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Sample records for metabolic network preferentially

  1. Genes encoding hub and bottleneck enzymes of the Arabidopsis metabolic network preferentially retain homeologs through whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whole genome duplication (WGD) occurs widely in angiosperm evolution. It raises the intriguing question of how interacting networks of genes cope with this dramatic evolutionary event. Results In study of the Arabidopsis metabolic network, we assigned each enzyme (node) with topological centralities (in-degree, out-degree and between-ness) to measure quantitatively their centralities in the network. The Arabidopsis metabolic network is highly modular and separated into 11 interconnected modules, which correspond well to the functional metabolic pathways. The enzymes with higher in-out degree and between-ness (defined as hub and bottleneck enzymes, respectively) tend to be more conserved and preferentially retain homeologs after WGD. Moreover, the simultaneous retention of homeologs encoding enzymes which catalyze consecutive steps in a pathway is highly favored and easily achieved, and enzyme-enzyme interactions contribute to the retention of one-third of WGD enzymes. Conclusions Our analyses indicate that the hub and bottleneck enzymes of metabolic network obtain great benefits from WGD, and this event grants clear evolutionary advantages in adaptation to different environments. PMID:20478072

  2. Measuring preferential attachment in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H.; Néda, Z.; Barabási, A. L.

    2003-02-01

    A key ingredient of many current models proposed to capture the topological evolution of complex networks is the hypothesis that highly connected nodes increase their connectivity faster than their less connected peers, a phenomenon called preferential attachment. Measurements on four networks, namely the science citation network, Internet, actor collaboration and science coauthorship network indicate that the rate at which nodes acquire links depends on the node's degree, offering direct quantitative support for the presence of preferential attachment. We find that for the first two systems the attachment rate depends linearly on the node degree, while for the last two the dependence follows a sublinear power law.

  3. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  4. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of "preferentiality" in countries' trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members' trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech "Textiles and Textile Articles" and the high-tech "Electronics" sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns.

  5. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of "preferentiality" in countries' trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members' trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech "Textiles and Textile Articles" and the high-tech "Electronics" sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns. PMID:26485163

  6. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of “preferentiality” in countries’ trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members’ trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech “Textiles and Textile Articles” and the high-tech “Electronics” sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns. PMID:26485163

  7. Preferential attachment in multiple trade networks.

    PubMed

    Foschi, Rachele; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop a model for the evolution of multiple networks which is able to replicate the concentrated and sparse nature of world trade data. Our model is an extension of the preferential attachment growth model to the case of multiple networks. Countries trade a variety of goods of different complexity. Every country progressively evolves from trading less sophisticated to high-tech goods. The probabilities of capturing more trade opportunities at a given level of complexity and of starting to trade more complex goods are both proportional to the number of existing trade links. We provide a set of theoretical predictions and simulative results. A calibration exercise shows that our model replicates the same concentration level of world trade as well as the sparsity pattern of the trade matrix. We also discuss a set of numerical solutions to deal with large multiple networks.

  8. Preferential attachment in multiple trade networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foschi, Rachele; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop a model for the evolution of multiple networks which is able to replicate the concentrated and sparse nature of world trade data. Our model is an extension of the preferential attachment growth model to the case of multiple networks. Countries trade a variety of goods of different complexity. Every country progressively evolves from trading less sophisticated to high-tech goods. The probabilities of capturing more trade opportunities at a given level of complexity and of starting to trade more complex goods are both proportional to the number of existing trade links. We provide a set of theoretical predictions and simulative results. A calibration exercise shows that our model replicates the same concentration level of world trade as well as the sparsity pattern of the trade matrix. We also discuss a set of numerical solutions to deal with large multiple networks.

  9. Uncorrelatedness in growing networks with preferential survival of nodes.

    PubMed

    Juher, David; Saldaña, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of uncorrelated growing networks is proved when nodes are removed either uniformly or under the preferential survival rule recently observed in the World Wide Web evolution. To this aim, the rate equation for the joint probability of degrees is derived, and stationary symmetrical solutions are obtained, by passing to the continuum limit. When a uniformly random removal of extant nodes and linear preferential attachment of new nodes are at work, we prove that the only stationary solution corresponds to uncorrelated networks for any removal rate r∈(0,1). In the more general case of preferential survival of nodes, uncorrelated solutions are also obtained. These results generalize the uncorrelatedness displayed by the (undirected) Barabási-Albert network model to models with uniformly random and selective (against low degrees) removal of nodes.

  10. Preferential survival in models of complex ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Joseph S.; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.

    2008-05-01

    There has been a rich interplay in recent years between (i) empirical investigations of real-world dynamic networks, (ii) analytical modeling of the microscopic mechanisms that drive the emergence of such networks, and (iii) harnessing of these mechanisms to either manipulate existing networks, or engineer new networks for specific tasks. We continue in this vein, and study the deletion phenomenon in the web by the following two different sets of websites (each comprising more than 150,000 pages) over a one-year period. Empirical data show that there is a significant deletion component in the underlying web networks, but the deletion process is not uniform. This motivates us to introduce a new mechanism of preferential survival (PS), where nodes are removed according to the degree-dependent deletion kernel, D(k)∝k, with α≥0. We use the mean-field rate equation approach to study a general dynamic model driven by Preferential Attachment (PA), Double PA (DPA), and a tunable PS (i.e., with any α>0), where c nodes ( c<1) are deleted per node added to the network, and verify our predictions via large-scale simulations. One of our results shows that, unlike in the case of uniform deletion (i.e., where α=0), the PS kernel when coupled with the standard PA mechanism, can lead to heavy-tailed power-law networks even in the presence of extreme turnover in the network. Moreover, a weak DPA mechanism, coupled with PS, can help to make the network even more heavy-tailed, especially in the limit when deletion and insertion rates are almost equal, and the overall network growth is minimal. The dynamics reported in this work can be used to design and engineer stable ad hoc networks and explain the stability of the power-law exponents observed in real-world networks.

  11. Structural controllability of complex networks based on preferential matching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xizhe; Lv, Tianyang; Yang, XueYing; Zhang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Minimum driver node sets (MDSs) play an important role in studying the structural controllability of complex networks. Recent research has shown that MDSs tend to avoid high-degree nodes. However, this observation is based on the analysis of a small number of MDSs, because enumerating all of the MDSs of a network is a #P problem. Therefore, past research has not been sufficient to arrive at a convincing conclusion. In this paper, first, we propose a preferential matching algorithm to find MDSs that have a specific degree property. Then, we show that the MDSs obtained by preferential matching can be composed of high- and medium-degree nodes. Moreover, the experimental results also show that the average degree of the MDSs of some networks tends to be greater than that of the overall network, even when the MDSs are obtained using previous research method. Further analysis shows that whether the driver nodes tend to be high-degree nodes or not is closely related to the edge direction of the network.

  12. Attractor Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Pelta, David A.; Veguillas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background The experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a Systemic Metabolic Structure in the cell, characterized by a set of different enzymatic reactions always locked into active states (metabolic core) while the rest of the catalytic processes are only intermittently active. This global metabolic structure was verified for Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it seems to be a common key feature to all cellular organisms. In concordance with these observations, the cell can be considered a complex metabolic network which mainly integrates a large ensemble of self-organized multienzymatic complexes interconnected by substrate fluxes and regulatory signals, where multiple autonomous oscillatory and quasi-stationary catalytic patterns simultaneously emerge. The network adjusts the internal metabolic activities to the external change by means of flux plasticity and structural plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to research the systemic mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cellular enzymatic activity we have studied different catalytic activities of a dissipative metabolic network under different external stimuli. The emergent biochemical data have been analysed using statistical mechanic tools, studying some macroscopic properties such as the global information and the energy of the system. We have also obtained an equivalent Hopfield network using a Boltzmann machine. Our main result shows that the dissipative metabolic network can behave as an attractor metabolic network. Conclusions/Significance We have found that the systemic enzymatic activities are governed by attractors with capacity to store functional metabolic patterns which can be correctly recovered from specific input stimuli. The network attractors regulate the catalytic patterns, modify the efficiency

  13. Soil organic carbon, macropore networks and preferential transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsbo, Mats; Koestel, John; Kätterer, Thomas; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural management practices such as tillage, crop rotations, residue management and fertilization can have a strong influence on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. An increase in SOC content will generally improve soil structure, which in turn determines the solute transport pathways through the soil. The aim of this study was to quantify the architecture of macropore networks in undisturbed soil columns (15 cm high, 12.7 cm diameter) sampled along a transect with natural variations in SOC using X-ray tomography and to relate the network characteristics to the degree of preferential transport in the columns. Two tracer experiments were carried out at constant irrigation rates of 2 and 5 mm h-1. We used the normalised 5% arrival time which reflects the tendency for early arrival of the solutes as a measure of the degree of preferential transport. The soil macropore networks were analysed in cylindrical sub-volumes (8 cm high, 10 cm diameter) located centrally within the soil columns. These sub-volumes were considered unaffected by sampling artefacts. Analyses were also carried out the for whole sample volumes to enable comparisons with the results from the transport experiments. Image processing and analysis were carried out in ImageJ and R. The same grey value threshold was applied to all images after harmonisation of grey values using the PVC column walls and the air outside the columns. This approach resulted in a satisfactory separation between the pore space and the surrounding soil matrix and organic matter. The SOC content along the transect, which varied from 4.2 to 15% , was correlated to all measures of the pore network for the sub-volumes except for the connectivity probability. Columns with high SOC content were associated with large macroporosities (both total and connected), large specific surface areas, large fractal dimensions and small mean pore thicknesses. The SOC content for whole sample volumes was positively correlated to 5% arrival times

  14. Granger causality stock market networks: Temporal proximity and preferential attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Výrost, Tomáš; Lyócsa, Štefan; Baumöhl, Eduard

    2015-06-01

    The structure of return spillovers is examined by constructing Granger causality networks using daily closing prices of 20 developed markets from 2nd January 2006 to 31st December 2013. The data is properly aligned to take into account non-synchronous trading effects. The study of the resulting networks of over 94 sub-samples revealed three significant findings. First, after the recent financial crisis the impact of the US stock market has declined. Second, spatial probit models confirmed the role of the temporal proximity between market closing times for return spillovers, i.e. the time distance between national stock markets matters. Third, a preferential attachment between stock markets exists, i.e. the probability of the presence of spillover effects between any given two markets increases with their degree of connectedness to others.

  15. Complex networks as an emerging property of hierarchical preferential attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Allard, Antoine; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J.

    2015-12-01

    Real complex systems are not rigidly structured; no clear rules or blueprints exist for their construction. Yet, amidst their apparent randomness, complex structural properties universally emerge. We propose that an important class of complex systems can be modeled as an organization of many embedded levels (potentially infinite in number), all of them following the same universal growth principle known as preferential attachment. We give examples of such hierarchy in real systems, for instance, in the pyramid of production entities of the film industry. More importantly, we show how real complex networks can be interpreted as a projection of our model, from which their scale independence, their clustering, their hierarchy, their fractality, and their navigability naturally emerge. Our results suggest that complex networks, viewed as growing systems, can be quite simple, and that the apparent complexity of their structure is largely a reflection of their unobserved hierarchical nature.

  16. Design of pathway preferential estrogens that provide beneficial metabolic and vascular effects without stimulating reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Kim, Sung Hoon; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru C; Zhang, Hui; Chambliss, Ken L; Carlson, Kathryn E; Mayne, Christopher G; Shaul, Philip W; Korach, Kenneth S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2016-01-01

    There is great medical need for estrogens with favorable pharmacological profiles that support desirable activities for menopausal women, such as metabolic and vascular protection, but that lack stimulatory activities on the breast and uterus. We report the development of structurally novel estrogens that preferentially activate a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways and result in favorable target tissue-selective activity. Through a process of structural alteration of estrogenic ligands that was designed to preserve their essential chemical and physical features but greatly reduced their binding affinity for ERs, we obtained "pathway preferential estrogens" (PaPEs), which interacted with ERs to activate the extranuclear-initiated signaling pathway preferentially over the nuclear-initiated pathway. PaPEs elicited a pattern of gene regulation and cellular and biological processes that did not stimulate reproductive and mammary tissues or breast cancer cells. However, in ovariectomized mice, PaPEs triggered beneficial responses both in metabolic tissues (adipose tissue and liver) that reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation and in the vasculature that accelerated repair of endothelial damage. This process of designed ligand structure alteration represents a novel approach to develop ligands that shift the balance in ER-mediated extranuclear and nuclear pathways to obtain tissue-selective, non-nuclear PaPEs, which may be beneficial for postmenopausal hormone replacement. The approach may also have broad applicability for other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:27221711

  17. Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thong; Sheridan, Paul; Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Complex network growth across diverse fields of science is hypothesized to be driven in the main by a combination of preferential attachment and node fitness processes. For measuring the respective influences of these processes, previous approaches make strong and untested assumptions on the functional forms of either the preferential attachment function or fitness function or both. We introduce a Bayesian statistical method called PAFit to estimate preferential attachment and node fitness without imposing such functional constraints that works by maximizing a log-likelihood function with suitably added regularization terms. We use PAFit to investigate the interplay between preferential attachment and node fitness processes in a Facebook wall-post network. While we uncover evidence for both preferential attachment and node fitness, thus validating the hypothesis that these processes together drive complex network evolution, we also find that node fitness plays the bigger role in determining the degree of a node. This is the first validation of its kind on real-world network data. But surprisingly the rate of preferential attachment is found to deviate from the conventional log-linear form when node fitness is taken into account. The proposed method is implemented in the R package PAFit. PMID:27601314

  18. Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thong; Sheridan, Paul; Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2016-09-01

    Complex network growth across diverse fields of science is hypothesized to be driven in the main by a combination of preferential attachment and node fitness processes. For measuring the respective influences of these processes, previous approaches make strong and untested assumptions on the functional forms of either the preferential attachment function or fitness function or both. We introduce a Bayesian statistical method called PAFit to estimate preferential attachment and node fitness without imposing such functional constraints that works by maximizing a log-likelihood function with suitably added regularization terms. We use PAFit to investigate the interplay between preferential attachment and node fitness processes in a Facebook wall-post network. While we uncover evidence for both preferential attachment and node fitness, thus validating the hypothesis that these processes together drive complex network evolution, we also find that node fitness plays the bigger role in determining the degree of a node. This is the first validation of its kind on real-world network data. But surprisingly the rate of preferential attachment is found to deviate from the conventional log-linear form when node fitness is taken into account. The proposed method is implemented in the R package PAFit.

  19. Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thong; Sheridan, Paul; Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2016-09-07

    Complex network growth across diverse fields of science is hypothesized to be driven in the main by a combination of preferential attachment and node fitness processes. For measuring the respective influences of these processes, previous approaches make strong and untested assumptions on the functional forms of either the preferential attachment function or fitness function or both. We introduce a Bayesian statistical method called PAFit to estimate preferential attachment and node fitness without imposing such functional constraints that works by maximizing a log-likelihood function with suitably added regularization terms. We use PAFit to investigate the interplay between preferential attachment and node fitness processes in a Facebook wall-post network. While we uncover evidence for both preferential attachment and node fitness, thus validating the hypothesis that these processes together drive complex network evolution, we also find that node fitness plays the bigger role in determining the degree of a node. This is the first validation of its kind on real-world network data. But surprisingly the rate of preferential attachment is found to deviate from the conventional log-linear form when node fitness is taken into account. The proposed method is implemented in the R package PAFit.

  20. Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Thong; Sheridan, Paul; Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Complex network growth across diverse fields of science is hypothesized to be driven in the main by a combination of preferential attachment and node fitness processes. For measuring the respective influences of these processes, previous approaches make strong and untested assumptions on the functional forms of either the preferential attachment function or fitness function or both. We introduce a Bayesian statistical method called PAFit to estimate preferential attachment and node fitness without imposing such functional constraints that works by maximizing a log-likelihood function with suitably added regularization terms. We use PAFit to investigate the interplay between preferential attachment and node fitness processes in a Facebook wall-post network. While we uncover evidence for both preferential attachment and node fitness, thus validating the hypothesis that these processes together drive complex network evolution, we also find that node fitness plays the bigger role in determining the degree of a node. This is the first validation of its kind on real-world network data. But surprisingly the rate of preferential attachment is found to deviate from the conventional log-linear form when node fitness is taken into account. The proposed method is implemented in the R package PAFit. PMID:27601314

  1. A coevolving model based on preferential triadic closure for social media networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Menghui; Zou, Hailin; Guan, Shuguang; Gong, Xiaofeng; Li, Kun; Di, Zengru; Lai, Choy-Heng

    2013-01-01

    The dynamical origin of complex networks, i.e., the underlying principles governing network evolution, is a crucial issue in network study. In this paper, by carrying out analysis to the temporal data of Flickr and Epinions–two typical social media networks, we found that the dynamical pattern in neighborhood, especially the formation of triadic links, plays a dominant role in the evolution of networks. We thus proposed a coevolving dynamical model for such networks, in which the evolution is only driven by the local dynamics–the preferential triadic closure. Numerical experiments verified that the model can reproduce global properties which are qualitatively consistent with the empirical observations. PMID:23979061

  2. A coevolving model based on preferential triadic closure for social media networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Menghui; Zou, Hailin; Guan, Shuguang; Gong, Xiaofeng; Li, Kun; di, Zengru; Lai, Choy-Heng

    2013-08-01

    The dynamical origin of complex networks, i.e., the underlying principles governing network evolution, is a crucial issue in network study. In this paper, by carrying out analysis to the temporal data of Flickr and Epinions-two typical social media networks, we found that the dynamical pattern in neighborhood, especially the formation of triadic links, plays a dominant role in the evolution of networks. We thus proposed a coevolving dynamical model for such networks, in which the evolution is only driven by the local dynamics-the preferential triadic closure. Numerical experiments verified that the model can reproduce global properties which are qualitatively consistent with the empirical observations.

  3. Network growth with preferential attachment and without “rich get richer” mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachgar, A.; Achahbar, A.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple preferential attachment model of growing network using the complementary probability of Barabási-Albert (BA) model, i.e. Π(ki)∝1-ki∑jkj. In this network, new nodes are preferentially attached to not well connected nodes. Numerical simulations, in perfect agreement with the master equation solution, give an exponential degree distribution. This suggests that the power law degree distribution is a consequence of preferential attachment probability together with “rich get richer” phenomena. We also calculate the average degree of a target node at time t() and its fluctuations, to have a better view of the microscopic evolution of the network, and we also compare the results with BA model.

  4. Network growth with preferential attachment for high indegree and low outdegree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2008-04-01

    We study the growth of a directed transportation network, such as a food web, in which links carry resources. We propose a growth process in which new nodes (or species) preferentially attach to existing nodes with high indegree (in food-web language, number of prey) and low outdegree (or number of predators). This scheme, which we call inverse preferential attachment, is intended to maximize the amount of resources available to each new node. We show that the outdegree (predator) distribution decays at least exponentially fast for large outdegree and is continuously tunable between an exponential distribution and a delta function. The indegree (prey) distribution is poissonian in the large-network limit.

  5. Short Fractions of Oligofructose Are Preferentially Metabolized by Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010

    PubMed Central

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Avonts, Lazlo; De Vuyst, Luc

    2004-01-01

    The growth of Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010 on different energy sources was studied through small- and large-scale fermentations. Growth on both more common energy sources (glucose, fructose, galactose, lactose, and sucrose) and inulin-type fructans was examined. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was used to investigate the kinetics. Gas chromatography was used to determine the fructan degradation during the fermentation process. B. animalis DN-173 010 was unable to grow on a medium containing glucose as the sole energy source. In general, monosaccharides were poor growth substrates for the B. animalis strain. The fermentations with the inulin-type fructans resulted in changes in both growth and metabolite production due to the preferential metabolism of certain fructans, especially the short-chain oligomers. Only after depletion of the shorter chains were the larger fractions also metabolized, although to a lesser extent. Acetic acid was the major metabolite produced during all fermentation experiments. At the beginning of the fermentation, high levels of lactic acid were produced, which were partially replaced by formic acid at later stages. This suggests a shift in sugar metabolism to gain additional ATP that is necessary for growth on oligofructose, which is metabolized more slowly. PMID:15066781

  6. Assortativity and leadership emerge from anti-preferential attachment in heterogeneous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Danziger, M. M.; Wang, Z.; Havlin, S.; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-02-01

    Real-world networks have distinct topologies, with marked deviations from purely random networks. Many of them exhibit degree-assortativity, with nodes of similar degree more likely to link to one another. Though microscopic mechanisms have been suggested for the emergence of other topological features, assortativity has proven elusive. Assortativity can be artificially implanted in a network via degree-preserving link permutations, however this destroys the graph’s hierarchical clustering and does not correspond to any microscopic mechanism. Here, we propose the first generative model which creates heterogeneous networks with scale-free-like properties in degree and clustering distributions and tunable realistic assortativity. Two distinct populations of nodes are incrementally added to an initial network by selecting a subgraph to connect to at random. One population (the followers) follows preferential attachment, while the other population (the potential leaders) connects via anti-preferential attachment: they link to lower degree nodes when added to the network. By selecting the lower degree nodes, the potential leader nodes maintain high visibility during the growth process, eventually growing into hubs. The evolution of links in Facebook empirically validates the connection between the initial anti-preferential attachment and long term high degree. In this way, our work sheds new light on the structure and evolution of social networks.

  7. Assortativity and leadership emerge from anti-preferential attachment in heterogeneous networks

    PubMed Central

    Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Danziger, M. M.; Wang, Z.; Havlin, S.; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-world networks have distinct topologies, with marked deviations from purely random networks. Many of them exhibit degree-assortativity, with nodes of similar degree more likely to link to one another. Though microscopic mechanisms have been suggested for the emergence of other topological features, assortativity has proven elusive. Assortativity can be artificially implanted in a network via degree-preserving link permutations, however this destroys the graph’s hierarchical clustering and does not correspond to any microscopic mechanism. Here, we propose the first generative model which creates heterogeneous networks with scale-free-like properties in degree and clustering distributions and tunable realistic assortativity. Two distinct populations of nodes are incrementally added to an initial network by selecting a subgraph to connect to at random. One population (the followers) follows preferential attachment, while the other population (the potential leaders) connects via anti-preferential attachment: they link to lower degree nodes when added to the network. By selecting the lower degree nodes, the potential leader nodes maintain high visibility during the growth process, eventually growing into hubs. The evolution of links in Facebook empirically validates the connection between the initial anti-preferential attachment and long term high degree. In this way, our work sheds new light on the structure and evolution of social networks. PMID:26887684

  8. PAND: A Distribution to Identify Functional Linkage from Networks with Preferential Attachment Property

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Tong, Pan; Gallegos, Juan; Dimmer, Emily; Cai, Guoshuai; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Shoudan

    2015-01-01

    Technology advances have immensely accelerated large-scale mapping of biological networks, which necessitates the development of accurate and powerful network-based algorithms to make functional inferences. A prevailing approach is to leverage functions of neighboring nodes to predict unknown molecular function. However, existing neighbor-based algorithms have ignored the scale-free property hidden in many biological networks. By assuming that neighbor sharing is constrained by the preferential attachment property, we developed a Preferential Attachment based common Neighbor Distribution (PAND) to calculate the probability of the neighbor-sharing event between any two nodes in scale-free networks, which nearly perfectly matched the observed probability in simulations. By applying PAND to a human protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, we showed that smaller probabilities represented closer functional linkages between proteins. With the PAND-derive linkages, we were able to build new networks where the links are more functionally reliable than those of the human PPI network. We then applied simple annotation schemes to a PAND-derived network to make reliable functional predictions for proteins. We also developed an R package called PANDA (PAND-derived functional Associations) to implement the methods proposed in this study. In conclusion, PAND is a useful distribution to calculate the probability of the neighbor-sharing events in scale-free networks. With PAND, we are able to extract reliable functional linkages from real biological networks and builds new networks that are better bases for further functional inference. PMID:26158709

  9. Preferential metabolism of N-nitrosodiethylamine by two cell lines derived from human pulmonary adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Falzon, M.; McMahon, J.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Schuller, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Diethylnitrosamine (DEN), in common with other nitrosamines, is a carcinogenic agent which produces tumors in a wide variety of tissues in experimental animals. The pulmonary Clara cell is a major target of N-nitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis in hamsters and rats. DEN is believed to require metabolic activation to elicit its carcinogenic effects. The metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DEN was studied in two cell lines derived from human lung adenocarcinomas and two cell lines derived from human small cell lung cancers by monitoring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production and covalent binding of radiolabel from (/sup 14/C)DEN to the cell protein and DNA fractions. (/sup 14/C)DEN was metabolized by adenocarcinoma-derived NCI-H322 (with Clara cell features) and NCI-H358 (with features of alveolar type II cells) but not by NCI-H69 and NCI-H128 (derived from small cell carcinoma). Metabolism was markedly inhibited by heat denaturation of the cell protein. (/sup 14/C)DEN metabolism by NCI-H322 was greatly decreased when the incubation was carried out under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of a carbon monoxide enriched atmosphere. These results suggested the involvement of the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase enzyme system. Metabolism by NCI-H358 was also decreased in the absence of oxygen or presence of carbon monoxide although the effects were relatively small compared with the results with NCI-H322. On the other hand, aspirin or indomethacin, which are inhibitors of the fatty acid cyclooxygenase component of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase, preferentially inhibited (/sup 14/C)DEN metabolism by NIC-H358. There were little or no effects of these inhibitors on the metabolism of DEN in NCI-H322. The data suggest that DEN metabolism in different lung cell types may be carried out by different enzyme systems which in turn may contribute to the selective effect of DEN in the lung.

  10. PAFit: A Statistical Method for Measuring Preferential Attachment in Temporal Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Thong; Sheridan, Paul; Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Preferential attachment is a stochastic process that has been proposed to explain certain topological features characteristic of complex networks from diverse domains. The systematic investigation of preferential attachment is an important area of research in network science, not only for the theoretical matter of verifying whether this hypothesized process is operative in real-world networks, but also for the practical insights that follow from knowledge of its functional form. Here we describe a maximum likelihood based estimation method for the measurement of preferential attachment in temporal complex networks. We call the method PAFit, and implement it in an R package of the same name. PAFit constitutes an advance over previous methods primarily because we based it on a nonparametric statistical framework that enables attachment kernel estimation free of any assumptions about its functional form. We show this results in PAFit outperforming the popular methods of Jeong and Newman in Monte Carlo simulations. What is more, we found that the application of PAFit to a publically available Flickr social network dataset yielded clear evidence for a deviation of the attachment kernel from the popularly assumed log-linear form. Independent of our main work, we provide a correction to a consequential error in Newman’s original method which had evidently gone unnoticed since its publication over a decade ago. PMID:26378457

  11. CORE-Net: exploiting prior knowledge and preferential attachment to infer biological interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, F; Cosentino, C; Amato, F

    2010-09-01

    The problem of reverse engineering in the topology of functional interaction networks from time-course experimental data has received considerable attention in literature, due to the potential applications in the most diverse fields, comprising engineering, biology, economics and social sciences. The present work introduces a novel technique, CORE-Net, which addresses this problem focusing on the case of biological interaction networks. The method is based on the representation of the network in the form of a dynamical system and on an iterative convex optimisation procedure. A first advantage of the proposed approach is that it allows to exploit qualitative prior knowledge about the network interactions, of the same kind as typically available from biological literature and databases. A second novel contribution consists of exploiting the growth and preferential attachment mechanisms to improve the inference performances when dealing with networks which exhibit a scale-free topology. The technique is first assessed through numerical tests on in silico random networks, subsequently it is applied to reverse engineering a cell cycle regulatory subnetwork in Saccharomyces cerevisiae from experimental microarray data. These tests show that the combined exploitation of prior knowledge and preferential attachment significantly improves the predictions with respect to other approaches.

  12. Common mycorrhizal networks amplify competition by preferential mineral nutrient allocation to large host plants.

    PubMed

    Weremijewicz, Joanna; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo O'Reilly; Janos, David P

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi interconnect plants in common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) which can amplify competition among neighbors. Amplified competition might result from the fungi supplying mineral nutrients preferentially to hosts that abundantly provide fixed carbon, as suggested by research with organ-cultured roots. We examined whether CMNs supplied (15) N preferentially to large, nonshaded, whole plants. We conducted an intraspecific target-neighbor pot experiment with Andropogon gerardii and several AM fungi in intact, severed or prevented CMNs. Neighbors were supplied (15) N, and half of the target plants were shaded. Intact CMNs increased target dry weight (DW), intensified competition and increased size inequality. Shading decreased target weight, but shaded plants in intact CMNs had mycorrhizal colonization similar to that of sunlit plants. AM fungi in intact CMNs acquired (15) N from the substrate of neighbors and preferentially allocated it to sunlit, large, target plants. Sunlit, intact CMN, target plants acquired as much as 27% of their nitrogen from the vicinity of their neighbors, but shaded targets did not. These results suggest that AM fungi in CMNs preferentially provide mineral nutrients to those conspecific host individuals best able to provide them with fixed carbon or representing the strongest sinks, thereby potentially amplifying asymmetric competition below ground. PMID:27265515

  13. Common mycorrhizal networks amplify competition by preferential mineral nutrient allocation to large host plants.

    PubMed

    Weremijewicz, Joanna; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo O'Reilly; Janos, David P

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi interconnect plants in common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) which can amplify competition among neighbors. Amplified competition might result from the fungi supplying mineral nutrients preferentially to hosts that abundantly provide fixed carbon, as suggested by research with organ-cultured roots. We examined whether CMNs supplied (15) N preferentially to large, nonshaded, whole plants. We conducted an intraspecific target-neighbor pot experiment with Andropogon gerardii and several AM fungi in intact, severed or prevented CMNs. Neighbors were supplied (15) N, and half of the target plants were shaded. Intact CMNs increased target dry weight (DW), intensified competition and increased size inequality. Shading decreased target weight, but shaded plants in intact CMNs had mycorrhizal colonization similar to that of sunlit plants. AM fungi in intact CMNs acquired (15) N from the substrate of neighbors and preferentially allocated it to sunlit, large, target plants. Sunlit, intact CMN, target plants acquired as much as 27% of their nitrogen from the vicinity of their neighbors, but shaded targets did not. These results suggest that AM fungi in CMNs preferentially provide mineral nutrients to those conspecific host individuals best able to provide them with fixed carbon or representing the strongest sinks, thereby potentially amplifying asymmetric competition below ground.

  14. Metabolic constraint-based refinement of transcriptional regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong need for computational frameworks that integrate different biological processes and data-types to unravel cellular regulation. Current efforts to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) focus primarily on proximal data such as gene co-expression and transcription factor (TF) binding. While such approaches enable rapid reconstruction of TRNs, the overwhelming combinatorics of possible networks limits identification of mechanistic regulatory interactions. Utilizing growth phenotypes and systems-level constraints to inform regulatory network reconstruction is an unmet challenge. We present our approach Gene Expression and Metabolism Integrated for Network Inference (GEMINI) that links a compendium of candidate regulatory interactions with the metabolic network to predict their systems-level effect on growth phenotypes. We then compare predictions with experimental phenotype data to select phenotype-consistent regulatory interactions. GEMINI makes use of the observation that only a small fraction of regulatory network states are compatible with a viable metabolic network, and outputs a regulatory network that is simultaneously consistent with the input genome-scale metabolic network model, gene expression data, and TF knockout phenotypes. GEMINI preferentially recalls gold-standard interactions (p-value = 10(-172)), significantly better than using gene expression alone. We applied GEMINI to create an integrated metabolic-regulatory network model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving 25,000 regulatory interactions controlling 1597 metabolic reactions. The model quantitatively predicts TF knockout phenotypes in new conditions (p-value = 10(-14)) and revealed potential condition-specific regulatory mechanisms. Our results suggest that a metabolic constraint-based approach can be successfully used to help reconstruct TRNs from high-throughput data, and highlights the potential of using a biochemically-detailed mechanistic framework to

  15. Metabolic constraint-based refinement of transcriptional regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong need for computational frameworks that integrate different biological processes and data-types to unravel cellular regulation. Current efforts to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) focus primarily on proximal data such as gene co-expression and transcription factor (TF) binding. While such approaches enable rapid reconstruction of TRNs, the overwhelming combinatorics of possible networks limits identification of mechanistic regulatory interactions. Utilizing growth phenotypes and systems-level constraints to inform regulatory network reconstruction is an unmet challenge. We present our approach Gene Expression and Metabolism Integrated for Network Inference (GEMINI) that links a compendium of candidate regulatory interactions with the metabolic network to predict their systems-level effect on growth phenotypes. We then compare predictions with experimental phenotype data to select phenotype-consistent regulatory interactions. GEMINI makes use of the observation that only a small fraction of regulatory network states are compatible with a viable metabolic network, and outputs a regulatory network that is simultaneously consistent with the input genome-scale metabolic network model, gene expression data, and TF knockout phenotypes. GEMINI preferentially recalls gold-standard interactions (p-value = 10(-172)), significantly better than using gene expression alone. We applied GEMINI to create an integrated metabolic-regulatory network model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving 25,000 regulatory interactions controlling 1597 metabolic reactions. The model quantitatively predicts TF knockout phenotypes in new conditions (p-value = 10(-14)) and revealed potential condition-specific regulatory mechanisms. Our results suggest that a metabolic constraint-based approach can be successfully used to help reconstruct TRNs from high-throughput data, and highlights the potential of using a biochemically-detailed mechanistic framework to

  16. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity.

  17. Nonlinear preferential rewiring in fixed-size networks as a diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Samuel; Torres, Joaquín J; Marro, Joaquín

    2009-05-01

    We present an evolving network model in which the total numbers of nodes and edges are conserved, but in which edges are continuously rewired according to nonlinear preferential detachment and reattachment. Assuming power-law kernels with exponents alpha and beta , the stationary states which the degree distributions evolve toward exhibit a second-order phase transition-from relatively homogeneous to highly heterogeneous (with the emergence of starlike structures) at alpha=beta . Temporal evolution of the distribution in this critical regime is shown to follow a nonlinear diffusion equation, arriving at either pure or mixed power laws of exponents -alpha and 1-alpha .

  18. Profiling metabolic networks to study cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth and survival, and tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to aid these processes. New capabilities in the computational and bioanalytical characterization of metabolism have now emerged, facilitating the identification of unique metabolic dependencies that arise in specific cancers. By understanding the metabolic phenotype of cancers as a function of their oncogenic profiles, metabolic engineering may be applied to design synthetically lethal therapies for some tumors. This process begins with accurate measurement of metabolic fluxes. Here we review advanced methods of quantifying pathway activity and highlight specific examples where these approaches have uncovered potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Design of pathway-preferential estrogens that provide beneficial metabolic and vascular effects without stimulating reproductive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru C.; Zhang, Hui; Chambliss, Ken L.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Mayne, Christopher G.; Shaul, Philip W.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2016-01-01

    There is great medical need for estrogens with favorable pharmacological profiles, that support desirable activities for menopausal women such as metabolic and vascular protection but that lack stimulatory activities on the breast and uterus. Here, we report the development of structurally novel estrogens that preferentially activate a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways and result in favorable target tissue-selective activity. Through a process of structural alteration of estrogenic ligands that was designed to preserve their essential chemical and physical features but greatly reduced their binding affinity for ERs, we obtained “Pathway Preferential Estrogens” (PaPEs) which interacted with ERs to activate the extranuclear-initiated signaling pathway preferentially over the nuclear-initiated pathway. PaPEs elicited a pattern of gene regulation and cellular and biological processes that did not stimulate reproductive and mammary tissues or breast cancer cells. However, in ovariectomized mice, PaPEs triggered beneficial responses both in metabolic tissues (adipose tissue and liver) that reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation and in the vasculature that accelerated repair of endothelial damage. This process of designed ligand structure alteration represents a novel approach to develop ligands that shift the balance in ER-mediated extranuclear and nuclear pathways to obtain tissue-selective, non-nuclear pathway-preferential estrogens, which may be beneficial for postmenopausal hormone replacement. The approach may also have broad applicability for other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:27221711

  20. Randomizing Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Areejit; Martin, Olivier C.

    2011-01-01

    Networks coming from protein-protein interactions, transcriptional regulation, signaling, or metabolism may appear to have “unusual” properties. To quantify this, it is appropriate to randomize the network and test the hypothesis that the network is not statistically different from expected in a motivated ensemble. However, when dealing with metabolic networks, the randomization of the network using edge exchange generates fictitious reactions that are biochemically meaningless. Here we provide several natural ensembles of randomized metabolic networks. A first constraint is to use valid biochemical reactions. Further constraints correspond to imposing appropriate functional constraints. We explain how to perform these randomizations with the help of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and show that they allow one to approach the properties of biological metabolic networks. The implication of the present work is that the observed global structural properties of real metabolic networks are likely to be the consequence of simple biochemical and functional constraints. PMID:21779409

  1. Preferential attachment in the growth of social networks: The internet encyclopedia Wikipedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capocci, A.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Colaiori, F.; Buriol, L. S.; Donato, D.; Leonardi, S.; Caldarelli, G.

