(-8) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively), near two flanking genes, GABRR1 and GABRR2 (15 and 17kb away, respectively). The third interesting SNP rs802568 was at 7q35 within CNTNAP2 (p=8.92 × 10(-4), 1.38 × 10(-5), and 1.62 × 10(-7) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively). Through meta-analysis, we found two additional associated genes NALCN (the top SNP is rs2044117, p=4.57 × 10(-7)) and NAP5 (the top SNP is rs10496702, p=7.15 × 10(-7)). Haplotype analyses of above five loci further supported the associations with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These results provide evidence of common genetic variants influencing schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These findings will serve as a resource for replication in other populations to elucidate the potential role of these genetic variants in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  20. Assessment of ethnic differences in sunitinib outcome between Caucasian and Asian patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Fiocco, Marta; Swen, Jesse J; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of studies have reported ethnic differences in sunitinib outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. However, a comprehensive analysis is still lacking. Therefore, we systematically collected available published data and performed a meta-analysis to compare sunitinib efficacy and toxicity in Asian and Caucasian mRCC patients. Data were extracted from published results from clinical trials, expanded access program and real-world clinical practice. Progression-free survival (or time to tumor progression), overall survival, objective response rate and adverse events were used as endpoints to evaluate the differences of sunitinib outcome between the two ethnicities. For adverse events, we focused the following clinically relevant side effects: diarrhea, fatigue, mucositis/stomatitis, hand-foot syndrome, hypertension, leukopenia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. A total of 33 publications including 9977 patients were available for meta-analysis. The efficacy of sunitinib in Asian patients was similar to that in Caucasian patients. However, Asian patients showed a higher incidence of all grades toxicity of hand-foot syndrome, > grade 2 fatigue, > grade 2 hand-foot syndrome and > grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Ethnic differences in adverse events of sunitinib in mRCC patients existed and dose adjustment in Asian patients may be considered.

  1. Is there still a role for sorafenib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of sorafenib over other targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Roberto; Verri, Elena; Cossu Rocca, Maria; Aurilio, Gaetano; Cullurà, Daniela; Santoni, Matteo; de Cobelli, Ottavio; Nolé, Franco

    2016-03-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has largely improved over the last decade, due to the availability of several targeted agents (TAs). Sorafenib was the first TA to report a benefit in terms of PFS in this disease, and it has largely been used as a comparator in randomized trials. We tested its activity compared to other TAs by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE/PubMed, the Cochrane library, and the ASCO university websites were searched for randomized phase II or III trials that compared other TAs to sorafenib in mRCC. Data extraction was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The measured outcomes were progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and the overall response rate (ORR). Sub-analyses were performed for MSKCC prognostic groups and lines of therapy. A total of 3094 patients were evaluable for PFS. Other TAs significantly reduce the risk of progression compared to sorafenib (HR=0.78; 95% CI, 0.72-0.85; p<0.001). This difference remains significant in patients in a good prognostic group with respect to both first- (HR=0.61; 95%CI, 0.44-0.85; p=0.003) and second-line therapy (HR=0.58; 95% CI, 0.42-0.79; p<0.001). No significant differences were, however, found in patients with an intermediate prognosis in terms of both first- (HR=0.80; 95% CI, 0.60-1.00; p=0.05) and second-line treatment (HR=0.89; 95% CI, 0.73-1.07; p=0.21). In 2922 patients evaluable for OS, no significant difference was found between other TAs and sorafenib (HR=1.07; 95% CI, 0.97-1.18; p=0.18). A benefit was also not identified when the analysis was limited to patients treated with first or subsequent lines of therapy or in patients previously treated with sunitinib. Significant differences were found in terms of the ORR in the 2963 evaluable patients favoring other TAs (RR=1.48; 95% CI, 1.24-1.76; p<0.001). This difference remain significant when a sub

  2. Single-agent DTIC versus combination chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy in metastatic melanoma: a meta-analysis of 3273 patients from 20 randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Huncharek, M; Caubet, J F; McGarry, R

    2001-02-01

    It is currently unclear whether any combination therapy for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is superior to standard single-agent dacarbazine (DTIC) in terms of tumour response and overall survival. The available randomized clinical trial data were combined in a meta-analysis to address this question. Initially a thorough MEDLARS search was conducted covering the time period from January 1970 to January 1999. This literature search was supplemented by manual searches of study bibliographies (including review articles) and review of relevant textbooks. The meta-analysis was performed according to a prospective protocol using strict study eligibility criteria. Data derived from randomized controlled trials comparing single-agent DTIC with combination chemo/immunotherapy were combined using a fixed effects model. Data were stratified into three combination therapy groups: DTIC-containing regimens, non-DTIC-containing therapy, and chemotherapy plus immunotherapy. The primary outcome of interest was the proportion of patients demonstrating a complete or partial response to treatment. A total of 20 randomized trials comprising 3273 patients were initially combined in a meta-analysis. This yielded an odds ratio (OR) of 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.48), demonstrating that combination drug therapies are associated with a 23% increase in response rate compared with single-agent DTIC. The combination of DTIC plus interferon-alpha produced a tumour response rate 53% greater (95% CI 1.10-2.13) than that seen with DTIC alone. This increase was greater than that seen with DTIC-containing multi-drug regimens, which had an OR of 1.33 (95% CI 0.99-1.78). No difference in overall survival was demonstrated. Non-DTIC-containing treatment programmes showed no advantage over DTIC in terms of tumour response rate (OR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.45-1.32). The combination of DTIC and interferon-alpha appears more active than standard single-agent DTIC in metastatic melanoma. Further

  3. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeinera, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, William J.; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A.G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made to establish genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American-Australian-European collaborative meta-analysis of fourteen studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (<50th percentile of BMI) of European ancestry. Taking forward the eight novel signals yielding association with P < 5×10−6 in to nine independent datasets (n = 2,818 cases and 4,083 controls) we observed two loci that yielded a genome wide significant combined P-value, namely near OLFM4 on 13q14 (rs9568856; P=1.82×10−9; OR=1.22) and within HOXB5 on 17q21 (rs9299; P=3.54×10−9; OR=1.14). Both loci continued to show association when including two extreme childhood obesity cohorts (n = 2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). Finally, these two loci yielded directionally consistent associations in the GIANT meta-analysis of adult BMI1. PMID:22484627

  4. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Jonathan P; Taal, H Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Cousminer, Diana L; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E; Evans, David M; St Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van der Valk, Ralf J P; de Jongste, Johan C; Postma, Dirkje S; Boomsma, Dorret I; Gauderman, W James; Hassanein, Mohamed T; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A G; Neville, Charlotte E; Moreno, Luis A; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M; Kemp, John P; Buxton, Jessica L; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Gillman, Matthew W; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A

    2012-05-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made in establishing genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American, Australian and European collaborative meta-analysis of 14 studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (<50th percentile of BMI) of European ancestry. Taking forward the eight newly discovered signals yielding association with P < 5 × 10(-6) in nine independent data sets (2,818 cases and 4,083 controls), we observed two loci that yielded genome-wide significant combined P values near OLFM4 at 13q14 (rs9568856; P = 1.82 × 10(-9); odds ratio (OR) = 1.22) and within HOXB5 at 17q21 (rs9299; P = 3.54 × 10(-9); OR = 1.14). Both loci continued to show association when two extreme childhood obesity cohorts were included (2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). These two loci also yielded directionally consistent associations in a previous meta-analysis of adult BMI(1).

  5. The incremental benefit of EUS for identifying unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    James, Paul D.; Zhang, Mei; Belletrutti, Paul J.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ghali, William; Roberts, Derek J.; Martel, Guillaume; Heitman, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims It is unclear to what extent EUS influences the surgical management of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This systematic review sought to determine if EUS evaluation improves the identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, bibliographies of included articles and conference proceedings for studies reporting original data regarding surgical management and/or survival among patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, from inception to January 7th 2017. Our main outcome was the incremental benefit of EUS for the identification of unresectable disease (IBEUS). The pooled IBEUS were calculated using random effects models. Heterogeneity was explored using stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results Among 4,903 citations identified, we included 8 cohort studies (study periods from 1992 to 2007) that examined the identification of unresectable disease (n = 795). Random effects meta-analysis suggested that EUS alone identified unresectable disease in 19% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 10–33%). Among those studies that considered portal or mesenteric vein invasion as potentially resectable, EUS alone was able to identify unresectable disease in 14% of patients (95% CI 8–24%) after a CT scan was performed. Limitations The majority of the included studies were retrospective. Conclusions EUS evaluation is associated with increased identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28319148

  6. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I; Conti, David V; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B; Partin, Alan W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian E; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Haiman, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P < 5 × 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease.

  7. Meta-analysis comparing maintenance strategies with continuous therapy and complete chemotherapy-free interval strategies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jing; Li, Huihui; Che, Juanjuan; Cao, Bangwei

    2016-05-31

    There is as yet no consensus as to the best choice among the three treatment options (maintenance, complete chemotherapy-free intervals [CFIs], and continuous) for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed a meta-analysis of six trials (N = 2, 454 patients) to compare the safety and efficacy of those three treatment strategies. Maintenance appeared to offer an advantage over CFI with respect to progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.69). PFS and overall survival (OS) were comparable between the maintenance and continuous strategies (HR: 1.18, 95% CI, 0.96-1.46; HR: 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98-1.27, respectively), as was OS between the maintenance and CFI strategies (HR: 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70-1.00). The incidence of grade 3/4 toxicity, including neutropenia, neuropathy, hand-foot syndrome and fatigue, was lower with maintenance than with continuous therapy. A maintenance regimen utilizing bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to confer a slight advantage over bevacizumab monotherapy with respect to PFS (P = 0.011). Maintenance appeared to reduce cumulative grade 3/4 toxicity as compared to the continuous strategy, while showing comparable efficacy. Bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to be of particular value in patients with metastatic CRC.

  8. Meta-analysis comparing maintenance strategies with continuous therapy and complete chemotherapy-free interval strategies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jing; Li, Huihui; Che, Juanjuan; Cao, Bangwei

    2016-01-01

    There is as yet no consensus as to the best choice among the three treatment options (maintenance, complete chemotherapy-free intervals [CFIs], and continuous) for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed a meta-analysis of six trials (N = 2, 454 patients) to compare the safety and efficacy of those three treatment strategies. Maintenance appeared to offer an advantage over CFI with respect to progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–0.69). PFS and overall survival (OS) were comparable between the maintenance and continuous strategies (HR: 1.18, 95% CI, 0.96–1.46; HR: 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98–1.27, respectively), as was OS between the maintenance and CFI strategies (HR: 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70–1.00). The incidence of grade 3/4 toxicity, including neutropenia, neuropathy, hand-foot syndrome and fatigue, was lower with maintenance than with continuous therapy. A maintenance regimen utilizing bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to confer a slight advantage over bevacizumab monotherapy with respect to PFS (P = 0.011). Maintenance appeared to reduce cumulative grade 3/4 toxicity as compared to the continuous strategy, while showing comparable efficacy. Bevacizumab-based doublets appeared to be of particular value in patients with metastatic CRC. PMID:27072579

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, M C; Byrne, E M; Esko, T; Nalls, M A; Ganna, A; Paynter, N; Monda, K L; Amin, N; Fischer, K; Renstrom, F; Ngwa, J S; Huikari, V; Cavadino, A; Nolte, I M; Teumer, A; Yu, K; Marques-Vidal, P; Rawal, R; Manichaikul, A; Wojczynski, M K; Vink, J M; Zhao, J H; Burlutsky, G; Lahti, J; Mikkilä, V; Lemaitre, R N; Eriksson, J; Musani, S K; Tanaka, T; Geller, F; Luan, J; Hui, J; Mägi, R; Dimitriou, M; Garcia, M E; Ho, W-K; Wright, M J; Rose, L M; Magnusson, P K E; Pedersen, N L; Couper, D; Oostra, B A; Hofman, A; Ikram, M A; Tiemeier, H W; Uitterlinden, A G; van Rooij, F J A; Barroso, I; Johansson, I; Xue, L; Kaakinen, M; Milani, L; Power, C; Snieder, H; Stolk, R P; Baumeister, S E; Biffar, R; Gu, F; Bastardot, F; Kutalik, Z; Jacobs, D R; Forouhi, N G; Mihailov, E; Lind, L; Lindgren, C; Michaëlsson, K; Morris, A; Jensen, M; Khaw, K-T; Luben, R N; Wang, J J; Männistö, S; Perälä, M-M; Kähönen, M; Lehtimäki, T; Viikari, J; Mozaffarian, D; Mukamal, K; Psaty, B M; Döring, A; Heath, A C; Montgomery, G W; Dahmen, N; Carithers, T; Tucker, K L; Ferrucci, L; Boyd, H A; Melbye, M; Treur, J L; Mellström, D; Hottenga, J J; Prokopenko, I; Tönjes, A; Deloukas, P; Kanoni, S; Lorentzon, M; Houston, D K; Liu, Y; Danesh, J; Rasheed, A; Mason, M A; Zonderman, A B; Franke, L; Kristal, B S; Karjalainen, J; Reed, D R; Westra, H-J; Evans, M K; Saleheen, D; Harris, T B; Dedoussis, G; Curhan, G; Stumvoll, M; Beilby, J; Pasquale, L R; Feenstra, B; Bandinelli, S; Ordovas, J M; Chan, A T; Peters, U; Ohlsson, C; Gieger, C; Martin, N G; Waldenberger, M; Siscovick, D S; Raitakari, O; Eriksson, J G; Mitchell, P; Hunter, D J; Kraft, P; Rimm, E B; Boomsma, D I; Borecki, I B; Loos, R J F; Wareham, N J; Vollenweider, P; Caporaso, N; Grabe, H J; Neuhouser, M L; Wolffenbuttel, B H R; Hu, F B; Hyppönen, E; Järvelin, M-R; Cupples, L A; Franks, P W; Ridker, P M; van Duijn, C M; Heiss, G; Metspalu, A; North, K E; Ingelsson, E; Nettleton, J A; van Dam, R M; Chasman, D I

    2015-05-01

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to 91,462 coffee consumers of European ancestry with top single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) followed-up in ~30 062 and 7964 coffee consumers of European and African-American ancestry, respectively. Studies from both stages were combined in a trans-ethnic meta-analysis. Confirmed loci were examined for putative functional and biological relevance. Eight loci, including six novel loci, met GW significance (log10Bayes factor (BF)>5.64) with per-allele effect sizes of 0.03-0.14 cups per day. Six are located in or near genes potentially involved in pharmacokinetics (ABCG2, AHR, POR and CYP1A2) and pharmacodynamics (BDNF and SLC6A4) of caffeine. Two map to GCKR and MLXIPL genes related to metabolic traits but lacking known roles in coffee consumption. Enhancer and promoter histone marks populate the regions of many confirmed loci and several potential regulatory SNPs are highly correlated with the lead SNP of each. SNP alleles near GCKR, MLXIPL, BDNF and CYP1A2 that were associated with higher coffee consumption have previously been associated with smoking initiation, higher adiposity and fasting insulin and glucose but lower blood pressure and favorable lipid, inflammatory and liver enzyme profiles (P<5 × 10(-8)).Our genetic findings among European and African-American adults reinforce the role of caffeine in mediating habitual coffee consumption and may point to molecular mechanisms underlying inter-individual variability in pharmacological and health effects of coffee.

  10. Meta-analysis identifies multiple loci associated with kidney function-related traits in east Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Sim, Xueling; Go, Min Jin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Seielstad, Mark; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S-J Cathy; Mei, Hao; Rao, Dabeeru C; Hixson, James E; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Ogihara, Toshio; Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Kooner, Jaspal S; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Cho, Yoon Shin; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2012-07-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), impairment of kidney function, is a serious public health problem, and the assessment of genetic factors influencing kidney function has substantial clinical relevance. Here, we report a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for kidney function-related traits, including 71,149 east Asian individuals from 18 studies in 11 population-, hospital- or family-based cohorts, conducted as part of the Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network (AGEN). Our meta-analysis identified 17 loci newly associated with kidney function-related traits, including the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen, uric acid and serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate based on serum creatinine levels (eGFRcrea) (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)). We further examined these loci with in silico replication in individuals of European ancestry from the KidneyGen, CKDGen and GUGC consortia, including a combined total of ∼110,347 individuals. We identify pleiotropic associations among these loci with kidney function-related traits and risk of CKD. These findings provide new insights into the genetics of kidney function.

  11. Cetuximab-based therapy is effective in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced and metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ezzeldin M; Abouelkhair, Khaled M; Al-Masri, Osama A; Chaudry, Najeeb C; Kazkaz, Ghieth A

    2011-06-01

    Randomized controlled trails (RCTs) where cetuximab added to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy for patients with advanced/metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis intended to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based therapy (CBT) in that setting. We analyzed four eligible RCTs that included 1,003 and 1,015 patients randomized to CBT and control intervention, respectively. As compared with the noncetuximab group, CBT demonstrated an 9% reduction in the risk of disease progression [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91; (CI = 0.83-1.00); p = 0.06], a 13% reduction in the risk of death [HR = 0.87; (CI = 0.78-0.96); p = 0.005], and an approximately 50% increase in objective response rate [odds ratio (OR) = 1.48; (CI = 1.22-1.80); p < 0.0001]. CBT-related adverse events were similar across comparisons except for toxicities known to be associated with anti-EGFR therapy. CBT produced significant clinical benefit with acceptable toxicity as a first-line strategy in patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC. Further research is needed to identify markers predictive of cetuximab benefit in that disease.

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET).

    PubMed

    Wong, Matthew H; Chan, David L; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81-1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77-1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04-1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27-0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24-10.51). Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET.

  13. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew H.; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T.; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J.; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Results Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81–1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77–1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04–1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27–0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24–10.51). Conclusion Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET. PMID:27362760

  14. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O’Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li-san; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2,11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24162737

  15. Twenty bone-mineral-density loci identified by large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneira, Fernando; Styrkársdottir, Unnur; Estrada, Karol; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Richards, J Brent; Zillikens, M Carola; Kavvoura, Fotini K; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Demissie, Serkalem; Grundberg, Elin; Hofman, Albert; Kong, Augustine; Karasik, David; van Meurs, Joyce B; Oostra, Ben; Pastinen, Tomi; Pols, Huibert A P; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Soranzo, Nicole; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Williams, Frances M K; Wilson, Scott G; Zhou, Yanhua; Ralston, Stuart H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Spector, Timothy; Kiel, Douglas P; Stefansson, Kari; Ioannidis, John P A; Uitterlinden, André G

    2009-11-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable complex trait used in the clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis and the assessment of fracture risk. We performed meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies of femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD in 19,195 subjects of Northern European descent. We identified 20 BMD loci that reached genome-wide significance (GWS; P < 5 x 10(-8)), of which 13 map to regions not previously associated with this trait: 1p31.3 (GPR177), 2p21 (SPTBN1), 3p22 (CTNNB1), 4q21.1 (MEPE), 5q14 (MEF2C), 7p14 (STARD3NL), 7q21.3 (FLJ42280), 11p11.2 (LRP4, ARHGAP1, F2), 11p14.1 (DCDC5), 11p15 (SOX6), 16q24 (FOXL1), 17q21 (HDAC5) and 17q12 (CRHR1). The meta-analysis also confirmed at GWS level seven known BMD loci on 1p36 (ZBTB40), 6q25 (ESR1), 8q24 (TNFRSF11B), 11q13.4 (LRP5), 12q13 (SP7), 13q14 (TNFSF11) and 18q21 (TNFRSF11A). The many SNPs associated with BMD map to genes in signaling pathways with relevance to bone metabolism and highlight the complex genetic architecture that underlies osteoporosis and variation in BMD.

  16. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I.; Conti, David V.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O.; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A.; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C.; Key, Tim J.; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Strom, Sara S.; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B.; Partin, Alan W.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L.; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Murphy, Adam B.; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S. Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L.; Hunter, David J.; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E.; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of >10 million SNPs in 43,303prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three novel susceptibility loci were revealed at P<5×10-8; 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 from multiethnic analyses and one was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with the known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk of the disease in European ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the utility of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease. PMID:25217961

  17. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 39 studies identifies type 2 diabetes loci.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R; Mega, Jessica L; Lanktree, Matthew B; Tare, Archana; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Li, Yun R; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Böhm, Bernhard O; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Crook, Errol D; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C H; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S; Furlong, Clement E; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A; Glessner, Joseph T; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E; Kim, Cecilia E; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y; Lawlor, Debbie A; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Molony, Cliona M; Morrow, David A; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K; Nelson, Christopher P; Newhouse, Stephen J; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R; Pepine, Carl J; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Erin N; Spijkerman, Annemieke W M; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L; van Iperen, Erik P A; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Cappola, Thomas P; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bhatt, Deepak; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dorn, Gerald W; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofker, Marten H; Huggins, Gordon S; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Klungel, Olaf H; Knowler, William C; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Meigs, James B; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Bielinski, Susan J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J; Schadt, Eric E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Asselbergs, Folkert; de Bakker, Paul I W; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S; Wilson, James G; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S; Keating, Brendan J

    2012-03-09

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ∼2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide significance. In silico follow-up analysis of putative association signals found in independent genome-wide association studies (including 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls) performed by the DIAGRAM consortium identified a T2D locus at genome-wide significance (GATAD2A/CILP2/PBX4; p = 5.7 × 10(-9)) and two loci exceeding study-wide significance (SREBF1, and TH/INS; p < 2.4 × 10(-6)). Second, meta-analyses of 1,986 cases and 7,695 controls from eight African-American studies identified study-wide-significant (p = 2.4 × 10(-7)) variants in HMGA2 and replicated variants in TCF7L2 (p = 5.1 × 10(-15)). Third, conditional analysis revealed multiple known and novel independent signals within five T2D-associated genes in samples of European ancestry and within HMGA2 in African-American samples. Fourth, a multiethnic meta-analysis of all 39 studies identified T2D-associated variants in BCL2 (p = 2.1 × 10(-8)). Finally, a composite genetic score of SNPs from new and established T2D signals was significantly associated with increased risk of diabetes in African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. In summary, large-scale meta-analysis involving a dense gene-centric approach has uncovered additional loci and variants that contribute to T2D risk and suggests substantial overlap of T2D association signals across multiple ethnic groups. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-Analysis across 39 Studies Identifies Type 2 Diabetes Loci

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Crook, Errol D.; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N.; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C.H.; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F.A.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Molony, Cliona M.; Morrow, David A.; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S.; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Erin N.; Spijkerman, Annemieke W.M.; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W.H. Linda; Pankow, James S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P.; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofker, Marten H.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Knowler, William C.; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Meigs, James B.; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Bielinski, Susan J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J.; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S.; Wilson, James G.; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ∼2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide significance. In silico follow-up analysis of putative association signals found in independent genome-wide association studies (including 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls) performed by the DIAGRAM consortium identified a T2D locus at genome-wide significance (GATAD2A/CILP2/PBX4; p = 5.7 × 10−9) and two loci exceeding study-wide significance (SREBF1, and TH/INS; p < 2.4 × 10−6). Second, meta-analyses of 1,986 cases and 7,695 controls from eight African-American studies identified study-wide-significant (p = 2.4 × 10−7) variants in HMGA2 and replicated variants in TCF7L2 (p = 5.1 × 10−15). Third, conditional analysis revealed multiple known and novel independent signals within five T2D-associated genes in samples of European ancestry and within HMGA2 in African-American samples. Fourth, a multiethnic meta-analysis of all 39 studies identified T2D-associated variants in BCL2 (p = 2.1 × 10−8). Finally, a composite genetic score of SNPs from new and established T2D signals was significantly associated with increased risk of diabetes in African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. In summary, large-scale meta-analysis involving a dense gene-centric approach has uncovered additional loci and variants that contribute to T2D risk and suggests substantial overlap of T2D association signals across multiple ethnic groups. PMID:22325160

  19. Platelet-reactivity tests identify patients at risk of secondary cardiovascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wisman, P P; Roest, M; Asselbergs, F W; de Groot, P G; Moll, F L; van der Graaf, Y; de Borst, G J

    2014-05-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the standard treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular events (CVEs). High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) is a risk factor for secondary CVEs in patients prescribed aspirin and/or clopidogrel. The present review and meta-analysis was aimed at assessing the ability of individual platelet-function tests to reliably identify patients at risk of developing secondary CVEs. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies on platelet-reactivity measurements and CVEs. The main inclusion criteria were: (i) prospective study design; (ii) study medication, including aspirin and/or clopidogrel; and (iii) a platelet-function test being performed at baseline, before follow-up started. Of 3882 identified studies, 102 (2.6%; reporting on 44 098 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. With regard to high on-aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR), 22 different tests were discussed in 55 studies (22 441 patients). Pooled analysis showed that HAPR was diagnosed in 22.2% of patients, and was associated with an increased CVE risk (relative risk [RR] 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.77-2.47). Eleven HAPR tests independently showed a significantly increased CVE risk in patients with HAPR as compared with those with normal on-aspirin platelet reactivity. As regards high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HCPR), 59 studies (34 776 patients) discussed 15 different tests, and reported that HCPR was present in 40.4% of patients and was associated with an increased CVE risk (RR 2.80; 95% CI 2.40-3.27). Ten tests showed a significantly increased CVE risk. Patients with HPR are suboptimally protected against future cardiovascular complications. Furthermore, not all of the numerous platelet tests proved to be able to identify patients at increased cardiovascular risk. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. Meta-Analysis Identifies Gene-by-Environment Interactions as Demonstrated in a Study of 4,965 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jong Wha J.; Shih, Diana; Davis, Richard C.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    Identifying environmentally-specific genetic effects is a key challenge in understanding the structure of complex traits. Model organisms play a crucial role in the identification of such gene-by-environment interactions, as a result of the unique ability to observe genetically similar individuals across multiple distinct environments. Many model organism studies examine the same traits but under varying environmental conditions. For example, knock-out or diet-controlled studies are often used to examine cholesterol in mice. These studies, when examined in aggregate, provide an opportunity to identify genomic loci exhibiting environmentally-dependent effects. However, the straightforward application of traditional methodologies to aggregate separate studies suffers from several problems. First, environmental conditions are often variable and do not fit the standard univariate model for interactions. Additionally, applying a multivariate model results in increased degrees of freedom and low statistical power. In this paper, we jointly analyze multiple studies with varying environmental conditions using a meta-analytic approach based on a random effects model to identify loci involved in gene-by-environment interactions. Our approach is motivated by the observation that methods for discovering gene-by-environment interactions are closely related to random effects models for meta-analysis. We show that interactions can be interpreted as heterogeneity and can be detected without utilizing the traditional uni- or multi-variate approaches for discovery of gene-by-environment interactions. We apply our new method to combine 17 mouse studies containing in aggregate 4,965 distinct animals. We identify 26 significant loci involved in High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, many of which are consistent with previous findings. Several of these loci show significant evidence of involvement in gene-by-environment interactions. An additional advantage of our meta-analysis

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical characteristics for identifying CT abnormality after minor brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pandor, Abdullah; Harnan, Susan; Goodacre, Steve; Pickering, Alastair; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Rees, Angie

    2012-03-20

    Clinical features can be used to identify which patients with minor brain injury need CT scanning. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to estimate the value of these characteristics for diagnosing intracranial injury (including the need for neurosurgery) in adults, children, and infants. Potentially relevant studies were identified through electronic searches of several key databases, including MEDLINE, from inception to March 2010. Cohort studies of patients with minor brain injury (Glasgow Coma Score [GCS], 13-15) were selected if they reported data on the diagnostic accuracy of individual clinical characteristics for intracranial or neurosurgical injury. Where applicable, meta-analysis was used to estimate pooled sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios. Data were extracted from 71 studies (with cohort sizes ranging from 39 to 31,694 patients). Depressed or basal skull fracture were the most useful clinical characteristics for the prediction of intracranial injury in both adults and children (positive likelihood ratio [PLR], >10). Other useful characteristics included focal neurological deficit, post-traumatic seizure (PLR >5), persistent vomiting, and coagulopathy (PLR 2 to 5). Characteristics that had limited diagnostic value included loss of consciousness and headache in adults and scalp hematoma and scalp laceration in children. Limited studies were undertaken in children and only a few studies reported data for neurosurgical injuries. In conclusion, this review identifies clinical characteristics that indicate increased risk of intracranial injury and the need for CT scanning. Other characteristics, such as headache in adults and scalp laceration of hematoma in children, do not reliably indicate increased risk.

  2. Gene-set meta-analysis of lung cancer identifies pathway related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Albert; Sohns, Melanie; Friedrichs, Stefanie; Hung, Rayjean J; Fehringer, Gord; McLaughlin, John; Amos, Christopher I; Brennan, Paul; Risch, Angela; Brüske, Irene; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Bickeböller, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Gene-set analysis (GSA) is an approach using the results of single-marker genome-wide association studies when investigating pathways as a whole with respect to the genetic basis of a disease. We performed a meta-analysis of seven GSAs for lung cancer, applying the method META-GSA. Overall, the information taken from 11,365 cases and 22,505 controls from within the TRICL/ILCCO consortia was used to investigate a total of 234 pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. META-GSA reveals the systemic lupus erythematosus KEGG pathway hsa05322, driven by the gene region 6p21-22, as also implicated in lung cancer (p = 0.0306). This gene region is known to be associated with squamous cell lung carcinoma. The most important genes driving the significance of this pathway belong to the genomic areas HIST1-H4L, -1BN, -2BN, -H2AK, -H4K and C2/C4A/C4B. Within these areas, the markers most significantly associated with LC are rs13194781 (located within HIST12BN) and rs1270942 (located between C2 and C4A). We have discovered a pathway currently marked as specific to systemic lupus erythematosus as being significantly implicated in lung cancer. The gene region 6p21-22 in this pathway appears to be more extensively associated with lung cancer than previously assumed. Given wide-stretched linkage disequilibrium to the area APOM/BAG6/MSH5, there is currently simply not enough information or evidence to conclude whether the potential pleiotropy of lung cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus is spurious, biological, or mediated. Further research into this pathway and gene region will be necessary.

  3. Gene-set meta-analysis of lung cancer identifies pathway related to systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sohns, Melanie; Friedrichs, Stefanie; Hung, Rayjean J.; Fehringer, Gord; McLaughlin, John; Amos, Christopher I.; Brennan, Paul; Risch, Angela; Brüske, Irene; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Bickeböller, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Gene-set analysis (GSA) is an approach using the results of single-marker genome-wide association studies when investigating pathways as a whole with respect to the genetic basis of a disease. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of seven GSAs for lung cancer, applying the method META-GSA. Overall, the information taken from 11,365 cases and 22,505 controls from within the TRICL/ILCCO consortia was used to investigate a total of 234 pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. Results META-GSA reveals the systemic lupus erythematosus KEGG pathway hsa05322, driven by the gene region 6p21-22, as also implicated in lung cancer (p = 0.0306). This gene region is known to be associated with squamous cell lung carcinoma. The most important genes driving the significance of this pathway belong to the genomic areas HIST1-H4L, -1BN, -2BN, -H2AK, -H4K and C2/C4A/C4B. Within these areas, the markers most significantly associated with LC are rs13194781 (located within HIST12BN) and rs1270942 (located between C2 and C4A). Conclusions We have discovered a pathway currently marked as specific to systemic lupus erythematosus as being significantly implicated in lung cancer. The gene region 6p21-22 in this pathway appears to be more extensively associated with lung cancer than previously assumed. Given wide-stretched linkage disequilibrium to the area APOM/BAG6/MSH5, there is currently simply not enough information or evidence to conclude whether the potential pleiotropy of lung cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus is spurious, biological, or mediated. Further research into this pathway and gene region will be necessary. PMID:28273134

  4. Mitogenomic Meta-Analysis Identifies Two Phases of Migration in the History of Eastern Eurasian Sheep.

    PubMed

    Lv, Feng-Hua; Peng, Wei-Feng; Yang, Ji; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Li, Wen-Rong; Liu, Ming-Jun; Ma, Yue-Hui; Zhao, Qian-Jun; Yang, Guang-Li; Wang, Feng; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Yong-Gang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Sheng-Guo; Hehua, Eer; Gorkhali, Neena A; Farhad Vahidi, S M; Muladno, Muhammad; Naqvi, Arifa N; Tabell, Jonna; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Bruford, Michael W; Kantanen, Juha; Han, Jian-Lin; Li, Meng-Hua

    2015-10-01

    Despite much attention, history of sheep (Ovis aries) evolution, including its dating, demographic trajectory and geographic spread, remains controversial. To address these questions, we generated 45 complete and 875 partial mitogenomic sequences, and performed a meta-analysis of these and published ovine mitochondrial DNA sequences (n = 3,229) across Eurasia. We inferred that O. orientalis and O. musimon share the most recent female ancestor with O. aries at approximately 0.790 Ma (95% CI: 0.637-0.934 Ma) during the Middle Pleistocene, substantially predating the domestication event (∼8-11 ka). By reconstructing historical variations in effective population size, we found evidence of a rapid population increase approximately 20-60 ka, immediately before the Last Glacial Maximum. Analyses of lineage expansions showed two sheep migratory waves at approximately 4.5-6.8 ka (lineages A and B: ∼6.4-6.8 ka; C: ∼4.5 ka) across eastern Eurasia, which could have been influenced by prehistoric West-East commercial trade and deliberate mating of domestic and wild sheep, respectively. A continent-scale examination of lineage diversity and approximate Bayesian computation analyses indicated that the Mongolian Plateau region was a secondary center of dispersal, acting as a "transportation hub" in eastern Eurasia: Sheep from the Middle Eastern domestication center were inferred to have migrated through the Caucasus and Central Asia, and arrived in North and Southwest China (lineages A, B, and C) and the Indian subcontinent (lineages B and C) through this region. Our results provide new insights into sheep domestication, particularly with respect to origins and migrations to and from eastern Eurasia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Mitogenomic Meta-Analysis Identifies Two Phases of Migration in the History of Eastern Eurasian Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Feng-Hua; Peng, Wei-Feng; Yang, Ji; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Li, Wen-Rong; Liu, Ming-Jun; Ma, Yue-Hui; Zhao, Qian-Jun; Yang, Guang-Li; Wang, Feng; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Yong-Gang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Sheng-Guo; Hehua, EEr; Gorkhali, Neena A.; Farhad Vahidi, S. M.; Muladno, Muhammad; Naqvi, Arifa N.; Tabell, Jonna; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Bruford, Michael W.; Kantanen, Juha; Han, Jian-Lin; Li, Meng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Despite much attention, history of sheep (Ovis aries) evolution, including its dating, demographic trajectory and geographic spread, remains controversial. To address these questions, we generated 45 complete and 875 partial mitogenomic sequences, and performed a meta-analysis of these and published ovine mitochondrial DNA sequences (n = 3,229) across Eurasia. We inferred that O. orientalis and O. musimon share the most recent female ancestor with O. aries at approximately 0.790 Ma (95% CI: 0.637–0.934 Ma) during the Middle Pleistocene, substantially predating the domestication event (∼8–11 ka). By reconstructing historical variations in effective population size, we found evidence of a rapid population increase approximately 20–60 ka, immediately before the Last Glacial Maximum. Analyses of lineage expansions showed two sheep migratory waves at approximately 4.5–6.8 ka (lineages A and B: ∼6.4–6.8 ka; C: ∼4.5 ka) across eastern Eurasia, which could have been influenced by prehistoric West–East commercial trade and deliberate mating of domestic and wild sheep, respectively. A continent-scale examination of lineage diversity and approximate Bayesian computation analyses indicated that the Mongolian Plateau region was a secondary center of dispersal, acting as a “transportation hub” in eastern Eurasia: Sheep from the Middle Eastern domestication center were inferred to have migrated through the Caucasus and Central Asia, and arrived in North and Southwest China (lineages A, B, and C) and the Indian subcontinent (lineages B and C) through this region. Our results provide new insights into sheep domestication, particularly with respect to origins and migrations to and from eastern Eurasia. PMID:26085518

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies two loci associated with circulating osteoprotegerin levels

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Johnny S.H.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Cheung, Ching-Lung; Dupuis, Josée; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Eriksson, Joel; Handelman, Samuel K.; Aragaki, Aaron; Karasik, David; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lacroix, Andrea Z.; Larson, Martin G.; Lau, Kam-Shing; Lorentzon, Mattias; Pichler, Irene; Sham, Pak C.; Taliun, Daniel; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Kiel, Douglas P.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Ohlsson, Claes; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Kung, Annie W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is involved in bone homeostasis and tumor cell survival. Circulating OPG levels are also important biomarkers of various clinical traits, such as cancers and atherosclerosis. OPG levels were measured in serum or in plasma. In a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 10 336 individuals from European and Asian origin, we discovered that variants >100 kb upstream of the TNFRSF11B gene encoding OPG and another new locus on chromosome 17q11.2 were significantly associated with OPG variation. We also identified a suggestive locus on chromosome 14q21.2 associated with the trait. Moreover, we estimated that over half of the heritability of OPG levels could be explained by all variants examined in our study. Our findings provide further insight into the genetic regulation of circulating OPG levels. PMID:25080503

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process.

    PubMed

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Höhn, René; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Montgomery, Grant W; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Iglesias, Adriana I; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hauser, Michael A; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P; Spector, Timothy D; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Klaver, Caroline C W; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A; Lotery, Andrew J; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A B; Young, Terri L; Wiggs, Janey L; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R; Hewitt, Alex W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J

    2014-09-22

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important disease-related optic nerve parameter. In 21,094 individuals of European ancestry and 6,784 individuals of Asian ancestry, we identify 10 new loci associated with variation in VCDR. In a separate risk-score analysis of five case-control studies, Caucasians in the highest quintile have a 2.5-fold increased risk of primary open-angle glaucoma as compared with those in the lowest quintile. This study has more than doubled the known loci associated with optic disc cupping and will allow greater understanding of mechanisms involved in this common blinding condition.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    PubMed Central

    Springelkamp, Henriët.; Höhn, René; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Iglesias, Adriana I.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hauser, Michael A.; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G.; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H.; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J.; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M. E.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N.; Xie, Jing; Inouye, Michael; Viswanathan, Ananth; Sim, Xueling; Weinreb, Robert N.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Allingham, R. Rand; Brilliant, Murray H.; Budenz, Donald L.; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Christen, William G.; Fingert, John; Friedman, David S.; Gaasterland, Douglas; Gaasterland, Terry; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hauser, Michael A.; Kang, Jae Hee; Kraft, Peter; Lee, Richard K.; Lichter, Paul R.; Liu, Yutao; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Realini, Anthony; Richards, Julia E.; Schuman, Joel S.; Scott, William K.; Singh, Kuldev; Sit, Arthur J.; Vollrath, Douglas; Weinreb, Robert N.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wollstein, Gadi; Zack, Donald J.; Zhang, Kang; Donnelly (Chair), Peter; Barroso (Deputy Chair), Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew (Chair), Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Lemij, Hans G.; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Jonas, Jost B.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Young, Terri L.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R.; Hewitt, Alex W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important disease-related optic nerve parameter. In 21,094 individuals of European ancestry and 6,784 individuals of Asian ancestry, we identify 10 new loci associated with variation in VCDR. In a separate risk-score analysis of five case-control studies, Caucasians in the highest quintile have a 2.5-fold increased risk of primary open-angle glaucoma as compared with those in the lowest quintile. This study has more than doubled the known loci associated with optic disc cupping and will allow greater understanding of mechanisms involved in this common blinding condition. PMID:25241763

  9. The effect of anti-angiogenic agents on overall survival in metastatic oesophago-gastric cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sjoquist, Katrin M.; Goldstein, David; Price, Timothy J.; Martin, Andrew J.; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Pavlakis, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies of anti-angiogenic agents (AAs), combined with chemotherapy (chemo) or as monotherapy in metastatic oesophago-gastric cancer (mOGC), have reported mixed outcomes. We undertook systematic review and meta-analysis to determine their overall benefits and harms. Methods Randomized controlled trials in mOGC were sought investigating the addition of AAs to standard therapy (best supportive care or chemo). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) with secondary endpoints progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR) and toxicity. Estimates of treatment effect from individual trials were combined using standard techniques. Subgroup analyses were performed by line of therapy, region, age, performance status, histological type, number of metastatic sites, primary site, mechanism of action and HER2 status. Results Fifteen trials evaluating 3502 patients were included in quantitative analysis. The addition of AAs was associated with improved OS: HR 0·81 (95% CI 0·75–0·88, p<0·00001) and improved PFS: HR 0·68 (95% CI 0·63–0·74, p<0·00001). Subgroup analyses favoured greater benefit for OS in 2nd/3rd line settings (HR 0·74) compared to 1st-line settings (HR 0·91) (X2 = 6·00, p = 0·01). OS benefit was seen across all regions—Asia (HR 0·83) and rest of world (HR 0·75)—without significant subgroup interaction. Results from 8 trials evaluating 2602 patients were pooled for toxicity > = Grade 3: with OR 1·39 (95% CI 1·17–1·65). Conclusions The addition of AAs to standard therapy in mOGC improves OS. Improved efficacy was only observed in 2nd- or 3rd-line setting and not in 1st-line setting. Consistent OS benefit was present across all geographical regions. This benefit is at the expense of increased overall toxicity. PMID:28222158

  10. Triplet (FOLFOXIRI) versus doublet (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) backbone chemotherapy as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rui Pedro; Duarte, Gonçalo S; Sterrantino, Carmelo; Pais, Helena Luna; Quintela, António; Martins, Ana Paula; Costa, João

    2017-10-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the comparative effectiveness of triplet chemotherapy (FOLFOXIRI) as backbone first-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) comparing triplet versus doublet chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) as first-line therapy in mCRC. Methods and reporting followed PRISMA and SAMPL guidelines. Eight RCTs were included, comprising 1732 patients. In pooled analysis, FOLFOXIRI was associated with improvements in efficacy outcomes, notably with a 25% survival increase (95%CI: 10-37%). FOLFOXIRI was also associated with increased toxicity, with a non-significant 25% increase in the risk of patients experiencing grade ≥3 adverse events (95% CI: -3 to 61%) and with a 1.83 (95% CI: 1.62-2.07) increase in the rate ratio of grade ≥3 adverse events. Moderate quality evidence suggests that first-line FOLFOXIRI provides clinically meaningful efficacy benefits in this setting, at the expense of increased toxicity. Further research is warranted to better characterize safety and to evaluate the most beneficial combination with targeted agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus erlotinib for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hu, Guo-fang; Zhang, Qian-qian; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Li-yan; Han, Xiao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhe-hai

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is considered as a chemoresistant neoplasm with extremely dismal prognosis. Gemcitabine is recommended as the standard agent for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. A series of trials have been conducted to improve the outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer with other anticancer drugs in combination with gemcitabine. Unfortunately, the designers of the clinical trials failed to improve the poor prognosis of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib was the first additional drug that improved the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of the combination of gemcitabine with erlotinib (GemErlo) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using the currently available evidence. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and relevant abstracts of major conferences were comprehensively searched. Data results on objective response rate, disease control rate, and 1-year survival were pooled by using MetaAnalyst with a random-effects model. Results on progression-free survival and overall survival were only summarized descriptively. Results A total of 24 studies with 1,742 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with GemErlo were included. Combined objective response rate was 14.4% (95% CI: 11.6%–17.7%), disease control rate was 55.0% (95% CI: 51.5%–58.5%), and 1-year survival rate was 28.5% (95% CI: 24.0%–33.4%). Progression-free survival ranged from 2.63 to 9.6 months, and overall survival varied from 6 to 10 months. As for the toxicity profile, the most common adverse events (AEs) were hematologic reactions, skin rash, and gastrointestinal reactions. Other severe AEs, which had low incidence, included treatment-induced death and interstitial lung disease. Conclusion Our study showed that GemErlo is associated with reasonable activity in treating

  12. A Metastatic Mouse Model Identifies Genes That Regulate Neuroblastoma Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Seong, Bo Kyung A; Fathers, Kelly E; Hallett, Robin; Yung, Christina K; Stein, Lincoln D; Mouaaz, Samar; Kee, Lynn; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Irwin, Meredith S; Kaplan, David R

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic relapse is the major cause of death in pediatric neuroblastoma, where there remains a lack of therapies to target this stage of disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms mediating neuroblastoma metastasis, we developed a mouse model using intracardiac injection and in vivo selection to isolate malignant cell subpopulations with a higher propensity for metastasis to bone and the central nervous system. Gene expression profiling revealed primary and metastatic cells as two distinct cell populations defined by differential expression of 412 genes and of multiple pathways, including CADM1, SPHK1, and YAP/TAZ, whose expression independently predicted survival. In the metastatic subpopulations, a gene signature was defined (MET-75) that predicted survival of neuroblastoma patients with metastatic disease. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated causal roles for CADM1, SPHK1, and YAP/TAZ in mediating metastatic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo Notably, pharmacologic targeting of SPHK1 or YAP/TAZ was sufficient to inhibit neuroblastoma metastasis in vivo Overall, we identify gene expression signatures and candidate therapeutics that could improve the treatment of metastatic neuroblastoma. Cancer Res; 77(3); 696-706. ©2017 AACR.

  13. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of 78,308 individuals identifies new loci and genes influencing human intelligence.

    PubMed

    Sniekers, Suzanne; Stringer, Sven; Watanabe, Kyoko; Jansen, Philip R; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Krapohl, Eva; Taskesen, Erdogan; Hammerschlag, Anke R; Okbay, Aysu; Zabaneh, Delilah; Amin, Najaf; Breen, Gerome; Cesarini, David; Chabris, Christopher F; Iacono, William G; Ikram, M Arfan; Johannesson, Magnus; Koellinger, Philipp; Lee, James J; Magnusson, Patrik K E; McGue, Matt; Miller, Mike B; Ollier, William E R; Payton, Antony; Pendleton, Neil; Plomin, Robert; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Posthuma, Danielle

    2017-07-01

    Intelligence is associated with important economic and health-related life outcomes. Despite intelligence having substantial heritability (0.54) and a confirmed polygenic nature, initial genetic studies were mostly underpowered. Here we report a meta-analysis for intelligence of 78,308 individuals. We identify 336 associated SNPs (METAL P < 5 × 10(-8)) in 18 genomic loci, of which 15 are new. Around half of the SNPs are located inside a gene, implicating 22 genes, of which 11 are new findings. Gene-based analyses identified an additional 30 genes (MAGMA P < 2.73 × 10(-6)), of which all but one had not been implicated previously. We show that the identified genes are predominantly expressed in brain tissue, and pathway analysis indicates the involvement of genes regulating cell development (MAGMA competitive P = 3.5 × 10(-6)). Despite the well-known difference in twin-based heritability for intelligence in childhood (0.45) and adulthood (0.80), we show substantial genetic correlation (rg = 0.89, LD score regression P = 5.4 × 10(-29)). These findings provide new insight into the genetic architecture of intelligence.

  14. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C.; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C.; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P.; Auer, Paul L.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G.; Grove, Megan L.; Smith, Albert V.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Faul, Jessica D.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E. Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B.; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R.; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Edwards, Todd L.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variants and gene-based tests identified 31 novel loci in discovery among 146,562 individuals with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (Ntotal=327,288). These blood pressure loci are enriched for known cardiometabolic trait variants. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare/low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27618448

  15. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carl A; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W; Franke, Andre; D'Amato, Mauro; Taylor, Kent D; Lee, James C; Goyette, Philippe; Imielinski, Marcin; Latiano, Anna; Lagacé, Caroline; Scott, Regan; Amininejad, Leila; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Baidoo, Leonard; Baldassano, Robert N; Barclay, Murray; Bayless, Theodore M; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Denson, Lee A; De Vos, Martine; Dubinsky, Marla; Edwards, Cathryn; Ellinghaus, David; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Floyd, James A B; Florin, Timothy; Franchimont, Denis; Franke, Lude; Georges, Michel; Glas, Jürgen; Glazer, Nicole L; Guthery, Stephen L; Haritunians, Talin; Hayward, Nicholas K; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Jobin, Gilles; Laukens, Debby; Lawrance, Ian; Lémann, Marc; Levine, Arie; Libioulle, Cecile; Louis, Edouard; McGovern, Dermot P; Milla, Monica; Montgomery, Grant W; Morley, Katherine I; Mowat, Craig; Ng, Aylwin; Newman, William; Ophoff, Roel A; Papi, Laura; Palmieri, Orazio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Panés, Julián; Phillips, Anne; Prescott, Natalie J; Proctor, Deborah D; Roberts, Rebecca; Russell, Richard; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sanderson, Jeremy; Sans, Miquel; Schumm, Philip; Seibold, Frank; Sharma, Yashoda; Simms, Lisa A; Seielstad, Mark; Steinhart, A Hillary; Targan, Stephan R; van den Berg, Leonard H; Vatn, Morten; Verspaget, Hein; Walters, Thomas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wilson, David C; Westra, Harm-Jan; Xavier, Ramnik J; Zhao, Zhen Z; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Andersen, Vibeke; Torkvist, Leif; Gazouli, Maria; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Karlsen, Tom H; Kupcinskas, Limas; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Mansfield, John C; Kugathasan, Subra; Silverberg, Mark S; Halfvarson, Jonas; Rotter, Jerome I; Mathew, Christopher G; Griffiths, Anne M; Gearry, Richard; Ahmad, Tariq; Brant, Steven R; Chamaillard, Mathias; Satsangi, Jack; Cho, Judy H; Schreiber, Stefan; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Parkes, Miles; Annese, Vito; Hakonarson, Hakon; Radford-Smith, Graham; Duerr, Richard H; Vermeire, Séverine; Weersma, Rinse K; Rioux, John D

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of six ulcerative colitis genome-wide association study datasets, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed up the top association signals in 9,628 cases and 12,917 controls. We identified 29 additional risk loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), increasing the number of ulcerative colitis-associated loci to 47. After annotating associated regions using GRAIL, expression quantitative trait loci data and correlations with non-synonymous SNPs, we identified many candidate genes that provide potentially important insights into disease pathogenesis, including IL1R2, IL8RA-IL8RB, IL7R, IL12B, DAP, PRDM1, JAK2, IRF5, GNA12 and LSP1. The total number of confirmed inflammatory bowel disease risk loci is now 99, including a minimum of 28 shared association signals between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  16. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of adult height in East Asians identifies 17 novel loci.