    2006-09-01

    We present an analysis of the statistical properties and growth of the free on-line encyclopedia Wikipedia. By describing topics by vertices and hyperlinks between them as edges, we can represent this encyclopedia as a directed graph. The topological properties of this graph are in close analogy with those of the World Wide Web, despite the very different growth mechanism. In particular, we measure a scale-invariant distribution of the in and out degree and we are able to reproduce these features by means of a simple statistical model. As a major consequence, Wikipedia growth can be described by local rules such as the preferential attachment mechanism, though users, who are responsible of its evolution, can act globally on the network.

  2. Preferential attachment in the growth of social networks: the internet encyclopedia Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Capocci, A; Servedio, V D P; Colaiori, F; Buriol, L S; Donato, D; Leonardi, S; Caldarelli, G

    2006-09-01

    We present an analysis of the statistical properties and growth of the free on-line encyclopedia Wikipedia. By describing topics by vertices and hyperlinks between them as edges, we can represent this encyclopedia as a directed graph. The topological properties of this graph are in close analogy with those of the World Wide Web, despite the very different growth mechanism. In particular, we measure a scale-invariant distribution of the in and out degree and we are able to reproduce these features by means of a simple statistical model. As a major consequence, Wikipedia growth can be described by local rules such as the preferential attachment mechanism, though users, who are responsible of its evolution, can act globally on the network.

  3. Consistency analysis of metabolic correlation networks

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Linow, Mark; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Metabolic correlation networks are derived from the covariance of metabolites in replicates of metabolomics experiments. They constitute an interesting intermediate between topology (i.e. the system's architecture defined by the set of reactions between metabolites) and dynamics (i.e. the metabolic concentrations observed as fluctuations around steady-state values in the metabolic network). Results Here we analyze, how such a correlation network changes over time, and compare the relative positions of metabolites in the correlation networks with those in established metabolic networks derived from genome databases. We find that network similarity indeed decreases with an increasing time difference between these networks during a day/night course and, counter intuitively, that proximity of metabolites in the correlation network is no indicator of proximity of the metabolites in the metabolic network. Conclusion The organizing principles of correlation networks are distinct from those of metabolic reaction maps. Time courses of correlation networks may in the future prove an important data source for understanding these organizing principles. PMID:17892579

  4. An online system for metabolic network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, Abdullah Ercument; Qi, Xinjian; Cakmak, Ali; Johnson, Stephen R.; Han, Xu; Alshalwi, Sami; Ozsoyoglu, Zehra Meral; Ozsoyoglu, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic networks have become one of the centers of attention in life sciences research with the advancements in the metabolomics field. A vast array of studies analyzes metabolites and their interrelations to seek explanations for various biological questions, and numerous genome-scale metabolic networks have been assembled to serve for this purpose. The increasing focus on this topic comes with the need for software systems that store, query, browse, analyze and visualize metabolic networks. PathCase Metabolomics Analysis Workbench (PathCaseMAW) is built, released and runs on a manually created generic mammalian metabolic network. The PathCaseMAW system provides a database-enabled framework and Web-based computational tools for browsing, querying, analyzing and visualizing stored metabolic networks. PathCaseMAW editor, with its user-friendly interface, can be used to create a new metabolic network and/or update an existing metabolic network. The network can also be created from an existing genome-scale reconstructed network using the PathCaseMAW SBML parser. The metabolic network can be accessed through a Web interface or an iPad application. For metabolomics analysis, steady-state metabolic network dynamics analysis (SMDA) algorithm is implemented and integrated with the system. SMDA tool is accessible through both the Web-based interface and the iPad application for metabolomics analysis based on a metabolic profile. PathCaseMAW is a comprehensive system with various data input and data access subsystems. It is easy to work with by design, and is a promising tool for metabolomics research and for educational purposes. Database URL: http://nashua.case.edu/PathwaysMAW/Web PMID:25267793

  5. Compartmentalization of the Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Direct in vivo investigation of human metabolism is complicated by the distinct metabolic functions of various sub-cellular organelles. Diverse micro-environments in different organelles may lead to distinct functions of the same protein and the use of different enzymes for the same metabolic reaction. To better understand the complexity in the human metabolism, a compartmentalized human metabolic network with integrated sub-cellular location information is required. Results We extended the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN) [Ma, et al. Molecular Systems Biology, 3:135, 2007] by integrating the sub-cellular location information for the reactions, adding transport reactions and refining the protein-reaction relationships based on the location information. Firstly, protein location information was obtained from Gene Ontology and complemented by a Swiss-Prot location keywords search. Then all the reactions in EHMN were assigned to a location based on the protein-reaction relationships to get a preliminary compartmentalized network. We investigated the localized sub-networks in each pathway to identify gaps and isolated reactions by connectivity analysis and refined the location information based on information from literature. As a result, location information for hundreds of reactions was revised and hundreds of incorrect protein-reaction relationships were corrected. Over 1400 transport reactions were added to link the location specific metabolic network. To validate the network, we have done pathway analysis to examine the capability of the network to synthesize or degrade certain key metabolites. Compared with a previously published human metabolic network (Human Recon 1), our network contains over 1000 more reactions assigned to clear cellular compartments. Conclusions By combining protein location information, network connectivity analysis and manual literature search, we have reconstructed a more complete

  6. Your Health Buddies Matter: Preferential Selection and Social Influence on Weight Management in an Online Health Social Network.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingbo

    2016-12-01

    A growing number of online social networks are designed with the intention to promote health by providing virtual space wherein individuals can seek and share information and support with similar others. Research has shown that real-world social networks have a significant influence on one's health behavior and outcomes. However, there is a dearth of studies on how individuals form social networks in virtual space and whether such online social networks exert any impact on individuals' health outcomes. Built on the Multi-Theoretical Multilevel (MTML) framework and drawing from literature on social influence, this study examined the mechanisms underlying the formation of an online health social network and empirically tested social influence on individual health outcomes through the network. Situated in a weight management social networking site, the study tracked a health buddy network of 709 users and their weight management activities and outcomes for 4 months. Actor-based modeling was used to test the joint dynamics of preferential selection and social influence among health buddies. The results showed that baseline, inbreeding, and health status homophily significantly predicted preferential selection of health buddies in the weight management social networking site, whereas self-interest in seeking experiential health information did not. The study also found peer influence of online health buddy networks on individual weight outcomes, such that an individual's odds of losing weight increased if, on average, the individual's health buddies were losing weight. PMID:27055008

  7. Organising metabolic networks: Cycles in flux distributions.

    PubMed

    Kritz, Maurício Vieira; Trindade Dos Santos, Marcelo; Urrutia, Sebastián; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    Metabolic networks are among the most widely studied biological systems. The topology and interconnections of metabolic reactions have been well described for many species. This is, however, not sufficient to understand how their activity is regulated in living organisms. These descriptions depict a static set of possible chains of reactions, with no information about the dynamic activity of reaction fluxes. Cyclic structures are thought to play a central role in the homeostasis of biological systems and in their resilience to a changing environment. In this work, we present a methodology to help investigating dynamic fluxes associated to biochemical reactions in metabolic networks. We introduce an algorithm for partitioning fluxes between cyclic and acyclic sub-networks, adapted from an algorithm initially developed to study fluxes in trophic networks. Using this algorithm, we analyse three metabolic systems: the central metabolism of wild type and a deletion mutant of Escherichia coli, erythrocyte metabolism and the central metabolism of the bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens. This methodology unveils the role of cycles in driving and maintaining metabolic fluxes under perturbations in these examples, and may be used to further investigate and understand the organisational invariance of biological systems.

  8. Mass-balanced randomization of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Georg; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Selbig, Joachim; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Network-centered studies in systems biology attempt to integrate the topological properties of biological networks with experimental data in order to make predictions and posit hypotheses. For any topology-based prediction, it is necessary to first assess the significance of the analyzed property in a biologically meaningful context. Therefore, devising network null models, carefully tailored to the topological and biochemical constraints imposed on the network, remains an important computational problem. Results: We first review the shortcomings of the existing generic sampling scheme—switch randomization—and explain its unsuitability for application to metabolic networks. We then devise a novel polynomial-time algorithm for randomizing metabolic networks under the (bio)chemical constraint of mass balance. The tractability of our method follows from the concept of mass equivalence classes, defined on the representation of compounds in the vector space over chemical elements. We finally demonstrate the uniformity of the proposed method on seven genome-scale metabolic networks, and empirically validate the theoretical findings. The proposed method allows a biologically meaningful estimation of significance for metabolic network properties. Contact: basler@mpimp-golm.mpg.de; nikoloski@mpimp-golm.mpg.de Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21436128

  9. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  10. Preferential Effect of Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy on Intracerebral 9L Gliosarcoma Vascular Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, Audrey; Lemasson, Benjamin; Le Duc, Geraldine; Maisin, Cecile; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Renaud, Luc; Khalil, Enam; Remy, Chantal; Poillot, Cathy; Bravin, Alberto; Laissue, Jean A.; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Serduc, Raphael

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) relies on spatial fractionation of the incident photon beam into parallel micron-wide beams. Our aim was to analyze the effects of MRT on normal brain and 9L gliosarcoma tissues, particularly on blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Responses to MRT (two arrays, one lateral, one anteroposterior (2 x 400 Gy), intersecting orthogonally in the tumor region) were studied during 6 weeks using MRI, immunohistochemistry, and vascular endothelial growth factor Western blot. Results: MRT increased the median survival time of irradiated rats (x3.25), significantly increased blood vessel permeability, and inhibited tumor growth; a cytotoxic effect on 9L cells was detected 5 days after irradiation. Significant decreases in tumoral blood volume fraction and vessel diameter were measured from 8 days after irradiation, due to loss of endothelial cells in tumors as detected by immunochemistry. Edema was observed in the normal brain exposed to both crossfired arrays about 6 weeks after irradiation. This edema was associated with changes in blood vessel morphology and an overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Conversely, vascular parameters and vessel morphology in brain regions exposed to one of the two arrays were not damaged, and there was no loss of vascular endothelia. Conclusions: We show for the first time that preferential damage of MRT to tumor vessels versus preservation of radioresistant normal brain vessels contributes to the efficient palliation of 9L gliosarcomas in rats. Molecular pathways of repair mechanisms in normal and tumoral vascular networks after MRT may be essential for the improvement of such differential effects on the vasculature.

  11. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  12. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  13. Metabolic networks are almost nonfractal: a comprehensive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Network self-similarity or fractality are widely accepted as an important topological property of metabolic networks; however, recent studies cast doubt on the reality of self-similarity in the networks. Therefore, we perform a comprehensive evaluation of metabolic network fractality using a box-covering method with an earlier version and the latest version of metabolic networks and demonstrate that the latest metabolic networks are almost self-dissimilar, while the earlier ones are fractal, as reported in a number of previous studies. This result may be because the networks were randomized because of an increase in network density due to database updates, suggesting that the previously observed network fractality was due to a lack of available data on metabolic reactions. This finding may not entirely discount the importance of self-similarity of metabolic networks. Rather, it highlights the need for a more suitable definition of network fractality and a more careful examination of self-similarity of metabolic networks.

  14. Metabolic networks are almost nonfractal: A comprehensive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Network self-similarity or fractality are widely accepted as an important topological property of metabolic networks; however, recent studies cast doubt on the reality of self-similarity in the networks. Therefore, we perform a comprehensive evaluation of metabolic network fractality using a box-covering method with an earlier version and the latest version of metabolic networks and demonstrate that the latest metabolic networks are almost self-dissimilar, while the earlier ones are fractal, as reported in a number of previous studies. This result may be because the networks were randomized because of an increase in network density due to database updates, suggesting that the previously observed network fractality was due to a lack of available data on metabolic reactions. This finding may not entirely discount the importance of self-similarity of metabolic networks. Rather, it highlights the need for a more suitable definition of network fractality and a more careful examination of self-similarity of metabolic networks.

  15. Constructing a fish metabolic network model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We report the construction of a genome-wide fish metabolic network model, MetaFishNet, and its application to analyzing high throughput gene expression data. This model is a stepping stone to broader applications of fish systems biology, for example by guiding study design through comparison with human metabolism and the integration of multiple data types. MetaFishNet resources, including a pathway enrichment analysis tool, are accessible at http://metafishnet.appspot.com. PMID:21114829

  16. Pathway knockout and redundancy in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Min, Yong; Jin, Xiaogang; Chen, Ming; Pan, Zhengzheng; Ge, Ying; Chang, Jie

    2011-02-01

    The robustness and stability of complex cellular networks is often attributed to the redundancy of components, including genes, enzymes and pathways. Estimation of redundancy is still an open question in systems biology. Current theoretical tools to measure redundancy have various strengths and shortcomings in providing a comprehensive description of metabolic networks. Specially, there is a lack of effective measures to cover different perturbation situations. Here we present a pathway knockout algorithm to improve quantitative measure of redundancy in metabolic networks grounded on the elementary flux mode (EFM) analysis. The proposed redundancy measure is based on the average ratio of remaining EFMs after knockout of one EFM in the unperturbed state. We demonstrated with four example systems that our algorithm overcomes limits of previous measures, and provides additional information about redundancy in the situation of targeted attacks. Additionally, we compare existing enzyme knockout and our pathway knockout algorithm by the mean-field analysis, which provides mathematical expression for the average ratio of remaining EFMs after both types of knockout. Our results prove that multiple-enzymes knockout does not always yield more information than single-enzyme knockout for evaluating redundancy. Indeed, pathway knockout considers additional effects of structural asymmetry. In the metabolic networks of amino acid anabolism in Escherichia coli and human hepatocytes, and the central metabolism in human erythrocytes, we validate our mean-field solutions and prove the capacity of pathway knockout algorithm. Moreover, in the E. coli model the two sub-networks synthesizing amino acids that are essential and those that are non-essential for humans are studied separately. In contrast to previous studies, we find that redundancy of two sub-networks is similar with each other, and even sub-networks synthesizing essential amino acids can be more redundant.

  17. Maize metabolic network construction and transcriptome analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A framework for understanding the synthesis and catalysis of metabolites and other biochemicals by proteins is crucial for unraveling the physiology of cells. To create such a framework for Zea mays ssp. mays (maize), we developed MaizeCyc a metabolic network of enzyme catalysts, proteins, carbohydr...

  18. Dissecting Germ Cell Metabolism through Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Leanne S.; Ye, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are increasingly postulated to be vital in programming cell fate, including stemness, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The commitment to meiosis is a critical fate decision for mammalian germ cells, and requires a metabolic derivative of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA). Recent evidence showed that a pulse of RA is generated in the testis of male mice thereby triggering meiotic commitment. However, enzymes and reactions that regulate this RA pulse have yet to be identified. We developed a mouse germ cell-specific metabolic network with a curated vitamin A pathway. Using this network, we implemented flux balance analysis throughout the initial wave of spermatogenesis to elucidate important reactions and enzymes for the generation and degradation of RA. Our results indicate that primary RA sources in the germ cell include RA import from the extracellular region, release of RA from binding proteins, and metabolism of retinal to RA. Further, in silico knockouts of genes and reactions in the vitamin A pathway predict that deletion of Lipe, hormone-sensitive lipase, disrupts the RA pulse thereby causing spermatogenic defects. Examination of other metabolic pathways reveals that the citric acid cycle is the most active pathway. In addition, we discover that fatty acid synthesis/oxidation are the primary energy sources in the germ cell. In summary, this study predicts enzymes, reactions, and pathways important for germ cell commitment to meiosis. These findings enhance our understanding of the metabolic control of germ cell differentiation and will help guide future experiments to improve reproductive health. PMID:26367011

  19. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Matthew B.; Medlock, Gregory L.; Kolling, Glynis L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions and constraint-based analysis are powerful methods that have the potential to make functional predictions about microbial communities. Current use of genome-scale metabolic networks to characterize the metabolic functions of microbial communities includes species compartmentalization, separating species-level and community-level objectives, dynamic analysis, the “enzyme-soup” approach, multi-scale modeling, and others. There are many challenges inherent to the field, including a need for tools that accurately assign high-level omics signals to individual community members, new automated reconstruction methods that rival manual curation, and novel algorithms for integrating omics data and engineering communities. As technologies and modeling frameworks improve, we expect that there will be proportional advances in the fields of ecology, health science, and microbial community engineering. PMID:26109480

  20. Meta-ecosystem metabolism across fluvial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulseth, A. J.; Singer, G. A.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems store, transform, and export terrestrial carbon and play an important role for regional and global carbon fluxes. Ecosystem metabolism is a measure of how and how much carbon is produced and transformed and - for streams and rivers - is typically estimated at the reach scale (typically tens to hundreds of meters). Due to methodological constraints we so far lack an understanding of metabolism of the fluvial meta-ecosystem continuum, i.e. at the scale of a fluvial network. To address this issue, we measured metabolism in multiple reaches across a 254 km2 catchment in Lower Austria, capturing both temporal dynamics and the spatial scale of the whole fluvial network. Stream metabolism was estimated from diel changes in oxygen and corrected for reaeration; continuously in 15 streams and during a short-term ';snap-shot' campaign across 42 streams. Across the network, the streams varied in catchment size (0.1 to 254 km2) and water chemistry (DOC: 1.0 to 2.7 mg L-1, NO3: 259 to 1277 μg L-1, NH4:<0.1 to 30 μg L-1, and PO4:<0.1 to 20 μg L-1) as a consequence of subcatchment landuse, elevation and geology. Gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) were suppressed across the network by high stream discharge events such as snow melt and heavy rains. Larger streams (catchment size > 35 km2) had higher GPP and tended to be more autotrophic than lower order streams. However, streams located above 1000 m elevation had higher GPP than streams of equivalent size found elsewhere in the stream network. During the winter months, all streams across the network were net heterotrophic, with GPP typically <1.0 g 02 m-2 d-1. The degree of autotrophy versus heterotrophy across the network was driven in part by light, which is contingent on location within the stream network. We will discuss scaling GPP and ER from the reach to the network scale in order to elucidate patterns of meta-ecosystem metabolism across fluvial networks.

  1. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  2. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-08-12

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models.

  3. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  4. Kinetic analysis of complex metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanopoulos, G.

    1996-12-31

    A new methodology is presented for the analysis of complex metabolic networks with the goal of metabolite overproduction. The objective is to locate a small number of reaction steps in a network that have maximum impact on network flux amplification and whose rate can also be increased without functional network derangement. This method extends the concepts of Metabolic Control Analysis to groups of reactions and offers the means for calculating group control coefficients as measures of the control exercised by groups of reactions on the overall network fluxes and intracellular metabolite pools. It is further demonstrated that the optimal strategy for the effective increase of network fluxes, while maintaining an uninterrupted supply of intermediate metabolites, is through the coordinated amplification of multiple (as opposed to a single) reaction steps. Satisfying this requirement invokes the concept of the concentration control to coefficient, which emerges as a critical parameter in the identification of feasible enzymatic modifications with maximal impact on the network flux. A case study of aromatic aminoacid production is provided to illustrate these concepts.

  5. Growth-Induced Instability in Metabolic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2007-03-30

    Product-feedback inhibition is a ubiquitous regulatory scheme for maintaining homeostasis in living cells. Individual metabolic pathways with product-feedback inhibition are stable as long as one pathway step is rate limiting. However, pathways are often coupled both by the use of a common substrate and by stoichiometric utilization of their products for cell growth. We show that such a coupled network with product-feedback inhibition may exhibit limit-cycle oscillations which arise via a Hopf bifurcation. Our results highlight novel evolutionary constraints on the architecture of metabolism.

  6. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Liò, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial metabolism is an important source of novel products/processes for everyday life and strong efforts are being undertaken to discover and exploit new usable substances of microbial origin. Computational modeling and in silico simulations are powerful tools in this context since they allow the exploration and a deeper understanding of bacterial metabolic circuits. Many approaches exist to quantitatively simulate chemical reaction fluxes within the whole microbial metabolism and, regardless of the technique of choice, metabolic model reconstruction is the first step in every modeling pipeline. Reconstructing a metabolic network consists in drafting the list of the biochemical reactions that an organism can carry out together with information on cellular boundaries, a biomass assembly reaction, and exchange fluxes with the external environment. Building up models able to represent the different functional cellular states is universally recognized as a tricky task that requires intensive manual effort and much additional information besides genome sequence. In this chapter we present a general protocol for metabolic reconstruction in bacteria and the main challenges encountered during this process. PMID:25343869

  7. Framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis to investigate the perturbed metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic network models have contributed to elucidating biological phenomena, and predicting gene targets to engineer for biotechnological applications. With their increasing importance, their precise network characterization has also been crucial for better understanding of the cellular physiology. Results We herein introduce a framework for network modularization and Bayesian network analysis (FMB) to investigate organism’s metabolism under perturbation. FMB reveals direction of influences among metabolic modules, in which reactions with similar or positively correlated flux variation patterns are clustered, in response to specific perturbation using metabolic flux data. With metabolic flux data calculated by constraints-based flux analysis under both control and perturbation conditions, FMB, in essence, reveals the effects of specific perturbations on the biological system through network modularization and Bayesian network analysis at metabolic modular level. As a demonstration, this framework was applied to the genetically perturbed Escherichia coli metabolism, which is a lpdA gene knockout mutant, using its genome-scale metabolic network model. Conclusions After all, it provides alternative scenarios of metabolic flux distributions in response to the perturbation, which are complementary to the data obtained from conventionally available genome-wide high-throughput techniques or metabolic flux analysis. PMID:22784571

  8. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  9. Sulfonate-grafted porous polymer networks for preferential CO2 adsorption at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Sculley, Julian; Zhao, Dan; Krishna, Rajamani; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2011-11-16

    A porous polymer network (PPN) grafted with sulfonic acid (PPN-6-SO(3)H) and its lithium salt (PPN-6-SO(3)Li) exhibit significant increases in isosteric heats of CO(2) adsorption and CO(2)-uptake capacities. IAST calculations using single-component-isotherm data and a 15/85 CO(2)/N(2) ratio at 295 K and 1 bar revealed that the sulfonate-grafted PPN-6 networks show exceptionally high adsorption selectivity for CO(2) over N(2) (155 and 414 for PPN-6-SO(3)H and PPN-6-SO(3)Li, respectively). Since these PPNs also possess ultrahigh physicochemical stability, practical applications in postcombustion capture of CO(2) lie well within the realm of possibility.

  10. Basic concepts and principles of stoichiometric modeling of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Maarleveld, Timo R; Khandelwal, Ruchir A; Olivier, Brett G; Teusink, Bas; Bruggeman, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic networks supply the energy and building blocks for cell growth and maintenance. Cells continuously rewire their metabolic networks in response to changes in environmental conditions to sustain fitness. Studies of the systemic properties of metabolic networks give insight into metabolic plasticity and robustness, and the ability of organisms to cope with different environments. Constraint-based stoichiometric modeling of metabolic networks has become an indispensable tool for such studies. Herein, we review the basic theoretical underpinnings of constraint-based stoichiometric modeling of metabolic networks. Basic concepts, such as stoichiometry, chemical moiety conservation, flux modes, flux balance analysis, and flux solution spaces, are explained with simple, illustrative examples. We emphasize the mathematical definitions and their network topological interpretations.

  11. Exploring mitochondrial evolution and metabolism organization principles by comparative analysis of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao; Wang, Zhuo; Hao, Pei; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue

    2010-06-01

    The endosymbiotic theory proposed that mitochondrial genomes are derived from an alpha-proteobacterium-like endosymbiont, which was concluded from sequence analysis. We rebuilt the metabolic networks of mitochondria and 22 relative species, and studied the evolution of mitochondrial metabolism at the level of enzyme content and network topology. Our phylogenetic results based on network alignment and motif identification supported the endosymbiotic theory from the point of view of systems biology for the first time. It was found that the mitochondrial metabolic network were much more compact than the relative species, probably related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation of the specialized organelle, and the network is highly clustered around the TCA cycle. Moreover, the mitochondrial metabolic network exhibited high functional specificity to the modules. This work provided insight to the understanding of mitochondria evolution, and the organization principle of mitochondrial metabolic network at the network level.

  12. Integration of metabolomics data into metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Töpfer, Nadine; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite levels together with their corresponding metabolic fluxes are integrative outcomes of biochemical transformations and regulatory processes and they can be used to characterize the response of biological systems to genetic and/or environmental changes. However, while changes in transcript or to some extent protein levels can usually be traced back to one or several responsible genes, changes in fluxes and particularly changes in metabolite levels do not follow such rationale and are often the outcome of complex interactions of several components. The increasing quality and coverage of metabolomics technologies have fostered the development of computational approaches for integrating metabolic read-outs with large-scale models to predict the physiological state of a system. Constraint-based approaches, relying on the stoichiometry of the considered reactions, provide a modeling framework amenable to analyses of large-scale systems and to the integration of high-throughput data. Here we review the existing approaches that integrate metabolomics data in variants of constrained-based approaches to refine model reconstructions, to constrain flux predictions in metabolic models, and to relate network structural properties to metabolite levels. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in the developments of constraint-based modeling approaches driven by metabolomics data. PMID:25741348

  13. Steady states and stability in metabolic networks without regulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Oleksandr; van der Schaft, Arjan; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-07-21

    Metabolic networks are often extremely complex. Despite intensive efforts many details of these networks, e.g., exact kinetic rates and parameters of metabolic reactions, are not known, making it difficult to derive their properties. Considerable effort has been made to develop theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks that are valid for any values of parameters. General results on uniqueness of steady states and their stability have been derived with specific assumptions on reaction kinetics, stoichiometry and network topology. For example, deep results have been obtained under the assumptions of mass-action reaction kinetics, continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR), concordant reaction networks and others. Nevertheless, a general theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks is still missing. Here we make a step further in the quest for such a theory. Specifically, we study properties of steady states in metabolic networks with monotonic kinetics in relation to their stoichiometry (simple and general) and the number of metabolites participating in every reaction (single or many). Our approach is based on the investigation of properties of the Jacobian matrix. We show that stoichiometry, network topology, and the number of metabolites that participate in every reaction have a large influence on the number of steady states and their stability in metabolic networks. Specifically, metabolic networks with single-substrate-single-product reactions have disconnected steady states, whereas in metabolic networks with multiple-substrates-multiple-product reactions manifolds of steady states arise. Metabolic networks with simple stoichiometry have either a unique globally asymptotically stable steady state or asymptotically stable manifolds of steady states. In metabolic networks with general stoichiometry the steady states are not always stable and we provide conditions for their stability. In order to demonstrate the biological

  14. Steady states and stability in metabolic networks without regulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Oleksandr; van der Schaft, Arjan; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-07-21

    Metabolic networks are often extremely complex. Despite intensive efforts many details of these networks, e.g., exact kinetic rates and parameters of metabolic reactions, are not known, making it difficult to derive their properties. Considerable effort has been made to develop theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks that are valid for any values of parameters. General results on uniqueness of steady states and their stability have been derived with specific assumptions on reaction kinetics, stoichiometry and network topology. For example, deep results have been obtained under the assumptions of mass-action reaction kinetics, continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR), concordant reaction networks and others. Nevertheless, a general theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks is still missing. Here we make a step further in the quest for such a theory. Specifically, we study properties of steady states in metabolic networks with monotonic kinetics in relation to their stoichiometry (simple and general) and the number of metabolites participating in every reaction (single or many). Our approach is based on the investigation of properties of the Jacobian matrix. We show that stoichiometry, network topology, and the number of metabolites that participate in every reaction have a large influence on the number of steady states and their stability in metabolic networks. Specifically, metabolic networks with single-substrate-single-product reactions have disconnected steady states, whereas in metabolic networks with multiple-substrates-multiple-product reactions manifolds of steady states arise. Metabolic networks with simple stoichiometry have either a unique globally asymptotically stable steady state or asymptotically stable manifolds of steady states. In metabolic networks with general stoichiometry the steady states are not always stable and we provide conditions for their stability. In order to demonstrate the biological

  15. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  16. Promise and Reality in the Expanding Field of Network Interaction Analysis: Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bazzani, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, metabolic networks revealed their capabilities as powerful tools to analyze the cellular metabolism. Many research fields (eg, metabolic engineering, diagnostic medicine, pharmacology, biochemistry, biology and physiology) improved the understanding of the cell combining experimental assays and metabolic network-based computations. This process led to the rise of the “systems biology” approach, where the theory meets experiments and where two complementary perspectives cooperate in the study of biological phenomena. Here, the reconstruction of metabolic networks is presented, along with established and new algorithms to improve the description of cellular metabolism. Then, advantages and limitations of modeling algorithms and network reconstruction are discussed. PMID:24812497

  17. Correlation between structure and temperature in prokaryotic metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years, an extensive characterization of network structures has been made in an effort to elucidate design principles of metabolic networks, providing valuable insights into the functional organization and the evolutionary history of organisms. However, previous analyses have not discussed the effects of environmental factors (i.e., exogenous forces) in shaping network structures. In this work, we investigate the effect of temperature, which is one of the environmental factors that may have contributed to shaping structures of metabolic networks. Results For this, we investigate the correlations between several structural properties characterized by graph metrics like the edge density, the degree exponent, the clustering coefficient, and the subgraph concentration in the metabolic networks of 113 prokaryotes and optimal growth temperature. As a result, we find that these structural properties are correlated with the optimal growth temperature. With increasing temperature, the edge density, the clustering coefficient and the subgraph concentration decrease and the degree exponent becomes large. Conclusion This result implies that the metabolic networks transit with temperature as follows. The density of chemical reactions becomes low, the connectivity of the networks becomes homogeneous such as random networks and both the network modularity, based on the graph-theoretic clustering coefficient, and the frequency of recurring subgraphs decay. In short, metabolic networks undergo a change from heterogeneous and high-modular structures to homogeneous and low-modular structures, such as random networks, with temperature. This finding may suggest that the temperature plays an important role in the design principles of metabolic networks. PMID:17711568

  18. Deciphering transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine metabolism during Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Fait, Aaron; Zhu, Xiaohong; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Feldmesser, Ester; Fernie, Alisdair R; Galili, Gad

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine (Lys) metabolism, we utilized developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds as a system in which Lys synthesis could be stimulated developmentally without application of chemicals and coupled this to a T-DNA insertion knockout mutation impaired in Lys catabolism. This seed-specific metabolic perturbation stimulated Lys accumulation starting from the initiation of storage reserve accumulation. Our results revealed that the response of seed metabolism to the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was relatively minor; however, that which was observable operated in a modular manner. They also demonstrated that Lys metabolism is strongly associated with the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle while largely disconnected from other metabolic networks. In contrast, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was strongly associated with gene networks, stimulating the expression of hundreds of genes controlling anabolic processes that are associated with plant performance and vigor while suppressing a small number of genes associated with plant stress interactions. The most pronounced effect of the developmentally inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was an induction of expression of a large set of genes encoding ribosomal proteins as well as genes encoding translation initiation and elongation factors, all of which are associated with protein synthesis. With respect to metabolic regulation, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was primarily associated with altered expression of genes belonging to networks of amino acids and sugar metabolism. The combined data are discussed within the context of network interactions both between and within metabolic and transcriptional control systems.

  19. Astroglial Metabolic Networks Sustain Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouach, Nathalie; Koulakoff, Annette; Abudara, Veronica; Willecke, Klaus; Giaume, Christian

    2008-12-01

    Astrocytes provide metabolic substrates to neurons in an activity-dependent manner. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this function, as well as its role in synaptic transmission, remain unclear. Here, we show that the gap-junction subunit proteins connexin 43 and 30 allow intercellular trafficking of glucose and its metabolites through astroglial networks. This trafficking is regulated by glutamatergic synaptic activity mediated by AMPA receptors. In the absence of extracellular glucose, the delivery of glucose or lactate to astrocytes sustains glutamatergic synaptic transmission and epileptiform activity only when they are connected by gap junctions. These results indicate that astroglial gap junctions provide an activity-dependent intercellular pathway for the delivery of energetic metabolites from blood vessels to distal neurons.

  20. Environmental versatility promotes modularity in genome-scale metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ubiquity of modules in biological networks may result from an evolutionary benefit of a modular organization. For instance, modularity may increase the rate of adaptive evolution, because modules can be easily combined into new arrangements that may benefit their carrier. Conversely, modularity may emerge as a by-product of some trait. We here ask whether this last scenario may play a role in genome-scale metabolic networks that need to sustain life in one or more chemical environments. For such networks, we define a network module as a maximal set of reactions that are fully coupled, i.e., whose fluxes can only vary in fixed proportions. This definition overcomes limitations of purely graph based analyses of metabolism by exploiting the functional links between reactions. We call a metabolic network viable in a given chemical environment if it can synthesize all of an organism's biomass compounds from nutrients in this environment. An organism's metabolism is highly versatile if it can sustain life in many different chemical environments. We here ask whether versatility affects the modularity of metabolic networks. Results Using recently developed techniques to randomly sample large numbers of viable metabolic networks from a vast space of metabolic networks, we use flux balance analysis to study in silico metabolic networks that differ in their versatility. We find that highly versatile networks are also highly modular. They contain more modules and more reactions that are organized into modules. Most or all reactions in a module are associated with the same biochemical pathways. Modules that arise in highly versatile networks generally involve reactions that process nutrients or closely related chemicals. We also observe that the metabolism of E. coli is significantly more modular than even our most versatile networks. Conclusions Our work shows that modularity in metabolic networks can be a by-product of functional constraints, e.g., the need to

  1. Matching metabolites and reactions in different metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xinjian; Ozsoyoglu, Z Meral; Ozsoyoglu, Gultekin

    2014-10-01

    Comparing and identifying matching metabolites, reactions, and compartments in genome-scale reconstructed metabolic networks can be difficult due to inconsistent naming in different networks. In this paper, we propose metabolite and reaction matching techniques for matching metabolites and reactions in a given metabolic network to metabolites and reactions in another metabolic network. We employ a variety of techniques that include approximate string matching, similarity score functions and multi-step filtering techniques, all enhanced by a set of rules based on the underlying metabolic biochemistry. The proposed techniques are evaluated by an empirical study on four pairs of metabolic networks, and significant accuracy gains are achieved using the proposed metabolite and reaction identification techniques.

  2. Knowledge-based generalization of metabolic networks: a practical study.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, Anna; Sherman, David J

    2014-04-01

    The complex process of genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction involves semi-automatic reaction inference, analysis, and refinement through curation by human experts. Unfortunately, decisions by experts are hampered by the complexity of the network, which can mask errors in the inferred network. In order to aid an expert in making sense out of the thousands of reactions in the organism's metabolism, we developed a method for knowledge-based generalization that provides a higher-level view of the network, highlighting the particularities and essential structure, while hiding the details. In this study, we show the application of this generalization method to 1,286 metabolic networks of organisms in Path2Models that describe fatty acid metabolism. We compare the generalised networks and show that we successfully highlight the aspects that are important for their curation and comparison. PMID:24712528

  3. Knowledge-based generalization of metabolic networks: a practical study.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, Anna; Sherman, David J

    2014-04-01

    The complex process of genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction involves semi-automatic reaction inference, analysis, and refinement through curation by human experts. Unfortunately, decisions by experts are hampered by the complexity of the network, which can mask errors in the inferred network. In order to aid an expert in making sense out of the thousands of reactions in the organism's metabolism, we developed a method for knowledge-based generalization that provides a higher-level view of the network, highlighting the particularities and essential structure, while hiding the details. In this study, we show the application of this generalization method to 1,286 metabolic networks of organisms in Path2Models that describe fatty acid metabolism. We compare the generalised networks and show that we successfully highlight the aspects that are important for their curation and comparison.

  4. Fluxes through plant metabolic networks: measurements, predictions, insights and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George

    2015-01-01

    Although the flows of material through metabolic networks are central to cell function, they are not easy to measure other than at the level of inputs and outputs. This is particularly true in plant cells, where the network spans multiple subcellular compartments and where the network may function either heterotrophically or photoautotrophically. For many years, kinetic modelling of pathways provided the only method for describing the operation of fragments of the network. However, more recently, it has become possible to map the fluxes in central carbon metabolism using the stable isotope labelling techniques of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), and to predict intracellular fluxes using constraints-based modelling procedures such as flux balance analysis (FBA). These approaches were originally developed for the analysis of microbial metabolism, but over the last decade, they have been adapted for the more demanding analysis of plant metabolic networks. Here, the principal features of MFA and FBA as applied to plants are outlined, followed by a discussion of the insights that have been gained into plant metabolic networks through the application of these time-consuming and non-trivial methods. The discussion focuses on how a system-wide view of plant metabolism has increased our understanding of network structure, metabolic perturbations and the provision of reducing power and energy for cell function. Current methodological challenges that limit the scope of plant MFA are discussed and particular emphasis is placed on the importance of developing methods for cell-specific MFA.