    PubMed

    He, Meian; Xu, Min; Zhang, Ben; Liang, Jun; Chen, Peng; Lee, Jong-Young; Johnson, Todd A; Li, Huaixing; Yang, Xiaobo; Dai, Juncheng; Liang, Liming; Gui, Lixuan; Qi, Qibin; Huang, Jinyan; Li, Yanping; Adair, Linda S; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chu, Minjie; Cui, Bin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Gu, Dongfeng; Gu, Weiqiong; Guo, Huan; Hao, Yongchen; Hong, Jie; Hu, Zhibin; Hu, Yanling; Huang, Jianfeng; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Jin, Guangfu; Kang, Dae-Hee; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Hung Tae; Kubo, Michiaki; Lee, Jeannette; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Nanette R; Li, Ruoying; Li, Jun; Liu, JianJun; Longe, Jirong; Lu, Wei; Lu, Xiangfeng; Miao, Xiaoping; Okada, Yukinori; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Qiu, Gaokun; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Song, Huaidong; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Taylor, Phil R; Wang, Laiyuan; Wang, Weiqing; Wang, Yiqin; Wu, Chen; Wu, Ying; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamamoto, Ken; Yang, Handong; Liao, Ming; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Young, Terri; Zhang, Xiaomin; Kato, Norihiro; Wang, Qing K; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Frank B; Lin, Dongxin; Shen, Hongbing; Teo, Yik Ying; Mo, Zengnan; Wong, Tien Yin; Lin, Xu; Mohlke, Karen L; Ning, Guang; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Tai, E Shyong; Wu, Tangchun; Qi, Lu

    2015-03-15

    Human height is associated with risk of multiple diseases and is profoundly determined by an individual's genetic makeup and shows a high degree of ethnic heterogeneity. Large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) analyses of adult height in Europeans have identified nearly 180 genetic loci. A recent study showed high replicability of results from Europeans-based GWA studies in Asians; however, population-specific loci may exist due to distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns. We carried out a GWA meta-analysis in 93 926 individuals from East Asia. We identified 98 loci, including 17 novel and 81 previously reported loci, associated with height at P < 5 × 10(-8), together explaining 8.89% of phenotypic variance. Among the newly identified variants, 10 are commonly distributed (minor allele frequency, MAF > 5%) in Europeans, with comparable frequencies with in Asians, and 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms are with low frequency (MAF < 5%) in Europeans. In addition, our data suggest that novel biological pathway such as the protein tyrosine phosphatase family is involved in regulation of height. The findings from this study considerably expand our knowledge of the genetic architecture of human height in Asians. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Carl A.; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W.; Franke, Andre; D’Amato, Mauro; Taylor, Kent D.; Lee, James C.; Goyette, Philippe; Imielinski, Marcin; Latiano, Anna; Lagacé, Caroline; Scott, Regan; Amininejad, Leila; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Baidoo, Leonard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barclay, Murray; Bayless, Theodore M.; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Denson, Lee A.; De Vos, Martine; Dubinsky, Marla; Edwards, Cathryn; Ellinghaus, David; Fehrmann, Rudolf S.N.; Floyd, James A.B.; Florin, Tim; Franchimont, Denis; Franke, Lude; Georges, Michel; Glas, Jürgen; Glazer, Nicole L.; Guthery, Stephen L.; Haritunians, Talin; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Jobin, Gilles; Laukens, Debby; Lawrance, Ian; Lémann, Marc; Levine, Arie; Libioulle, Cecile; Louis, Edouard; McGovern, Dermot P.; Milla, Monica; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morley, Katherine I.; Mowat, Craig; Ng, Aylwin; Newman, William; Ophoff, Roel A; Papi, Laura; Palmieri, Orazio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Panés, Julián; Phillips, Anne; Prescott, Natalie J.; Proctor, Deborah D.; Roberts, Rebecca; Russell, Richard; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sanderson, Jeremy; Sans, Miquel; Schumm, Philip; Seibold, Frank; Sharma, Yashoda; Simms, Lisa; Seielstad, Mark; Steinhart, A. Hillary; Targan, Stephan R.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Vatn, Morten; Verspaget, Hein; Walters, Thomas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wilson, David C.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Zhao, Zhen Z.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Andersen, Vibeke; Torkvist, Leif; Gazouli, Maria; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Kupcinskas, Limas; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Mansfield, John C.; Kugathasan, Subra; Silverberg, Mark S.; Halfvarson, Jonas; Rotter, Jerome I.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Griffiths, Anne M.; Gearry, Richard; Ahmad, Tariq; Brant, Steven R.; Chamaillard, Mathias; Satsangi, Jack; Cho, Judy H.; Schreiber, Stefan; Daly, Mark J.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Parkes, Miles; Annese, Vito; Hakonarson, Hakon; Radford-Smith, Graham; Duerr, Richard H.; Vermeire, Séverine; Weersma, Rinse K.; Rioux, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis (UC) have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of 6 UC GWAS, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed-up the top association signals in 9,628 cases and 12,917 controls. We identified 29 additional risk loci (P<5×10-8), increasing the number of UC associated loci to 47. After annotating associated regions using GRAIL, eQTL data and correlations with non-synonymous SNPs, we identified many candidate genes providing potentially important insights into disease pathogenesis, including IL1R2, IL8RA/B, IL7R, IL12B, DAP, PRDM1, JAK2, IRF5, GNA12 and LSP1. The total number of confirmed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk loci is now 99, including a minimum of 28 shared association signals between Crohn’s disease (CD) and UC. PMID:21297633

  18. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P; Auer, Paul L; Chu, Audrey Y; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G; Grove, Megan L; Smith, Albert V; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Rossouw, Jacques E; Faul, Jessica D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Edwards, Todd L; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Loos, Ruth J F; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood pressure-associated loci are enriched for known variants for cardiometabolic traits. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare and low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure-associated loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension, emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk.

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of adult height in East Asians identifies 17 novel loci

    PubMed Central

    He, Meian; Xu, Min; Zhang, Ben; Liang, Jun; Chen, Peng; Lee, Jong-Young; Johnson, Todd A.; Li, Huaixing; Yang, Xiaobo; Dai, Juncheng; Liang, Liming; Gui, Lixuan; Qi, Qibin; Huang, Jinyan; Li, Yanping; Adair, Linda S.; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chu, Minjie; Cui, Bin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Gu, Dongfeng; Gu, Weiqiong; Guo, Huan; Hao, Yongchen; Hong, Jie; Hu, Zhibin; Hu, Yanling; Huang, Jianfeng; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Jin, Guangfu; Kang, Dae-Hee; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Hung Tae; Kubo, Michiaki; Lee, Jeannette; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Nanette R.; Li, Ruoying; Li, Jun; Liu, JianJun; Longe, Jirong; Lu, Wei; Lu, Xiangfeng; Miao, Xiaoping; Okada, Yukinori; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Qiu, Gaokun; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Song, Huaidong; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Taylor, Phil R.; Wang, Laiyuan; Wang, Weiqing; Wang, Yiqin; Wu, Chen; Wu, Ying; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamamoto, Ken; Yang, Handong; Liao, Ming; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Young, Terri; Zhang, Xiaomin; Kato, Norihiro; Wang, Qing K.; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Frank B.; Lin, Dongxin; Shen, Hongbing; Teo, Yik Ying; Mo, Zengnan; Wong, Tien Yin; Lin, Xu; Mohlke, Karen L.; Ning, Guang; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Tai, E. Shyong; Wu, Tangchun; Qi, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Human height is associated with risk of multiple diseases and is profoundly determined by an individual's genetic makeup and shows a high degree of ethnic heterogeneity. Large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) analyses of adult height in Europeans have identified nearly 180 genetic loci. A recent study showed high replicability of results from Europeans-based GWA studies in Asians; however, population-specific loci may exist due to distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns. We carried out a GWA meta-analysis in 93 926 individuals from East Asia. We identified 98 loci, including 17 novel and 81 previously reported loci, associated with height at P < 5 × 10−8, together explaining 8.89% of phenotypic variance. Among the newly identified variants, 10 are commonly distributed (minor allele frequency, MAF > 5%) in Europeans, with comparable frequencies with in Asians, and 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms are with low frequency (MAF < 5%) in Europeans. In addition, our data suggest that novel biological pathway such as the protein tyrosine phosphatase family is involved in regulation of height. The findings from this study considerably expand our knowledge of the genetic architecture of human height in Asians. PMID:25429064

  20. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M Arfan; Ioannidis, John P A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Bis, Joshua C; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 newly identified loci. Conditional analyses within loci showed that four loci, including GBA, GAK-DGKQ, SNCA and the HLA region, contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total, we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson's disease across 24 loci. Although the effect of each individual locus was small, risk profile analysis showed substantial cumulative risk in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles of genetic risk (odds ratio (OR) = 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.55-4.30; P = 2 × 10(-16)). We also show six risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation.

  1. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Cathy E.; Perry, John R.B.; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Visser, Jenny A.; Byrne, Enda M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lin, Peng; Mangino, Massimo; Marongiu, Mara; McArdle, Patrick F.; Smith, Albert V.; Stolk, Lisette; van Wingerden, Sophie W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Albrecht, Eva; Corre, Tanguy; Ingelsson, Erik; Hayward, Caroline; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Smith, Erin N.; Ulivi, Shelia; Warrington, Nicole M.; Zgaga, Lina; Alavere, Helen; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Blackburn, Hannah; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Wei; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D.; d’Adamo, Pio; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Deloukas, Panos; Döring, Angela; Smith, George Davey; Easton, Douglas F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Foroud, Tatiana; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Geller, Frank; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ferreli, Liana; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B.; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Andrew D.; Karasik, David; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Laven, Joop S.E.; Li, Shengxu; Liu, Jianjun; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Melbye, Mads; Mooser, Vincent; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Murray, Sarah S.; Nalls, Michael A.; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Ness, Andrew R.; Northstone, Kate; Oostra, Ben A.; Peacock, Munro; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peltonen, Leena; Pennell, Craig E.; Pharoah, Paul; Polasek, Ozren; Plump, Andrew S.; Pouta, Anneli; Porcu, Eleonora; Rafnar, Thorunn; Rice, John P.; Ring, Susan M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schork, Nicholas J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Strachan, David P.; Tammesoo, Mar-Liis; Tikkanen, Emmi; Toniolo, Daniela; Tsui, Kim; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tyrer, Jonathon; Uda, Manuela; van Dam, Rob M.; van Meurs, Joyve B.J.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wichmann, H. Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Young, Lauren; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Bierut, Laura J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Boyd, Heather A.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Econs, Michael J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hunter, David J.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W.; Ridker, Paul M.; Spector, Tim D.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G.; Widen, Elisabeth; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ong, Ken K.; Murray, Anna

    2011-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P=5.4×10−60) and 9q31.2 (P=2.2×10−33), we identified 30 novel menarche loci (all P<5×10−8) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P<1.9×10−6). New loci included four previously associated with BMI (in/near FTO, SEC16B, TRA2B and TMEM18), three in/near other genes implicated in energy homeostasis (BSX, CRTC1, and MCHR2), and three in/near genes implicated in hormonal regulation (INHBA, PCSK2 and RXRG). Ingenuity and MAGENTA pathway analyses identified coenzyme A and fatty acid biosynthesis as biological processes related to menarche timing. PMID:21102462

  2. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Visser, Jenny A; Byrne, Enda M; Cousminer, Diana L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lin, Peng; Mangino, Massimo; Marongiu, Mara; McArdle, Patrick F; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; van Wingerden, Sophie H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Albrecht, Eva; Corre, Tanguy; Ingelsson, Erik; Hayward, Caroline; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Smith, Erin N; Ulivi, Shelia; Warrington, Nicole M; Zgaga, Lina; Alavere, Helen; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Inês; Berenson, Gerald S; Bergmann, Sven; Blackburn, Hannah; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Wei; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; d'Adamo, Pio; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Deloukas, Panos; Döring, Angela; Smith, George Davey; Easton, Douglas F; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R; Foroud, Tatiana; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Geller, Frank; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E; Ferreli, Liana; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena G; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J; Laven, Joop S E; Li, Shengxu; Liu, Jianjun; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Mooser, Vincent; Murray, Jeffrey C; Murray, Sarah S; Nalls, Michael A; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peltonen, Leena; Pennell, Craig E; Pharoah, Paul; Polasek, Ozren; Plump, Andrew S; Pouta, Anneli; Porcu, Eleonora; Rafnar, Thorunn; Rice, John P; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schork, Nicholas J; Scuteri, Angelo; Segrè, Ayellet V; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Strachan, David P; Tammesoo, Mar-Liis; Tikkanen, Emmi; Toniolo, Daniela; Tsui, Kim; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tyrer, Jonathon; Uda, Manuela; van Dam, Rob M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Wichmann, H Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Young, Lauren; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Bierut, Laura J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Econs, Michael J; Harris, Tamara B; Hunter, David J; Loos, Ruth J F; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Ridker, Paul M; Spector, Tim D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G; Widen, Elisabeth; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K; Murray, Anna

    2010-12-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarche loci (all P < 5 × 10⁻⁸) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P < 1.9 × 10⁻⁶). The new loci included four previously associated with body mass index (in or near FTO, SEC16B, TRA2B and TMEM18), three in or near other genes implicated in energy homeostasis (BSX, CRTC1 and MCHR2) and three in or near genes implicated in hormonal regulation (INHBA, PCSK2 and RXRG). Ingenuity and gene-set enrichment pathway analyses identified coenzyme A and fatty acid biosynthesis as biological processes related to menarche timing.

  3. A meta-analysis of public microarray data identifies gene regulatory pathways deregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus compared to those without.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Wendy; Mapiye, Darlington; Entfellner, Jean-Baka Domelevo; Tiffin, Nicki

    2016-11-15

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a complex, multi-systemic, autoimmune disease for which the underlying aetiological mechanisms are poorly understood. The genetic and molecular processes underlying lupus have been extensively investigated using a variety of -omics approaches, including genome-wide association studies, candidate gene studies and microarray experiments of differential gene expression in lupus samples compared to controls. This study analyses a combination of existing microarray data sets to identify differentially regulated genetic pathways that are dysregulated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from SLE patients compared to unaffected controls. Two statistical approaches, quantile discretisation and scaling, are used to combine publicly available expression microarray datasets and perform a meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes implicated in interferon signaling were identified by the meta-analysis, in agreement with the findings of the individual studies that generated the datasets used. In contrast to the individual studies, however, the meta-analysis and subsequent pathway analysis additionally highlighted TLR signaling, oxidative phosphorylation and diapedesis and adhesion regulatory networks as being differentially regulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from SLE patients compared to controls. Our analysis demonstrates that it is possible to derive additional information from publicly available expression data using meta-analysis techniques, which is particularly relevant to research into rare diseases where sample numbers can be limiting.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng; Long, Jirong; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Sim, Xueling; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wu, Ying; Go, Min Jin; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Kwak, Soo Heon; Ma, Ronald C W; Yamamoto, Ken; Adair, Linda S; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Gao, Yutang; Hu, Frank B; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jeannette Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R; Li, Yun; Liu, Jian Jun; Lu, Wei; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Tay, Wan Ting; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wong, Tien Yin; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; So, Wing Yee; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Hara, Kazuo; Cho, Young Min; Cho, Nam H; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Bao, Yuqian; Hedman, Åsa K; Morris, Andrew P; McCarthy, Mark I; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Park, Kyong Soo; Jia, Weiping; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chan, Juliana C N; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Lee, Jong-Young; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E Shyong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Mohlke, Karen L; Kato, Norihiro; Han, Bok-Ghee; Seielstad, Mark

    2011-12-11

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis (5,843 cases and 4,574 controls) and a stage 3 de novo replication analysis (12,284 cases and 13,172 controls). The combined analysis identified eight new T2D loci reaching genome-wide significance, which mapped in or near GLIS3, PEPD, FITM2-R3HDML-HNF4A, KCNK16, MAEA, GCC1-PAX4, PSMD6 and ZFAND3. GLIS3, which is involved in pancreatic beta cell development and insulin gene expression, is known for its association with fasting glucose levels. The evidence of an association with T2D for PEPD and HNF4A has been shown in previous studies. KCNK16 may regulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion in the pancreas. These findings, derived from an east Asian population, provide new perspectives on the etiology of T2D.

  5. A Meta-Analysis Identifies New Loci Associated with Body Mass index in Individuals of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Keri L.; Chen, Gary K.; Taylor, Kira C.; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Chen, Guanji; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Rhie, Suhn K.; Li, Guo; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Youfang; Lu, Yingchang; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ademola, Adeyinka; Amos, Christopher I.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Britton, Angela; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cai, Quiyin; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carlson, Chris; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Chiang, Charleston W.K.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Demerath, Ellen; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L.; Driver, Ryan W.; Dubbert, Patricia; Feitosa, Mary F.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Xiuqing; Haritunians, Talin; Harris, Tamara; Harris, Curtis C.; Hennis, Anselm JM; Hernandez, Dena G.; McNeill, Lorna H.; Howard, Timothy D.; Howard, Barbara V.; Howard, Virginia J.; Johnson, Karen C.; Kang, Sun J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kuller, Lewis H.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Langefeld, Carl D.; Lettre, Guillaume; Lohman, Kurt; Lotay, Vaneet; Lyon, Helen; Manson, JoAnn E.; Maixner, William; Meng, Yan A.; Monroe, Kristine R.; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Murphy, Adam B.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Nayak, Uma; N’Diaye, Amidou; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M. Cristina; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Neuhouser, Marian; Nyante, Sarah; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ogundiran, Temidayo O.; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Palmer, Julie R.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Press, Michael F.; Rampersaud, Evandine; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Salako, Babatunde; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shriner, Daniel A.; Siscovick, David; Smith, Shad B.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Sucheston, Lara; Taylor, Herman; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Witte, John S.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, James J.; Levin, Albert M.; Young, Taylor R.; Zakai, Neil A.; Cushman, Mary; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Yonglan; Zhou, Jie; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Hunt, Kelly J.; Spruill, Ida J.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ambs, Stefan; Arnett, Donna K.; Atwood, Larry; Becker, Diane M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Burke, Gregory; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; Ding, Jingzhong; Duggan, David; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Caroline; Garvey, W. Timothy; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hsing, Ann; Chu, Lisa; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huo, Dezheng; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kittles, Rick A.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Simin; McKnight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Williams, L. Keoki; Patel, Sanjay R.; Peters, Ulrike; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Redline, Susan; Rotimi, Charles N.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Sale, Michèle M.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara S.; Thun, Michael J.; Vitolins, Mara; Zheng, Wei; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zonderman, Alan B.; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George; Henderson, Brian E.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth JF; North, Kari E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry, and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one novel locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, p=3.4×10−11) and another at 7p15 when combined with data from the Giant consortium (MIR148A/NFE2L3, rs10261878, p=1.2×10−10). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, p=6.9×10−8). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants displayed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial p=9.7×10−7), of which five reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations. PMID:23583978

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 8 new loci for type 2 diabetes in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng; Long, Jirong; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Sim, Xueling; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wu, Ying; Go, Min Jin; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Kwak, Soo Heon; Ma, Ronald C.W.; Yamamoto, Ken; Adair, Linda S.; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Gao, Yutang; Hu, Frank B.; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jeannette Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R.; Li, Yun; Liu, Jian Jun; Lu, Wei; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Tay, Wan Ting; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wong, Tien Yin; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; So, Wing Yee; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Hara, Kazuo; Cho, Young Min; Cho, Nam H; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Bao, Yuqian; Hedman, Åsa K.; Morris, Andrew P.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Park, Kyong Soo; Jia, Weiping; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chan, Juliana C.N.; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Lee, Jong-Young; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E Shyong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Mohlke, Karen L.; Kato, Norihiro; Han, Bok-Ghee; Seielstad, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in East Asian populations. The first stage meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases and 11,865 controls) was followed by a second stage in silico replication analysis (5,843 cases and 4,574 controls) and a stage 3 de novo replication analysis (12,284 cases and 13,172 controls). The combined analysis identified eight new T2D loci reaching genome-wide significance, which were mapped in or near GLIS3, PEPD, FITM2-R3HDML-HNF4A, KCNK16, MAEA, GCC1-PAX4, PSMD6 and ZFAND3. GLIS3, involved in pancreatic beta cell development and insulin gene expression1,2, is known for its association with fasting glucose levels3,4. The evidence of T2D association for PEPD5 and HNF4A6,7 has been detected in previous studies. KCNK16 may regulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion in the pancreas. These findings derived from East Asians provide new perspectives on the etiology of T2D. PMID:22158537

  7. Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies five modifier loci of lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corvol, Harriet; Blackman, Scott M.; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Gallins, Paul J.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Accurso, Frank J.; Clement, Annick; Collaco, Joseph M.; Dang, Hong; Dang, Anthony T.; Franca, Arianna; Gong, Jiafen; Guillot, Loic; Keenan, Katherine; Li, Weili; Lin, Fan; Patrone, Michael V.; Raraigh, Karen S.; Sun, Lei; Zhou, Yi-Hui; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Sontag, Marci K.; Levy, Hara; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Wright, Fred A.; Strug, Lisa J.; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of small molecules that target specific CFTR variants has ushered in a new era of treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), yet optimal, individualized treatment of CF will require identification and targeting of disease modifiers. Here we use genome-wide association analysis to identify genetic modifiers of CF lung disease, the primary cause of mortality. Meta-analysis of 6,365 CF patients identifies five loci that display significant association with variation in lung disease. Regions on chr3q29 (MUC4/MUC20; P=3.3 × 10−11), chr5p15.3 (SLC9A3; P=6.8 × 10−12), chr6p21.3 (HLA Class II; P=1.2 × 10−8) and chrXq22-q23 (AGTR2/SLC6A14; P=1.8 × 10−9) contain genes of high biological relevance to CF pathophysiology. The fifth locus, on chr11p12-p13 (EHF/APIP; P=1.9 × 10−10), was previously shown to be associated with lung disease. These results provide new insights into potential targets for modulating lung disease severity in CF. PMID:26417704

  8. Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Optic Disc Morphology.

    PubMed

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G; Gharahkhani, Puya; Höhn, René; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D; Vithana, Eranga; Koh, Victor; Yazar, Seyhan; Xu, Liang; Forward, Hannah; Kearns, Lisa S; Amin, Najaf; Iglesias, Adriana I; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Demirkan, Ayse; van der Lee, Sven; Loon, Seng-Chee; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Nag, Abhishek; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Schillert, Arne; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Zhou, Tiger; Burdon, Kathryn P; Spector, Timothy D; Lackner, Karl J; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R; Teo, Yik-Ying; Pasquale, Louis R; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Tai, E-Shyong; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Klaver, Caroline C W; Craig, Jamie E; Young, Terri L; Haines, Jonathan L; MacGregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Wiggs, Janey L; Hewitt, Alex W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is the most common optic neuropathy and an important cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The optic nerve head or optic disc is divided in two parts: a central cup (without nerve fibers) surrounded by the neuroretinal rim (containing axons of the retinal ganglion cells). The International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies consisting of 17,248 individuals of European ancestry and 6,841 individuals of Asian ancestry. The outcomes of the genome-wide association studies were disc area and cup area. These specific measurements describe optic nerve morphology in another way than the vertical cup-disc ratio, which is a clinically used measurement, and may shed light on new glaucoma mechanisms. We identified 10 new loci associated with disc area (CDC42BPA, F5, DIRC3, RARB, ABI3BP, DCAF4L2, ELP4, TMTC2, NR2F2, and HORMAD2) and another 10 new loci associated with cup area (DHRS3, TRIB2, EFEMP1, FLNB, FAM101, DDHD1, ASB7, KPNB1, BCAS3, and TRIOBP). The new genes participate in a number of pathways and future work is likely to identify more functions related to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Optic Disc Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Höhn, René; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Koh, Victor; Yazar, Seyhan; Xu, Liang; Forward, Hannah; Kearns, Lisa S.; Amin, Najaf; Iglesias, Adriana I.; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Demirkan, Ayse; van der Lee, Sven; Loon, Seng-Chee; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Nag, Abhishek; Sanfilippo, Paul G.; Schillert, Arne; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Zhou, Tiger; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Spector, Timothy D.; Lackner, Karl J.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Pasquale, Louis R.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Lemij, Hans G.; Tai, E-Shyong; Jonas, Jost B.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Young, Terri L.; Haines, Jonathan L.; MacGregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Wiggs, Janey L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is the most common optic neuropathy and an important cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The optic nerve head or optic disc is divided in two parts: a central cup (without nerve fibers) surrounded by the neuroretinal rim (containing axons of the retinal ganglion cells). The International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies consisting of 17,248 individuals of European ancestry and 6,841 individuals of Asian ancestry. The outcomes of the genome-wide association studies were disc area and cup area. These specific measurements describe optic nerve morphology in another way than the vertical cup-disc ratio, which is a clinically used measurement, and may shed light on new glaucoma mechanisms. We identified 10 new loci associated with disc area (CDC42BPA, F5, DIRC3, RARB, ABI3BP, DCAF4L2, ELP4, TMTC2, NR2F2, and HORMAD2) and another 10 new loci associated with cup area (DHRS3, TRIB2, EFEMP1, FLNB, FAM101, DDHD1, ASB7, KPNB1, BCAS3, and TRIOBP). The new genes participate in a number of pathways and future work is likely to identify more functions related to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. PMID:25631615

  10. A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Monda, Keri L; Chen, Gary K; Taylor, Kira C; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L; Lange, Leslie A; Ng, Maggie C Y; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Allison, Matthew A; Bielak, Lawrence F; Chen, Guanjie; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R; Rhie, Suhn K; Li, Guo; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Youfang; Lu, Yingchang; Nalls, Michael A; Sun, Yan V; Wojczynski, Mary K; Yanek, Lisa R; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ademola, Adeyinka; Amos, Christopher I; Bandera, Elisa V; Bock, Cathryn H; Britton, Angela; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cai, Quiyin; Caporaso, Neil E; Carlson, Chris S; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Chen, Yii-Der I; Chiang, Charleston W K; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Demerath, Ellen; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Driver, Ryan W; Dubbert, Patricia; Feitosa, Mary F; Feng, Ye; Freedman, Barry I; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Xiuqing; Haritunians, Talin; Harris, Tamara; Harris, Curtis C; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hernandez, Dena G; McNeill, Lorna H; Howard, Timothy D; Howard, Barbara V; Howard, Virginia J; Johnson, Karen C; Kang, Sun J; Keating, Brendan J; Kolb, Suzanne; Kuller, Lewis H; Kutlar, Abdullah; Langefeld, Carl D; Lettre, Guillaume; Lohman, Kurt; Lotay, Vaneet; Lyon, Helen; Manson, Joann E; Maixner, William; Meng, Yan A; Monroe, Kristine R; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Murphy, Adam B; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Nathanson, Katherine L; Nayak, Uma; N'diaye, Amidou; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M Cristina; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Neuhouser, Marian; Nyante, Sarah; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Palmer, Nicholette D; Press, Michael F; Rampersaud, Evandine; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Salako, Babatunde; Schadt, Eric E; Schwartz, Ann G; Shriner, Daniel A; Siscovick, David; Smith, Shad B; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Spitz, Margaret R; Sucheston, Lara; Taylor, Herman; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tucker, Margaret A; Van Den Berg, David J; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K; Winkler, Thomas W; Witte, John S; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, James J; Levin, Albert M; Young, Taylor R; Zakai, Neil A; Cushman, Mary; Zanetti, Krista A; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Yonglan; Zhou, Jie; Ziegler, Regina G; Zmuda, Joseph M; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Hunt, Kelly J; Spruill, Ida J; Ambrosone, Christine B; Ambs, Stefan; Arnett, Donna K; Atwood, Larry; Becker, Diane M; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bowden, Donald W; Burke, Gregory; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; Ding, Jingzhong; Duggan, David; Evans, Michele K; Fox, Caroline; Garvey, W Timothy; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A; Hsing, Ann; Chu, Lisa; Hu, Jennifer J; Huo, Dezheng; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Jordan, Joanne M; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kittles, Rick A; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Simin; McKnight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert C; Mosley, Thomas H; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Williams, L Keoki; Patel, Sanjay R; Peters, Ulrike; Pettaway, Curtis A; Peyser, Patricia A; Psaty, Bruce M; Redline, Susan; Rotimi, Charles N; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Sale, Michèle M; Schreiner, Pamela J; Signorello, Lisa B; Singleton, Andrew B; Stanford, Janet L; Strom, Sara S; Thun, Michael J; Vitolins, Mara; Zheng, Wei; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Scott M; Ketkar, Shamika; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zonderman, Alan B; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Henderson, Brian E; Reiner, Alex P; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Loos, Ruth J F; North, Kari E; Haiman, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one new locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, P = 3.4 × 10(-11)) and another at 7p15 when we included data from the GIANT consortium (MIR148A-NFE2L3, rs10261878, P = 1.2 × 10(-10)). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African-ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, P = 6.9 × 10(-8)). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants showed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial P = 9.7 × 10(-7)), five of which reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations, as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations.

  11. Meta-analysis of IDH-mutant cancers identifies EBF1 as an interaction partner for TET2.

    PubMed

    Guilhamon, Paul; Eskandarpour, Malihe; Halai, Dina; Wilson, Gareth A; Feber, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gomez, Valenti; Hergovich, Alexander; Tirabosco, Roberto; Fernanda Amary, M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Jundt, Gernot; Ross, Mark T; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Beck, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes 1 and 2 are frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), low-grade glioma, cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and chondrosarcoma (CS). For AML, low-grade glioma and CC, mutant IDH status is associated with a DNA hypermethylation phenotype, implicating altered epigenome dynamics in the aetiology of these cancers. Here we show that the IDH variants in CS are also associated with a hypermethylation phenotype and display increased production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, supporting the role of mutant IDH-produced 2-hydroxyglutarate as an inhibitor of TET-mediated DNA demethylation. Meta-analysis of the acute myeloid leukaemia, low-grade glioma, cholangiocarcinoma and CS methylation data identifies cancer-specific effectors within the retinoic acid receptor activation pathway among the hypermethylated targets. By analysing sequence motifs surrounding hypermethylated sites across the four cancer types, and using chromatin immunoprecipitation and western blotting, we identify the transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) as an interaction partner for TET2, suggesting a sequence-specific mechanism for regulating DNA methylation.

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common variants in CTNNA2 associated with excitement-seeking

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, A; Esko, T; Sutin, A R; de Moor, M H M; Meirelles, O; Zhu, G; Tanaka, T; Giegling, I; Nutile, T; Realo, A; Allik, J; Hansell, N K; Wright, M J; Montgomery, G W; Willemsen, G; Hottenga, J-J; Friedl, M; Ruggiero, D; Sorice, R; Sanna, S; Cannas, A; Räikkönen, K; Widen, E; Palotie, A; Eriksson, J G; Cucca, F; Krueger, R F; Lahti, J; Luciano, M; Smoller, J W; van Duijn, C M; Abecasis, G R; Boomsma, D I; Ciullo, M; Costa, P T; Ferrucci, L; Martin, N G; Metspalu, A; Rujescu, D; Schlessinger, D; Uda, M

    2011-01-01

    The tendency to seek stimulating activities and intense sensations define excitement-seeking, a personality trait akin to some aspects of sensation-seeking. This trait is a central feature of extraversion and is a component of the multifaceted impulsivity construct. Those who score high on measures of excitement-seeking are more likely to smoke, use other drugs, gamble, drive recklessly, have unsafe/unprotected sex and engage in other risky behaviors of clinical and social relevance. To identify common genetic variants associated with the Excitement-Seeking scale of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, we performed genome-wide association studies in six samples of European ancestry (N=7860), and combined the results in a meta-analysis. We identified a genome-wide significant association between the Excitement-Seeking scale and rs7600563 (P=2 × 10−8). This single-nucleotide polymorphism maps within the catenin cadherin-associated protein, alpha 2 (CTNNA2) gene, which encodes for a brain-expressed α-catenin critical for synaptic contact. The effect of rs7600563 was in the same direction in all six samples, but did not replicate in additional samples (N=5105). The results provide insight into the genetics of excitement-seeking and risk-taking, and are relevant to hyperactivity, substance use, antisocial and bipolar disorders. PMID:22833195

  13. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H.; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab HH; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M.; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkä, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn MJM; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around 1 in 7 people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Some debate exists over whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed the largest genetic study of migraine to date, comprising 59,674 cases and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10−8) that map to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and the first locus identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies. PMID:27322543

  14. Prognostic Value of EMT-inducing Transcription Factors (EMT-TFs) in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Saber; Hosseinifard, Hossein; Cheng, Jingliang; Wei, Chunli; Fu, Junjiang

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a vital control point in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). TWIST1, SNAIL1, SLUG, and ZEB1, as key EMT-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs), are involved in MBC through different signaling cascades. This updated meta-analysis was conducted to assess the correlation between the expression of EMT-TFs and prognostic value in MBC patients. A total of 3,218 MBC patients from fourteen eligible studies were evaluated. The pooled hazard ratios (HR) for EMT-TFs suggested that high EMT-TF expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in MBC patients (HRs = 1.72; 95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 1.53–1.93; P = 0.001). In addition, the overexpression of SLUG was the most impactful on the risk of MBC compared with TWIST1 and SNAIL1, which sponsored fixed models. Strikingly, the increased risk of MBC was less associated with ZEB1 expression. However, the EMT-TF expression levels significantly increased the risk of MBC in the Asian population (HR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.70–2.62) without any publication bias (t = 1.70, P = 0.11). These findings suggest that the overexpression of potentially TWIST1, SNAIL1 and especially SLUG play a key role in the aggregation of MBC treatment as well as in the improvement of follow-up plans in Asian MBC patients. PMID:27335258

  15. Prognostic Value of EMT-inducing Transcription Factors (EMT-TFs) in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Hosseinifard, Hossein; Cheng, Jingliang; Wei, Chunli; Fu, Junjiang

    2016-06-23

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a vital control point in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). TWIST1, SNAIL1, SLUG, and ZEB1, as key EMT-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs), are involved in MBC through different signaling cascades. This updated meta-analysis was conducted to assess the correlation between the expression of EMT-TFs and prognostic value in MBC patients. A total of 3,218 MBC patients from fourteen eligible studies were evaluated. The pooled hazard ratios (HR) for EMT-TFs suggested that high EMT-TF expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in MBC patients (HRs = 1.72; 95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 1.53-1.93; P = 0.001). In addition, the overexpression of SLUG was the most impactful on the risk of MBC compared with TWIST1 and SNAIL1, which sponsored fixed models. Strikingly, the increased risk of MBC was less associated with ZEB1 expression. However, the EMT-TF expression levels significantly increased the risk of MBC in the Asian population (HR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.70-2.62) without any publication bias (t = 1.70, P = 0.11). These findings suggest that the overexpression of potentially TWIST1, SNAIL1 and especially SLUG play a key role in the aggregation of MBC treatment as well as in the improvement of follow-up plans in Asian MBC patients.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Gemcitabine Plus Either Taxane or Carboplatin in the First-Line Setting of Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Necchi, Andrea; Pond, Gregory R; Raggi, Daniele; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Grivas, Petros; Galsky, Matthew D; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Sonpavde, Guru

    2017-02-01

    Although gemcitabine plus carboplatin (GCa) is the conventional first-line chemotherapy for cisplatin-ineligible metastatic urothelial carcinoma, its results are suboptimal. A meta-analysis evaluated the results of gemcitabine with either carboplatin or a taxane (GT). Literature was searched for studies including GT (paclitaxel or docetaxel) and GCa. We pooled trial level data including response-rate, progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and Grade 3 to 4 side effects. Trial characteristics and outcomes were univariably compared between GT and GCa. Those factors, which were recorded in > 12 trials, were analyzed. Multivariable regression models were used adjusting for Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 and the presence of visceral metastases. Each trial was weighted by its sample size. Twenty-seven arms of trials totaling 1032 patients were selected, of which 13 contained GT (n = 484) and 14 GCa (n = 548). The percentage of patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 was statistically significantly different between the 2 groups (median, 8.7% vs. 23.9%; P = .003). No efficacy outcome was statistically significantly different. Median OS was 13.2 months (range, 10-15.8 months) for GT and 10 months (range, 3.3-20 months) for GCa (P = .12). However, statistically significant increases in the frequency of Grade 3 to 4 anemia (P = .010) and thrombocytopenia (P = .010) for GCa, and neuropathy (P = .040) for GT were observed. No difference in OS according to treatment was found multivariably (P = .79). In this analysis, a similar response rate and survival and worse neurotoxicity were observed with GT compared with GCa, for which hematologic toxicity was more frequent. GT is an alternative to GCa for advanced cisplatin-ineligible urothelial cancer.

  17. A Meta-analysis of Multiple Myeloma Risk Regions in African and European Ancestry Populations Identifies Putatively Functional Loci.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kristin A; Song, Chi; Dean, Eric; Serie, Daniel J; Curtin, Karen; Sheng, Xin; Hu, Donglei; Huff, Carol Ann; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Tomasson, Michael H; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Singhal, Seema; Pawlish, Karen; Peters, Edward S; Bock, Cathryn H; Stram, Alex; Van Den Berg, David J; Edlund, Christopher K; Conti, David V; Zimmerman, Todd; Hwang, Amie E; Huntsman, Scott; Graff, John; Nooka, Ajay; Kong, Yinfei; Pregja, Silvana L; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chu, Lisa; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Lieber, Michael R; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hennis, Anselm J M; Hsing, Ann W; Mehta, Jayesh; Kittles, Rick A; Kolb, Suzanne; Klein, Eric A; Leske, Cristina; Murphy, Adam B; Nemesure, Barbara; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Strom, Sara S; Vij, Ravi; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Stanford, Janet L; Signorello, Lisa B; Witte, John S; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bhatti, Parveen; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Olshan, Andrew F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah J; Bandera, Elisa V; Birmann, Brenda M; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Atanackovic, Djordje; Glenn, Martha J; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Jones, Brandt; Tricot, Guido; Martin, Thomas G; Kumar, Shaji K; Wolf, Jeffrey L; Deming Halverson, Sandra L; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chanock, Stephen J; Slager, Susan L; Severson, Richard K; Janakiraman, Nalini; Terebelo, Howard R; Brown, Elizabeth E; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Mohrbacher, Ann F; Colditz, Graham A; Giles, Graham G; Spinelli, John J; Chiu, Brian C; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Levy, Joan; Zonder, Jeffrey A; Orlowski, Robert Z; Lonial, Sagar; Camp, Nicola J; Vachon, Celine M; Ziv, Elad; Stram, Daniel O; Hazelett, Dennis J; Haiman, Christopher A; Cozen, Wendy

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European populations have identified genetic risk variants associated with multiple myeloma. We performed association testing of common variation in eight regions in 1,318 patients with multiple myeloma and 1,480 controls of European ancestry and 1,305 patients with multiple myeloma and 7,078 controls of African ancestry and conducted a meta-analysis to localize the signals, with epigenetic annotation used to predict functionality. We found that variants in 7p15.3, 17p11.2, 22q13.1 were statistically significantly (P < 0.05) associated with multiple myeloma risk in persons of African ancestry and persons of European ancestry, and the variant in 3p22.1 was associated in European ancestry only. In a combined African ancestry-European ancestry meta-analysis, variation in five regions (2p23.3, 3p22.1, 7p15.3, 17p11.2, 22q13.1) was statistically significantly associated with multiple myeloma risk. In 3p22.1, the correlated variants clustered within the gene body of ULK4 Correlated variants in 7p15.3 clustered around an enhancer at the 3' end of the CDCA7L transcription termination site. A missense variant at 17p11.2 (rs34562254, Pro251Leu, OR, 1.32; P = 2.93 × 10(-7)) in TNFRSF13B encodes a lymphocyte-specific protein in the TNF receptor family that interacts with the NF-κB pathway. SNPs correlated with the index signal in 22q13.1 cluster around the promoter and enhancer regions of CBX7 CONCLUSIONS: We found that reported multiple myeloma susceptibility regions contain risk variants important across populations, supporting the use of multiple racial/ethnic groups with different underlying genetic architecture to enhance the localization and identification of putatively functional alleles. A subset of reported risk loci for multiple myeloma has consistent effects across populations and is likely to be functional. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(12); 1609-18. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab H H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkö, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we carried out a genetic study of migraine on 59,674 affected subjects and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10(-8)) that mapped to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and a locus that to our knowledge is the first to be identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies.

  19. Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ellinor, Patrick T; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Albert, Christine M; Glazer, Nicole L; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Lubitz, Steven A; Bis, Joshua C; Chung, Mina K; Dörr, Marcus; Ozaki, Kouichi; Roberts, Jason D; Smith, J Gustav; Pfeufer, Arne; Sinner, Moritz F; Lohman, Kurt; Ding, Jingzhong; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Jonathan D; Rienstra, Michiel; Rice, Kenneth M; Van Wagoner, David R; Magnani, Jared W; Wakili, Reza; Clauss, Sebastian; Rotter, Jerome I; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Launer, Lenore J; Davies, Robert W; Borkovich, Matthew; Harris, Tamara B; Lin, Honghuang; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Milan, David J; Hofman, Albert; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chen, Lin Y; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Voight, Benjamin F; Li, Guo; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kubo, Michiaki; Tedrow, Usha B; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Conen, David; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Xu, Siyan; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Levy, Daniel; Nakamura, Yusuke; Parvez, Babar; Mahida, Saagar; Furie, Karen L; Rosand, Jonathan; Muhammad, Raafia; Psaty, Bruce M; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Wichmann, H-Erich; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kao, W H Linda; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roden, Dan M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McKnight, Barbara; Sjögren, Marketa; Newman, Anne B; Liu, Yongmei; Gollob, Michael H; Melander, Olle; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ch Stricker, Bruno H; Felix, Stephan B; Alonso, Alvaro; Darbar, Dawood; Barnard, John; Chasman, Daniel I; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kääb, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death1. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation susceptibility loci were identified and replicated in an additional sample of individuals of European ancestry, including 5,381 subjects with and 1 0,030 subjects without atrial fibrillation (P < 5 × 10−8). Four of the loci identified in Europeans were further replicated in silico in a GWAS of Japanese individuals, including 843 individuals with and 3,350 individuals without atrial fibrillation. The identified loci implicate candidate genes that encode transcription factors related to cardiopulmonary development, cardiac-expressed ion channels and cell signaling molecules. PMID:22544366

  20. A new GWAS and meta-analysis with 1000Genomes imputation identifies novel risk variants for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J.; Palles, Claire; Farrington, Susan M.; Dobbins, Sara E.; Harris, Rebecca; Gorman, Maggie; Tenesa, Albert; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Kinnersley, Ben; Campbell, Harry; Martin, Lynn; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Barclay, Ella; Maughan, Timothy S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchannan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have identified 23 susceptibility loci thus far. Analyses of previously conducted GWAS indicate additional risk loci are yet to be discovered. To identify novel CRC susceptibility loci, we conducted a new GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with five published GWAS (totalling 7,577 cases and 9,979 controls of European ancestry), imputing genotypes utilising the 1000 Genomes Project. The combined analysis identified new, significant associations with CRC at 1p36.2 marked by rs72647484 (minor allele frequency [MAF] = 0.09) near CDC42 and WNT4 (P = 1.21 × 10−8, odds ratio [OR] = 1.21 ) and at 16q24.1 marked by rs16941835 (MAF = 0.21, P = 5.06 × 10−8; OR = 1.15) within the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) RP11-58A18.1 and ~500 kb from the nearest coding gene FOXL1. Additionally we identified a promising association at 10p13 with rs10904849 intronic to CUBN (MAF = 0.32, P = 7.01 × 10-8; OR = 1.14). These findings provide further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC. Additionally, our analysis further demonstrates that imputation can be used to exploit GWAS data to identify novel disease-causing variants. PMID:25990418

  1. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Duijts, Liesbeth; Ferreira, Manuel A; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; Albrecht, Eva; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Feenstra, Bjarke; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Hysi, Pirro; Warrington, Nicole M; Curjuric, Ivan; Myhre, Ronny; Curtin, John A; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Kerkhof, Marjan; Sääf, Annika; Franke, Andre; Ellinghaus, David; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Montgomery, Stephen B; Prokisch, Holger; Heim, Katharina; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Pekkanen, Juha; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Buxton, Jessica L; Kaakinen, Marika; Duffy, David L; Madden, Pamela A; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Le Souëf, Peter; St Pourcain, Beate; Smith, George Davey; Henderson, John; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Deloukas, Panos; Ring, Susan M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Novak, Natalija; Klopp, Norman; Rodríguez, Elke; McArdle, Wendy; Linneberg, Allan; Menné, Torkil; Nohr, Ellen A; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornélia M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; de Jongste, Johan C; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Wjst, Matthias; Jogi, Rain; Geller, Frank; Boyd, Heather A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Kim, Cecilia; Mentch, Frank; March, Michael; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Bataille, Veronique; Pennell, Craig E; Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter; Tiesler, Carla M T; Thiering, Elisabeth; Illig, Thomas; Imboden, Medea; Nystad, Wenche; Simpson, Angela; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Postma, Dirkje; Koppelman, Gerard H; Smit, Henriette A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Chawes, Bo; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Melén, Erik; Boomsma, Dorret I; Custovic, Adnan; Jacobsson, Bo; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Palmer, Lyle J; Glass, Daniel; Hakonarson, Hakon; Melbye, Mads; Jarvis, Deborah L; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Gieger, Christian; Strachan, David P; Martin, Nicholas G; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2011-12-25

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 population-based cohorts and then examined the ten most strongly associated new susceptibility loci in an additional 5,419 affected individuals and 19,833 controls from 14 studies. Three SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the discovery and replication cohorts combined, including rs479844 upstream of OVOL1 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.88, P = 1.1 × 10(-13)) and rs2164983 near ACTL9 (OR = 1.16, P = 7.1 × 10(-9)), both of which are near genes that have been implicated in epidermal proliferation and differentiation, as well as rs2897442 in KIF3A within the cytokine cluster at 5q31.1 (OR = 1.11, P = 3.8 × 10(-8)). We also replicated association with the FLG locus and with two recently identified association signals at 11q13.5 (rs7927894; P = 0.008) and 20q13.33 (rs6010620; P = 0.002). Our results underline the importance of both epidermal barrier function and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis.

  2. META-ANALYSIS OF GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDIES IDENTIFIES THREE NEW RISK LOCI FOR ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Duijts, Liesbeth; Ferreira, Manuel A; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; Albrecht, Eva; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Feenstra, Bjarke; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Hysi, Pirro; Warrington, Nicole M; Curjuric, Ivan; Myhre, Ronny; Curtin, John A; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Kerkhof, Marjan; Sääf, Annika; Franke, Andre; Ellinghaus, David; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Montgomery, Stephen B; Prokisch, Holger; Heim, Katharina; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Pekkanen, Juha; Blakemore, Alexandra IF; Buxton, Jessica L; Kaakinen, Marika; Duffy, David L; Madden, Pamela A; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Le Souëf, Peter; Pourcain, Beate St; Smith, George Davey; Henderson, John; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Deloukas, Panos; Ring, Susan M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Novak, Natalija; Klopp, Norman; Rodríguez, Elke; McArdle, Wendy; Linneberg, Allan; Menné, Torkil; Nohr, Ellen A; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornélia M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; de Jongste, Johan C; van der Valk, Ralf JP; Wjst, Matthias; Jogi, Rain; Geller, Frank; Boyd, Heather A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Kim, Cecilia; Mentch, Frank; March, Michael; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Bataille, Veronique; Pennell, Craig E; Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Illig, Thomas; Imboden, Medea; Nystad, Wenche; Simpson, Angela; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Postma, Dirkje; Koppelman, Gerard H; Smit, Henriette A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Chawes, Bo; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Melén, Erik; Boomsma, Dorret I; Custovic, Adnan; Jacobsson, Bo; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Palmer, Lyle J; Glass, Daniel; Hakonarson, Hakon; Melbye, Mads; Jarvis, Deborah L; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Gieger, Christian; Strachan, David P; Martin, Nicholas G; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing AD are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 cases and 20,565 controls from 16 population-based cohorts and followed up the ten most strongly associated novel markers in a further 5,419 cases and 19,833 controls from 14 studies. Three SNPs met genome-wide significance in the discovery and replication cohorts combined: rs479844 upstream of OVOL1 (OR=0.88, p=1.1×10−13) and rs2164983 near ACTL9 (OR=1.16, p=7.1×10−9), genes which have been implicated in epidermal proliferation and differentiation, as well as rs2897442 in KIF3A within the cytokine cluster on 5q31.1 (OR=1.11, p=3.8×10−8). We also replicated the FLG locus and two recently identified association signals at 11q13.5 (rs7927894, p=0.008) and 20q13.3 (rs6010620, p=0.002). Our results underline the importance of both epidermal barrier function and immune dysregulation in AD pathogenesis. PMID:22197932

  3. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  4. Meta-analysis of gene–environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W.; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E.; Williams, Katie M.; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F.; Joshi, Peter K.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M.; Simpson, Claire L.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S.; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M. Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E. H.; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W.; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N.; Foster, Paul J.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L.; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A.; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N.; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G.; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O.; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L.; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L.; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10−5), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common variants associated with blood pressure variation in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kelly, Tanika N.; Go, Min Jin; Sim, Xueling; Tay, Wan Ting; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Zhang, Yi; Yamamoto, Ken; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Young Jin; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Nabika, Toru; Gu, Dongfeng; Chang, Li-ching; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Huang, Wei; Ohnaka, Keizo; Yamori, Yukio; Nakashima, Eitaro; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Lee, Jong-Young; Seielstad, Mark; Isono, Masato; Hixson, James E.; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Miki, Tetsuro; Zhang, Xuegong; Sugiyama, Takao; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Liu, Jian Jun; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kim, Sung Soo; Aung, Tin; Sung, Yun Ju; Zhou, Xueya; Wong, Tien Yin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kobayashi, Shotai; Ogihara, Toshio; Zhu, Dingliang; Iwai, Naoharu; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E Shyong; Cho, Yoon Shin; He, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure in 19,608 subjects of East Asian ancestry from the AGEN-BP consortium followed by de novo genotypingin 2 stages of replication involving 10,518 and 20,247 East Asian samples. We identified novel genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10−8) associations between SBP or DBP and variants at four novel loci: ST7L-CAPZA1, FIGN-GRB14, ENPEP, and NPR3, as well as a novel variant near TBX3. Except for NPR3, all novel findings were significantly replicated for SBP or DBP in independent samples. Sevenloci previously reported in populations of European descent were confirmed. On 12q24.13, we observed an ethnic specific association(implicating rs671 at the ALDH2 locus as the causal variant) that affected SBP, DBP and multiple traits related to coronary artery disease. These findings provide novel insights into blood pressure regulation and potential targets for intervention. PMID:21572416

  6. Meta-analysis identifies novel risk loci and yields systematic insights into the biology of male-pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Herold, Christine; Hochfeld, Lara M; Hillmer, Axel M; Nyholt, Dale R; Hecker, Julian; Javed, Asif; Chew, Elaine G Y; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Drichel, Dmitriy; Heng, Xiu Ting; Del Rosario, Ricardo C-H; Fier, Heide L; Paus, Ralf; Rueedi, Rico; Galesloot, Tessel E; Moebus, Susanne; Anhalt, Thomas; Prabhakar, Shyam; Li, Rui; Kanoni, Stavroula; Papanikolaou, George; Kutalik, Zoltán; Deloukas, Panos; Philpott, Michael P; Waeber, Gérard; Spector, Tim D; Vollenweider, Peter; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Dedoussis, George; Richards, J Brent; Nothnagel, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Becker, Tim; Hinds, David A; Nöthen, Markus M

    2017-03-08

    Male-pattern baldness (MPB) is a common and highly heritable trait characterized by androgen-dependent, progressive hair loss from the scalp. Here, we carry out the largest GWAS meta-analysis of MPB to date, comprising 10,846 early-onset cases and 11,672 controls from eight independent cohorts. We identify 63 MPB-associated loci (P<5 × 10(-8), METAL) of which 23 have not been reported previously. The 63 loci explain ∼39% of the phenotypic variance in MPB and highlight several plausible candidate genes (FGF5, IRF4, DKK2) and pathways (melatonin signalling, adipogenesis) that are likely to be implicated in the key-pathophysiological features of MPB and may represent promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic options. The data provide molecular evidence that rather than being an isolated trait, MPB shares a substantial biological basis with numerous other human phenotypes and may deserve evaluation as an early prognostic marker, for example, for prostate cancer, sudden cardiac arrest and neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Meta-analysis identifies novel risk loci and yields systematic insights into the biology of male-pattern baldness

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Herold, Christine; Hochfeld, Lara M.; Hillmer, Axel M.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Hecker, Julian; Javed, Asif; Chew, Elaine G. Y.; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Drichel, Dmitriy; Heng, Xiu Ting; del Rosario, Ricardo C. -H.; Fier, Heide L.; Paus, Ralf; Rueedi, Rico; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Moebus, Susanne; Anhalt, Thomas; Prabhakar, Shyam; Li, Rui; Kanoni, Stavroula; Papanikolaou, George; Kutalik, Zoltán; Deloukas, Panos; Philpott, Michael P.; Waeber, Gérard; Spector, Tim D.; Vollenweider, Peter; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Dedoussis, George; Richards, J. Brent; Nothnagel, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G.; Becker, Tim; Hinds, David A.; Nöthen, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    Male-pattern baldness (MPB) is a common and highly heritable trait characterized by androgen-dependent, progressive hair loss from the scalp. Here, we carry out the largest GWAS meta-analysis of MPB to date, comprising 10,846 early-onset cases and 11,672 controls from eight independent cohorts. We identify 63 MPB-associated loci (P<5 × 10−8, METAL) of which 23 have not been reported previously. The 63 loci explain ∼39% of the phenotypic variance in MPB and highlight several plausible candidate genes (FGF5, IRF4, DKK2) and pathways (melatonin signalling, adipogenesis) that are likely to be implicated in the key-pathophysiological features of MPB and may represent promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic options. The data provide molecular evidence that rather than being an isolated trait, MPB shares a substantial biological basis with numerous other human phenotypes and may deserve evaluation as an early prognostic marker, for example, for prostate cancer, sudden cardiac arrest and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28272467

  8. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Paul S.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J.; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A.; Kleber, Marcus E.; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L.; Attia, John R.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Joshi, Peter K.; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D.; Delgado, Graciela E.; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M.; Berentzen, Tina L.; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A.; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F.; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C.; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Lowe, Gordon D.; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G.; Becker, Diane M.; Starr, John M.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Jhun, Min A.; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M.; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G.; Stott, David J.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J.; Becker, Lewis C.; Scott, Rodney J.; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J.; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Ridker, Paul M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Strachan, David P.; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration. PMID:26561523

  9. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration.

  10. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 32 studies identifies multiple lipid loci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholest...

  11. Novel linkage disequilibrium clustering algorithm identifies new lupus genes on meta-analysis of GWAS datasets.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammad

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disorder. Genetic association studies of complex disorders suffer from the following three major issues: phenotypic heterogeneity, false positive (type I error), and false negative (type II error) results. Hence, genes with low to moderate effects are missed in standard analyses, especially after statistical corrections. OASIS is a novel linkage disequilibrium clustering algorithm that can potentially address false positives and negatives in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of complex disorders such as SLE. OASIS was applied to two SLE dbGAP GWAS datasets (6077 subjects; ∼0.75 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms). OASIS identified three known SLE genes viz. IFIH1, TNIP1, and CD44, not previously reported using these GWAS datasets. In addition, 22 novel loci for SLE were identified and the 5 SLE genes previously reported using these datasets were verified. OASIS methodology was validated using single-variant replication and gene-based analysis with GATES. This led to the verification of 60% of OASIS loci. New SLE genes that OASIS identified and were further verified include TNFAIP6, DNAJB3, TTF1, GRIN2B, MON2, LATS2, SNX6, RBFOX1, NCOA3, and CHAF1B. This study presents the OASIS algorithm, software, and the meta-analyses of two publicly available SLE GWAS datasets along with the novel SLE genes. Hence, OASIS is a novel linkage disequilibrium clustering method that can be universally applied to existing GWAS datasets for the identification of new genes.

  12. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Sarah L; Dorling, Leila; Fachal, Laura; Bentzen, Søren; Pharoah, Paul D P; Barnes, Daniel R; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Carballo, Ana M; Dearnaley, David P; Peleteiro, Paula; Gulliford, Sarah L; Hall, Emma; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carracedo, Ángel; Sia, Michael; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson N; Sydes, Matthew R; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Parliament, Matthew; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Burnet, Neil G; Dunning, Alison M; Barnett, Gillian C; West, Catharine M L

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08-4.69, p-value 4.16×10(-8)) and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90-3.86, p-value=3.21×10(-8)). These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling.

  13. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Price, Melissa; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Shen, Howard; Weber, Rachel; Karevan, Rod; Larson, Melissa C.; Song, Honglin; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M.; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Aben, Katja K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Birrer, Michael J.; Bloom, Greg; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brenton, James D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brown, Robert; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carney, Michael E; Carvalho, Renato S.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cicek, Mine S.; Coetzee, Gerhard; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Despierre, Evelyn; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fenstermacher, David; Flanagan, James; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Gore, Martin; Gronwald, Jacek; Guo, Qi; Halle, Mari K; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hillemanns, Peter; Hoatlin, Maureen; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Nathan; Lee, Janet; Leminen, Arto; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nakanishi, Toru; Narod, Steven A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stefan; Noushmehr, Houtan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Paul, James; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qu, Xiaotao; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hui; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Southey, Melissa C.; Spellman, Paul; Tajima, Kazuo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Berg, David Van Den; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wik, Elisabeth; Winterhoff, Boris; Woo, Yin Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah P.; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zulkifli, Famida; Goodman, Marc T.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Iversen, Edwin; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with another two loci being close to genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the United Kingdom. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. Follow-up genotyping was carried out in 18,174 cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 previously near genome-wide significance and identified three novel loci associated with risk; two loci associated with all EOC subtypes, at 8q21 (rs11782652, P=5.5×10-9) and 10p12 (rs1243180; P=1.8×10-8), and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210; P=8.1×10-10). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility that implicates CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. PMID:23535730

  14. Acute Tc-99m DMSA scan for identifying dilating vesicoureteral reflux in children: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Vouloumanou, Evridiki K; Georgantzi, Georgia G; Tsalkidis, Aggelos; Chatzimichael, Athanassios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2011-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the type and/or sequence of imaging studies needed during the first febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in young children. Several investigators have claimed that because acute-phase Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal-scan results are abnormal in the presence of dilating vesicoureteral reflux, a normal DMSA-scan result makes voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) unnecessary in the primary examination of infants with UTI. To evaluate the accuracy of acute-phase DMSA scanning in identifying dilating (grades III through V) vesicoureteral reflux documented by VCUG in children with a first febrile UTI, we performed a meta-analysis of the accuracy of diagnostic tests as reported from relevant studies identified through the PubMed and Scopus databases. Patient-based and renal unit-based analyses were performed. Overall, 13 cohort studies were identified. Nine studies involved patients younger than 2 years, 3 involved children aged 16 years or younger, and 1 involved exclusively neonates. Girls constituted 22% to 85% of the involved children. Pooled (95% confidence intervals) sensitivity and specificity rates of DMSA scanning were 79% and 53%, respectively, for the patient-based analysis (8 studies) and 60% and 65% for the renal unit-based analysis (5 studies). The respective areas under the hierarchical summary receiver operating curves were 0.71 and 0.67. Marked statistical heterogeneity was observed in both analyses, as indicated by I(2) test values of 91% and 87%, respectively. Acute-phase DMSA renal scanning cannot be recommended as replacement for VCUG in the evaluation of young children with a first febrile UTI.

  15. A principal component meta-analysis on multiple anthropometric traits identifies novel loci for body shape.

    PubMed

    Ried, Janina S; Jeff M, Janina; Chu, Audrey Y; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; van Dongen, Jenny; Huffman, Jennifer E; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Cadby, Gemma; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Joel; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Jackson, Anne U; Jokinen, Eero; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Mangino, Massimo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L; Nolte, Ilja M; Pérusse, Louis; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Rose, Lynda M; Salvi, Erika; Smith, Megan T; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; van der Harst, Pim; Walker, Ryan W; Wang, Sophie R; Wild, Sarah H; Willems, Sara M; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Bakker, Stephan J L; Barlassina, Cristina; Bartz, Traci M; Beilby, John; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chiang, Charleston W K; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Cucca, Fracensco; Cupples, L Adrienne; D'Avila, Francesca; de Geus, Eco J C; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Döring, Angela; Eriksson, Johan G; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Farrall, Martin; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Forouhi, Nita G; Friedrich, Nele; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Glorioso, Nicola; Graff, Mariaelisa; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Hamsten, Anders; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew Tym; Havulinna, Aki S; Heliövaara, Markku; Hillege, Hans; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Hysi, Pirro G; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; James, Alan L; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Marie Justesen, Johanne; Justice, Anne E; Kähönen, Mika; Karaleftheri, Maria; Tee Khaw, Kay; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kinnunen, Leena; Knekt, Paul B; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Laitinen, Tomi; Langenberg, Claudia; Lewin, Alexandra M; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Lorbeer, Roberto; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; Mcknight, Barbara; Mohlke, Karen L; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Montasser, May E; Morris, Andrew P; Müller, Gabriele; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S; Paternoster, Lavinia; Penninx, Brenda W; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G; Polašek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Rice, Treva K; Richards, Marcus; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ryan, Kathy A; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A; Sebert, Sylvain; Southam, Lorraine; Sparsø, Thomas Hempel; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Tönjes, Anke; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vartiainen, Erkki; Venturini, Cristina; Verweij, Niek; Viikari, Jorma S; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M; Waeber, Gérard; Widén, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Winkler, Thomas W; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zillikens, M Carola; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cusi, Daniele; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Hansen, Torben; Hicks, Andrew A; Hu, Frank; Hveem, Kristian; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Palmer, Lyle J; Pedersen, Oluf; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Psaty, Bruce M; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shudiner, Alan R; Smit, Jan H; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tremblay, Angelo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fox, Caroline; Groop, Leif C; Heid, Iris M; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; McCarthy, Mark I; North, Kari E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Schlessinger, David; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Strachan, David P; Frayling, Timothy; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-11-23

    Large consortia have revealed hundreds of genetic loci associated with anthropometric traits, one trait at a time. We examined whether genetic variants affect body shape as a composite phenotype that is represented by a combination of anthropometric traits. We developed an approach that calculates averaged PCs (AvPCs) representing body shape derived from six anthropometric traits (body mass index, height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio). The first four AvPCs explain >99% of the variability, are heritable, and associate with cardiometabolic outcomes. We performed genome-wide association analyses for each body shape composite phenotype across 65 studies and meta-analysed summary statistics. We identify six novel loci: LEMD2 and CD47 for AvPC1, RPS6KA5/C14orf159 and GANAB for AvPC3, and ARL15 and ANP32 for AvPC4. Our findings highlight the value of using multiple traits to define complex phenotypes for discovery, which are not captured by single-trait analyses, and may shed light onto new pathways.

  16. A principal component meta-analysis on multiple anthropometric traits identifies novel loci for body shape

    PubMed Central

    Ried, Janina S.; Jeff M., Janina; Chu, Audrey Y.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; van Dongen, Jenny; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Cadby, Gemma; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Joel; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jokinen, Eero; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Mangino, Massimo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Pérusse, Louis; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Rose, Lynda M.; Salvi, Erika; Smith, Megan T.; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; van der Harst, Pim; Walker, Ryan W.; Wang, Sophie R.; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Barlassina, Cristina; Bartz, Traci M.; Beilby, John; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S; Cucca, Fracensco; Cupples, L Adrienne; D'Avila, Francesca; de Geus, Eco J .C.; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Döring, Angela; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Farrall, Martin; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Forouhi, Nita G.; Friedrich, Nele; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Glorioso, Nicola; Graff, Mariaelisa; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Hamsten, Anders; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew Tym; Havulinna, Aki S.; Heliövaara, Markku; Hillege, Hans; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Hysi, Pirro G.; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; James, Alan L.; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Marie Justesen, Johanne; Justice, Anne E.; Kähönen, Mika; Karaleftheri, Maria; Tee Khaw, Kay; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kinnunen, Leena; Knekt, Paul B.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Laitinen, Tomi; Langenberg, Claudia; Lewin, Alexandra M.; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Lorbeer, Roberto; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Mcknight, Barbara; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Montasser, May E.; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Gabriele; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G.; Polašek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Rice, Treva K.; Richards, Marcus; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ryan, Kathy A.; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A.; Sebert, Sylvain; Southam, Lorraine; Sparsø, Thomas Hempel; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vartiainen, Erkki; Venturini, Cristina; Verweij, Niek; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M.; Waeber, Gérard; Widén, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wright, Alan F.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Hua Zhao, Jing; Carola Zillikens, M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cusi, Daniele; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gieger, Christian; Hansen, Torben; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hu, Frank; Hveem, Kristian; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pedersen, Oluf; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Psaty, Bruce M.; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shudiner, Alan R.; Smit, Jan H.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tremblay, Angelo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fox, Caroline; Groop, Leif C.; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; McCarthy, Mark I.; North, Kari E.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Strachan, David P.; Frayling, Timothy; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Large consortia have revealed hundreds of genetic loci associated with anthropometric traits, one trait at a time. We examined whether genetic variants affect body shape as a composite phenotype that is represented by a combination of anthropometric traits. We developed an approach that calculates averaged PCs (AvPCs) representing body shape derived from six anthropometric traits (body mass index, height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio). The first four AvPCs explain >99% of the variability, are heritable, and associate with cardiometabolic outcomes. We performed genome-wide association analyses for each body shape composite phenotype across 65 studies and meta-analysed summary statistics. We identify six novel loci: LEMD2 and CD47 for AvPC1, RPS6KA5/C14orf159 and GANAB for AvPC3, and ARL15 and ANP32 for AvPC4. Our findings highlight the value of using multiple traits to define complex phenotypes for discovery, which are not captured by single-trait analyses, and may shed light onto new pathways. PMID:27876822

  17. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march.

    PubMed

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P; Spycher, Ben D; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Sääf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Söderhäll, Cilla; Pershagen, Göran; de Jongste, Johan C; Postma, Dirkje S; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M; Puzyrev, Valery P; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L; Marks, Guy B; Robertson, Colin F; Montgomery, Grant W; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J; Martin, Nicholas G; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Pennell, Craig E; Sly, Peter D; Schmidt, Carsten O; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Hübner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A R; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H; Melén, Erik; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Henderson, A John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-11-06

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations including 2,428 cases and 17,034 controls. Here we report two novel loci specific for the combined eczema plus asthma phenotype, which are associated with allergic disease for the first time; rs9357733 located in EFHC1 on chromosome 6p12.3 (OR 1.27; P=2.1 × 10(-8)) and rs993226 between TMTC2 and SLC6A15 on chromosome 12q21.3 (OR 1.58; P=5.3 × 10(-9)). Additional susceptibility loci identified at genome-wide significance are FLG (1q21.3), IL4/KIF3A (5q31.1), AP5B1/OVOL1 (11q13.1), C11orf30/LRRC32 (11q13.5) and IKZF3 (17q21). We show that predominantly eczema loci increase the risk for the atopic march. Our findings suggest that eczema may play an important role in the development of asthma after eczema.

  18. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march

    PubMed Central

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P.; Spycher, Ben D.; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Sääf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C.; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q.; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Söderhäll, Cilla; Pershagen, Göran; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J.; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L.; Marks, Guy B.; Robertson, Colin F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pennell, Craig E.; Sly, Peter D.; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Hübner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G.; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A. R.; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B.; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Melén, Erik; Dizier, Marie- Hélène; Henderson, A John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-01-01

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the ‘atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations including 2,428 cases and 17,034 controls. Here we report two novel loci specific for the combined eczema plus asthma phenotype, which are associated with allergic disease for the first time; rs9357733 located in EFHC1 on chromosome 6p12.3 (OR 1.27; P=2.1 × 10−8) and rs993226 between TMTC2 and SLC6A15 on chromosome 12q21.3 (OR 1.58; P=5.3 × 10−9). Additional susceptibility loci identified at genome-wide significance are FLG (1q21.3), IL4/KIF3A (5q31.1), AP5B1/OVOL1 (11q13.1), C11orf30/LRRC32 (11q13.5) and IKZF3 (17q21). We show that predominantly eczema loci increase the risk for the atopic march. Our findings suggest that eczema may play an important role in the development of asthma after eczema. PMID:26542096

  19. A meta-analysis identifies adolescent idiopathic scoliosis association with LBX1 locus in multiple ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Londono, Douglas; Kou, Ikuyo; Johnson, Todd A; Sharma, Swarkar; Ogura, Yoji; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Morio; Herring, John A; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Wang, Xingyan; Tam, Elisa M S; Song, You-Qiang; Fan, Yan-Hui; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Qiu, Xusheng; Jiang, Hua; Huang, Dongsheng; TSRHC IS Clinical Group; International Consortium for Scoliosis Genetics; Su, Peiqiang; Sham, Pak; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Luk, Keith D K; Gordon, Derek; Qiu, Yong; Cheng, Jack; Tang, Nelson; Ikegawa, Shiro; Wise, Carol A

    2014-06-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common rotational deformity of the spine that presents in children worldwide, yet its etiology is poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a few candidate risk loci. One locus near the chromosome 10q24.31 LBX1 gene (OMIM #604255) was originally identified by a GWAS of Japanese subjects and replicated in additional Asian populations. To extend this result, and to create larger AIS cohorts for the purpose of large-scale meta-analyses in multiple ethnicities, we formed a collaborative group called the International Consortium for Scoliosis Genetics (ICSG). Here, we report the first ICSG study, a meta-analysis of the LBX1 locus in six Asian and three non-Asian cohorts. We find significant evidence for association of this locus with AIS susceptibility in all nine cohorts. Results for seven cohorts containing both genders yielded P=1.22×10-43 for rs11190870, and P=2.94×10-48 for females in all nine cohorts. Comparing the regional haplotype structures for three populations, we refined the boundaries of association to a ∼25 kb block encompassing the LBX1 gene. The LBX1 protein, a homeobox transcription factor that is orthologous to the Drosophila ladybird late gene, is involved in proper migration of muscle precursor cells, specification of cardiac neural crest cells, and neuronal determination in developing neural tubes. Our results firmly establish the LBX1 region as the first major susceptibility locus for AIS in Asian and non-Hispanic white groups, and provide a platform for larger studies in additional ancestral groups. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Meta-analysis of transcriptomic responses as a means to identify pulmonary disease outcomes for engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Nikota, Jake; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2016-05-11

    The increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) of varying physical and chemical characteristics poses a great challenge for screening and assessing the potential pathology induced by these materials, necessitating novel toxicological approaches. Toxicogenomics measures changes in mRNA levels in cells and tissues following exposure to toxic substances. The resulting information on altered gene expression profiles, associated pathways, and the doses at which these changes occur, are used to identify the underlying mechanisms of toxicity and to predict disease outcomes. We evaluated the applicability of toxicogenomics data in identifying potential lung-specific (genomic datasets are currently available from experiments where mice have been exposed to various ENMs through this common route of exposure) disease outcomes following exposure to ENMs. Seven toxicogenomics studies describing mouse pulmonary responses over time following intra-tracheal exposure to increasing doses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon black, and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles of varying properties were examined to understand underlying mechanisms of toxicity. mRNA profiles from these studies were compared to the publicly available datasets of 15 other mouse models of lung injury/diseases induced by various agents including bleomycin, ovalbumin, TNFα, lipopolysaccharide, bacterial infection, and welding fumes to delineate the implications of ENM-perturbed biological processes to disease pathogenesis in lungs. The meta-analysis revealed two distinct clusters-one driven by TiO2 and the other by CNTs. Unsupervised clustering of the genes showing significant expression changes revealed that CNT response clustered with bleomycin injury and bacterial infection models, both of which are known to induce lung fibrosis, in a post-exposure-time dependent manner, irrespective of the CNT's physical-chemical properties. TiO2 samples clustered separately from CNTs and disease models. These

  1. International comparison of clinicians' ability to identify depression in primary care: meta-analysis and meta-regression of predictors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alex J; Rao, Sanjay; Vaze, Amol

    2011-01-01

    Background There are international differences in the epidemiology of depression and the performance of primary care physicians but the factors underlying these national differences are uncertain. Aim To examine the international variability in diagnostic performance of primary care physicians when diagnosing depression in primary care. Design of study A meta-analysis of unassisted clinical diagnoses against semi-structured interviews. Method A systematic literature search, critical appraisal, and pooled analysis were conducted and 25 international studies were identified involving 8917 individuals. A minimum of three independent studies per country were required to aid extrapolation. Results Clinicians in the Netherlands performed best at case finding (the ability to rule in cases of depression with minimal false positives) (AUC+ 0.735) and this was statistically significantly better than the ability of clinicians in Australia (AUC+ 0.622) and the US (AUC+ 0.653), who were the worst performers. Clinicians from Italy had intermediate case-finding abilities. Regarding screening (the ability to rule out cases of no depression with minimal false negatives) there were no strong differences. Looking at overall accuracy, primary care physicians in Italy and the Netherlands were most successful in their diagnoses and physicians from the US and Australia least successful (83.5%, 81.9%, 74.3%, and 67.0%, respectively). GPs in the UK appeared to have the lowest ability to detect depression, as a proportion of all cases of depression (45.6%; 95% CI = 27.7% to 64.2%). Several factors influenced detection accuracy including: collecting data on clinical outcomes; routinely comparing the clinical performance of staff; working in small practices; and having long waits to see a specialist. Conclusion Assuming these differences are representative, there appear to be international variations in the ability of primary care physicians to diagnose depression, but little differences in

  2. Variants identified in a GWAS meta-analysis for blood lipids are associated with the lipid response to fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Goodarzi, Mark O; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Yan, Xiaofei; Irvin, Marguerite R; Kim, Eric; Tiwari, Hemant K; Guo, Xiuqing; Straka, Robert J; Taylor, Kent D; Tsai, Michael Y; Hopkins, Paul N; Korenman, Stanley G; Borecki, Ingrid B; Chen, Yii-Der I; Ordovas, Jose M; Rotter, Jerome I; Arnett, Donna K

    2012-01-01

    A recent large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide studies has identified 95 loci, 59 of them novel, as statistically significant predictors of blood lipid traits; we tested whether the same loci explain the observed heterogeneity in response to lipid-lowering therapy with fenofibrate. Using data from the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN, n = 861) we fit linear mixed models with the genetic markers as predictors and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations as outcomes. For all four traits, we analyzed both baseline levels and changes in response to treatment with fenofibrate. For the markers that were significantly associated with fenofibrate response, we fit additional models evaluating potential epistatic interactions. All models were adjusted for age, sex, and study center as fixed effects, and pedigree as a random effect. Statistically significant associations were observed between the rs964184 polymorphism near APOA1 (P-value≤0.0001) and fenofibrate response for HDL and triglycerides. The association was replicated in the Pharmacogenetics of Hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanics study (HyperTG, n = 267). Suggestive associations with fenofibrate response were observed for markers in or near PDE3A, MOSC1, FLJ36070, CETP, the APOE-APOC1-APOC4-APOC2, and CILP2. Finally, we present strong evidence for epistasis (P-value for interaction =  0.0006 in GOLDN, 0.05 in HyperTG) between rs10401969 near CILP2 and rs4420638 in the APOE-APOC1-APOC4-APOC2 cluster with total cholesterol response to fenofibrate. In conclusion, we present evidence linking several novel and biologically relevant genetic polymorphisms to lipid lowering drug response, as well as suggesting novel gene-gene interactions in fenofibrate pharmacogenetics.

  3. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Line Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Real-World Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Heng, Daniel Y; Signorovitch, James; Swallow, Elyse; Li, Nanxin; Zhong, Yichen; Qin, Paige; Zhuo, Daisy Y; Wang, Xufang; Park, Jinhee; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios; Kollmannsberger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The optimal sequencing of targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is unknown. Observational studies with a variety of designs have reported differing results. The objective of this study is to systematically summarize and interpret the published real-world evidence comparing sequential treatment for mRCC. A search was conducted in Medline and Embase (2009-2013), and conference proceedings from American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium (ASCO-GU), and European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) (2011-2013). We systematically reviewed observational studies comparing second-line mRCC treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) versus vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Studies were evaluated for 1) use of a retrospective cohort design after initiation of second-line therapy, 2) adjustment for patient characteristics, and 3) use of data from multiple centers. Meta-analyses were conducted for comparisons of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Ten studies reported OS and exhibited significant heterogeneity in estimated second-line treatment effects (I2 = 68%; P = 0.001). Four of these were adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies, and these showed no evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0%; P = 0.61) and a significant association between second-line mTORi (>75% everolimus) and longer OS compared to VEGF TKI (>60% sorafenib) (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.98) in a meta-analysis. Seven studies comparing PFS showed significant heterogeneity overall and among the adjusted, multicenter, retrospective cohort studies. Real-world observational data for axitinib outcomes was limited at the time of this study. Real-world studies employed different designs and reported heterogeneous results comparing the effectiveness of second-line mTORi and VEGF TKI in the treatment of mRCC. Within the subset of adjusted

  4. Meta-Analysis of 28,141 Individuals Identifies Common Variants within Five New Loci That Influence Uric Acid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Serena; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Perola, Markus; Mangino, Massimo; Albrecht, Eva; Wallace, Chris; Farrall, Martin; Johansson, Åsa; Nyholt, Dale R.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris; Campbell, Harry; Connell, John; Dominiczak, Anna; Homuth, Georg; Lamina, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meitinger, Thomas; Mooser, Vincent; Munroe, Patricia; Nauck, Matthias; Peden, John; Prokisch, Holger; Salo, Perttu; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Völker, Uwe; Waeber, Gérard; Waterworth, Dawn; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Wright, Alan F.; Adamski, Jerzy; Whitfield, John B.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Pramstaller, Peter; Watkins, Hugh; Doering, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Spector, Tim D.; Peltonen, Leena; Völzke, Henry; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Vollenweider, Peter; Caulfield, Mark; Illig, Thomas; Gieger, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels cause gout and are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To investigate the polygenetic basis of serum uric acid levels, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans from 14 studies totalling 28,141 participants of European descent, resulting in identification of 954 SNPs distributed across nine loci that exceeded the threshold of genome-wide significance, five of which are novel. Overall, the common variants associated with serum uric acid levels fall in the following nine regions: SLC2A9 (p = 5.2×10−201), ABCG2 (p = 3.1×10−26), SLC17A1 (p = 3.0×10−14), SLC22A11 (p = 6.7×10−14), SLC22A12 (p = 2.0×10−9), SLC16A9 (p = 1.1×10−8), GCKR (p = 1.4×10−9), LRRC16A (p = 8.5×10−9), and near PDZK1 (p = 2.7×10−9). Identified variants were analyzed for gender differences. We found that the minor allele for rs734553 in SLC2A9 has greater influence in lowering uric acid levels in women and the minor allele of rs2231142 in ABCG2 elevates uric acid levels more strongly in men compared to women. To further characterize the identified variants, we analyzed their association with a panel of metabolites. rs12356193 within SLC16A9 was associated with DL-carnitine (p = 4.0×10−26) and propionyl-L-carnitine (p = 5.0×10−8) concentrations, which in turn were associated with serum UA levels (p = 1.4×10−57 and p = 8.1×10−54, respectively), forming a triangle between SNP, metabolites, and UA levels. Taken together, these associations highlight additional pathways that are important in the regulation of serum uric acid levels and point toward novel potential targets for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat hyperuricemia. In addition, these findings strongly support the hypothesis that transport proteins are key in regulating serum uric acid levels. PMID:19503597

  5. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L.; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs. PMID:27362418

  6. Six Novel Loci Associated with Circulating VEGF Levels Identified by a Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ci; Nutile, Teresa; Vernon Smith, Albert; Concas, Maria Pina; Traglia, Michela; Barbieri, Caterina; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Stathopoulou, Maria G.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Maestrale, Giovanni Battista; Sala, Cinzia; Debette, Stephanie; Kovacs, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lamont, John; Fitzgerald, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Toniolo, Daniela; Pirastu, Mario; Bellenguez, Celine; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ingelsson, Erik; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Johnson, Andrew D.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Seshadri, Sudha; Ciullo, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic and neurotrophic factor, secreted by endothelial cells, known to impact various physiological and disease processes from cancer to cardiovascular disease and to be pharmacologically modifiable. We sought to identify novel loci associated with circulating VEGF levels through a genome-wide association meta-analysis combining data from European-ancestry individuals and using a dense variant map from 1000 genomes imputation panel. Six discovery cohorts including 13,312 samples were analyzed, followed by in-silico and de-novo replication studies including an additional 2,800 individuals. A total of 10 genome-wide significant variants were identified at 7 loci. Four were novel loci (5q14.3, 10q21.3, 16q24.2 and 18q22.3) and the leading variants at these loci were rs114694170 (MEF2C, P = 6.79x10-13), rs74506613 (JMJD1C, P = 1.17x10-19), rs4782371 (ZFPM1, P = 1.59x10-9) and rs2639990 (ZADH2, P = 1.72x10-8), respectively. We also identified two new independent variants (rs34528081, VEGFA, P = 1.52x10-18; rs7043199, VLDLR-AS1, P = 5.12x10-14) at the 3 previously identified loci and strengthened the evidence for the four previously identified SNPs (rs6921438, LOC100132354, P = 7.39x10-1467; rs1740073, C6orf223, P = 2.34x10-17; rs6993770, ZFPM2, P = 2.44x10-60; rs2375981, KCNV2, P = 1.48x10-100). These variants collectively explained up to 52% of the VEGF phenotypic variance. We explored biological links between genes in the associated loci using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis that emphasized their roles in embryonic development and function. Gene set enrichment analysis identified the ERK5 pathway as enriched in genes containing VEGF associated variants. eQTL analysis showed, in three of the identified regions, variants acting as both cis and trans eQTLs for multiple genes. Most of these genes, as well as some of those in the associated loci, were involved in platelet biogenesis and functionality, suggesting the

  7. Prognostic Role of Primary Tumor Location in Non-Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 50 Studies.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Fausto; Ghidini, Michele; Barni, Sandro; Steccanella, Francesca; Sgroi, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Tomasello, Gianluca

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer (GC) arising in the upper third of the stomach, including the cardia or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), has increased in the last decades due to established etiological risk factors such as diet, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the prognostic role of site of origin in patients with proximal versus distal GC. We conducted a search of the PubMed, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, Web of Science, EMBASE, Google Scholar, LILACS, and CINAHL databases from inception to September 2016. Studies reporting data on the independent prognostic effect of site in GC and comparing overall survival (OS) in proximal versus distal tumors were eligible. Data were pooled using OS hazard ratios (HRs) of proximal versus distal GC according to fixed- or random-effect model. Overall, 50 studies including 128,268 patients were identified. Cancers located in the upper third of the stomach were associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-1.46, p < 0.001, I (2) = 91%). After exclusion of GEJ tumors, prognosis was worse for pure cardia location (HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.22-1.58, p < 0.001, I (2) = 61%) compared with proximal or upper-third GCs without a specific subsite definition (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.37, p = 0.04, I (2) = 91%). Location of the primary GC in the upper third of the stomach, particularly at the GEJ/cardia, should be acknowledged as an important prognostic factor. Based on these results, more effective treatment strategies for proximal GCs are needed.

  8. Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2004-01-01

    Systematic reviews use explicit and reproducible criteria to assemble, appraise, and combine articles with a minimum of bias. Meta-analysis is a form of systematic review that uses statistical techniques to derive quantitative estimates of the magnitude of treatment effects and their associated precision. Valid meta-analyses address focused questions, use appropriate criteria to select articles, assess the quality and combinability of articles, provide graphic and numeric summaries, consider potential biases, and can be generalized to a meaningful target population. The rate difference, or absolute risk reduction, is the preferred measure of clinical effect size; the reciprocal tells the number needed to treat for one additional favorable outcome. The benefits of meta-analysis over individual trials include greater precision, increased statistical power, and the ability to identify and explore diversity among studies. Threats to validity include heterogeneity, citation bias, publication bias, language bias, and variations in study quality. Because meta-analysis defines rational treatment expectations at a population level, it is an adjunct to, not a substitute for, clinical judgment in the care of individual patients.

  9. Meta-analysis of lipid-traits in Hispanics identifies novel loci, population-specific effects, and tissue-specific enrichment of eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Below, Jennifer E.; Parra, Esteban J.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Torres, Jason; Krithika, S.; Candille, Sophie; Lu, Yingchang; Manichakul, Ani; Peralta-Romero, Jesus; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Morris, Andrew P.; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin; Wang, Xin-Qun; Taylor, Kent D.; Ida Chen, Y.-D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rich, Stephen S.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Tang, Hua; Cox, Nancy J.; Cruz, Miguel; Hanis, Craig L.; Valladares-Salgado, Adan

    2016-01-01

    We performed genome-wide meta-analysis of lipid traits on three samples of Mexican and Mexican American ancestry comprising 4,383 individuals, and followed up significant and highly suggestive associations in three additional Hispanic samples comprising 7,876 individuals. Genome-wide significant signals were observed in or near CELSR2, ZNF259/APOA5, KANK2/DOCK6 and NCAN/MAU2 for total cholesterol, LPL, ABCA1, ZNF259/APOA5, LIPC and CETP for HDL cholesterol, CELSR2, APOB and NCAN/MAU2 for LDL cholesterol, and GCKR, TRIB1, ZNF259/APOA5 and NCAN/MAU2 for triglycerides. Linkage disequilibrium and conditional analyses indicate that signals observed at ABCA1 and LIPC for HDL cholesterol and NCAN/MAU2 for triglycerides are independent of previously reported lead SNP associations. Analyses of lead SNPs from the European Global Lipids Genetics Consortium (GLGC) dataset in our Hispanic samples show remarkable concordance of direction of effects as well as strong correlation in effect sizes. A meta-analysis of the European GLGC and our Hispanic datasets identified five novel regions reaching genome-wide significance: two for total cholesterol (FN1 and SAMM50), two for HDL cholesterol (LOC100996634 and COPB1) and one for LDL cholesterol (LINC00324/CTC1/PFAS). The top meta-analysis signals were found to be enriched for SNPs associated with gene expression in a tissue-specific fashion, suggesting an enrichment of tissue-specific function in lipid-associated loci. PMID:26780889

  10. Meta-analysis of gene expression studies in endometrial cancer identifies gene expression profiles associated with aggressive disease and patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Tracy A.; Zhao, Min; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    Although endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC; comprising ~80% of all endometrial cancers diagnosed) is typically associated with favourable patient outcome, a significant portion (~20%) of women with this subtype will relapse. We hypothesised that gene expression predictors of the more aggressive non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (NEEC) could be used to predict EEC patients with poor prognosis. To explore this hypothesis, we performed meta-analysis of 12 gene expression microarray studies followed by validation using RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1,253 genes differentially expressed between EEC and NEEC. Analysis found 121 genes were associated with poor outcome among EEC patients. Forward selection likelihood-based modelling identified a 9-gene signature associated with EEC outcome in our discovery RNA-Seq dataset which remained significant after adjustment for clinical covariates, but was not significant in a smaller RNA-Seq dataset. Our study demonstrates the value of employing meta-analysis to improve the power of gene expression microarray data, and highlight genes and molecular pathways of importance for endometrial cancer therapy. PMID:27830726

  11. Meta-analysis of gene expression studies in endometrial cancer identifies gene expression profiles associated with aggressive disease and patient outcome.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Zhao, Min; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-11-10

    Although endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC; comprising ~80% of all endometrial cancers diagnosed) is typically associated with favourable patient outcome, a significant portion (~20%) of women with this subtype will relapse. We hypothesised that gene expression predictors of the more aggressive non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (NEEC) could be used to predict EEC patients with poor prognosis. To explore this hypothesis, we performed meta-analysis of 12 gene expression microarray studies followed by validation using RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1,253 genes differentially expressed between EEC and NEEC. Analysis found 121 genes were associated with poor outcome among EEC patients. Forward selection likelihood-based modelling identified a 9-gene signature associated with EEC outcome in our discovery RNA-Seq dataset which remained significant after adjustment for clinical covariates, but was not significant in a smaller RNA-Seq dataset. Our study demonstrates the value of employing meta-analysis to improve the power of gene expression microarray data, and highlight genes and molecular pathways of importance for endometrial cancer therapy.

  12. Diagnostic performance of neck circumference to identify overweight and obesity as defined by body mass index in children and adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunming; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yue; Lu, Qiang; Liu, Xiaoli; Yin, Fuzai

    2017-05-01

    The neck circumference (NC) has been shown to be an accurate index for screening overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. To perform a meta-analysis to assess the performance of NC for the assessment of overweight and obesity. Data sources were PubMed and EMBASE up to March 2016. Studies providing measures of diagnostic performance of NC and using body mass index as reference standard were included. Six eligible studies that evaluated 11 214 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years were included in the meta-analysis. NC showed pooled sensitivity to detect high body mass index of 0.780 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.765-0.794), specificity of 0.746 (95% CI =  0.736-0.756) and a diagnostic odds ratio of 17.343 (95% CI =  8.743-34.405). The NC had moderate diagnostic accuracy for identifying overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

  13. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes identified by the transethnic meta-analysis study: assessment in American Indians and evidence for a new signal in LPP.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anup K; Muller, Yunhua Li; McLean, Nellie A; Abdussamad, Maryam; Piaggi, Paolo; Kobes, Sayuko; Weil, E Jennifer; Curtis, Jeffrey M; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Baier, Leslie J

    2014-11-01

    A recent genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis identified seven new loci associated with type 2 diabetes. We assessed the replication of the seven lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and evaluated these loci for additional signals in American Indians. Seven SNPs were genotyped in 7,710 individuals from a longitudinally studied American Indian population, and associations with type 2 diabetes, BMI and related phenotypes were assessed. Previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from these individuals were used to screen for additional type 2 diabetes signals at these loci. A variant independent of the trans-ancestry meta-analysis was identified within LPP, and its replication was assessed in an additional 3,106 urban American Indians. SNP rs6813195 near to TMEM154 was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.01, OR 1.12 [95% CI 1.03, 1.22]) and adiposity: the type 2 diabetes risk allele was associated with a lower percentage body fat (β = -1.451%, p = 4.8 × 10(-4)). Another SNP, rs3130501 near to POU5F1-TCF19, was associated with BMI (β = -0.012, p = 0.004), type 2 diabetes adjusted for BMI (p = 0.02, OR 1.11 [95% CI 1.02, 1.22]), 2 h glucose concentrations (β = 0.080 mmol/l, p = 0.02) and insulin resistance estimated by homeostatic model (β = 0.039, p = 0.009). The independent variant identified at the LPP locus in our American Indian GWAS for type 2 diabetes was replicated in the additional samples (all American Indian meta-analysis, p = 8.9 × 10(-6), OR 1.29 [95% CI 1.15, 1.45]). For two of the seven newly identified variants, there was nominal evidence for association with type 2 diabetes and related traits in American Indians. Identification of an independent variant at the LPP locus suggests the existence of more than one type 2 diabetes signal at this locus.

  14. Meta-Analysis of Microarray Data Identifies GAS6 Expression as an Independent Predictor of Poor Survival in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Brian; Jacob, Francis; Caduff, Rosmarie; Fink, Daniel; Goldstein, Darlene R.; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Seeking new biomarkers for epithelial ovarian cancer, the fifth most common cause of death from all cancers in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies, we performed a meta-analysis of three independent studies and compared the results in regard to clinicopathological parameters. This analysis revealed that GAS6 was highly expressed in ovarian cancer and therefore was selected as our candidate of choice. GAS6 encodes a secreted protein involved in physiological processes including cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and cell survival. We performed immunohistochemistry on various ovarian cancer tissues and found that GAS6 expression was elevated in tumour tissue samples compared to healthy control samples (P < 0.0001). In addition, GAS6 expression was also higher in tumours from patients with residual disease compared to those without. Our data propose GAS6 as an independent predictor of poor survival, suggesting GAS6, both on the mRNA and on the protein level, as a potential biomarker for ovarian cancer. In clinical practice, the staining of a tumour biopsy for GAS6 may be useful to assess cancer prognosis and/or to monitor disease progression. PMID:23878800

  15. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals common differential and global gene expression profiles in cystic fibrosis and other respiratory disorders and identifies CFTR regulators.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Sousa, Lisete; Falcao, Andre O; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-11-01

    A meta-analysis of 13 independent microarray data sets was performed and gene expression profiles from cystic fibrosis (CF), similar disorders (COPD: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, asthma), environmental conditions (smoking, epithelial injury), related cellular processes (epithelial differentiation/regeneration), and non-respiratory "control" conditions (schizophrenia, dieting), were compared. Similarity among differentially expressed (DE) gene lists was assessed using a permutation test, and a clustergram was constructed, identifying common gene markers. Global gene expression values were standardized using a novel approach, revealing that similarities between independent data sets run deeper than shared DE genes. Correlation of gene expression values identified putative gene regulators of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, of potential therapeutic significance. Our study provides a novel perspective on CF epithelial gene expression in the context of other lung disorders and conditions, and highlights the contribution of differentiation/EMT and injury to gene signatures of respiratory disease.

  16. A GWAS meta-analysis and replication study identifies a novel locus within CLPTM1L/TERT associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma in individuals of Chinese ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kai; Chin, Yoon-Ming; Lou, Pei-Jen; Hsu, Wan-Lun; McKay, James D.; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Li-Zhen; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Cui, Qian; Feng, Fu-Tuo; Feng, Qi-Shen; Guo, Yun-Miao; Jia, Wei-Hua; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Pua, Kin-Choo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Tse, Ka-Po; Xia, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Hongxin; Zhou, Gang-Qiao; Liu, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Hildesheim, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic loci within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated cancer, in several GWAS. Results outside this region have varied. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of four NPC GWAS among Chinese individuals (2,152 cases;3,740 controls). 43 noteworthy findings outside the MHC region were identified and targeted for replication in a pooled analysis of 4 independent case-control studies across 3 regions in Asia (4,716 cases;5,379 controls). A meta-analysis that combined results from the initial GWA and replication studies was performed. Results In the combined meta-analysis, rs31489, located within the CLPTM1L/TERT region on chromosome 5p15.33, was strongly associated with NPC (OR=0.81;p-value 6.3*10−13). Our results also provide support for associations reported from published NPC GWAS - rs6774494 (p = 1.5*10−12;located in the MECOM gene region), rs9510787 (p = 5.0*10−10;located in the TNFRSF19 gene region), and rs1412829/rs4977756/rs1063192 (p = 2.8*10−8,p = 7.0*10−7,and p = 8.4*10−7 respectively;located in the CDKN2A/B gene region). Conclusion We have identified a novel association between genetic variation in the CLPTM1L/TERT region and NPC. Supporting our finding, rs31489 and other SNPs in this region have been reported to be associated with multiple cancer sites, candidate-based studies have reported associations between polymorphisms in this region and NPC, the TERT gene is important for telomere maintenance and has been reported to be over-expressed in NPC, and an EBV protein expressed in NPC (LMP1) modulates TERT expression/telomerase activity. Impact Our finding suggests that factors involved in telomere length maintenance are involved in NPC pathogenesis. PMID:26545403

  17. A combined large-scale meta-analysis identifies COG6 as a novel shared risk locus for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Ana; Vidal-Bralo, Laura; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; González-Gay, Miguel A; Balsa, Alejandro; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ayala-Gutiérrez, María M; García-Hernández, Francisco José; González-Escribano, M Francisca; Sabio, José Mario; Tolosa, Carles; Suárez, Ana; González, Antonio; Padyukov, Leonid; Worthington, Jane; Vyse, Timothy; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    During the last years, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a number of common genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the genetic overlap between these two immune-mediated diseases has not been thoroughly examined so far. The aim of the present study was to identify additional risk loci shared between RA and SLE. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS data from RA (3911 cases and 4083 controls) and SLE (2237 cases and 6315 controls). The top-associated polymorphisms in the discovery phase were selected for replication in additional datasets comprising 13 641 RA cases and 31 921 controls and 1957 patients with SLE and 4588 controls. The rs9603612 genetic variant, located nearby the COG6 gene, an established susceptibility locus for RA, reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis including both discovery and replication sets (p value=2.95E-13). In silico expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that the associated polymorphism acts as a regulatory variant influencing COG6 expression. Moreover, protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses suggested the existence of overlap with specific biological processes, specially the type I interferon signalling pathway. Finally, genetic correlation and polygenic risk score analyses showed cross-phenotype associations between RA and SLE. In conclusion, we have identified a new risk locus shared between RA and SLE through a meta-analysis including GWAS datasets of both diseases. This study represents the first comprehensive large-scale analysis on the genetic overlap between these two complex disorders. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Individualized Venous Thromboembolism Risk Stratification Using the 2005 Caprini Score to Identify the Benefits and Harms of Chemoprophylaxis in Surgical Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pannucci, Christopher J; Swistun, Lukasz; MacDonald, John K; Henke, Peter K; Brooke, Benjamin S

    2017-06-01

    We performed a meta-analysis to investigate benefits and harms of chemoprophylaxis among surgical patients individually risk stratified for venous thromboembolism (VTE) using Caprini scores. Individualized VTE risk stratification may identify high risk surgical patients who benefit from peri-operative chemoprophylaxis. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) databases were queried. Eligible studies contained data on postoperative VTE and/or bleeding events with and without chemoprophylaxis. Primary outcomes included rates of VTE and clinically relevant bleeding after surgical procedures, stratified by Caprini score. A meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model. Among 13 included studies, 11 (n = 14,776) contained data for VTE events and 8 (n = 7590) contained data for clinically relevant bleeding with and without chemoprophylaxis. The majority of patients received mechanical prophylaxis. A 14-fold variation in VTE risk (from 0.7% to 10.7%) was identified among surgical patients who did not receive chemoprophylaxis, and patients at increased levels of Caprini risk were significantly more likely to have VTE. Patients with Caprini scores of 7 to 8 [odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.37-0.97] and >8 (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.26-0.65) had significant VTE risk reduction after surgery with chemoprophylaxis. Patients with Caprini scores ≤6 comprised 75% of the overall population, and these patients did not have a significant VTE risk reduction with chemoprophylaxis. No association between postoperative bleeding risk and Caprini score was identified. The benefit of peri-operative VTE chemoprophylaxis was only found among surgical patients with Caprini scores ≥7. Precision medicine using individualized VTE risk stratification helps ensure that chemoprophylaxis is used only in appropriate surgical patients and may minimize bleeding complications.

  19. Identifying Parameters to Distinguish Non-Diabetic Renal Diseases from Diabetic Nephropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Guang-Yan; Zhu, Han-Yu; Zhou, Jian-Hui; Wu, Jie; Chen, Pu; Lin, Shu-peng; Qiu, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal injuries in patients with diabetes include diabetic nephropathy (DN) and non-diabetic renal diseases (NDRD). The value of a clinical diagnosis of DN and NDRD remains inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of the literature to identify predictive factors of NDRD and to compare the clinical characteristics of DN and NDRD for differential diagnosis. Methods We searched PubMed (1990 to January 2012), Embase (1990 to February 2009), and CNKI (1990 to January 2012) to identify studies that enrolled patients with DN and NDRD. Then, the quality of the studies was assessed, and data were extracted. The results were summarized as odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous outcomes and weighted mean differences (WMDs) for continuous outcomes. Results Twenty-six relevant studies with 2,322 patients were included. The meta-analysis showed that the absence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) predicts NDRD (OR, 0.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09–0.26, p<0.00001). A shorter duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) also predicted NDRD (weighted mean difference, −34.67; 95% CI, −45.23–−24.11, p<0.00001). The levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C%), blood pressure (BP), and total cholesterol were lower in patients with NDRD, whereas triglycerides and body mass index were higher. Other clinical parameters, including age, 24-h urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, blood urea nitrogen, and glomerular filtration rate were not different between patients with NDRD and DN. Conclusions We identified that the absence of DR, shorter duration of DM, lower HbA1C, and lower BP may help to distinguish NDRD from DN in patients with diabetes. This could assist clinicians in making a safe and sound diagnosis and lead to more effective treatments. PMID:23691167

  20. Identifying the lowest effective dose of acetazolamide for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Emma V; Gupta, Vaibhav; Schedlbauer, Angela; Grocott, Michael P W

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy of three different daily doses of acetazolamide in the prevention of acute mountain sickness and to determine the lowest effective dose. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline and Embase along with a hand search of selected bibliographies. No language restrictions were applied. Study selection Randomised controlled trials assessing the use of acetazolamide at 250 mg, 500 mg, or 750 mg daily versus placebo in adults as a drug intervention for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness. Included studies were required to state the administered dose of acetazolamide and to randomise participants before ascent to either acetazolamide or placebo. Two reviewers independently carried out the selection process. Data extraction Two reviewers extracted data concerning study methods, pharmacological intervention with acetazolamide, method of assessment of acute mountain sickness, and event rates in both control and intervention groups, which were verified and analysed by the review team collaboratively. Data synthesis 11 studies (with 12 interventions arms) were included in the review. Acetazolamide at doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg were all effective in preventing acute mountain sickness above 3000 m, with a combined odds ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.46). At a dose of 250 mg daily the number needed to treat for acetazolamide to prevent acute mountain sickness was 6 (95% confidence interval 5 to 11). Heterogeneity ranged from I2=0% (500 mg subgroup) to I2=44% (750 mg subgroup). Conclusions Acetazolamide in doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg daily are all more effective than placebo for preventing acute mountain sickness. Acetazolamide 250 mg daily is the lowest effective dose to prevent acute mountain sickness for which evidence is available. PMID:23081689

  1. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass.