  5. Path finding methods accounting for stoichiometry in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Pey, Jon; Prada, Joaquín; Beasley, John E; Planes, Francisco J

    2011-01-01

    Graph-based methods have been widely used for the analysis of biological networks. Their application to metabolic networks has been much discussed, in particular noting that an important weakness in such methods is that reaction stoichiometry is neglected. In this study, we show that reaction stoichiometry can be incorporated into path-finding approaches via mixed-integer linear programming. This major advance at the modeling level results in improved prediction of topological and functional properties in metabolic networks. PMID:21619601

  6. Path finding methods accounting for stoichiometry in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Graph-based methods have been widely used for the analysis of biological networks. Their application to metabolic networks has been much discussed, in particular noting that an important weakness in such methods is that reaction stoichiometry is neglected. In this study, we show that reaction stoichiometry can be incorporated into path-finding approaches via mixed-integer linear programming. This major advance at the modeling level results in improved prediction of topological and functional properties in metabolic networks. PMID:21619601

  7. Evolution of biomolecular networks: lessons from metabolic and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takuji; Bork, Peer

    2009-11-01

    Despite only becoming popular at the beginning of this decade, biomolecular networks are now frameworks that facilitate many discoveries in molecular biology. The nodes of these networks are usually proteins (specifically enzymes in metabolic networks), whereas the links (or edges) are their interactions with other molecules. These networks are made up of protein-protein interactions or enzyme-enzyme interactions through shared metabolites in the case of metabolic networks. Evolutionary analysis has revealed that changes in the nodes and links in protein-protein interaction and metabolic networks are subject to different selection pressures owing to distinct topological features. However, many evolutionary constraints can be uncovered only if temporal and spatial aspects are included in the network analysis.

  8. Graph methods for the investigation of metabolic networks in parasitology.

    PubMed

    Cottret, Ludovic; Jourdan, Fabien

    2010-08-01

    Recently, a way was opened with the development of many mathematical methods to model and analyze genome-scale metabolic networks. Among them, methods based on graph models enable to us quickly perform large-scale analyses on large metabolic networks. However, it could be difficult for parasitologists to select the graph model and methods adapted to their biological questions. In this review, after briefly addressing the problem of the metabolic network reconstruction, we propose an overview of the graph-based approaches used in whole metabolic network analyses. Applications highlight the usefulness of this kind of approach in the field of parasitology, especially by suggesting metabolic targets for new drugs. Their development still represents a major challenge to fight against the numerous diseases caused by parasites.

  9. The Edinburgh human metabolic network reconstruction and its functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwu; Sorokin, Anatoly; Mazein, Alexander; Selkov, Alex; Selkov, Evgeni; Demin, Oleg; Goryanin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A better understanding of human metabolism and its relationship with diseases is an important task in human systems biology studies. In this paper, we present a high-quality human metabolic network manually reconstructed by integrating genome annotation information from different databases and metabolic reaction information from literature. The network contains nearly 3000 metabolic reactions, which were reorganized into about 70 human-specific metabolic pathways according to their functional relationships. By analysis of the functional connectivity of the metabolites in the network, the bow-tie structure, which was found previously by structure analysis, is reconfirmed. Furthermore, the distribution of the disease related genes in the network suggests that the IN (substrates) subset of the bow-tie structure has more flexibility than other parts. PMID:17882155

  10. Inferring minimal feasible metabolic networks of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Da; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2010-01-01

    Since the organism contains many redundant reactions, the minimal feasible metabolic network that contains the basic growth function is not the collection of reactions that associate the essential genes. To identify minimal metabolic reaction set is a challenging work in theoretical approach. A new method is presented here to identify the smallest required reaction set of growth-sustaining metabolic networks. The content and number of the minimal reactions for growth are variable in different random processes. Though the different carbon sources also vary the content of the reactions in the minimal metabolic networks, most essential reactions locate in the same metabolic subsystems, such as cofactor and prosthetic group biosynthesis, cell envelope biosynthesis, and membrane lipid metabolism.

  11. FCDECOMP: decomposition of metabolic networks based on flux coupling relations.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, Abolfazl; Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Eslahchi, Changiz

    2014-10-01

    A metabolic network model provides a computational framework to study the metabolism of a cell at the system level. Due to their large sizes and complexity, rational decomposition of these networks into subsystems is a strategy to obtain better insight into the metabolic functions. Additionally, decomposing metabolic networks paves the way to use computational methods that will be otherwise very slow when run on the original genome-scale network. In the present study, we propose FCDECOMP decomposition method based on flux coupling relations (FCRs) between pairs of reaction fluxes. This approach utilizes a genetic algorithm (GA) to obtain subsystems that can be analyzed in isolation, i.e. without considering the reactions of the original network in the analysis. Therefore, we propose that our method is useful for discovering biologically meaningful modules in metabolic networks. As a case study, we show that when this method is applied to the metabolic networks of barley seeds and yeast, the modules are in good agreement with the biological compartments of these networks.

  12. MANET: tracing evolution of protein architecture in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Shin; Mittenthal, Jay E; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cellular metabolism can be characterized by networks of enzymatic reactions and transport processes capable of supporting cellular life. Our aim is to find evolutionary patterns and processes embedded in the architecture and function of modern metabolism, using information derived from structural genomics. Description The Molecular Ancestry Network (MANET) project traces evolution of protein architecture in biomolecular networks. We describe metabolic MANET, a database that links information in the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP), the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and phylogenetic reconstructions depicting the evolution of protein fold architecture. Metabolic MANET literally 'paints' the ancestries of enzymes derived from rooted phylogenomic trees directly onto over one hundred metabolic subnetworks, enabling the study of evolutionary patterns at global and local levels. An initial analysis of painted subnetworks reveals widespread enzymatic recruitment and an early origin of amino acid metabolism. Conclusion MANET maps evolutionary relationships directly and globally onto biological networks, and can generate and test hypotheses related to evolution of metabolism. We anticipate its use in the study of other networks, such as signaling and other protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:16854231

  13. Metabolic reconstruction, constraint-based analysis and game theory to probe genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Ruppin, Eytan; Papin, Jason A; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Schuster, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    With the advent of modern omics technologies, it has become feasible to reconstruct (quasi-) whole-cell metabolic networks and characterize them in more and more detail. Computer simulations of the dynamic behavior of such networks are difficult due to a lack of kinetic data and to computational limitations. In contrast, network analysis based on appropriate constraints such as the steady-state condition (constraint-based analysis) is feasible and allows one to derive conclusions about the system's metabolic capabilities. Here, we review methods for the reconstruction of metabolic networks, modeling techniques such as flux balance analysis and elementary flux modes and current progress in their development and applications. Game-theoretical methods for studying metabolic networks are discussed as well. PMID:20692823

  14. Metabolic reconstruction, constraint-based analysis and game theory to probe genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Ruppin, Eytan; Papin, Jason A; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Schuster, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    With the advent of modern omics technologies, it has become feasible to reconstruct (quasi-) whole-cell metabolic networks and characterize them in more and more detail. Computer simulations of the dynamic behavior of such networks are difficult due to a lack of kinetic data and to computational limitations. In contrast, network analysis based on appropriate constraints such as the steady-state condition (constraint-based analysis) is feasible and allows one to derive conclusions about the system's metabolic capabilities. Here, we review methods for the reconstruction of metabolic networks, modeling techniques such as flux balance analysis and elementary flux modes and current progress in their development and applications. Game-theoretical methods for studying metabolic networks are discussed as well.

  15. Comparing methods for metabolic network analysis and an application to metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K

    2013-05-25

    Bioinformatics tools have facilitated the reconstruction and analysis of cellular metabolism of various organisms based on information encoded in their genomes. Characterization of cellular metabolism is useful to understand the phenotypic capabilities of these organisms. It has been done quantitatively through the analysis of pathway operations. There are several in silico approaches for analyzing metabolic networks, including structural and stoichiometric analysis, metabolic flux analysis, metabolic control analysis, and several kinetic modeling based analyses. They can serve as a virtual laboratory to give insights into basic principles of cellular functions. This article summarizes the progress and advances in software and algorithm development for metabolic network analysis, along with their applications relevant to cellular physiology, and metabolic engineering with an emphasis on microbial strain optimization. Moreover, it provides a detailed comparative analysis of existing approaches under different categories.

  16. Metabolic disease network and its implication for disease comorbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deok-Sun; Oltvai, Zoltan; Christakis, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    Given that most diseases are the result of the breakdown of some cellular processes, a key aim of modern medicine is to establish the relationship between disease phenotypes and the various disruptions in the underlying cellular networks. Here we show that our current understanding of the structure of the human metabolic network can provide insight into potential relationships among often distinct disease phenotypes. Using the known enzyme-disease associations, we construct a human metabolic disease network in which nodes are diseases and two diseases are linked if the enzymes associated with them catalyze adjacent metabolic reactions. We find that the more connected a disease is, the higher is its prevalence and the chance that it is associated with a high mortality. The results indicate that the cellular network-level relationships between metabolic pathways and the associated disease provide insights into disease comorbidity, with potential important consequences on disease diagnosis and prevention.

  17. A compendium of inborn errors of metabolism mapped onto the human metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Swagatika; Franzson, Leifur; Jonsson, Jon J; Thiele, Ines

    2012-10-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are hereditary metabolic defects, which are encountered in almost all major metabolic pathways occurring in man. Many IEMs are screened for in neonates through metabolomic analysis of dried blood spot samples. To enable the mapping of these metabolomic data onto the published human metabolic reconstruction, we added missing reactions and pathways involved in acylcarnitine (AC) and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) metabolism. Using literary data, we reconstructed an AC/FAO module consisting of 352 reactions and 139 metabolites. When this module was combined with the human metabolic reconstruction, the synthesis of 39 acylcarnitines and 22 amino acids, which are routinely measured, was captured and 235 distinct IEMs could be mapped. We collected phenotypic and clinical features for each IEM enabling comprehensive classification. We found that carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid metabolism were most affected by the IEMs, while the brain was the most commonly affected organ. Furthermore, we analyzed the IEMs in the context of metabolic network topology to gain insight into common features between metabolically connected IEMs. While many known examples were identified, we discovered some surprising IEM pairs that shared reactions as well as clinical features but not necessarily causal genes. Moreover, we could also re-confirm that acetyl-CoA acts as a central metabolite. This network based analysis leads to further insight of hot spots in human metabolism with respect to IEMs. The presented comprehensive knowledge base of IEMs will provide a valuable tool in studying metabolic changes involved in inherited metabolic diseases. PMID:22699794

  18. Does habitat variability really promote metabolic network modularity?

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that variability in natural habitats promotes modular organization is widely accepted for cellular networks. However, results of some data analyses and theoretical studies have begun to cast doubt on the impact of habitat variability on modularity in metabolic networks. Therefore, we re-evaluated this hypothesis using statistical data analysis and current metabolic information. We were unable to conclude that an increase in modularity was the result of habitat variability. Although horizontal gene transfer was also considered because it may contribute for survival in a variety of environments, closely related to habitat variability, and is known to be positively correlated with network modularity, such a positive correlation was not concluded in the latest version of metabolic networks. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the previously observed increase in network modularity due to habitat variability and horizontal gene transfer was probably due to a lack of available data on metabolic reactions. Instead, we determined that modularity in metabolic networks is dependent on species growth conditions. These results may not entirely discount the impact of habitat variability and horizontal gene transfer. Rather, they highlight the need for a more suitable definition of habitat variability and a more careful examination of relationships of the network modularity with horizontal gene transfer, habitats, and environments.

  19. Inferring the metabolism of human orphan metabolites from their metabolic network context affirms human gluconokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Rolfsson, Óttar; Paglia, Giuseppe; Magnusdóttir, Manuela; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2013-01-15

    Metabolic network reconstructions define metabolic information within a target organism and can therefore be used to address incomplete metabolic information. In the present study we used a computational approach to identify human metabolites whose metabolism is incomplete on the basis of their detection in humans but exclusion from the human metabolic network reconstruction RECON 1. Candidate solutions, composed of metabolic reactions capable of explaining the metabolism of these compounds, were then identified computationally from a global biochemical reaction database. Solutions were characterized with respect to how metabolites were incorporated into RECON 1 and their biological relevance. Through detailed case studies we show that biologically plausible non-intuitive hypotheses regarding the metabolism of these compounds can be proposed in a semi-automated manner, in an approach that is similar to de novo network reconstruction. We subsequently experimentally validated one of the proposed hypotheses and report that C9orf103, previously identified as a candidate tumour suppressor gene, encodes a functional human gluconokinase. The results of the present study demonstrate how semi-automatic gap filling can be used to refine and extend metabolic reconstructions, thereby increasing their biological scope. Furthermore, we illustrate how incomplete human metabolic knowledge can be coupled with gene annotation in order to prioritize and confirm gene functions.

  20. Dynamic optimization of metabolic networks coupled with gene expression.

    PubMed

    Waldherr, Steffen; Oyarzún, Diego A; Bockmayr, Alexander

    2015-01-21

    The regulation of metabolic activity by tuning enzyme expression levels is crucial to sustain cellular growth in changing environments. Metabolic networks are often studied at steady state using constraint-based models and optimization techniques. However, metabolic adaptations driven by changes in gene expression cannot be analyzed by steady state models, as these do not account for temporal changes in biomass composition. Here we present a dynamic optimization framework that integrates the metabolic network with the dynamics of biomass production and composition. An approximation by a timescale separation leads to a coupled model of quasi-steady state constraints on the metabolic reactions, and differential equations for the substrate concentrations and biomass composition. We propose a dynamic optimization approach to determine reaction fluxes for this model, explicitly taking into account enzyme production costs and enzymatic capacity. In contrast to the established dynamic flux balance analysis, our approach allows predicting dynamic changes in both the metabolic fluxes and the biomass composition during metabolic adaptations. Discretization of the optimization problems leads to a linear program that can be efficiently solved. We applied our algorithm in two case studies: a minimal nutrient uptake network, and an abstraction of core metabolic processes in bacteria. In the minimal model, we show that the optimized uptake rates reproduce the empirical Monod growth for bacterial cultures. For the network of core metabolic processes, the dynamic optimization algorithm predicted commonly observed metabolic adaptations, such as a diauxic switch with a preference ranking for different nutrients, re-utilization of waste products after depletion of the original substrate, and metabolic adaptation to an impending nutrient depletion. These examples illustrate how dynamic adaptations of enzyme expression can be predicted solely from an optimization principle.

  1. Microalgal Metabolic Network Model Refinement through High-Throughput Functional Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Dohai, Bushra Saeed; Cai, Hong; Nelson, David R.; Jijakli, Kenan; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling provides the means to define metabolic processes at a systems level; however, genome-scale metabolic models often remain incomplete in their description of metabolic networks and may include reactions that are experimentally unverified. This shortcoming is exacerbated in reconstructed models of newly isolated algal species, as there may be little to no biochemical evidence available for the metabolism of such isolates. The phenotype microarray (PM) technology (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) provides an efficient, high-throughput method to functionally define cellular metabolic activities in response to a large array of entry metabolites. The platform can experimentally verify many of the unverified reactions in a network model as well as identify missing or new reactions in the reconstructed metabolic model. The PM technology has been used for metabolic phenotyping of non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi, but it has not been reported for the phenotyping of microalgae. Here, we introduce the use of PM assays in a systematic way to the study of microalgae, applying it specifically to the green microalgal model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results obtained in this study validate a number of existing annotated metabolic reactions and identify a number of novel and unexpected metabolites. The obtained information was used to expand and refine the existing COBRA-based C. reinhardtii metabolic network model iRC1080. Over 254 reactions were added to the network, and the effects of these additions on flux distribution within the network are described. The novel reactions include the support of metabolism by a number of d-amino acids, l-dipeptides, and l-tripeptides as nitrogen sources, as well as support of cellular respiration by cysteamine-S-phosphate as a phosphorus source. The protocol developed here can be used as a foundation to functionally profile other microalgae such as known microalgae mutants and novel isolates. PMID:25540776

  2. Evolution under fluctuating environments explains observed robustness in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Orkun S; Pfeiffer, Thomas

    2010-08-26

    A high level of robustness against gene deletion is observed in many organisms. However, it is still not clear which biochemical features underline this robustness and how these are acquired during evolution. One hypothesis, specific to metabolic networks, is that robustness emerges as a byproduct of selection for biomass production in different environments. To test this hypothesis we performed evolutionary simulations of metabolic networks under stable and fluctuating environments. We find that networks evolved under the latter scenario can better tolerate single gene deletion in specific environments. Such robustness is underlined by an increased number of independent fluxes and multifunctional enzymes in the evolved networks. Observed robustness in networks evolved under fluctuating environments was "apparent," in the sense that it decreased significantly as we tested effects of gene deletions under all environments experienced during evolution. Furthermore, when we continued evolution of these networks under a stable environment, we found that any robustness they had acquired was completely lost. These findings provide evidence that evolution under fluctuating environments can account for the observed robustness in metabolic networks. Further, they suggest that organisms living under stable environments should display lower robustness in their metabolic networks, and that robustness should decrease upon switching to more stable environments.

  3. Green pathways: Metabolic network analysis of plant systems.

    PubMed

    Dersch, Lisa Maria; Beckers, Veronique; Wittmann, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic engineering of plants with enhanced crop yield and value-added compositional traits is particularly challenging as they probably exhibit the highest metabolic network complexity of all living organisms. Therefore, approaches of plant metabolic network analysis, which can provide systems-level understanding of plant physiology, appear valuable as guidance for plant metabolic engineers. Strongly supported by the sequencing of plant genomes, a number of different experimental and computational methods have emerged in recent years to study plant systems at various levels: from heterotrophic cell cultures to autotrophic entire plants. The present review presents a state-of-the-art toolbox for plant metabolic network analysis. Among the described approaches are different in silico modeling techniques, including flux balance analysis, elementary flux mode analysis and kinetic flux profiling, as well as different variants of experiments with plant systems which use radioactive and stable isotopes to determine in vivo plant metabolic fluxes. The fundamental principles of these techniques, the required data input and the obtained flux information are enriched by technical advices, specific to plants. In addition, pioneering and high-impacting findings of plant metabolic network analysis highlight the potential of the field.

  4. Green pathways: Metabolic network analysis of plant systems.

    PubMed

    Dersch, Lisa Maria; Beckers, Veronique; Wittmann, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic engineering of plants with enhanced crop yield and value-added compositional traits is particularly challenging as they probably exhibit the highest metabolic network complexity of all living organisms. Therefore, approaches of plant metabolic network analysis, which can provide systems-level understanding of plant physiology, appear valuable as guidance for plant metabolic engineers. Strongly supported by the sequencing of plant genomes, a number of different experimental and computational methods have emerged in recent years to study plant systems at various levels: from heterotrophic cell cultures to autotrophic entire plants. The present review presents a state-of-the-art toolbox for plant metabolic network analysis. Among the described approaches are different in silico modeling techniques, including flux balance analysis, elementary flux mode analysis and kinetic flux profiling, as well as different variants of experiments with plant systems which use radioactive and stable isotopes to determine in vivo plant metabolic fluxes. The fundamental principles of these techniques, the required data input and the obtained flux information are enriched by technical advices, specific to plants. In addition, pioneering and high-impacting findings of plant metabolic network analysis highlight the potential of the field. PMID:26704307

  5. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  6. Metabolic networks in motion: 13C-based flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Many properties of complex networks cannot be understood from monitoring the components--not even when comprehensively monitoring all protein or metabolite concentrations--unless such information is connected and integrated through mathematical models. The reason is that static component concentrations, albeit extremely informative, do not contain functional information per se. The functional behavior of a network emerges only through the nonlinear gene, protein, and metabolite interactions across multiple metabolic and regulatory layers. I argue here that intracellular reaction rates are the functional end points of these interactions in metabolic networks, hence are highly relevant for systems biology. Methods for experimental determination of metabolic fluxes differ fundamentally from component concentration measurements; that is, intracellular reaction rates cannot be detected directly, but must be estimated through computer model-based interpretation of stable isotope patterns in products of metabolism.

  7. Restricted cooperative games on metabolic networks reveal functionally important reactions.

    PubMed

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the emerging properties of complex biological systems is in the crux of systems biology studies. Computational methods for elucidating the role of each component in the synergetic interplay can be used to identify targets for genetic and metabolic engineering. In particular, we aim at determining the importance of reactions in a metabolic network with respect to a specific biological function. Therefore, we propose a novel game-theoretic framework which integrates restricted cooperative games with the outcome of flux balance analysis. We define productivity games on metabolic networks and present an analysis of their unrestricted and restricted variants based on the game-theoretic solution concept of the Shapley value. Correspondingly, this concept provides a characterization of the robustness and functional centrality for each enzyme involved in a given metabolic network. Furthermore, the comparison of two different environments - feast and famine - demonstrates the dependence of the results on the imposed flux capacities.

  8. Reconstruction of a generic metabolic network model of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Mahdieh; Marashi, Sayed-Amir

    2014-11-01

    A promising strategy for finding new cancer drugs is to use metabolic network models to investigate the essential reactions or genes in cancer cells. In this study, we present a generic constraint-based model of cancer metabolism, which is able to successfully predict the metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells. This model is reconstructed by collecting the available data on tumor suppressor genes. Notably, we show that the activation of oncogene related reactions can be explained by the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. We show that in a simulated growth medium similar to the body fluids, our model outperforms the previously proposed model of cancer metabolism in predicting expressed genes.

  9. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-01

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10-5 of on/off ratio and ~8 cm2 V-1 s-1 of field effect mobility.

  10. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-22

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10(-5) of on/off ratio and approximately 8 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) of field effect mobility. PMID:19567966

  11. An integrated text mining framework for metabolic interaction network reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patumcharoenpol, Preecha; Doungpan, Narumol; Meechai, Asawin; Shen, Bairong; Chan, Jonathan H; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa

    2016-01-01

    Text mining (TM) in the field of biology is fast becoming a routine analysis for the extraction and curation of biological entities (e.g., genes, proteins, simple chemicals) as well as their relationships. Due to the wide applicability of TM in situations involving complex relationships, it is valuable to apply TM to the extraction of metabolic interactions (i.e., enzyme and metabolite interactions) through metabolic events. Here we present an integrated TM framework containing two modules for the extraction of metabolic events (Metabolic Event Extraction module-MEE) and for the construction of a metabolic interaction network (Metabolic Interaction Network Reconstruction module-MINR). The proposed integrated TM framework performed well based on standard measures of recall, precision and F-score. Evaluation of the MEE module using the constructed Metabolic Entities (ME) corpus yielded F-scores of 59.15% and 48.59% for the detection of metabolic events for production and consumption, respectively. As for the testing of the entity tagger for Gene and Protein (GP) and metabolite with the test corpus, the obtained F-score was greater than 80% for the Superpathway of leucine, valine, and isoleucine biosynthesis. Mapping of enzyme and metabolite interactions through network reconstruction showed a fair performance for the MINR module on the test corpus with F-score >70%. Finally, an application of our integrated TM framework on a big-scale data (i.e., EcoCyc extraction data) for reconstructing a metabolic interaction network showed reasonable precisions at 69.93%, 70.63% and 46.71% for enzyme, metabolite and enzyme-metabolite interaction, respectively. This study presents the first open-source integrated TM framework for reconstructing a metabolic interaction network. This framework can be a powerful tool that helps biologists to extract metabolic events for further reconstruction of a metabolic interaction network. The ME corpus, test corpus, source code, and virtual

  12. Flux analysis in plant metabolic networks: increasing throughput and coverage.

    PubMed

    Junker, Björn H

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative information about metabolic networks has been mainly obtained at the level of metabolite contents, transcript abundance, and enzyme activities. However, the active process of metabolism is represented by the flow of matter through the pathways. These metabolic fluxes can be predicted by Flux Balance Analysis or determined experimentally by (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis. These relatively complicated and time-consuming methods have recently seen significant improvements at the level of coverage and throughput. Metabolic models have developed from single cell models into whole-organism dynamic models. Advances in lab automation and data handling have significantly increased the throughput of flux measurements. This review summarizes advances to increase coverage and throughput of metabolic flux analysis in plants.

  13. Metabolism and evolution: A comparative study of reconstructed genome-level metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2008-03-01

    The availability of high-quality annotations of sequenced genomes has made it possible to generate organism-specific comprehensive maps of cellular metabolism. Currently, more than twenty such metabolic reconstructions are publicly available, with the majority focused on bacteria. A typical metabolic reconstruction for a bacterium results in a complex network containing hundreds of metabolites (nodes) and reactions (links), while some even contain more than a thousand. The constrain-based optimization approach of flux-balance analysis (FBA) is used to investigate the functional characteristics of such large-scale metabolic networks, making it possible to estimate an organism's growth behavior in a wide variety of nutrient environments, as well as its robustness to gene loss. We have recently completed the genome-level metabolic reconstruction of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, as well as the three Yersinia pestis biovars Antiqua, Mediaevalis, and Orientalis. While Y. pseudotuberculosis typically only causes fever and abdominal pain that can mimic appendicitis, the evolutionary closely related Y. pestis strains are the aetiological agents of the bubonic plague. In this presentation, I will discuss our results and conclusions from a comparative study on the evolution of metabolic function in the four Yersiniae networks using FBA and related techniques, and I will give particular focus to the interplay between metabolic network topology and evolutionary flexibility.

  14. Signatures of Arithmetic Simplicity in Metabolic Network Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, William J.; Krapivsky, Paul L.; Redner, Sidney; Segrè, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic networks perform some of the most fundamental functions in living cells, including energy transduction and building block biosynthesis. While these are the best characterized networks in living systems, understanding their evolutionary history and complex wiring constitutes one of the most fascinating open questions in biology, intimately related to the enigma of life's origin itself. Is the evolution of metabolism subject to general principles, beyond the unpredictable accumulation of multiple historical accidents? Here we search for such principles by applying to an artificial chemical universe some of the methodologies developed for the study of genome scale models of cellular metabolism. In particular, we use metabolic flux constraint-based models to exhaustively search for artificial chemistry pathways that can optimally perform an array of elementary metabolic functions. Despite the simplicity of the model employed, we find that the ensuing pathways display a surprisingly rich set of properties, including the existence of autocatalytic cycles and hierarchical modules, the appearance of universally preferable metabolites and reactions, and a logarithmic trend of pathway length as a function of input/output molecule size. Some of these properties can be derived analytically, borrowing methods previously used in cryptography. In addition, by mapping biochemical networks onto a simplified carbon atom reaction backbone, we find that properties similar to those predicted for the artificial chemistry hold also for real metabolic networks. These findings suggest that optimality principles and arithmetic simplicity might lie beneath some aspects of biochemical complexity. PMID:20369010

  15. Computational identification of obligatorily autocatalytic replicators embedded in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Kun, Ádám; Papp, Balázs; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2008-01-01

    Background If chemical A is necessary for the synthesis of more chemical A, then A has the power of replication (such systems are known as autocatalytic systems). We provide the first systems-level analysis searching for small-molecular autocatalytic components in the metabolisms of diverse organisms, including an inferred minimal metabolism. Results We find that intermediary metabolism is invariably autocatalytic for ATP. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the existence of additional, organism-specific autocatalytic metabolites in the forms of coenzymes (NAD+, coenzyme A, tetrahydrofolate, quinones) and sugars. Although the enzymatic reactions of a number of autocatalytic cycles are present in most of the studied organisms, they display obligatorily autocatalytic behavior in a few networks only, hence demonstrating the need for a systems-level approach to identify metabolic replicators embedded in large networks. Conclusion Metabolic replicators are apparently common and potentially both universal and ancestral: without their presence, kick-starting metabolic networks is impossible, even if all enzymes and genes are present in the same cell. Identification of metabolic replicators is also important for attempts to create synthetic cells, as some of these autocatalytic molecules will presumably be needed to be added to the system as, by definition, the system cannot synthesize them without their initial presence. PMID:18331628

  16. Metabolic networks evolve towards states of maximum entropy production

    PubMed Central

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Srienc, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    A metabolic network can be described by a set of elementary modes or pathways representing discrete metabolic states that support cell function. We have recently shown that in the most likely metabolic state the usage probability of individual elementary modes is distributed according to the Boltzmann distribution law while complying with the principle of maximum entropy production. To demonstrate that a metabolic network evolves towards such state we have carried out adaptive evolution experiments with Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum operating with a reduced metabolic functionality based on a reduced set of elementary modes. In such reduced metabolic network metabolic fluxes can be conveniently computed from the measured metabolite secretion pattern. Over a time span of 300 generations the specific growth rate of the strain continuously increased together with a continuous increase in the rate of entropy production. We show that the rate of entropy production asymptotically approaches the maximum entropy production rate predicted from the state when the usage probability of individual elementary modes is distributed according to the Boltzmann distribution. Therefore, the outcome of evolution of a complex biological system can be predicted in highly quantitative terms using basic statistical mechanical principles. PMID:21903175

  17. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alex; Rahmanian, Sorena; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by disease processes in multiple organ systems. The effect of aspirin (ASA) resistance on platelet metabolism was evaluated using constraint-based modeling, which revealed a redirection of glycolytic, fatty acid, and nucleotide metabolism reaction fluxes in order to accommodate eicosanoid synthesis and reactive oxygen species stress. These results were confirmed with independent proteomic data. The construction and availability of iAT-PLT-636 should stimulate further data-driven, systems analysis of platelet metabolism towards the understanding of pathophysiological conditions including, but not strictly limited to, coagulopathies.

  18. Phylogeny of metabolic networks: a spectral graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Deyasi, Krishanu; Banerjee, Anirban; Deb, Bony

    2015-10-01

    Many methods have been developed for finding the commonalities between different organisms in order to study their phylogeny. The structure of metabolic networks also reveals valuable insights into metabolic capacity of species as well as into the habitats where they have evolved. We constructed metabolic networks of 79 fully sequenced organisms and compared their architectures. We used spectral density of normalized Laplacian matrix for comparing the structure of networks. The eigenvalues of this matrix reflect not only the global architecture of a network but also the local topologies that are produced by different graph evolutionary processes like motif duplication or joining. A divergence measure on spectral densities is used to quantify the distances between various metabolic networks, and a split network is constructed to analyse the phylogeny from these distances. In our analysis, we focused on the species that belong to different classes, but appear more related to each other in the phylogeny. We tried to explore whether they have evolved under similar environmental conditions or have similar life histories. With this focus, we have obtained interesting insights into the phylogenetic commonality between different organisms. PMID:26564980

  19. Phylogeny of metabolic networks: a spectral graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Deyasi, Krishanu; Banerjee, Anirban; Deb, Bony

    2015-10-01

    Many methods have been developed for finding the commonalities between different organisms in order to study their phylogeny. The structure of metabolic networks also reveals valuable insights into metabolic capacity of species as well as into the habitats where they have evolved. We constructed metabolic networks of 79 fully sequenced organisms and compared their architectures. We used spectral density of normalized Laplacian matrix for comparing the structure of networks. The eigenvalues of this matrix reflect not only the global architecture of a network but also the local topologies that are produced by different graph evolutionary processes like motif duplication or joining. A divergence measure on spectral densities is used to quantify the distances between various metabolic networks, and a split network is constructed to analyse the phylogeny from these distances. In our analysis, we focused on the species that belong to different classes, but appear more related to each other in the phylogeny. We tried to explore whether they have evolved under similar environmental conditions or have similar life histories. With this focus, we have obtained interesting insights into the phylogenetic commonality between different organisms.

  20. Metabolic Network Prediction of Drug Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Itay; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Atias, Nir; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-03-23

    Drug side effects levy a massive cost on society through drug failures, morbidity, and mortality cases every year, and their early detection is critically important. Here, we describe the array of model-based phenotype predictors (AMPP), an approach that leverages medical informatics resources and a human genome-scale metabolic model (GSMM) to predict drug side effects. AMPP is substantially predictive (AUC > 0.7) for >70 drug side effects, including very serious ones such as interstitial nephritis and extrapyramidal disorders. We evaluate AMPP's predictive signal through cross-validation, comparison across multiple versions of a side effects database, and co-occurrence analysis of drug side effect associations in scientific abstracts (hypergeometric p value = 2.2e-40). AMPP outperforms a previous biochemical structure-based method in predicting metabolically based side effects (aggregate AUC = 0.65 versus 0.59). Importantly, AMPP enables the identification of key metabolic reactions and biomarkers that are predictive of specific side effects. Taken together, this work lays a foundation for future detection of metabolically grounded side effects during early stages of drug development. PMID:27135366

  1. MaizeCyc: Metabolic networks in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeCyc is a catalog of known and predicted metabolic and transport pathways that enables plant researchers to graphically represent the metabolome of maize (Zea mays), thereby supporting integrated systems-biology analysis. Supported analyses include molecular and genetic/phenotypic profiling (e.g...

  2. Predicting novel pathways in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Stefan; de Figueiredo, Luís F; Kaleta, Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Elementary-modes analysis has become a well-established theoretical tool in metabolic pathway analysis. It allows one to decompose complex metabolic networks into the smallest functional entities, which can be interpreted as biochemical pathways. This analysis has, in medium-size metabolic networks, led to the successful theoretical prediction of hitherto unknown pathways. For illustration, we discuss the example of the phosphoenolpyruvate-glyoxylate cycle in Escherichia coli. Elementary-modes analysis meets with the problem of combinatorial explosion in the number of pathways with increasing system size, which has hampered scaling it up to genome-wide models. We present a novel approach to overcoming this obstacle. That approach is based on elementary flux patterns, which are defined as sets of reactions representing the basic routes through a particular subsystem that are compatible with admissible fluxes in a (possibly) much larger metabolic network. The subsystem can be made up by reactions in which we are interested in, for example, reactions producing a certain metabolite. This allows one to predict novel metabolic pathways in genome-scale networks.

  3. Topological Signatures of Species Interactions in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Marcus W.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The topology of metabolic networks can provide insight not only into the metabolic processes that occur within each species, but also into interactions between different species. Here, we introduce a novel pair-wise, topology-based measure of biosynthetic support, reflecting the extent to which the nutritional requirements of one species could be satisfied by the biosynthetic capacity of another. To evaluate the biosynthetic support for a given pair of species, we use a graph-based algorithm to identify the set of exogenously acquired compounds in the metabolic network of the first species, and calculate the fraction of this set that occurs in the metabolic network of the second species. Reconstructing the metabolic network of 569 bacterial species and several eukaryotes, and calculating the biosynthetic support score for all bacterial-eukaryotic pairs, we show that this measure indeed reflects host-parasite interactions and facilitates a successful prediction of such interactions on a large-scale. Integrating this method with phylogenetic analysis and calculating the biosynthetic support of ancestral species in the Firmicutes division (as well as other bacterial divisions) further reveals a large-scale evolutionary trend of biosynthetic capacity loss in parasites. The inference of ecological features from genomic-based data presented here lays the foundations for an exciting “reverse ecology” framework for studying the complex web of interactions characterizing various ecosystems. PMID:19178139

  4. Topological signatures of species interactions in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Elhanan; Feldman, Marcus W

    2009-02-01

    The topology of metabolic networks can provide insight not only into the metabolic processes that occur within each species, but also into interactions between different species. Here, we introduce a novel pair-wise, topology-based measure of biosynthetic support, reflecting the extent to which the nutritional requirements of one species could be satisfied by the biosynthetic capacity of another. To evaluate the biosynthetic support for a given pair of species, we use a graph-based algorithm to identify the set of exogenously acquired compounds in the metabolic network of the first species, and calculate the fraction of this set that occurs in the metabolic network of the second species. Reconstructing the metabolic network of 569 bacterial species and several eukaryotes, and calculating the biosynthetic support score for all bacterial-eukaryotic pairs, we show that this measure indeed reflects host-parasite interactions and facilitates a successful prediction of such interactions on a large-scale. Integrating this method with phylogenetic analysis and calculating the biosynthetic support of ancestral species in the Firmicutes division (as well as other bacterial divisions) further reveals a large-scale evolutionary trend of biosynthetic capacity loss in parasites. The inference of ecological features from genomic-based data presented here lays the foundations for an exciting "reverse ecology" framework for studying the complex web of interactions characterizing various ecosystems.

  5. Evolutionary constraint and adaptation in the metabolic network of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Anthony J; Stockwell, Sarah R; Clark, Andrew G

    2008-12-01

    Organisms must carefully control their metabolism in order to survive. On the other hand, enzymes must adapt in response to evolutionary pressures on the pathways in which they are imbedded. Taking advantage of the newly available whole-genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species, we examined how protein function and metabolic network architecture influence rates of enzyme evolution. We found that despite high overall constraint, there were significant differences in rates of amino acid substitution among functional classes of enzymes. This heterogeneity arises because proteins involved in the metabolism of foreign compounds evolve relatively rapidly, whereas enzymes that act in "core" metabolism exhibit much slower rates of amino acid replacement, suggesting strong selective constraint. Network architecture also influences enzymes' rates of amino acid replacement. In particular, enzymes that share metabolites with many other enzymes are relatively constrained, although apparently not because they are more likely to be essential. Our analyses suggest that this pattern is driven by strong constraint of enzymes acting at branch points in metabolic pathways. We conclude that metabolic network architecture and enzyme function separately affect enzyme evolution rates.

  6. The folate metabolic network of Falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sora, J Enrique; Ward, Steve A

    2013-03-01

    The targeting of key enzymes in the folate pathway continues to be an effective chemotherapeutic approach that has earned antifolate drugs a valuable position in the medical pharmacopoeia. The successful therapeutic use of antifolates as antimalarials has been a catalyst for ongoing research into the biochemistry of folate and pterin biosynthesis in malaria parasites. However, our understanding of the parasites folate metabolism remains partial and patchy, especially in relation to the shikimate pathway, the folate cycle, and folate salvage. A sizeable number of potential folate targets remain to be characterised. Recent reports on the parasite specific transport of folate precursors that would normally be present in the human host awaken previous hypotheses on the salvage of folate precursors or by-products. As the parasite progresses through its life-cycle it encounters very contrasting host cell environments that present radically different metabolic milieus and biochemical challenges. It would seem probable that as the parasite encounters differing environments it would need to modify its biochemistry. This would be reflected in the folate homeostasis in Plasmodium. Recent drug screening efforts and insights into folate membrane transport substantiate the argument that folate metabolism may still offer unexplored opportunities for therapeutic attack.

  7. EGFR Signal-Network Reconstruction Demonstrates Metabolic Crosstalk in EMT

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Rohatgi, Neha; Briem, Eirikur; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Gudmundsson, Steinn; Rolfsson, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important event during development and cancer metastasis. There is limited understanding of the metabolic alterations that give rise to and take place during EMT. Dysregulation of signalling pathways that impact metabolism, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), are however a hallmark of EMT and metastasis. In this study, we report the investigation into EGFR signalling and metabolic crosstalk of EMT through constraint-based modelling and analysis of the breast epithelial EMT cell model D492 and its mesenchymal counterpart D492M. We built an EGFR signalling network for EMT based on stoichiometric coefficients and constrained the network with gene expression data to build epithelial (EGFR_E) and mesenchymal (EGFR_M) networks. Metabolic alterations arising from differential expression of EGFR genes was derived from a literature review of AKT regulated metabolic genes. Signaling flux differences between EGFR_E and EGFR_M models subsequently allowed metabolism in D492 and D492M cells to be assessed. Higher flux within AKT pathway in the D492 cells compared to D492M suggested higher glycolytic activity in D492 that we confirmed experimentally through measurements of glucose uptake and lactate secretion rates. The signaling genes from the AKT, RAS/MAPK and CaM pathways were predicted to revert D492M to D492 phenotype. Follow-up analysis of EGFR signaling metabolic crosstalk in three additional breast epithelial cell lines highlighted variability in in vitro cell models of EMT. This study shows that the metabolic phenotype may be predicted by in silico analyses of gene expression data of EGFR signaling genes, but this phenomenon is cell-specific and does not follow a simple trend. PMID:27253373

  8. Reconstructed Metabolic Network Models Predict Flux-Level Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Emrah; Çakır, Tunahan

    2016-01-01

    Developments in genome scale metabolic modeling techniques and omics technologies have enabled the reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models. In this study, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors, is investigated by mapping GBM gene expression data on the growth-implemented brain specific genome-scale metabolic network, and GBM-specific models are generated. The models are used to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the tumor cells. Metabolic phenotypes predicted by the GBM-specific metabolic models reconstructed in this work reflect the general metabolic reprogramming of GBM, reported both in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. The computed flux profiles quantitatively predict that major sources of the acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetic acid pool used in TCA cycle are pyruvate dehydrogenase from glycolysis and anaplerotic flux from glutaminolysis, respectively. Also, our results, in accordance with recent studies, predict a contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to ATP pool via a slightly active TCA cycle in addition to the major contributor aerobic glycolysis. We verified our results by using different computational methods that incorporate transcriptome data with genome-scale models and by using different transcriptome datasets. Correct predictions of flux distributions in glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA cycle and lipid precursor metabolism validate the reconstructed models for further use in future to simulate more specific metabolic patterns for GBM. PMID:27147948

  9. Estimating the size of the solution space of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Alfredo; Mulet, Roberto; Pagnani, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Background Cellular metabolism is one of the most investigated system of biological interactions. While the topological nature of individual reactions and pathways in the network is quite well understood there is still a lack of comprehension regarding the global functional behavior of the system. In the last few years flux-balance analysis (FBA) has been the most successful and widely used technique for studying metabolism at system level. This method strongly relies on the hypothesis that the organism maximizes an objective function. However only under very specific biological conditions (e.g. maximization of biomass for E. coli in reach nutrient medium) the cell seems to obey such optimization law. A more refined analysis not assuming extremization remains an elusive task for large metabolic systems due to algorithmic limitations. Results In this work we propose a novel algorithmic strategy that provides an efficient characterization of the whole set of stable fluxes compatible with the metabolic constraints. Using a technique derived from the fields of statistical physics and information theory we designed a message-passing algorithm to estimate the size of the affine space containing all possible steady-state flux distributions of metabolic networks. The algorithm, based on the well known Bethe approximation, can be used to approximately compute the volume of a non full-dimensional convex polytope in high dimensions. We first compare the accuracy of the predictions with an exact algorithm on small random metabolic networks. We also verify that the predictions of the algorithm match closely those of Monte Carlo based methods in the case of the Red Blood Cell metabolic network. Then we test the effect of gene knock-outs on the size of the solution space in the case of E. coli central metabolism. Finally we analyze the statistical properties of the average fluxes of the reactions in the E. coli metabolic network. Conclusion We propose a novel efficient

  10. Blueprint for antimicrobial hit discovery targeting metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Y.; Liu, J.; Estiu, G.; Isin, B.; Ahn, Y-Y.; Lee, D-S.; Barabási, A-L.; Kapatral, V.; Wiest, O.; Oltvai, Z. N.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in genome analysis, network biology, and computational chemistry have the potential to revolutionize drug discovery by combining system-level identification of drug targets with the atomistic modeling of small molecules capable of modulating their activity. To demonstrate the effectiveness of such a discovery pipeline, we deduced common antibiotic targets in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by identifying shared tissue-specific or uniformly essential metabolic reactions in their metabolic networks. We then predicted through virtual screening dozens of potential inhibitors for several enzymes of these reactions and showed experimentally that a subset of these inhibited both enzyme activities in vitro and bacterial cell viability. This blueprint is applicable for any sequenced organism with high-quality metabolic reconstruction and suggests a general strategy for strain-specific antiinfective therapy. PMID:20080587

  11. Transcription factor networks regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Talianidis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of lipid levels is critical for cellular and organismal homeostasis, not only in terms of energy utilization and storage, but also to prevent potential toxicity. The liver utilizes a set of hepatic transcription factors to regulate the expression of genes implicated in all aspects of lipid metabolism including catabolism, transport, and synthesis. In this article, we will review the main transcriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. The principal regulatory pathways are composed of simple modules of transcription factor crosstalks, which correspond to building blocks of more complex regulatory networks. These transcriptional networks contribute to the regulation of proper lipid homeostasis in parallel to posttranslational mechanisms and end product-mediated modulation of lipid metabolizing enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  12. Multi-scale modularity and motif distributional effect in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Chen, Alan; Rahmani, Ali; Zeng, Jia; Tan, Mehmet; Alhajj, Reda; Rokne, Jon; Demetrick, Douglas; Wei, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a set of fundamental processes that play important roles in a plethora of biological and medical contexts. It is understood that the topological information of reconstructed metabolic networks, such as modular organization, has crucial implications on biological functions. Recent interpretations of modularity in network settings provide a view of multiple network partitions induced by different resolution parameters. Here we ask the question: How do multiple network partitions affect the organization of metabolic networks? Since network motifs are often interpreted as the super families of evolved units, we further investigate their impact under multiple network partitions and investigate how the distribution of network motifs influences the organization of metabolic networks. We studied Homo sapiens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli metabolic networks; we analyzed the relationship between different community structures and motif distribution patterns. Further, we quantified the degree to which motifs participate in the modular organization of metabolic networks.

  13. Parameter estimation in tree graph metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, Hans; Gomez Roldan, Maria Victoria; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Hall, Robert D.; Groenenboom, Marian; Molenaar, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the glycosylation processes that convert initially toxic substrates to nutritionally valuable metabolites in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings. To estimate the reaction rates we use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model the enzyme kinetics. A popular choice is to use a system of linear ODEs with constant kinetic rates or to use Michaelis–Menten kinetics. In reality, the catalytic rates, which are affected among other factors by kinetic constants and enzyme concentrations, are changing in time and with the approaches just mentioned, this phenomenon cannot be described. Another problem is that, in general these kinetic coefficients are not always identifiable. A third problem is that, it is not precisely known which enzymes are catalyzing the observed glycosylation processes. With several hundred potential gene candidates, experimental validation using purified target proteins is expensive and time consuming. We aim at reducing this task via mathematical modeling to allow for the pre-selection of most potential gene candidates. In this article we discuss a fast and relatively simple approach to estimate time varying kinetic rates, with three favorable properties: firstly, it allows for identifiable estimation of time dependent parameters in networks with a tree-like structure. Secondly, it is relatively fast compared to usually applied methods that estimate the model derivatives together with the network parameters. Thirdly, by combining the metabolite concentration data with a corresponding microarray data, it can help in detecting the genes related to the enzymatic processes. By comparing the estimated time dynamics of the catalytic rates with time series gene expression data we may assess potential candidate genes behind enzymatic reactions. As an example, we show how to apply this method to select prominent glycosyltransferase genes in tomato seedlings.

  14. Parameter estimation in tree graph metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Astola, Laura; Stigter, Hans; Gomez Roldan, Maria Victoria; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Hall, Robert D; Groenenboom, Marian; Molenaar, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    We study the glycosylation processes that convert initially toxic substrates to nutritionally valuable metabolites in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings. To estimate the reaction rates we use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model the enzyme kinetics. A popular choice is to use a system of linear ODEs with constant kinetic rates or to use Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In reality, the catalytic rates, which are affected among other factors by kinetic constants and enzyme concentrations, are changing in time and with the approaches just mentioned, this phenomenon cannot be described. Another problem is that, in general these kinetic coefficients are not always identifiable. A third problem is that, it is not precisely known which enzymes are catalyzing the observed glycosylation processes. With several hundred potential gene candidates, experimental validation using purified target proteins is expensive and time consuming. We aim at reducing this task via mathematical modeling to allow for the pre-selection of most potential gene candidates. In this article we discuss a fast and relatively simple approach to estimate time varying kinetic rates, with three favorable properties: firstly, it allows for identifiable estimation of time dependent parameters in networks with a tree-like structure. Secondly, it is relatively fast compared to usually applied methods that estimate the model derivatives together with the network parameters. Thirdly, by combining the metabolite concentration data with a corresponding microarray data, it can help in detecting the genes related to the enzymatic processes. By comparing the estimated time dynamics of the catalytic rates with time series gene expression data we may assess potential candidate genes behind enzymatic reactions. As an example, we show how to apply this method to select prominent glycosyltransferase genes in tomato seedlings.

  15. Parameter estimation in tree graph metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Astola, Laura; Stigter, Hans; Gomez Roldan, Maria Victoria; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Hall, Robert D; Groenenboom, Marian; Molenaar, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    We study the glycosylation processes that convert initially toxic substrates to nutritionally valuable metabolites in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings. To estimate the reaction rates we use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model the enzyme kinetics. A popular choice is to use a system of linear ODEs with constant kinetic rates or to use Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In reality, the catalytic rates, which are affected among other factors by kinetic constants and enzyme concentrations, are changing in time and with the approaches just mentioned, this phenomenon cannot be described. Another problem is that, in general these kinetic coefficients are not always identifiable. A third problem is that, it is not precisely known which enzymes are catalyzing the observed glycosylation processes. With several hundred potential gene candidates, experimental validation using purified target proteins is expensive and time consuming. We aim at reducing this task via mathematical modeling to allow for the pre-selection of most potential gene candidates. In this article we discuss a fast and relatively simple approach to estimate time varying kinetic rates, with three favorable properties: firstly, it allows for identifiable estimation of time dependent parameters in networks with a tree-like structure. Secondly, it is relatively fast compared to usually applied methods that estimate the model derivatives together with the network parameters. Thirdly, by combining the metabolite concentration data with a corresponding microarray data, it can help in detecting the genes related to the enzymatic processes. By comparing the estimated time dynamics of the catalytic rates with time series gene expression data we may assess potential candidate genes behind enzymatic reactions. As an example, we show how to apply this method to select prominent glycosyltransferase genes in tomato seedlings. PMID:27688960

  16. Parameter estimation in tree graph metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, Hans; Gomez Roldan, Maria Victoria; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Hall, Robert D.; Groenenboom, Marian; Molenaar, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the glycosylation processes that convert initially toxic substrates to nutritionally valuable metabolites in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings. To estimate the reaction rates we use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model the enzyme kinetics. A popular choice is to use a system of linear ODEs with constant kinetic rates or to use Michaelis–Menten kinetics. In reality, the catalytic rates, which are affected among other factors by kinetic constants and enzyme concentrations, are changing in time and with the approaches just mentioned, this phenomenon cannot be described. Another problem is that, in general these kinetic coefficients are not always identifiable. A third problem is that, it is not precisely known which enzymes are catalyzing the observed glycosylation processes. With several hundred potential gene candidates, experimental validation using purified target proteins is expensive and time consuming. We aim at reducing this task via mathematical modeling to allow for the pre-selection of most potential gene candidates. In this article we discuss a fast and relatively simple approach to estimate time varying kinetic rates, with three favorable properties: firstly, it allows for identifiable estimation of time dependent parameters in networks with a tree-like structure. Secondly, it is relatively fast compared to usually applied methods that estimate the model derivatives together with the network parameters. Thirdly, by combining the metabolite concentration data with a corresponding microarray data, it can help in detecting the genes related to the enzymatic processes. By comparing the estimated time dynamics of the catalytic rates with time series gene expression data we may assess potential candidate genes behind enzymatic reactions. As an example, we show how to apply this method to select prominent glycosyltransferase genes in tomato seedlings. PMID:27688960

  17. Out of fuzzy chemistry: from prebiotic chemistry to metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Peretó, Juli

    2012-08-21

    The origin of life on Earth was a chemical affair. So how did primitive biochemical systems originate from geochemical and cosmochemical processes on the young planet? Contemporary research into the origins of life subscribes to the Darwinian principle of material causes operating in an evolutionary context, as advocated by A. I. Oparin and J. B. S. Haldane in the 1920s. In its simplest form (e.g., a bacterial cell) extant biological complexity relies on the functional integration of metabolic networks and replicative genomes inside a lipid boundary. Different research programmes have explored the prebiotic plausibility of each of these autocatalytic subsystems and combinations thereof: self-maintained networks of small molecules, template chemistry, and self-reproductive vesicles. This tutorial review focuses on the debates surrounding the origin of metabolism and offers a brief overview of current studies on the evolution of metabolic networks. I suggest that a leitmotif in the origin and evolution of metabolism is the role played by catalysers' substrate ambiguity and multifunctionality.

  18. Out of fuzzy chemistry: from prebiotic chemistry to metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Peretó, Juli

    2012-08-21

    The origin of life on Earth was a chemical affair. So how did primitive biochemical systems originate from geochemical and cosmochemical processes on the young planet? Contemporary research into the origins of life subscribes to the Darwinian principle of material causes operating in an evolutionary context, as advocated by A. I. Oparin and J. B. S. Haldane in the 1920s. In its simplest form (e.g., a bacterial cell) extant biological complexity relies on the functional integration of metabolic networks and replicative genomes inside a lipid boundary. Different research programmes have explored the prebiotic plausibility of each of these autocatalytic subsystems and combinations thereof: self-maintained networks of small molecules, template chemistry, and self-reproductive vesicles. This tutorial review focuses on the debates surrounding the origin of metabolism and offers a brief overview of current studies on the evolution of metabolic networks. I suggest that a leitmotif in the origin and evolution of metabolism is the role played by catalysers' substrate ambiguity and multifunctionality. PMID:22508108

  19. MIRAGE: a functional genomics-based approach for metabolic network model reconstruction and its application to cyanobacteria networks.

    PubMed

    Vitkin, Edward; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions are considered a key step in quantifying the genotype-phenotype relationship. We present a novel gap-filling approach, MetabolIc Reconstruction via functionAl GEnomics (MIRAGE), which identifies missing network reactions by integrating metabolic flux analysis and functional genomics data. MIRAGE's performance is demonstrated on the reconstruction of metabolic network models of E. coli and Synechocystis sp. and validated via existing networks for these species. Then, it is applied to reconstruct genome-scale metabolic network models for 36 sequenced cyanobacteria amenable for constraint-based modeling analysis and specifically for metabolic engineering. The reconstructed network models are supplied via standard SBML files. PMID:23194418

  20. Metabolomics integrated elementary flux mode analysis in large metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Gerstl, Matthias P; Ruckerbauer, David E; Mattanovich, Diethard; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2015-03-10

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) are non-decomposable steady-state pathways in metabolic networks. They characterize phenotypes, quantify robustness or identify engineering targets. An EFM analysis (EFMA) is currently restricted to medium-scale models, as the number of EFMs explodes with the network's size. However, many topologically feasible EFMs are biologically irrelevant. We present thermodynamic EFMA (tEFMA), which calculates only the small(er) subset of thermodynamically feasible EFMs. We integrate network embedded thermodynamics into EFMA and show that we can use the metabolome to identify and remove thermodynamically infeasible EFMs during an EFMA without losing biologically relevant EFMs. Calculating only the thermodynamically feasible EFMs strongly reduces memory consumption and program runtime, allowing the analysis of larger networks. We apply tEFMA to study the central carbon metabolism of E. coli and find that up to 80% of its EFMs are thermodynamically infeasible. Moreover, we identify glutamate dehydrogenase as a bottleneck, when E. coli is grown on glucose and explain its inactivity as a consequence of network embedded thermodynamics. We implemented tEFMA as a Java package which is available for download at https://github.com/mpgerstl/tEFMA.

  1. The evolution of metabolic networks of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of numerous complete genome sequences from E. coli strains, published genome-scale metabolic models exist only for two commensal E. coli strains. These models have proven useful for many applications, such as engineering strains for desired product formation, and we sought to explore how constructing and evaluating additional metabolic models for E. coli strains could enhance these efforts. Results We used the genomic information from 16 E. coli strains to generate an E. coli pangenome metabolic network by evaluating their collective 76,990 ORFs. Each of these ORFs was assigned to one of 17,647 ortholog groups including ORFs associated with reactions in the most recent metabolic model for E. coli K-12. For orthologous groups that contain an ORF already represented in the MG1655 model, the gene to protein to reaction associations represented in this model could then be easily propagated to other E. coli strain models. All remaining orthologous groups were evaluated to see if new metabolic reactions could be added to generate a pangenome-scale metabolic model (iEco1712_pan). The pangenome model included reactions from a metabolic model update for E. coli K-12 MG1655 (iEco1339_MG1655) and enabled development of five additional strain-specific genome-scale metabolic models. These additional models include a second K-12 strain (iEco1335_W3110) and four pathogenic strains (two enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 and two uropathogens). When compared to the E. coli K-12 models, the metabolic models for the enterohemorrhagic (iEco1344_EDL933 and iEco1345_Sakai) and uropathogenic strains (iEco1288_CFT073 and iEco1301_UTI89) contained numerous lineage-specific gene and reaction differences. All six E. coli models were evaluated by comparing model predictions to carbon source utilization measurements under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and to batch growth profiles in minimal media with 0.2% (w/v) glucose. An ancestral genome

  2. Estimating Metabolic Fluxes Using a Maximum Network Flexibility Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Megchelenbrink, Wout; Rossell, Sergio; Huynen, Martijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Genome-scale metabolic networks can be modeled in a constraint-based fashion. Reaction stoichiometry combined with flux capacity constraints determine the space of allowable reaction rates. This space is often large and a central challenge in metabolic modeling is finding the biologically most relevant flux distributions. A widely used method is flux balance analysis (FBA), which optimizes a biologically relevant objective such as growth or ATP production. Although FBA has proven to be highly useful for predicting growth and byproduct secretion, it cannot predict the intracellular fluxes under all environmental conditions. Therefore, alternative strategies have been developed to select flux distributions that are in agreement with experimental “omics” data, or by incorporating experimental flux measurements. The latter, unfortunately can only be applied to a limited set of reactions and is currently not feasible at the genome-scale. On the other hand, it has been observed that micro-organisms favor a suboptimal growth rate, possibly in exchange for a more “flexible” metabolic network. Instead of dedicating the internal network state to an optimal growth rate in one condition, a suboptimal growth rate is used, that allows for an easier switch to other nutrient sources. A small decrease in growth rate is exchanged for a relatively large gain in metabolic capability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Results Here, we propose Maximum Metabolic Flexibility (MMF) a computational method that utilizes this observation to find the most probable intracellular flux distributions. By mapping measured flux data from central metabolism to the genome-scale models of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that i) indeed, most of the measured fluxes agree with a high adaptability of the network, ii) this result can be used to further reduce the space of feasible solutions iii) this reduced space improves the quantitative predictions

  3. Genetic Networks of Liver Metabolism Revealed by Integration of Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Christine T.; Wang, Ping; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Stevens, Robert D.; Bain, James R.; Wenner, Brett R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Keller, Mark P.; Blasiole, Daniel A.; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Attie, Alan D.

    2008-01-01

    Although numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing disease-related phenotypes have been detected through gene mapping and positional cloning, identification of the individual gene(s) and molecular pathways leading to those phenotypes is often elusive. One way to improve understanding of genetic architecture is to classify phenotypes in greater depth by including transcriptional and metabolic profiling. In the current study, we have generated and analyzed mRNA expression and metabolic profiles in liver samples obtained in an F2 intercross between the diabetes-resistant C57BL/6 leptinob/ob and the diabetes-susceptible BTBR leptinob/ob mouse strains. This cross, which segregates for genotype and physiological traits, was previously used to identify several diabetes-related QTL. Our current investigation includes microarray analysis of over 40,000 probe sets, plus quantitative mass spectrometry-based measurements of sixty-seven intermediary metabolites in three different classes (amino acids, organic acids, and acyl-carnitines). We show that liver metabolites map to distinct genetic regions, thereby indicating that tissue metabolites are heritable. We also demonstrate that genomic analysis can be integrated with liver mRNA expression and metabolite profiling data to construct causal networks for control of specific metabolic processes in liver. As a proof of principle of the practical significance of this integrative approach, we illustrate the construction of a specific causal network that links gene expression and metabolic changes in the context of glutamate metabolism, and demonstrate its validity by showing that genes in the network respond to changes in glutamine and glutamate availability. Thus, the methods described here have the potential to reveal regulatory networks that contribute to chronic, complex, and highly prevalent diseases and conditions such as obesity and diabetes. PMID:18369453

  4. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach. 1. Examples and the carbon metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold

    2015-02-21

    In biological cells, chemical reaction pathways lead to complex network systems like metabolic networks. One experimental approach to the dynamics of such systems examines their "sensitivity": each enzyme mediating a reaction in the system is increased/decreased or knocked out separately, and the responses in the concentrations of chemicals or their fluxes are observed. In this study, we present a mathematical method, named structural sensitivity analysis, to determine the sensitivity of reaction systems from information on the network alone. We investigate how the sensitivity responses of chemicals in a reaction network depend on the structure of the network, and on the position of the perturbed reaction in the network. We establish and prove some general rules which relate the sensitivity response to the structure of the underlying network. We describe a hierarchical pattern in the flux response which is governed by branchings in the network. We apply our method to several hypothetical and real life chemical reaction networks, including the metabolic network of the Escherichia coli TCA cycle.

  5. Metabolic PathFinding: inferring relevant pathways in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Croes, Didier; Couche, Fabian; Wodak, Shoshana J; van Helden, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    Our knowledge of metabolism can be represented as a network comprising several thousands of nodes (compounds and reactions). Several groups applied graph theory to analyse the topological properties of this network and to infer metabolic pathways by path finding. This is, however, not straightforward, with a major problem caused by traversing irrelevant shortcuts through highly connected nodes, which correspond to pool metabolites and co-factors (e.g. H2O, NADP and H+). In this study, we present a web server implementing two simple approaches, which circumvent this problem, thereby improving the relevance of the inferred pathways. In the simplest approach, the shortest path is computed, while filtering out the selection of highly connected compounds. In the second approach, the shortest path is computed on the weighted metabolic graph where each compound is assigned a weight equal to its connectivity in the network. This approach significantly increases the accuracy of the inferred pathways, enabling the correct inference of relatively long pathways (e.g. with as many as eight intermediate reactions). Available options include the calculation of the k-shortest paths between two specified seed nodes (either compounds or reactions). Multiple requests can be submitted in a queue. Results are returned by email, in textual as well as graphical formats (available in http://www.scmbb.ulb.ac.be/pathfinding/).

  6. Second Law of Thermodynamics Applied to Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigam, R.; Liang, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple algorithm based on linear programming, that combines Kirchoff's flux and potential laws and applies them to metabolic networks to predict thermodynamically feasible reaction fluxes. These law's represent mass conservation and energy feasibility that are widely used in electrical circuit analysis. Formulating the Kirchoff's potential law around a reaction loop in terms of the null space of the stoichiometric matrix leads to a simple representation of the law of entropy that can be readily incorporated into the traditional flux balance analysis without resorting to non-linear optimization. Our technique is new as it can easily check the fluxes got by applying flux balance analysis for thermodynamic feasibility and modify them if they are infeasible so that they satisfy the law of entropy. We illustrate our method by applying it to the network dealing with the central metabolism of Escherichia coli. Due to its simplicity this algorithm will be useful in studying large scale complex metabolic networks in the cell of different organisms.

  7. Current Understanding of the Formation and Adaptation of Metabolic Systems Based on Network Theory

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Formation and adaptation of metabolic networks has been a long-standing question in biology. With recent developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics, the understanding of metabolism is progressively becoming clearer from a network perspective. This review introduces the comprehensive metabolic world that has been revealed by a wide range of data analyses and theoretical studies; in particular, it illustrates the role of evolutionary events, such as gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, and environmental factors, such as nutrient availability and growth conditions, in evolution of the metabolic network. Furthermore, the mathematical models for the formation and adaptation of metabolic networks have also been described, according to the current understanding from a perspective of metabolic networks. These recent findings are helpful in not only understanding the formation of metabolic networks and their adaptation, but also metabolic engineering. PMID:24957641

  8. Network-based analysis of the sphingolipid metabolism in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Common diseases like essential hypertension or diabetes mellitus are complex as they are polygenic in nature, such that each genetic variation only has a small influence on the disease. Genes operates in integrated networks providing the blue-print for all biological processes and conditional of the complex genotype determines the state and dynamics of any trait, which may be modified to various extent by non-genetic factors. Thus, diseases are heterogenous ensembles of conditions with a common endpoint. Numerous studies have been performed to define genes of importance for a trait or disease, but only a few genes with small effect have been identified. The major reasons for this modest progress is the unresolved heterogeneity of the regulation of blood pressure and the shortcomings of the prevailing monogenic approach to capture genetic effects in a polygenic condition. Here, a two-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analyzed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e., the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure. The heritabilities for diastolic and systolic blood pressure were estimated to be 0.63 and 0.01, which may in fact be the maximum heritabilities of these traits. This procedure

  9. Network-based analysis of the sphingolipid metabolism in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fenger, Mogens; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Common diseases like essential hypertension or diabetes mellitus are complex as they are polygenic in nature, such that each genetic variation only has a small influence on the disease. Genes operates in integrated networks providing the blue-print for all biological processes and conditional of the complex genotype determines the state and dynamics of any trait, which may be modified to various extent by non-genetic factors. Thus, diseases are heterogenous ensembles of conditions with a common endpoint. Numerous studies have been performed to define genes of importance for a trait or disease, but only a few genes with small effect have been identified. The major reasons for this modest progress is the unresolved heterogeneity of the regulation of blood pressure and the shortcomings of the prevailing monogenic approach to capture genetic effects in a polygenic condition. Here, a two-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analyzed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e., the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure. The heritabilities for diastolic and systolic blood pressure were estimated to be 0.63 and 0.01, which may in fact be the maximum heritabilities of these traits. This procedure

  10. Sequence-based Network Completion Reveals the Integrality of Missing Reactions in Metabolic Networks.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Elias W; Libourel, Igor G L

    2015-07-31

    Genome-scale metabolic models are central in connecting genotypes to metabolic phenotypes. However, even for well studied organisms, such as Escherichia coli, draft networks do not contain a complete biochemical network. Missing reactions are referred to as gaps. These gaps need to be filled to enable functional analysis, and gap-filling choices influence model predictions. To investigate whether functional networks existed where all gap-filling reactions were supported by sequence similarity to annotated enzymes, four draft networks were supplemented with all reactions from the Model SEED database for which minimal sequence similarity was found in their genomes. Quadratic programming revealed that the number of reactions that could partake in a gap-filling solution was vast: 3,270 in the case of E. coli, where 72% of the metabolites in the draft network could connect a gap-filling solution. Nonetheless, no network could be completed without the inclusion of orphaned enzymes, suggesting that parts of the biochemistry integral to biomass precursor formation are uncharacterized. However, many gap-filling reactions were well determined, and the resulting networks showed improved prediction of gene essentiality compared with networks generated through canonical gap filling. In addition, gene essentiality predictions that were sensitive to poorly determined gap-filling reactions were of poor quality, suggesting that damage to the network structure resulting from the inclusion of erroneous gap-filling reactions may be predictable.

  11. Hierarchical decomposition of metabolic networks using k-modules.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Arne C

    2015-12-01

    The optimal solutions obtained by flux balance analysis (FBA) are typically not unique. Flux modules have recently been shown to be a very useful tool to simplify and decompose the space of FBA-optimal solutions. Since yield-maximization is sometimes not the primary objective encountered in vivo, we are also interested in understanding the space of sub-optimal solutions. Unfortunately, the flux modules are too restrictive and not suited for this task. We present a generalization, called k-module, which compensates the limited applicability of flux modules to the space of sub-optimal solutions. Intuitively, a k-module is a sub-network with low connectivity to the rest of the network. Recursive application of k-modules yields a hierarchical decomposition of the metabolic network, which is also known as branch decomposition in matroid theory. In particular, decompositions computed by existing methods, like the null-space-based approach, introduced by Poolman et al. [(2007) J. Theor. Biol. 249: , 691-705] can be interpreted as branch decompositions. With k-modules we can now compare alternative decompositions of metabolic networks to the classical sub-systems of glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, etc. They can be used to speed up algorithmic problems [theoretically shown for elementary flux modes (EFM) enumeration] and have the potential to present computational solutions in a more intuitive way independently from the classical sub-systems.

  12. Global insights into energetic and metabolic networks in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving our understanding of processes at the core of cellular lifestyles can be aided by combining information from genetic analyses, high-throughput experiments and computational predictions. Results We combined data and predictions derived from phenotypic, physiological, genetic and computational analyses to dissect the metabolic and energetic networks of the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We focused our analysis on pathways crucial to the production and recycling of pyridine nucleotides during aerobic respiratory and anaerobic photosynthetic growth in the presence of an organic electron donor. In particular, we assessed the requirement for NADH/NADPH transhydrogenase enzyme, PntAB during respiratory and photosynthetic growth. Using high-throughput phenotype microarrays (PMs), we found that PntAB is essential for photosynthetic growth in the presence of many organic electron donors, particularly those predicted to require its activity to produce NADPH. Utilizing the genome-scale metabolic model iRsp1095, we predicted alternative routes of NADPH synthesis and used gene expression analyses to show that transcripts from a subset of the corresponding genes were conditionally increased in a ΔpntAB mutant. We then used a combination of metabolic flux predictions and mutational analysis to identify flux redistribution patterns utilized in the ΔpntAB mutant to compensate for the loss of this enzyme. Data generated from metabolic and phenotypic analyses of wild type and mutant cells were used to develop iRsp1140, an expanded genome-scale metabolic reconstruction for R. sphaeroides with improved ability to analyze and predict pathways associated with photosynthesis and other metabolic processes. Conclusions These analyses increased our understanding of key aspects of the photosynthetic lifestyle, highlighting the added importance of NADPH production under these conditions. It also led to a significant improvement in the

  13. Classifying Membrane Proteins in the Proteome by Using Artificial Neural Networks Based on the Preferential Parameters of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subrata K.; Browne, Antony; Kazemian, Hassan; White, Kenneth

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are large set of biological macromolecules that play a fundamental role in physiology and pathophysiology for survival. From a pharma-economical perspective, though it is the fact that MPs constitute ˜75% of possible targets for novel drugs but MPs are one of the most understudied groups of proteins in biochemical research. This is mainly because of the technical difficulties of obtaining structural information about trans-membrane regions (these are small sequences that crossways the bilayer lipid membrane). It is quite useful to predict the location of transmembrane segments down the sequence, since these are the elementary structural building blocks defining their topology. There have been several attempts over the last 20 years to develop tools for predicting membrane-spanning regions but current tools are far away from achieving a considerable reliability in prediction. This study aims to exploit the knowledge and current understanding in the field of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in particular data representation through the development of a system to identify and predict membrane-spanning regions by analysing primary amino acids sequence. In this paper we present a novel neural network (NNs) architecture and algorithms for predicting membrane spanning regions from primary amino acids sequences by using their preference parameters.

  14. An Organic Anion Transporter 1 (OAT1)-centered Metabolic Network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Henry C; Jamshidi, Neema; Chen, Yuchen; Eraly, Satish A; Cho, Sai Yee; Bhatnagar, Vibha; Wu, Wei; Bush, Kevin T; Abagyan, Ruben; Palsson, Bernhard O; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2016-09-01

    There has been a recent interest in the broader physiological importance of multispecific "drug" transporters of the SLC and ABC transporter families. Here, a novel multi-tiered systems biology approach was used to predict metabolites and signaling molecules potentially affected by the in vivo deletion of organic anion transporter 1 (Oat1, Slc22a6, originally NKT), a major kidney-expressed drug transporter. Validation of some predictions in wet-lab assays, together with re-evaluation of existing transport and knock-out metabolomics data, generated an experimentally validated, confidence ranked set of OAT1-interacting endogenous compounds enabling construction of an "OAT1-centered metabolic interaction network." Pathway and enrichment analysis indicated an important role for OAT1 in metabolism involving: the TCA cycle, tryptophan and other amino acids, fatty acids, prostaglandins, cyclic nucleotides, odorants, polyamines, and vitamins. The partly validated reconstructed network is also consistent with a major role for OAT1 in modulating metabolic and signaling pathways involving uric acid, gut microbiome products, and so-called uremic toxins accumulating in chronic kidney disease. Together, the findings are compatible with the hypothesized role of drug transporters in remote inter-organ and inter-organismal communication: The Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis (Nigam, S. K. (2015) Nat. Rev. Drug Disc. 14, 29). The fact that OAT1 can affect many systemic biological pathways suggests that drug-metabolite interactions need to be considered beyond simple competition for the drug transporter itself and may explain aspects of drug-induced metabolic syndrome. Our approach should provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of OAT1 and other drug transporters implicated in metabolic diseases like gout, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. PMID:27440044

  15. Corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor preferentially mediates gene networks underlying neural stem cell fate decisions.