    PubMed

    Zillikens, M Carola; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Chou, Wen-Chi; Stolk, Lisette; Livshits, Gregory; Broer, Linda; Johnson, Toby; Koller, Daniel L; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Malkin, Ida; Ried, Janina S; Smith, Albert V; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weihua; Aghdassi, Ali; Åkesson, Kristina; Amin, Najaf; Baier, Leslie J; Barroso, Inês; Bennett, David A; Bertram, Lars; Biffar, Rainer; Bochud, Murielle; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Buchman, Aron S; Byberg, Liisa; Campbell, Harry; Campos Obanda, Natalia; Cauley, Jane A; Cawthon, Peggy M; Cederberg, Henna; Chen, Zhao; Cho, Nam H; Jin Choi, Hyung; Claussnitzer, Melina; Collins, Francis; Cummings, Steven R; De Jager, Philip L; Demuth, Ilja; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Diatchenko, Luda; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Enneman, Anke W; Erdos, Mike; Eriksson, Johan G; Eriksson, Joel; Estrada, Karol; Evans, Daniel S; Feitosa, Mary F; Fu, Mao; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Girke, Thomas; Glazer, Nicole L; Grallert, Harald; Grewal, Jagvir; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hanson, Robert L; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Hoffman, Eric P; Homuth, Georg; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hubal, Monica J; Hubbard, Alan; Huffman, Kim M; Husted, Lise B; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ittermann, Till; Jansson, John-Olov; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Karlsson, Magnus; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Klopp, Norman; Kloth, Jacqueline S L; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kraus, William E; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lahti, Jari; Lang, Thomas; Langdahl, Bente L; Launer, Lenore J; Lee, Jong-Young; Lerch, Markus M; Lewis, Joshua R; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Maixner, William; McGuigan, Fiona E; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Meitinger, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Mellström, Dan; Melov, Simon; Michaëlsson, Karl; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morris, Andrew P; Mosekilde, Leif; Newman, Anne; Nielson, Carrie M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oostra, Ben A; Orwoll, Eric S; Palotie, Aarno; Parker, Stephan; Peacock, Munro; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Prince, Richard L; Räikkönen, Katri; Ralston, Stuart H; Ripatti, Samuli; Robbins, John A; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Satterfield, Suzanne; Schadt, Eric E; Schipf, Sabine; Scott, Laura; Sehmi, Joban; Shen, Jian; Soo Shin, Chan; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Smith, Shad; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Swart, Karin M A; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Thompson, Patricia; Thomson, Cynthia A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tranah, Gregory J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Schoor, Natasja M; Verma, Arjun; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Walker, Mark; Weedon, Michael N; Welch, Ryan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Williams, Frances M K; Wilson, James F; Wright, Nicole C; Xie, Weijia; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Yanhua; Chambers, John C; Döring, Angela; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Econs, Michael J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kooner, Jaspal S; Psaty, Bruce M; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ossowski, Vicky; Waterworth, Dawn; Loos, Ruth J F; Karasik, David; Harris, Tamara B; Ohlsson, Claes; Kiel, Douglas P

    2017-07-19

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, height, and fat mass. Twenty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with lean body mass either genome wide (p < 5 × 10(-8)) or suggestively genome wide (p < 2.3 × 10(-6)). Replication in 63,475 (47,227 of European ancestry) individuals from 33 cohorts for whole body lean body mass and in 45,090 (42,360 of European ancestry) subjects from 25 cohorts for appendicular lean body mass was successful for five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in/near HSD17B11, VCAN, ADAMTSL3, IRS1, and FTO for total lean body mass and for three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in/near VCAN, ADAMTSL3, and IRS1 for appendicular lean body mass. Our findings provide new insight into the genetics of lean body mass.Lean body mass is a highly heritable trait and is associated with various health conditions. Here, Kiel and colleagues perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for whole body lean body mass and find five novel genetic loci to be significantly associated.

  2. Identifying the lowest effective dose of acetazolamide for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Low, Emma V; Avery, Anthony J; Gupta, Vaibhav; Schedlbauer, Angela; Grocott, Michael P W

    2012-10-18

    To assess the efficacy of three different daily doses of acetazolamide in the prevention of acute mountain sickness and to determine the lowest effective dose. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Medline and Embase along with a hand search of selected bibliographies. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials assessing the use of acetazolamide at 250 mg, 500 mg, or 750 mg daily versus placebo in adults as a drug intervention for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness. Included studies were required to state the administered dose of acetazolamide and to randomise participants before ascent to either acetazolamide or placebo. Two reviewers independently carried out the selection process. Two reviewers extracted data concerning study methods, pharmacological intervention with acetazolamide, method of assessment of acute mountain sickness, and event rates in both control and intervention groups, which were verified and analysed by the review team collaboratively. 11 studies (with 12 interventions arms) were included in the review. Acetazolamide at doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg were all effective in preventing acute mountain sickness above 3000 m, with a combined odds ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.46). At a dose of 250 mg daily the number needed to treat for acetazolamide to prevent acute mountain sickness was 6 (95% confidence interval 5 to 11). Heterogeneity ranged from I(2)=0% (500 mg subgroup) to I(2)=44% (750 mg subgroup). Acetazolamide in doses of 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg daily are all more effective than placebo for preventing acute mountain sickness. Acetazolamide 250 mg daily is the lowest effective dose to prevent acute mountain sickness for which evidence is available.

  3. Correlation between progression-free survival and overall survival in metastatic breast cancer patients receiving anthracyclines, taxanes, or targeted therapies: a trial-level meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adunlin, George; Cyrus, John W. W.; Dranitsaris, George

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, several new drugs have received regulatory approval for metastatic breast cancer (MBC). However, some of these approvals were based on improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), without a concomitant increase in overall survival (OS). This has led some to question the utility of using PFS as a measure for drug approval. To address the uncertainty of using PFS as a surrogate for OS in MBC, a systematic literature review followed by a trial-level correlative analysis was conducted in patients receiving anthracyclines, taxanes, or targeted therapies. Electronic databases were searched to identify randomized trials published between January 1990 and August 2015. Data extraction included hazard ratios for PFS (HRPFS) and OS (HROS) between comparative arms as well as trial-level parameters. Weighted multivariate regression analysis was then used to test the strength of the association between HRPFS and HROS. 72 trials providing 84 comparative arms met the inclusion criteria. HRPFS was a significant predictor of HROS (model coefficient = 0.18, p = 0.04). However, only 31 % (i.e., model R2) of the variability between the PFS–OS association was accounted for. When trials were limited to ≥2nd-line setting, the strength of the association improved (model coefficient = 0.40, p < 0.001) and the model R2 increased to 55 %. However, the HRPFS–HROS association was no longer significant when only 1st-line trials were considered (p = 0.90). HRPFS is a predictor for HROS in MBC randomized trials. However, the effect was driven by trials in the ≥2nd-line setting. Therefore, PFS can be a suitable surrogate for OS in trials evaluating new treatments in the 2nd setting and beyond. The use of PFS alone as a primary trial endpoint in the 1st-line setting is not recommended. PMID:26596731

  4. Replication Study in a Japanese Population of Six Susceptibility Loci for Type 2 Diabetes Originally Identified by a Transethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Matsuba, Ren; Imamura, Minako; Tanaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Minoru; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Watada, Hirotaka; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Maeda, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Aim We performed a replication study in a Japanese population to evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes and six susceptibility loci (TMEM154, SSR1, FAF1, POU5F1, ARL15, and MPHOSPH9) originally identified by a transethnic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 2014. Methods We genotyped 7,620 Japanese participants (5,817 type 2 diabetes patients and 1,803 controls) for each of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction invader assay. The association of each SNP locus with the disease was evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Of the six SNPs examined in this study, four (rs6813195 near TMEM154, rs17106184 in FAF1, rs3130501 in POU5F1 and rs4275659 near MPHOSPH9) had the same direction of effect as in the original reports, but two (rs9505118 in SSR1 and rs702634 in ARL15) had the opposite direction of effect. Among these loci, rs3130501 and rs4275659 were nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (rs3130501; p = 0.017, odds ratio [OR] = 1.113, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.019–1.215, rs4275659; p = 0.012, OR = 1.127, 95% CI 1.026–1.238, adjusted for sex, age and body mass index), but we did not observe a significant association with type 2 diabetes for any of the six evaluated SNP loci in our Japanese population. Conclusions Our results indicate that effects of the six SNP loci identified in the transethnic GWAS meta-analysis are not major among the Japanese, although SNPs in POU5F1 and MPHOSPH9 loci may have some effect on susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in this population. PMID:27115357

  5. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P; Saunders, Gary I; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J C; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Jukema, J Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J M; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline

    2014-08-15

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼ 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥ 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥ 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Lutetium-177-labelled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen antibody and ligands for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Calopedos, R J S; Chalasani, V; Asher, R; Emmett, L; Woo, H H

    2017-09-01

    Promising therapeutic results of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand have been shown when labelling with lutetium-177 ((177)Lu). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the therapeutic response of (177)Lu-PSMA in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). A systematic review was conducted using electronic databases up to December 2016. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality. The main outcome of interest was antitumour biochemical response of (177)Lu-PSMA, analysing two measures: 'any PSA decline' and '>50% decline' from baseline. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to calculate the pooled proportion across studies. The I(2) statistic was calculated in each case to investigate the extent of heterogeneity across the studies. A sensitivity analysis was conducted removing two studies, which were presented as abstracts and proportions were summarised by chemical type ((177)Lu-J591/DKZ/I&T). All analyses were conducted using Stata v14. A total of 10 studies were included in the analysis giving a total sample size of 369, 220 (of 334 analysable) experienced any PSA decline. The pooled proportion of patients with any PSA decline was 68% (95% confidence interval (CI): 61-74). The I(2) statistic was 39.1% (P=0.11) suggesting minor heterogeneity between results. The pooled proportion of patients with >50% PSA decline was 37% (95% CI: 22-52). The I(2) statistic was 91.0% (P<0.001) suggesting substantial heterogeneity between results. On subgroup analysis, a higher proportion of patients in the (177)Lu-DKZ/I&T subgroup had a PSA decline >50%, however, it can be seen that the (177)Lu-DKZ/I&T subgroup had a substantial amount of heterogeneity across studies. This review suggests promising early results for the treatment of mCRPC, especially from patients treated with the more recently developed radioligands. Overall, our meta-analysis showed that approximately two

  7. Meta-Analysis at Middle Age: A Personal History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.

    2015-01-01

    The 40-year history of meta-analysis is traced from the vantage point of one of its originators. Research syntheses leading to the first examples of meta-analysis are identified. Early meta-analyses of the literature on psychotherapy outcomes and school class size are recounted. The influence on the development of meta-analysis of several…

  8. Meta-Analysis of Multiple Simulation-Based Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    and Developing Hypotheses 6 Waterfall approach 1: Establishing the objectives of the meta - analysis and identifying the specific hypotheses that...Operational Environments” Paper ID: 48 Meta - Analysis of Multiple Simulation-Based Experiments Topics: Topic 5: Experimentation, Metrics, and...circumstances. Thus, effectively utilizing a variety of models in a prospective meta - analysis (a set of common hypotheses and controllable variables

  9. Meta-Analysis at Middle Age: A Personal History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.

    2015-01-01

    The 40-year history of meta-analysis is traced from the vantage point of one of its originators. Research syntheses leading to the first examples of meta-analysis are identified. Early meta-analyses of the literature on psychotherapy outcomes and school class size are recounted. The influence on the development of meta-analysis of several…

  10. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Bonilla, Carolina; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bacelis, Jonas; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Tiesler, Carla M T; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ring, Susan; Vissing, Nadja H; Fink, Nadia R; Jugessur, Astanand; Mentch, Frank D; Ballester, Ferran; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Wolsk, Helene M; Llop, Sabrina; Thiering, Elisabeth; Beth, Systke A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Andersen, Josefine; Schulz, Holger; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Evans, David M; Waage, Johannes; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A; Jacobsson, Bo; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Davey Smith, George; Moll, Henriette A; Heinrich, Joachim; Estivill, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-09-15

    More than a million childhood diarrhoeal episodes occur worldwide each year, and in developed countries a considerable part of them are caused by viral infections. In this study, we aimed to search for genetic variants associated with diarrhoeal disease in young children by meta-analyzing genome-wide association studies, and to elucidate plausible biological mechanisms. The study was conducted in the context of the Early Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium. Data about diarrhoeal disease in two time windows (around 1 year of age and around 2 years of age) was obtained via parental questionnaires, doctor interviews or medical records. Standard quality control and statistical tests were applied to the 1000 Genomes imputed genotypic data. The meta-analysis (N = 5758) followed by replication (N = 3784) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8111874 and diarrhoea at age 1 year. Conditional analysis suggested that the causal variant could be rs601338 (W154X) in the FUT2 gene. Children with the A allele, which results in a truncated FUT2 protein, had lower risk of diarrhoea. FUT2 participates in the production of histo-blood group antigens and has previously been implicated in the susceptibility to infections, including Rotavirus and Norovirus Gene-set enrichment analysis suggested pathways related to the histo-blood group antigen production, and the regulation of ion transport and blood pressure. Among others, the gastrointestinal tract, and the immune and neuro-secretory systems were detected as relevant organs. In summary, this genome-wide association meta-analysis suggests the implication of the FUT2 gene in diarrhoeal disease in young children from the general population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Bonilla, Carolina; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Tiesler, Carla M.T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ring, Susan; Vissing, Nadja H.; Fink, Nadia R.; Jugessur, Astanand; Mentch, Frank D.; Ballester, Ferran; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Wolsk, Helene M.; Llop, Sabrina; Thiering, Elisabeth; Beth, Systke A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Andersen, Josefine; Schulz, Holger; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Evans, David M.; Waage, Johannes; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.; Jacobsson, Bo; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Davey Smith, George; Moll, Henriette A.; Heinrich, Joachim; Estivill, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    More than a million childhood diarrhoeal episodes occur worldwide each year, and in developed countries a considerable part of them are caused by viral infections. In this study, we aimed to search for genetic variants associated with diarrhoeal disease in young children by meta-analyzing genome-wide association studies, and to elucidate plausible biological mechanisms. The study was conducted in the context of the Early Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium. Data about diarrhoeal disease in two time windows (around 1 year of age and around 2 years of age) was obtained via parental questionnaires, doctor interviews or medical records. Standard quality control and statistical tests were applied to the 1000 Genomes imputed genotypic data. The meta-analysis (N = 5758) followed by replication (N = 3784) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8111874 and diarrhoea at age 1 year. Conditional analysis suggested that the causal variant could be rs601338 (W154X) in the FUT2 gene. Children with the A allele, which results in a truncated FUT2 protein, had lower risk of diarrhoea. FUT2 participates in the production of histo-blood group antigens and has previously been implicated in the susceptibility to infections, including Rotavirus and Norovirus. Gene-set enrichment analysis suggested pathways related to the histo-blood group antigen production, and the regulation of ion transport and blood pressure. Among others, the gastrointestinal tract, and the immune and neuro-secretory systems were detected as relevant organs. In summary, this genome-wide association meta-analysis suggests the implication of the FUT2 gene in diarrhoeal disease in young children from the general population. PMID:27559109

  12. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS) across populations

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby H; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-01-01

    In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA). Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6–7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS). Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin) at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p < 0.0001 for 160–167 cM, including D1), chromosome 3 (p-value < 0.0000001 for 287–294 cM, including D2), chromosome 5 (p-value < 0.001 for 0–7 cM, including D3), and chromosome 9 (p-value < 0.05 for 7–14 cM, the region adjacent to D4). This GSMA analysis approach demonstrates the power of linkage meta-analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. The MRMS method enhances this powerful tool to focus on more localized regions of linkage. PMID:16451653

  13. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS) across populations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby H; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-12-30

    In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA). Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6-7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS). Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin) at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p < 0.0001 for 160-167 cM, including D1), chromosome 3 (p-value < 0.0000001 for 287-294 cM, including D2), chromosome 5 (p-value < 0.001 for 0-7 cM, including D3), and chromosome 9 (p-value < 0.05 for 7-14 cM, the region adjacent to D4). This GSMA analysis approach demonstrates the power of linkage meta-analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. The MRMS method enhances this powerful tool to focus on more localized regions of linkage.

  14. Comprehensive meta-analysis, co-expression, and miRNA nested network analysis identifies gene candidates in citrus against Huanglongbing disease.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Nidhi; Kiran, Sandhya P; Du, Dongliang; Gmitter, Fred G; Deng, Zhanao

    2015-07-28

    Huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus, is associated with infection by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas) and is vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Recently, the molecular basis of citrus-HLB interactions has been examined using transcriptome analyses, and these analyses have identified many probe sets and pathways modulated by CaLas infection among different citrus cultivars. However, lack of consistency among reported findings indicates that an integrative approach is needed. This study was designed to identify the candidate probe sets in citrus-HLB interactions using meta-analysis and gene co-expression network modelling. Twenty-two publically available transcriptome studies on citrus-HLB interactions, comprising 18 susceptible (S) datasets and four resistant (R) datasets, were investigated using Limma and RankProd methods of meta-analysis. A combined list of 7,412 differentially expressed probe sets was generated using a Teradata in-house Structured Query Language (SQL) script. We identified the 65 most common probe sets modulated in HLB disease among different tissues from the S and R datasets. Gene ontology analysis of these probe sets suggested that carbohydrate metabolism, nutrient transport, and biotic stress were the core pathways that were modulated in citrus by CaLas infection and HLB development. We also identified R-specific probe sets, which encoded leucine-rich repeat proteins, chitinase, constitutive disease resistance (CDR), miraculins, and lectins. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was conducted on 3,499 probe sets, and 21 modules with major hub probe sets were identified. Further, a miRNA nested network was created to examine gene regulation of the 3,499 target probe sets. Results suggest that csi-miR167 and csi-miR396 could affect ion transporters and defence response pathways, respectively. Most of the potential candidate hub probe sets were co-expressed with gibberellin pathway (GA

  15. Risk factor screening to identify women requiring oral glucose tolerance testing to diagnose gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis and analysis of two pregnancy cohorts.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Diane; Simmonds, Mark; Bryant, Maria; Lawlor, Debbie A; Dunne, Fidelma; Tuffnell, Derek; Sheldon, Trevor A

    2017-01-01

    Easily identifiable risk factors including: obesity and ethnicity at high risk of diabetes are commonly used to indicate which women should be offered the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to diagnose gestational diabetes (GDM). Evidence regarding these risk factors is limited however. We conducted a systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis and individual participant data (IPD) analysis to evaluate the performance of risk factors in identifying women with GDM. We searched MEDLINE, Medline in Process, Embase, Maternity and Infant Care and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to August 2016 and conducted additional reference checking. We included observational, cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies reporting the performance characteristics of risk factors used to identify women at high risk of GDM. We had access to IPD from the Born in Bradford and Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy cohorts, all pregnant women in the two cohorts with data on risk factors and OGTT results were included. Twenty nine published studies with 211,698 women for the SR and a further 14,103 women from two birth cohorts (Born in Bradford and the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy study) for the IPD analysis were included. Six studies assessed the screening performance of guidelines; six examined combinations of risk factors; eight evaluated the number of risk factors and nine examined prediction models or scores. Meta-analysis using data from published studies suggests that irrespective of the method used, risk factors do not identify women with GDM well. Using IPD and combining risk factors to produce the highest sensitivities, results in low specificities (and so higher false positives). Strategies that use the risk factors of age (>25 or >30) and BMI (>25 or 30) perform as well as other strategies with additional risk factors included. Risk factor screening methods are poor predictors of which pregnant women will be diagnosed with GDM. A simple approach of

  16. Quantitative Secretomic Analysis Identifies Extracellular Protein Factors That Modulate the Metastatic Phenotype of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rongkuan; Huffman, Kenneth E; Chu, Michael; Zhang, Yajie; Minna, John D; Yu, Yonghao

    2016-02-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for men and women in the United States, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) representing 85% of all diagnoses. Late stage detection, metastatic disease and lack of actionable biomarkers contribute to the high mortality rate. Proteins in the extracellular space are known to be critically involved in regulating every stage of the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To investigate the mechanism by which secreted proteins contribute to the pathogenesis of NSCLC, we performed quantitative secretomic analysis of two isogenic NSCLC cell lines (NCI-H1993 and NCI-H2073) and an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (HBEC3-KT) as control. H1993 was derived from a chemo-naïve metastatic tumor, while H2073 was derived from the primary tumor after etoposide/cisplatin therapy. From the conditioned media of these three cell lines, we identified and quantified 2713 proteins, including a series of proteins involved in regulating inflammatory response, programmed cell death and cell motion. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicates that a number of proteins overexpressed in H1993 media are involved in biological processes related to cancer metastasis, including cell motion, cell-cell adhesion and cell migration. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knock down of a number of these proteins, including SULT2B1, CEACAM5, SPRR3, AGR2, S100P, and S100A14, leads to dramatically reduced migration of these cells. In addition, meta-analysis of survival data indicates NSCLC patients whose tumors express higher levels of several of these secreted proteins, including SULT2B1, CEACAM5, SPRR3, S100P, and S100A14, have a worse prognosis. Collectively, our results provide a potential molecular link between deregulated secretome and NSCLC cell migration/metastasis. In addition, the identification of these aberrantly secreted proteins might facilitate the development of biomarkers for early detection of this devastating disease.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gregory T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; Van't Hof, Femke N G; Webb, Thomas R; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Elmore, James R; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Borthwick, Kenneth M; Smelser, Diane T; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J; McCarty, Catherine A; Böttinger, Erwin P; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Crawford, Dana C; Carrell, David S; Gerhard, Glenn S; Franklin, David P; Carey, David J; Phillips, Victoria L; Williams, Michael J A; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A; Vasudevan, Thodor M; Lewis, David R; Thomson, Ian A; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A; Clough, Rachel E; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D Julian A; Futers, T Simon; Romaine, Simon P R; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Matthiasson, Stefan E; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Teijink, Joep A W; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lindholt, Jes S; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E; Powell, Janet T; Humphries, Steve E; Hamby, Stephen E; Goodall, Alison H; Nelson, Christopher P; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D; Johnson, Andrew D; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M; Verhoeven, Eric L; Zeebregts, Clark J; Geelkerken, Robert H; van Sambeek, Marc R; van Sterkenburg, Steven M; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D; Harrison, Seamus C; van Rij, Andre M; Samani, Nilesh J; Bown, Matthew J

    2017-01-20

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available genome-wide association studies. Through a meta-analysis of 6 genome-wide association study data sets and a validation study totaling 10 204 cases and 107 766 controls, we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches, we observed no new associations between the lead AAA single nucleotide polymorphisms and coronary artery disease, blood pressure, lipids, or diabetes mellitus. Network analyses identified ERG, IL6R, and LDLR as modifiers of MMP9, with a direct interaction between ERG and MMP9. The 4 new risk loci for AAA seem to be specific for AAA compared with other cardiovascular diseases and related traits suggesting that traditional cardiovascular risk factor management may only have limited value in preventing the progression of aneurysmal disease. © 2016 The Authors.

  18. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; van‘t Hof, Femke N.G.; Webb, Thomas R.; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Elmore, James R.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L.; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S.; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Borthwick, Kenneth M.; Smelser, Diane T.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Carrell, David S.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Franklin, David P.; Carey, David J.; Phillips, Victoria L.; Williams, Michael J.A.; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A.; Vasudevan, Thodor M.; Lewis, David R.; Thomson, Ian A.; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B.; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R.; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Futers, T. Simon; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Bailey, Marc A.; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A.W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lindholt, Jes S.; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; Powell, Janet T.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Goodall, Alison H.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D.; Harrison, Seamus C.; van Rij, Andre M.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. Objective: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available genome-wide association studies. Methods and Results: Through a meta-analysis of 6 genome-wide association study data sets and a validation study totaling 10 204 cases and 107 766 controls, we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches, we observed no new associations between the lead AAA single nucleotide polymorphisms and coronary artery disease, blood pressure, lipids, or diabetes mellitus. Network analyses identified ERG, IL6R, and LDLR as modifiers of MMP9, with a direct interaction between ERG and MMP9. Conclusions: The 4 new risk loci for AAA seem to be specific for AAA compared with other cardiovascular diseases and related traits suggesting that traditional cardiovascular risk factor management may only have limited value in preventing the progression of aneurysmal disease. PMID:27899403

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in East Asian-ancestry populations identifies four new loci for body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wanqing; Zheng, Wei; Okada, Yukinori; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Li, Huaixing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Xiaobo; He, Jiang; Wu, Ying; He, Meian; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Jun; Guo, Xiuqing; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Delahanty, Ryan; Guo, Xingyi; Kubo, Michiaki; Yamamoto, Ken; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Go, Min Jin; Liu, Jian Jun; Gan, Wei; Chen, Ching-Chu; Gao, Yong; Li, Shengxu; Lee, Nanette R.; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xueya; Song, Huaidong; Yao, Jie; Lee, I-Te; Long, Jirong; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Koichi; Takashima, Naoyuki; Cho, Yoon Shin; Ong, Rick TH; Lu, Ling; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tan, Aihua; Rice, Treva K; Adair, Linda S.; Gui, Lixuan; Allison, Matthew; Lee, Wen-Jane; Cai, Qiuyin; Isomura, Minoru; Umemura, Satoshi; Kim, Young Jin; Seielstad, Mark; Hixson, James; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Isono, Masato; Kim, Bong-Jo; Sim, Xueling; Lu, Wei; Nabika, Toru; Lee, Juyoung; Lim, Wei-Yen; Gao, Yu-Tang; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kang, Dae-Hee; Wong, Tien Yin; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Wu, I-Chien; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Shi, Jiajun; Choi, Bo Youl; Aung, Tin; Hu, Frank; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lim, Wei Yen; Wang, Tzung-Dao; Shin, Min-Ho; Lee, Jeannette; Ji, Bu-Tian; Lee, Young-Hoon; Young, Terri L.; Shin, Dong Hoon; Chun, Byung-Yeol; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hwu, Chii-Min; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Absher, Devin; Yan, Xiaofei; Kim, Eric; Kuo, Jane Z.; Kwon, Soonil; Taylor, Kent D.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Qi, Lu; Zhu, Dingliang; Wu, Tangchun; Mohlke, Karen L.; Gu, Dongfeng; Mo, Zengnan; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Lin, Xu; Miki, Tetsuro; Tai, E. Shyong; Lee, Jong-Young; Kato, Norihiro; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent genetic association studies have identified 55 genetic loci associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI). The vast majority, 51 loci, however, were identified in European-ancestry populations. We conducted a meta-analysis of associations between BMI and ∼2.5 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms among 86 757 individuals of Asian ancestry, followed by in silico and de novo replication among 7488–47 352 additional Asian-ancestry individuals. We identified four novel BMI-associated loci near the KCNQ1 (rs2237892, P = 9.29 × 10−13), ALDH2/MYL2 (rs671, P = 3.40 × 10−11; rs12229654, P = 4.56 × 10−9), ITIH4 (rs2535633, P = 1.77 × 10−10) and NT5C2 (rs11191580, P = 3.83 × 10−8) genes. The association of BMI with rs2237892, rs671 and rs12229654 was significantly stronger among men than among women. Of the 51 BMI-associated loci initially identified in European-ancestry populations, we confirmed eight loci at the genome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10−8) and an additional 14 at P < 1.0 × 10−3 with the same direction of effect as reported previously. Findings from this analysis expand our knowledge of the genetic basis of obesity. PMID:24861553

  20. Key biological processes driving metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer as identified by multi-omics studies.

    PubMed

    Le Large, T Y S; Bijlsma, M F; Kazemier, G; van Laarhoven, H W M; Giovannetti, E; Jimenez, C R

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely aggressive malignancy, characterized by a high metastatic burden, already at the time of diagnosis. The metastatic potential of PDAC is one of the main reasons for the poor outcome next to lack of significant improvement in effective treatments in the last decade. Key mutated driver genes, such as activating KRAS mutations, are concordantly expressed in primary and metastatic tumors. However, the biology behind the metastatic potential of PDAC is not fully understood. Recently, large-scale omic approaches have revealed new mechanisms by which PDAC cells gain their metastatic potency. In particular, genomic studies have shown that multiple heterogeneous subclones reside in the primary tumor with different metastatic potential. The development of metastases may be correlated to a more mesenchymal transcriptomic subtype. However, for cancer cells to survive in a distant organ, metastatic sites need to be modulated into pre-metastatic niches. Proteomic studies identified the influence of exosomes on the Kuppfer cells in the liver, which could function to prepare this tissue for metastatic colonization. Phosphoproteomics adds an extra layer to the established omic techniques by unravelling key functional signaling. Future studies integrating results from these large-scale omic approaches will hopefully improve PDAC prognosis through identification of new therapeutic targets and patient selection tools. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the biology of PDAC metastasis unravelled by large scale multi-omic approaches. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Individual Patient-Level Meta-Analysis of the Performance of the Decipher Genomic Classifier in High-Risk Men After Prostatectomy to Predict Development of Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Spratt, Daniel E; Yousefi, Kasra; Deheshi, Samineh; Ross, Ashley E; Den, Robert B; Schaeffer, Edward M; Trock, Bruce J; Zhang, Jingbin; Glass, Andrew G; Dicker, Adam P; Abdollah, Firas; Zhao, Shuang G; Lam, Lucia L C; du Plessis, Marguerite; Choeurng, Voleak; Haddad, Zaid; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai; Weinmann, Sheila; Freedland, Stephen J; Klein, Eric A; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Feng, Felix Y

    2017-06-20

    Purpose To perform the first meta-analysis of the performance of the genomic classifier test, Decipher, in men with prostate cancer postprostatectomy. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Decipher genomic resource information database were searched for published reports between 2011 and 2016 of men treated by prostatectomy that assessed the benefit of the Decipher test. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models fit to individual patient data were performed; meta-analyses were conducted by pooling the study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects modeling. Extent of heterogeneity between studies was determined with the I(2) test. Results Five studies (975 total patients, and 855 patients with individual patient-level data) were eligible for analysis, with a median follow-up of 8 years. Of the total cohort, 60.9%, 22.6%, and 16.5% of patients were classified by Decipher as low, intermediate, and high risk, respectively. The 10-year cumulative incidence metastases rates were 5.5%, 15.0%, and 26.7% ( P < .001), respectively, for the three risk classifications. Pooling the study-specific Decipher HRs across the five studies resulted in an HR of 1.52 (95% CI, 1.39 to 1.67; I(2) = 0%) per 0.1 unit. In multivariable analysis of individual patient data, adjusting for clinicopathologic variables, Decipher remained a statistically significant predictor of metastasis (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.47; P < .001) per 0.1 unit. The C-index for 10-year distant metastasis of the clinical model alone was 0.76; this increased to 0.81 with inclusion of Decipher. Conclusion The genomic classifier test, Decipher, can independently improve prognostication of patients postprostatectomy, as well as within nearly all clinicopathologic, demographic, and treatment subgroups. Future study of how to best incorporate genomic testing in clinical decision-making and subsequent treatment recommendations is warranted.

  2. Effect of Application and Intensity of Bevacizumab-based Maintenance After Induction Chemotherapy With Bevacizumab for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stein, Alexander; Schwenke, Carsten; Folprecht, Gunnar; Arnold, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    The administration and intensity of bevacizumab-based maintenance therapy after induction treatment with bevacizumab is still a matter of debate. Thus, the present meta-analysis and an indirect comparison were performed to clarify these issues. Trials evaluating a separately defined "maintenance phase," with randomization after the induction phase, were selected. Three trials of maintenance with bevacizumab with or without a fluoropyrimidine (CAIRO3, SAKK 41/06, and AIO KRK 0207) were analyzed regarding the effect on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of any maintenance therapy compared with observation alone and different maintenance intensities (bevacizumab with or without fluoropyrimidine) compared with observation alone and between each other. Maintenance with bevacizumab with or without fluoropyrimidine after bevacizumab-based induction treatment for 4 to 6 months significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.75; P = .0004) and showed a trend toward prolonged OS (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.78-1.02; P = .09) compared with observation alone. The effect on PFS increased with the intensity of the maintenance regimen (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.60-0.85 for single-agent bevacizumab vs. HR, 0.45; 95%, CI 0.39-0.51 for combination therapy, both compared to observation alone). In contrast, the HRs for OS remained in the same range. A similarly improved PFS (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50-0.79) was shown for the more intensive maintenance therapy (bevacizumab and fluoropyrimidine) compared with bevacizumab alone. Bevacizumab-based maintenance therapy after induction chemotherapy with bevacizumab significantly improves PFS and showed a trend toward prolonged OS and should thus be considered, in particular, in patients with a response to induction treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Reliability of the Tracheoesophageal Groove and the Ligament of Berry as Landmarks for Identifying the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: A Cadaveric Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Beatrice; Graves, Matthew J.; Sanna, Silvia; Vikse, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a comprehensive evidence-based assessment, supplemented by cadaveric dissections, of the value of using the Ligament of Berry and Tracheoesophageal Groove as anatomical landmarks for identifying the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve. Methods. Seven major databases were searched to identify studies for inclusion. Eligibility was judged by two reviewers. Suitable studies were identified and extracted. MetaXL was used for analysis. All pooled prevalence rates were calculated using a random effects model. Heterogeneity among included studies was assessed using the Chi2 test and the I2 statistic. Results. Sixteen studies (n = 2,470 nerves), including original cadaveric data, were analyzed for the BL/RLN relationship. The RLN was most often located superficial to the BL with a pooled prevalence estimate of 78.2% of nerves, followed by deep to the BL in 14.8%. Twenty-three studies (n = 5,970 nerves) examined the RLN/TEG relationship. The RLN was located inside the TEG in 63.7% (95% CI: 55.3–77.7) of sides. Conclusions. Both the BL and TEG are landmarks that can help surgeons provide patients with complication-free procedures. Our analysis showed that the BL is a more consistent anatomical landmark than the TEG, but it is necessary to use both to prevent iatrogenic RLN injuries during thyroidectomies. PMID:28271065

  4. The performance of blood pressure-to-height ratio as a screening measure for identifying children and adolescents with hypertension: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunming; Liu, Yue; Lu, Qiang; Lu, Na; Liu, Xiaoli; Tian, Yiming; Wang, Rui; Yin, Fuzai

    2016-02-01

    The blood pressure-to-height ratio (BPHR) has been shown to be an accurate index for screening hypertension in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to perform a meta-analysis to assess the performance of BPHR for the assessment of hypertension. Electronic and manual searches were performed to identify studies of the BPHR. After methodological quality assessment and data extraction, pooled estimates of the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and summary receiver operating characteristics were assessed systematically. The extent of heterogeneity for it was assessed. Six studies were identified for analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio values of BPHR, for assessment of hypertension, were 96% [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.95-0.97], 90% (95% CI=0.90-0.91), 10.68 (95% CI=8.03-14.21), 0.04 (95% CI=0.03-0.07) and 247.82 (95% CI=114.50-536.34), respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9472. The BPHR had higher diagnostic accuracies for identifying hypertension in children and adolescents.

  5. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; Heijer, Martin den; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Dörr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O’Connell, Jeff; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Campbell, Harry; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Münzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts. Methods and Results Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). Conclusions GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI. PMID:22199011

  6. Gene-centric Meta-analysis in 87,736 Individuals of European Ancestry Identifies Multiple Blood-Pressure-Related Loci

    PubMed Central

    Tragante, Vinicius; Barnes, Michael R.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Wei; Franceschini, Nora; Smith, Erin N.; Johnson, Toby; Holmes, Michael V.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Almoguera, Berta; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C.; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E.; Leach, Irene Mateo; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Melander, Olle; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Pankratz, Nathan; Price, Tom S.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Witkowska, Kate; Wong, Caroline O.L.; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Brown, Morris; Burt, Amber; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Curtis, Sean P.; Davey-Smith, George; Delles, Christian; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiqing, Shen; Hastie, Claire E.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kim, Daniel S.; Kirkland, Susan A.; Klein, Barbara E.; Klein, Ronald; Li, Yun R.; Maiwald, Steffi; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O’Brien, Eoin T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palmas, Walter; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pettinger, Mary; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; M Ridker, Paul; Rose, Lynda M.; Sever, Peter; Shimbo, Daichi; Steele, Laura; Stolk, Ronald P.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J. Hunter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chasman, Daniel I.; Davidson, Karina W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Gums, John G.; Fornage, Myriam; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halder, Indrani; Hillege, Hans L.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kumari, Meena; März, Winfried; Murray, Sarah S.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Pankow, James S.; Rader, Daniel J.; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Snieder, Harold; Snyder, Michael; Stanton, Alice V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Watkins, Hugh; Johnson, Andrew D.; Reiner, Alex P.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Levy, Daniel; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10−7) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification. PMID:24560520

  7. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zillikens, M Carola; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Mägi, Reedik; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; White, Charles C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Harris, Tamara B; Berndt, Sonja I; Ingelsson, Erik; Willer, Cristen J; Weedon, Michael N; Luan, Jian'an; Vedantam, Sailaja; Esko, Tõnu; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kutalik, Zoltán; Li, Shengxu; Monda, Keri L; Dixon, Anna L; Holmes, Christopher C; Kaplan, Lee M; Liang, Liming; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Molony, Cliona; Nicholson, George; Schadt, Eric E; Zondervan, Krina T; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Lango Allen, Hana; Weyant, Robert J; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Estrada, Karol; Goddard, Michael E; Lettre, Guillaume; Mangino, Massimo; Nyholt, Dale R; Purcell, Shaun; Smith, Albert Vernon; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; McCarroll, Steven A; Nemesh, James; Voight, Benjamin F; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Coin, Lachlan; Glazer, Nicole L; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kapur, Karen; Ketkar, Shamika; Knowles, Joshua W; Kraft, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Lamina, Claudia; Leitzmann, Michael F; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Rayner, Nigel W; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sanna, Serena; Sovio, Ulla; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; van Wingerden, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Zhao, Jing Hua; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chines, Peter S; Fisher, Eva; Kulzer, Jennifer R; Lecoeur, Cecile; Narisu, Narisu; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Silander, Kaisa; Stark, Klaus; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Teslovich, Tanya M; Timpson, Nicholas John; Watanabe, Richard M; Welch, Ryan; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Kettunen, Johannes; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Alavere, Helene; Almgren, Peter; Atwood, Larry D; Bennett, Amanda J; Biffar, Reiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Buchanan, Thomas A; Campbell, Harry; Day, Ian N M; Dei, Mariano; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Geus, Eco J C; Gjesing, Anette P; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Havulinna, Aki S; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kinnunen, Leena; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lathrop, G Mark; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; Morken, Mario A; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Peden, John F; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Teder-Laving, Maris; Thomson, Brian; Usala, Gianluca; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Volpato, Claudia B; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Viikari, Jorma; Balkau, Beverley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Boeing, Heiner; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hveem, Kristian; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Midthjell, Kristian; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Arnold, Alice M; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kao, W H Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Launer, Lenore J; Munroe, Patricia B; Oostra, Ben; Penninx, Brenda W; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Wright, Alan F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; North, Kari E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Assimes, Themistocles L; Wichmann, H-Erich; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Cupples, L Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; Fox, Caroline S; Mohlke, Karen L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2010-11-01

    Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10⁻⁹ to P = 1.8 × 10⁻⁴⁰) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10⁻³ to P = 1.2 × 10⁻¹³). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Seow, Wei Jie; Shiraishi, Kouya; Hsiung, Chao A.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Liu, Jie; Chen, Kexin; Yamji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Chang, I-Shou; Wu, Chen; Hong, Yun-Chul; Burdett, Laurie; Wyatt, Kathleen; Chung, Charles C.; Li, Shengchao A.; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria T.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Song, Minsun; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ashikawa, Kyota; Momozawa, Yukihide; Daigo, Yataro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Guan, Peng; Chang, Jiang; Tan, Wen; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Gee-Chen; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Zheng, Hong; Li, Haixin; Cui, Ping; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sung, Jae Sook; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Young Tae; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Hee Nam; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Sung, Sook Whan; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Seow, Adeline; Chen, Ying; Lim, Wei-Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Maria Pik; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Bassig, Bryan A.; Tucker, Margaret; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Wang, Junwen; Xu, Jun; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Ho, James C.M.; Chan, John K.C.; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Lu, Daru; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Wei, Fusheng; Wu, Guoping; An, She-Juan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Su, Jian; Wu, Yi-Long; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; He, Xingzhou; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Klein, Robert; Pao, William; Lawrence, Charles; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Yao-Jen; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Chien-Chung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin; Zhou, Baosen; Yu, Jinming; Shen, Hongbing; Kubo, Michiaki; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10−13), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10−10) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10−9). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings. PMID:26732429

  10. Integrative transcriptomic meta-analysis of Parkinson’s disease and depression identifies NAMPT as a potential blood biomarker for de novo Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Jose A.; Littlefield, Alyssa M.; Potashkin, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging research indicates that depression could be one of the earliest prodromal symptoms or risk factors associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, but the mechanisms underlying the association between both diseases remains unknown. Understanding the molecular networks linking these diseases could facilitate the discovery of novel diagnostic and therapeutics. Transcriptomic meta-analysis and network analysis of blood microarrays from untreated patients with PD and depression identified genes enriched in pathways related to the immune system, metabolism of lipids, glucose, fatty acids, nicotinamide, lysosome, insulin signaling and type 1 diabetes. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an adipokine that plays a role in lipid and glucose metabolism, was identified as the most significant dysregulated gene. Relative abundance of NAMPT was upregulated in blood of 99 early stage and drug-naïve PD patients compared to 101 healthy controls (HC) nested in the cross-sectional Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). Thus, here we demonstrate that shared molecular networks between PD and depression provide an additional source of biologically relevant biomarkers. Evaluation of NAMPT in a larger prospective longitudinal study including samples from other neurodegenerative diseases, and patients at risk of PD is warranted. PMID:27680512

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Seow, Wei Jie; Shiraishi, Kouya; Hsiung, Chao A; Matsuo, Keitaro; Liu, Jie; Chen, Kexin; Yamji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Chang, I-Shou; Wu, Chen; Hong, Yun-Chul; Burdett, Laurie; Wyatt, Kathleen; Chung, Charles C; Li, Shengchao A; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria T; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Song, Minsun; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ashikawa, Kyota; Momozawa, Yukihide; Daigo, Yataro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Guan, Peng; Chang, Jiang; Tan, Wen; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Gee-Chen; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Zheng, Hong; Li, Haixin; Cui, Ping; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sung, Jae Sook; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Young Tae; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Hee Nam; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Sung, Sook Whan; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Seow, Adeline; Chen, Ying; Lim, Wei-Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Maria Pik; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Berndt, Sonja I; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Wang, Junwen; Xu, Jun; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Ho, James C M; Chan, John K C; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Lu, Daru; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Wei, Fusheng; Wu, Guoping; An, She-Juan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Su, Jian; Wu, Yi-Long; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; He, Xingzhou; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Klein, Robert; Pao, William; Lawrence, Charles; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Yao-Jen; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Chien-Chung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin; Zhou, Baosen; Yu, Jinming; Shen, Hongbing; Kubo, Michiaki; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10(-13)), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10(-10)) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10(-9)). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings.

  12. Gene-centric meta-analysis in 87,736 individuals of European ancestry identifies multiple blood-pressure-related loci.