    PubMed

    Abrajano, Joseph J; Qureshi, Irfan A; Gokhan, Solen; Molero, Aldrin E; Zheng, Deyou; Bergman, Aviv; Mehler, Mark F

    2010-09-21

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) silences neuronal genes in neural stem cells (NSCs) and nonneuronal cells through its role as a dynamic modular platform for recruitment of transcriptional and epigenetic regulatory cofactors to RE1-containing promoters. In embryonic stem cells, the REST regulatory network is highly integrated with the transcriptional circuitry governing self-renewal and pluripotency, although its exact functional role is unclear. The C-terminal cofactor for REST, CoREST, also acts as a modular scaffold, but its cell type-specific roles have not been elucidated. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip to examine CoREST and REST binding sites in NSCs and their proximate progenitor species. In NSCs, we identified a larger number of CoREST (1,820) compared with REST (322) target genes. The majority of these CoREST targets do not contain known RE1 motifs. Notably, these CoREST target genes do play important roles in pluripotency networks, in modulating NSC identity and fate decisions and in epigenetic processes previously associated with both REST and CoREST. Moreover, we found that NSC-mediated developmental transitions were associated primarily with liberation of CoREST from promoters with transcriptional repression favored in less lineage-restricted radial glia and transcriptional activation favored in more lineage-restricted neuronal-oligodendrocyte precursors. Clonal NSC REST and CoREST gene manipulation paradigms further revealed that CoREST has largely independent and previously uncharacterized roles in promoting NSC multilineage potential and modulating early neural fate decisions. PMID:20823235

  16. Flux Balance Analysis of Cyanobacterial Metabolism: The Metabolic Network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Henning; Gründel, Marianne; Zilliges, Yvonne; Lehmann, Robert; Hoffmann, Sabrina; Lockau, Wolfgang; Steuer, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are versatile unicellular phototrophic microorganisms that are highly abundant in many environments. Owing to their capability to utilize solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth, cyanobacteria are increasingly recognized as a prolific resource for the synthesis of valuable chemicals and various biofuels. To fully harness the metabolic capabilities of cyanobacteria necessitates an in-depth understanding of the metabolic interconversions taking place during phototrophic growth, as provided by genome-scale reconstructions of microbial organisms. Here we present an extended reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Building upon several recent reconstructions of cyanobacterial metabolism, unclear reaction steps are experimentally validated and the functional consequences of unknown or dissenting pathway topologies are discussed. The updated model integrates novel results with respect to the cyanobacterial TCA cycle, an alleged glyoxylate shunt, and the role of photorespiration in cellular growth. Going beyond conventional flux-balance analysis, we extend the computational analysis to diurnal light/dark cycles of cyanobacterial metabolism. PMID:23843751

  17. Multi-objective optimization of enzyme manipulations in metabolic networks considering resilience effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Improving the synthesis rate of desired metabolites in metabolic systems is one of the main tasks in metabolic engineering. In the last decade, metabolic engineering approaches based on the mathematical optimization have been used extensively for the analysis and manipulation of metabolic networks. Experimental evidence shows that mutants reflect resilience phenomena against gene alterations. Although researchers have published many studies on the design of metabolic systems based on kinetic models and optimization strategies, almost no studies discuss the multi-objective optimization problem for enzyme manipulations in metabolic networks considering resilience phenomenon. Results This study proposes a generalized fuzzy multi-objective optimization approach to formulate the enzyme intervention problem for metabolic networks considering resilience phenomena and cell viability. This approach is a general framework that can be applied to any metabolic networks to investigate the influence of resilience phenomena on gene intervention strategies and maximum target synthesis rates. This study evaluates the performance of the proposed approach by applying it to two metabolic systems: S. cerevisiae and E. coli. Results show that the maximum synthesis rates of target products by genetic interventions are always over-estimated in metabolic networks that do not consider the resilience effects. Conclusions Considering the resilience phenomena in metabolic networks can improve the predictions of gene intervention and maximum synthesis rates in metabolic engineering. The proposed generalized fuzzy multi-objective optimization approach has the potential to be a good and practical framework in the design of metabolic networks. PMID:21929795

  18. Alterations in metabolic pathways and networks in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Zhu, H; Sharma, S; Bogdanov, M; Rozen, S G; Matson, W; Oki, N O; Motsinger-Reif, A A; Churchill, E; Lei, Z; Appleby, D; Kling, M A; Trojanowski, J Q; Doraiswamy, P M; Arnold, S E

    2013-04-09

    The pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain largely unknown and clinical trials have not demonstrated significant benefit. Biochemical characterization of AD and its prodromal phase may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic insights. We used targeted metabolomics platform to profile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD (n=40), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=36) and control (n=38) subjects; univariate and multivariate analyses to define between-group differences; and partial least square-discriminant analysis models to classify diagnostic groups using CSF metabolomic profiles. A partial correlation network was built to link metabolic markers, protein markers and disease severity. AD subjects had elevated methionine (MET), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), vanillylmandelic acid, xanthosine and glutathione versus controls. MCI subjects had elevated 5-HIAA, MET, hypoxanthine and other metabolites versus controls. Metabolite ratios revealed changes within tryptophan, MET and purine pathways. Initial pathway analyses identified steps in several pathways that appear altered in AD and MCI. A partial correlation network showed total tau most directly related to norepinephrine and purine pathways; amyloid-β (Ab42) was related directly to an unidentified metabolite and indirectly to 5-HIAA and MET. These findings indicate that MCI and AD are associated with an overlapping pattern of perturbations in tryptophan, tyrosine, MET and purine pathways, and suggest that profound biochemical alterations are linked to abnormal Ab42 and tau metabolism. Metabolomics provides powerful tools to map interlinked biochemical pathway perturbations and study AD as a disease of network failure.

  19. Flux Coupling Analysis of Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Burgard, Anthony P.; Nikolaev, Evgeni V.; Schilling, Christophe H.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Flux Coupling Finder (FCF) framework for elucidating the topological and flux connectivity features of genome-scale metabolic networks. The framework is demonstrated on genome-scale metabolic reconstructions of Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The analysis allows one to determine whether any two metabolic fluxes, v1 and v2, are (1) directionally coupled, if a non-zero flux for v1 implies a non-zero flux for v2 but not necessarily the reverse; (2) partially coupled, if a non-zero flux for v1 implies a non-zero, though variable, flux for v2 and vice versa; or (3) fully coupled, if a non-zero flux for v1 implies not only a non-zero but also a fixed flux for v2 and vice versa. Flux coupling analysis also enables the global identification of blocked reactions, which are all reactions incapable of carrying flux under a certain condition; equivalent knockouts, defined as the set of all possible reactions whose deletion forces the flux through a particular reaction to zero; and sets of affected reactions denoting all reactions whose fluxes are forced to zero if a particular reaction is deleted. The FCF approach thus provides a novel and versatile tool for aiding metabolic reconstructions and guiding genetic manipulations. PMID:14718379

  20. On Algebraic Properties of Extreme Pathways in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jevremovic, Dimitrije; Trinh, Cong T.; Srienc, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We give a concise development of some of the major algebraic properties of extreme pathways (pathways that cannot be the result of combining other pathways) of metabolic networks, contrasting them to those of elementary flux modes (pathways involving a minimal set of reactions). In particular, we show that an extreme pathway can be recognized by a rank test as simple as the existing rank test for elementary flux modes, without computing all the modes. We make the observation that, unlike elementary flux modes, the property of being an extreme pathway depends on the presence or absence of reactions beyond those involved in the pathway itself. Hence, the property of being an extreme pathway is not a local property. As a consequence, we find that the set of all elementary flux modes for a network includes all the elementary flux modes for all its subnetworks, but that this property does not hold for the set of all extreme pathways. PMID:20170399

  1. On algebraic properties of extreme pathways in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Jevremovic, Dimitrije; Trinh, Cong T; Srienc, Friedrich; Boley, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We give a concise development of some of the major algebraic properties of extreme pathways (pathways that cannot be the result of combining other pathways) of metabolic networks, contrasting them to those of elementary flux modes (pathways involving a minimal set of reactions). In particular, we show that an extreme pathway can be recognized by a rank test as simple as the existing rank test for elementary flux modes, without computing all the modes. We make the observation that, unlike elementary flux modes, the property of being an extreme pathway depends on the presence or absence of reactions beyond those involved in the pathway itself. Hence, the property of being an extreme pathway is not a local property. As a consequence, we find that the set of all elementary flux modes for a network includes all the elementary flux modes for all its subnetworks, but that this property does not hold for the set of all extreme pathways.

  2. Inactivation of Metabolic Genes Causes Short- and Long-Range dys-Regulation in Escherichia coli Metabolic Network

    PubMed Central

    Barupal, Dinesh Kumar; Lee, Sang Jun; Karoly, Edward D.; Adhya, Sankar

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic network in E. coli can be severely affected by the inactivation of metabolic genes that are required to catabolize a nutrient (D-galactose). We hypothesized that the resulting accumulation of small molecules can yield local as well as systemic effects on the metabolic network. Analysis of metabolomics data in wild-type and D-galactose non-utilizing mutants, galT, galU and galE, reveal the large metabolic differences between the wild-type and the mutants when the strains were grown in D-galactose. Network mapping suggested that the enzymatic defects affected the metabolic modules located both at short- and long-ranges from the D-galactose metabolic module. These modules suggested alterations in glutathione, energy, nucleotide and lipid metabolism and disturbed carbon to nitrogen ratio in mutant strains. The altered modules are required for normal cell growth for the wild-type strain, explaining why the cell growth is inhibited in the mutants in the presence of D-galactose. Identification of these distance-based dys-regulations would enhance the systems level understanding of metabolic networks of microorganisms having importance in biomedical and biotechnological research. PMID:24363806

  3. Hands-on metabolism analysis of complex biochemical networks using elementary flux modes.

    PubMed

    Schäuble, Sascha; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to discuss the basic principles and reasoning behind elementary flux mode analysis (EFM analysis)--an important tool for the analysis of metabolic networks. We begin with a short introduction into metabolic pathway analysis and subsequently outline in detail fundamentals of EFM analysis by way of a small example network. We discuss issues arising in the reconstruction of metabolic networks required for EFM analysis and how they can be circumvented. Subsequently, we analyze a more elaborate example network representing photosynthate metabolism. Finally, we give an overview of applications of EFM analysis in biotechnology and other fields and discuss issues arising when applying methods from metabolic pathway analysis to genome-scale metabolic networks.

  4. Reconstruction and applications of consensus yeast metabolic network based on RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuqi; Wang, Yanjie; Zou, Lei; Huang, Jingfei

    2016-04-01

    One practical application of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions is to interrogate multispecies relationships. Here, we report a consensus metabolic model in four yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, and S. bayanus) by integrating metabolic network simulations with RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) datasets. We generated high-resolution transcriptome maps of four yeast species through de novo assembly and genome-guided approaches. The transcriptomes were annotated and applied to build the consensus metabolic network, which was verified using independent RNA-seq experiments. The expression profiles reveal that the genes involved in amino acid and lipid metabolism are highly coexpressed. The diverse phenotypic characteristics, such as cellular growth and gene deletions, can be simulated using the metabolic model. We also explored the applications of the consensus model in metabolic engineering using yeast-specific reactions and biofuel production as examples. Similar strategies will benefit communities studying genome-scale metabolic networks of other organisms. PMID:27239440

  5. Integration of metabolic and gene regulatory networks modulates the C. elegans dietary response.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Arda, H Efsun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2013-03-28

    Expression profiles are tailored according to dietary input. However, the networks that control dietary responses remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine forward and reverse genetic screens to delineate a network of 184 genes that affect the C. elegans dietary response to Comamonas DA1877 bacteria. We find that perturbation of a mitochondrial network composed of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and the TCA cycle affects the dietary response. In humans, mutations in the corresponding genes cause inborn diseases of amino acid metabolism, most of which are treated by dietary intervention. We identify several transcription factors (TFs) that mediate the changes in gene expression upon metabolic network perturbations. Altogether, our findings unveil a transcriptional response system that is poised to sense dietary cues and metabolic imbalances, illustrating extensive communication between metabolic networks in the mitochondria and gene regulatory networks in the nucleus.

  6. Metabolic impact assessment for heterologous protein production in Streptomyces lividans based on genome-scale metabolic network modeling.

    PubMed

    Lule, Ivan; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef; Bernaerts, Kristel; Van Impe, Jan

    2013-11-01

    The metabolic impact exerted on a microorganism due to heterologous protein production is still poorly understood in Streptomyces lividans. In this present paper, based on exometabolomic data, a proposed genome-scale metabolic network model is used to assess this metabolic impact in S. lividans. Constraint-based modeling results obtained in this work revealed that the metabolic impact due to heterologous protein production is widely distributed in the genome of S. lividans, causing both slow substrate assimilation and a shift in active pathways. Exchange fluxes that are critical for model performance have been identified for metabolites of mouse tumor necrosis factor, histidine, valine and lysine, as well as biomass. Our results unravel the interaction of heterologous protein production with intracellular metabolism of S. lividans, thus, a possible basis for further studies in relieving the metabolic burden via metabolic or bioprocess engineering.

  7. Perspectives for a better understanding of the metabolic integration of photorespiration within a complex plant primary metabolism network.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Michael; Dellero, Younès; Keech, Olivier; Betti, Marco; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Sage, Rowan; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Allen, Doug K; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration is an essential high flux metabolic pathway that is found in all oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms. It is often viewed as a closed metabolic repair pathway that serves to detoxify 2-phosphoglycolic acid and to recycle carbon to fuel the Calvin-Benson cycle. However, this view is too simplistic since the photorespiratory cycle is known to interact with several primary metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, nitrate assimilation, amino acid metabolism, C1 metabolism and the Krebs (TCA) cycle. Here we will review recent advances in photorespiration research and discuss future priorities to better understand (i) the metabolic integration of the photorespiratory cycle within the complex network of plant primary metabolism and (ii) the importance of photorespiration in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID:27053720

  8. A flexible state-space approach for the modeling of metabolic networks II: advanced interrogation of hybridoma metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Adam C; Sharfstein, Susan T; Martin, Lealon L

    2011-03-01

    Having previously introduced the mathematical framework of topological metabolic analysis (TMA) - a novel optimization-based technique for modeling metabolic networks of arbitrary size and complexity - we demonstrate how TMA facilitates unique methods of metabolic interrogation. With the aid of several hybridoma metabolic investigations as case-studies (Bonarius et al., 1995, 1996, 2001), we first establish that the TMA framework identifies biologically important aspects of the metabolic network under investigation. We also show that the use of a structured weighting approach within our objective provides a substantial modeling benefit over an unstructured, uniform, weighting approach. We then illustrate the strength of TAM as an advanced interrogation technique, first by using TMA to prove the existence of (and to quantitatively describe) multiple topologically distinct configurations of a metabolic network that each optimally model a given set of experimental observations. We further show that such alternate topologies are indistinguishable using existing stoichiometric modeling techniques, and we explain the biological significance of the topological variables appearing within our model. By leveraging the manner in which TMA implements metabolite inputs and outputs, we also show that metabolites whose possible metabolic fates are inadequately described by a given network reconstruction can be quickly identified. Lastly, we show how the use of the TMA aggregate objective function (AOF) permits the identification of modeling solutions that can simultaneously consider experimental observations, underlying biological motivations, or even purely engineering- or design-based goals.

  9. A Bayesian Approach to the Evolution of Metabolic Networks on a Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Mithani, Aziz; Preston, Gail M.; Hein, Jotun

    2010-01-01

    The availability of genomes of many closely related bacteria with diverse metabolic capabilities offers the possibility of tracing metabolic evolution on a phylogeny relating the genomes to understand the evolutionary processes and constraints that affect the evolution of metabolic networks. Using simple (independent loss/gain of reactions) or complex (incorporating dependencies among reactions) stochastic models of metabolic evolution, it is possible to study how metabolic networks evolve over time. Here, we describe a model that takes the reaction neighborhood into account when modeling metabolic evolution. The model also allows estimation of the strength of the neighborhood effect during the course of evolution. We present Gibbs samplers for sampling networks at the internal node of a phylogeny and for estimating the parameters of evolution over a phylogeny without exploring the whole search space by iteratively sampling from the conditional distributions of the internal networks and parameters. The samplers are used to estimate the parameters of evolution of metabolic networks of bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas and to infer the metabolic networks of the ancestral pseudomonads. The results suggest that pathway maps that are conserved across the Pseudomonas phylogeny have a stronger neighborhood structure than those which have a variable distribution of reactions across the phylogeny, and that some Pseudomonas lineages are going through genome reduction resulting in the loss of a number of reactions from their metabolic networks. PMID:20700467

  10. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-García, Celia; Peláez, Ana I.; Mesa, Victoria; Sánchez, Jesús; Golyshina, Olga V.; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon, and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics-based methodologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and archaea recovered through sterile filtering (herein referred to as filterable fraction) in these environments demand their inclusion in the microbial characterization of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including filterable fraction), and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems, and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far. PMID:26074887

  11. A state of the art of metabolic networks of unicellular microalgae and cyanobacteria for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Baroukh, Caroline; Muñoz-Tamayo, Rafael; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    The most promising and yet challenging application of microalgae and cyanobacteria is the production of renewable energy: biodiesel from microalgae triacylglycerols and bioethanol from cyanobacteria carbohydrates. A thorough understanding of microalgal and cyanobacterial metabolism is necessary to master and optimize biofuel production yields. To this end, systems biology and metabolic modeling have proven to be very efficient tools if supported by an accurate knowledge of the metabolic network. However, unlike heterotrophic microorganisms that utilize the same substrate for energy and as carbon source, microalgae and cyanobacteria require light for energy and inorganic carbon (CO2 or bicarbonate) as carbon source. This double specificity, together with the complex mechanisms of light capture, makes the representation of metabolic network nonstandard. Here, we review the existing metabolic networks of photoautotrophic microalgae and cyanobacteria. We highlight how these networks have been useful for gaining insight on photoautotrophic metabolism.

  12. NMR analysis of a stress response metabolic signaling network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Halouska, Steven; Schiaffo, Charles E; Sadykov, Marat R; Somerville, Greg A; Powers, Robert

    2011-08-01

    We previously hypothesized that Staphylococcus epidermidis senses a diverse set of environmental and nutritional factors associated with biofilm formation through a modulation in the activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Herein, we report our further investigation of the impact of additional environmental stress factors on TCA cycle activity and provide a detailed description of our NMR methodology. S. epidermidis wild-type strain 1457 was treated with stressors that are associated with biofilm formation, a sublethal dose of tetracycline, 5% NaCl, 2% glucose, and autoinducer-2 (AI-2). As controls and to integrate our current data with our previous study, 4% ethanol stress and iron-limitation were also used. Consistent with our prior observations, the effect of many environmental stress factors on the S. epidermidis metabolome was essentially identical to the effect of TCA cycle inactivation in the aconitase mutant strain 1457-acnA::tetM. A detailed quantitative analysis of metabolite concentration changes using 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC and (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectra identified a network of 37 metabolites uniformly affected by the stressors and TCA cycle inactivation. We postulate that the TCA cycle acts as the central pathway in a metabolic signaling network.

  13. Text mining for metabolic pathways, signaling cascades, and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Robert; Krallinger, Martin; Andres, Eduardo; Tamames, Javier; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-05-10

    The complexity of the information stored in databases and publications on metabolic and signaling pathways, the high throughput of experimental data, and the growing number of publications make it imperative to provide systems to help the researcher navigate through these interrelated information resources. Text-mining methods have started to play a key role in the creation and maintenance of links between the information stored in biological databases and its original sources in the literature. These links will be extremely useful for database updating and curation, especially if a number of technical problems can be solved satisfactorily, including the identification of protein and gene names (entities in general) and the characterization of their types of interactions. The first generation of openly accessible text-mining systems, such as iHOP (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins), provides additional functions to facilitate the reconstruction of protein interaction networks, combine database and text information, and support the scientist in the formulation of novel hypotheses. The next challenge is the generation of comprehensive information regarding the general function of signaling pathways and protein interaction networks. PMID:15886388

  14. NMR analysis of a stress response metabolic signaling network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Halouska, Steven; Schiaffo, Charles E; Sadykov, Marat R; Somerville, Greg A; Powers, Robert

    2011-08-01

    We previously hypothesized that Staphylococcus epidermidis senses a diverse set of environmental and nutritional factors associated with biofilm formation through a modulation in the activity of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Herein, we report our further investigation of the impact of additional environmental stress factors on TCA cycle activity and provide a detailed description of our NMR methodology. S. epidermidis wild-type strain 1457 was treated with stressors that are associated with biofilm formation, a sublethal dose of tetracycline, 5% NaCl, 2% glucose, and autoinducer-2 (AI-2). As controls and to integrate our current data with our previous study, 4% ethanol stress and iron-limitation were also used. Consistent with our prior observations, the effect of many environmental stress factors on the S. epidermidis metabolome was essentially identical to the effect of TCA cycle inactivation in the aconitase mutant strain 1457-acnA::tetM. A detailed quantitative analysis of metabolite concentration changes using 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC and (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectra identified a network of 37 metabolites uniformly affected by the stressors and TCA cycle inactivation. We postulate that the TCA cycle acts as the central pathway in a metabolic signaling network. PMID:21692534

  15. Automated refinement and inference of analytical models for metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael D; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Soni, Abhishek S; Wikswo, John P; Lipson, Hod

    2013-01-01

    The reverse engineering of metabolic networks from experimental data is traditionally a labor-intensive task requiring a priori systems knowledge. Using a proven model as a test system, we demonstrate an automated method to simplify this process by modifying an existing or related model – suggesting nonlinear terms and structural modifications – or even constructing a new model that agrees with the system’s time-series observations. In certain cases, this method can identify the full dynamical model from scratch without prior knowledge or structural assumptions. The algorithm selects between multiple candidate models by designing experiments to make their predictions disagree. We performed computational experiments to analyze a nonlinear seven-dimensional model of yeast glycolytic oscillations. This approach corrected mistakes reliably in both approximated and overspecified models. The method performed well to high levels of noise for most states, could identify the correct model de novo, and make better predictions than ordinary parametric regression and neural network models. We identified an invariant quantity in the model, which accurately derived kinetics and the numerical sensitivity coefficients of the system. Finally, we compared the system to dynamic flux estimation and discussed the scaling and application of this methodology to automated experiment design and control in biological systems in real-time. PMID:21832805

  16. Controllability in cancer metabolic networks according to drug targets as driver nodes.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine.

  17. Controllability in Cancer Metabolic Networks According to Drug Targets as Driver Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine. PMID:24282504

  18. Rearrangements of the transcriptional regulatory networks of metabolic pathways in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Hugo; Hogues, Hervé; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2009-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that transcriptional regulatory networks in many organisms are highly flexible. Here, we discuss the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks governing the metabolic machinery of sequenced ascomycetes. In particular, recent work has shown that transcriptional rewiring is common in regulons controlling processes such as production of ribosome components and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. We note that dramatic rearrangements of the transcriptional regulatory components of metabolic functions have occurred among ascomycetes species.

  19. MicroRNA regulation of bovine monocyte inflammatory and metabolic networks in an in vivo infection model.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Nathan; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Bryan, Kenneth; Baker, Mike; Pesch, Bruce; Zimmerman, Duane; Zuelke, Kurt; Sonstegard, Tad; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Lippolis, John D; Lynn, David J

    2014-01-27

    Bovine mastitis is an inflammation-driven disease of the bovine mammary gland that costs the global dairy industry several billion dollars per year. Because disease susceptibility is a multifactorial complex phenotype, an integrative biology approach is required to dissect the molecular networks involved. Here, we report such an approach using next-generation sequencing combined with advanced network and pathway biology methods to simultaneously profile mRNA and miRNA expression at multiple time points (0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hr) in milk and blood FACS-isolated CD14(+) monocytes from animals infected in vivo with Streptococcus uberis. More than 3700 differentially expressed (DE) genes were identified in milk-isolated monocytes (MIMs), a key immune cell recruited to the site of infection during mastitis. Upregulated genes were significantly enriched for inflammatory pathways, whereas downregulated genes were enriched for nonglycolytic metabolic pathways. Monocyte transcriptional changes in the blood, however, were more subtle but highlighted the impact of this infection systemically. Genes upregulated in blood-isolated monocytes (BIMs) showed a significant association with interferon and chemokine signaling. Furthermore, 26 miRNAs were DE in MIMs and three were DE in BIMs. Pathway analysis revealed that predicted targets of downregulated miRNAs were highly enriched for roles in innate immunity (FDR < 3.4E-8), particularly TLR signaling, whereas upregulated miRNAs preferentially targeted genes involved in metabolism. We conclude that during S. uberis infection miRNAs are key amplifiers of monocyte inflammatory response networks and repressors of several metabolic pathways.

  20. Identification of Functional Differences in Metabolic Networks Using Comparative Genomics and Constraint-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Joshua J.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions are useful tools for understanding cellular metabolism, and comparisons of such reconstructions can provide insight into metabolic differences between organisms. Recent efforts toward comparing genome-scale models have focused primarily on aligning metabolic networks at the reaction level and then looking at differences and similarities in reaction and gene content. However, these reaction comparison approaches are time-consuming and do not identify the effect network differences have on the functional states of the network. We have developed a bilevel mixed-integer programming approach, CONGA, to identify functional differences between metabolic networks by comparing network reconstructions aligned at the gene level. We first identify orthologous genes across two reconstructions and then use CONGA to identify conditions under which differences in gene content give rise to differences in metabolic capabilities. By seeking genes whose deletion in one or both models disproportionately changes flux through a selected reaction (e.g., growth or by-product secretion) in one model over another, we are able to identify structural metabolic network differences enabling unique metabolic capabilities. Using CONGA, we explore functional differences between two metabolic reconstructions of Escherichia coli and identify a set of reactions responsible for chemical production differences between the two models. We also use this approach to aid in the development of a genome-scale model of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Finally, we propose potential antimicrobial targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus based on differences in their metabolic capabilities. Through these examples, we demonstrate that a gene-centric approach to comparing metabolic networks allows for a rapid comparison of metabolic models at a functional level. Using CONGA, we can identify differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different

  1. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  2. Metabolomics and systems pharmacology: why and how to model the human metabolic network for drug discovery☆

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Douglas B.; Goodacre, Royston

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism represents the ‘sharp end’ of systems biology, because changes in metabolite concentrations are necessarily amplified relative to changes in the transcriptome, proteome and enzyme activities, which can be modulated by drugs. To understand such behaviour, we therefore need (and increasingly have) reliable consensus (community) models of the human metabolic network that include the important transporters. Small molecule ‘drug’ transporters are in fact metabolite transporters, because drugs bear structural similarities to metabolites known from the network reconstructions and from measurements of the metabolome. Recon2 represents the present state-of-the-art human metabolic network reconstruction; it can predict inter alia: (i) the effects of inborn errors of metabolism; (ii) which metabolites are exometabolites, and (iii) how metabolism varies between tissues and cellular compartments. However, even these qualitative network models are not yet complete. As our understanding improves so do we recognise more clearly the need for a systems (poly)pharmacology. PMID:23892182

  3. Into new territory: improved microbial synthesis through engineering of the essential metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering offer the promise of next generation bioprocesses to produce numerous products including specialty and bulk chemicals and even biofuels sustainably from renewable feedstocks. A primary challenge is the optimization of product flux, within a much larger and complex metabolic network. While simple gene deletion methods can be used in the case of non-essential byproduct pathways, more sophisticated approaches are required when competitive fluxes are essential to host cellular functions. Engineering essential metabolic networks has been traditionally off-limits to metabolic engineers. Newer approaches to be reviewed include the rebalancing or rewiring of the metabolic network by tuning the levels of essential enzymes and the use of dynamic metabolic control strategies to conditionally reduce essential competitive fluxes.

  4. Design of pathway-level bioprocess monitoring and control strategies supported by metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Inês A; Ferreira, Ana R; Clemente, João J; Cunha, António E; Dias, João M L; Oliveira, Rui

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the basic tools for the design of bioprocess monitoring, optimization, and control algorithms that incorporate a priori knowledge of metabolic networks. The main advantage is that this ultimately enables the targeting of intracellular control variables such as metabolic reactions or metabolic pathways directly linked with productivity and product quality. We analyze in particular design methods that target elementary modes of metabolic networks. The topics covered include the analysis of the structure of metabolic networks, computation and reduction of elementary modes, measurement methods for the envirome, envirome-guided metabolic reconstruction, and macroscopic dynamic modeling and control. These topics are illustrated with applications to a cultivation process of a recombinant Pichia pastoris X33 strain expressing a single-chain antibody fragment (scFv).

  5. A Computational Solution to Automatically Map Metabolite Libraries in the Context of Genome Scale Metabolic Networks.

    PubMed

    Merlet, Benjamin; Paulhe, Nils; Vinson, Florence; Frainay, Clément; Chazalviel, Maxime; Poupin, Nathalie; Gloaguen, Yoann; Giacomoni, Franck; Jourdan, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a generic programmatic method for mapping chemical compound libraries on organism-specific metabolic networks from various databases (KEGG, BioCyc) and flat file formats (SBML and Matlab files). We show how this pipeline was successfully applied to decipher the coverage of chemical libraries set up by two metabolomics facilities MetaboHub (French National infrastructure for metabolomics and fluxomics) and Glasgow Polyomics (GP) on the metabolic networks available in the MetExplore web server. The present generic protocol is designed to formalize and reduce the volume of information transfer between the library and the network database. Matching of metabolites between libraries and metabolic networks is based on InChIs or InChIKeys and therefore requires that these identifiers are specified in both libraries and networks. In addition to providing covering statistics, this pipeline also allows the visualization of mapping results in the context of metabolic networks. In order to achieve this goal, we tackled issues on programmatic interaction between two servers, improvement of metabolite annotation in metabolic networks and automatic loading of a mapping in genome scale metabolic network analysis tool MetExplore. It is important to note that this mapping can also be performed on a single or a selection of organisms of interest and is thus not limited to large facilities. PMID:26909353

  6. A Computational Solution to Automatically Map Metabolite Libraries in the Context of Genome Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Merlet, Benjamin; Paulhe, Nils; Vinson, Florence; Frainay, Clément; Chazalviel, Maxime; Poupin, Nathalie; Gloaguen, Yoann; Giacomoni, Franck; Jourdan, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a generic programmatic method for mapping chemical compound libraries on organism-specific metabolic networks from various databases (KEGG, BioCyc) and flat file formats (SBML and Matlab files). We show how this pipeline was successfully applied to decipher the coverage of chemical libraries set up by two metabolomics facilities MetaboHub (French National infrastructure for metabolomics and fluxomics) and Glasgow Polyomics (GP) on the metabolic networks available in the MetExplore web server. The present generic protocol is designed to formalize and reduce the volume of information transfer between the library and the network database. Matching of metabolites between libraries and metabolic networks is based on InChIs or InChIKeys and therefore requires that these identifiers are specified in both libraries and networks. In addition to providing covering statistics, this pipeline also allows the visualization of mapping results in the context of metabolic networks. In order to achieve this goal, we tackled issues on programmatic interaction between two servers, improvement of metabolite annotation in metabolic networks and automatic loading of a mapping in genome scale metabolic network analysis tool MetExplore. It is important to note that this mapping can also be performed on a single or a selection of organisms of interest and is thus not limited to large facilities. PMID:26909353

  7. A toolbox model of evolution of metabolic pathways on networks of arbitrary topology.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tin Yau; Maslov, Sergei

    2011-05-01

    In prokaryotic genomes the number of transcriptional regulators is known to be proportional to the square of the total number of protein-coding genes. A toolbox model of evolution was recently proposed to explain this empirical scaling for metabolic enzymes and their regulators. According to its rules, the metabolic network of an organism evolves by horizontal transfer of pathways from other species. These pathways are part of a larger "universal" network formed by the union of all species-specific networks. It remained to be understood, however, how the topological properties of this universal network influence the scaling law of functional content of genomes in the toolbox model. Here we answer this question by first analyzing the scaling properties of the toolbox model on arbitrary tree-like universal networks. We prove that critical branching topology, in which the average number of upstream neighbors of a node is equal to one, is both necessary and sufficient for quadratic scaling. We further generalize the rules of the model to incorporate reactions with multiple substrates/products as well as branched and cyclic metabolic pathways. To achieve its metabolic tasks, the new model employs evolutionary optimized pathways with minimal number of reactions. Numerical simulations of this realistic model on the universal network of all reactions in the KEGG database produced approximately quadratic scaling between the number of regulated pathways and the size of the metabolic network. To quantify the geometrical structure of individual pathways, we investigated the relationship between their number of reactions, byproducts, intermediate, and feedback metabolites. Our results validate and explain the ubiquitous appearance of the quadratic scaling for a broad spectrum of topologies of underlying universal metabolic networks. They also demonstrate why, in spite of "small-world" topology, real-life metabolic networks are characterized by a broad distribution of pathway

  8. A Toolbox Model of Evolution of Metabolic Pathways on Networks of Arbitrary Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Pang, T.Y.

    2011-05-01

    In prokaryotic genomes the number of transcriptional regulators is known to be proportional to the square of the total number of protein-coding genes. A toolbox model of evolution was recently proposed to explain this empirical scaling for metabolic enzymes and their regulators. According to its rules, the metabolic network of an organism evolves by horizontal transfer of pathways from other species. These pathways are part of a larger 'universal' network formed by the union of all species-specific networks. It remained to be understood, however, how the topological properties of this universal network influence the scaling law of functional content of genomes in the toolbox model. Here we answer this question by first analyzing the scaling properties of the toolbox model on arbitrary tree-like universal networks. We prove that critical branching topology, in which the average number of upstream neighbors of a node is equal to one, is both necessary and sufficient for quadratic scaling. We further generalize the rules of the model to incorporate reactions with multiple substrates/products as well as branched and cyclic metabolic pathways. To achieve its metabolic tasks, the new model employs evolutionary optimized pathways with minimal number of reactions. Numerical simulations of this realistic model on the universal network of all reactions in the KEGG database produced approximately quadratic scaling between the number of regulated pathways and the size of the metabolic network. To quantify the geometrical structure of individual pathways, we investigated the relationship between their number of reactions, byproducts, intermediate, and feedback metabolites. Our results validate and explain the ubiquitous appearance of the quadratic scaling for a broad spectrum of topologies of underlying universal metabolic networks. They also demonstrate why, in spite of 'small-world' topology, real-life metabolic networks are characterized by a broad distribution of pathway

  9. Plasticity of genetic interactions in metabolic networks of yeast.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Richard; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba; Oliver, Stephen G; Delneri, Daniela

    2007-02-13

    Why are most genes dispensable? The impact of gene deletions may depend on the environment (plasticity), the presence of compensatory mechanisms (mutational robustness), or both. Here, we analyze the interaction between these two forces by exploring the condition-dependence of synthetic genetic interactions that define redundant functions and alternative pathways. We performed systems-level flux balance analysis of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) metabolic network to identify genetic interactions and then tested the model's predictions with in vivo gene-deletion studies. We found that the majority of synthetic genetic interactions are restricted to certain environmental conditions, partly because of the lack of compensation under some (but not all) nutrient conditions. Moreover, the phylogenetic cooccurrence of synthetically interacting pairs is not significantly different from random expectation. These findings suggest that these gene pairs have at least partially independent functions, and, hence, compensation is only a byproduct of their evolutionary history. Experimental analyses that used multiple gene deletion strains not only confirmed predictions of the model but also showed that investigation of false predictions may both improve functional annotation within the model and also lead to the discovery of higher-order genetic interactions. Our work supports the view that functional redundancy may be more apparent than real, and it offers a unified framework for the evolution of environmental adaptation and mutational robustness. PMID:17284612

  10. Artificial intelligence techniques for colorectal cancer drug metabolism: ontology and complex network.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Romero, Marcos; Vázquez-Naya, José M; Rabuñal, Juan R; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Macenlle, Ramiro; Castro-Alvariño, Javier; López-Roses, Leopoldo; Ulla, José L; Martínez-Calvo, Antonio V; Vázquez, Santiago; Pereira, Javier; Porto-Pazos, Ana B; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2010-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent types of cancer in the world and generates important social impact. The understanding of the specific metabolism of this disease and the transformations of the specific drugs will allow finding effective prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the colorectal cancer. All the terms that describe the drug metabolism contribute to the construction of ontology in order to help scientists to link the correlated information and to find the most useful data about this topic. The molecular components involved in this metabolism are included in complex network such as metabolic pathways in order to describe all the molecular interactions in the colorectal cancer. The graphical method of processing biological information such as graphs and complex networks leads to the numerical characterization of the colorectal cancer drug metabolic network by using invariant values named topological indices. Thus, this method can help scientists to study the most important elements in the metabolic pathways and the dynamics of the networks during mutations, denaturation or evolution for any type of disease. This review presents the last studies regarding ontology and complex networks of the colorectal cancer drug metabolism and a basic topology characterization of the drug metabolic process sub-ontology from the Gene Ontology.