    PubMed

    Tragante, Vinicius; Barnes, Michael R; Ganesh, Santhi K; Lanktree, Matthew B; Guo, Wei; Franceschini, Nora; Smith, Erin N; Johnson, Toby; Holmes, Michael V; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Karczewski, Konrad J; Almoguera, Berta; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E; Gaunt, Tom R; Gho, Johannes M I H; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E; Mateo Leach, Irene; McDonough, Caitrin W; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Melander, Olle; Nelson, Christopher P; Nolte, Ilja M; Pankratz, Nathan; Price, Tom S; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Most, Peter J; Van Iperen, Erik P A; Vonk, Judith M; Witkowska, Kate; Wong, Caroline O L; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L; Berenson, Gerald S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Brown, Morris; Burt, Amber; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Connell, John M; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Curtis, Sean P; Davey-Smith, George; Delles, Christian; Gansevoort, Ron T; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiqing, Shen; Hastie, Claire E; Hofker, Marten H; Hovingh, G Kees; Kim, Daniel S; Kirkland, Susan A; Klein, Barbara E; Klein, Ronald; Li, Yun R; Maiwald, Steffi; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Brien, Eoin T; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Palmas, Walter; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W; Pettinger, Mary; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ranchalis, Jane E; M Ridker, Paul; Rose, Lynda M; Sever, Peter; Shimbo, Daichi; Steele, Laura; Stolk, Ronald P; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Verschuren, W Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J Hunter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bezzina, Connie R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chasman, Daniel I; Davidson, Karina W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dominiczak, Anna F; FitzGerald, Garret A; Gums, John G; Fornage, Myriam; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halder, Indrani; Hillege, Hans L; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kumari, Meena; März, Winfried; Murray, Sarah S; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pankow, James S; Rader, Daniel J; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach P; Schadt, Eric E; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Snieder, Harold; Snyder, Michael; Stanton, Alice V; Tobin, Martin D; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Samani, Nilesh J; Watkins, Hugh; Johnson, Andrew D; Reiner, Alex P; Zhu, Xiaofeng; de Bakker, Paul I W; Levy, Daniel; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Munroe, Patricia B; Keating, Brendan J

    2014-03-06

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ~50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10(-7)) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M.; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G.; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L.; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F.; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H.; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H.; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A.; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W.; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta analysis of Parkinson’s disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as genome-wide significant; these and six additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 novel loci. Conditional analyses within loci show four loci including GBA, GAK/DGKQ, SNCA, and HLA contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson disease across 24 loci. While the effect of each individual locus is small, a risk profile analysis revealed a substantial cummulative risk in a comparison highest versus lowest quintiles of genetic risk (OR=3.31, 95% CI: 2.55, 4.30; p-value = 2×10−16). We also show 6 risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation. PMID:25064009

  14. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Berndt, Sonja I.; Benlloch, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Thun, Michael J.; Gaziano, Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Siddiq, Afshan; Travis, Ruth C.; Cox, David G.; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B.; Schleutker, Johanna; Auvinen, Anssi; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Weischer, Maren; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Sorensen, Karina D.; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, Robert A.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Dörk, Thilo; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M.; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Kaneva, Radka; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Park, Jong Y.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Saunders, Edward; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; Govindasami, Koveela; O'Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Hall, Amanda L.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas; Virtamo, Jarmo; Le Marchand, Loic; Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Yeager, Meredith; Cox, Angela; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; Aly, Markus; Isaacs, William; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Wahlfors, Tiina; Taari, Kimmo; Kujala, Paula; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Røder, M. Andreas; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Bojesen, Stig E.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Rinckleb, Antje; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Marthick, James R.; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Spurdle, Amanda; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Joana; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A.; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Chanock, Stephen; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS including 5953 cases of aggressive PrCa and 11 463 controls (men without PrCa). We computed association tests for approximately 2.6 million SNPs and followed up the most significant SNPs by genotyping 49 121 samples in 29 studies through the international PRACTICAL and BPC3 consortia. We not only confirmed the association of a PrCa susceptibility locus, rs11672691 on chromosome 19, but also showed an association with aggressive PrCa [odds ratio = 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.21), P = 1.4 × 10−8]. This report describes a genetic variant which is associated with aggressive PrCa, which is a type of PrCa associated with a poorer prognosis. PMID:23065704

  15. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zillikens, M Carola; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Mägi, Reedik; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; White, Charles C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Harris, Tamara B; Berndt, Sonja I; Ingelsson, Erik; Willer, Cristen J; Weedon, Michael N; Luan, Jian’An; Vedantam, Sailaja; Esko, Tõnu; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kutalik, Zoltán; Li, Shengxu; Monda, Keri L; Dixon, Anna L; Holmes, Christopher C; Kaplan, Lee M; Liang, Liming; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Molony, Cliona; Nicholson, George; Schadt, Eric E; Zondervan, Krina T; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Allen, Hana Lango; Weyant, Robert J; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Estrada, Karol; Goddard, Michael E; Lettre, Guillaume; Mangino, Massimo; Nyholt, Dale R; Purcell, Shaun; Smith, Albert Vernon; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; McCarroll, Steven A; Nemesh, James; Voight, Benjamin F; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Coin, Lachlan; Glazer, Nicole L; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kapur, Karen; Ketkar, Shamika; Knowles, Joshua W; Kraft, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Lamina, Claudia; Leitzmann, Michael F; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Rayner, Nigel W; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sanna, Serena; Sovio, Ulla; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; van Wingerden, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Zhao, Jing Hua; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chines, Peter S; Fisher, Eva; Kulzer, Jennifer R; Lecoeur, Cecile; Narisu, Narisu; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Silander, Kaisa; Stark, Klaus; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Teslovich, Tanya M; Timpson, Nicholas John; Watanabe, Richard M; Welch, Ryan; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Kettunen, Johannes; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Alavere, Helene; Almgren, Peter; Atwood, Larry D; Bennett, Amanda J; Biffar, Reiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Buchanan, Thomas A; Campbell, Harry; Day, Ian N M; Dei, Mariano; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Geus, Eco J C; Gjesing, Anette P; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Havulinna, Aki S; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kinnunen, Leena; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lathrop, G Mark; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; Morken, Mario A; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Peden, John F; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Teder-Laving, Maris; Thomson, Brian; Usala, Gianluca; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Volpato, Claudia B; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Viikari, Jorma; Balkau, Beverley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Boeing, Heiner; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hveem, Kristian; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Midthjell, Kristian; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Arnold, Alice M; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kao, W H Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Launer, Lenore J; Munroe, Patricia B; Oostra, Ben; Penninx, Brenda W; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Wright, Alan F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; North, Kari E; O’connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Assimes, Themistocles L; Wichmann, H-Erich; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Cupples, L Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; Fox, Caroline S; Mohlke, Karen L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2011-01-01

    Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10−9 to P = 1.8 × 10−40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10−3 to P = 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions. PMID:20935629

  16. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tianle; de Bakker, Paul I W; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Chia-Jen; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbaek, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2008-05-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to identify variants with modest effects, we carried out meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans comprising 10,128 individuals of European descent and approximately 2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed), followed by replication testing in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. We detected at least six previously unknown loci with robust evidence for association, including the JAZF1 (P = 5.0 x 10(-14)), CDC123-CAMK1D (P = 1.2 x 10(-10)), TSPAN8-LGR5 (P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), THADA (P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), ADAMTS9 (P = 1.2 x 10(-8)) and NOTCH2 (P = 4.1 x 10(-8)) gene regions. Our results illustrate the value of large discovery and follow-up samples for gaining further insights into the inherited basis of T2D.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Celiac Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis Identifies Fourteen Non-HLA Shared Loci

    PubMed Central

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli A.; Trynka, Gosia; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Festen, Eleanora A.; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Thomson, Brian; Gupta, Namrata; Romanos, Jihane; McManus, Ross; Ryan, Anthony W.; Turner, Graham; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Tucci, Francesca; Toes, Rene; Grandone, Elvira; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Rybak, Anna; Cukrowska, Bozena; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Li, Yonghong; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Klareskog, Lars; Huizinga, Tom W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for each disease) are shared between both diseases. We hypothesized that there are additional shared risk alleles and that combining genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from each disease would increase power to identify these shared risk alleles. We performed a meta-analysis of two published GWAS on CD (4,533 cases and 10,750 controls) and RA (5,539 cases and 17,231 controls). After genotyping the top associated SNPs in 2,169 CD cases and 2,255 controls, and 2,845 RA cases and 4,944 controls, 8 additional SNPs demonstrated P<5×10−8 in a combined analysis of all 50,266 samples, including four SNPs that have not been previously confirmed in either disease: rs10892279 near the DDX6 gene (Pcombined = 1.2×10−12), rs864537 near CD247 (Pcombined = 2.2×10−11), rs2298428 near UBE2L3 (Pcombined = 2.5×10−10), and rs11203203 near UBASH3A (Pcombined = 1.1×10−8). We also confirmed that 4 gene loci previously established in either CD or RA are associated with the other autoimmune disease at combined P<5×10−8 (SH2B3, 8q24, STAT4, and TRAF1-C5). From the 14 shared gene loci, 7 SNPs showed a genome-wide significant effect on expression of one or more transcripts in the linkage disequilibrium (LD) block around the SNP. These associations implicate antigen presentation and T-cell activation as a shared mechanism of disease pathogenesis and underscore the utility of cross-disease meta-analysis for identification of genetic risk factors with pleiotropic effects between two clinically distinct diseases. PMID:21383967

  18. Can Falls Risk Prediction Tools Correctly Identify Fall-Prone Elderly Rehabilitation Inpatients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Bruno Roza; Rutjes, Anne Wilhelmina Saskia; Mendy, Angelico; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie; Vieira, Edgar Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Background Falls of elderly people may cause permanent disability or death. Particularly susceptible are elderly patients in rehabilitation hospitals. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify falls prediction tools available for assessing elderly inpatients in rehabilitation hospitals. Methods and Findings We searched six electronic databases using comprehensive search strategies developed for each database. Estimates of sensitivity and specificity were plotted in ROC space graphs and pooled across studies. Our search identified three studies which assessed the prediction properties of falls prediction tools in a total of 754 elderly inpatients in rehabilitation hospitals. Only the STRATIFY tool was assessed in all three studies; the other identified tools (PJC-FRAT and DOWNTON) were assessed by a single study. For a STRATIFY cut-score of two, pooled sensitivity was 73% (95%CI 63 to 81%) and pooled specificity was 42% (95%CI 34 to 51%). An indirect comparison of the tools across studies indicated that the DOWNTON tool has the highest sensitivity (92%), while the PJC-FRAT offers the best balance between sensitivity and specificity (73% and 75%, respectively). All studies presented major methodological limitations. Conclusions We did not identify any tool which had an optimal balance between sensitivity and specificity, or which were clearly better than a simple clinical judgment of risk of falling. The limited number of identified studies with major methodological limitations impairs sound conclusions on the usefulness of falls risk prediction tools in geriatric rehabilitation hospitals. PMID:22815914

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson LS; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances MK; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We tested the top-associated BMD markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 cases and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 novel)associated with BMD atgenome-wide significant level (P<5×10−8). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal-stem-cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and the Wnt signalling pathways. However, we also discovered loci containing genes not known to play a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD loci were also associated with fracture risk (P<5×10−4, Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P<5×10−8 including: 18p11.21 (C18orf19), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. PMID:22504420

  20. Genome-wide association meta-analysis in Chinese and European individuals identifies ten new loci associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Fei; Zhu, Zhengwei; Tombleson, Philip; Chen, Lingyan; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S; Bentham, James; Roberts, Amy L; Chen, Ruoyan; Zuo, Xianbo; Wang, Tingyou; Wen, Leilei; Yang, Chao; Liu, Lu; Yang, Lulu; Li, Feng; Huang, Yuanbo; Yin, Xianyong; Yang, Sen; Rönnblom, Lars; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Voll, Reinhard E; Schett, Georg; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Gaffney, Patrick M; Lau, Yu Lung; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Wanling; Cui, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 1 152700) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 50 loci as robustly associated with the disease in single ancestries, but genome-wide transancestral studies have not been conducted. We combined three GWAS data sets from Chinese (1,659 cases and 3,398 controls) and European (4,036 cases and 6,959 controls) populations. A meta-analysis of these studies showed that over half of the published SLE genetic associations are present in both populations. A replication study in Chinese (3,043 cases and 5,074 controls) and European (2,643 cases and 9,032 controls) subjects found ten previously unreported SLE loci. Our study provides further evidence that the majority of genetic risk polymorphisms for SLE are contained within the same regions across both populations. Furthermore, a comparison of risk allele frequencies and genetic risk scores suggested that the increased prevalence of SLE in non-Europeans (including Asians) has a genetic basis. PMID:27399966

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson L S; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances M K; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-04-15

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most widely used predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and east Asian ancestry. We tested the top BMD-associated markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for association with risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 individuals with a history of fracture (cases) and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 new) associated with BMD at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and Wnt signaling pathways. However, we also discovered loci that were localized to genes not known to have a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD-associated loci were also associated with fracture risk (P < 5 × 10(-4), Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P < 5 × 10(-8), including at 18p11.21 (FAM210A), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility.

  2. The accuracy of pain drawing in identifying psychological distress in low back pain—systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic studies

    PubMed Central

    Bertozzi, Lucia; Rosso, Anna; Romeo, Antonio; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Guccione, Andrew A.; Pillastrini, Paolo; Vanti, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the accuracy of qualitative pain drawings (PDs) in identifying psychological distress in subacute and chronic low back pain (LBP) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Data were obtained from searches of PubMed, EBSCO, Scopus, PsycINFO and ISI Web of Science from their inception to July 2014. Quality assessments of bias and applicability were conducted using the Quality of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2). [Results] The summary estimates were: sensitivity=0.45 (95% CI 0.34, 0.61), specificity=0.66 (95% CI 0.53, 0.82), positive likelihood ratio=1.23 (95% CI 0.93, 1.62), negative likelihood ratio=0.84 (95% CI 0.70, 1.01), and diagnostic odds ratio=1.46 (95% CI 0.79, 2.68). The area under the curve was 78% (CI, 57 to 99%). [Conclusion] The results of this systematic review do not show broad and unqualified support for the accuracy of PDs in detecting psychological distress in subacute and chronic LBP. PMID:26644701

  3. Comprehensive Meta-analysis of Ontology Annotated 16S rRNA Profiles Identifies Beta Diversity Clusters of Environmental Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Henschel, Andreas; Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Manohar, Vimitha

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive mapping of environmental microbiomes in terms of their compositional features remains a great challenge in understanding the microbial biosphere of the Earth. It bears promise to identify the driving forces behind the observed community patterns and whether community assembly happens deterministically. Advances in Next Generation Sequencing allow large community profiling studies, exceeding sequencing data output of conventional methods in scale by orders of magnitude. However, appropriate collection systems are still in a nascent state. We here present a database of 20,427 diverse environmental 16S rRNA profiles from 2,426 independent studies, which forms the foundation of our meta-analysis. We conducted a sample size adaptive all-against-all beta diversity comparison while also respecting phylogenetic relationships of Operational Taxonomic Units(OTUs). After conventional hierarchical clustering we systematically test for enrichment of Environmental Ontology terms and their abstractions in all possible clusters. This post-hoc algorithm provides a novel formalism that quantifies to what extend compositional and semantic similarity of microbial community samples coincide. We automatically visualize significantly enriched subclusters on a comprehensive dendrogram of microbial communities. As a result we obtain the hitherto most differentiated and comprehensive view on global patterns of microbial community diversity. We observe strong clusterability of microbial communities in ecosystems such as human/mammal-associated, geothermal, fresh water, plant-associated, soils and rhizosphere microbiomes, whereas hypersaline and anthropogenic samples are less homogeneous. Moreover, saline samples appear less cohesive in terms of compositional properties than previously reported. PMID:26458130

  4. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Risk Factors for Stroke in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Carty, Cara L; Keene, Keith L; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C; Kittner, Steven J; Rich, Stephen S; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Langefeld, Carl D; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, Yongmei; Sale, Michèle M; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, W T; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African Americans, despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14 746 African Americans (1365 ischemic and 1592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested genetic variants with P<10(-6) for validation in METASTROKE, a consortium of ischemic stroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613; P=3.9×10(-8)) in African Americans. Nominal associations (P<10(-6)) for total or ischemic stroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/mRNA presplicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, and IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (P<0.05) with stroke in COMPASS. We identified a novel genetic variant associated with total stroke in African Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The (non)comparability of the correlation effect size across different measurement procedures: a challenge to meta-analysis as a tool for identifying "evidence based practices".

    PubMed

    Nugent, William R

    2011-05-01

    Meta-analysis is becoming a principal tool for research synthesis and for the identification and justification of evidence based practices. A fundamental assumption in meta-analysis is that effect sizes based upon different measures are comparable. Recent work has challenged this assumption in the case of the standardized mean difference. In this article it is shown that population universe (true) score level correlation effect sizes, for the relationship between two constructs A and B, based upon different measures will be comparable only if construct validity invariance holds across the measures used to make inferences to A and the measures used to make inferences to B. The results of a simulation study are also reported which show that the results of a meta-analysis may be significantly and adversely affected by violations of construct validity invariance. Finally, it is concluded that the theoretical results obtained in this article, and the results of the simulation study, combine to suggest that the role of meta-analysis in the synthesis of social work research, and in the identification of evidence based practices, be de-emphasized until important questions about the sensitivity of meta-analysis to violations of construct validity invariance are answered.

  6. Large-scale meta-analysis of cancer microarray data identifies common transcriptional profiles of neoplastic transformation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Daniel R.; Yu, Jianjun; Shanker, K.; Deshpande, Nandan; Varambally, Radhika; Ghosh, Debashis; Barrette, Terrence; Pandey, Akhilesh; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have used DNA microarrays to identify the gene expression signatures of human cancer, yet the critical features of these often unmanageably large signatures remain elusive. To address this, we developed a statistical method, comparative metaprofiling, which identifies and assesses the intersection of multiple gene expression signatures from a diverse collection of microarray data sets. We collected and analyzed 40 published cancer microarray data sets, comprising 38 million gene expression measurements from >3,700 cancer samples. From this, we characterized a common transcriptional profile that is universally activated in most cancer types relative to the normal tissues from which they arose, likely reflecting essential transcriptional features of neoplastic transformation. In addition, we characterized a transcriptional profile that is commonly activated in various types of undifferentiated cancer, suggesting common molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells progress and avoid differentiation. Finally, we validated these transcriptional profiles on independent data sets. PMID:15184677

  7. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F; Justice, Anne E; Monda, Keri L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J; Winkler, Thomas W; Wood, Andrew R; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L; Neale, Benjamin M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; König, Inke R; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P; Balmforth, Anthony J; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Cookson, William O; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Heath, Andrew C; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B; Hunt, Sarah E; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A; Magnusson, Patrik K; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Munroe, Patricia B; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Sanders, Alan R; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J; Theodoraki, Eirini V; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vermeulen, Sita H; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F; Martin, Nicholas G; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D; Nieminen, Markku S; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ouwehand, Willem H; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam F; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Visscher, Peter M; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Loos, Ruth J F; Ingelsson, Erik

    2013-05-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.

  8. A large-scale genome-wide association and meta-analysis identified four novel susceptibility loci for leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Sun, Yonghu; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Gongqi; Wang, Chuan; Bao, Fangfang; Yue, Zhenhua; Li, Jianke; Sun, Lele; Irwanto, Astrid; Yu, Yongxiang; Chen, Mingfei; Mi, Zihao; Wang, Honglei; Huai, Pengcheng; Li, Yi; Du, Tiantian; Yu, Wenjun; Xia, Yang; Xiao, Hailu; You, Jiabao; Li, Jinghui; Yang, Qing; Wang, Na; Shang, Panpan; Niu, Guiye; Chi, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiuhuan; Cao, Jing; Cheng, Xiujun; Liu, Hong; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy, a chronic infectious disease, results from the uncultivable pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), and usually progresses to peripheral neuropathy and permanent progressive deformity if not treated. Previously published genetic studies have identified 18 gene/loci significantly associated with leprosy at the genome-wide significant level. However as a complex disease, only a small proportion of leprosy risk could be explained by those gene/loci. To further identify more susceptibility gene/loci, we hereby performed a three-stage GWAS comprising 8,156 leprosy patients and 15,610 controls of Chinese ancestry. Four novel loci were identified including rs6807915 on 3p25.2 (P=1.94 × 10−8, OR=0.89), rs4720118 on 7p14.3 (P=3.85 × 10−10, OR=1.16), rs55894533 on 8p23.1 (P=5.07 × 10−11, OR=1.15) and rs10100465 on 8q24.11 (P=2.85 × 10−11, OR=0.85). Altogether, these findings have provided new insight and significantly expanded our understanding of the genetic basis of leprosy. PMID:27976721

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies genetic risk factors for stroke in African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Cara L.; Keene, Keith L.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F.; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C.; Kittner, Steven J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H.; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, YongMei; Sale, Michèle M.; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, WT; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B.; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African-Americans despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population genome-wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Methods Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14,746 African-Americans (1,365 ischemic and 1,592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested SNPs with P<10−6 for validation in METASTROKE, a consortium of ischemic stroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. Results The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613, P=3.9×10−8) in African-Americans. Nominal associations (P<10−6) for total or ischemic stroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/ mRNA pre-splicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (P<0.05) with stroke in COMPASS. Conclusions We identified a novel SNP associated with total stroke in African-Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African-Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. PMID:26089329

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in East Asian-ancestry populations identifies four new loci for body mass index.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wanqing; Zheng, Wei; Okada, Yukinori; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Li, Huaixing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Xiaobo; He, Jiang; Wu, Ying; He, Meian; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Jun; Guo, Xiuqing; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Delahanty, Ryan; Guo, Xingyi; Kubo, Michiaki; Yamamoto, Ken; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Go, Min Jin; Liu, Jian Jun; Gan, Wei; Chen, Ching-Chu; Gao, Yong; Li, Shengxu; Lee, Nanette R; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xueya; Song, Huaidong; Yao, Jie; Lee, I-Te; Long, Jirong; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Koichi; Takashima, Naoyuki; Cho, Yoon Shin; Ong, Rick Th; Lu, Ling; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tan, Aihua; Rice, Treva K; Adair, Linda S; Gui, Lixuan; Allison, Matthew; Lee, Wen-Jane; Cai, Qiuyin; Isomura, Minoru; Umemura, Satoshi; Kim, Young Jin; Seielstad, Mark; Hixson, James; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Isono, Masato; Kim, Bong-Jo; Sim, Xueling; Lu, Wei; Nabika, Toru; Lee, Juyoung; Lim, Wei-Yen; Gao, Yu-Tang; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kang, Dae-Hee; Wong, Tien Yin; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Wu, I-Chien; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Shi, Jiajun; Choi, Bo Youl; Aung, Tin; Hu, Frank; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lim, Wei Yen; Wang, Tzung-Dao; Shin, Min-Ho; Lee, Jeannette; Ji, Bu-Tian; Lee, Young-Hoon; Young, Terri L; Shin, Dong Hoon; Chun, Byung-Yeol; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hwu, Chii-Min; Assimes, Themistocles L; Absher, Devin; Yan, Xiaofei; Kim, Eric; Kuo, Jane Z; Kwon, Soonil; Taylor, Kent D; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Qi, Lu; Zhu, Dingliang; Wu, Tangchun; Mohlke, Karen L; Gu, Dongfeng; Mo, Zengnan; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Lin, Xu; Miki, Tetsuro; Tai, E Shyong; Lee, Jong-Young; Kato, Norihiro; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2014-10-15

    Recent genetic association studies have identified 55 genetic loci associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI). The vast majority, 51 loci, however, were identified in European-ancestry populations. We conducted a meta-analysis of associations between BMI and ∼2.5 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms among 86 757 individuals of Asian ancestry, followed by in silico and de novo replication among 7488-47 352 additional Asian-ancestry individuals. We identified four novel BMI-associated loci near the KCNQ1 (rs2237892, P = 9.29 × 10(-13)), ALDH2/MYL2 (rs671, P = 3.40 × 10(-11); rs12229654, P = 4.56 × 10(-9)), ITIH4 (rs2535633, P = 1.77 × 10(-10)) and NT5C2 (rs11191580, P = 3.83 × 10(-8)) genes. The association of BMI with rs2237892, rs671 and rs12229654 was significantly stronger among men than among women. Of the 51 BMI-associated loci initially identified in European-ancestry populations, we confirmed eight loci at the genome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)) and an additional 14 at P < 1.0 × 10(-3) with the same direction of effect as reported previously. Findings from this analysis expand our knowledge of the genetic basis of obesity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Greene, Casey S; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Gershwin, M Eric; Anderson, Carl A; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F; Sandford, Richard N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2015-09-22

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10(-8)) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine-cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist.

  12. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F.; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Greene, Casey S.; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D.; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C.; Floyd, James A. B.; Morley, Katherine I.; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Schlicht, Erik M; Lammert, Craig; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Chan, Landon L; de Andrade, Mariza; Balschun, Tobias; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Zhang, Jinyi; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Qu, Jia; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer Jr, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Gregersen, Peter K; Almasio, Piero L; Alvaro, Domenico; Andreone, Pietro; Andriulli, Angelo; Barlassina, Cristina; Battezzati, Pier Maria; Benedetti, Antonio; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Bianchi, Ilaria; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Bruno, Savino; Casella, Giovanni; Coco, Barbara; Colli, Agostino; Colombo, Massimo; Colombo, Silvia; Cursaro, Carmela; Crocè, Lory Saveria; Crosignani, Andrea; Donato, Maria Francesca; Elia, Gianfranco; Fabris, Luca; Ferrari, Carlo; Floreani, Annarosa; Foglieni, Barbara; Fontana, Rosanna; Galli, Andrea; Lazzari, Roberta; Macaluso, Fabio; Malinverno, Federica; Marra, Fabio; Marzioni, Marco; Mattalia, Alberto; Montanari, Renzo; Morini, Lorenzo; Morisco, Filomena; Hani S, Mousa; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Niro, Grazia A; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Picciotto, Antonio; Podda, Mauro; Portincasa, Piero; Ronca, Vincenzo; Rosina, Floriano; Rossi, Sonia; Sogno, Ilaria; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Spreafico, Marta; Strazzabosco, Mario; Tarallo, Sonia; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tiribelli, Claudio; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Vinci, Maria; Zuin, Massimo; Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Rahman, Mesbah; Yapp, Tom; Sturgess, Richard; Healey, Christopher; Czajkowski, Marek; Gunasekera, Anton; Gyawali, Pranab; Premchand, Purushothaman; Kapur, Kapil; Marley, Richard; Foster, Graham; Watson, Alan; Dias, Aruna; Subhani, Javaid; Harvey, Rory; McCorry, Roger; Ramanaden, David; Gasem, Jaber; Evans, Richard; Mathialahan, Thiriloganathan; Shorrock, Christopher; Lipscomb, George; Southern, Paul; Tibble, Jeremy; Gorard, David; Palegwala, Altaf; Jones, Susan; Carbone, Marco; Dawwas, Mohamed; Alexander, Graeme; Dolwani, Sunil; Prince, Martin; Foxton, Matthew; Elphick, David; Mitchison, Harriet; Gooding, Ian; Karmo, Mazn; Saksena, Sushma; Mendall, Mike; Patel, Minesh; Ede, Roland; Austin, Andrew; Sayer, Joanna; Hankey, Lorraine; Hovell, Christopher; Fisher, Neil; Carter, Martyn; Koss, Konrad; Piotrowicz, Andrzej; Grimley, Charles; Neal, David; Lim, Guan; Levi, Sass; Ala, Aftab; Broad, Andrea; Saeed, Athar; Wood, Gordon; Brown, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Mark; Gordon, Harriet; Ramage, John; Ridpath, Jo; Ngatchu, Theodore; Grover, Bob; Shaukat, Syed; Shidrawi, Ray; Abouda, George; Ali, Faiz; Rees, Ian; Salam, Imroz; Narain, Mark; Brown, Ashley; Taylor-Robinson, Simon; Williams, Simon; Grellier, Leonie; Banim, Paul; Das, Debashis; Chilton, Andrew; Heneghan, Michael; Curtis, Howard; Gess, Markus; Drake, Ian; Aldersley, Mark; Davies, Mervyn; Jones, Rebecca; McNair, Alastair; Srirajaskanthan, Raj; Pitcher, Maxton; Sen, Sambit; Bird, George; Barnardo, Adrian; Kitchen, Paul; Yoong, Kevin; Chirag, Oza; Sivaramakrishnan, Nurani; MacFaul, George; Jones, David; Shah, Amir; Evans, Chris; Saha, Subrata; Pollock, Katharine; Bramley, Peter; Mukhopadhya, Ashis; Fraser, Andrew; Mills, Peter; Shallcross, Christopher; Campbell, Stewart; Bathgate, Andrew; Shepherd, Alan; Dillon, John; Rushbrook, Simon; Przemioslo, Robert; Macdonald, Christopher; Metcalf, Jane; Shmueli, Udi; Davis, Andrew; Naqvi, Asifabbas; Lee, Tom; Ryder, Stephen D; Collier, Jane; Klass, Howard; Ninkovic, Mary; Cramp, Matthew; Sharer, Nicholas; Aspinall, Richard; Goggin, Patrick; Ghosh, Deb; Douds, Andrew; Hoeroldt, Barbara; Booth, Jonathan; Williams, Earl; Hussaini, Hyder; Stableforth, William; Ayres, Reuben; Thorburn, Douglas; Marshall, Eileen; Burroughs, Andrew; Mann, Steven; Lombard, Martin; Richardson, Paul; Patanwala, Imran; Maltby, Julia; Brookes, Matthew; Mathew, Ray; Vyas, Samir; Singhal, Saket; Gleeson, Dermot; Misra, Sharat; Butterworth, Jeff; George, Keith; Harding, Tim; Douglass, Andrew; Panter, Simon; Shearman, Jeremy; Bray, Gary; Butcher, Graham; Forton, Daniel; Mclindon, John; Cowan, Matthew; Whatley, Gregory; Mandal, Aditya; Gupta, Hemant; Sanghi, Pradeep; Jain, Sanjiv; Pereira, Steve; Prasad, Geeta; Watts, Gill; Wright, Mark; Neuberger, James; Gordon, Fiona; Unitt, Esther; Grant, Allister; Delahooke, Toby; Higham, Andrew; Brind, Alison; Cox, Mark; Ramakrishnan, Subramaniam; King, Alistair; Collins, Carole; Whalley, Simon; Li, Andy; Fraser, Jocelyn; Bell, Andrew; Wong, Voi Shim; Singhal, Amit; Gee, Ian; Ang, Yeng; Ransford, Rupert; Gotto, James; Millson, Charles; Bowles, Jane; Thomas, Caradog; Harrison, Melanie; Galaska, Roman; Kendall, Jennie; Whiteman, Jessica; Lawlor, Caroline; Gray, Catherine; Elliott, Keith; Mulvaney-Jones, Caroline; Hobson, Lucie; Van Duyvenvoorde, Greta; Loftus, Alison; Seward, Katie; Penn, Ruth; Maiden, Jane; Damant, Rose; Hails, Janeane; Cloudsdale, Rebecca; Silvestre, Valeria; Glenn, Sue; Dungca, Eleanor; Wheatley, Natalie; Doyle, Helen; Kent, Melanie; Hamilton, Caroline; Braim, Delyth; Wooldridge, Helen; Abrahams, Rachel; Paton, Alison; Lancaster, Nicola; Gibbins, Andrew; Hogben, Karen; Desousa, Phillipa; Muscariu, Florin; Musselwhite, Janine; McKay, Alexandra; Tan, LaiTing; Foale, Carole; Brighton, Jacqueline; Flahive, Kerry; Nambela, Estelle; Townshend, Paula; Ford, Chris; Holder, Sophie; Palmer, Caroline; Featherstone, James; Nasseri, Mariam; Sadeghian, Joy; Williams, Bronwen; Thomas, Carol; Rolls, Sally-Ann; Hynes, Abigail; Duggan, Claire; Jones, Sarah; Crossey, Mary; Stansfield, Glynis; MacNicol, Carolyn; Wilkins, Joy; Wilhelmsen, Elva; Raymode, Parizade; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Durant, Emma; Bishop, Rebecca; Ncube, Noma; Tripoli, Sherill; Casey, Rebecca; Cowley, Caroline; Miller, Richard; Houghton, Kathryn; Ducker, Samantha; Wright, Fiona; Bird, Bridget; Baxter, Gwen; Keggans, Janie; Hughes, Maggie; Grieve, Emma; Young, Karin; Williams, D; Ocker, Kate; Hines, Frances; Martin, Kirsty; Innes, Caron; Valliani, Talal; Fairlamb, Helen; Thornthwaite, Sarah; Eastick, Anne; Tanqueray, Elizabeth; Morrison, Jennifer; Holbrook, Becky; Browning, Julie; Walker, Kirsten; Congreave, Susan; Verheyden, Juliette; Slininger, Susan; Stafford, Lizzie; O'Donnell, Denise; Ainsworth, Mark; Lord, Susan; Kent, Linda; March, Linda; Dickson, Christine; Simpson, Diane; Longhurst, Beverley; Hayes, Maria; Shpuza, Ervin; White, Nikki; Besley, Sarah; Pearson, Sallyanne; Wright, Alice; Jones, Linda; Gunter, Emma; Dewhurst, Hannah; Fouracres, Anna; Farrington, Liz; Graves, Lyn; Marriott, Suzie; Leoni, Marina; Tyrer, David; Martin, Kate; Dali-kemmery, Lola; Lambourne, Victoria; Green, Marie; Sirdefield, Dawn; Amor, Kelly; Colley, Julie; Shinder, Bal; Jones, Jayne; Mills, Marisa; Carnahan, Mandy; Taylor, Natalie; Boulton, Kerenza; Tregonning, Julie; Brown, Carly; Clifford, Gayle; Archer, Emily; Hamilton, Maria; Curtis, Janette; Shewan, Tracey; Walsh, Sue; Warner, Karen; Netherton, Kimberley; Mupudzi, Mcdonald; Gunson, Bridget; Gitahi, Jane; Gocher, Denise; Batham, Sally; Pateman, Hilary; Desmennu, Senayon; Conder, Jill; Clement, Darren; Gallagher, Susan; Orpe, Jacky; Chan, PuiChing; Currie, Lynn; O'Donohoe, Lynn; Oblak, Metod; Morgan, Lisa; Quinn, Marie; Amey, Isobel; Baird, Yolanda; Cotterill, Donna; Cumlat, Lourdes; Winter, Louise; Greer, Sandra; Spurdle, Katie; Allison, Joanna; Dyer, Simon; Sweeting, Helen; Kordula, Jean; Gershwin, M. Eric; Anderson, Carl A.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F.; Sandford, Richard N.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10−8) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine–cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist. PMID:26394269

  13. Optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy following radiation therapy in intermediate- or high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Frederico; de Figueiredo, Maximiliano Augusto Novis; Sasse, Andre Deeke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To investigate current evidence on the optimal duration of adjuvant hormone deprivation for prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Materials and Methods: A systematic search was performed in electronic databases. Data from randomized trials comparing different durations of hormone blockade was collected for pooled analysis. Overall survival, disease-free survival, disease-specific survival and toxicity were the outcomes of interest. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects model. Results: Six studies met the eligibility criteria. For overall survival, the pooled data from the studies demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for longer hormone deprivation (Hazard Ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.74 – 0.96). A statistically significant benefit was also found for disease-free survival (Hazard Ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.62 – 0.89), and disease-specific survival (Hazard Ratio 0.73; 95% CI 0.62 – 0.85). Studies with longer blockade duration arm demonstrated greater benefit. Toxicity was low, with no increase in cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Longer duration of androgen deprivation combined to radiotherapy prolongs OS, DFS and DSS in patients with intermediate and high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer. However, this evidence is based on trials using older radiation techniques, and further research of combination of androgen deprivation and new RT technologies may be warranted. PMID:26200535

  14. Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies novel variants associated with fasting plasma glucose in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Sim, Xueling; Wu, Ying; Liang, Jun; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hu, Cheng; Hara, Kazuo; Tam, Claudia H T; Cai, Qiuyin; Zhao, Qi; Jee, Sunha; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Go, Min Jin; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kim, Young Jin; Zhang, Rong; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; So, Wing Yee; Long, Jirong; Gu, Dongfeng; Lee, Nanette R; Kim, Soriul; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Oh, Ji Hee; Liu, Jianjun; Umemura, Satoshi; Kim, Yeon-Jung; Jiang, Feng; Maeda, Shiro; Chan, Juliana C N; Lu, Wei; Hixson, James E; Adair, Linda S; Jung, Keum Ji; Nabika, Toru; Bae, Jae-Bum; Lee, Mi Hee; Seielstad, Mark; Young, Terri L; Teo, Yik Ying; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takashima, Naoyuki; Osawa, Haruhiko; Lee, So-Hyun; Shin, Min-Ho; Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Bo Youl; Shi, Jiajun; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Wei; Kato, Norihiro; Yoon, Miwuk; He, Jiang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Ma, Ronald C W; Kadowaki, Takashi; Jia, Weiping; Miki, Tetsuro; Qi, Lu; Tai, E Shyong; Mohlke, Karen L; Han, Bok-Ghee; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Bong-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) has been recognized as an important indicator for the overall glycemic state preceding the onset of metabolic diseases. So far, most indentified genome-wide association loci for FPG were derived from populations with European ancestry, with a few exceptions. To extend a thorough catalog for FPG loci, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 genome-wide association studies in up to 24,740 nondiabetic subjects with East Asian ancestry. Follow-up replication analyses in up to an additional 21,345 participants identified three new FPG loci reaching genome-wide significance in or near PDK1-RAPGEF4, KANK1, and IGF1R. Our results could provide additional insight into the genetic variation implicated in fasting glucose regulation. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C.; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E.; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Approaches exploiting extremes of the trait distribution may reveal novel loci for common traits, but it is unknown whether such loci are generalizable to the general population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with upper vs. lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity including up to 263,407 European individuals, we identified four new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1, PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the tails and seven new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3, ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we show that there is large overlap in terms of genetic structure and distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiologic heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. PMID:23563607

  16. Genome-Wide Association Meta-analysis Identifies Novel Variants Associated With Fasting Plasma Glucose in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Sim, Xueling; Wu, Ying; Liang, Jun; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hu, Cheng; Hara, Kazuo; Tam, Claudia H.T.; Cai, Qiuyin; Zhao, Qi; Jee, Sunha; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Go, Min Jin; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kim, Young Jin; Zhang, Rong; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; So, Wing Yee; Long, Jirong; Gu, Dongfeng; Lee, Nanette R.; Kim, Soriul; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Oh, Ji Hee; Liu, Jianjun; Umemura, Satoshi; Kim, Yeon-Jung; Jiang, Feng; Maeda, Shiro; Chan, Juliana C.N.; Lu, Wei; Hixson, James E.; Adair, Linda S.; Jung, Keum Ji; Nabika, Toru; Bae, Jae-Bum; Lee, Mi Hee; Seielstad, Mark; Young, Terri L.; Teo, Yik Ying; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takashima, Naoyuki; Osawa, Haruhiko; Lee, So-Hyun; Shin, Min-Ho; Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Bo Youl; Shi, Jiajun; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Wei; Kato, Norihiro; Yoon, Miwuk; He, Jiang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Ma, Ronald C.W.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Jia, Weiping; Miki, Tetsuro; Qi, Lu; Tai, E Shyong; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) has been recognized as an important indicator for the overall glycemic state preceding the onset of metabolic diseases. So far, most indentified genome-wide association loci for FPG were derived from populations with European ancestry, with a few exceptions. To extend a thorough catalog for FPG loci, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 genome-wide association studies in up to 24,740 nondiabetic subjects with East Asian ancestry. Follow-up replication analyses in up to an additional 21,345 participants identified three new FPG loci reaching genome-wide significance in or near PDK1-RAPGEF4, KANK1, and IGF1R. Our results could provide additional insight into the genetic variation implicated in fasting glucose regulation. PMID:25187374

  17. Network-based SNP meta-analysis identifies joint and disjoint genetic features across common human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided a large set of genetic loci influencing the risk for many common diseases. Association studies typically analyze one specific trait in single populations in an isolated fashion without taking into account the potential phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits. However, GWA data can be efficiently used to identify overlapping loci with analogous or contrasting effects on different diseases. Results Here, we describe a new approach to systematically prioritize and interpret available GWA data. We focus on the analysis of joint and disjoint genetic determinants across diseases. Using network analysis, we show that variant-based approaches are superior to locus-based analyses. In addition, we provide a prioritization of disease loci based on network properties and discuss the roles of hub loci across several diseases. We demonstrate that, in general, agonistic associations appear to reflect current disease classifications, and present the potential use of effect sizes in refining and revising these agonistic signals. We further identify potential branching points in disease etiologies based on antagonistic variants and describe plausible small-scale models of the underlying molecular switches. Conclusions The observation that a surprisingly high fraction (>15%) of the SNPs considered in our study are associated both agonistically and antagonistically with related as well as unrelated disorders indicates that the molecular mechanisms influencing causes and progress of human diseases are in part interrelated. Genetic overlaps between two diseases also suggest the importance of the affected entities in the specific pathogenic pathways and should be investigated further. PMID:22988944

  18. Discriminative ability and predictive validity of the timed up and go test in identifying older people who fall: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schoene, Daniel; Wu, Sandy M-S; Mikolaizak, A Stefanie; Menant, Jasmine C; Smith, Stuart T; Delbaere, Kim; Lord, Stephen R

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the discriminative ability and diagnostic accuracy of the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) as a clinical screening instrument for identifying older people at risk of falling. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. People aged 60 and older living independently or in institutional settings. Studies were identified with searches of the PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL data bases. Retrospective and prospective cohort studies comparing times to complete any version of the TUG of fallers and non-fallers were included. Fifty-three studies with 12,832 participants met the inclusion criteria. The pooled mean difference between fallers and non-fallers depended on the functional status of the cohort investigated: 0.63 seconds (95% confidence (CI) = 0.14-1.12 seconds) for high-functioning to 3.59 seconds (95% CI = 2.18-4.99 seconds) for those in institutional settings. The majority of studies did not retain TUG scores in multivariate analysis. Derived cut-points varied greatly between studies, and with the exception of a few small studies, diagnostic accuracy was poor to moderate. The findings suggest that the TUG is not useful for discriminating fallers from non-fallers in healthy, high-functioning older people but is of more value in less-healthy, lower-functioning older people. Overall, the predictive ability and diagnostic accuracy of the TUG are at best moderate. No cut-point can be recommended. Quick, multifactorial fall risk screens should be considered to provide additional information for identifying older people at risk of falls. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis of European and Asian-ancestry samples identifies three novel loci associated with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, D T; Jiang, X; Akula, N; Shugart, Y Y; Wendland, J R; Steele, C J M; Kassem, L; Park, J-H; Chatterjee, N; Jamain, S; Cheng, A; Leboyer, M; Muglia, P; Schulze, T G; Cichon, S; Nöthen, M M; Rietschel, M; McMahon, F J; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Craig, I; Lewis, C; Hosang, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Vincent, J B; Kennedy, J L; Strauss, J

    2013-02-01

    Meta-analyses of bipolar disorder (BD) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genome-wide significant signals in European-ancestry samples, but so far account for little of the inherited risk. We performed a meta-analysis of ∼750,000 high-quality genetic markers on a combined sample of ∼14,000 subjects of European and Asian-ancestry (phase I). The most significant findings were further tested in an extended sample of ∼17,700 cases and controls (phase II). The results suggest novel association findings near the genes TRANK1 (LBA1), LMAN2L and PTGFR. In phase I, the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9834970 near TRANK1, was significant at the P=2.4 × 10(-11) level, with no heterogeneity. Supportive evidence for prior association findings near ANK3 and a locus on chromosome 3p21.1 was also observed. The phase II results were similar, although the heterogeneity test became significant for several SNPs. On the basis of these results and other established risk loci, we used the method developed by Park et al. to estimate the number, and the effect size distribution, of BD risk loci that could still be found by GWAS methods. We estimate that >63,000 case-control samples would be needed to identify the ∼105 BD risk loci discoverable by GWAS, and that these will together explain <6% of the inherited risk. These results support previous GWAS findings and identify three new candidate genes for BD. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings and may potentially lead to identification of functional variants. Sample size will remain a limiting factor in the discovery of common alleles associated with BD.

  20. Multiethnic genome-wide meta-analysis of ectopic fat depots identifies loci associated with adipocyte development and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Audrey Y; Deng, Xuan; Fisher, Virginia A; Drong, Alexander; Zhang, Yang; Feitosa, Mary F; Liu, Ching-Ti; Weeks, Olivia; Choh, Audrey C; Duan, Qing; Dyer, Thomas D; Eicher, John D; Guo, Xiuqing; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Kacprowski, Tim; Kent, Jack W; Lange, Leslie A; Liu, Xinggang; Lohman, Kurt; Lu, Lingyi; Mahajan, Anubha; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Parihar, Ankita; Peralta, Juan M; Smith, Albert V; Zhang, Yi; Homuth, Georg; Kissebah, Ahmed H; Kullberg, Joel; Laqua, René; Launer, Lenore J; Nauck, Matthias; Olivier, Michael; Peyser, Patricia A; Terry, James G; Wojczynski, Mary K; Yao, Jie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Blangero, John; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bowden, Donald W; Carr, John Jeffrey; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Ding, Jingzhong; Friedrich, Nele; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Johnson, Andrew D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Langefeld, Carl D; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morris, Andrew P; Mosley, Thomas H; Rotter, Jerome I; Shuldiner, Alan R; Towne, Bradford; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wilson, James G; Allison, Matthew; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Goessling, Wolfram; Cupples, L Adrienne; Steinhauser, Matthew L; Fox, Caroline S

    2017-01-01

    Variation in body fat distribution contributes to the metabolic sequelae of obesity. The genetic determinants of body fat distribution are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to gain new insights into the underlying genetics of body fat distribution by conducting sample-size-weighted fixed-effects genome-wide association meta-analyses in up to 9,594 women and 8,738 men of European, African, Hispanic and Chinese ancestry, with and without sex stratification, for six traits associated with ectopic fat (hereinafter referred to as ectopic-fat traits). In total, we identified seven new loci associated with ectopic-fat traits (ATXN1, UBE2E2, EBF1, RREB1, GSDMB, GRAMD3 and ENSA; P < 5 × 10(-8); false discovery rate < 1%). Functional analysis of these genes showed that loss of function of either Atxn1 or Ube2e2 in primary mouse adipose progenitor cells impaired adipocyte differentiation, suggesting physiological roles for ATXN1 and UBE2E2 in adipogenesis. Future studies are necessary to further explore the mechanisms by which these genes affect adipocyte biology and how their perturbations contribute to systemic metabolic disease.

  1. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Five Asian Cohorts Identifies PDGFRA as a Susceptibility Locus for Corneal Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Zhou, Xin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Goh, Liang-Kee; Sim, Xueling; Tay, Wan-Ting; Li, Yi-Ju; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Suo, Chen; Cornes, Belinda; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Chia, Kee-Seng; Seielstad, Mark; Liu, Jianjun; Vithana, Eranga; Young, Terri L.; Tai, E.-Shyong

    2011-01-01

    Corneal astigmatism refers to refractive abnormalities and irregularities in the curvature of the cornea, and this interferes with light being accurately focused at a single point in the eye. This ametropic condition is highly prevalent, influences visual acuity, and is a highly heritable trait. There is currently a paucity of research in the genetic etiology of corneal astigmatism. Here we report the results from five genome-wide association studies of corneal astigmatism across three Asian populations, with an initial discovery set of 4,254 Chinese and Malay individuals consisting of 2,249 cases and 2,005 controls. Replication was obtained from three surveys comprising of 2,139 Indians, an additional 929 Chinese children, and an independent 397 Chinese family trios. Variants in PDGFRA on chromosome 4q12 (lead SNP: rs7677751, allelic odds ratio = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.16–1.36), P meta = 7.87×10−9) were identified to be significantly associated with corneal astigmatism, exhibiting consistent effect sizes across all five cohorts. This highlights the potential role of variants in PDGFRA in the genetic etiology of corneal astigmatism across diverse Asian populations. PMID:22144915

  2. Meta-analysis of incomplete microarray studies.

    PubMed

    Zollinger, Alix; Davison, Anthony C; Goldstein, Darlene R

    2015-10-01

    Meta-analysis of microarray studies to produce an overall gene list is relatively straightforward when complete data are available. When some studies lack information-providing only a ranked list of genes, for example-it is common to reduce all studies to ranked lists prior to combining them. Since this entails a loss of information, we consider a hierarchical Bayes approach to meta-analysis using different types of information from different studies: the full data matrix, summary statistics, or ranks. The model uses an informative prior for the parameter of interest to aid the detection of differentially expressed genes. Simulations show that the new approach can give substantial power gains compared with classical meta-analysis and list aggregation methods. A meta-analysis of 11 published studies with different data types identifies genes known to be involved in ovarian cancer and shows significant enrichment.

  3. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of self-reported allergy identifies shared and allergy-specific susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Hinds, David A; McMahon, George; Kiefer, Amy K; Do, Chuong B; Eriksson, Nicholas; Evans, David M; St Pourcain, Beate; Ring, Susan M; Mountain, Joanna L; Francke, Uta; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tung, Joyce Y

    2013-08-01

    Allergic disease is very common and carries substantial public-health burdens. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide associations with self-reported cat, dust-mite and pollen allergies in 53,862 individuals. We used generalized estimating equations to model shared and allergy-specific genetic effects. We identified 16 shared susceptibility loci with association P<5×10(-8), including 8 loci previously associated with asthma, as well as 4p14 near TLR1, TLR6 and TLR10 (rs2101521, P=5.3×10(-21)); 6p21.33 near HLA-C and MICA (rs9266772, P=3.2×10(-12)); 5p13.1 near PTGER4 (rs7720838, P=8.2×10(-11)); 2q33.1 in PLCL1 (rs10497813, P=6.1×10(-10)), 3q28 in LPP (rs9860547, P=1.2×10(-9)); 20q13.2 in NFATC2 (rs6021270, P=6.9×10(-9)), 4q27 in ADAD1 (rs17388568, P=3.9×10(-8)); and 14q21.1 near FOXA1 and TTC6 (rs1998359, P=4.8×10(-8)). We identified one locus with substantial evidence of differences in effects across allergies at 6p21.32 in the class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region (rs17533090, P=1.7×10(-12)), which was strongly associated with cat allergy. Our study sheds new light on the shared etiology of immune and autoimmune disease.

  4. The Impact of Adding Taxanes to Gemcitabine and Platinum Chemotherapy for the First-Line Therapy of Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Giannatempo, Patrizia; Pond, Gregory R; Sonpavde, Guru; Raggi, Daniele; Naik, Gurudatta; Galsky, Matthew D; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Necchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Gemcitabine/platinum chemotherapy is the most widely used first-line regimen for metastatic urothelial carcinoma, and the potential improvement of adding taxanes needs to be clarified. To study the survival impact of taxane plus gemcitabine/platinum compared with gemcitabine/platinum alone as upfront therapy. Literature was searched for studies including gemcitabine/platinum ± taxanes (paclitaxel or docetaxel only). We pooled trial level data including the median, proportions, and confidence intervals on response-rate, progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and side effects. Univariable and multivariable regression models evaluated the prognostic role of addition of taxanes after adjusting for platinum type, performance status 2, and the presence of visceral metastases. Data were weighted by the logarithm of the trial sample size. Thirty-five arms of trials including 2,365 patients were selected (seven with taxanes [n=617], and 28 arms without taxanes [n=1,748]). Median OS was univariably significantly different (p=0.019) between trials with and without taxanes. Across trials, the median 'median OS' amongst trials containing taxanes was 15.5 mo, compared with 12.5 mo in trials which did not. Multivariably, visceral disease and performance status were significantly associated with OS, and the addition of taxanes trended toward significantly better OS (p=0.056) and increase in grade ≥ 3 neurotoxicity (p=0.051), regardless of specific platinum agent used. In this meta-analysis, adding taxanes to gemcitabine and platinum showed a trend for improved OS and higher grade ≥ 3 neurotoxicity. Improvements in patient selection and the evaluation of a more potent and tolerable tubulin inhibitor in combination with gemcitabine/platinum in a well-powered trial are the critical next steps. In this report, a trend for improved overall survival and worse neurotoxicity was observed for adding a taxane to first-line gemcitabine/platinum chemotherapy for metastatic

  5. Increased risk of hemorrhage in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab: An updated meta-analysis of 12 randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Xianglong; Yu, Chenyang; Hong, Jie; Fang, Jingyuan; Chen, Haoyan

    2016-08-01

    As an important antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab has been administrated for the treatment of cancer patients. Hemorrhage, one of the common adverse events of angiogenesis inhibitors, sometimes is also fatal and life-threatening. We aimed at determining the incidence and risk of hemorrhage associated with bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Web of Science databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The overall incidence, overall relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by using a random-effects or fixed-effects model based on the heterogeneity of selected trials. A total of 10,555 mCRC patients from 12 RCTs were included in our study. The overall incidence of hemorrhage was 5.8% (95% CI 3.9%-7.8%). Bevacizumab significantly increased the overall risk of hemorrhage with an RR of 1.96 (95% CI 1.27-3.02). The RR of all-grade hemorrhage was 2.39 (95% CI 1.09-5.24) and 1.41 (95% CI 1.01-1.97) for high-grade hemorrhage. The risk of hemorrhage associated with bevacizumab was dose-dependent with an RR of 1.73 (95% CI 1.15-2.61) for 2.5 mg/kg/wk and 4.67 (95% CI 2.36-9.23) for 5 mg/kg/wk. More importantly, the RR of hemorrhage for treatment duration (<= 6 months and > 6 months) based on subgroup analysis was 4.13 (95% CI 2.58-6.61) and 1.43 (95% CI 0.96-2.14), respectively. The addition of bevacizumab to concurrent antineoplastic in patients with mCRC significantly increased the risk of hemorrhage. The dose of bevacizumab may contribute to the risk of hemorrhage. And the 1st 6 months of treatment may be a crucial period when hemorrhagic events occur.

  6. A genome-wide meta-analysis of nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma identifies risk loci at 6p21.32.

    PubMed

    Cozen, Wendy; Li, Dalin; Best, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Cortessis, Victoria K; Skol, Andrew D; Mack, Thomas M; Glaser, Sally L; Weiss, Lawrence M; Nathwani, Bharat N; Bhatia, Smita; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Edlund, Christopher K; Hwang, Amie E; Slager, Susan L; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Strong, Louise C; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Cerhan, James R; Robison, Leslie L; Conti, David V; Onel, Kenan

    2012-01-12

    Nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma (NSHL) is a distinct, highly heritable Hodgkin lymphoma subtype. We undertook a genome-wide meta-analysis of 393 European-origin adolescent/young adult NSHL patients and 3315 controls using the Illumina Human610-Quad Beadchip and Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. We identified 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6p21.32 that were significantly associated with NSHL risk: rs9268542 (P = 5.35 × 10(-10)), rs204999 (P = 1.44 × 10(-9)), and rs2858870 (P = 1.69 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed a previously reported association in the same region, rs6903608 (P = 3.52 × 10(-10)). rs204999 and rs2858870 were weakly correlated (r(2) = 0.257), and the remaining pairs of SNPs were not correlated (r(2) < 0.1). In an independent set of 113 NSHL cases and 214 controls, 2 SNPs were significantly associated with NSHL and a third showed a comparable odds ratio (OR). These SNPs are found on 2 haplotypes associated with NSHL risk (rs204999-rs9268528-rs9268542-rs6903608-rs2858870; AGGCT, OR = 1.7, P = 1.71 × 10(-6); GAATC, OR = 0.4, P = 1.16 × 10(-4)). All individuals with the GAATC haplotype also carried the HLA class II DRB1*0701 allele. In a separate analysis, the DRB1*0701 allele was associated with a decreased risk of NSHL (OR = 0.5, 95% confidence interval = 0.4, 0.7). These data support the importance of the HLA class II region in NSHL etiology.

  7. Meta-analysis on blood transcriptomic studies identifies consistently coexpressed protein–protein interaction modules as robust markers of human aging

    PubMed Central

    van den Akker, Erik B; Passtoors, Willemijn M; Jansen, Rick; van Zwet, Erik W; Goeman, Jelle J; Hulsman, Marc; Emilsson, Valur; Perola, Markus; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Heijmans, Bas T; Maier, Andrea B; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kok, Joost N; Slagboom, Pieternella E; Reinders, Marcel JT; Beekman, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The bodily decline that occurs with advancing age strongly impacts on the prospects for future health and life expectancy. Despite the profound role of age in disease etiology, knowledge about the molecular mechanisms driving the process of aging in humans is limited. Here, we used an integrative network-based approach for combining multiple large-scale expression studies in blood (2539 individuals) with protein–protein Interaction (PPI) data for the detection of consistently coexpressed PPI modules that may reflect key processes that change throughout the course of normative aging. Module detection followed by a meta-analysis on chronological age identified fifteen consistently coexpressed PPI modules associated with chronological age, including a highly significant module (P = 3.5 × 10−38) enriched for ‘T-cell activation’ marking age-associated shifts in lymphocyte blood cell counts (R2 = 0.603; P = 1.9 × 10−10). Adjusting the analysis in the compendium for the ‘T-cell activation’ module showed five consistently coexpressed PPI modules that robustly associated with chronological age and included modules enriched for ‘Translational elongation’, ‘Cytolysis’ and ‘DNA metabolic process’. In an independent study of 3535 individuals, four of five modules consistently associated with chronological age, underpinning the robustness of the approach. We found three of five modules to be significantly enriched with aging-related genes, as defined by the GenAge database, and association with prospective survival at high ages for one of the modules including ASF1A. The hereby-detected age-associated and consistently coexpressed PPI modules therefore may provide a molecular basis for future research into mechanisms underlying human aging. PMID:24119000

  8. Five blood pressure loci identified by an updated genome-wide linkage scan: meta-analysis of the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    PubMed

    Simino, Jeannette; Shi, Gang; Kume, Rezart; Schwander, Karen; Province, Michael A; Gu, C Charles; Kardia, Sharon; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ehret, Georg; Olshen, Richard A; Turner, Stephen T; Ho, Low-Tone; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Jaquish, Cashell; Paltoo, Dina; Cooper, Richard S; Weder, Alan; Curb, J David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary genome-wide linkage analysis of blood pressure in the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP) was reported previously. We harnessed the power and ethnic diversity of the final pooled FBPP dataset to identify novel loci for blood pressure thereby enhancing localization of genes containing less common variants with large effects on blood pressure levels and hypertension. We performed one overall and 4 race-specific meta-analyses of genome-wide blood pressure linkage scans using data on 4,226 African-American, 2,154 Asian, 4,229 Caucasian, and 2,435 Mexican-American participants (total N = 13,044). Variance components models were fit to measured (raw) blood pressure levels and two types of antihypertensive medication adjusted blood pressure phenotypes within each of 10 subgroups defined by race and network. A modified Fisher's method was used to combine the P values for each linkage marker across the 10 subgroups. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on chromosomes 6p22.3, 8q23.1, 20q13.12, 21q21.1, and 21q21.3 based on significant linkage evidence (defined by logarithm of odds (lod) score ≥3) in at least one meta-analysis and lod scores ≥1 in at least 2 subgroups defined by network and race. The chromosome 8q23.1 locus was supported by Asian-, Caucasian-, and Mexican-American-specific meta-analyses. The new QTLs reported justify new candidate gene studies. They may help support results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that fall in these QTL regions but fail to achieve the genome-wide significance.

  9. Meta-analysis of 65,734 Individuals Identifies TSPAN15 and SLC44A2 as Two Susceptibility Loci for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Marine; Chasman, Daniel I.; de Haan, Hugoline; Tang, Weihong; Lindström, Sara; Weng, Lu-Chen; de Andrade, Mariza; de Visser, Marieke C.H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Suchon, Pierre; Saut, Noémie; Smadja, David M.; Le Gal, Grégoire; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Di Narzo, Antonio; Hao, Ke; Nelson, Christopher P.; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Folkersen, Lasse; Monajemi, Ramin; Rose, Lynda M.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Slagboom, Eline; Aïssi, Dylan; Gagnon, France; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Tzourio, Christophe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Berr, Claudine; Taylor, Kent D.; Civelek, Mete; Eriksson, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Houwing-Duitermaat, Jeanine; Goodall, Alison H.; Cambien, François; Kraft, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Samani, Nilesh J.; Basu, Saonli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Kabrhel, Christopher; Folsom, Aaron R.; Heit, John; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Smith, Nicholas L.; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, is a complex thrombotic disorder with environmental and genetic determinants. Although several genetic variants have been found associated with VTE, they explain a minor proportion of VTE risk in cases. We undertook a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to identify additional VTE susceptibility genes. Twelve GWASs totaling 7,507 VTE case subjects and 52,632 control subjects formed our discovery stage where 6,751,884 SNPs were tested for association with VTE. Nine loci reached the genome-wide significance level of 5 × 10−8 including six already known to associate with VTE (ABO, F2, F5, F11, FGG, and PROCR) and three unsuspected loci. SNPs mapping to these latter were selected for replication in three independent case-control studies totaling 3,009 VTE-affected individuals and 2,586 control subjects. This strategy led to the identification and replication of two VTE-associated loci, TSPAN15 and SLC44A2, with lead risk alleles associated with odds ratio for disease of 1.31 (p = 1.67 × 10−16) and 1.21 (p = 2.75 × 10−15), respectively. The lead SNP at the TSPAN15 locus is the intronic rs78707713 and the lead SLC44A2 SNP is the non-synonymous rs2288904 previously shown to associate with transfusion-related acute lung injury. We further showed that these two variants did not associate with known hemostatic plasma markers. TSPAN15 and SLC44A2 do not belong to conventional pathways for thrombosis and have not been associated to other cardiovascular diseases nor related quantitative biomarkers. Our findings uncovered unexpected actors of VTE etiology and pave the way for novel mechanistic concepts of VTE pathophysiology. PMID:25772935

  10. Systematic large-scale meta-analysis identifies a panel of two mRNAs as blood biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Rodia, Maria Teresa; Ugolini, Giampaolo; Mattei, Gabriella; Montroni, Isacco; Zattoni, Davide; Ghignone, Federico; Veronese, Giacomo; Marisi, Giorgia; Lauriola, Mattia; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Solmi, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. A significant survival rate is achieved if it is detected at an early stage. A whole blood screening test, without any attempt to isolate blood fractions, could be an important tool to improve early detection of colorectal cancer. We searched for candidate markers with a novel approach based on the Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), aimed at identifying specific RNAs with the highest differential expression ratio between colorectal cancer tissue and normal blood samples. This tool permits a large-scale systematic meta-analysis of all available data obtained by microarray experiments. The targeting of RNA took into consideration that tumour phenotypic variation is associated with changes in the mRNA levels of genes regulating or affecting this variation. A real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT- PCR) was applied to the validation of candidate markers in the blood of 67 patients and 67 healthy controls. The expression of genes: TSPAN8, LGALS4, COL1A2 and CEACAM6 resulted as being statistically different. In particular ROC curves attested for TSPAN8 an AUC of 0.751 with a sensitivity of 83.6% and a specificity of 58.2% at a cut off of 10.85, while the panel of the two best genes showed an AUC of 0.861 and a sensitivity of 92.5% with a specificity of 67.2%. Our preliminary study on a total of 134 subjects showed promising results for a blood screening test to be validated in a larger cohort with the staging stratification and in patients with other gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26993598

  11. Refining genome-wide linkage intervals using a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies loci influencing personality dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hansell, Narelle K; Janssens, A Cecile JW; de Moor, Marleen HM; Madden, Pamela AF; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Penninx, Brenda W; Terracciano, Antonio; Uda, Manuela; Tanaka, Toshiko; Esko, Tonu; Realo, Anu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luciano, Michelle; Davies, Gail; Metspalu, Andres; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Deary, Ian J; Raikkonen, Katri; Bierut, Laura J; Costa, Paul T; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zhu, Gu; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Isaacs, Aaron; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heath, Andrew C; Pergadia, Michele L; Medland, Sarah E; Axenovich, Tatiana I; de Geus, Eco; Montgomery, Grant W; Wright, Margaret J; Oostra, Ben A; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Personality traits are complex phenotypes related to psychosomatic health. Individually, various gene finding methods have not achieved much success in finding genetic variants associated with personality traits. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide linkage scans (N=6149 subjects) of five basic personality traits assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. We compared the significant regions from the meta-analysis of linkage scans with the results of a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N∼17 000). We found significant evidence of linkage of neuroticism to chromosome 3p14 (rs1490265, LOD=4.67) and to chromosome 19q13 (rs628604, LOD=3.55); of extraversion to 14q32 (ATGG002, LOD=3.3); and of agreeableness to 3p25 (rs709160, LOD=3.67) and to two adjacent regions on chromosome 15, including 15q13 (rs970408, LOD=4.07) and 15q14 (rs1055356, LOD=3.52) in the individual scans. In the meta-analysis, we found strong evidence of linkage of extraversion to 4q34, 9q34, 10q24 and 11q22, openness to 2p25, 3q26, 9p21, 11q24, 15q26 and 19q13 and agreeableness to 4q34 and 19p13. Significant evidence of association in the GWAS was detected between openness and rs677035 at 11q24 (P-value=2.6 × 10−06, KCNJ1). The findings of our linkage meta-analysis and those of the GWAS suggest that 11q24 is a susceptible locus for openness, with KCNJ1 as the possible candidate gene. PMID:23211697

  12. Refining genome-wide linkage intervals using a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies loci influencing personality dimensions.

    PubMed

    Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hansell, Narelle K; Janssens, A Cecile J W; de Moor, Marleen H M; Madden, Pamela A F; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Penninx, Brenda W; Terracciano, Antonio; Uda, Manuela; Tanaka, Toshiko; Esko, Tonu; Realo, Anu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luciano, Michelle; Davies, Gail; Metspalu, Andres; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Deary, Ian J; Raikkonen, Katri; Bierut, Laura J; Costa, Paul T; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zhu, Gu; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Isaacs, Aaron; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heath, Andrew C; Pergadia, Michele L; Medland, Sarah E; Axenovich, Tatiana I; de Geus, Eco; Montgomery, Grant W; Wright, Margaret J; Oostra, Ben A; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-08-01

    Personality traits are complex phenotypes related to psychosomatic health. Individually, various gene finding methods have not achieved much success in finding genetic variants associated with personality traits. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide linkage scans (N=6149 subjects) of five basic personality traits assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. We compared the significant regions from the meta-analysis of linkage scans with the results of a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (N∼17 000). We found significant evidence of linkage of neuroticism to chromosome 3p14 (rs1490265, LOD=4.67) and to chromosome 19q13 (rs628604, LOD=3.55); of extraversion to 14q32 (ATGG002, LOD=3.3); and of agreeableness to 3p25 (rs709160, LOD=3.67) and to two adjacent regions on chromosome 15, including 15q13 (rs970408, LOD=4.07) and 15q14 (rs1055356, LOD=3.52) in the individual scans. In the meta-analysis, we found strong evidence of linkage of extraversion to 4q34, 9q34, 10q24 and 11q22, openness to 2p25, 3q26, 9p21, 11q24, 15q26 and 19q13 and agreeableness to 4q34 and 19p13. Significant evidence of association in the GWAS was detected between openness and rs677035 at 11q24 (P-value=2.6 × 10(-06), KCNJ1). The findings of our linkage meta-analysis and those of the GWAS suggest that 11q24 is a susceptible locus for openness, with KCNJ1 as the possible candidate gene.

  13. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for adiponectin levels in East Asians identifies a novel locus near WDR11-FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Gao, He; Li, Huaixing; Tabara, Yasuharu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Park, Eun Jung; Wen, Wanqing; Adair, Linda S.; Borja, Judith B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Peng; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Fogarty, Marie P.; Gan, Wei; He, Chih-Tsueng; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hwu, Chii-Min; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Jo, Jaeseong; Kato, Norihiro; Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Kuzawa, Christophor W.; Lee, Jeannette J.M.; Liu, Jianjun; Lu, Ling; Mcdade, Thomas W.; Osawa, Haruhiko; Sheu, Wayne H-H.; Teo, Yvonne; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Van Dam, Rob M.; Wang, Yiqin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamamoto, Ken; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Terri L.; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Jingwen; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shin, Chol; Jee, Sun Ha; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Miki, Tetsuro; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Lin, Xu; Mohlke, Karen L; Tai, E Shyong

    2014-01-01

    Blood levels of adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted protein correlated with metabolic and cardiovascular risks, are highly heritable. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies for adiponectin levels have identified 14 loci harboring variants associated with blood levels of adiponectin. To identify novel adiponectin-associated loci, particularly those of importance in East Asians, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWA studies for adiponectin in 7827 individuals, followed by two stages of replications in 4298 and 5954 additional individuals. We identified a novel adiponectin-associated locus on chromosome 10 near WDR11-FGFR2 (P = 3.0 × 10−14) and provided suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 12 near OR8S1-LALBA (P = 1.2 × 10−7). Of the adiponectin-associated loci previously described, we confirmed the association at CDH13 (P = 6.8 × 10−165), ADIPOQ (P = 1.8 × 10−22), PEPD (P = 3.6 × 10−12), CMIP (P = 2.1 × 10−10), ZNF664 (P = 2.3 × 10−7) and GPR109A (P = 7.4 × 10−6). Conditional analysis at ADIPOQ revealed a second signal with suggestive evidence of association only after conditioning on the lead SNP (Pinitial = 0.020; Pconditional = 7.0 × 10−7). We further confirmed the independence of two pairs of closely located loci (<2 Mb) on chromosome 16 at CMIP and CDH13, and on chromosome 12 at GPR109A and ZNF664. In addition, the newly identified signal near WDR11-FGFR2 exhibited evidence of association with triglycerides (P = 3.3 × 10−4), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, P = 4.9 × 10−4) and body mass index (BMI)-adjusted waist–hip ratio (P = 9.8 × 10−3). These findings improve our knowledge of the genetic basis of adiponectin variation, demonstrate the shared allelic architecture for adiponectin with lipids and central obesity and motivate further studies of underlying mechanisms. PMID:24105470

  14. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J.; Chen, Gary K.; Lindström, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O.; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berg, Christine D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M.; Buring, Julie E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L.; Diasio, Robert B.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gerty, Susan M.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Giles, Graham G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A.; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B.; John, Esther M.; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M.; Lee, I-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J.; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F.; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Severi, Gianluca; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, JoEllen; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Van Den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10-5 in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10−8) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10–6) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10−9), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10−5) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10−7) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci. PMID:22976474

  15. Educational interventions for general practitioners to identify and manage depression as a suicide risk factor in young people: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol.

    PubMed

    Tait, Lynda; Michail, Maria

    2014-12-15

    Suicide is a major public health problem and globally is the second leading cause of death in young adults. Globally, there are 164,000 suicides per year in young people under 25 years. Depression is a strong risk factor for suicide. Evidence shows that 45% of those completing suicide, including young adults, contact their general practitioner rather than a mental health professional in the month before their death. Further evidence indicates that risk factors or early warning signs of suicide in young people go undetected and untreated by general practitioners. Healthcare-based suicide prevention interventions targeted at general practitioners are designed to increase identification of at-risk young people. The rationale of this type of intervention is that early identification and improved clinical management of at-risk individuals will reduce morbidity and mortality. This systematic review will synthesise evidence on the effectiveness of education interventions for general practitioners in identifying and managing depression as a suicide risk factor in young people. We shall conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis following the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions guidelines and conform to the reporting guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement recommendations. Electronic databases will be systematically searched for randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies investigating the effectiveness of interventions for general practitioners in identifying and managing depression as a suicide risk factor in young people in comparison to any other intervention, no intervention, usual care or waiting list. Grey literature will be searched by screening trial registers. Only studies published in English will be included. No date restrictions will be applied. Two authors will independently screen titles and abstracts of potential studies. The primary outcome is

  16. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J; Chen, Gary K; Lindström, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M; Buring, Julie E; Buys, Saundra S; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E; Chasman, Daniel I; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Diver, W Ryan; Dunning, Alison M; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M; Gerty, Susan M; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Giles, Graham G; van Gils, Carla H; Godwin, Andrew K; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Hu, Jennifer J; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B; John, Esther M; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M; Lee, I-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G; McLean, Catriona A; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R; Montgomery, Grant W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J; Palmer, Julie R; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C; Stevens, Kristen N; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Severi, Gianluca; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J; Thun, Michael J; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, Joellen; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wilkens, Lynne R; Van Den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Henderson, Brian E; Chanock, Stephen J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ≤ 1 × 10(-5) in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10(-8)) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10(-6)) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10(-5)) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10(-7)) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Combined Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) and Docetaxel Compared with ADT Alone for Metastatic Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Botrel, Tobias Engel Ayer; Clark, Otávio; Lima Pompeo, Antônio Carlos; Horta Bretas, Francisco Flávio; Sadi, Marcus Vinicius; Ferreira, Ubirajara; Borges dos Reis, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and second most common cause of cancer mortality in older men in the United States (USA) and Western Europe. Androgen-deprivation therapy alone (ADT) remains the first line of treatment in most cases, for metastatic disease. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCT) that compared the efficacy and adverse events profile of a chemohormonal therapy (ADT ± docetaxel) for metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer (mHNPC). Methods Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Data extracted from the studies were combined by using the hazard ratio (HR) or risk ratio (RR) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The final analysis included 3 trials comprising 2,264 patients (mHNPC). Patients who received the chemohormonal therapy had a longer clinical progression-free survival interval (HR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.75; p<0.00001), and no heterogeneity (Chi2 = 0.64; df = 1 [p = 0.42]; I2 = 0%). The biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) also was higher in patients treated with ADT plus docetaxel (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.57 to 0.69; p<0.00001), also with no heterogeneity noted (Chi2 = 0.48; df = 2 [p = 0.79]; I2 = 0%). Finally, the combination of ADT with docetaxel showed a superior overall survival (OS) compared with ADT alone (HR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.84; p<0.0001), with moderate heterogeneity (Chi2 = 3.84; df = 2 [p = 0.15]; I2 = 48%). A random-effects model analysis was performed, and the results remained favorable to the use of ADT plus docetaxel (HR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.60 to 0.89; p = 0.002). In the final combined analysis of the high-volume disease patients, the use of the combination therapy also favored an increased overall survival (HR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.83; p = 0.0003). Regarding adverse events and severe toxicity (grade ≥3), the group

  18. Genome-wide in vivo screen identifies novel host regulators of metastatic colonization.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, Louise; Arends, Mark J; Campbell, Andrew D; Bald, Tobias; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Griggs, Nicola; Velasco-Herrera, Martin Del Castillo; Tüting, Thomas; Sansom, Owen J; Karp, Natasha A; Clare, Simon; Gleeson, Diane; Ryder, Edward; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Cambridge, Emma L; Voet, Thierry; Macaulay, Iain C; Wong, Kim; Spiegel, Sarah; Speak, Anneliese O; Adams, David J

    2017-01-12

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death for cancer patients. This multi-stage process requires tumour cells to survive in the circulation, extravasate at distant sites, then proliferate; it involves contributions from both the tumour cell and tumour microenvironment ('host', which includes stromal cells and the immune system). Studies suggest the early steps of the metastatic process are relatively efficient, with the post-extravasation regulation of tumour growth ('colonization') being critical in determining metastatic outcome. Here we show the results of screening 810 mutant mouse lines using an in vivo assay to identify microenvironmental regulators of metastatic colonization. We identify 23 genes that, when disrupted in mouse, modify the ability of tumour cells to establish metastatic foci, with 19 of these genes not previously demonstrated to play a role in host control of metastasis. The largest reduction in pulmonary metastasis was observed in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter spinster homologue 2 (Spns2)-deficient mice. We demonstrate a novel outcome of S1P-mediated regulation of lymphocyte trafficking, whereby deletion of Spns2, either globally or in a lymphatic endothelial-specific manner, creates a circulating lymphopenia and a higher percentage of effector T cells and natural killer (NK) cells present in the lung. This allows for potent tumour cell killing, and an overall decreased metastatic burden.

  19. Interpreting and using meta-analysis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Holly, Cheryl; Slyer, Jason T

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews, which can include a meta-analysis, are considered the gold standard for determination of best practice. Meta-analysis combines the results from many primary studies to identify patterns among the individual study results and then assesses the overall effectiveness of a specific healthcare intervention. The purpose of this article was to describe the process of performing a meta-analysis, discuss advantages and disadvantages of meta-analyses, and interpret the results of a meta-analysis from current research relevant to orthopaedic nursing practice.

  20. Periostin is identified as a putative metastatic marker in breast cancer-derived exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Vardaki, Ioulia; Ceder, Sophia; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Baltatzis, George; Foukakis, Theodoros; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BrCa) is the most frequent cancer type in women and a leading cause of cancer related deaths in the world. Despite the decrease in mortality due to better diagnostics and palliative care, there is a lack of prognostic markers of metastasis. Recently, the exploitation of liquid biopsies and in particular of the extracellular vesicles has shown promise in the identification of such prognostic markers. In this study we compared the proteomic content of exosomes derived from metastatic and non-metastatic human (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) and mouse (67NR and 4T1) cell lines. We found significant differences not only in the amount of secreted exosomes but most importantly in the protein content of exosomes secreted from metastatic versus non-metastatic ones. We identified periostin as a protein that is enriched in exosomes secreted by metastatic cells and validated its presence in a pilot cohort of breast cancer patient samples with localized disease or lymph node (LN) metastasis. PMID:27589561

  1. Brief Report: IRF4 Newly Identified as a Common Susceptibility Locus for Systemic Sclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Cross-Disease Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    López-Isac, Elena; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Assassi, Shervin; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Freire, Mayka; Beltrán, Emma; Narváez, Javier; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; Ortiz, Ana M; González-Gay, Miguel A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Bellocchi, Chiara; Lunardi, Claudio; Moroncini, Gianluca; Gabrielli, Armando; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Distler, Jörg H W; Riekemasten, Gabriella; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Magro-Checa, Cesar; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Vonk, Madelon C; Molberg, Øyvind; Merriman, Tony; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Herrick, Ariane; Eyre, Steve; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Denton, Christopher P; Fonseca, Carmen; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Worthington, Jane; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are autoimmune diseases that have similar clinical and immunologic characteristics. To date, several shared SSc-RA genetic loci have been identified independently. The aim of the current study was to systematically search for new common SSc-RA loci through an interdisease meta-genome-wide association (meta-GWAS) strategy. The study was designed as a meta-analysis combining GWAS data sets of patients with SSc and patients with RA, using a strategy that allowed identification of loci with both same-direction and opposite-direction allelic effects. The top single-nucleotide polymorphisms were followed up in independent SSc and RA case-control cohorts. This allowed an increase in the sample size to a total of 8,830 patients with SSc, 16,870 patients with RA, and 43,393 healthy controls. This cross-disease meta-analysis of the GWAS data sets identified several loci with nominal association signals (P < 5 × 10(-6) ) that also showed evidence of association in the disease-specific GWAS scans. These loci included several genomic regions not previously reported as shared loci, as well as several risk factors that were previously found to be associated with both diseases. Follow-up analyses of the putatively new SSc-RA loci identified IRF4 as a shared risk factor for these 2 diseases (Pcombined  = 3.29 × 10(-12) ). Analysis of the biologic relevance of the known SSc-RA shared loci identified the type I interferon and interleukin-12 signaling pathways as the main common etiologic factors. This study identified a novel shared locus, IRF4, for the risk of SSc and RA, and highlighted the usefulness of a cross-disease GWAS meta-analysis strategy in the identification of common risk loci. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 as shared risk loci for Crohn's disease and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Festen, Eleonora A M; Goyette, Philippe; Green, Todd; Boucher, Gabrielle; Beauchamp, Claudine; Trynka, Gosia; Dubois, Patrick C; Lagacé, Caroline; Stokkers, Pieter C F; Hommes, Daan W; Barisani, Donatella; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; van Heel, David A; Weersma, Rinse K; Daly, Mark J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rioux, John D

    2011-01-27

    Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease (CelD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls) and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0 x 10⁻⁵ in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value < 1 x 10⁻² in CelD and < 1 x 10⁻³ in CD). These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37 x 10⁻⁸ and 6.39 x 10⁻⁹, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls) and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls) cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071) in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55 x 10⁻¹⁰ and 1.38 x 10⁻¹¹ respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a relatively small

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Scans Identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 As Shared Risk Loci for Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Gabrielle; Beauchamp, Claudine; Trynka, Gosia; Dubois, Patrick C.; Lagacé, Caroline; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Hommes, Daan W.; Barisani, Donatella; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; van Heel, David A.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Daly, Mark J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rioux, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease (CelD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls) and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0×10−5 in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value <1×10−2 in CelD and <1×10−3 in CD). These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37×10−8 and 6.39×10−9, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls) and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls) cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071) in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55×10−10 and 1.38×10−11 respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a relatively small effect. PMID:21298027

  4. Pro: Meta-analysis: the case for.

    PubMed

    Mudge, David W; Webster, Angela C; Johnson, David W

    2016-06-01

    With ever-accumulating medical evidence for treatment benefits and harms, it is vital that clinicians are able to access and use up-to-date, best evidence in specific clinical scenarios involving individual patients-the primary goal of evidence-based medicine. In this article, we propose that meta-analysis, when properly conducted and reported in the context of a rigorous systematic review, is an indispensable tool for synthesis and interpretation of clinical evidence for the purpose of informing clinical decision-making by clinicians, patients and health care policy makers. Meta-analysis provides many benefits, including enhanced precision and statistical power, greater transparency, identification of bias, exploration of heterogeneity of effects, enhanced generalizability, efficient integration of clinical knowledge, identification of evidence gaps, better informed future trial design and avoidance of unnecessary research duplication and potential patient harm. The overall standard, clinical value and reach of meta-analysis has been further enhanced by the development of standards for registration, conduct and reporting, as well as advanced meta-analytic techniques, such as network meta-analysis. Of course, meta-analysis can at times be limited by poor quality studies, trial heterogeneity, publication bias and non-rigorous review and analysis, although through appraisal these issues are often able to be identified and explored, such that valuable clinical information can still be obtained. Consequently, meta-analysis is now the most highly cited form of research and is considered by many leading organizations to represent the highest level of clinical evidence. However, to maximize their considerable value, it is essential that all clinicians have the skills to critically appraise, carefully interpret and judiciously apply meta-analyses in their practice.

  5. Meta-analysis identified the TNFA -308G > A promoter polymorphism as a risk factor for disease severity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study is to investigate whether the -308G > A promoter polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA) gene is associated with disease severity and radiologic joint damage in a large cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A long-term observational early RA inception cohort (n = 208) with detailed information about disease activity and radiologic damage after 3, 6 and 9 years of disease was genotyped for the TNFA -308G > A promoter polymorphism (rs1800629). A longitudinal regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of genotype on RA disease severity and joint damage. Subsequently, a meta-analysis, including all publically available data, was performed to further test the association between joint erosions and the TNFA polymorphism. To learn more about the mechanism behind the effect of the polymorphism, RNA isolated from peripheral blood from RA patients (n = 66) was used for TNFA gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR. Results Longitudinal regression analysis with correction for gender and disease activity showed a significant difference in total joint damage between GG and GA+AA genotype groups (P = 0.002), which was stable over time. The meta-analysis, which included 2,053 patients, confirmed an association of the genetic variant with the development of erosions (odds ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.62, 0.98). No significant differences in TNFA gene expression were observed for the different genotypes, confirming earlier findings in healthy individuals. Conclusions Our data confirm that the TNFA -308G > A promoter polymorphism is associated with joint damage in patients with RA. This is not mediated by differences in TNFA gene expression between genotypes. PMID:23217265

  6. Meta-analysis added power to identify variants in FTO associated with type 2 diabetes and obesity in the Asian population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Zhe; Song, Yiqing; Zhou, Daizhan; Zhang, Di; Zhao, Teng; Chen, Zhuo; Yu, Lan; Yang, Yifeng; Feng, Guoyin; Li, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Simin; Zhang, Zuofeng; He, Lin; Xu, He

    2010-08-01

    Several common variants in the intron 1 of FTO (fat mass and associated obesity) gene have been reliably associated with BMI and obesity in European populations. We analyzed two variants (rs9939609 and rs8050136) in 4,189 Chinese Han individuals and conducted a meta-analysis of published studies in Asian population to investigate whether these variants are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity in Asian population. In this study, both the minor allele A of rs9939609 and the minor allele A of rs805136 were associated with increased risk of T2D, independent of measures of BMI; the odds ratios (ORs) per copy of the risk allele were 1.19 for rs9939609 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.37; P = 0.01) and 1.22 for rs8050136 (95% CI, 1.07-1.40; P = 0.004) after adjusting for age, sex, and BMI. Our results also showed association with risk of obesity (rs9939609: OR = 1.39 (95% CI 1.04-1.85), P = 0.02; rs8050136: OR = 1.45 (95% CI 1.09-1.93), P = 0.01) but no association with overweight. These results were consistent with the pooled results from our meta-analysis study (for diabetes, rs8050136, P = 1.3 x 10(-3); rs9939609, P = 9.8 x 10(-4); for obesity, rs8050136, P = 2.2 x 10(-7); rs9939609, P = 9.0 x 10(-9)). Our findings indicate that the two variants (rs9939609 and rs8050136) in the FTO gene contribute to obesity and T2D in the Asian populations.

  7. An Evaluation of Algorithms for Identifying Metastatic Breast, Lung, or Colorectal Cancer in Administrative Claims Data.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Joanna L; Engel-Nitz, Nicole M; Teitelbaum, April; Gomez Rey, Gabriel; Kallich, Joel D

    2015-07-01

    Administrative health care claims data are used for epidemiologic, health services, and outcomes cancer research and thus play a significant role in policy. Cancer stage, which is often a major driver of cost and clinical outcomes, is not typically included in claims data. Evaluate algorithms used in a dataset of cancer patients to identify patients with metastatic breast (BC), lung (LC), or colorectal (CRC) cancer using claims data. Clinical data on BC, LC, or CRC patients (between January 1, 2007 and March 31, 2010) were linked to a health care claims database. Inclusion required health plan enrollment ≥3 months before initial cancer diagnosis date. Algorithms were used in the claims database to identify patients' disease status, which was compared with physician-reported metastases. Generic and tumor-specific algorithms were evaluated using ICD-9 codes, varying diagnosis time frames, and including/excluding other tumors. Positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity, and specificity were assessed. The linked databases included 14,480 patients; of whom, 32%, 17%, and 14.2% had metastatic BC, LC, and CRC, respectively, at diagnosis and met inclusion criteria. Nontumor-specific algorithms had lower specificity than tumor-specific algorithms. Tumor-specific algorithms' sensitivity and specificity were 53% and 99% for BC, 55% and 85% for LC, and 59% and 98% for CRC, respectively. Algorithms to distinguish metastatic BC, LC, and CRC from locally advanced disease should use tumor-specific primary cancer codes with 2 claims for the specific primary cancer >30-42 days apart to reduce misclassification. These performed best overall in specificity, positive predictive values, and overall accuracy to identify metastatic cancer in a health care claims database.

  8. Disturbed by Meta-Analysis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachter, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Defines meta-analysis as statistical procedures for combining results from previous separate studies. Discusses four charges promoted by some skeptics as it relates to this statistical procedure. States that many of the trends making a place for meta-analysis are disturbing. (RT)

  9. Effectiveness of Reirradiation for Painful Bone Metastases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huisman, Merel; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Wijlemans, Joost W.; Vulpen, Marco van; Linden, Yvette M. van der; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases in nonresponders or patients with recurrent pain after initial response is performed in up to 42% of patients initially treated with radiotherapy. Literature on the effect of reirradiation for pain control in those patients is scarce. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we quantify the effectiveness of reirradiation for achieving pain control in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A free text search was performed to identify eligible studies using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration library electronic databases. After study selection and quality assessment, a pooled estimate was calculated for overall pain response for reirradiation of metastatic bone pain. Results: Our literature search identified 707 titles, of which 10 articles were selected for systematic review and seven entered the meta-analysis. Overall study quality was mediocre. Of the 2,694 patients initially treated for metastatic bone pain, 527 (20%) patients underwent reirradiation. Overall, a pain response after reirradiation was achieved in 58% of patients (pooled overall response rate 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.49-0.67). There was a substantial between-study heterogeneity (I{sup 2} = 63.3%, p = 0.01) because of clinical and methodological differences between studies. Conclusions: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective in terms of pain relief for a small majority of patients; approximately 40% of patients do not benefit from reirradiation. Although the validity of results is limited, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview and the most quantitative estimate of reirradiation effectiveness to date.

  10. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  11. Precision Oncology: Identifying Predictive Biomarkers for the Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Parth K.; Farber, Nicholas J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of multiple new pharmaceutical agents for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has left physicians with several options for first- and second- line therapy. With limited head-to-head comparisons, however, there is a paucity of evidence to recommend the use of one agent over another. To address this knowledge gap, Voss et al. identified serum biomarkers from specimens collected during the RECORD-3 trial, a comparative study of first-line sunitinib versus first-line everolimus. Of the biomarkers identified, the 5 most strongly associated with first-line everolimus progression-free survival (PFS1L) were combined to form a composite biomarker score (CBS). The CBS was significantly associated with everolimus PFS1L in multivariate regression analysis. This study is an example of the additional value offered by a randomized trial with prospective biospecimen collection and a significant step towards identifying predictive biomarkers for the treatment of metastatic RCC. As further comparative trials are performed, it will be essential that biomarkers are appropriately identified and validated in order to further the goal of precision oncology. PMID:27540511

  12. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies and Network Analysis-Based Integration with Gene Expression Data Identify New Suggestive Loci and Unravel a Wnt-Centric Network Associated with Dupuytren’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kerstin; Siegert, Sabine; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Du, Juanjiangmeng; Casper, Ramona; Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; Tinschert, Sigrid; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Nothnagel, Michael; Nürnberg, Peter; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dupuytren´s disease, a fibromatosis of the connective tissue in the palm, is a common complex disease with a strong genetic component. Up to date nine genetic loci have been found to be associated with the disease. Six of these loci contain genes that code for Wnt signalling proteins. In spite of this striking first insight into the genetic factors in Dupuytren´s disease, much of the inherited risk in Dupuytren´s disease still needs to be discovered. The already identified loci jointly explain ~1% of the heritability in this disease. To further elucidate the genetic basis of Dupuytren´s disease, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis combining three genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets, comprising 1,580 cases and 4,480 controls. We corroborated all nine previously identified loci, six of these with genome-wide significance (p-value < 5x10-8). In addition, we identified 14 new suggestive loci (p-value < 10−5). Intriguingly, several of these new loci contain genes associated with Wnt signalling and therefore represent excellent candidates for replication. Next, we compared whole-transcriptome data between patient- and control-derived tissue samples and found the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to be the top deregulated pathway in patient samples. We then conducted network and pathway analyses in order to identify protein networks that are enriched for genes highlighted in the GWAS meta-analysis and expression data sets. We found further evidence that the Wnt signalling pathways in conjunction with other pathways may play a critical role in Dupuytren´s disease. PMID:27467239

  13. A Multi-Ethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Over 100,000 Subjects Identifies 23 Fibrinogen-Associated Loci but no Strong Evidence of a Causal Association between Circulating Fibrinogen and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Huang, Jie; Chasman, Daniel; Naitza, Silvia; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D; Teumer, Alexander; Reiner, Alex P; Folkersen, Lasse; Basu, Saonli; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Trompet, Stella; Mälarstig, Anders; Baumert, Jens; Bis, Joshua C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hottenga, Jouke J; Shin, So-Youn; Lopez, Lorna M; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Wilson, James F; Navarro, Pau; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zemunik, Tatijana; Redline, Susan; Mehra, Reena; Pulanic, Drazen; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Wild, Sarah H; Campbell, Harry; Curb, J David; Wallace, Robert; Liu, Simin; Eaton, Charles B.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Fornage, Myriam; Green, David; Gross, Myron; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Williams, Frances M.K.; Grant, P.J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strawbridge, Rona J; Silveira, Angela; Sennblad, Bengt; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; van Dongen, Jenny; Willemsen, G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Yao, Jie; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Haritunians, Talin; McKnight, Barbara; Lumley, Thomas; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Grotevendt, Anne; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Kocher, Thomas; Goel, Anuj; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Clarke, Robert; Steri, Maristella; Tarasov, Kirill V; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Stott, David J; Sattar, Naveed; Buckley, Brendan M; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D; McArdle, Wendy L; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Song, Jaejoon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Teichert, Martina; Ikram, M Arfan; Mosley, Thomas H; Bevan, Steve; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Nelson, Christopher P; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Eriksson, Johan G; Jacobs, David; Deary, Ian J; Soranzo, Nicole; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; de Geus, Eco JC; Tracy, Russell P.; Hayward, Caroline; Koenig, Wolfgang; Cucca, Francesco; Jukema, J Wouter; Eriksson, Per; Seshadri, Sudha; Markus, Hugh S.; Watkins, Hugh; Samani, Nilesh J; Wallaschofski, Henri; Smith, Nicholas L.; Tregouet, David; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; Strachan, David P.; Hamsten, Anders; O’Donnell, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), range from 34 to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies only explain a small proportion (< 2%) of its variation. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 GWA studies, including more than 90,000 subjects of European ancestry, the first GWA meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in 7 African Americans studies totaling 8,289 samples, and a GWA study in Hispanic-Americans totaling 1,366 samples. Evaluation for association of SNPs with clinical outcomes included a total of 40,695 cases and 85,582 controls for coronary artery disease (CAD), 4,752 cases and 24,030 controls for stroke, and 3,208 cases and 46,167 controls for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Overall, we identified 24 genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) independent signals in 23 loci, including 15 novel associations, together accounting for 3.7% of plasma fibrinogen variation. Gene-set enrichment analysis highlighted key roles in fibrinogen regulation for the three structural fibrinogen genes and pathways related to inflammation, adipocytokines and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone signaling. Whereas lead SNPs in a few loci were significantly associated with CAD, the combined effect of all 24 fibrinogen-associated lead SNPs was not significant for CAD, stroke or VTE. Conclusion We identify 23 robustly associated fibrinogen loci, 15 of which are new. Clinical outcome analysis of these loci does not support a causal relationship between circulating levels of fibrinogen and CAD, stroke or VTE. PMID:23969696

  14. Helicobacter Species Identified in Captive Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) with Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Esmail, Michael Y.; Bacon, Rebecca; Swennes, Alton G.; Feng, Yan; Shen, Zeli; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Sharma, Prachi; Cohen, Joyce; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Of all human cancers, gastric carcinoma is the one of the leading causes of death. Helicobacter pylori is considered a major etiologic agent of this disease. Spontaneously occurring gastric carcinoma is a rare diagnosis in nonhuman primates. A 2011 case report documented a high incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in a closed colony of captive sooty mangabeys (Cercebus atys). However, H. pylori infection was not detected in these animals. Materials and Methods In this study, using archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stomach sections of these animals alternative methodologies were used to identify H. pylori and other non-H. pylori Helicobacter species. In addition, two additional cases of sooty mangabeys with metastatic gastric carcinoma are characterized. Results Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we identified gastric H. suis in 75% of archived and new gastric carcinoma cases. In the two newly reported cases, H. suis and a novel Helicobacter species were detected via PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. H. pylori was not identified in any of the gastric carcinoma cases via FISH and/or PCR and sequence analysis of Helicobacter spp. in DNA from of available tissues. Conclusions This report is the first to characterize Helicobacter species infection in spontaneous gastric carcinoma with metastatic potential in nonhuman primates. PMID:26477442

  15. Helicobacter Species Identified in Captive Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) with Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Michael Y; Bacon, Rebecca; Swennes, Alton G; Feng, Yan; Shen, Zeli; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Sharma, Prachi; Cohen, Joyce; Fox, James G

    2016-06-01

    Of all human cancers, gastric carcinoma is the one of the leading causes of death. Helicobacter pylori is considered a major etiologic agent of this disease. Spontaneously occurring gastric carcinoma is a rare diagnosis in nonhuman primates. A 2011 case report documented a high incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma in a closed colony of captive sooty mangabeys (Cercebus atys). However, H. pylori infection was not detected in these animals. In this study, using archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stomach sections of these animals alternative methodologies were used to identify H. pylori and other non-H. pylori Helicobacter species. In addition, two additional cases of sooty mangabeys with metastatic gastric carcinoma are characterized. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we identified gastric H. suis in 75% of archived and new gastric carcinoma cases. In the two newly reported cases, H. suis and a novel Helicobacter species were detected via PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. H. pylori was not identified in any of the gastric carcinoma cases via FISH and/or PCR and sequence analysis of Helicobacter spp. in DNA from of available tissues. This report is the first to characterize Helicobacter species infection in spontaneous gastric carcinoma with metastatic potential in nonhuman primates. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Genome-wide association and meta-analysis in populations from Starr County, Texas, and Mexico City identify type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci and enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci in top signals

    PubMed Central

    Below, J. E.; Gamazon, E. R.; Morrison, J. V.; Konkashbaev, A.; Pluzhnikov, A.; McKeigue, P. M.; Parra, E. J.; Elbein, S. C.; Hallman, D. M.; Nicolae, D. L.; Bell, G. I.; Cruz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses to identify and characterise risk loci for type 2 diabetes in Mexican-Americans from Starr County, TX, USA. Method Using 1.8 million directly interrogated and imputed genotypes in 837 unrelated type 2 diabetes cases and 436 normoglycaemic controls, we conducted Armitage trend tests. To improve power in this population with high disease rates, we also performed ordinal regression including an intermediate class with impaired fasting glucose and/or glucose tolerance. These analyses were followed by meta-analysis with a study of 967 type 2 diabetes cases and 343 normoglycaemic controls from Mexico City, Mexico. Result The top signals (unadjusted p value <1×10−5) included 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight gene regions (PER3, PARD3B, EPHA4, TOMM7, PTPRD, HNT [also known as RREB1], LOC729993 and IL34) and six intergenic regions. Among these was a missense polymorphism (rs10462020; Gly639Val) in the clock gene PER3, a system recently implicated in diabetes. We also report a second signal (minimum p value 1.52× 10−6) within PTPRD, independent of the previously implicated SNP, in a population of Han Chinese. Top meta-analysis signals included known regions HNF1A and KCNQ1. Annotation of top association signals in both studies revealed a marked excess of trans-acting eQTL in both adipose and muscle tissues. Conclusions/Interpretation In the largest study of type 2 diabetes in Mexican populations to date, we identified modest associations of novel and previously reported SNPs. In addition, in our top signals we report significant excess of SNPs that predict transcript levels in muscle and adipose tissues. PMID:21647700

  17. Methodology Series Module 6: Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analysis have become an important of biomedical literature, and they provide the “highest level of evidence” for various clinical questions. There are a lot of studies – sometimes with contradictory conclusions – on a particular topic in literature. Hence, as a clinician, which results will you believe? What will you tell your patient? Which drug is better? A systematic review or a meta-analysis may help us answer these questions. In addition, it may also help us understand the quality of the articles in literature or the type of studies that have been conducted and published (example, randomized trials or observational studies). The first step it to identify a research question for systematic review or meta-analysis. The next step is to identify the articles that will be included in the study. This will be done by searching various databases; it is important that the researcher should search for articles in more than one database. It will also be useful to form a group of researchers and statisticians that have expertise in conducting systematic reviews and meta-analysis before initiating them. We strongly encourage the readers to register their proposed review/meta-analysis with PROSPERO. Finally, these studies should be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis checklist. PMID:27904176

  18. Meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies identifies susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer at 1q41, 3q26.2, 12q13.13 and 20q13.33

    PubMed Central

    Houlston, Richard S; Cheadle, Jeremy; Dobbins, Sara E; Tenesa, Albert; Jones, Angela M; Howarth, Kimberley; Spain, Sarah L; Broderick, Peter; Domingo, Enric; Farrington, Susan; Prendergast, James GD; Pittman, Alan M; Theodoratou, Evi; Smith, Christopher G; Olver, Bianca; Walther, Axel; Barnetson, Rebecca A; Churchman, Michael; Jaeger, Emma EM; Penegar, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Mager, Rachel; Johnstone, Elaine; Midgley, Rachel; Niittymäki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Colley, James; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Thomas, Huw JM; Lucassen, Anneke M; Evans, D Gareth R; Maher, Eamonn R; Maughan, Timothy; Dimas, Antigone; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Pharoah, Paul; Kerr, David J; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Campbell, Harry; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tomlinson, Ian PM

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 10 loci at which common variants influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). To enhance power to identify additional loci, we conducted a meta-analysis of three GWA studies from the UK totalling 3,334 cases and 4,628 controls, followed by multiple validation analyses, involving a total of 18,095 CRC cases and 20,197 controls. We identified new associations at 4 CRC risk loci: 1q41 (rs6691170, OR=1.06, P=9.55x10-10; rs6687758, OR=1.09, P=2.27x10-9); 3q26.2 (rs10936599, OR=0.93, P=3.39x10-8); 12q13.13 (rs11169552, OR=0.92, P=1.89x10-10; rs7136702, OR=1.06, P=4.02=x10-8); and 20q13.33 (rs4925386, OR=0.93, P=1.89x10-10). As well as identifying multiple new CRC risk loci this analysis provides evidence that additional CRC-associated variants of similar effect size remain to be discovered. PMID:20972440

  19. Pooling research results: benefits and limitations of meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, J P; Lau, J

    1999-09-01

    Meta-analysis, the systematic and quantitative synthesis of evidence, has developed considerably in the 1990s and is emerging as an important methodology in medical decision making. As a research methodology, meta-analysis has benefits and limitations that must be acknowledged in its application. The benefits of meta-analysis include the ability to improve the power of small or inconclusive studies to answer questions and the ability to identify sources of diversity across various types of studies. Meta-analysis may reveal how heterogeneity among populations affects the effectiveness of medical interventions in different settings and in different patients. It can also help detect biases, such as publication bias and "Tower of Babel" bias, as well as deficiencies in the design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation of research. In this way, it can also stimulate improvements in the quality of the data needed to optimize medical care. Meta-analysis cannot improve the quality or reporting of the original studies. Other limitations come from misapplications of the method, such as when study diversity is ignored or mishandled in the analysis or when the variability of patient populations, the quality of the data, and the potential for underlying biases are not addressed. Meta-analysis has promoted the sense that obtaining evidence is a global enterprise and that complete information needs to be evaluated and synthesized to obtain the most unbiased results. Analyzing sources of bias and diversity is essential to performing, understanding, and using meta-analyses in medical care.

  20. Meta-analysis Followed by Replication Identifies Loci in or near CDKN1B, TET3, CD80, DRAM1, and ARID5B as Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanling; Tang, Huayang; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Xianfa; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Liangdan; Yang, Jing; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Cheng, Hui; Pan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Jinping; Lee, Tsz Leung; Sheng, Yujun; Lau, Chak Sing; Li, Yang; Chan, Tak Mao; Yin, Xianyong; Ying, Dingge; Lu, Qianjin; Leung, Alexander Moon Ho; Zuo, Xianbo; Chen, Xiang; Tong, Kwok Lung; Zhou, Fusheng; Diao, Qingchun; Tse, Niko Kei Chiu; Xie, Hongfu; Mok, Chi Chiu; Hao, Fei; Wong, Sik Nin; Shi, Bingjun; Lee, Ka Wing; Hui, Yan; Ho, Marco Hok Kung; Liang, Bo; Lee, Pamela Pui Wah; Cui, Hongzhou; Guo, Qing; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Pu, Xiongming; Liu, Qiji; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Change; Chong, Chun Yin; Fang, Hong; Wong, Raymond Woon Sing; Sun, Yonghu; Mok, Mo Yin; Li, Xiang-Pei; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Zhai, Zhifang; Rianthavorn, Pornpimol; Deekajorndej, Thavatchai; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Gao, Fei; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk; Kang, Xiaojing; Ying, Shirley King Yee; Zhang, Lijuan; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Zhu, Dingxian; Fung, Samuel Ka Shun; Zeng, Fanqin; Lai, Wai Ming; Wong, Chun-Ming; Ng, Irene Oi Lin; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè; Cherny, Stacey S.; Shen, Nan; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Sham, Pak Chung; Ye, Dong-Qing; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Lau, Yu Lung

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototype autoimmune disease with a strong genetic involvement and ethnic differences. Susceptibility genes identified so far only explain a small portion of the genetic heritability of SLE, suggesting that many more loci are yet to be uncovered for this disease. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies on SLE in Chinese Han populations and followed up the findings by replication in four additional Asian cohorts with a total of 5,365 cases and 10,054 corresponding controls. We identified genetic variants in or near CDKN1B, TET3, CD80, DRAM1, and ARID5B as associated with the disease. These findings point to potential roles of cell-cycle regulation, autophagy, and DNA demethylation in SLE pathogenesis. For the region involving TET3 and that involving CDKN1B, multiple independent SNPs were identified, highlighting a phenomenon that might partially explain the missing heritability of complex diseases. PMID:23273568

  1. Pathologic features of metastatic lymph nodes identified from prophylactic central neck dissection in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Shin; Park, Chanwoo; Kim, Sung Won; Noh, Woong Jae; Lim, Soo Jin; Chun, Bong Kwon; Kim, Beom Su; Hong, Jong Chul; Lee, Kang Dae

    2016-10-01

    The importance of pathologic features of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs), such as size, number, and extranodal extension, has been recently emphasized in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We evaluated the characteristics of metastatic LNs identified after prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) in patients with PTC. We performed a retrospective review of 1,046 patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral thyroidectomy with ipsilateral prophylactic CND. We reviewed the characteristics of the metastatic LNs and analyzed their correlation to the clinicopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor. Cervical LN metastasis after prophylactic CND was identified in 280 out of 1046 patients (26.8 %). The size of metastatic foci (≥2 mm) was independently correlated with primary tumor size (≥1 cm) (p = 0.016, OR = 1.88). Primary tumor size (≥1 cm) was also correlated to the number of metastatic LNs (≥5) (p = 0.004, OR = 3.14) and extranodal extension (p = 0.021, OR = 2.41) in univariate analysis. The size of the primary tumor affects pathologic features of subclinical LN metastasis in patients with PTC. Patients with primary tumors ≥1 cm have an increased risk of larger LN metastases (≥2 mm), an increased number of LN metastases (≥5), and a higher incidence of ENE, which should be considered in decision for prophylactic CND.