  11. Limited influence of oxygen on the evolution of chemical diversity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Yoshitake, Ikumi

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen is thought to promote species and biomolecule diversity. Previous studies have suggested that oxygen expands metabolic networks by acquiring metabolites with different chemical properties (higher hydrophobicity, for example). However, such conclusions are typically based on biased evaluation, and are therefore non-conclusive. Thus, we re-investigated the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution using a phylogenetic comparative method and metadata analysis to reduce the bias as much as possible. Notably, we found no difference in metabolic network expansion between aerobes and anaerobes when evaluating phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, we showed that previous studies have overestimated or underestimated the degrees of differences in the chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity) between oxic and anoxic metabolites in metabolic networks of unicellular organisms; however, such overestimation was not observed when considering the metabolic networks of multicellular organisms. These findings indicate that the contribution of oxygen to increased chemical diversity in metabolic networks is lower than previously thought; rather, phylogenetic signals and cell-cell communication result in increased chemical diversity. However, this conclusion does not contradict the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution; instead, it provides a deeper understanding of how oxygen contributes to metabolic evolution despite several limitations in data analysis methods. PMID:24958261

  12. Global reconstruction of the human metabolic network based on genomic and bibliomic data

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Natalie C.; Becker, Scott A.; Jamshidi, Neema; Thiele, Ines; Mo, Monica L.; Vo, Thuy D.; Srivas, Rohith; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolism is a vital cellular process, and its malfunction is a major contributor to human disease. Metabolic networks are complex and highly interconnected, and thus systems-level computational approaches are required to elucidate and understand metabolic genotype–phenotype relationships. We have manually reconstructed the global human metabolic network based on Build 35 of the genome annotation and a comprehensive evaluation of >50 years of legacy data (i.e., bibliomic data). Herein we describe the reconstruction process and demonstrate how the resulting genome-scale (or global) network can be used (i) for the discovery of missing information, (ii) for the formulation of an in silico model, and (iii) as a structured context for analyzing high-throughput biological data sets. Our comprehensive evaluation of the literature revealed many gaps in the current understanding of human metabolism that require future experimental investigation. Mathematical analysis of network structure elucidated the implications of intracellular compartmentalization and the potential use of correlated reaction sets for alternative drug target identification. Integrated analysis of high-throughput data sets within the context of the reconstruction enabled a global assessment of functional metabolic states. These results highlight some of the applications enabled by the reconstructed human metabolic network. The establishment of this network represents an important step toward genome-scale human systems biology. PMID:17267599

  13. Methylisoindigo preferentially kills cancer stem cells by interfering cell metabolism via inhibition of LKB1 and activation of AMPK in PDACs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Kim, Jee Young; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Duvaci, Tijen; Rafiee, Roya; Theobald, Jannick; Alborzinia, Hamed; Holenya, Pavlo; Fredebohm, Johannes; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Hafezi, Mohammadreza; Saffari, Arash; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) clinically has a very poor prognosis. No small molecule is available to reliably achieve cures. Meisoindigo is chemically related to the natural product indirubin and showed substantial efficiency in clinical chemotherapy for CML in China. However, its effect on PDAC is still unknown. Our results showed strong anti-proliferation effect of meisoindigo on gemcitabine-resistant PDACs. Using a recently established primary PDAC cell line, called Jopaca-1 with a larger CSCs population as model, we observed a reduction of CD133+ and ESA+/CD44+/CD24+ populations upon treatment and concomitantly a decreased expression of CSC-associated genes, and reduced cellular mobility and sphere formation. Investigating basic cellular metabolic responses, we detected lower oxygen consumption and glucose uptake, while intracellular ROS levels increased. This was effectively neutralized by the addition of antioxidants, indicating an essential role of the cellular redox balance. Further analysis on energy metabolism related signaling revealed that meisoindigo inhibited LKB1, but activated AMPK. Both of them were involved in cellular apoptosis. Additional in situ hybridization in tissue sections of PDAC patients reproducibly demonstrated co-expression and -localization of LKB1 and CD133 in malignant areas. Finally, we detected that CD133+/CD44+ were more vulnerable to meisoindigo, which could be mimicked by LKB1 siRNAs. Our results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that LKB1 sustains the CSC population in PDACs and demonstrate a clear benefit of meisoindigo in treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells. This novel mechanism may provide a promising new treatment option for PDAC. PMID:26887594

  14. Reconstruction of phyletic trees by global alignment of multiple metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last decade, a considerable amount of research has been devoted to investigating the phylogenetic properties of organisms from a systems-level perspective. Most studies have focused on the classification of organisms based on structural comparison and local alignment of metabolic pathways. In contrast, global alignment of multiple metabolic networks complements sequence-based phylogenetic analyses and provides more comprehensive information. Results We explored the phylogenetic relationships between microorganisms through global alignment of multiple metabolic networks. The proposed approach integrates sequence homology data with topological information of metabolic networks. In general, compared to recent studies, the resulting trees reflect the living style of organisms as well as classical taxa. Moreover, for phylogenetically closely related organisms, the classification results are consistent with specific metabolic characteristics, such as the light-harvesting systems, fermentation types, and sources of electrons in photosynthesis. Conclusions We demonstrate the usefulness of global alignment of multiple metabolic networks to infer phylogenetic relationships between species. In addition, our exhaustive analysis of microbial metabolic pathways reveals differences in metabolic features between phylogenetically closely related organisms. With the ongoing increase in the number of genomic sequences and metabolic annotations, the proposed approach will help identify phenotypic variations that may not be apparent based solely on sequence-based classification. PMID:23368411

  15. Systems level analysis of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii metabolic network reveals variability in evolutionary co-conservation.

    PubMed

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Ghamsari, Lila; Dohai, Bushra; Ng, Patrick; Khraiwesh, Basel; Jaiswal, Ashish; Jijakli, Kenan; Koussa, Joseph; Nelson, David R; Cai, Hong; Yang, Xinping; Chang, Roger L; Papin, Jason; Yu, Haiyuan; Balaji, Santhanam; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2016-07-19

    Metabolic networks, which are mathematical representations of organismal metabolism, are reconstructed to provide computational platforms to guide metabolic engineering experiments and explore fundamental questions on metabolism. Systems level analyses, such as interrogation of phylogenetic relationships within the network, can provide further guidance on the modification of metabolic circuitries. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a biofuel relevant green alga that has retained key genes with plant, animal, and protist affinities, serves as an ideal model organism to investigate the interplay between gene function and phylogenetic affinities at multiple organizational levels. Here, using detailed topological and functional analyses, coupled with transcriptomics studies on a metabolic network that we have reconstructed for C. reinhardtii, we show that network connectivity has a significant concordance with the co-conservation of genes; however, a distinction between topological and functional relationships is observable within the network. Dynamic and static modes of co-conservation were defined and observed in a subset of gene-pairs across the network topologically. In contrast, genes with predicted synthetic interactions, or genes involved in coupled reactions, show significant enrichment for both shorter and longer phylogenetic distances. Based on our results, we propose that the metabolic network of C. reinhardtii is assembled with an architecture to minimize phylogenetic profile distances topologically, while it includes an expansion of such distances for functionally interacting genes. This arrangement may increase the robustness of C. reinhardtii's network in dealing with varied environmental challenges that the species may face. The defined evolutionary constraints within the network, which identify important pairings of genes in metabolism, may offer guidance on synthetic biology approaches to optimize the production of desirable metabolites. PMID:27357594

  16. Systems level analysis of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii metabolic network reveals variability in evolutionary co-conservation.

    PubMed

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Ghamsari, Lila; Dohai, Bushra; Ng, Patrick; Khraiwesh, Basel; Jaiswal, Ashish; Jijakli, Kenan; Koussa, Joseph; Nelson, David R; Cai, Hong; Yang, Xinping; Chang, Roger L; Papin, Jason; Yu, Haiyuan; Balaji, Santhanam; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2016-07-19

    Metabolic networks, which are mathematical representations of organismal metabolism, are reconstructed to provide computational platforms to guide metabolic engineering experiments and explore fundamental questions on metabolism. Systems level analyses, such as interrogation of phylogenetic relationships within the network, can provide further guidance on the modification of metabolic circuitries. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a biofuel relevant green alga that has retained key genes with plant, animal, and protist affinities, serves as an ideal model organism to investigate the interplay between gene function and phylogenetic affinities at multiple organizational levels. Here, using detailed topological and functional analyses, coupled with transcriptomics studies on a metabolic network that we have reconstructed for C. reinhardtii, we show that network connectivity has a significant concordance with the co-conservation of genes; however, a distinction between topological and functional relationships is observable within the network. Dynamic and static modes of co-conservation were defined and observed in a subset of gene-pairs across the network topologically. In contrast, genes with predicted synthetic interactions, or genes involved in coupled reactions, show significant enrichment for both shorter and longer phylogenetic distances. Based on our results, we propose that the metabolic network of C. reinhardtii is assembled with an architecture to minimize phylogenetic profile distances topologically, while it includes an expansion of such distances for functionally interacting genes. This arrangement may increase the robustness of C. reinhardtii's network in dealing with varied environmental challenges that the species may face. The defined evolutionary constraints within the network, which identify important pairings of genes in metabolism, may offer guidance on synthetic biology approaches to optimize the production of desirable metabolites.

  17. Metabolic Network Discovery by Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches and Paths for Reconciliation

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Tunahan; Khatibipour, Mohammad Jafar

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus in the network-centric analysis of cellular metabolism by systems biology approaches is to identify the active metabolic network for the condition of interest. Two major approaches are available for the discovery of the condition-specific metabolic networks. One approach starts from genome-scale metabolic networks, which cover all possible reactions known to occur in the related organism in a condition-independent manner, and applies methods such as the optimization-based Flux-Balance Analysis to elucidate the active network. The other approach starts from the condition-specific metabolome data, and processes the data with statistical or optimization-based methods to extract information content of the data such that the active network is inferred. These approaches, termed bottom-up and top-down, respectively, are currently employed independently. However, considering that both approaches have the same goal, they can both benefit from each other paving the way for the novel integrative analysis methods of metabolome data- and flux-analysis approaches in the post-genomic era. This study reviews the strengths of constraint-based analysis and network inference methods reported in the metabolic systems biology field; then elaborates on the potential paths to reconcile the two approaches to shed better light on how the metabolism functions. PMID:25520953

  18. Using the reconstructed genome-scale human metabolic network to study physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism plays a key role in many major human diseases. Generation of high-throughput omics data has ushered in a new era of systems biology. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions provide a platform to interpret omics data in a biochemically meaningful manner. The release of the global human metabolic network, Recon 1, in 2007 has enabled new systems biology approaches to study human physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. There are currently over 20 publications that utilize Recon 1, including studies of cancer, diabetes, host-pathogen interactions, heritable metabolic disorders, and off-target drug binding effects. In this mini-review, we focus on the reconstruction of the global human metabolic network and four classes of its application. We show that computational simulations for numerous pathologies have yielded clinically relevant results, many corroborated by existing or newly generated experimental data. PMID:22142339

  19. Metabolic design based on a coupled gene expression-metabolic network model of tryptophan production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Joachim W; Mauch, Klaus; Reuss, Matthias; Gilles, Ernst D; Kremling, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    The presumably high potential of a holistic design approach for complex biochemical reaction networks is exemplified here for the network of tryptophan biosynthesis from glucose, a system whose components have been investigated thoroughly before. A dynamic model that combines the behavior of the trp operon gene expression with the metabolic network of central carbon metabolism and tryptophan biosynthesis is investigated. This model is analyzed in terms of metabolic fluxes, metabolic control, and nonlinear optimization. We compare two models for a wild-type strain and another model for a tryptophan producer. An integrated optimization of the whole network leads to a significant increase in tryptophan production rate for all systems under study. This enhancement is well above the increase that can be achieved by an optimization of subsystems. A constant ratio of control coefficients on tryptophan synthesis rate has been identified for the models regarding or disregarding trp operon expression. Although we found some examples where flux control coefficients even contradict the trends of enzyme activity changes in an optimized profile, flux control can be used as an indication for enzymes that have to be taken into account in optimization. PMID:15491865

  20. A genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and its application to photorespiratory metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huili; Cheung, C Y Maurice; Poolman, Mark G; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2016-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) has been studied extensively due to its high economic value in the market, and high content in health-promoting antioxidant compounds. Tomato is also considered as an excellent model organism for studying the development and metabolism of fleshy fruits. However, the growth, yield and fruit quality of tomatoes can be affected by drought stress, a common abiotic stress for tomato. To investigate the potential metabolic response of tomato plants to drought, we reconstructed iHY3410, a genome-scale metabolic model of tomato leaf, and used this metabolic network to simulate tomato leaf metabolism. The resulting model includes 3410 genes and 2143 biochemical and transport reactions distributed across five intracellular organelles including cytosol, plastid, mitochondrion, peroxisome and vacuole. The model successfully described the known metabolic behaviour of tomato leaf under heterotrophic and phototrophic conditions. The in silico investigation of the metabolic characteristics for photorespiration and other relevant metabolic processes under drought stress suggested that: (i) the flux distributions through the mevalonate (MVA) pathway under drought were distinct from that under normal conditions; and (ii) the changes in fluxes through core metabolic pathways with varying flux ratio of RubisCO carboxylase to oxygenase may contribute to the adaptive stress response of plants. In addition, we improved on previous studies of reaction essentiality analysis for leaf metabolism by including potential alternative routes for compensating reaction knockouts. Altogether, the genome-scale model provides a sound framework for investigating tomato metabolism and gives valuable insights into the functional consequences of abiotic stresses.

  1. Phenotypic constraints promote latent versatility and carbon efficiency in metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardoscia, Marco; Marsili, Matteo; Samal, Areejit

    2015-07-01

    System-level properties of metabolic networks may be the direct product of natural selection or arise as a by-product of selection on other properties. Here we study the effect of direct selective pressure for growth or viability in particular environments on two properties of metabolic networks: latent versatility to function in additional environments and carbon usage efficiency. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling based on flux balance analysis (FBA), we sample from a known biochemical universe random viable metabolic networks that differ in the number of directly constrained environments. We find that the latent versatility of sampled metabolic networks increases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. We then show that the average carbon wastage of sampled metabolic networks across the constrained environments decreases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. Our work expands the growing body of evidence about nonadaptive origins of key functional properties of biological networks.

  2. Phenotypic constraints promote latent versatility and carbon efficiency in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Bardoscia, Marco; Marsili, Matteo; Samal, Areejit

    2015-07-01

    System-level properties of metabolic networks may be the direct product of natural selection or arise as a by-product of selection on other properties. Here we study the effect of direct selective pressure for growth or viability in particular environments on two properties of metabolic networks: latent versatility to function in additional environments and carbon usage efficiency. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling based on flux balance analysis (FBA), we sample from a known biochemical universe random viable metabolic networks that differ in the number of directly constrained environments. We find that the latent versatility of sampled metabolic networks increases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. We then show that the average carbon wastage of sampled metabolic networks across the constrained environments decreases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. Our work expands the growing body of evidence about nonadaptive origins of key functional properties of biological networks. PMID:26274227

  3. Phenotypic constraints promote latent versatility and carbon efficiency in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Bardoscia, Marco; Marsili, Matteo; Samal, Areejit

    2015-07-01

    System-level properties of metabolic networks may be the direct product of natural selection or arise as a by-product of selection on other properties. Here we study the effect of direct selective pressure for growth or viability in particular environments on two properties of metabolic networks: latent versatility to function in additional environments and carbon usage efficiency. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling based on flux balance analysis (FBA), we sample from a known biochemical universe random viable metabolic networks that differ in the number of directly constrained environments. We find that the latent versatility of sampled metabolic networks increases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. We then show that the average carbon wastage of sampled metabolic networks across the constrained environments decreases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. Our work expands the growing body of evidence about nonadaptive origins of key functional properties of biological networks.

  4. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  5. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  6. Genome-scale analysis of the metabolic networks of oleaginous Zygomycete fungi.

    PubMed

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Ruenwai, Rawisara; Tang, Xin; Hu, Xinjie; Zhang, Hao; Shen, Bairong; Song, Yuanda; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2013-05-25

    Microbial lipids are becoming an attractive option for the industrial production of foods and oleochemicals. To investigate the lipid physiology of the oleaginous microorganisms, at the system level, genome-scale metabolic networks of Mortierella alpina and Mucor circinelloides were constructed using bioinformatics and systems biology. As scaffolds for integrated data analysis focusing on lipid production, consensus metabolic routes governing fatty acid synthesis, and lipid storage and mobilisation were identified by comparative analysis of developed metabolic networks. Unique metabolic features were identified in individual fungi, particularly in NADPH metabolism and sterol biosynthesis, which might be related to differences in fungal lipid phenotypes. The frameworks detailing the metabolic relationship between M. alpina and M. circinelloides generated in this study is useful for further elucidation of the microbial oleaginicity, which might lead to the production improvement of microbial oils as alternative feedstocks for oleochemical industry.

  7. Integrated analysis of transcript-level regulation of metabolism reveals disease-relevant nodes of the human metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Berninger, Philipp; Lin, Jake; Sauter, Thomas; Heinäniemi, Merja

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic diseases and comorbidities represent an ever-growing epidemic where multiple cell types impact tissue homeostasis. Here, the link between the metabolic and gene regulatory networks was studied through experimental and computational analysis. Integrating gene regulation data with a human metabolic network prompted the establishment of an open-sourced web portal, IDARE (Integrated Data Nodes of Regulation), for visualizing various gene-related data in context of metabolic pathways. Motivated by increasing availability of deep sequencing studies, we obtained ChIP-seq data from widely studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that association of metabolic genes with multiple transcription factors (TFs) enriched disease-associated genes. To demonstrate further extensions enabled by examining these networks together, constraint-based modeling was applied to data from human preadipocyte differentiation. In parallel, data on gene expression, genome-wide ChIP-seq profiles for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP) α, liver X receptor (LXR) and H3K4me3 and microRNA target identification for miR-27a, miR-29a and miR-222 were collected. Disease-relevant key nodes, including mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), were exposed from metabolic pathways predicted to change activity by focusing on association with multiple regulators. In both cell types, our analysis reveals the convergence of microRNAs and TFs within the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway, possibly providing an explanation for its downregulation in obese and diabetic conditions.

  8. Metabolic network reconstruction, growth characterization and 13C-metabolic flux analysis of the extremophile Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Aditi; Lu, Jing; DeWoody, Kathleen C; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-07-01

    Thermus thermophilus is an extremely thermophilic bacterium with significant biotechnological potential. In this work, we have characterized aerobic growth characteristics of T. thermophilus HB8 at temperatures between 50 and 85°C, constructed a metabolic network model of its central carbon metabolism and validated the model using (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). First, cells were grown in batch cultures in custom constructed mini-bioreactors at different temperatures to determine optimal growth conditions. The optimal temperature for T. thermophilus grown on defined medium with glucose was 81°C. The maximum growth rate was 0.25h(-1). Between 50 and 81°C the growth rate increased by 7-fold and the temperature dependence was described well by an Arrhenius model with an activation energy of 47kJ/mol. Next, we performed a (13)C-labeling experiment with [1,2-(13)C] glucose as the tracer and calculated intracellular metabolic fluxes using (13)C-MFA. The results provided support for the constructed network model and highlighted several interesting characteristics of T. thermophilus metabolism. We found that T. thermophilus largely uses glycolysis and TCA cycle to produce biosynthetic precursors, ATP and reducing equivalents needed for cells growth. Consistent with its proposed metabolic network model, we did not detect any oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux or Entner-Doudoroff pathway activity. The biomass precursors erythrose-4-phosphate and ribose-5-phosphate were produced via the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and largely via transketolase, with little contribution from transaldolase. The high biomass yield on glucose that was measured experimentally was also confirmed independently by (13)C-MFA. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of T. thermophilus and its metabolic engineering applications.

  9. Integrated analysis of transcript-level regulation of metabolism reveals disease-relevant nodes of the human metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Berninger, Philipp; Lin, Jake; Sauter, Thomas; Heinäniemi, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases and comorbidities represent an ever-growing epidemic where multiple cell types impact tissue homeostasis. Here, the link between the metabolic and gene regulatory networks was studied through experimental and computational analysis. Integrating gene regulation data with a human metabolic network prompted the establishment of an open-sourced web portal, IDARE (Integrated Data Nodes of Regulation), for visualizing various gene-related data in context of metabolic pathways. Motivated by increasing availability of deep sequencing studies, we obtained ChIP-seq data from widely studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that association of metabolic genes with multiple transcription factors (TFs) enriched disease-associated genes. To demonstrate further extensions enabled by examining these networks together, constraint-based modeling was applied to data from human preadipocyte differentiation. In parallel, data on gene expression, genome-wide ChIP-seq profiles for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP) α, liver X receptor (LXR) and H3K4me3 and microRNA target identification for miR-27a, miR-29a and miR-222 were collected. Disease-relevant key nodes, including mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), were exposed from metabolic pathways predicted to change activity by focusing on association with multiple regulators. In both cell types, our analysis reveals the convergence of microRNAs and TFs within the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway, possibly providing an explanation for its downregulation in obese and diabetic conditions. PMID:24198249

  10. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  11. Reconstruction and Use of Microbial Metabolic Networks: the Core Escherichia coli Metabolic Model as an Educational Guide.

    PubMed

    Orth, Jeffrey D; Fleming, R M T; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-09-01

    Biochemical network reconstructions have become popular tools in systems biology. Metabolicnetwork reconstructions are biochemically, genetically, and genomically (BiGG) structured databases of biochemical reactions and metabolites. They contain information such as exact reaction stoichiometry, reaction reversibility, and the relationships between genes, proteins, and reactions. Network reconstructions have been used extensively to study the phenotypic behavior of wild-type and mutant stains under a variety of conditions, linking genotypes with phenotypes. Such phenotypic simulations have allowed for the prediction of growth after genetic manipulations, prediction of growth phenotypes after adaptive evolution, and prediction of essential genes. Additionally, because network reconstructions are organism specific, they can be used to understand differences between organisms of species in a functional context.There are different types of reconstructions representing various types of biological networks (metabolic, regulatory, transcription/translation). This chapter serves as an introduction to metabolic and regulatory network reconstructions and models and gives a complete description of the core Escherichia coli metabolic model. This model can be analyzed in any computational format (such as MATLAB or Mathematica) based on the information given in this chapter. The core E. coli model is a small-scale model that can be used for educational purposes. It is meant to be used by senior undergraduate and first-year graduate students learning about constraint-based modeling and systems biology. This model has enough reactions and pathways to enable interesting and insightful calculations, but it is also simple enough that the results of such calculations can be understoodeasily.

  12. Preferential Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Derrick A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophical rationale for preferential affirmative action presented by Daniel C. Maguire in "A New American Justice." Maintains that self-interest bars present society's acceptance of Maguire's theories of justice, as demonstrated in negative reactions to the Harvard Law Review's affirmative action plan. (MJL)

  13. Against Preferential Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekes, John

    1997-01-01

    Argues that preferential treatment of women and minorities in the selection of college faculty elevates a form of corruption to standard administrative practice by including people in academic life on the basis of characteristics irrelevant to teaching and research; and previous unjust treatment is inadequate justification for preferential…

  14. Towards kinetic modeling of genome-scale metabolic networks without sacrificing stoichiometric, thermodynamic and physiological constraints.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Miskovic, Ljubisa; Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-09-01

    Mathematical modeling is an essential tool for the comprehensive understanding of cell metabolism and its interactions with the environmental and process conditions. Recent developments in the construction and analysis of stoichiometric models made it possible to define limits on steady-state metabolic behavior using flux balance analysis. However, detailed information on enzyme kinetics and enzyme regulation is needed to formulate kinetic models that can accurately capture the dynamic metabolic responses. The use of mechanistic enzyme kinetics is a difficult task due to uncertainty in the kinetic properties of enzymes. Therefore, the majority of recent works considered only mass action kinetics for reactions in metabolic networks. Herein, we applied the optimization and risk analysis of complex living entities (ORACLE) framework and constructed a large-scale mechanistic kinetic model of optimally grown Escherichia coli. We investigated the complex interplay between stoichiometry, thermodynamics, and kinetics in determining the flexibility and capabilities of metabolism. Our results indicate that enzyme saturation is a necessary consideration in modeling metabolic networks and it extends the feasible ranges of metabolic fluxes and metabolite concentrations. Our results further suggest that enzymes in metabolic networks have evolved to function at different saturation states to ensure greater flexibility and robustness of cellular metabolism.

  15. The AT-hook motif-encoding gene METABOLIC NETWORK MODULATOR 1 underlies natural variation in Arabidopsis primary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baohua; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of primary metabolism is a central mechanism by which plants coordinate their various responses to biotic and abiotic challenge. To identify genes responsible for natural variation in primary metabolism, we focused on cloning a locus from Arabidopsis thaliana that influences the level of TCA cycle metabolites in planta. We found that the Met.V.67 locus was controlled by natural variation in METABOLIC NETWORK MODULATOR 1 (MNM1), which encoded an AT-hook motif-containing protein that was unique to the Brassicales lineage. MNM1 had wide ranging effects on plant metabolism and displayed a tissue expression pattern that was suggestive of a function in sink tissues. Natural variation within MNM1 had differential effects during a diurnal time course, and this temporal dependency was supported by analysis of T-DNA insertion and over-expression lines for MNM1. Thus, the cloning of a natural variation locus specifically associated with primary metabolism allowed us to identify MNM1 as a lineage-specific modulator of primary metabolism, suggesting that the regulation of primary metabolism can change during evolution. PMID:25202318

  16. Combining Flux Balance and Energy Balance Analysis for Large-Scale Metabolic Network: Biochemical Circuit Theory for Analysis of Large-Scale Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Daniel A.; Liang, Shou-Dan; Qian, Hong; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Predicting behavior of large-scale biochemical metabolic networks represents one of the greatest challenges of bioinformatics and computational biology. Approaches, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), that account for the known stoichiometry of the reaction network while avoiding implementation of detailed reaction kinetics are perhaps the most promising tools for the analysis of large complex networks. As a step towards building a complete theory of biochemical circuit analysis, we introduce energy balance analysis (EBA), which compliments the FBA approach by introducing fundamental constraints based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Fluxes obtained with EBA are thermodynamically feasible and provide valuable insight into the activation and suppression of biochemical pathways.

  17. Dead End Metabolites - Defining the Known Unknowns of the E. coli Metabolic Network

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Amanda; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Nolan, Laura; Karp, Peter D.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    The EcoCyc database is an online scientific database which provides an integrated view of the metabolic and regulatory network of the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 and facilitates computational exploration of this important model organism. We have analysed the occurrence of dead end metabolites within the database – these are metabolites which lack the requisite reactions (either metabolic or transport) that would account for their production or consumption within the metabolic network. 127 dead end metabolites were identified from the 995 compounds that are contained within the EcoCyc metabolic network. Their presence reflects either a deficit in our representation of the network or in our knowledge of E. coli metabolism. Extensive literature searches resulted in the addition of 38 transport reactions and 3 metabolic reactions to the database and led to an improved representation of the pathway for Vitamin B12 salvage. 39 dead end metabolites were identified as components of reactions that are not physiologically relevant to E. coli K-12 – these reactions are properties of purified enzymes in vitro that would not be expected to occur in vivo. Our analysis led to improvements in the software that underpins the database and to the program that finds dead end metabolites within EcoCyc. The remaining dead end metabolites in the EcoCyc database likely represent deficiencies in our knowledge of E. coli metabolism. PMID:24086468

  18. Inference of Network Dynamics and Metabolic Interactions in the Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Thomas P.; Papin, Jason A.; Albert, Reka

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel methodology to construct a Boolean dynamic model from time series metagenomic information and integrate this modeling with genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions to identify metabolic underpinnings for microbial interactions. We apply this in the context of a critical health issue: clindamycin antibiotic treatment and opportunistic Clostridium difficile infection. Our model recapitulates known dynamics of clindamycin antibiotic treatment and C. difficile infection and predicts therapeutic probiotic interventions to suppress C. difficile infection. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions reveal metabolic differences between community members and are used to explore the role of metabolism in the observed microbial interactions. In vitro experimental data validate a key result of our computational model, that B. intestinihominis can in fact slow C. difficile growth. PMID:26102287

  19. Bidirectionality and compartmentation of metabolic fluxes are revealed in the dynamics of isotopomer networks.

    PubMed

    Schryer, David W; Peterson, Pearu; Paalme, Toomas; Vendelin, Marko

    2009-04-01

    Isotope labeling is one of the few methods of revealing the in vivo bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes within metabolic networks. We argue that a shift from steady state to dynamic isotopomer analysis is required to deal with these cellular complexities and provide a review of dynamic studies of compartmentalized energy fluxes in eukaryotic cells including cardiac muscle, plants, and astrocytes. Knowledge of complex metabolic behaviour on a molecular level is prerequisite for the intelligent design of genetically modified organisms able to realize their potential of revolutionizing food, energy, and pharmaceutical production. We describe techniques to explore the bidirectionality and compartmentalization of metabolic fluxes using information contained in the isotopic transient, and discuss the integration of kinetic models with MFA. The flux parameters of an example metabolic network were optimized to examine the compartmentalization of metabolites and and the bidirectionality of fluxes in the TCA cycle of Saccharomyces uvarum for steady-state respiratory growth. PMID:19468334

  20. Inference of Network Dynamics and Metabolic Interactions in the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Steinway, Steven N; Biggs, Matthew B; Loughran, Thomas P; Papin, Jason A; Albert, Reka

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel methodology to construct a Boolean dynamic model from time series metagenomic information and integrate this modeling with genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions to identify metabolic underpinnings for microbial interactions. We apply this in the context of a critical health issue: clindamycin antibiotic treatment and opportunistic Clostridium difficile infection. Our model recapitulates known dynamics of clindamycin antibiotic treatment and C. difficile infection and predicts therapeutic probiotic interventions to suppress C. difficile infection. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions reveal metabolic differences between community members and are used to explore the role of metabolism in the observed microbial interactions. In vitro experimental data validate a key result of our computational model, that B. intestinihominis can in fact slow C. difficile growth.

  1. New approach for phylogenetic tree recovery based on genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Gamermann, Daniel; Montagud, Arnaud; Conejero, J Alberto; Urchueguía, Javier F; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2014-07-01

    A wide range of applications and research has been done with genome-scale metabolic models. In this work, we describe an innovative methodology for comparing metabolic networks constructed from genome-scale metabolic models and how to apply this comparison in order to infer evolutionary distances between different organisms. Our methodology allows a quantification of the metabolic differences between different species from a broad range of families and even kingdoms. This quantification is then applied in order to reconstruct phylogenetic trees for sets of various organisms.

  2. RELATCH: relative optimality in metabolic networks explains robust metabolic and regulatory responses to perturbations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Predicting cellular responses to perturbations is an important task in systems biology. We report a new approach, RELATCH, which uses flux and gene expression data from a reference state to predict metabolic responses in a genetically or environmentally perturbed state. Using the concept of relative optimality, which considers relative flux changes from a reference state, we hypothesize a relative metabolic flux pattern is maintained from one state to another, and that cells adapt to perturbations using metabolic and regulatory reprogramming to preserve this relative flux pattern. This constraint-based approach will have broad utility where predictions of metabolic responses are needed. PMID:23013597

  3. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A.; Hoch, Martin M.

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  4. Efficient Reconstruction of Predictive Consensus Metabolic Network Models.

    PubMed

    van Heck, Ruben G A; Ganter, Mathias; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P; Stelling, Joerg

    2016-08-01

    Understanding cellular function requires accurate, comprehensive representations of metabolism. Genome-scale, constraint-based metabolic models (GSMs) provide such representations, but their usability is often hampered by inconsistencies at various levels, in particular for concurrent models. COMMGEN, our tool for COnsensus Metabolic Model GENeration, automatically identifies inconsistencies between concurrent models and semi-automatically resolves them, thereby contributing to consolidate knowledge of metabolic function. Tests of COMMGEN for four organisms showed that automatically generated consensus models were predictive and that they substantially increased coherence of knowledge representation. COMMGEN ought to be particularly useful for complex scenarios in which manual curation does not scale, such as for eukaryotic organisms, microbial communities, and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27563720

  5. Efficient Reconstruction of Predictive Consensus Metabolic Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Stelling, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular function requires accurate, comprehensive representations of metabolism. Genome-scale, constraint-based metabolic models (GSMs) provide such representations, but their usability is often hampered by inconsistencies at various levels, in particular for concurrent models. COMMGEN, our tool for COnsensus Metabolic Model GENeration, automatically identifies inconsistencies between concurrent models and semi-automatically resolves them, thereby contributing to consolidate knowledge of metabolic function. Tests of COMMGEN for four organisms showed that automatically generated consensus models were predictive and that they substantially increased coherence of knowledge representation. COMMGEN ought to be particularly useful for complex scenarios in which manual curation does not scale, such as for eukaryotic organisms, microbial communities, and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27563720

  6. Reconstruction of Tissue-Specific Metabolic Networks Using CORDA

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, André; Qutub, Amina A.

    2016-01-01

    Human metabolism involves thousands of reactions and metabolites. To interpret this complexity, computational modeling becomes an essential experimental tool. One of the most popular techniques to study human metabolism as a whole is genome scale modeling. A key challenge to applying genome scale modeling is identifying critical metabolic reactions across diverse human tissues. Here we introduce a novel algorithm called Cost Optimization Reaction Dependency Assessment (CORDA) to build genome scale models in a tissue-specific manner. CORDA performs more efficiently computationally, shows better agreement to experimental data, and displays better model functionality and capacity when compared to previous algorithms. CORDA also returns reaction associations that can greatly assist in any manual curation to be performed following the automated reconstruction process. Using CORDA, we developed a library of 76 healthy and 20 cancer tissue-specific reconstructions. These reconstructions identified which metabolic pathways are shared across diverse human tissues. Moreover, we identified changes in reactions and pathways that are differentially included and present different capacity profiles in cancer compared to healthy tissues, including up-regulation of folate metabolism, the down-regulation of thiamine metabolism, and tight regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26942765

  7. Reconstruction of Tissue-Specific Metabolic Networks Using CORDA.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Qutub, Amina A

    2016-03-01

    Human metabolism involves thousands of reactions and metabolites. To interpret this complexity, computational modeling becomes an essential experimental tool. One of the most popular techniques to study human metabolism as a whole is genome scale modeling. A key challenge to applying genome scale modeling is identifying critical metabolic reactions across diverse human tissues. Here we introduce a novel algorithm called Cost Optimization Reaction Dependency Assessment (CORDA) to build genome scale models in a tissue-specific manner. CORDA performs more efficiently computationally, shows better agreement to experimental data, and displays better model functionality and capacity when compared to previous algorithms. CORDA also returns reaction associations that can greatly assist in any manual curation to be performed following the automated reconstruction process. Using CORDA, we developed a library of 76 healthy and 20 cancer tissue-specific reconstructions. These reconstructions identified which metabolic pathways are shared across diverse human tissues. Moreover, we identified changes in reactions and pathways that are differentially included and present different capacity profiles in cancer compared to healthy tissues, including up-regulation of folate metabolism, the down-regulation of thiamine metabolism, and tight regulation of oxidative phosphorylation.

  8. A U-system approach for predicting metabolic behaviors and responses based on an alleged metabolic reaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Progress in systems biology offers sophisticated approaches toward a comprehensive understanding of biological systems. Yet, computational analyses are held back due to difficulties in determining suitable model parameter values from experimental data which naturally are subject to biological fluctuations. The data may also be corrupted by experimental uncertainties and sometimes do not contain all information regarding variables that cannot be measured for technical reasons. Results We show here a streamlined approach for the construction of a coarse model that allows us to set up dynamic models with minimal input information. The approach uses a hybrid between a pure mass action system and a generalized mass action (GMA) system in the framework of biochemical systems theory (BST) with rate constants of 1, normal kinetic orders of 1, and -0.5 and 0.5 for inhibitory and activating effects, named Unity (U)-system. The U-system model does not necessarily fit all data well but is often sufficient for predicting metabolic behavior of metabolites which cannot be simultaneously measured, identifying inconsistencies between experimental data and the assumed underlying pathway structure, as well as predicting system responses to a modification of gene or enzyme. The U-system approach was validated with small, generic systems and implemented to model a large-scale metabolic reaction network of a higher plant, Arabidopsis. The dynamic behaviors obtained by predictive simulations agreed with actually available metabolomic time-series data, identified probable errors in the experimental datasets, and estimated probable behavior of unmeasurable metabolites in a qualitative manner. The model could also predict metabolic responses of Arabidopsis with altered network structures due to genetic modification. Conclusions The U-system approach can effectively predict metabolic behaviors and responses based on structures of an alleged metabolic reaction network. Thus, it can

  9. Theoretical Basis for Dynamic Label Propagation in Stationary Metabolic Networks under Step and Periodic Inputs.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of label propagation in a stationary metabolic network during an isotope labeling experiment can provide highly valuable information on the network topology, metabolic fluxes, and on the size of metabolite pools. However, major issues, both in the experimental set-up and in the accompanying numerical methods currently limit the application of this approach. Here, we propose a method to apply novel types of label inputs, sinusoidal or more generally periodic label inputs, to address both the practical and numerical challenges of dynamic labeling experiments. By considering a simple metabolic system, i.e. a linear, non-reversible pathway of arbitrary length, we develop mathematical descriptions of label propagation for both classical and novel label inputs. Theoretical developments and computer simulations show that the application of rectangular periodic pulses has both numerical and practical advantages over other approaches. We applied the strategy to estimate fluxes in a simulated experiment performed on a complex metabolic network (the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli), to further demonstrate its value in conditions which are close to those in real experiments. This study provides a theoretical basis for the rational interpretation of label propagation curves in real experiments, and will help identify the strengths, pitfalls and limitations of such experiments. The cases described here can also be used as test cases for more general numerical methods aimed at identifying network topology, analyzing metabolic fluxes or measuring concentrations of metabolites.