  2. Optical redox ratio identifies metastatic potential-dependent changes in breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alhallak, Kinan; Rebello, Lisa G.; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    The development of prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic risk could reduce the number of patients receiving chemotherapy for tumors with low metastatic potential. Recent evidence points to a critical role for cell metabolism in driving breast cancer metastasis. Endogenous fluorescence intensity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) can provide a label-free method for assessing cell metabolism. We report the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD + NADH) of four isogenic triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with varying metastatic potential. Under normoxic conditions, the redox ratio increases with increasing metastatic potential (168FARN>4T07>4T1), indicating a shift to more oxidative metabolism in cells capable of metastasis. Reoxygenation following acute hypoxia increased the redox ratio by 43 ± 9% and 33 ± 4% in the 4T1 and 4T07 cells, respectively; in contrast, the redox ratio decreased 14 ± 7% in the non-metastatic 67NR cell line. These results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio is sensitive to the metabolic adaptability of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential and could potentially be used to measure dynamic functional changes that are indicative of invasive or metastatic potential. PMID:27895979

  3. Metallothionein – Immunohistochemical Cancer Biomarker: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Masarik, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) has been extensively investigated as a molecular marker of various types of cancer. In spite of the fact that numerous reviews have been published in this field, no meta-analytical approach has been performed. Therefore, results of to-date immunohistochemistry-based studies were summarized using meta-analysis in this review. Web of science, PubMed, Embase and CENTRAL databases were searched (up to April 30, 2013) and the eligibility of individual studies and heterogeneity among the studies was assessed. Random and fixed effects model meta-analysis was employed depending on the heterogeneity, and publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and Egger's tests. A total of 77 studies were included with 8,015 tissue samples (4,631 cases and 3,384 controls). A significantly positive association between MT staining and tumors (vs. healthy tissues) was observed in head and neck (odds ratio, OR 9.95; 95% CI 5.82–17.03) and ovarian tumors (OR 7.83; 1.09–56.29), and a negative association was ascertained in liver tumors (OR 0.10; 0.03–0.30). No significant associations were identified in breast, colorectal, prostate, thyroid, stomach, bladder, kidney, gallbladder, and uterine cancers and in melanoma. While no associations were identified between MT and tumor staging, a positive association was identified with the tumor grade (OR 1.58; 1.08–2.30). In particular, strong associations were observed in breast, ovarian, uterine and prostate cancers. Borderline significant association of metastatic status and MT staining were determined (OR 1.59; 1.03–2.46), particularly in esophageal cancer. Additionally, a significant association between the patient prognosis and MT staining was also demonstrated (hazard ratio 2.04; 1.47–2.81). However, a high degree of inconsistence was observed in several tumor types, including colorectal, kidney and prostate cancer. Despite the ambiguity in some tumor types, conclusive results are provided in the tumors of

  4. Differential Adverse Event Profiles Associated with BCG as a Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccine or Therapeutic Bladder Cancer Vaccine Identified by Comparative Ontology-Based VAERS and Literature Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiangan; Codd, Christopher; Mo, Kevin; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    M. bovis strain Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been the only licensed live attenuated vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) for nearly one century and has also been approved as a therapeutic vaccine for bladder cancer treatment since 1990. During its long time usage, different adverse events (AEs) have been reported. However, the AEs associated with the BCG preventive TB vaccine and therapeutic cancer vaccine have not been systematically compared. In this study, we systematically collected various BCG AE data mined from the US VAERS database and PubMed literature reports, identified statistically significant BCG-associated AEs, and ontologically classified and compared these AEs related to these two types of BCG vaccine. From 397 VAERS BCG AE case reports, we identified 64 AEs statistically significantly associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 14 AEs with the BCG cancer vaccine. Our meta-analysis of 41 peer-reviewed journal reports identified 48 AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 43 AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine. Among all identified AEs from VAERS and literature reports, 25 AEs belong to serious AEs. The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE)-based ontological hierarchical analysis indicated that the AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine were enriched in immune system (e.g., lymphadenopathy and lymphadenitis), skin (e.g., skin ulceration and cyanosis), and respiratory system (e.g., cough and pneumonia); in contrast, the AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine mainly occurred in the urinary system (e.g., dysuria, pollakiuria, and hematuria). With these distinct AE profiles detected, this study also discovered three AEs (i.e., chills, pneumonia, and C-reactive protein increased) shared by the BCG TB vaccine and bladder cancer vaccine. Furthermore, our deep investigation of 24 BCG-associated death cases from VAERS identified the important effects of age, vaccine co-administration, and immunosuppressive status on the final BCG-associated death

  5. Differential Adverse Event Profiles Associated with BCG as a Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccine or Therapeutic Bladder Cancer Vaccine Identified by Comparative Ontology-Based VAERS and Literature Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiangan; Codd, Christopher; Mo, Kevin; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    M. bovis strain Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) has been the only licensed live attenuated vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) for nearly one century and has also been approved as a therapeutic vaccine for bladder cancer treatment since 1990. During its long time usage, different adverse events (AEs) have been reported. However, the AEs associated with the BCG preventive TB vaccine and therapeutic cancer vaccine have not been systematically compared. In this study, we systematically collected various BCG AE data mined from the US VAERS database and PubMed literature reports, identified statistically significant BCG-associated AEs, and ontologically classified and compared these AEs related to these two types of BCG vaccine. From 397 VAERS BCG AE case reports, we identified 64 AEs statistically significantly associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 14 AEs with the BCG cancer vaccine. Our meta-analysis of 41 peer-reviewed journal reports identified 48 AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine and 43 AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine. Among all identified AEs from VAERS and literature reports, 25 AEs belong to serious AEs. The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE)-based ontological hierarchical analysis indicated that the AEs associated with the BCG TB vaccine were enriched in immune system (e.g., lymphadenopathy and lymphadenitis), skin (e.g., skin ulceration and cyanosis), and respiratory system (e.g., cough and pneumonia); in contrast, the AEs associated with the BCG cancer vaccine mainly occurred in the urinary system (e.g., dysuria, pollakiuria, and hematuria). With these distinct AE profiles detected, this study also discovered three AEs (i.e., chills, pneumonia, and C-reactive protein increased) shared by the BCG TB vaccine and bladder cancer vaccine. Furthermore, our deep investigation of 24 BCG-associated death cases from VAERS identified the important effects of age, vaccine co-administration, and immunosuppressive status on the final BCG-associated death

  6. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer.

  7. Efficacy of gemcitabine plus platinum agents for biliary tract cancers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yong-jun; Li, Hong-bo; Hu, Jun-bo; Zou, Sheng-quan

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a meta-analysis of the efficacy of gemcitabine+platinum agent regimens in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). PubMed and Google Scholar were searched using the following combination of search terms: gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, cholangiocarcinoma, biliary, gallbladder, bile duct. Studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis if they were randomized trials on the use of gemcitabine plus a platinum agent for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic cancer) BTC. Outcomes of interest were response rate, overall survival, and progression-free survival. Pooled odds ratios/differences in median survival and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined for each outcome. A total of 47 records were identified in the initial search. Ultimately, three open-label randomized trials (two phase 2 and one phase 3) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Two studies compared gemcitabine plus cisplatin with gemcitabine alone, whereas the other study compared gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin with fluorouracil-folinic acid. The total number of patients in the studies ranged from 54 to 410. The overall analyses revealed that all survival outcomes assessed were significantly more favorable for patients treated with gemcitabine plus platinum agents than for patients not treated with this combination. Response rates: odds ratio=2.639, 95% CI=1.210-5.757, Z=2.439, P=0.015; pooled difference in median overall survival=3.822 months, 95% CI=1.798-5.845 months, Z=3.702, P<0.001; pooled difference in median progression-free survival=3.268 months, 95% CI=1.996-4.541 months, Z=5.035, P<0.001. Patients with advanced BTC who are treated with gemcitabine plus platinum agents may experience better survival outcomes compared with patients who are not treated with this combination of chemotherapy.

  8. Meta-analysis of clinical data using human meiotic genes identifies a novel cohort of highly restricted cancer-specific marker genes.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Julia; Aldeailej, Ibrahim; Anderson, Rebecca; Almutairi, Mikhlid; Almatrafi, Ahmed; Alsiwiehri, Naif; Griffiths, Keith; Stuart, Nicholas; Wakeman, Jane A; Larcombe, Lee; McFarlane, Ramsay J

    2012-08-01

    Identifying cancer-specific biomarkers represents an ongoing challenge to the development of novel cancer diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies. Cancer/testis (CT) genes are an important gene family with expression tightly restricted to the testis in normal individuals but which can also be activated in cancers. Here we develop a pipeline to identify new CT genes. We analysed and validated expression profiles of human meiotic genes in normal and cancerous tissue followed by meta-analyses of clinical data sets from a range of tumour types resulting in the identification of a large cohort of highly specific cancer biomarker genes, including the recombination hot spot activator PRDM9 and the meiotic cohesin genes SMC1beta and RAD21L. These genes not only provide excellent cancer biomarkers for diagnostics and prognostics, but may serve as oncogenes and have excellent drug targeting potential.

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits.

    PubMed

    Justice, Anne E; Winkler, Thomas W; Feitosa, Mary F; Graff, Misa; Fisher, Virginia A; Young, Kristin; Barata, Llilda; Deng, Xuan; Czajkowski, Jacek; Hadley, David; Ngwa, Julius S; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Chu, Audrey Y; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Lim, Elise; Perez, Jeremiah; Eicher, John D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Xue, Luting; Mahajan, Anubha; Renström, Frida; Wu, Joseph; Qi, Qibin; Ahmad, Shafqat; Alfred, Tamuno; Amin, Najaf; Bielak, Lawrence F; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bragg, Jennifer; Cadby, Gemma; Chittani, Martina; Coggeshall, Scott; Corre, Tanguy; Direk, Nese; Eriksson, Joel; Fischer, Krista; Gorski, Mathias; Neergaard Harder, Marie; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huang, Tao; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jackson, Anne U; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kinnunen, Leena; Kleber, Marcus E; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Lim, Unhee; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mangino, Massimo; Manichaikul, Ani; Marten, Jonathan; Middelberg, Rita P S; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Pérusse, Louis; Pervjakova, Natalia; Sarti, Cinzia; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smith, Jennifer A; Stančáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van der Most, Peter J; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vedantam, Sailaja L; Verweij, Niek; Vink, Jacqueline M; Vitart, Veronique; Wu, Ying; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zimmermann, Martina E; Zubair, Niha; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Adair, Linda S; Afaq, Saima; Afzal, Uzma; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bartz, Traci M; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin; Braga, Daniele; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chambers, John C; Collins, Francis S; Curran, Joanne E; de Borst, Gert J; de Craen, Anton J M; de Geus, Eco J C; Dedoussis, George; Delgado, Graciela E; den Ruijter, Hester M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Anna L; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D; Ford, Ian; Forrester, Terrence; Gertow, Karl; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Gong, Jian; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Haitjema, Saskia; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas D; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J; Hollensted, Mette; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Homuth, Georg; Jan Hottenga, Jouke; Huang, Jie; Hung, Joseph; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; James, Alan L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A; Jørgensen, Marit E; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kooperberg, Charles; Krämer, Bernhard K; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Linneberg, Allan; Lobbens, Stephane; Loh, Marie; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lubke, Gitta; Ludolph-Donislawski, Anja; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A F; Männikkö, Reija; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Martin, Nicholas G; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Mellström, Dan; Menni, Cristina; Montgomery, Grant W; Musk, Aw Bill; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peyser, Patricia A; Pisinger, Charlotta; Porteous, David J; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rawal, Rajesh; Rice, Treva; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Bien, Stephanie A; Rudan, Igor; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A; Sattar, Naveed; Savonen, Kai; Schlessinger, David; Scholtens, Salome; Schurmann, Claudia; Scott, Robert A; Sennblad, Bengt; Siemelink, Marten A; Silbernagel, Günther; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Staessen, Jan A; Stott, David J; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Taylor, Kent D; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothee; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M; Waeber, Gérard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Westendorp, R G J; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhao, Wei; Zillikens, M Carola; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Böger, Carsten A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bouchard, Claude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Chasman, Daniel I; Chen, Yii-DerIda; Chines, Peter S; Cooper, Richard S; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Faire, Ulf de; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Hayward, Caroline; Hveem, Kristian; Johnson, Andrew D; Wouter Jukema, J; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Marchand, Loic Le; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew P; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smith, Blair H; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Strauch, Konstantin; Tiemeier, Henning; Tremoli, Elena; van der Harst, Pim; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Whitfield, John B; Wilson, James F; Tyrrell, Jessica; Frayling, Timothy M; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Fox, Caroline S; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hunter, David J; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Heid, Iris M; Mohlke, Karen L; Marchini, Jonathan; Loos, Ruth J F; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Liu, Ching-Ti; Borecki, Ingrid B; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2017-04-26

    Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Anne E.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Graff, Misa; Fisher, Virginia A.; Young, Kristin; Barata, Llilda; Deng, Xuan; Czajkowski, Jacek; Hadley, David; Ngwa, Julius S.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Lim, Elise; Perez, Jeremiah; Eicher, John D.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Xue, Luting; Mahajan, Anubha; Renström, Frida; Wu, Joseph; Qi, Qibin; Ahmad, Shafqat; Alfred, Tamuno; Amin, Najaf; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bragg, Jennifer; Cadby, Gemma; Chittani, Martina; Coggeshall, Scott; Corre, Tanguy; Direk, Nese; Eriksson, Joel; Fischer, Krista; Gorski, Mathias; Neergaard Harder, Marie; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huang, Tao; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jackson, Anne U.; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kinnunen, Leena; Kleber, Marcus E.; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Lim, Unhee; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mangino, Massimo; Manichaikul, Ani; Marten, Jonathan; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Pérusse, Louis; Pervjakova, Natalia; Sarti, Cinzia; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smith, Jennifer A.; Stančáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W.; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vedantam, Sailaja L.; Verweij, Niek; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Vitart, Veronique; Wu, Ying; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zimmermann, Martina E.; Zubair, Niha; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Afaq, Saima; Afzal, Uzma; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bartz, Traci M.; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bottinger, Erwin; Braga, Daniele; Buckley, Brendan M.; Buyske, Steve; Campbell, Harry; Chambers, John C.; Collins, Francis S.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Borst, Gert J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dedoussis, George; Delgado, Graciela E.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Anna L.; Esko, Tõnu; Faul, Jessica D.; Ford, Ian; Forrester, Terrence; Gertow, Karl; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Gong, Jian; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; Haitjema, Saskia; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena; Hindorff, Lucia; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hollensted, Mette; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Homuth, Georg; Jan Hottenga, Jouke; Huang, Jie; Hung, Joseph; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; James, Alan L.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kooperberg, Charles; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Linneberg, Allan; Lobbens, Stephane; Loh, Marie; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lubke, Gitta; Ludolph-Donislawski, Anja; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Männikkö, Reija; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Martin, Nicholas G.; McKenzie, Colin A.; McKnight, Barbara; Mellström, Dan; Menni, Cristina; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, AW (Bill); Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Olden, Matthias; Ong, Ken K.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pisinger, Charlotta; Porteous, David J.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rawal, Rajesh; Rice, Treva; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Bien, Stephanie A.; Rudan, Igor; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Sattar, Naveed; Savonen, Kai; Schlessinger, David; Scholtens, Salome; Schurmann, Claudia; Scott, Robert A.; Sennblad, Bengt; Siemelink, Marten A.; Silbernagel, Günther; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Staessen, Jan A.; Stott, David J.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Thorand, Barbara; Thuillier, Dorothee; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Waeber, Gérard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zhao, Wei; Zillikens, M Carola; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Böger, Carsten A.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bouchard, Claude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Yii-DerIda; Chines, Peter S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Faire, Ulf de; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Grabe, Hans- Jörgen; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hayward, Caroline; Hveem, Kristian; Johnson, Andrew D.; Wouter Jukema, J; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Marchand, Loic Le; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew P.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smith, Blair H.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tiemeier, Henning; Tremoli, Elena; van der Harst, Pim; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Whitfield, John B.; Wilson, James F.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Frayling, Timothy M.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Fox, Caroline S.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hunter, David J.; Spector, Tim D.; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Heid, Iris M.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Marchini, Jonathan; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Borecki, Ingrid B.; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution. PMID:28443625

  11. Immune signature of metastatic breast cancer: Identifying predictive markers of immunotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Eunjin; Park, Kyunghee; Park, Woong-Yang; Jung, Hae Hyun; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2017-07-18

    In breast cancer (BC), up to 10-20% patients were known to have clinical benefit with immune checkpoint inhibitors, and biomarkers are needed for optimal use of this multi-potential therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, we conducted an experiment to identify expression of genes associated with immune checkpoints that represent potential targets of cancer immunotherapy. We performed whole-transcriptome sequencing and whole-exome sequencing using 37 refractory BC specimens. In the immune pathway gene set expression analysis, we found that HER2 expression and previous taxane treatment were positively correlated with high expression of immune gene set expression (p = 0.070 and 0.008, respectively). The nine genes associated with immune checkpoints - PDCD1(PD-1), CD274(PD-L1), CD276(B7-H3), CTLA-4, IDO1, LAG3, VTCN1, HAVCR2, and TNFRSF4(OX40) - interacted with each other. In addition, HER2 expression also affected the expression levels of these genes (p = 0.044). Lastly, expression of immune checkpoint genes and tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes were positively correlated in metastatic BCs (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we suggest that HER2 expression and previous taxane treatment are potential surrogate markers for high expression of immune checkpoint genes and immune pathway gene sets. Further study of the BC immune signature with large-scale, translational data sets is warranted.

  12. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies a novel locus at 17q11.2 associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fogh, Isabella; Ratti, Antonia; Gellera, Cinzia; Lin, Kuang; Tiloca, Cinzia; Moskvina, Valentina; Corrado, Lucia; Sorarù, Gianni; Cereda, Cristina; Corti, Stefania; Gentilini, Davide; Calini, Daniela; Castellotti, Barbara; Mazzini, Letizia; Querin, Giorgia; Gagliardi, Stella; Del Bo, Roberto; Conforti, Francesca L.; Siciliano, Gabriele; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Saccà, Francesco; Bongioanni, Paolo; Penco, Silvana; Corbo, Massimo; Sorbi, Sandro; Filosto, Massimiliano; Ferlini, Alessandra; Di Blasio, Anna M.; Signorini, Stefano; Shatunov, Aleksey; Jones, Ashley; Shaw, Pamela J.; Morrison, Karen E.; Farmer, Anne E.; Van Damme, Philip; Robberecht, Wim; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.; Sendtner, Michael; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Andersen, Peter M.; Leigh, Nigel P.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Overste, Daniel; Diekstra, Frank P.; Veldink, Jan H.; van Es, Michael A.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Weale, Michael E.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Williams, Julie; Brown, Robert H.; Landers, John E.; Ticozzi, Nicola; Ceroni, Mauro; Pegoraro, Elena; Comi, Giacomo P.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Taroni, Franco; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Powell, John; Silani, Vincenzo; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Filla, Alessandro; Massimo, Filosto; Marsili, Angela; Viviana, Pensato; Puorro, Giorgia; La Bella, Vincenzo; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Quattrone, Aldo; Simone, Isabella Laura; Ahmeti, Kreshnik B.; Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Armstrong, Jennifer; Birve, Anne; Blauw, Hylke M.; Bruijn, Lucie; Chen, Wenjie; Comeau, Mary C.; Cronin, Simon; Soraya, Gkazi Athina; Grab, Josh D.; Groen, Ewout J.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Heller, Scott; Huang, Jie; Hung, Wu-Yen; Jaworski, James M.; Khan, Humaira; Langefeld, Carl D.; Marion, Miranda C.; McLaughlin, Russell L.; Miller, Jack W.; Mora, Gabriele; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Siddique, Nailah; Siddique, Teepu; Smith, Bradley N.; Sufit, Robert; Topp, Simon; Vance, Caroline; van Vught, Paul; Yang, Yi; Zheng, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of mutations at familial loci for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has provided novel insights into the aetiology of this rapidly progressing fatal neurodegenerative disease. However, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the more common (∼90%) sporadic form have been less successful with the exception of the replicated locus at 9p21.2. To identify new loci associated with disease susceptibility, we have established the largest association study in ALS to date and undertaken a GWAS meta-analytical study combining 3959 newly genotyped Italian individuals (1982 cases and 1977 controls) collected by SLAGEN (Italian Consortium for the Genetics of ALS) together with samples from Netherlands, USA, UK, Sweden, Belgium, France, Ireland and Italy collected by ALSGEN (the International Consortium on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Genetics). We analysed a total of 13 225 individuals, 6100 cases and 7125 controls for almost 7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We identified a novel locus with genome-wide significance at 17q11.2 (rs34517613 with P = 1.11 × 10−8; OR 0.82) that was validated when combined with genotype data from a replication cohort (P = 8.62 × 10−9; OR 0.833) of 4656 individuals. Furthermore, we confirmed the previously reported association at 9p21.2 (rs3849943 with P = 7.69 × 10−9; OR 1.16). Finally, we estimated the contribution of common variation to heritability of sporadic ALS as ∼12% using a linear mixed model accounting for all SNPs. Our results provide an insight into the genetic structure of sporadic ALS, confirming that common variation contributes to risk and that sufficiently powered studies can identify novel susceptibility loci. PMID:24256812

  13. Clinicopathological Significance of RhoA Expression in Digestive Tract Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Li, Wanyu; Peng, Jifeng; Qi, Shengnan; Song, Lingxie; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-10-01

    RhoA protein expression has been reported in different types of cancer. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics of RhoA protein expression in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. We searched in several databases, including MEDLINE (PubMed) and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to identify studies examining the association between RhoA protein and cancer. The quality of the included studies was assessed. Cochrane Collaboration's Software Review Manager 5.3 was utilized to test the heterogeneity, overall effect, and publication bias of the combined studies. The reported odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by using fixed and random effects models depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. A total of 15 studies met the inclusion criteria of the meta-analysis. RhoA expression was significantly higher in gastrointestinal cancer than in normal tissues. RhoA protein expression in digestive system neoplasms was significantly associated with tumor clinical staging, metastatic status and differentiated degree. However, no association with gender was found. RhoA mRNA expression was no associated with clinicopathological significance. Current evidence supports the conclusion that RhoA expression is associated with clinical staging, metastatic status, and differentiated degree in digestive system neoplasms. RhoA expression may play an important role in the carcinogenesis and metastasis of gastrointestinal cancer.

  14. Genome-wide Trans-ethnic Meta-analysis Identifies Seven Genetic Loci Influencing Erythrocyte Traits and a Role for RBPMS in Erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, Frank J A; Qayyum, Rehan; Smith, Albert V; Zhou, Yi; Trompet, Stella; Tanaka, Toshiko; Keller, Margaux F; Chang, Li-Ching; Schmidt, Helena; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Ming-Huei; Hayes, James; Johnson, Andrew D; Yanek, Lisa R; Mueller, Christian; Lange, Leslie; Floyd, James S; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Zonderman, Alan B; Jukema, J Wouter; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Desch, Karl C; Saba, Yasaman; Ozel, Ayse B; Snively, Beverly M; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fornage, Myriam; Klein, Robert J; Fox, Caroline S; Matsuda, Koichi; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Wild, Philipp S; Stott, David J; Ford, Ian; Slagboom, P Eline; Yang, Jaden; Chu, Audrey Y; Lambert, Amy J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Hofer, Edith; Ginsburg, David; Hu, Bella; Keating, Brendan; Schick, Ursula M; Brody, Jennifer A; Li, Jun Z; Chen, Zhao; Zeller, Tanja; Guralnik, Jack M; Chasman, Daniel I; Peters, Luanne L; Kubo, Michiaki; Becker, Diane M; Li, Jin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Rotter, Jerome I; Levy, Daniel; Grossmann, Vera; Patel, Kushang V; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Ridker, Paul M; Tang, Hua; Launer, Lenore J; Rice, Kenneth M; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Ferrucci, Luigi; Evans, Michelle K; Choudhuri, Avik; Trompouki, Eirini; Abraham, Brian J; Yang, Song; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Kooperberg, Charles; Harris, Tamara B; Jee, Sun Ha; Coresh, Josef; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Longo, Dan L; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Felix, Janine F; Yang, Qiong; Psaty, Bruce M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Becker, Lewis C; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Wilson, James G; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Dehghan, Abbas; Cupples, L Adrienne; Nalls, Michael A; Morris, Andrew P; Okada, Yukinori; Reiner, Alexander P; Zon, Leonard I; Ganesh, Santhi K

    2017-01-05

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified loci for erythrocyte traits in primarily European ancestry populations. We conducted GWAS meta-analyses of six erythrocyte traits in 71,638 individuals from European, East Asian, and African ancestries using a Bayesian approach to account for heterogeneity in allelic effects and variation in the structure of linkage disequilibrium between ethnicities. We identified seven loci for erythrocyte traits including a locus (RBPMS/GTF2E2) associated with mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume. Statistical fine-mapping at this locus pointed to RBPMS at this locus and excluded nearby GTF2E2. Using zebrafish morpholino to evaluate loss of function, we observed a strong in vivo erythropoietic effect for RBPMS but not for GTF2E2, supporting the statistical fine-mapping at this locus and demonstrating that RBPMS is a regulator of erythropoiesis. Our findings show the utility of trans-ethnic GWASs for discovery and characterization of genetic loci influencing hematologic traits.

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >80,000 subjects identifies multiple loci for C-reactive protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F; Paré, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco JC; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert YL; Schnabel, Renate B; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Albert V; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M; Larson, Martin G; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Freimer, Nelson B; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P; Launer, Lenore J; Buring, Julie E; Yamamoto, Jennifer F; Folsom, Aaron R; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, João D; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H; Kuss, Oliver; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Völzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A; Penninx, Brenda W; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Dörte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Benjamin, Emelia J; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We aimed to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results We performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis of CRP in 66,185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16,540 individuals from ten independent studies. We found 18 genome-wide significant loci and we provided evidence of replication for eight of them. Our results confirm seven previously known loci and introduce 11 novel loci that are implicated in pathways related to the metabolic syndrome (APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, HNF4A, and PTPN2), immune system (CRP, IL6R, NLRP3, IL1F10, and IRF1), or that reside in regions previously not known to play a role in chronic inflammation (PPP1R3B, SALL1, PABPC4, ASCL1, RORA, and BCL7B). We found significant interaction of body mass index (BMI) with LEPR (p<2.9×10−6). A weighted genetic risk score that was developed to summarize the effect of risk alleles was strongly associated with CRP levels and explained approximately 5% of the trait variance; however, there was no evidence for these genetic variants explaining the association of CRP with coronary heart disease. Conclusion We identified 18 loci that were associated with CRP levels. Our study highlights immune response and metabolic regulatory pathways involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. PMID:21300955

  16. A conserved BDNF, glutamate- and GABA-enriched gene module related to human depression identified by coexpression meta-analysis and DNA variant genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lun-Ching; Jamain, Stephane; Lin, Chien-Wei; Rujescu, Dan; Tseng, George C; Sibille, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Large scale gene expression (transcriptome) analysis and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for single nucleotide polymorphisms have generated a considerable amount of gene- and disease-related information, but heterogeneity and various sources of noise have limited the discovery of disease mechanisms. As systematic dataset integration is becoming essential, we developed methods and performed meta-clustering of gene coexpression links in 11 transcriptome studies from postmortem brains of human subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) and non-psychiatric control subjects. We next sought enrichment in the top 50 meta-analyzed coexpression modules for genes otherwise identified by GWAS for various sets of disorders. One coexpression module of 88 genes was consistently and significantly associated with GWAS for MDD, other neuropsychiatric disorders and brain functions, and for medical illnesses with elevated clinical risk of depression, but not for other diseases. In support of the superior discriminative power of this novel approach, we observed no significant enrichment for GWAS-related genes in coexpression modules extracted from single studies or in meta-modules using gene expression data from non-psychiatric control subjects. Genes in the identified module encode proteins implicated in neuronal signaling and structure, including glutamate metabotropic receptors (GRM1, GRM7), GABA receptors (GABRA2, GABRA4), and neurotrophic and development-related proteins [BDNF, reelin (RELN), Ephrin receptors (EPHA3, EPHA5)]. These results are consistent with the current understanding of molecular mechanisms of MDD and provide a set of putative interacting molecular partners, potentially reflecting components of a functional module across cells and biological pathways that are synchronously recruited in MDD, other brain disorders and MDD-related illnesses. Collectively, this study demonstrates the importance of integrating transcriptome data, gene coexpression modules

  17. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies loci associated with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels with impact on age-related traits.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Qi, Qibin; Nethander, Maria; Aschard, Hugues; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Berndt, Sonja I; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Broer, Linda; Cappola, Anne; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Ming-Huei; Chen, Tai C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chung, Jonathan; Del Greco Miglianico, Fabiola; Eriksson, Joel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedrich, Nele; Gnewuch, Carsten; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grarup, Niels; Guo, Tingwei; Hammer, Elke; Hayes, Richard B; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J; Husemoen, Lise L; Isaacs, Aaron; Jacobs, Kevin B; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jehmlich, Nico; Johnson, Simon; Juul, Anders; Karlsson, Magnus; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Li, Chao; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J F; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Maggio, Marcello; Magi, Reedik; Meigs, James; Mellström, Dan; Nauck, Matthias; Newman, Anne B; Pollak, Michael N; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Psaty, Bruce M; Reincke, Martin; Rimm, Eric B; Rotter, Jerome I; Saint Pierre, Aude; Schurmann, Claudia; Seshadri, Sudha; Sjögren, Klara; Slagboom, P Eline; Strickler, Howard D; Stumvoll, Michael; Suh, Yousin; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Cuilin; Svensson, Johan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tare, Archana; Tönjes, Anke; Uh, Hae-Won; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Heemst, Diana; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Völker, Uwe; Willems, Sara M; Ohlsson, Claes; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kaplan, Robert C

    2016-10-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis can be manipulated in animal models to promote longevity, and IGF-related proteins including IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have also been implicated in risk of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Through genomewide association study of up to 30 884 adults of European ancestry from 21 studies, we confirmed and extended the list of previously identified loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations (IGF1, IGFBP3, GCKR, TNS3, GHSR, FOXO3, ASXL2, NUBP2/IGFALS, SORCS2, and CELSR2). Significant sex interactions, which were characterized by different genotype-phenotype associations between men and women, were found only for associations of IGFBP-3 concentrations with SNPs at the loci IGFBP3 and SORCS2. Analyses of SNPs, gene expression, and protein levels suggested that interplay between IGFBP3 and genes within the NUBP2 locus (IGFALS and HAGH) may affect circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations. The IGF-I-decreasing allele of SNP rs934073, which is an eQTL of ASXL2, was associated with lower adiposity and higher likelihood of survival beyond 90 years. The known longevity-associated variant rs2153960 (FOXO3) was observed to be a genomewide significant SNP for IGF-I concentrations. Bioinformatics analysis suggested enrichment of putative regulatory elements among these IGF-I- and IGFBP-3-associated loci, particularly of rs646776 at CELSR2. In conclusion, this study identified several loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations and provides clues to the potential role of the IGF axis in mediating effects of known (FOXO3) and novel (ASXL2) longevity-associated loci. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Can We Identify the Active Ingredients of Behaviour Change Interventions for Coronary Heart Disease Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Laura; Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Khan, Nadia; Hotopf, Matthew H; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2016-01-01

    The main behaviour change intervention available for coronary heart disease (CHD) patients is cardiac rehabilitation. There is little recognition of what the active ingredients of behavioural interventions for CHD might be. Using a behaviour change technique (BCT) framework to code existing interventions may help to identify this. The objectives of this systematic review are to determine the effectiveness of CHD behaviour change interventions and how this may be explained by BCT content and structure. A systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo electronic databases was conducted over a twelve year period (2003-2015) to identify studies which reported on behaviour change interventions for CHD patients. The content of the behaviour change interventions was coded using the Coventry Aberdeen and London-Refined (CALO-RE) taxonomy. Meta-regression analyses examined the BCT content as a predictor of mortality. Twenty two papers met the criteria for this review, reporting data on 16,766 participants. The most commonly included BCTs were providing information, and goal setting. There was a small but significant effect of the interventions on smoking (risk ratio (RR) = 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.97). The interventions did not reduce the risk of CHD events (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.68, 1.09), but significantly reduced the risk of mortality (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.69, 0.97). Sensitivity analyses did not find that any of the BCT variables predicted mortality and the number of BCTs included in an intervention was not associated with mortality (β = -0.02, 95% CI -0.06-0.03). Behaviour change interventions for CHD patients appear to have a positive impact on a number of outcomes. Using an existing BCT taxonomy to code the interventions helped us to understand which were the most commonly used techniques, providing information and goal setting, but not the active components of these complex interventions.

  19. Comparing interferon-gamma release assays with tuberculin skin test for identifying latent tuberculosis infection that progresses to active tuberculosis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Peter; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Pink, Joshua; Court, Rachel; McCarthy, Noel; Sutcliffe, Paul; Clarke, Aileen

    2017-03-09

    Timely and accurate identification of people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is important for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). There is no gold standard for diagnosis of LTBI. Screening tests such as interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) and tuberculin skin test (TST) provide indirect and imperfect information. This systematic review compared two types of IGRAs QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB with TST for identification of LTBI by predicting progression to a diagnosis of active TB in three subgroups: children, immunocompromised people, and those recently arrived from countries with high TB burden. Cohort studies were eligible for inclusion. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and other databases from December 2009 to June 2015. One reviewer screened studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias with cross checking by a second reviewer. Strength of association between test results and incidence of TB was summarised using cumulative incidence ratios (CIRs with 95% CIs). Summary effect measures: the ratio of CIRs (R-CIR) with 95% CIs. R-CIRs, were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Chi-squared and I(2) statistics. Seventeen studies, mostly of moderate or high risk of bias (five in children, 10 in immunocompromised people, and two in those recently arrived) were included. In children, while in two studies, there was no significant difference between QFT-GIT and TST (≥5 mm) (pooled R-CIR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.71, 1.74), two other studies showed QFT-GIT to outperform TST (≥10 mm) in identifying LTBI. In immunocompromised people, IGRA (T-SPOT.TB) was not significant different from TST (≥10 mm) for identifying LTBI, (pooled R-CIR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.65, 1.58). The forest plot of two studies in recently arrived people from countries with high TB burden demonstrated inconsistent findings (high heterogeneity; I(2) = 92%). Prospective studies comparing IGRA

  20. Meta-analysis of rare and common exome chip variants identifies S1PR4 and other loci influencing blood cell traits

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Schick, Ursula M; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Wei; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Allende, Maria Laura; Auer, Paul L; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brody, Jennifer A; Chen, Ming-Huei; Clavo, Vinna; Eicher, John D; Grarup, Niels; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Hu, Bella; Hunker, Kristina; Johnson, Andrew D; Leusink, Maarten; Lu, Yingchang; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Manichaikul, Ani; Marioni, Riccardo E; Nalls, Mike A; Pazoki, Raha; Smith, Albert Vernon; van Rooij, Frank J A; Yang, Min-Lee; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yan; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bottinger, Erwin P; Cushman, Mary; de Bakker, Paul I W; Deary, Ian J; Dong, Liguang; Feitosa, Mary F; Floyd, James S; Franceschini, Nora; Franco, Oscar H; Garcia, Melissa E; Grove, Megan L; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jia, Jia; Kähönen, Mika; Launer, Lenore J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J F; Nguyen, Vy M; Numans, Mattijs E; Pedersen, Oluf; Psaty, Bruce M; Raitakari, Olli T; Rich, Stephen S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Di Sant, Amanda M Rosa; Rotter, Jerome I; Starr, John M; Taylor, Kent D; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk; Tracy, Russell P; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Jiansong; Wang, Judy; Dehghan, Abbas; Huo, Yong; Cupples, L Adrienne; Wilson, James G; Proia, Richard L; Zon, Leonard I; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Reiner, Alex P; Ganesh, Santhi K

    2016-01-01

    Hematologic measures such as hematocrit and white blood cell (WBC) count are heritable and clinically relevant. Erythrocyte and WBC phenotypes were analyzed with Illumina HumanExome BeadChip genotypes in 52,531 individuals (37,775 of European ancestry; 11,589 African Americans; 3,167 Hispanic Americans) from 16 population-based cohorts. We then performed replication analyses of novel discoveries in 18,018 European American women and 5,261 Han Chinese. We identified and replicated four novel erythrocyte trait-locus associations (CEP89, SHROOM3, FADS2, and APOE) and six novel WBC loci for neutrophil count (S1PR4), monocyte count (BTBD8, NLRP12, and IL17RA), eosinophil count (IRF1), and total WBC (MYB). The novel association of a rare missense variant in S1PR4 supports the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in leukocyte trafficking and circulating neutrophil counts. Loss-of-function experiments of S1pr4 in mouse and zebrafish demonstrated phenotypes consistent with the association observed in humans and altered kinetics of neutrophil recruitment and resolution in response to tissue injury. PMID:27399967

  1. Meta-analysis of rare and common exome chip variants identifies S1PR4 and other loci influencing blood cell traits.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic measures such as hematocrit and white blood cell (WBC) count are heritable and clinically relevant. We analyzed erythrocyte and WBC phenotypes in 52,531 individuals (37,775 of European ancestry, 11,589 African Americans, and 3,167 Hispanic Americans) from 16 population-based cohorts with Illumina HumanExome BeadChip genotypes. We then performed replication analyses of new discoveries in 18,018 European-American women and 5,261 Han Chinese. We identified and replicated four new erythrocyte trait-locus associations (CEP89, SHROOM3, FADS2, and APOE) and six new WBC loci for neutrophil count (S1PR4), monocyte count (BTBD8, NLRP12, and IL17RA), eosinophil count (IRF1), and total WBC count (MYB). The association of a rare missense variant in S1PR4 supports the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in leukocyte trafficking and circulating neutrophil counts. Loss-of-function experiments for S1pr4 in mouse and s1pr4 in zebrafish demonstrated phenotypes consistent with the association observed in humans and altered kinetics of neutrophil recruitment and resolution in response to tissue injury.

  2. Rethinking Meta-Analysis: Applications for Air Pollution Data and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Julie E; Petito Boyce, Catherine; Sax, Sonja N; Beyer, Leslie A; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses offer a rigorous and transparent systematic framework for synthesizing data that can be used for a wide range of research areas, study designs, and data types. Both the outcome of meta-analyses and the meta-analysis process itself can yield useful insights for answering scientific questions and making policy decisions. Development of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards illustrates many potential applications of meta-analysis. These applications demonstrate the strengths and limitations of meta-analysis, issues that arise in various data realms, how meta-analysis design choices can influence interpretation of results, and how meta-analysis can be used to address bias and heterogeneity. Reviewing available data from a meta-analysis perspective can provide a useful framework and impetus for identifying and refining strategies for future research. Moreover, increased pervasiveness of a meta-analysis mindset—focusing on how the pieces of the research puzzle fit together—would benefit scientific research and data syntheses regardless of whether or not a quantitative meta-analysis is undertaken. While an individual meta-analysis can only synthesize studies addressing the same research question, the results of separate meta-analyses can be combined to address a question encompassing multiple data types. This observation applies to any scientific or policy area where information from a variety of disciplines must be considered to address a broader research question. PMID:25969128

  3. Rethinking Meta-Analysis: Applications for Air Pollution Data and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Petito Boyce, Catherine; Sax, Sonja N; Beyer, Leslie A; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2015-06-01

    Meta-analyses offer a rigorous and transparent systematic framework for synthesizing data that can be used for a wide range of research areas, study designs, and data types. Both the outcome of meta-analyses and the meta-analysis process itself can yield useful insights for answering scientific questions and making policy decisions. Development of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards illustrates many potential applications of meta-analysis. These applications demonstrate the strengths and limitations of meta-analysis, issues that arise in various data realms, how meta-analysis design choices can influence interpretation of results, and how meta-analysis can be used to address bias and heterogeneity. Reviewing available data from a meta-analysis perspective can provide a useful framework and impetus for identifying and refining strategies for future research. Moreover, increased pervasiveness of a meta-analysis mindset-focusing on how the pieces of the research puzzle fit together-would benefit scientific research and data syntheses regardless of whether or not a quantitative meta-analysis is undertaken. While an individual meta-analysis can only synthesize studies addressing the same research question, the results of separate meta-analyses can be combined to address a question encompassing multiple data types. This observation applies to any scientific or policy area where information from a variety of disciplines must be considered to address a broader research question.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Timothy HT; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O’Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica MJ; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W.; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10−9) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10−8), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers. PMID:26621817

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O'Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica M J; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-12-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10(-9)) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10(-8)), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers.

  6. Alcohol Involvement and the Five-Factor Model of Personality: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malouff, John M.; Thorsteinsson, Einar B.; Rooke, Sally E.; Schutte, Nicola S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to quantify the relationship between the Five-Factor Model of personality and alcohol involvement and to identify moderators of the relationship. The meta-analysis included 20 studies, 119 effect sizes, and 7,886 participants. Possible moderators examined included: five-factor rating type (self vs. other);…

  7. Next generation sequencing identifies ‘interactome’ signatures in relapsed and refractory metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Laurence; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2017-01-01

    Background In the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutational status individualizes therapeutic options and identify a cohort of patients (pts) with an aggressive clinical course. We hypothesized that relapsed and refractory mCRC pts develop unique mutational signatures that may guide therapy, predict for a response and highlight key signaling pathways important for clinical decision making. Methods Relapsed and refractory mCRC pts (N=32) were molecularly profiled utilizing commercially available next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Web-based bioinformatics tools (Reactome/Enrichr) were utilized to elucidate mutational profile linked pathways-networks that have the potential to guide therapy. Results Pts had progressed on fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab and/or panitumumab. Most common histology was adenocarcinoma (colon N=29; rectal N=3). Of the mutations TP53 was the most common, followed by APC, KRAS, PIK3CA, BRAF, SMAD4, SPTA1, FAT1, PDGFRA, ATM, ROS1, ALK, CDKN2A, FBXW7, TGFBR2, NOTCH1 and HER3. Pts had on average had ≥5 unique mutations. The most frequent activated signaling pathways were: HER2, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), p38 through BRAF-MEK cascade via RIT and RIN, ARMS-mediated activation of MAPK cascade, and VEGFR2. Conclusions Dominant driver oncogene mutations do not always equate to oncogenic dependence, hence understanding pathogenic ‘interactome(s)’ in individual pts is key to both clinically relevant targets and in choosing the next best therapy. Mutational signatures derived from corresponding ‘pathway-networks’ represent a meaningful tool to (I) evaluate functional investigation in the laboratory; (II) predict response to drug therapy; and (III) guide rational drug combinations in relapsed and refractory mCRC pts. PMID:28280605

  8. Evaluating markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition to identify cancer patients at risk for metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Evan L.; Keku, Temitope O.; Richardson, David B.; Cohen, Stephanie M.; Eberhard, David A.; Avery, Christy L.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are due to metastases. Markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) measured in primary tumor cancer cells could be helpful to assess patient risk of metastatic disease, even among those otherwise diagnosed with local disease. Previous studies of EMT markers and patient outcomes used inconsistent methods and did not compare the clinical impact of different expression cut points for the same marker. Using digital image analysis, we measured the EMT markers Snail and E-cadherin in primary tumor specimens from 190 subjects in tissue microarrays from a population-based prospective cohort of colorectal cancer patients and estimated their associations with time-to-death. After measuring continuous marker expression data, we performed a systematic search for the cut point for each marker with the best model fit between dichotomous marker expression and time-to-death. We also assessed the potential clinical impact of different cut points for the same marker. After dichotomizing expression status at the statistically-optimal cut point, we found that Snail expression was not associated with time-to-death. When measured as a weighted average of tumor cores, low E-cadherin expression was associated with a greater risk of dying within 5 years of surgery than high expression (risk difference = 33 %, 95 % confidence interval 3–62 %). Identifying a clinically-optimal cut point for an EMT marker requires trade-offs between strength and precision of the association with patient outcomes, as well as consideration of the number of patients whose treatments might change based on using the marker at a given cut point. PMID:26507436

  9. Whole-exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in peritoneal metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Tingting; Huang, Haipeng; Lin, Tian; Hu, Yanfeng; Qi, Xiaolong; Yu, Jiang; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer and is associated with the worst prognosis. The associated genomic events and pathogenesis remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mutation spectrum of gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis and provide a basis for the identification of new biomarkers and treatment targets. Matched pairs of normal gastric mucosa and peritoneal tissue and matched pairs of primary tumor and peritoneal metastasis were collected from one patient for whole-exome sequencing (WES); Sanger sequencing was employed to confirm the somatic mutations. G>A and C>T mutations were the two most frequent transversions among the somatic mutations. We confirmed 48somatic mutations in the primary site and 49 in the peritoneal site. Additionally, 25 non-synonymous somatic variations (single-nucleotide variants, SNVs) and 2 somatic insertions/deletions (INDELs) were confirmed in the primary tumor, and 30 SNVs and 5 INDELs were verified in the peritoneal metastasis. Approximately 59% of the somatic mutations were shared between the primary and metastatic site. Five genes (TP53, BAI1, THSD1, ARID2, and KIAA2022) verified in our study were also mutated at a frequency greater than 5%in the COSMIC database. We also identified 9genes (ERBB4, ZNF721, NT5E, PDE10A, CA1, NUMB, NBN, ZFYVE16, and NCAM1) that were only mutated in metastasis and are expected to become treatment targets. In conclusion, we observed that the majority of the somatic mutations in the primary site persisted in metastasis, whereas several single-nucleotide polymorphisms occurred de novo at the second site. PMID:27270314

  10. Survival benefit and safety of the combinations of FOLFOXIRI ± bevacizumab versus the combinations of FOLFIRI ± bevacizumab as first-line treatment for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Kuang, Meng; Gong, Yang; Cao, Chunxiang; Chen, Jinfei; Tang, Cuiju

    2016-01-01

    Background The survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could be improved with exposure to three active drugs, irinotecan, fluorouracil/leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, irrespective of their sequence. However, only 50%–80% of patients can be exposed to all the three drugs in a sequential strategy with two-drug combinations. We carried out this systematic assessment to compare the survival benefit and safety of FOLFOXIRI (irinotecan, fluorouracil/leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) ± bevacizumab (with or without bevacizumab) versus FOLFIRI (irinotecan and fluorouracil/leucovorin) ± bevacizumab (with or without bevacizumab) as first-line treatment for unresectable mCRC. Methods PubMed and EMBASE were searched for original articles written in English and published before December 2015. A total of 1,035 patients from three randomized controlled trials were included. Results Our results demonstrated that overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73–0.97), progression-free survival (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.59–0.81), and overall response rate (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.28–2.98) were significantly improved in the FOLFOXIRI ± bevacizumab arm compared to the FOLFIRI ± bevacizumab arm. Significantly higher incidences of neutropenia, anemia, diarrhea, stomatitis, and neuropathy were observed in the FOLFOXIRI ± bevacizumab arm. Conclusion Current evidence shows that the combination of FOLFOXIRI ± bevacizumab significantly improves the overall survival, progression-free survival, and overall response rate of patients with mCRC, with an increased but manageable toxicity, compared with the combinations of FOLFIRI ± bevacizumab. The combination of FOLFOXIRI ± bevacizumab should be considered as a treatment option for these patients under the premise of reasonable selection of target population. PMID:27536147

  11. Identification of novel chemotherapeutic strategies for metastatic uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fagone, Paolo; Caltabiano, Rosario; Russo, Andrea; Lupo, Gabriella; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Basile, Maria Sofia; Longo, Antonio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; De Pasquale, Rocco; Libra, Massimo; Reibaldi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma of the uveal tract accounts for approximately 5% of all melanomas and represents the most common primary intraocular malignancy. Despite improvements in diagnosis and more effective local therapies for primary cancer, the rate of metastatic death has not changed in the past forty years. In the present study, we made use of bioinformatics to analyze the data obtained from three public available microarray datasets on uveal melanoma in an attempt to identify novel putative chemotherapeutic options for the liver metastatic disease. We have first carried out a meta-analysis of publicly available whole-genome datasets, that included data from 132 patients, comparing metastatic vs. non metastatic uveal melanomas, in order to identify the most relevant genes characterizing the spreading of tumor to the liver. Subsequently, the L1000CDS2 web-based utility was used to predict small molecules and drugs targeting the metastatic uveal melanoma gene signature. The most promising drugs were found to be Cinnarizine, an anti-histaminic drug used for motion sickness, Digitoxigenin, a precursor of cardiac glycosides, and Clofazimine, a fat-soluble iminophenazine used in leprosy. In vitro and in vivo validation studies will be needed to confirm the efficacy of these molecules for the prevention and treatment of metastatic uveal melanoma. PMID:28303962

  12. Identification of novel chemotherapeutic strategies for metastatic uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Caltabiano, Rosario; Russo, Andrea; Lupo, Gabriella; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Basile, Maria Sofia; Longo, Antonio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; De Pasquale, Rocco; Libra, Massimo; Reibaldi, Michele

    2017-03-17

    Melanoma of the uveal tract accounts for approximately 5% of all melanomas and represents the most common primary intraocular malignancy. Despite improvements in diagnosis and more effective local therapies for primary cancer, the rate of metastatic death has not changed in the past forty years. In the present study, we made use of bioinformatics to analyze the data obtained from three public available microarray datasets on uveal melanoma in an attempt to identify novel putative chemotherapeutic options for the liver metastatic disease. We have first carried out a meta-analysis of publicly available whole-genome datasets, that included data from 132 patients, comparing metastatic vs. non metastatic uveal melanomas, in order to identify the most relevant genes characterizing the spreading of tumor to the liver. Subsequently, the L1000CDS(2) web-based utility was used to predict small molecules and drugs targeting the metastatic uveal melanoma gene signature. The most promising drugs were found to be Cinnarizine, an anti-histaminic drug used for motion sickness, Digitoxigenin, a precursor of cardiac glycosides, and Clofazimine, a fat-soluble iminophenazine used in leprosy. In vitro and in vivo validation studies will be needed to confirm the efficacy of these molecules for the prevention and treatment of metastatic uveal melanoma.