  10. Theoretical Basis for Dynamic Label Propagation in Stationary Metabolic Networks under Step and Periodic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of label propagation in a stationary metabolic network during an isotope labeling experiment can provide highly valuable information on the network topology, metabolic fluxes, and on the size of metabolite pools. However, major issues, both in the experimental set-up and in the accompanying numerical methods currently limit the application of this approach. Here, we propose a method to apply novel types of label inputs, sinusoidal or more generally periodic label inputs, to address both the practical and numerical challenges of dynamic labeling experiments. By considering a simple metabolic system, i.e. a linear, non-reversible pathway of arbitrary length, we develop mathematical descriptions of label propagation for both classical and novel label inputs. Theoretical developments and computer simulations show that the application of rectangular periodic pulses has both numerical and practical advantages over other approaches. We applied the strategy to estimate fluxes in a simulated experiment performed on a complex metabolic network (the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli), to further demonstrate its value in conditions which are close to those in real experiments. This study provides a theoretical basis for the rational interpretation of label propagation curves in real experiments, and will help identify the strengths, pitfalls and limitations of such experiments. The cases described here can also be used as test cases for more general numerical methods aimed at identifying network topology, analyzing metabolic fluxes or measuring concentrations of metabolites. PMID:26641860

  11. Metabolic profiling during peach fruit development and ripening reveals the metabolic networks that underpin each developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Verónica A; Osorio, Sonia; Borsani, Julia; Lauxmann, Martin A; Bustamante, Claudia A; Budde, Claudio O; Andreo, Carlos S; Lara, María V; Fernie, Alisdair R; Drincovich, María F

    2011-12-01

    Fruit from rosaceous species collectively display a great variety of flavors and textures as well as a generally high content of nutritionally beneficial metabolites. However, relatively little analysis of metabolic networks in rosaceous fruit has been reported. Among rosaceous species, peach (Prunus persica) has stone fruits composed of a juicy mesocarp and lignified endocarp. Here, peach mesocarp metabolic networks were studied across development using metabolomics and analysis of key regulatory enzymes. Principal component analysis of peach metabolic composition revealed clear metabolic shifts from early through late development stages and subsequently during postharvest ripening. Early developmental stages were characterized by a substantial decrease in protein abundance and high levels of bioactive polyphenols and amino acids, which are substrates for the phenylpropanoid and lignin pathways during stone hardening. Sucrose levels showed a large increase during development, reflecting translocation from the leaf, while the importance of galactinol and raffinose is also inferred. Our study further suggests that posttranscriptional mechanisms are key for metabolic regulation at early stages. In contrast to early developmental stages, a decrease in amino acid levels is coupled to an induction of transcripts encoding amino acid and organic acid catabolic enzymes during ripening. These data are consistent with the mobilization of amino acids to support respiration. In addition, sucrose cycling, suggested by the parallel increase of transcripts encoding sucrose degradative and synthetic enzymes, appears to operate during postharvest ripening. When taken together, these data highlight singular metabolic programs for peach development and may allow the identification of key factors related to agronomic traits of this important crop species. PMID:22021422

  12. Metabolic profiling during peach fruit development and ripening reveals the metabolic networks that underpin each developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Verónica A; Osorio, Sonia; Borsani, Julia; Lauxmann, Martin A; Bustamante, Claudia A; Budde, Claudio O; Andreo, Carlos S; Lara, María V; Fernie, Alisdair R; Drincovich, María F

    2011-12-01

    Fruit from rosaceous species collectively display a great variety of flavors and textures as well as a generally high content of nutritionally beneficial metabolites. However, relatively little analysis of metabolic networks in rosaceous fruit has been reported. Among rosaceous species, peach (Prunus persica) has stone fruits composed of a juicy mesocarp and lignified endocarp. Here, peach mesocarp metabolic networks were studied across development using metabolomics and analysis of key regulatory enzymes. Principal component analysis of peach metabolic composition revealed clear metabolic shifts from early through late development stages and subsequently during postharvest ripening. Early developmental stages were characterized by a substantial decrease in protein abundance and high levels of bioactive polyphenols and amino acids, which are substrates for the phenylpropanoid and lignin pathways during stone hardening. Sucrose levels showed a large increase during development, reflecting translocation from the leaf, while the importance of galactinol and raffinose is also inferred. Our study further suggests that posttranscriptional mechanisms are key for metabolic regulation at early stages. In contrast to early developmental stages, a decrease in amino acid levels is coupled to an induction of transcripts encoding amino acid and organic acid catabolic enzymes during ripening. These data are consistent with the mobilization of amino acids to support respiration. In addition, sucrose cycling, suggested by the parallel increase of transcripts encoding sucrose degradative and synthetic enzymes, appears to operate during postharvest ripening. When taken together, these data highlight singular metabolic programs for peach development and may allow the identification of key factors related to agronomic traits of this important crop species.

  13. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®. PMID:27014700

  14. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®.

  15. Impact of Stoichiometry Representation on Simulation of Genotype-Phenotype Relationships in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Andrejev, Sergej; Maranas, Costas D.; Patil, Kiran R.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic networks provide a comprehensive structural framework for modeling genotype-phenotype relationships through flux simulations. The solution space for the metabolic flux state of the cell is typically very large and optimization-based approaches are often necessary for predicting the active metabolic state under specific environmental conditions. The objective function to be used in such optimization algorithms is directly linked with the biological hypothesis underlying the model and therefore it is one of the most relevant parameters for successful modeling. Although linear combination of selected fluxes is widely used for formulating metabolic objective functions, we show that the resulting optimization problem is sensitive towards stoichiometry representation of the metabolic network. This undesirable sensitivity leads to different simulation results when using numerically different but biochemically equivalent stoichiometry representations and thereby makes biological interpretation intrinsically subjective and ambiguous. We hereby propose a new method, Minimization of Metabolites Balance (MiMBl), which decouples the artifacts of stoichiometry representation from the formulation of the desired objective functions, by casting objective functions using metabolite turnovers rather than fluxes. By simulating perturbed metabolic networks, we demonstrate that the use of stoichiometry representation independent algorithms is fundamental for unambiguously linking modeling results with biological interpretation. For example, MiMBl allowed us to expand the scope of metabolic modeling in elucidating the mechanistic basis of several genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23133362

  16. Microbial Community Metabolic Modeling: A Community Data-Driven Network Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Henry, Christopher S; Bernstein, Hans C; Weisenhorn, Pamela; Taylor, Ronald C; Lee, Joon-Yong; Zucker, Jeremy; Song, Hyun-Seob

    2016-11-01

    Metabolic network modeling of microbial communities provides an in-depth understanding of community-wide metabolic and regulatory processes. Compared to single organism analyses, community metabolic network modeling is more complex because it needs to account for interspecies interactions. To date, most approaches focus on reconstruction of high-quality individual networks so that, when combined, they can predict community behaviors as a result of interspecies interactions. However, this conventional method becomes ineffective for communities whose members are not well characterized and cannot be experimentally interrogated in isolation. Here, we tested a new approach that uses community-level data as a critical input for the network reconstruction process. This method focuses on directly predicting interspecies metabolic interactions in a community, when axenic information is insufficient. We validated our method through the case study of a bacterial photoautotroph-heterotroph consortium that was used to provide data needed for a community-level metabolic network reconstruction. Resulting simulations provided experimentally validated predictions of how a photoautotrophic cyanobacterium supports the growth of an obligate heterotrophic species by providing organic carbon and nitrogen sources. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2339-2345, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27186840

  17. Electrical and Network Neuronal Properties Are Preferentially Disrupted in Dorsal, But Not Ventral, Medial Entorhinal Cortex in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Clair A.; Ridler, Thomas; Murray, Tracey K.; Ward, Mark A.; de Groot, Emily; Goodfellow, Marc; Phillips, Keith G.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the first areas to be disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. The responsiveness of individual neurons to electrical and environmental stimuli varies along the dorsal–ventral axis of the medial EC (mEC) in a manner that suggests this topographical organization plays a key role in neural encoding of geometric space. We examined the cellular properties of layer II mEC stellate neurons (mEC-SCs) in rTg4510 mice, a rodent model of neurodegeneration. Dorsoventral gradients in certain intrinsic membrane properties, such as membrane capacitance and afterhyperpolarizations, were flattened in rTg4510 mEC-SCs, while other cellular gradients [e.g., input resistance (Ri), action potential properties] remained intact. Specifically, the intrinsic properties of rTg4510 mEC-SCs in dorsal aspects of the mEC were preferentially affected, such that action potential firing patterns in dorsal mEC-SCs were altered, while those in ventral mEC-SCs were unaffected. We also found that neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30–80 Hz) were preferentially disrupted in the dorsal mEC of rTg4510 slices, while those in ventral regions were comparatively preserved. These alterations corresponded to a flattened dorsoventral gradient in theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling of local field potentials recorded from the mEC of freely moving rTg4510 mice. These differences were not paralleled by changes to the dorsoventral gradient in parvalbumin staining or neurodegeneration. We propose that the selective disruption to dorsal mECs, and the resultant flattening of certain dorsoventral gradients, may contribute to disturbances in spatial information processing observed in this model of dementia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) plays a key role in spatial memory and is one of the first areas to express the pathological features of dementia. Neurons of the mEC are

  18. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  19. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  20. Exact quantification of cellular robustness in genome-scale metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Gerstl, Matthias P.; Klamt, Steffen; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Robustness, the ability of biological networks to uphold their functionality in spite of perturbations, is a key characteristic of all living systems. Although several theoretical approaches have been developed to formalize robustness, it still eludes an exact quantification. Here, we present a rigorous and quantitative approach for the structural robustness of metabolic networks by measuring their ability to tolerate random reaction (or gene) knockouts. Results: In analogy to reliability theory, based on an explicit consideration of all possible knockout sets, we exactly quantify the probability of failure for a given network function (e.g. growth). This measure can be computed if the network’s minimal cut sets (MSCs) are known. We show that even in genome-scale metabolic networks the probability of (network) failure can be reliably estimated from MSCs with lowest cardinalities. We demonstrate the applicability of our theory by analyzing the structural robustness of multiple Enterobacteriaceae and Blattibacteriaceae and show a dramatically low structural robustness for the latter. We find that structural robustness develops from the ability to proliferate in multiple growth environments consistent with experimentally found knowledge. Conclusion: The probability of (network) failure provides thus a reliable and easily computable measure of structural robustness and redundancy in (genome-scale) metabolic networks. Availability and implementation: Source code is available under the GNU General Public License at https://github.com/mpgerstl/networkRobustnessToolbox. Contact: juergen.zanghellini@boku.ac.at Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26543173

  1. Study on Incompatibility of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Evidence from Formula Network, Chemical Space, and Metabolism Room

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wu, Hong-Ying; Jin, Jin; Yu, Guang-Yun; He, Xin; Wang, Hao; Shen, Xiu; Zhou, Ze-Wei; Liu, Pei-Xun; Fan, Sai-Jun

    2013-01-01

    A traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula network including 362 TCM formulas was built by using complex network methodologies. The properties of this network were analyzed including network diameter, average distance, clustering coefficient, and average degree. Meanwhile, we built a TCM chemical space and a TCM metabolism room under the theory of chemical space. The properties of chemical space and metabolism room were calculated and analyzed. The properties of the medicine pairs in “eighteen antagonisms and nineteen mutual inhibitors,” an ancient rule for TCM incompatibility, were studied based on the TCM formula network, chemical space, and metabolism room. The results showed that the properties of these incompatible medicine pairs are different from those of the other TCM based on the analysis of the TCM formula network, chemical space, and metabolism room. The lines of evidence derived from our work demonstrated that the ancient rule of TCM incompatibility, “eighteen antagonisms and nineteen mutual inhibitors,” is probably scientifically based. PMID:24369478

  2. Comparative analysis of Salmonella genomes identifies a metabolic network for escalating growth in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-18

    The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. IMPORTANCE While some Salmonella serovars cause infections that remain localized to the gut, others disseminate throughout the body. Here, we compared Salmonella genomes to identify characteristics that distinguish gastrointestinal from extraintestinal pathogens. We identified a large metabolic network that is functional in gastrointestinal pathogens but decaying in extraintestinal pathogens. While taxonomists have used traits from this network empirically for many decades for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars, our findings suggest that it is part of a "business plan" for growth in the inflamed gastrointestinal tract. By identifying a large metabolic network characteristic of Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis, our in silico analysis provides a blueprint for potential strategies to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients and edge out competing gut microbes.

  3. Reconstruction and Analysis of Human Kidney-Specific Metabolic Network Based on Omics Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Di; Dai, Shao-Xing; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the high-throughput data production, recent studies of tissue-specific metabolic networks have largely advanced our understanding of the metabolic basis of various physiological and pathological processes. However, for kidney, which plays an essential role in the body, the available kidney-specific model remains incomplete. This paper reports the reconstruction and characterization of the human kidney metabolic network based on transcriptome and proteome data. In silico simulations revealed that house-keeping genes were more essential than kidney-specific genes in maintaining kidney metabolism. Importantly, a total of 267 potential metabolic biomarkers for kidney-related diseases were successfully explored using this model. Furthermore, we found that the discrepancies in metabolic processes of different tissues are directly corresponding to tissue's functions. Finally, the phenotypes of the differentially expressed genes in diabetic kidney disease were characterized, suggesting that these genes may affect disease development through altering kidney metabolism. Thus, the human kidney-specific model constructed in this study may provide valuable information for the metabolism of kidney and offer excellent insights into complex kidney diseases. PMID:24222897

  4. Regulatory network rewiring for secondary metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana under various conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant secondary metabolites are critical to various biological processes. However, the regulations of these metabolites are complex because of regulatory rewiring or crosstalk. To unveil how regulatory behaviors on secondary metabolism reshape biological processes, we constructed and analyzed a dynamic regulatory network of secondary metabolic pathways in Arabidopsis. Results The dynamic regulatory network was constructed through integrating co-expressed gene pairs and regulatory interactions. Regulatory interactions were either predicted by conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or proved by experiments. We found that integrating two data (co-expression and predicted regulatory interactions) enhanced the number of highly confident regulatory interactions by over 10% compared with using single data. The dynamic changes of regulatory network systematically manifested regulatory rewiring to explain the mechanism of regulation, such as in terpenoids metabolism, the regulatory crosstalk of RAV1 (AT1G13260) and ATHB1 (AT3G01470) on HMG1 (hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, AT1G76490); and regulation of RAV1 on epoxysqualene biosynthesis and sterol biosynthesis. Besides, we investigated regulatory rewiring with expression, network topology and upstream signaling pathways. Regulatory rewiring was revealed by the variability of genes’ expression: pathway genes and transcription factors (TFs) were significantly differentially expressed under different conditions (such as terpenoids biosynthetic genes in tissue experiments and E2F/DP family members in genotype experiments). Both network topology and signaling pathways supported regulatory rewiring. For example, we discovered correlation among the numbers of pathway genes, TFs and network topology: one-gene pathways (such as δ-carotene biosynthesis) were regulated by a fewer TFs, and were not critical to metabolic network because of their low degrees in topology. Upstream signaling pathways of 50

  5. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha Jm

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild.

  6. An efficient graph theory based method to identify every minimal reaction set in a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of cells with minimal metabolic functionality is gaining importance due to their efficiency in producing chemicals and fuels. Existing computational methods to identify minimal reaction sets in metabolic networks are computationally expensive. Further, they identify only one of the several possible minimal reaction sets. Results In this paper, we propose an efficient graph theory based recursive optimization approach to identify all minimal reaction sets. Graph theoretical insights offer systematic methods to not only reduce the number of variables in math programming and increase its computational efficiency, but also provide efficient ways to find multiple optimal solutions. The efficacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated using case studies from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In case study 1, the proposed method identified three minimal reaction sets each containing 38 reactions in Escherichia coli central metabolic network with 77 reactions. Analysis of these three minimal reaction sets revealed that one of them is more suitable for developing minimal metabolism cell compared to other two due to practically achievable internal flux distribution. In case study 2, the proposed method identified 256 minimal reaction sets from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome scale metabolic network with 620 reactions. The proposed method required only 4.5 hours to identify all the 256 minimal reaction sets and has shown a significant reduction (approximately 80%) in the solution time when compared to the existing methods for finding minimal reaction set. Conclusions Identification of all minimal reactions sets in metabolic networks is essential since different minimal reaction sets have different properties that effect the bioprocess development. The proposed method correctly identified all minimal reaction sets in a both the case studies. The proposed method is computationally efficient compared to other methods for finding minimal

  7. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  8. Development and analysis of an in vivo-compatible metabolic network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis confronts a generally hostile and nutrient-poor in vivo host environment. Existing models and analyses of M. tuberculosis metabolic networks are able to reproduce experimentally measured cellular growth rates and identify genes required for growth in a range of different in vitro media. However, these models, under in vitro conditions, do not provide an adequate description of the metabolic processes required by the pathogen to infect and persist in a host. Results To better account for the metabolic activity of M. tuberculosis in the host environment, we developed a set of procedures to systematically modify an existing in vitro metabolic network by enhancing the agreement between calculated and in vivo-measured gene essentiality data. After our modifications, the new in vivo network contained 663 genes, 838 metabolites, and 1,049 reactions and had a significantly increased sensitivity (0.81) in predicted gene essentiality than the in vitro network (0.31). We verified the modifications generated from the purely computational analysis through a review of the literature and found, for example, that, as the analysis suggested, lipids are used as the main source for carbon metabolism and oxygen must be available for the pathogen under in vivo conditions. Moreover, we used the developed in vivo network to predict the effects of double-gene deletions on M. tuberculosis growth in the host environment, explore metabolic adaptations to life in an acidic environment, highlight the importance of different enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid-cycle under different limiting nutrient conditions, investigate the effects of inhibiting multiple reactions, and look at the importance of both aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration during infection. Conclusions The network modifications we implemented suggest a distinctive set of metabolic conditions and requirements faced by M. tuberculosis during host infection compared with

  9. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; DeLisi, Charles; Segrè, Daniel; Hu, Zhenjun

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space), a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT’s unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the “symbiotic layout” of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu. PMID:27081850

  10. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0.

    PubMed

    Granger, Brian R; Chang, Yi-Chien; Wang, Yan; DeLisi, Charles; Segrè, Daniel; Hu, Zhenjun

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space), a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu.

  11. Visualization of Metabolic Interaction Networks in Microbial Communities Using VisANT 5.0.

    PubMed

    Granger, Brian R; Chang, Yi-Chien; Wang, Yan; DeLisi, Charles; Segrè, Daniel; Hu, Zhenjun

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space), a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique metagraph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction network between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu and COMETS at http://comets.bu.edu. PMID:27081850

  12. Towards stable kinetics of large metabolic networks: Nonequilibrium potential function approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Cong; Yuan, Ruo-Shi; Ao, Ping; Xu, Min-Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Mei

    2016-06-01

    While the biochemistry of metabolism in many organisms is well studied, details of the metabolic dynamics are not fully explored yet. Acquiring adequate in vivo kinetic parameters experimentally has always been an obstacle. Unless the parameters of a vast number of enzyme-catalyzed reactions happened to fall into very special ranges, a kinetic model for a large metabolic network would fail to reach a steady state. In this work we show that a stable metabolic network can be systematically established via a biologically motivated regulatory process. The regulation is constructed in terms of a potential landscape description of stochastic and nongradient systems. The constructed process draws enzymatic parameters towards stable metabolism by reducing the change in the Lyapunov function tied to the stochastic fluctuations. Biologically it can be viewed as interplay between the flux balance and the spread of workloads on the network. Our approach allows further constraints such as thermodynamics and optimal efficiency. We choose the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 as a case study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. Growth efficiency on carbon conversion rate versus cell viability and futile cycles is investigated in depth. PMID:27415300

  13. Towards stable kinetics of large metabolic networks: Nonequilibrium potential function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-Cong; Yuan, Ruo-Shi; Ao, Ping; Xu, Min-Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Mei

    2016-06-01

    While the biochemistry of metabolism in many organisms is well studied, details of the metabolic dynamics are not fully explored yet. Acquiring adequate in vivo kinetic parameters experimentally has always been an obstacle. Unless the parameters of a vast number of enzyme-catalyzed reactions happened to fall into very special ranges, a kinetic model for a large metabolic network would fail to reach a steady state. In this work we show that a stable metabolic network can be systematically established via a biologically motivated regulatory process. The regulation is constructed in terms of a potential landscape description of stochastic and nongradient systems. The constructed process draws enzymatic parameters towards stable metabolism by reducing the change in the Lyapunov function tied to the stochastic fluctuations. Biologically it can be viewed as interplay between the flux balance and the spread of workloads on the network. Our approach allows further constraints such as thermodynamics and optimal efficiency. We choose the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 as a case study to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. Growth efficiency on carbon conversion rate versus cell viability and futile cycles is investigated in depth.

  14. An Evidence-Based Review of Related Metabolites and Metabolic Network Research on Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengting; Tang, Liying; Liu, Xin; Fang, Jing; Zhan, Hao; Wu, Hongwei; Yang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, metabolomics analyses have been widely applied to cerebral ischemia research. This paper introduces the latest proceedings of metabolomics research on cerebral ischemia. The main techniques, models, animals, and biomarkers of cerebral ischemia will be discussed. With analysis help from the MBRole website and the KEGG database, the altered metabolites in rat cerebral ischemia were used for metabolic pathway enrichment analyses. Our results identify the main metabolic pathways that are related to cerebral ischemia and further construct a metabolic network. These results will provide useful information for elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia, as well as the discovery of cerebral ischemia biomarkers. PMID:27274780

  15. Systematic Identification of Anti-Fungal Drug Targets by a Metabolic Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaltdorf, Martin; Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K.; Liang, Chunguang; Binder, Jasmin; Dietl, Anna-Maria; Meir, Zohar; Haas, Hubertus; Osherov, Nir; Krappmann, Sven; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    New antimycotic drugs are challenging to find, as potential target proteins may have close human orthologs. We here focus on identifying metabolic targets that are critical for fungal growth and have minimal similarity to targets among human proteins. We compare and combine here: (I) direct metabolic network modeling using elementary mode analysis and flux estimates approximations using expression data, (II) targeting metabolic genes by transcriptome analysis of condition-specific highly expressed enzymes, and (III) analysis of enzyme structure, enzyme interconnectedness (“hubs”), and identification of pathogen-specific enzymes using orthology relations. We have identified 64 targets including metabolic enzymes involved in vitamin synthesis, lipid, and amino acid biosynthesis including 18 targets validated from the literature, two validated and five currently examined in own genetic experiments, and 38 further promising novel target proteins which are non-orthologous to human proteins, involved in metabolism and are highly ranked drug targets from these pipelines. PMID:27379244

  16. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Noise effect in metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng-Yan; Xie, Zheng-Wei; Chen, Tong; Ouyang, Qi

    2009-12-01

    Constraint-based models such as flux balance analysis (FBA) are a powerful tool to study biological metabolic networks. Under the hypothesis that cells operate at an optimal growth rate as the result of evolution and natural selection, this model successfully predicts most cellular behaviours in growth rate. However, the model ignores the fact that cells can change their cellular metabolic states during evolution, leaving optimal metabolic states unstable. Here, we consider all the cellular processes that change metabolic states into a single term 'noise', and assume that cells change metabolic states by randomly walking in feasible solution space. By simulating a state of a cell randomly walking in the constrained solution space of metabolic networks, we found that in a noisy environment cells in optimal states tend to travel away from these points. On considering the competition between the noise effect and the growth effect in cell evolution, we found that there exists a trade-off between these two effects. As a result, the population of the cells contains different cellular metabolic states, and the population growth rate is at suboptimal states.

  17. Identification of candidate network hubs involved in metabolic adjustments of rice under drought stress by integrating transcriptome data and genome-scale metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Kitazumi, Ai; Cheung, C Y Maurice; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Jang, In-Cheol; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have integrated a rice genome-scale metabolic network and the transcriptome of a drought-tolerant rice line, DK151, to identify the major transcriptional regulators involved in metabolic adjustments necessary for adaptation to drought. This was achieved by examining the differential expressions of transcription factors and metabolic genes in leaf, root and young panicle of rice plants subjected to drought stress during tillering, booting and panicle elongation stages. Critical transcription factors such as AP2/ERF, bZIP, MYB and NAC that control the important nodes in the gene regulatory pathway were identified through correlative analysis of the patterns of spatio-temporal expression and cis-element enrichment. We showed that many of the candidate transcription factors involved in metabolic adjustments were previously linked to phenotypic variation for drought tolerance. This approach represents the first attempt to integrate models of transcriptional regulation and metabolic pathways for the identification of candidate regulatory genes for targeted selection in rice breeding. PMID:26566840

  18. MicroRNAs and oncogenic transcriptional regulatory networks controlling metabolic reprogramming in cancers.

    PubMed

    Pinweha, Pannapa; Rattanapornsompong, Khanti; Charoensawan, Varodom; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a fundamental adaptation of cancer during rapid proliferation as a result of growth factor overstimulation. We review different pathways involving metabolic alterations in cancers including aerobic glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, de novo fatty acid synthesis, and serine and glycine metabolism. Although oncoproteins, c-MYC, HIF1α and p53 are the major drivers of this metabolic reprogramming, post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs (miR) also plays an important role in finely adjusting the requirement of the key metabolic enzymes underlying this metabolic reprogramming. We also combine the literature data on the miRNAs that potentially regulate 40 metabolic enzymes responsible for metabolic reprogramming in cancers, with additional miRs from computational prediction. Our analyses show that: (1) a metabolic enzyme is frequently regulated by multiple miRs, (2) confidence scores from prediction algorithms might be useful to help narrow down functional miR-mRNA interaction, which might be worth further experimental validation. By combining known and predicted interactions of oncogenic transcription factors (TFs) (c-MYC, HIF1α and p53), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), 40 metabolic enzymes, and regulatory miRs we have established one of the first reference maps for miRs and oncogenic TFs that regulate metabolic reprogramming in cancers. The combined network shows that glycolytic enzymes are linked to miRs via p53, c-MYC, HIF1α, whereas the genes in serine, glycine and one carbon metabolism are regulated via the c-MYC, as well as other regulatory organization that cannot be observed by investigating individual miRs, TFs, and target genes. PMID:27358718

  19. An extended bioreaction database that significantly improves reconstruction and analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Michael; Sun, Jibin; Kamphans, Tom; Fekete, Sándor P; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-11-01

    The bioreaction database established by Ma and Zeng (Bioinformatics, 2003, 19, 270-277) for in silico reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks has been widely used. Based on more recent information in the reference databases KEGG LIGAND and Brenda, we upgrade the bioreaction database in this work by almost doubling the number of reactions from 3565 to 6851. Over 70% of the reactions have been manually updated/revised in terms of reversibility, reactant pairs, currency metabolites and error correction. For the first time, 41 spontaneous sugar mutarotation reactions are introduced into the biochemical database. The upgrade significantly improves the reconstruction of genome scale metabolic networks. Many gaps or missing biochemical links can be recovered, as exemplified with three model organisms Homo sapiens, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli. The topological parameters of the constructed networks were also largely affected, however, the overall network structure remains scale-free. Furthermore, we consider the problem of computing biologically feasible shortest paths in reconstructed metabolic networks. We show that these paths are hard to compute and present solutions to find such paths in networks of small and medium size.

  20. Finding elementary flux modes in metabolic networks based on flux balance analysis and flux coupling analysis: application to the analysis of Escherichia coli metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Marashi, Sayed-Amir

    2013-12-01

    Elementary modes (EMs) are steady-state metabolic flux vectors with minimal set of active reactions. Each EM corresponds to a metabolic pathway. Therefore, studying EMs is helpful for analyzing the production of biotechnologically important metabolites. However, memory requirements for computing EMs may hamper their applicability as, in most genome-scale metabolic models, no EM can be computed due to running out of memory. In this study, we present a method for computing randomly sampled EMs. In this approach, a network reduction algorithm is used for EM computation, which is based on flux balance-based methods. We show that this approach can be used to recover the EMs in the medium- and genome-scale metabolic network models, while the EMs are sampled in an unbiased way. The applicability of such results is shown by computing “estimated” control-effective flux values in Escherichia coli metabolic network.

  1. Ongoing resolution of duplicate gene functions shapes the diversification of a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Meihua Christina; Hutchins, Paul D; Russell, Jason D; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms leading to duplicate gene retention are well understood, but the long-term impacts of paralog differentiation on the regulation of metabolism remain underappreciated. Here we experimentally dissect the functions of two pairs of ancient paralogs of the GALactose sugar utilization network in two yeast species. We show that the Saccharomyces uvarum network is more active, even as over-induction is prevented by a second co-repressor that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks. Surprisingly, removal of this repression system leads to a strong growth arrest, likely due to overly rapid galactose catabolism and metabolic overload. Alternative sugars, such as fructose, circumvent metabolic control systems and exacerbate this phenotype. We further show that S. cerevisiae experiences homologous metabolic constraints that are subtler due to how the paralogs have diversified. These results show how the functional differentiation of paralogs continues to shape regulatory network architectures and metabolic strategies long after initial preservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19027.001 PMID:27690225

  2. Visualization of metabolic interaction networks in microbial communities using VisANT 5.0

    DOE PAGES

    Granger, Brian R.; Chang, Yi -Chien; Wang, Yan; DeLisi, Charles; Segre, Daniel; Hu, Zhenjun

    2016-04-15

    Here, the complexity of metabolic networks in microbial communities poses an unresolved visualization and interpretation challenge. We address this challenge in the newly expanded version of a software tool for the analysis of biological networks, VisANT 5.0. We focus in particular on facilitating the visual exploration of metabolic interaction between microbes in a community, e.g. as predicted by COMETS (Computation of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space), a dynamic stoichiometric modeling framework. Using VisANT's unique meta-graph implementation, we show how one can use VisANT 5.0 to explore different time-dependent ecosystem-level metabolic networks. In particular, we analyze the metabolic interaction networkmore » between two bacteria previously shown to display an obligate cross-feeding interdependency. In addition, we illustrate how a putative minimal gut microbiome community could be represented in our framework, making it possible to highlight interactions across multiple coexisting species. We envisage that the "symbiotic layout" of VisANT can be employed as a general tool for the analysis of metabolism in complex microbial communities as well as heterogeneous human tissues.« less

  3. Reconstruction of metabolic networks in a fluoranthene-degrading enrichments from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Kang; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ai, Guo-Min; Deng, Ye; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Jiang, Cheng-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the primary process of removing PAHs from environments. The metabolic pathway of PAHs in pure cultures has been intensively studied, but cooperative metabolisms at community-level remained to be explored. In this study, we determined the dynamic composition of a microbial community and its metabolic intermediates during fluoranthene degradation using high-throughput metagenomics and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. Subsequently, a cooperative metabolic network for fluoranthene degradation was constructed. The network shows that Mycobacterium contributed the majority of ring-hydroxylating and -cleavage dioxygenases, while Diaphorobacter contributed most of the dehydrogenases. Hyphomicrobium, Agrobacterium, and Sphingopyxis contributed to genes encoding enzymes involved in downstream reactions of fluoranthene degradation. The contributions of various microbial groups were calculated with the PICRUSt program. The contributions of Hyphomicrobium to alcohol dehydrogenases were 62.4% in stage 1 (i.e., when fluoranthene was rapidly removed) and 76.8% in stage 3 (i.e., when fluoranthene was not detectable), respectively; the contribution of Pseudomonas were 6.6% in stage 1 and decreased to 1.2% in subsequent stages. To the best of the author's knowledge, this report describes the first cooperative metabolic network to predict the contributions of various microbial groups during PAH-degradation at community-level. PMID:27415596

  4. Glucose Metabolic Brain Networks in Early-Onset vs. Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Eunjoo; Na, Duk L.; Jeong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EAD) shows distinct features from late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LAD). To explore the characteristics of EAD, clinical, neuropsychological, and functional imaging studies have been conducted. However, differences between EAD and LAD are not clear, especially in terms of brain connectivity and networks. In this study, we investigated the differences in metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD by adopting graph theory measures. Methods: We analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images to investigate the distinct features of metabolic connectivity between EAD and LAD. Using metabolic connectivity and graph theory analysis, metabolic network differences between LAD and EAD were explored. Results: Results showed the decreased connectivity centered in the cingulate gyri and occipital regions in EAD, whereas decreased connectivity in the occipital and temporal regions as well as increased connectivity in the supplementary motor area were observed in LAD when compared with age-matched control groups. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were decreased in EAD but not in LAD. EAD showed progressive network deterioration as a function of disease severity and clinical dementia rating (CDR) scores, mainly in terms of connectivity between the cingulate gyri and occipital regions. Global efficiency and clustering coefficients were also decreased along with disease severity. Conclusion: These results indicate that EAD and LAD have distinguished features in terms of metabolic connectivity, with EAD demonstrating more extensive and progressive deterioration. PMID:27445800

  5. Quantitative Tools for Dissection of Hydrogen-Producing Metabolic Networks-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Dismukes, G.Charles.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2012-10-19

    During this project we have pioneered the development of integrated experimental-computational technologies for the quantitative dissection of metabolism in hydrogen and biofuel producing microorganisms (i.e. C. acetobutylicum and various cyanobacteria species). The application of these new methodologies resulted in many significant advances in the understanding of the metabolic networks and metabolism of these organisms, and has provided new strategies to enhance their hydrogen or biofuel producing capabilities. As an example, using mass spectrometry, isotope tracers, and quantitative flux-modeling we mapped the metabolic network structure in C. acetobutylicum. This resulted in a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of central carbon metabolism that could not have been obtained using genomic data alone. We discovered that biofuel production in this bacterium, which only occurs during stationary phase, requires a global remodeling of central metabolism (involving large changes in metabolite concentrations and fluxes) that has the effect of redirecting resources (carbon and reducing power) from biomass production into solvent production. This new holistic, quantitative understanding of metabolism is now being used as the basis for metabolic engineering strategies to improve solvent production in this bacterium. In another example, making use of newly developed technologies for monitoring hydrogen and NAD(P)H levels in vivo, we dissected the metabolic pathways for photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. This investigation led to the identification of multiple targets for improving hydrogen production. Importantly, the quantitative tools and approaches that we have developed are broadly applicable and we are now using them to investigate other important biofuel producers, such as cellulolytic bacteria.

  6. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M; Gang, David R

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism.

  7. FASIMU: flexible software for flux-balance computation series in large metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Flux-balance analysis based on linear optimization is widely used to compute metabolic fluxes in large metabolic networks and gains increasingly importance in network curation and structural analysis. Thus, a computational tool flexible enough to realize a wide variety of FBA algorithms and able to handle batch series of flux-balance optimizations is of great benefit. Results We present FASIMU, a command line oriented software for the computation of flux distributions using a variety of the most common FBA algorithms, including the first available implementation of (i) weighted flux minimization, (ii) fitness maximization for partially inhibited enzymes, and (iii) of the concentration-based thermodynamic feasibility constraint. It allows batch computation with varying objectives and constraints suited for network pruning, leak analysis, flux-variability analysis, and systematic probing of metabolic objectives for network curation. Input and output supports SBML. FASIMU can work with free (lp_solve and GLPK) or commercial solvers (CPLEX, LINDO). A new plugin (faBiNA) for BiNA allows to conveniently visualize calculated flux distributions. The platform-independent program is an open-source project, freely available under GNU public license at http://www.bioinformatics.org/fasimu including manual, tutorial, and plugins. Conclusions We present a flux-balance optimization program whose main merits are the implementation of thermodynamics as a constraint, batch series of computations, free availability of sources, choice on various external solvers, and the flexibility on metabolic objectives and constraints. PMID:21255455

  8. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F. Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M.; Gang, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:26022256

  9. A Scalable Algorithm to Explore the Gibbs Energy Landscape of Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Daniele; Figliuzzi, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    The integration of various types of genomic data into predictive models of biological networks is one of the main challenges currently faced by computational biology. Constraint-based models in particular play a key role in the attempt to obtain a quantitative understanding of cellular metabolism at genome scale. In essence, their goal is to frame the metabolic capabilities of an organism based on minimal assumptions that describe the steady states of the underlying reaction network via suitable stoichiometric constraints, specifically mass balance and energy balance (i.e. thermodynamic feasibility). The implementation of these requirements to generate viable configurations of reaction fluxes and/or to test given flux profiles for thermodynamic feasibility can however prove to be computationally intensive. We propose here a fast and scalable stoichiometry-based method to explore the Gibbs energy landscape of a biochemical network at steady state. The method is applied to the problem of reconstructing the Gibbs energy landscape underlying metabolic activity in the human red blood cell, and to that of identifying and removing thermodynamically infeasible reaction cycles in the Escherichia coli metabolic network (iAF1260). In the former case, we produce consistent predictions for chemical potentials (or log-concentrations) of intracellular metabolites; in the latter, we identify a restricted set of loops (23 in total) in the periplasmic and cytoplasmic core as the origin of thermodynamic infeasibility in a large sample () of flux configurations generated randomly and compatibly with the prior information available on reaction reversibility. PMID:22737065

  10. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Rardin, Matthew J.; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C.; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R.; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5−/− animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  11. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2.