  13. The Psychological Effects of Meditation: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlmeier, Peter; Eberth, Juliane; Schwarz, Marcus; Zimmermann, Doreen; Haarig, Frederik; Jaeger, Sonia; Kunze, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we give a comprehensive overview of the effects of meditation on psychological variables that can be extracted from empirical studies, concentrating on the effects of meditation on nonclinical groups of adult meditators. Mostly because of methodological problems, almost 3/4 of an initially identified 595 studies had to be…

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Extensive Reading Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakanishi, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall effectiveness of extensive reading, whether learners' age impacts learning, and whether the length of time second language learners engage in extensive reading influences test scores. The author conducted a meta-analysis to answer research questions and to identify future research…

  15. A Meta-Analysis of Extensive Reading Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakanishi, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the overall effectiveness of extensive reading, whether learners' age impacts learning, and whether the length of time second language learners engage in extensive reading influences test scores. The author conducted a meta-analysis to answer research questions and to identify future research…

  16. The Psychological Effects of Meditation: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlmeier, Peter; Eberth, Juliane; Schwarz, Marcus; Zimmermann, Doreen; Haarig, Frederik; Jaeger, Sonia; Kunze, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we give a comprehensive overview of the effects of meditation on psychological variables that can be extracted from empirical studies, concentrating on the effects of meditation on nonclinical groups of adult meditators. Mostly because of methodological problems, almost 3/4 of an initially identified 595 studies had to be…

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Father Involvement in Parent Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundahl, Brad W.; Tollefson, Derrik; Risser, Heather; Lovejoy, M. Christine

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Investigate (a) whether including fathers in parent training enhances outcomes and (b) whether mothers and fathers benefit equally from parent training. Method: Using traditional meta-analysis methodology, 26 studies that could answer the research questions were identified and meta-analyzed. Results: Studies that included fathers,…

  18. Formalizing the definition of meta-analysis in Molecular Ecology.

    PubMed

    ArchMiller, Althea A; Bauer, Eric F; Koch, Rebecca E; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Anil, Ammu; Kottwitz, Jack J; Munsterman, Amelia S; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of pertinent literature to develop evidence-based conclusions, is relatively new to the field of molecular ecology, with the first meta-analysis published in the journal Molecular Ecology in 2003 (Slate & Phua 2003). The goal of this article is to formalize the definition of meta-analysis for the authors, editors, reviewers and readers of Molecular Ecology by completing a review of the meta-analyses previously published in this journal. We also provide a brief overview of the many components required for meta-analysis with a more specific discussion of the issues related to the field of molecular ecology, including the use and statistical considerations of Wright's FST and its related analogues as effect sizes in meta-analysis. We performed a literature review to identify articles published as 'meta-analyses' in Molecular Ecology, which were then evaluated by at least two reviewers. We specifically targeted Molecular Ecology publications because as a flagship journal in this field, meta-analyses published in Molecular Ecology have the potential to set the standard for meta-analyses in other journals. We found that while many of these reviewed articles were strong meta-analyses, others failed to follow standard meta-analytical techniques. One of these unsatisfactory meta-analyses was in fact a secondary analysis. Other studies attempted meta-analyses but lacked the fundamental statistics that are considered necessary for an effective and powerful meta-analysis. By drawing attention to the inconsistency of studies labelled as meta-analyses, we emphasize the importance of understanding the components of traditional meta-analyses to fully embrace the strengths of quantitative data synthesis in the field of molecular ecology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  20. Metastatic thyroid carcinoma without identifiable primary tumor within the thyroid gland: a retrospective study of a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Cohen, Perry R; Prasad, Manju L; Hasanovic, Adnan; Tuttle, Robert Michael; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2017-07-01

    Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) without an identifiable primary tumor despite extensive microscopic examination of the thyroid gland is a rare but true phenomenon.We retrieved 7 of such cases and described in detail the clinical and pathologic features of these tumors. BRAF V600E immunohistochemistry and Sequenom molecular profile were conducted in selected cases. All patients harbored metastatic disease in the central (n=3), lateral (n=3), or both neck compartments (n=1). The histotype of the metastatic disease was PTC (n=5), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma in association with a PTC columnar variant (n=1), and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in association with a PTC tall cell variant (n=1). Fibrosis was present in the thyroid of 5 patients. All patients with PTC were alive without evidence of recurrence. The 76-year-old patient with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma did not recur and died of unknown causes. Finally, the patient with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma was alive with distant metastasis at last follow-up. The median follow-up for this cohort was 2.2years (range, 0.8-17). BRAF V600E was detected in 4 of 6 cases by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, metastatic nodal disease without identifiable thyroid primary is a rare but real phenomenon of unknown mechanisms. Although most tumors are low grade and well differentiated, aggressive behavior due to poorly differentiated or anaplastic carcinoma can happen. Most cases are BRAF(V600E)-positive thyroid tumors. A papillary carcinoma phenotype is found in all reported cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  2. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Song, G G

    2015-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes and biological processes associated with changes in gene expression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We performed a meta-analysis using the integrative meta-analysis of expression data program on publicly available microarray AS Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets. We performed Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses and pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Four GEO datasets, including 31 patients with AS and 39 controls, were available for the meta-analysis. We identified 65 genes across the studies that were consistently DE in patients with AS vs controls (23 upregulated and 42 downregulated). The upregulated gene with the largest effect size (ES; -1.2628, P = 0.020951) was integral membrane protein 2A (ITM2A), which is expressed by CD4+ T cells and plays a role in activation of T cells. The downregulated gene with the largest ES (1.2299, P = 0.040075) was mitochondrial ribosomal protein S11 (MRPS11). The most significant GO enrichment was in the respiratory electron transport chain category (P = 1.67 x 10-9). Therefore, our meta-analysis identified genes that were consistently DE as well as biological pathways associated with gene expression changes in AS.

  3. Meta-analysis and its problems.

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1994-09-24

    Including all relevant material--good, bad, and indifferent--in meta-analysis admits the subjective judgments that meta-analysis was designed to avoid. Several problems arise in meta-analysis: regressions are often non-linear; effects are often multivariate rather than univariate; coverage can be restricted; bad studies may be included; the data summarised may not be homogeneous; grouping different causal factors may lead to meaningless estimates of effects; and the theory-directed approach may obscure discrepancies. Meta-analysis may not be the one best method for studying the diversity of fields for which it has been used.

  4. A novel genome-wide in vivo screen for metastatic suppressors in human colon cancer identifies the positive WNT-TCF pathway modulators TMED3 and SOX12

    PubMed Central

    Duquet, Arnaud; Melotti, Alice; Mishra, Sonakshi; Malerba, Monica; Seth, Chandan; Conod, Arwen; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    The progression of tumors to the metastatic state involves the loss of metastatic suppressor functions. Finding these, however, is difficult as in vitro assays do not fully predict metastatic behavior, and the majority of studies have used cloned cell lines, which do not reflect primary tumor heterogeneity. Here, we have designed a novel genome-wide screen to identify metastatic suppressors using primary human tumor cells in mice, which allows saturation screens. Using this unbiased approach, we have tested the hypothesis that endogenous colon cancer metastatic suppressors affect WNT-TCF signaling. Our screen has identified two novel metastatic suppressors: TMED3 and SOX12, the knockdown of which increases metastatic growth after direct seeding. Moreover, both modify the type of self-renewing spheroids, but only knockdown of TMED3 also induces spheroid cell spreading and lung metastases from a subcutaneous xenograft. Importantly, whereas TMED3 and SOX12 belong to different families involved in protein secretion and transcriptional regulation, both promote endogenous WNT-TCF activity. Treatments for advanced or metastatic colon cancer may thus not benefit from WNT blockers, and these may promote a worse outcome. PMID:24920608

  5. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Homocysteine and Methionine Metabolism Identifies Five One Carbon Metabolism Loci and a Novel Association of ALDH1L1 with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Liu, Xuan; Keene, Keith L.; Jacques, Paul; Chen, Wei-Min; Weinstein, Galit; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Beiser, Alexa; Wang, Liewei; Bookman, Ebony; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Wolf, Philip A.; Zilka, Michelle; Selhub, Jacob; Nelson, Sarah; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Seshadri, Sudha; Sale, Michèle M.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating homocysteine levels (tHcy), a product of the folate one carbon metabolism pathway (FOCM) through the demethylation of methionine, are heritable and are associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and dementia. The FOCM is the sole source of de novo methyl group synthesis, impacting many biological and epigenetic pathways. However, the genetic determinants of elevated tHcy (hyperhomocysteinemia), dysregulation of methionine metabolism and the underlying biological processes remain unclear. We conducted independent genome-wide association studies and a meta-analysis of methionine metabolism, characterized by post-methionine load test tHcy, in 2,710 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and 2,100 participants from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, and then examined the association of the identified loci with incident stroke in FHS. Five genes in the FOCM pathway (GNMT [p = 1.60×10−63], CBS [p = 3.15×10−26], CPS1 [p = 9.10×10−13], ALDH1L1 [p = 7.3×10−13] and PSPH [p = 1.17×10−16]) were strongly associated with the difference between pre- and post-methionine load test tHcy levels (ΔPOST). Of these, one variant in the ALDH1L1 locus, rs2364368, was associated with incident ischemic stroke. Promoter analyses reveal genetic and epigenetic differences that may explain a direct effect on GNMT transcription and a downstream affect on methionine metabolism. Additionally, a genetic-score consisting of the five significant loci explains 13% of the variance of ΔPOST in FHS and 6% of the variance in VISP. Association between variants in FOCM genes with ΔPOST suggest novel mechanisms that lead to differences in methionine metabolism, and possibly the epigenome, impacting disease risk. These data emphasize the importance of a concerted effort to understand regulators of one carbon metabolism as potential therapeutic targets

  6. Genome-wide meta-analysis of homocysteine and methionine metabolism identifies five one carbon metabolism loci and a novel association of ALDH1L1 with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Fang; Liu, Xuan; Keene, Keith L; Jacques, Paul; Chen, Wei-Min; Weinstein, Galit; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Beiser, Alexa; Wang, Liewei; Bookman, Ebony; Doheny, Kimberly F; Wolf, Philip A; Zilka, Michelle; Selhub, Jacob; Nelson, Sarah; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Worrall, Bradford B; Seshadri, Sudha; Sale, Michèle M

    2014-03-01

    Circulating homocysteine levels (tHcy), a product of the folate one carbon metabolism pathway (FOCM) through the demethylation of methionine, are heritable and are associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and dementia. The FOCM is the sole source of de novo methyl group synthesis, impacting many biological and epigenetic pathways. However, the genetic determinants of elevated tHcy (hyperhomocysteinemia), dysregulation of methionine metabolism and the underlying biological processes remain unclear. We conducted independent genome-wide association studies and a meta-analysis of methionine metabolism, characterized by post-methionine load test tHcy, in 2,710 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and 2,100 participants from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, and then examined the association of the identified loci with incident stroke in FHS. Five genes in the FOCM pathway (GNMT [p = 1.60 × 10(-63)], CBS [p = 3.15 × 10(-26)], CPS1 [p = 9.10 × 10(-13)], ALDH1L1 [p = 7.3 × 10(-13)] and PSPH [p = 1.17 × 10(-16)]) were strongly associated with the difference between pre- and post-methionine load test tHcy levels (ΔPOST). Of these, one variant in the ALDH1L1 locus, rs2364368, was associated with incident ischemic stroke. Promoter analyses reveal genetic and epigenetic differences that may explain a direct effect on GNMT transcription and a downstream affect on methionine metabolism. Additionally, a genetic-score consisting of the five significant loci explains 13% of the variance of ΔPOST in FHS and 6% of the variance in VISP. Association between variants in FOCM genes with ΔPOST suggest novel mechanisms that lead to differences in methionine metabolism, and possibly the epigenome, impacting disease risk. These data emphasize the importance of a concerted effort to understand regulators of one carbon metabolism as potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Automating network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Valkenhoef, Gert; Lu, Guobing; de Brock, Bert; Hillege, Hans; Ades, A E; Welton, Nicky J

    2012-12-01

    Mixed treatment comparison (MTC) (also called network meta-analysis) is an extension of traditional meta-analysis to allow the simultaneous pooling of data from clinical trials comparing more than two treatment options. Typically, MTCs are performed using general-purpose Markov chain Monte Carlo software such as WinBUGS, requiring a model and data to be specified using a specific syntax. It would be preferable if, for the most common cases, both could be derived from a well-structured data file that can be easily checked for errors. Automation is particularly valuable for simulation studies in which the large number of MTCs that have to be estimated may preclude manual model specification and analysis. Moreover, automated model generation raises issues that provide additional insight into the nature of MTC. We present a method for the automated generation of Bayesian homogeneous variance random effects consistency models, including the choice of basic parameters and trial baselines, priors, and starting values for the Markov chain(s). We validate our method against the results of five published MTCs. The method is implemented in freely available open source software. This means that performing an MTC no longer requires manually writing a statistical model. This reduces time and effort, and facilitates error checking of the dataset. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A novel random effect model for GWAS meta-analysis and its application to trans-ethnic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jingchunzi; Lee, Seunggeun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Meta-analysis of trans-ethnic genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has proven to be a practical and profitable approach for identifying loci that contribute to the risk of complex diseases. However, the expected genetic effect heterogeneity cannot easily be accommodated through existing fixed-effects and random-effects methods. In response, we propose a novel random effect model for trans-ethnic meta-analysis with flexible modeling of the expected genetic effect heterogeneity across diverse populations. Specifically, we adopt a modified random effect model from the kernel regression framework, in which genetic effect coefficients are random variables whose correlation structure reflects the genetic distances across ancestry groups. In addition, we use the adaptive variance component test to achieve robust power regardless of the degree of genetic effect heterogeneity. Simulation studies show that our proposed method has well-calibrated type I error rates at very stringent significance levels and can improve power over the traditional meta-analysis methods. We re-analyzed the published type 2 diabetes GWAS meta-analysis (Consortium et al., 2014) and successfully identified one additional SNP that clearly exhibits genetic effect heterogeneity across different ancestry groups. Furthermore, our proposed method provides scalable computing time for genome-wide datasets, in which an analysis of one million SNPs would require less than 3 hours. PMID:26916671

  9. A novel random effect model for GWAS meta-analysis and its application to trans-ethnic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingchunzi; Lee, Seunggeun

    2016-09-01

    Meta-analysis of trans-ethnic genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has proven to be a practical and profitable approach for identifying loci that contribute to the risk of complex diseases. However, the expected genetic effect heterogeneity cannot easily be accommodated through existing fixed-effects and random-effects methods. In response, we propose a novel random effect model for trans-ethnic meta-analysis with flexible modeling of the expected genetic effect heterogeneity across diverse populations. Specifically, we adopt a modified random effect model from the kernel regression framework, in which genetic effect coefficients are random variables whose correlation structure reflects the genetic distances across ancestry groups. In addition, we use the adaptive variance component test to achieve robust power regardless of the degree of genetic effect heterogeneity. Simulation studies show that our proposed method has well-calibrated type I error rates at very stringent significance levels and can improve power over the traditional meta-analysis methods. We reanalyzed the published type 2 diabetes GWAS meta-analysis (Consortium et al., 2014) and successfully identified one additional SNP that clearly exhibits genetic effect heterogeneity across different ancestry groups. Furthermore, our proposed method provides scalable computing time for genome-wide datasets, in which an analysis of one million SNPs would require less than 3 hours. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Sequential Stereotype Priming: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kidder, Ciara K; White, Katherine R; Hinojos, Michelle R; Sandoval, Mayra; Crites, Stephen L

    2017-08-01

    Psychological interest in stereotype measurement has spanned nearly a century, with researchers adopting implicit measures in the 1980s to complement explicit measures. One of the most frequently used implicit measures of stereotypes is the sequential priming paradigm. The current meta-analysis examines stereotype priming, focusing specifically on this paradigm. To contribute to ongoing discussions regarding methodological rigor in social psychology, one primary goal was to identify methodological moderators of the stereotype priming effect-whether priming is due to a relation between the prime and target stimuli, the prime and target response, participant task, stereotype dimension, stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and stimuli type. Data from 39 studies yielded 87 individual effect sizes from 5,497 participants. Analyses revealed that stereotype priming is significantly moderated by the presence of prime-response relations, participant task, stereotype dimension, target stimulus type, SOA, and prime repetition. These results carry both practical and theoretical implications for future research on stereotype priming.

  11. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  12. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  13. Meta-Analysis in Stata Using Gllamm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagos, Pantelis G.

    2015-01-01

    There are several user-written programs for performing meta-analysis in Stata (Stata Statistical Software: College Station, TX: Stata Corp LP). These include metan, metareg, mvmeta, and glst. However, there are several cases for which these programs do not suffice. For instance, there is no software for performing univariate meta-analysis with…

  14. A Teacher's Guide to Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banda, Devender R.; Therrien, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Technical terms such as "meta-analysis," research synthesis," and "effect size" may sound alien to practitioners in the field of education. Due to limited knowledge on meta-analysis among educators, the results of meta-analyses seldom translate from research to classroom practice--even though meta-analyses may provide valuable information on how…

  15. Statistical Power in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Statistical power is important in a meta-analysis study, although few studies have examined the performance of simulated power in meta-analysis. The purpose of this study is to inform researchers about statistical power estimation on two sample mean difference test under different situations: (1) the discrepancy between the analytical power and…

  16. Meta-Analysis in Stata Using Gllamm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagos, Pantelis G.

    2015-01-01

    There are several user-written programs for performing meta-analysis in Stata (Stata Statistical Software: College Station, TX: Stata Corp LP). These include metan, metareg, mvmeta, and glst. However, there are several cases for which these programs do not suffice. For instance, there is no software for performing univariate meta-analysis with…

  17. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  18. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  19. Statistical Power in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Statistical power is important in a meta-analysis study, although few studies have examined the performance of simulated power in meta-analysis. The purpose of this study is to inform researchers about statistical power estimation on two sample mean difference test under different situations: (1) the discrepancy between the analytical power and…

  20. A Teacher's Guide to Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banda, Devender R.; Therrien, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Technical terms such as "meta-analysis," research synthesis," and "effect size" may sound alien to practitioners in the field of education. Due to limited knowledge on meta-analysis among educators, the results of meta-analyses seldom translate from research to classroom practice--even though meta-analyses may provide valuable information on how…

  1. Hierarchical Dependence in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John R.; Taylor, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a frequent tool among education and behavioral researchers to combine results from multiple experiments to arrive at a clear understanding of some effect of interest. One of the traditional assumptions in a meta-analysis is the independence of the effect sizes from the studies under consideration. This article presents a…

  2. Alcohol Consumption and Gastric Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Baloch, Zulqarnain; He, Ting-Ting; Xia, Xueshan

    2017-01-01

    Background We sought to determine by meta-analysis the relationship between drinking alcohol and the risk of gastric cancer. Material/Methods A systematic Medline search was performed to identify all published reports of drinking alcohol and the associated risk of gastric cancer. Initially we retrieved 2,494 studies, but after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, only ten studies were found to be eligible for our meta-analysis. Results Our meta-analysis showed that alcohol consumption elevated the risk of gastric cancer with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.39 (95% CI 1.20–1.61). Additionally, subgroup analysis showed that only a nested case-control report from Sweden did not support this observation. Subgroup analysis of moderate drinking and heavy drinking also confirmed that drinking alcohol increased the risk of gastric cancer. Publication bias analysis (Begg’s and Egger’s tests) showed p values were more than 0.05, suggesting that the 10 articles included in our analysis did not have a publication bias. Conclusions The results from this meta-analysis support the hypothesis that alcohol consumption can increase the risk of gastric cancer; suggesting that effective moderation of alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of gastric cancer. PMID:28087989

  3. Understanding and evaluating meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Deborah V; Pihlstrom, Bruce L; Blanchette, Derek R

    2016-04-01

    Meta-analysis refers to statistical methodology used to combine data from many studies to obtain an overall assessment of disease risk or treatment outcomes. In this article, the authors review basic methods, interpretation, and limitations of meta-analysis. Investigators use meta-analysis approaches to combine data from available studies to obtain an answer to a specific question. An investigator uses a fixed model if there is homogeneity among the combined studies and a random-effects model if there is heterogeneity. The random-effects model results in wider confidence limits and more conservative estimates of overall results. A meta-analysis can be biased because studies with negative results (no differences in treatment outcomes) are less likely to be published (publication bias). A meta-analysis should include a well-specified and reproducible set of procedures, including description of data abstraction procedures, attempts to include unpublished studies, and appropriate statistical analysis that includes thorough consideration of heterogeneity and potential bias. Meta-analysis cannot correct shortcomings of existing studies or data. However, if potential pitfalls are recognized, meta-analysis can be a useful tool for summarizing existing studies, providing a means to address conflicting reports. Meta-analysis can lead to increased precision, providing greater power to detect existing relationships or treatment effects. Furthermore, meta-analysis may make it possible to address questions that cannot be answered by means of individual studies. Meta-analysis provides an objective, quantitative synthesis of available studies but needs to be understood and assessed critically by those who use it to assess risk or make treatment decisions. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating Web-Based Nursing Education's Effects: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiwon; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated whether using web-based nursing educational programs increases a participant's knowledge and clinical performance. We performed a meta-analysis of studies published between January 2000 and July 2016 and identified through RISS, CINAHL, ProQuest Central, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PubMed. Eleven studies were eligible for inclusion in this analysis. The results of the meta-analysis demonstrated significant differences not only for the overall effect but also specifically for blended programs and short (2 weeks or 4 weeks) intervention periods. To present more evidence supporting the effectiveness of web-based nursing educational programs, further research is warranted.

  5. Development of a screen to identify selective small molecules active against patient-derived metastatic and chemoresistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction High failure rates of new investigational drugs have impaired the development of breast cancer therapies. One challenge is that excellent activity in preclinical models, such as established cancer cell lines, does not always translate into improved clinical outcomes for patients. New preclinical models, which better replicate clinically-relevant attributes of cancer, such as chemoresistance, metastasis and cellular heterogeneity, may identify novel anti-cancer mechanisms and increase the success of drug development. Methods Metastatic breast cancer cells were obtained from pleural effusions of consented patients whose disease had progressed. Normal primary human breast cells were collected from a reduction mammoplasty and immortalized with human telomerase. The patient-derived cells were characterized to determine their cellular heterogeneity and proliferation rate by flow cytometry, while dose response curves were performed for chemotherapies to assess resistance. A screen was developed to measure the differential activity of small molecules on the growth and survival of patient-derived normal breast and metastatic, chemoresistant tumor cells to identify selective anti-cancer compounds. Several hits were identified and validated in dose response assays. One compound, C-6, was further characterized for its effect on cell cycle and cell death in cancer cells. Results Patient-derived cells were found to be more heterogeneous, with reduced proliferation rates and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy compared to established cell lines. A screen was subsequently developed that utilized both tumor and normal patient-derived cells. Several compounds were identified, which selectively targeted tumor cells, but not normal cells. Compound C-6 was found to inhibit proliferation and induce cell death in tumor cells via a caspase-independent mechanism. Conclusions Short-term culture of patient-derived cells retained more clinically relevant features of breast cancer

  6. Drivers of wetland conversion: a global meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Asselen, Sanneke; Verburg, Peter H; Vermaat, Jan E; Janse, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of case studies has become an important tool for synthesizing case study findings in land change. Meta-analyses of deforestation, urbanization, desertification and change in shifting cultivation systems have been published. This present study adds to this literature, with an analysis of the proximate causes and underlying forces of wetland conversion at a global scale using two complementary approaches of systematic review. Firstly, a meta-analysis of 105 case-study papers describing wetland conversion was performed, showing that different combinations of multiple-factor proximate causes, and underlying forces, drive wetland conversion. Agricultural development has been the main proximate cause of wetland conversion, and economic growth and population density are the most frequently identified underlying forces. Secondly, to add a more quantitative component to the study, a logistic meta-regression analysis was performed to estimate the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide, using globally-consistent biophysical and socioeconomic location factor maps. Significant factors explaining wetland conversion, in order of importance, are market influence, total wetland area (lower conversion probability), mean annual temperature and cropland or built-up area. The regression analyses results support the outcomes of the meta-analysis of the processes of conversion mentioned in the individual case studies. In other meta-analyses of land change, similar factors (e.g., agricultural development, population growth, market/economic factors) are also identified as important causes of various types of land change (e.g., deforestation, desertification). Meta-analysis helps to identify commonalities across the various local case studies and identify which variables may lead to individual cases to behave differently. The meta-regression provides maps indicating the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide based on the location factors that have determined historic

  7. Drivers of Wetland Conversion: a Global Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Asselen, Sanneke; Verburg, Peter H.; Vermaat, Jan E.; Janse, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of case studies has become an important tool for synthesizing case study findings in land change. Meta-analyses of deforestation, urbanization, desertification and change in shifting cultivation systems have been published. This present study adds to this literature, with an analysis of the proximate causes and underlying forces of wetland conversion at a global scale using two complementary approaches of systematic review. Firstly, a meta-analysis of 105 case-study papers describing wetland conversion was performed, showing that different combinations of multiple-factor proximate causes, and underlying forces, drive wetland conversion. Agricultural development has been the main proximate cause of wetland conversion, and economic growth and population density are the most frequently identified underlying forces. Secondly, to add a more quantitative component to the study, a logistic meta-regression analysis was performed to estimate the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide, using globally-consistent biophysical and socioeconomic location factor maps. Significant factors explaining wetland conversion, in order of importance, are market influence, total wetland area (lower conversion probability), mean annual temperature and cropland or built-up area. The regression analyses results support the outcomes of the meta-analysis of the processes of conversion mentioned in the individual case studies. In other meta-analyses of land change, similar factors (e.g., agricultural development, population growth, market/economic factors) are also identified as important causes of various types of land change (e.g., deforestation, desertification). Meta-analysis helps to identify commonalities across the various local case studies and identify which variables may lead to individual cases to behave differently. The meta-regression provides maps indicating the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide based on the location factors that have determined historic

  8. Integrative Analyses Identify Osteopontin, LAMB3 and ITGB1 as Critical Pro-Metastatic Genes for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming-Xia; Liu, Lei; Jia, De-Shui; Geng, Qin; Lin, He-Chun; He, Xiang-Huo; Li, Jin-Jun; Yao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the key regulatory genes associated with lung cancer in order to reduce its occurrence and progress through silencing these key genes. Methods To identify the key regulatory genes involved in lung cancer, we performed a combination of gene array and bioinformatics analyses to compare gene transcription profiles in 3 monoclonal cell strains with high, medium or low metastatic abilities, which were separated from the SPC-A-1sci and SPC-A-1 cell lines by limiting dilution monoclone assay. We then analyzed those genes’ biological activities by knocking down their expression in SPC-A-1sci cells using siRNA and lenti-viral shRNA vectors, followed by determinations of the invasion and migration capabilities of the resulting cell lines in vitro as well as their potential for inducing occurrence and metastasis of lung cancer in vivo. To examine the clinical relevance of these findings, we analyzed the expression levels of the identified genes in human lung cancer tissues (n = 135) and matched adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Results Three monoclonal cell strains characterized with high, medium or low metastatic abilities were successfully selected. Gene array and bioinformatics analyses implied that osteopontin, LAMB3 and ITGB1 were key genes involved in lung cancer. Knockdown of these genes suppressed human lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Clinical sample analyses indicated that osteopontin, LAMB3 and ITGB1 protein expression levels were higher in lung cancer patients, compared to non-cancerous adjacent tissues, and correlated with lymphatic metastasis. Conclusions We confirmed that osteopontin, LAMB3 and ITGB1 played important roles in the occurrence and metastasis of lung cancer, thus provided important clues to understanding the molecular mechanism of metastasis and contributing to the therapeutic treatment of lung cancer. PMID:23441154

  9. Circulating microRNA Profiling Identifies a Subset of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients with Evidence of Cancer-Associated Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kroh, Evan M.; Dowell, Alexander E.; Chéry, Lisly; Siddiqui, Javed; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Knudsen, Beatrice S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Morrissey, Colm; Tewari, Muneesh

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼22 nucleotide) non-coding RNAs that regulate a myriad of biological processes and are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Cancer-associated microRNAs have been detected in serum and plasma and hold promise as minimally invasive cancer biomarkers, potentially for assessing disease characteristics in patients with metastatic disease that is difficult to biopsy. Here we used miRNA profiling to identify cancer-associated miRNAs that are differentially expressed in sera from patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) as compared to healthy controls. Of 365 miRNAs profiled, we identified five serum miRNAs (miR-141, miR-200a, miR-200c, miR-210 and miR-375) that were elevated in cases compared to controls across two independent cohorts. One of these, miR-210, is a known transcriptional target of the hypoxia-responsive HIF-1α signaling pathway. Exposure of cultured prostate cancer cells to hypoxia led to induction of miR-210 and its release into the extracellular environment. Moreover, we found that serum miR-210 levels varied widely amongst mCRPC patients undergoing therapy, and correlated with treatment response as assessed by change in PSA. Our results suggest that (i) cancer-associated hypoxia is a frequent, previously under-appreciated characteristic of mCRPC, and (ii) serum miR-210 may be further developed as a predictive biomarker in patients with this distinct disease biology. PMID:23935962

  10. Meta-analysis of noncontingent reinforcement effects on problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Richman, David M; Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Grubb, Laura; Bosch, Amanda; Abby, Layla

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) outcomes was conducted using hierarchical linear modeling (a) to document the effect size for decreasing problem behavior, (b) to compare effect sizes for NCR using functional reinforcers and nonfunctional reinforcers, and (c) to document the influence of schedule thinning on effect size. Analyses were conducted with data from 55 studies and 91 participants. Results indicate that NCR was associated with a very strong effect size (d =-1.58) for reduction of problem behavior, functional reinforcers were slightly more effective than nonfunctional reinforcers, and schedule thinning resulted in minor degradation of effect size. Meta-analysis of single-case design data provides a method to quantitatively estimate effect sizes of interventions across participants. Therefore, it allows one to identify important variables that are not otherwise evident in single-case data, helps to disseminate findings to the broader scientific community, and contributes to the documentation of empirically supported interventions.

  11. Allergy reduces the risk of meningioma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-fei; Ji, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Li, Shou-wei; Yan, Chang-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common brain tumours; however, little is known regarding their aetiology. The data are inconsistent concerning atopic disease and the risk of developing meningioma. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between allergic conditions and the risk of developing meningioma. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Web of SCI from Jan 1979 to Feb 2016. Two investigators independently selected the relevant articles according to the inclusion criteria. Eight case-control studies and 2 cohort studies were included in the final analysis, comprising 5,679 meningioma cases and 55,621 control subjects. Compared with no history of allergy, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for allergic conditions was 0.81 (0.70–0.94) for meningioma in a random-effects meta-analysis. Inverse correlations of meningioma occurrence were also identified for asthma and eczema, in which the pooled ORs were 0.78 (0.70–0.86) and 0.78 (0.69–0.87), respectively. A reduced risk of meningioma occurrence was identified in hay fever; however, the association was weak (0.88, 95% CI = 0.78–0.99). The source of this heterogeneity could be the various confounding variables in individual studies. Overall, the current meta-analysis indicated that allergy reduced the risk of developing meningiomas. Large cohort studies are required to investigate this relationship. PMID:28071746

  12. Application of a Drug-Induced Apoptosis Assay to Identify Treatment Strategies in Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosserman, Linda; Rogers, Karl; Willis, Carl; Davidson, Dirk; Whitworth, Pat; Karimi, Misagh; Upadhyaya, Gargi; Rutledge, James; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Presant, Cary A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes. Methods In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users), or elect to not use the test (non-users). Results The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73%) used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR) rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04) and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable) rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01). Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01). Conclusions The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT

  13. Meta-analysis: Problems with Russian Publications.

    PubMed

    Verbitskaya, E V

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a powerful tool to identify Evidence Based medical technologies (interventions) for use in every day practice. Meta-analysis uses statistical approaches to combine results from multiple studies in an effort to increase power (over individual studies), improve estimates of the size of the effect and/or to resolve uncertainty when reports disagree. Meta-analysis is a quantitative, formal study design used to systematically assess previous research studies to derive conclusions from this research. Meta-analysis may provide more precise estimate of the effect of treatment or risk factor for a disease, or other outcomes, than any individual study contributing to the pooled analysis.We have quite a substantial number of Russian medical publications, but not so many Meta-Analyses published in Russian. Russian publications are cited in English language papers not so often. A total of 90% of clinical studies included in published Meta-Analyses incorporate only English language papers. International studies or papers with Russian co-authors are published in English language. The main question is: what is the problem with inclusion of Russian medical publications in Meta-Analysis? The main reasons for this are the following: 1) It is difficult to find Russian papers, difficult to work with them and to work with Russian journals:a. There are single Russian Biomedical Journals, which are translated into English and are included in databases (PubMed, Scopus and other), despite the fact that all of them have English language abstracts.b. The majority the meta-analyses authors use in their work different citation management software such as the Mendeley, Reference Manager, ProCite, EndNote, and others. These citation management systems allow scientists to organize their own literature databases with internet searches and have adds-on for the Office programs what makes process of literature citation very convenient. The Internet sites of the majority of

  14. Meta-analysis in medicine: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anselm; Cheung, Mike W L; Fu, Erin H Y; Ho, Roger C M

    2010-05-01

    Meta-analysis, a complex statistical method which involves synthesis of data from relevant studies to devise an effect size or a conclusion, has increasingly been recognized and impacts on evidence-based medicine, especially in the field of health science. Thanks to the advent and unmet need of evidence-based medicine, since the first recordable publication of a meta-analysis in 1904 addressing the effectiveness of typhoid vaccine, both the number and quality of meta-analyses published relating to healthcare science have been on a steep rise. If properly conducted, based on answering relevant clinical questions, strict selection criteria of participating studies, appropriate analytical methods, and proper presentation of results, coupled with critical and faithful discussion on the strength and weakness of the analysis, meta-analysis will definitely be an invaluable tool for clinicians and researchers in understanding epidemiology, justifying and refining hypotheses of various diseases, for medical practitioners to implement sound management decisions based on evidence-based medicine, and ultimately, for policy-makers to formulate cost-efficient treatment strategies, guidelines and legislation. In this first paper of a mini-series, the current trend of meta-analysis publications in the medical literature, examples of important meta-analyses relevant to rheumatology and the pros and cons of meta-analysis, will be discussed. Important terminology related to meta-analysis, the systematic ways to critically appraise, and finally the preferred methodology of conducting meta-analysis will be covered in the subsequent three reviews of this mini-series.

  15. Functional Annotation of Metastasis-associated MicroRNAs of Melanoma: A Meta-analysis of Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Li-Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Hu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melanoma is a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells. Until now, its pathological mechanisms remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify metastasis-related microRNA (miRNAs) and gain an understanding of the biological functions in the metastasis of melanoma. Methods: We searched the PubMed and Gene Expression Omnibus database to collect miRNA expression profiling datasets about melanoma, with key words of “melanoma”, “miRNA”, “microarray”, and “gene expression profiling”. Only the original experimental works published before June 2016 for analyzing the metastasis of melanoma were retained, other nonhuman studies, reviews, and meta-analyses were removed. We performed a meta-analysis to explore the differentially expressed miRNA between metastatic and nonmetastatic samples. Moreover, we predicted target genes of the miRNAs to study their biological roles for these miRNAs. Results: We identified a total of 63 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs by meta-analysis of the melanoma expression profiling data. The regulatory network constructed by using these miRNAs and the predicted targets identified several key genes involved in the metastasis of melanoma. Functional annotation of these genes indicated that they are mainly enriched in some biological pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, cell junction, and focal adhesion. Conclusions: By collecting the miRNA expression datasets from different platforms, multiple biological markers were identified for the metastasis of melanoma. This study provided novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, thereby aiding the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:27748342

  16. Air Pollution and Quality of Sperm: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Namvar, Farideh; Ghavami Ghanbarabadi, Vahid; Hadizadeh Talasaz, Zahra; Esmaeli, Mahin

    2015-01-01

    Context: Air pollution is common in all countries and affects reproductive functions in men and women. It particularly impacts sperm parameters in men. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the impact of air pollution on the quality of sperm. Evidence Acquisition: The scientific databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, Cochrane Library, and Elsevier were searched to identify relevant articles published between 1978 to 2013. In the first step, 76 articles were selected. These studies were ecological correlation, cohort, retrospective, cross-sectional, and case control ones that were found through electronic and hand search of references about air pollution and male infertility. The outcome measurement was the change in sperm parameters. A total of 11 articles were ultimately included in a meta-analysis to examine the impact of air pollution on sperm parameters. The authors applied meta-analysis sheets from Cochrane library, then data extraction, including mean and standard deviation of sperm parameters were calculated and finally their confidence interval (CI) were compared to CI of standard parameters. Results: The CI for pooled means were as follows: 2.68 ± 0.32 for ejaculation volume (mL), 62.1 ± 15.88 for sperm concentration (million per milliliter), 39.4 ± 5.52 for sperm motility (%), 23.91 ± 13.43 for sperm morphology (%) and 49.53 ± 11.08 for sperm count. Conclusions: The results of this meta-analysis showed that air pollution reduces sperm motility, but has no impact on the other sperm parameters of spermogram. PMID:26023349

  17. Air pollution and quality of sperm: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Namvar, Farideh; Ghavami Ghanbarabadi, Vahid; Hadizadeh Talasaz, Zahra; Esmaeli, Mahin

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is common in all countries and affects reproductive functions in men and women. It particularly impacts sperm parameters in men. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the impact of air pollution on the quality of sperm. The scientific databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, Cochrane Library, and Elsevier were searched to identify relevant articles published between 1978 to 2013. In the first step, 76 articles were selected. These studies were ecological correlation, cohort, retrospective, cross-sectional, and case control ones that were found through electronic and hand search of references about air pollution and male infertility. The outcome measurement was the change in sperm parameters. A total of 11 articles were ultimately included in a meta-analysis to examine the impact of air pollution on sperm parameters. The authors applied meta-analysis sheets from Cochrane library, then data extraction, including mean and standard deviation of sperm parameters were calculated and finally their confidence interval (CI) were compared to CI of standard parameters. The CI for pooled means were as follows: 2.68 ± 0.32 for ejaculation volume (mL), 62.1 ± 15.88 for sperm concentration (million per milliliter), 39.4 ± 5.52 for sperm motility (%), 23.91 ± 13.43 for sperm morphology (%) and 49.53 ± 11.08 for sperm count. The results of this meta-analysis showed that air pollution reduces sperm motility, but has no impact on the other sperm parameters of spermogram.

  18. Laparoscopic versus open appendectomy in children: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Omer; Athanasiou, Thanos; Tekkis, Paris P; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Haddow, James; Malinovski, Vitali; Paraskeva, Paraskevas; Darzi, Ara

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare laparoscopic and open appendectomy in a pediatric population. Meta-analysis is a statistical tool that can be used to evaluate the literature in both qualitative and quantitative ways, accounting for variations in characteristics that can influence overall estimate of outcomes of interest. Meta-analysis of laparoscopic versus open appendectomy in a pediatric population has not previously been performed. Comparative studies published between 1992 and 2004 of laparoscopic versus open appendectomy in children were included. Endpoints were postoperative pyrexia, ileus, wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess formation, operative time, and postoperative hospital stay. Twenty-three studies including 6477 children (43% laparoscopic, 57% open) were included. Wound infection was significantly reduced with laparoscopic versus open appendectomy (1.5% versus 5%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-0.75), as was ileus (1.3% versus 2.8%; OR = 0.5, 95% CI, 0.29-0.86). Intra-abdominal abscess formation was more common following laparoscopic surgery, although this was not statistically significant. Subgroup analysis of randomized trials did not reveal significant difference between the 2 techniques in any of the 4 complications. Operative time was not significantly longer in the laparoscopic group, and postoperative stay was significantly shorter (weighted mean difference, -0.48; 95% CI, -0.65 to -0.31). Sensitivity analysis identified lowest heterogeneity when only randomized studies were considered, followed by prospective, recent, and finally large studies. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that laparoscopic appendectomy in children reduces complications. However, we also see the need for further high-quality randomized trials comparing the 2 techniques, matched not only for age and sex but also for obesity and severity of appendicitis.

  19. Motivational interviewing: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rubak, Sune; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Christensen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Background Motivational Interviewing is a well-known, scientifically tested method of counselling clients developed by Miller and Rollnick and viewed as a useful intervention strategy in the treatment of lifestyle problems and disease. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in different areas of disease and to identify factors shaping outcomes. Design of study A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials using motivational interviewing as the intervention. Method After selection criteria a systematic literature search in 16 databases produced 72 randomised controlled trials the first of which was published in 1991. A quality assessment was made with a validated scale. A meta-analysis was performed as a generic inverse variance meta-analysis. Results Meta-analysis showed a significant effect (95% confidence interval) for motivational interviewing for combined effect estimates for body mass index, total blood cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, blood alcohol concentration and standard ethanol content, while combined effect estimates for cigarettes per day and for HbA1c were not significant. Motivational interviewing had a significant and clinically relevant effect in approximately three out of four studies, with an equal effect on physiological (72%) and psychological (75%) diseases. Psychologists and physicians obtained an effect in approximately 80% of the studies, while other healthcare providers obtained an effect in 46% of the studies. When using motivational interviewing in brief encounters of 15 minutes, 64% of the studies showed an effect. More than one encounter with the patient ensures the effectiveness of motivational interviewing. Conclusion Motivational interviewing in a scientific setting outperforms traditional advice giving in the treatment of a broad range of behavioural problems and diseases. Large-scale studies are now needed to prove that motivational interviewing can be implemented into daily

  20. Radiosurgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Zachary D.; Batra, Sachin; Limb, Charles J.; Li, Gordon; Sughrue, Michael E.; Redmond, Kristin; Rigamonti, Daniele; Parsa, Andrew T.; Chang, Steven; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Lim, Michael

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: During the past two decades, radiosurgery has arisen as a promising approach to the management of glomus jugulare. In the present study, we report on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data on the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare tumors. Methods and Materials: To identify eligible studies, systematic searches of all glomus jugulare tumors treated with radiosurgery were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The data search yielded 19 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. The data from 335 glomus jugulare patients were extracted. The fixed effects pooled proportions were calculated from the data when Cochrane's statistic was statistically insignificant and the inconsistency among studies was <25%. Bias was assessed using the Egger funnel plot test. Results: Across all studies, 97% of patients achieved tumor control, and 95% of patients achieved clinical control. Eight studies reported a mean or median follow-up time of >36 months. In these studies, 95% of patients achieved clinical control and 96% achieved tumor control. The gamma knife, linear accelerator, and CyberKnife technologies all exhibited high rates of tumor and clinical control. Conclusions: The present study reports the results of a meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare. Because of its high effectiveness, we suggest considering radiosurgery for the primary management of glomus jugulare tumors.

  1. Parental bonding and alexithymia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Thorberg, F A; Young, R McD; Sullivan, K A; Lyvers, M

    2011-04-01

    The primary purpose of this meta-analysis was to explore, clarify and report the strength of the relationship between alexithymia, as measured by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and parenting style as measured by the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). Web of Science, PsycInfo, PubMed and ProQuest: Dissertations and Theses searches were undertaken, yielding nine samples with sufficient data to be included in the meta-analysis. Evidence indicated moderate to strong relationships between maternal care and alexithymia, and between maternal care and two of the three TAS-20 alexithymia facets (Difficulties Describing Feelings and Difficulties Identifying Feelings, but not Externally Oriented Thinking). Moderate relationships were observed for both maternal- and paternal-overprotection and alexithymia respectively, and for overprotection (both maternal and paternal) and Difficulties Describing Feelings. This study is the first meta-analysis of the relationship between parenting styles and alexithymia, and findings confirm an especially strong association between maternal care and key elements of alexithymia. This review highlights the issues that still remain to be addressed in exploring the link between parenting style and alexithymia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Cancer risk in waterpipe smokers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Ravinder; Cheema, Sohaila; Sheikh, Javaid; Al Mulla, Ahmad; Lowenfels, Albert; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    To quantify by meta-analysis the relationship between waterpipe smoking and cancer, including cancer of the head and neck, esophagus, stomach, lung and bladder. We performed a systematic literature search to identify relevant studies, scored their quality, used fixed and random-effect models to estimate summary relative risks (SRR), evaluated heterogeneity and publication bias. We retrieved information from 28 published reports. Considering only highquality studies, waterpipe smoking was associated with increased risk of head and neck cancer (SRR 2.97; 95 % CI 2.26-3.90), esophageal cancer (1.84; 1.42-2.38) and lung cancer (2.22; 1.24-3.97), with no evidence of heterogeneity or publication bias. Increased risk was also observed for stomach and bladder cancer but based mainly on poor-quality studies. For colorectum, liver and for all sites combined risk estimates were elevated, but there were insufficient reports to perform a meta-analysis. Contrary to the perception of the relative safety of waterpipe smoking, this meta-analysis provides quantitative estimates of its association with cancers of the head and neck, esophagus and lung. The scarcity and limited quality of available reports point out the need for larger carefully designed studies in well-defined populations.

  3. Regularized gene selection in cancer microarray meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuangge; Huang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    In cancer studies, it is common that multiple microarray experiments are conducted to measure the same clinical outcome and expressions of the same set of genes. An important goal of such experiments is to identify a subset of genes that can potentially serve as predictive markers for cancer development and progression. Analyses of individual experiments may lead to unreliable gene selection results because of the small sample sizes. Meta analysis can be used to pool multiple experiments, increase statistical power, and achieve more reliable gene selection. The meta analysis of cancer microarray data is challenging because of the high dimensionality of gene expressions and the differences in experimental settings amongst different experiments. We propose a Meta Threshold Gradient Descent Regularization (MTGDR) approach for gene selection in the meta analysis of cancer microarray data. The MTGDR has many advantages over existing approaches. It allows different experiments to have different experimental settings. It can account for the joint effects of multiple genes on cancer, and it can select the same set of cancer-associated genes across multiple experiments. Simulation studies and analyses of multiple pancreatic and liver cancer experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the MTGDR. The MTGDR provides an effective way of analyzing multiple cancer microarray studies and selecting reliable cancer-associated genes.

  4. Dietary Patterns and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Ying; Shu, Long; Shen, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xu-Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2017-01-05

    A number of studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of pancreatic cancer. MEDLINE (provided by the National Library of Medicine) and EBSCO (Elton B. Stephens Company) databases were searched for relevant articles published up to May 2016 that identified common dietary patterns. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were finally included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy patterns (odds ratio, OR = 0.86; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.77-0.95; p = 0.004) and light-moderate drinking patterns (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83-0.98; p = 0.02). There was evidence of an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in the highest compared with the lowest categories of western-type pattern (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06-1.45; p = 0.008) and heavy drinking pattern (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10-1.48; p = 0.002). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that healthy and light-moderate drinking patterns may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas western-type and heavy drinking patterns may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Reproductive disorders among cosmetologists and hairdressers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyung; Kang, Mo-Yeol; Choi, Sungyeul; Park, Jaechan; Lee, Hye-Ji; Kim, Eun-A

    2016-07-01

    Occupational risks for reproductive disorders among hairdressers and cosmetologists have been examined in numerous epidemiological studies, although the results of those studies have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the risks of reproductive disorders among cosmetologists and hairdressers. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the reference lists of relevant publications, to identify studies for our analysis. After careful consideration, 19 eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis. We also performed systematic evaluations of publication bias, heterogeneity, and publication quality. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were weighted using the inverse of their variance to calculate fixed- and random-effect pooled estimates. The meta-analysis revealed a significantly increased risk of infertility (OR 1.15, 95 % CI 1.03-1.28), fetal death (OR 1.14, 95 % CI 1.04-1.24), and preterm delivery (OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07) among hairdressers and cosmetologists. These findings indicate that hairdressers and cosmetologists have a higher risk of reproductive disorders, compared to the general population.

  6. Cognitive benefits of right-handedness: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Somers, Metten; Shields, Laura S; Boks, Marco P; Kahn, René S; Sommer, Iris E

    2015-04-01

    Hand preference - which is related to cerebral dominance - is thought to be associated with cognitive skills; however, findings on this association are inconsistent and there is no consensus whether left- or right-handers have an advantage in either spatial or verbal abilities. In addition, it is not clear whether an interaction between sex and hand preference exists in relation to these cognitive abilities. As these matters are relevant from a neurodevelopmental perspective we performed a meta-analysis of the available literature. We searched PubMed and Embase, and included 14 studies (359,890 subjects) in the verbal ability meta-analysis and 16 studies (218,351 subjects) in the spatial ability meta-analysis. There was no difference between the full sample of left and right-handers for verbal ability, nor was there a hand preference-by-sex interaction. Subgroup analysis of children showed a small right-hand benefit. Our results further revealed a modest but significant effect favouring right-handedness for overall spatial ability, which was more pronounced when analysis was restricted to studies applying the mental rotation test. We could not identify a specific interaction with sex. Our results indicate that there is a small but significant cognitive advantage of right-handedness on spatial ability. In the verbal domain, this advantage is only significant in children. An interaction effect with sex is not confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Meta-analysis for Discovering Rare-Variant Associations: Statistical Methods and Software Programs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2015-07-02

    There is heightened interest in using next-generation sequencing technologies to identify rare variants that influence complex human diseases and traits. Meta-analysis is essential to this endeavor because large sample sizes are required for detecting associations with rare variants. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of statistical methods for meta-analysis of sequencing studies for discovering rare-variant associations. Specifically, we discuss the calculation of relevant summary statistics from participating studies, the construction of gene-level association tests, the choice of transformation for quantitative traits, the use of fixed-effects versus random-effects models, and the removal of shadow association signals through conditional analysis. We also show that meta-analysis based on properly calculated summary statistics is as powerful as joint analysis of individual-participant data. In addition, we demonstrate the performance of different meta-analysis methods by using both simulated and empirical data. We then compare four major software packages for meta-analysis of rare-variant associations-MASS, RAREMETAL, MetaSKAT, and seqMeta-in terms of the underlying statistical methodology, analysis pipeline, and software interface. Finally, we present PreMeta, a software interface that integrates the four meta-analysis packages and allows a consortium to combine otherwise incompatible summary statistics.

  8. Random-effects meta-analysis: the number of studies matters.

    PubMed

    Guolo, Annamaria; Varin, Cristiano

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the number of studies on meta-analysis and meta-regression within the random-effects model framework. It is frequently neglected that inference in random-effects models requires a substantial number of studies included in meta-analysis to guarantee reliable conclusions. Several authors warn about the risk of inaccurate results of the traditional DerSimonian and Laird approach especially in the common case of meta-analysis involving a limited number of studies. This paper presents a selection of likelihood and non-likelihood methods for inference in meta-analysis proposed to overcome the limitations of the DerSimonian and Laird procedure, with a focus on the effect of the number of studies. The applicability and the performance of the methods are investigat