  12. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  13. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  14. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  15. Metabolic Network Modeling of Microbial Interactions in Natural and Engineered Environmental Systems.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Lear, Gavin; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches to characterize metabolic interactions within microbial communities using Stoichiometric Metabolic Network (SMN) models for applications in environmental and industrial biotechnology. SMN models are computational tools used to evaluate the metabolic engineering potential of various organisms. They have successfully been applied to design and optimize the microbial production of antibiotics, alcohols and amino acids by single strains. To date however, such models have been rarely applied to analyze and control the metabolism of more complex microbial communities. This is largely attributed to the diversity of microbial community functions, metabolisms, and interactions. Here, we firstly review different types of microbial interaction and describe their relevance for natural and engineered environmental processes. Next, we provide a general description of the essential methods of the SMN modeling workflow including the steps of network reconstruction, simulation through Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), experimental data gathering, and model calibration. Then we broadly describe and compare four approaches to model microbial interactions using metabolic networks, i.e., (i) lumped networks, (ii) compartment per guild networks, (iii) bi-level optimization simulations, and (iv) dynamic-SMN methods. These approaches can be used to integrate and analyze diverse microbial physiology, ecology and molecular community data. All of them (except the lumped approach) are suitable for incorporating species abundance data but so far they have been used only to model simple communities of two to eight different species. Interactions based on substrate exchange and competition can be directly modeled using the above approaches. However, interactions based on metabolic feedbacks, such as product inhibition and synthropy require extensions to current models, incorporating gene regulation and compounding accumulation mechanisms. SMN models of microbial interactions can

  16. Identifying all moiety conservation laws in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Andrea; De Martino, Daniele; Mulet, Roberto; Pagnani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The stoichiometry of a metabolic network gives rise to a set of conservation laws for the aggregate level of specific pools of metabolites, which, on one hand, pose dynamical constraints that cross-link the variations of metabolite concentrations and, on the other, provide key insight into a cell's metabolic production capabilities. When the conserved quantity identifies with a chemical moiety, extracting all such conservation laws from the stoichiometry amounts to finding all non-negative integer solutions of a linear system, a programming problem known to be NP-hard. We present an efficient strategy to compute the complete set of integer conservation laws of a genome-scale stoichiometric matrix, also providing a certificate for correctness and maximality of the solution. Our method is deployed for the analysis of moiety conservation relationships in two large-scale reconstructions of the metabolism of the bacterium E. coli, in six tissue-specific human metabolic networks, and, finally, in the human reactome as a whole, revealing that bacterial metabolism could be evolutionarily designed to cover broader production spectra than human metabolism. Convergence to the full set of moiety conservation laws in each case is achieved in extremely reduced computing times. In addition, we uncover a scaling relation that links the size of the independent pool basis to the number of metabolites, for which we present an analytical explanation. PMID:24988199

  17. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; Watanabe, Miki; Guarracino, Mario R; Ferraro, Maria B; Edison, Arthur S; Morgan, Theodore J; Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations.

  18. c-Myc activates multiple metabolic networks to generate substrates for cell-cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Morrish, F; Isern, N; Sadilek, M; Jeffrey, M; Hockenbery, D M

    2009-07-01

    Cell proliferation requires the coordinated activity of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways to provide ATP and building blocks for DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Many metabolic pathway genes are targets of the c-myc oncogene and cell-cycle regulator. However, the contribution of c-Myc to the activation of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic networks during cell-cycle entry is unknown. Here, we report the metabolic fates of [U-(13)C] glucose in serum-stimulated myc(-/-) and myc(+/+) fibroblasts by (13)C isotopomer NMR analysis. We demonstrate that endogenous c-myc increased (13)C labeling of ribose sugars, purines and amino acids, indicating partitioning of glucose carbons into C1/folate and pentose phosphate pathways, and increased tricarboxylic acid cycle turnover at the expense of anaplerotic flux. Myc expression also increased global O-linked N-acetylglucosamine protein modification, and inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis selectively reduced growth of Myc-expressing cells, suggesting its importance in Myc-induced proliferation. These data reveal a central organizing function for the Myc oncogene in the metabolism of cycling cells. The pervasive deregulation of this oncogene in human cancers may be explained by its function in directing metabolic networks required for cell proliferation.

  19. Microbial metabolic networks in a complex electrogenic biofilm recovered from a stimulus-induced metatranscriptomics approach.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Tenney, Aaron; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Bretschger, Orianna

    2015-10-07

    Microorganisms almost always exist as mixed communities in nature. While the significance of microbial community activities is well appreciated, a thorough understanding about how microbial communities respond to environmental perturbations has not yet been achieved. Here we have used a combination of metagenomic, genome binning, and stimulus-induced metatranscriptomic approaches to estimate the metabolic network and stimuli-induced metabolic switches existing in a complex microbial biofilm that was producing electrical current via extracellular electron transfer (EET) to a solid electrode surface. Two stimuli were employed: to increase EET and to stop EET. An analysis of cell activity marker genes after stimuli exposure revealed that only two strains within eleven binned genomes had strong transcriptional responses to increased EET rates, with one responding positively and the other responding negatively. Potential metabolic switches between eleven dominant members were mainly observed for acetate, hydrogen, and ethanol metabolisms. These results have enabled the estimation of a multi-species metabolic network and the associated short-term responses to EET stimuli that induce changes to metabolic flow and cooperative or competitive microbial interactions. This systematic meta-omics approach represents a next step towards understanding complex microbial roles within a community and how community members respond to specific environmental stimuli.

  20. c-Myc activates multiple metabolic networks to generate substrates for cell-cycle entry.

    SciTech Connect

    Morrish, Fionnuala M.; Isern, Nancy; Sadilek, Martin; Jeffrey, Mark; Hockenbery, David M.

    2009-05-18

    Cell proliferation requires the coordinated activity of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways to provide ATP and building blocks for DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis. Many metabolic pathway genes are targets of the c-myc oncogene and cell cycle regulator. However, the contribution of c-Myc to the activation of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic networks during cell cycle entry is unknown. Here, we report the metabolic fates of [U-13C] glucose in serum-stimulated myc-/- and myc+/+ fibroblasts by 13C isotopomer NMR analysis. We demonstrate that endogenous c-myc increased 13C-labeling of ribose sugars, purines, and amino acids, indicating partitioning of glucose carbons into C1/folate and pentose phosphate pathways, and increased tricarboxylic acid cycle turnover at the expense of anaplerotic flux. Myc expression also increased global O-linked GlcNAc protein modification, and inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis selectively reduced growth of Myc-expressing cells, suggesting its importance in Myc-induced proliferation. These data reveal a central organizing role for the Myc oncogene in the metabolism of cycling cells. The pervasive deregulation of this oncogene in human cancers may be explained by its role in directing metabolic networks required for cell proliferation.

  1. Microbial metabolic networks in a complex electrogenic biofilm recovered from a stimulus-induced metatranscriptomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shun’ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Tenney, Aaron; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Bretschger, Orianna

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms almost always exist as mixed communities in nature. While the significance of microbial community activities is well appreciated, a thorough understanding about how microbial communities respond to environmental perturbations has not yet been achieved. Here we have used a combination of metagenomic, genome binning, and stimulus-induced metatranscriptomic approaches to estimate the metabolic network and stimuli-induced metabolic switches existing in a complex microbial biofilm that was producing electrical current via extracellular electron transfer (EET) to a solid electrode surface. Two stimuli were employed: to increase EET and to stop EET. An analysis of cell activity marker genes after stimuli exposure revealed that only two strains within eleven binned genomes had strong transcriptional responses to increased EET rates, with one responding positively and the other responding negatively. Potential metabolic switches between eleven dominant members were mainly observed for acetate, hydrogen, and ethanol metabolisms. These results have enabled the estimation of a multi-species metabolic network and the associated short-term responses to EET stimuli that induce changes to metabolic flow and cooperative or competitive microbial interactions. This systematic meta-omics approach represents a next step towards understanding complex microbial roles within a community and how community members respond to specific environmental stimuli. PMID:26443302

  2. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Williams, CM; Watanabe, M; Guarracino, MR; Ferraro, MB; Edison, AS; Morgan, TJ; Boroujerdi, AFB; Hahn, DA

    2015-01-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using NMR spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations. PMID:25308124

  3. Metabolic Network Constrains Gene Regulation of C4 Photosynthesis: The Case of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Robaina-Estévez, Semidán; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Engineering C3 plants to increase their efficiency of carbon fixation as well as of nitrogen and water use simultaneously may be facilitated by understanding the mechanisms that underpin the C4 syndrome. Existing experimental studies have indicated that the emergence of the C4 syndrome requires co-ordination between several levels of cellular organization, from gene regulation to metabolism, across two co-operating cell systems—mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Yet, determining the extent to which the structure of the C4 plant metabolic network may constrain gene expression remains unclear, although it will provide an important consideration in engineering C4 photosynthesis in C3 plants. Here, we utilize flux coupling analysis with the second-generation maize metabolic models to investigate the correspondence between metabolic network structure and transcriptomic phenotypes along the maize leaf gradient. The examined scenarios with publically available data from independent experiments indicate that the transcriptomic programs of the two cell types are co-ordinated, quantitatively and qualitatively, due to the presence of coupled metabolic reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that precise quantitative coupling will have to be achieved in order to ensure a successfully engineered transition from C3 to C4 crops. PMID:26903529

  4. Identifying all moiety conservation laws in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Andrea; De Martino, Daniele; Mulet, Roberto; Pagnani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The stoichiometry of a metabolic network gives rise to a set of conservation laws for the aggregate level of specific pools of metabolites, which, on one hand, pose dynamical constraints that cross-link the variations of metabolite concentrations and, on the other, provide key insight into a cell's metabolic production capabilities. When the conserved quantity identifies with a chemical moiety, extracting all such conservation laws from the stoichiometry amounts to finding all non-negative integer solutions of a linear system, a programming problem known to be NP-hard. We present an efficient strategy to compute the complete set of integer conservation laws of a genome-scale stoichiometric matrix, also providing a certificate for correctness and maximality of the solution. Our method is deployed for the analysis of moiety conservation relationships in two large-scale reconstructions of the metabolism of the bacterium E. coli, in six tissue-specific human metabolic networks, and, finally, in the human reactome as a whole, revealing that bacterial metabolism could be evolutionarily designed to cover broader production spectra than human metabolism. Convergence to the full set of moiety conservation laws in each case is achieved in extremely reduced computing times. In addition, we uncover a scaling relation that links the size of the independent pool basis to the number of metabolites, for which we present an analytical explanation.

  5. The oncogene c-Myc coordinates regulation of metabolic networks to enable rapid cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Hockenbery, David M

    2008-04-15

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is rapidly activated by serum and regulates genes involved in metabolism and cell cycle progression. This gene is thereby uniquely poised to coordinate both the metabolic and cell cycle regulatory events required for cell cycle entry. However, this function of Myc has not been evaluated. Using a rat fibroblast model of isogenic cell lines, myc(-/-), myc(+/-), myc(+/+) and myc(-/-) cells with an inducible c-myc transgene (mycER), we show that the Myc protein programs cells to utilize both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to drive cell cycle progression. We demonstrate this coordinate regulation of metabolic networks is essential, as specific inhibitors of these pathways block Myc-induced proliferation. Metabolic events temporally correlated with cell cycle entry include increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial function, pyruvate and lactate production, and ATP generation. Treatment of normal cells with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation recapitulates the myc(-/-) phenotype, resulting in impaired cell cycle entry and reduced metabolism. Combined with a kinetic expression profiling analysis of genes linked to mitochondrial function, our study indicates that Myc's ability to coordinately regulate the mitochondrial metabolic network transcriptome is required for rapid cell cycle entry. This function of Myc may underlie the pervasive presence of Myc in many human cancers.

  6. Analysis of ThiC variants in the context of the metabolic network of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lauren D; Dougherty, Michael J; Downs, Diana M

    2012-11-01

    In bacteria, the 4-amino-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) moiety of thiamine is synthesized from 5-aminoimidazole ribotide (AIR), a branch point metabolite of purine and thiamine biosynthesis. ThiC is a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) superfamily and catalyzes the complex chemical rearrangement of AIR to HMP-P. As reconstituted in vitro, the ThiC reaction requires AdoMet, AIR, and reductant. This study analyzed variants of ThiC in vivo and in vitro to probe the metabolic network surrounding AIR in Salmonella enterica. Several variants of ThiC that required metabolic perturbations to function in vivo were biochemically characterized in vitro. Results presented herein indicate that the subtleties of the metabolic network have not been captured in the current reconstitution of the ThiC reaction.

  7. [Predicting genetic modification targets based on metabolic network analysis--a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Peishun; Ma, Hongwu; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Construction of artificial cell factory to produce specific compounds of interest needs wild strain to be genetically engineered. In recent years, with the reconstruction of many genome-scale metabolic networks, a number of methods have been proposed based on metabolic network analysis for predicting genetic modification targets that lead to overproduction of compounds of interest. These approaches use constraints of stoichiometry and reaction reversibility in genome-scale models of metabolism and adopt different mathematical algorithms to predict modification targets, and thus can discover new targets that are difficult to find through traditional intuitive methods. In this review, we introduce the principle, merit, demerit and application of various strain optimization methods in detail. The main problems in existing methods and perspectives on this emerging research field are also discussed, aiming to provide guidance to choose the appropriate methods according to different types of products and the reliability of the predicted results. PMID:27363195

  8. Network integration of parallel metabolic and transcriptional data reveals metabolic modules that regulate macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhishek K; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Sergushichev, Alexey; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Ivanova, Yulia; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Chmielewski, Karina; Stewart, Kelly M; Ashall, Juliet; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Driggers, Edward M; Artyomov, Maxim N

    2015-03-17

    Macrophage polarization involves a coordinated metabolic and transcriptional rewiring that is only partially understood. By using an integrated high-throughput transcriptional-metabolic profiling and analysis pipeline, we characterized systemic changes during murine macrophage M1 and M2 polarization. M2 polarization was found to activate glutamine catabolism and UDP-GlcNAc-associated modules. Correspondingly, glutamine deprivation or inhibition of N-glycosylation decreased M2 polarization and production of chemokine CCL22. In M1 macrophages, we identified a metabolic break at Idh, the enzyme that converts isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate, providing mechanistic explanation for TCA cycle fragmentation. (13)C-tracer studies suggested the presence of an active variant of the aspartate-arginosuccinate shunt that compensated for this break. Consistently, inhibition of aspartate-aminotransferase, a key enzyme of the shunt, inhibited nitric oxide and interleukin-6 production in M1 macrophages, while promoting mitochondrial respiration. This systems approach provides a highly integrated picture of the physiological modules supporting macrophage polarization, identifying potential pharmacologic control points for both macrophage phenotypes. PMID:25786174

  9. Network integration of parallel metabolic and transcriptional data reveals metabolic modules that regulate macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhishek K; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Sergushichev, Alexey; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Ivanova, Yulia; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Chmielewski, Karina; Stewart, Kelly M; Ashall, Juliet; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Driggers, Edward M; Artyomov, Maxim N

    2015-03-17

    Macrophage polarization involves a coordinated metabolic and transcriptional rewiring that is only partially understood. By using an integrated high-throughput transcriptional-metabolic profiling and analysis pipeline, we characterized systemic changes during murine macrophage M1 and M2 polarization. M2 polarization was found to activate glutamine catabolism and UDP-GlcNAc-associated modules. Correspondingly, glutamine deprivation or inhibition of N-glycosylation decreased M2 polarization and production of chemokine CCL22. In M1 macrophages, we identified a metabolic break at Idh, the enzyme that converts isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate, providing mechanistic explanation for TCA cycle fragmentation. (13)C-tracer studies suggested the presence of an active variant of the aspartate-arginosuccinate shunt that compensated for this break. Consistently, inhibition of aspartate-aminotransferase, a key enzyme of the shunt, inhibited nitric oxide and interleukin-6 production in M1 macrophages, while promoting mitochondrial respiration. This systems approach provides a highly integrated picture of the physiological modules supporting macrophage polarization, identifying potential pharmacologic control points for both macrophage phenotypes.

  10. Data-driven integration of genome-scale regulatory and metabolic network models

    DOE PAGES

    Imam, Saheed; Schauble, Sascha; Brooks, Aaron N.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Price, Nathan D.

    2015-05-05

    Microbes are diverse and extremely versatile organisms that play vital roles in all ecological niches. Understanding and harnessing microbial systems will be key to the sustainability of our planet. One approach to improving our knowledge of microbial processes is through data-driven and mechanism-informed computational modeling. Individual models of biological networks (such as metabolism, transcription, and signaling) have played pivotal roles in driving microbial research through the years. These networks, however, are highly interconnected and function in concert a fact that has led to the development of a variety of approaches aimed at simulating the integrated functions of two or moremore » network types. Though the task of integrating these different models is fraught with new challenges, the large amounts of high-throughput data sets being generated, and algorithms being developed, means that the time is at hand for concerted efforts to build integrated regulatory-metabolic networks in a data-driven fashion. Lastly, in this perspective, we review current approaches for constructing integrated regulatory-metabolic models and outline new strategies for future development of these network models for any microbial system.« less

  11. Data-driven integration of genome-scale regulatory and metabolic network models

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Saheed; Schäuble, Sascha; Brooks, Aaron N.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Price, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbes are diverse and extremely versatile organisms that play vital roles in all ecological niches. Understanding and harnessing microbial systems will be key to the sustainability of our planet. One approach to improving our knowledge of microbial processes is through data-driven and mechanism-informed computational modeling. Individual models of biological networks (such as metabolism, transcription, and signaling) have played pivotal roles in driving microbial research through the years. These networks, however, are highly interconnected and function in concert—a fact that has led to the development of a variety of approaches aimed at simulating the integrated functions of two or more network types. Though the task of integrating these different models is fraught with new challenges, the large amounts of high-throughput data sets being generated, and algorithms being developed, means that the time is at hand for concerted efforts to build integrated regulatory-metabolic networks in a data-driven fashion. In this perspective, we review current approaches for constructing integrated regulatory-metabolic models and outline new strategies for future development of these network models for any microbial system. PMID:25999934

  12. Data-driven integration of genome-scale regulatory and metabolic network models

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Saheed; Schauble, Sascha; Brooks, Aaron N.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Price, Nathan D.

    2015-05-05

    Microbes are diverse and extremely versatile organisms that play vital roles in all ecological niches. Understanding and harnessing microbial systems will be key to the sustainability of our planet. One approach to improving our knowledge of microbial processes is through data-driven and mechanism-informed computational modeling. Individual models of biological networks (such as metabolism, transcription, and signaling) have played pivotal roles in driving microbial research through the years. These networks, however, are highly interconnected and function in concert a fact that has led to the development of a variety of approaches aimed at simulating the integrated functions of two or more network types. Though the task of integrating these different models is fraught with new challenges, the large amounts of high-throughput data sets being generated, and algorithms being developed, means that the time is at hand for concerted efforts to build integrated regulatory-metabolic networks in a data-driven fashion. Lastly, in this perspective, we review current approaches for constructing integrated regulatory-metabolic models and outline new strategies for future development of these network models for any microbial system.

  13. Using atom mapping rules for an improved detection of relevant routes in weighted metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Computational analysis of pathways in metabolic networks has numerous applications in systems biology. While graph theory-based approaches have been presented that find biotransformation routes from one metabolite to another in these networks, most of these approaches suffer from finding too many routes, most of which are biologically infeasible or meaningless. We present a novel approach for finding relevant routes based on atom mapping rules (describing which educt atoms are mapped onto which product atoms in a chemical reaction). This leads to a reformulation of the problem as a lightest path search in a degree-weighted metabolic network. The key component of the approach is a new method of computing optimal atom mapping rules.

  14. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory.

  15. An integrated approach to characterize genetic interaction networks in yeast metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Szappanos, Balázs; Kovács, Károly; Szamecz, Béla; Honti, Frantisek; Costanzo, Michael; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Gelius-Dietrich, Gabriel; Lercher, Martin J.; Jelasity, Márk; Myers, Chad L.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Oliver, Stephen G.; Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    Intense experimental and theoretical efforts have been made to globally map genetic interactions, yet we still do not understand how gene-gene interactions arise from the operation of biomolecular networks. To bridge the gap between empirical and computational studies, we: i) quantitatively measure genetic interactions between ~185,000 metabolic gene pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ii) superpose the data on a detailed systems biology model of metabolism, and iii) introduce a machine-learning method to reconcile empirical interaction data with model predictions. We systematically investigate the relative impacts of functional modularity and metabolic flux coupling on the distribution of negative and positive genetic interactions. We also provide a mechanistic explanation for the link between the degree of genetic interaction, pleiotropy, and gene dispensability. Last, we demonstrate the feasibility of automated metabolic model refinement by correcting misannotations in NAD biosynthesis and confirming them by in vivo experiments. PMID:21623372

  16. An exact arithmetic toolbox for a consistent and reproducible structural analysis of metabolic network models.

    PubMed

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Trigg, Jason; Regev, Aviv; Berger, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Constraint-based models are currently the only methodology that allows the study of metabolism at the whole-genome scale. Flux balance analysis is commonly used to analyse constraint-based models. Curiously, the results of this analysis vary with the software being run, a situation that we show can be remedied by using exact rather than floating-point arithmetic. Here we introduce MONGOOSE, a toolbox for analysing the structure of constraint-based metabolic models in exact arithmetic. We apply MONGOOSE to the analysis of 98 existing metabolic network models and find that the biomass reaction is surprisingly blocked (unable to sustain non-zero flux) in nearly half of them. We propose a principled approach for unblocking these reactions and extend it to the problems of identifying essential and synthetic lethal reactions and minimal media. Our structural insights enable a systematic study of constraint-based metabolic models, yielding a deeper understanding of their possibilities and limitations. PMID:25291352

  17. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells.

  18. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells. PMID:21867233

  19. Group Contribution Method for Thermodynamic Analysis of Complex Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Matthew D.; Henry, Christopher S.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2008-01-01

    A new, to our knowledge, group contribution method based on the group contribution method of Mavrovouniotis is introduced for estimating the standard Gibbs free energy of formation (ΔfG′°) and reaction (ΔrG′°) in biochemical systems. Gibbs free energy contribution values were estimated for 74 distinct molecular substructures and 11 interaction factors using multiple linear regression against a training set of 645 reactions and 224 compounds. The standard error for the fitted values was 1.90 kcal/mol. Cross-validation analysis was utilized to determine the accuracy of the methodology in estimating ΔrG′° and ΔfG′° for reactions and compounds not included in the training set, and based on the results of the cross-validation, the standard error involved in these estimations is 2.22 kcal/mol. This group contribution method is demonstrated to be capable of estimating ΔrG′° and ΔfG′° for the majority of the biochemical compounds and reactions found in the iJR904 and iAF1260 genome-scale metabolic models of Escherichia coli and in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and University of Minnesota Biocatalysis and Biodegradation Database. A web-based implementation of this new group contribution method is available free at http://sparta.chem-eng.northwestern.edu/cgi-bin/GCM/WebGCM.cgi. PMID:18645197

  20. GAM: a web-service for integrated transcriptional and metabolic network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sergushichev, Alexey A.; Loboda, Alexander A.; Jha, Abhishek K.; Vincent, Emma E.; Driggers, Edward M.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Edward J.; Artyomov, Maxim N.

    2016-01-01

    Novel techniques for high-throughput steady-state metabolomic profiling yield information about changes of nearly thousands of metabolites. Such metabolomic profiles, when analyzed together with transcriptional profiles, can reveal novel insights about underlying biological processes. While a number of conceptual approaches have been developed for data integration, easily accessible tools for integrated analysis of mammalian steady-state metabolomic and transcriptional data are lacking. Here we present GAM (‘genes and metabolites’): a web-service for integrated network analysis of transcriptional and steady-state metabolomic data focused on identification of the most changing metabolic subnetworks between two conditions of interest. In the web-service, we have pre-assembled metabolic networks for humans, mice, Arabidopsis and yeast and adapted exact solvers for an optimal subgraph search to work in the context of these metabolic networks. The output is the most regulated metabolic subnetwork of size controlled by false discovery rate parameters. The subnetworks are then visualized online and also can be downloaded in Cytoscape format for subsequent processing. The web-service is available at: https://artyomovlab.wustl.edu/shiny/gam/ PMID:27098040

  1. Identification of metabolic network models from incomplete high-throughput datasets

    PubMed Central

    Berthoumieux, Sara; Brilli, Matteo; de Jong, Hidde; Kahn, Daniel; Cinquemani, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput measurement techniques for metabolism and gene expression provide a wealth of information for the identification of metabolic network models. Yet, missing observations scattered over the dataset restrict the number of effectively available datapoints and make classical regression techniques inaccurate or inapplicable. Thorough exploitation of the data by identification techniques that explicitly cope with missing observations is therefore of major importance. Results: We develop a maximum-likelihood approach for the estimation of unknown parameters of metabolic network models that relies on the integration of statistical priors to compensate for the missing data. In the context of the linlog metabolic modeling framework, we implement the identification method by an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm and by a simpler direct numerical optimization method. We evaluate performance of our methods by comparison to existing approaches, and show that our EM method provides the best results over a variety of simulated scenarios. We then apply the EM algorithm to a real problem, the identification of a model for the Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism, based on challenging experimental data from the literature. This leads to promising results and allows us to highlight critical identification issues. Contact: sara.berthoumieux@inria.fr; eugenio.cinquemani@inria.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21685069

  2. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A.

    PubMed

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Hamilton, Joshua J; Stahl, Buffy; Broadbent, Jeff R; Reed, Jennifer L; Steele, James L

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications.

  3. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A.

    PubMed

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Hamilton, Joshua J; Stahl, Buffy; Broadbent, Jeff R; Reed, Jennifer L; Steele, James L

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications. PMID:25365062

  4. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  5. Genome –Scale Reconstruction of Metabolic Networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A

    PubMed Central

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Hamilton, Joshua J.; Stahl, Buffy; Broadbent, Jeff R.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Steele, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications. PMID:25365062

  6. Multi-omics approach for estimating metabolic networks using low-order partial correlations.

    PubMed

    Kayano, Mitsunori; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Miyano, Satoru

    2013-08-01

    Two typical purposes of metabolome analysis are to estimate metabolic pathways and to understand the regulatory systems underlying the metabolism. A powerful source of information for these analyses is a set of multi-omics data for RNA, proteins, and metabolites. However, integrated methods that analyze multi-omics data simultaneously and unravel the systems behind metabolisms have not been well established. We developed a statistical method based on low-order partial correlations with a robust correlation coefficient for estimating metabolic networks from metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome data. Our method is defined by the maximum of low-order, particularly first-order, partial correlations (MF-PCor) in order to assign a correct edge with the highest correlation and to detect the factors that strongly affect the correlation coefficient. First, through numerical experiments with real and synthetic data, we showed that the use of protein and transcript data of enzymes improved the accuracy of the estimated metabolic networks in MF-PCor. In these experiments, the effectiveness of the proposed method was also demonstrated by comparison with a correlation network (Cor) and a Gaussian graphical model (GGM). Our theoretical investigation confirmed that the performance of MF-PCor could be superior to that of the competing methods. In addition, in the real data analysis, we investigated the role of metabolites, enzymes, and enzyme genes that were identified as important factors in the network established by MF-PCor. We then found that some of them corresponded to specific reactions between metabolites mediated by catalytic enzymes that were difficult to be identified by analysis based on metabolite data alone.

  7. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to the author, by the…

  8. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  9. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  10. Modeling and Robustness Analysis of Biochemical Networks of Glycerol Metabolism by Klebsiella Pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianxiong; Feng, Enmin; Wang, Lei; Xiu, Zhilong; Sun, Yaqin

    Glycerol bioconversion to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can be characterized by an intricate network of interactions among biochemical fluxes, metabolic compounds, key enzymes and genetic regulatory. To date, there still exist some uncertain factors in this complex network because of the limitation in bio-techniques, especially in measuring techniques for intracellular substances. In this paper, among these uncertain factors, we aim to infer the transport mechanisms of glycerol and 1,3-PD across the cell membrane, which have received intensive interest in recent years. On the basis of different inferences of the transport mechanisms, we reconstruct various metabolic networks correspondingly and subsequently develop their dynamical systems (S-systems). To determine the most reasonable metabolic network from all possible ones, we establish a quantitative definition of biological robustness and undertake parameter identification and robustness analysis for each system. Numerical results show that it is most possible that both glycerol and 1,3-PD pass the cell membrane by active transport and passive diffusion.

  11. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate. PMID:22792053

  12. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  13. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  14. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-02

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  15. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  16. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  17. Version 6 of the consensus yeast metabolic network refines biochemical coverage and improves model performance

    PubMed Central

    Heavner, Benjamin D.; Smallbone, Kieran; Price, Nathan D.; Walker, Larry P.

    2013-01-01

    Updates to maintain a state-of-the art reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network are essential to reflect our understanding of yeast metabolism and functional organization, to eliminate any inaccuracies identified in earlier iterations, to improve predictive accuracy and to continue to expand into novel subsystems to extend the comprehensiveness of the model. Here, we present version 6 of the consensus yeast metabolic network (Yeast 6) as an update to the community effort to computationally reconstruct the genome-scale metabolic network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c. Yeast 6 comprises 1458 metabolites participating in 1888 reactions, which are annotated with 900 yeast genes encoding the catalyzing enzymes. Compared with Yeast 5, Yeast 6 demonstrates improved sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values for predicting gene essentiality in glucose-limited aerobic conditions when analyzed with flux balance analysis. Additionally, Yeast 6 improves the accuracy of predicting the likelihood that a mutation will cause auxotrophy. The network reconstruction is available as a Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) file enriched with Minimium Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM)-compliant annotations. Small- and macromolecules in the network are referenced to authoritative databases such as Uniprot or ChEBI. Molecules and reactions are also annotated with appropriate publications that contain supporting evidence. Yeast 6 is freely available at http://yeast.sf.net/ as three separate SBML files: a model using the SBML level 3 Flux Balance Constraint package, a model compatible with the MATLAB® COBRA Toolbox for backward compatibility and a reconstruction containing only reactions for which there is experimental evidence (without the non-biological reactions necessary for simulating growth). Database URL: http://yeast.sf.net/ PMID:23935056

  18. A FDG-PET Study of Metabolic Networks in Apolipoprotein E ε4 Allele Carriers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Weihao; Chen, Xuejiao; Gao, Xiang; Xie, Yuanwei; Fang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, some studies have applied the graph theory in brain network analysis in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). However, relatively little research has specifically explored the properties of the metabolic network in apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele carriers. In our study, all the subjects, including ADs, MCIs and NCs (normal controls) were divided into 165 APOE ε4 carriers and 165 APOE ε4 noncarriers. To establish the metabolic network for all brain regions except the cerebellum, cerebral glucose metabolism data obtained from FDG-PET (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) were segmented into 90 areas with automated anatomical labeling (AAL) template. Then, the properties of the networks were computed to explore the between-group differences. Our results suggested that both APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers showed the small-world properties. Besides, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, the carriers showed a lower clustering coefficient. In addition, significant changes in 6 hub brain regions were found in between-group nodal centrality. Namely, compared with APOE ε4 noncarriers, significant decreases of the nodal centrality were found in left insula, right insula, right anterior cingulate, right paracingulate gyri, left cuneus, as well as significant increases in left paracentral lobule and left heschl gyrus in APOE ε4 carriers. Increased local short distance interregional correlations and disrupted long distance interregional correlations were found, which may support the point that the APOE ε4 carriers were more similar with AD or MCI in FDG uptake. In summary, the organization of metabolic network in APOE ε4 carriers indicated a less optimal pattern and APOE ε4 might be a risk factor for AD.

  19. Cooccurrence of free-living amoebae and nontuberculous Mycobacteria in hospital water networks, and preferential growth of Mycobacterium avium in Acanthamoeba lenticulata.

    PubMed

    Ovrutsky, Alida R; Chan, Edward D; Kartalija, Marinka; Bai, Xiyuan; Jackson, Mary; Gibbs, Sara; Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; Reynolds, Paul R; McDonnell, Gerald; Thomas, Vincent

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung and other diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing. NTM sources include potable water, especially in households where NTM populate pipes, taps, and showerheads. NTM share habitats with free-living amoebae (FLA) and can grow in FLA as parasites or as endosymbionts. FLA containing NTM may form cysts that protect mycobacteria from disinfectants and antibiotics. We first assessed the presence of FLA and NTM in water and biofilm samples collected from a hospital, confirming the high prevalence of NTM and FLA in potable water systems, particularly in biofilms. Acanthamoeba spp. (genotype T4) were mainly recovered (8/17), followed by Hartmannella vermiformis (7/17) as well as one isolate closely related to the genus Flamella and one isolate only distantly related to previously described species. Concerning mycobacteria, Mycobacterium gordonae was the most frequently found isolate (9/17), followed by Mycobacterium peregrinum (4/17), Mycobacterium chelonae (2/17), Mycobacterium mucogenicum (1/17), and Mycobacterium avium (1/17). The propensity of Mycobacterium avium hospital isolate H87 and M. avium collection strain 104 to survive and replicate within various FLA was also evaluated, demonstrating survival of both strains in all amoebal species tested but high replication rates only in Acanthamoeba lenticulata. As A. lenticulata was frequently recovered from environmental samples, including drinking water samples, these results could have important consequences for the ecology of M. avium in drinking water networks and the epidemiology of disease due to this species.

  20. Habitat variability does not generally promote metabolic network modularity in flies and mammals.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of species habitat range is an important topic over a wide range of research fields. In higher organisms, habitat range evolution is generally associated with genetic events such as gene duplication. However, the specific factors that determine habitat variability remain unclear at higher levels of biological organization (e.g., biochemical networks). One widely accepted hypothesis developed from both theoretical and empirical analyses is that habitat variability promotes network modularity; however, this relationship has not yet been directly tested in higher organisms. Therefore, I investigated the relationship between habitat variability and metabolic network modularity using compound and enzymatic networks in flies and mammals. Contrary to expectation, there was no clear positive correlation between habitat variability and network modularity. As an exception, the network modularity increased with habitat variability in the enzymatic networks of flies. However, the observed association was likely an artifact, and the frequency of gene duplication appears to be the main factor contributing to network modularity. These findings raise the question of whether or not there is a general mechanism for habitat range expansion at a higher level (i.e., above the gene scale). This study suggests that the currently widely accepted hypothesis for habitat variability should be reconsidered.

  1. Computing smallest intervention strategies for multiple metabolic networks in a boolean model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tamura, Takeyuki; Song, Jiangning; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-02-01

    This article considers the problem whereby, given two metabolic networks N1 and N2, a set of source compounds, and a set of target compounds, we must find the minimum set of reactions whose removal (knockout) ensures that the target compounds are not producible in N1 but are producible in N2. Similar studies exist for the problem of finding the minimum knockout with the smallest side effect for a single network. However, if technologies of external perturbations are advanced in the near future, it may be important to develop methods of computing the minimum knockout for multiple networks (MKMN). Flux balance analysis (FBA) is efficient if a well-polished model is available. However, that is not always the case. Therefore, in this article, we study MKMN in Boolean models and an elementary mode (EM)-based model. Integer linear programming (ILP)-based methods are developed for these models, since MKMN is NP-complete for both the Boolean model and the EM-based model. Computer experiments are conducted with metabolic networks of clostridium perfringens SM101 and bifidobacterium longum DJO10A, respectively known as bad bacteria and good bacteria for the human intestine. The results show that larger networks are more likely to have MKMN solutions. However, solving for these larger networks takes a very long time, and often the computation cannot be completed. This is reasonable, because small networks do not have many alternative pathways, making it difficult to satisfy the MKMN condition, whereas in large networks the number of candidate solutions explodes. Our developed software minFvskO is available online.

  2. Simultaneous Parameters Identifiability and Estimation of an E. coli Metabolic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Alberton, André Luís; Di Maggio, Jimena Andrea; Estrada, Vanina Gisela; Díaz, María Soledad; Secchi, Argimiro Resende

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a procedure for simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation in metabolic networks in order to overcome difficulties associated with lack of experimental data and large number of parameters, a common scenario in the modeling of such systems. As case study, the complex real problem of parameters identifiability of the Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 dynamic model was investigated, composed by 18 differential ordinary equations and 35 kinetic rates, containing 125 parameters. With the procedure, model fit was improved for most of the measured metabolites, achieving 58 parameters estimated, including 5 unknown initial conditions. The results indicate that simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation approach in metabolic networks is appealing, since model fit to the most of measured metabolites was possible even when important measures of intracellular metabolites and good initial estimates of parameters are not available. PMID:25654103

  3. Simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation of an E. coli metabolic network model.

    PubMed

    Pontes Freitas Alberton, Kese; Alberton, André Luís; Di Maggio, Jimena Andrea; Estrada, Vanina Gisela; Díaz, María Soledad; Secchi, Argimiro Resende

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a procedure for simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation in metabolic networks in order to overcome difficulties associated with lack of experimental data and large number of parameters, a common scenario in the modeling of such systems. As case study, the complex real problem of parameters identifiability of the Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 dynamic model was investigated, composed by 18 differential ordinary equations and 35 kinetic rates, containing 125 parameters. With the procedure, model fit was improved for most of the measured metabolites, achieving 58 parameters estimated, including 5 unknown initial conditions. The results indicate that simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation approach in metabolic networks is appealing, since model fit to the most of measured metabolites was possible even when important measures of intracellular metabolites and good initial estimates of parameters are not available. PMID:25654103

  4. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Plasticity of Metabolic Networks in Mycobacterium smegmatis *

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Tarun; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Chiappe, Diego; Moniatte, Marc; McKinney, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a remarkable ability to persist within the human host as a clinically inapparent or chronically active infection. Fatty acids are thought to be an important carbon source used by the bacteria during long term infection. Catabolism of fatty acids requires reprogramming of metabolic networks, and enzymes central to this reprogramming have been targeted for drug discovery. Mycobacterium smegmatis, a nonpathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis, is often used as a model system because of the similarity of basic cellular processes in these two species. Here, we take a quantitative proteomics-based approach to achieve a global view of how the M. smegmatis metabolic network adjusts to utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled proteins identified a total of 3,067 proteins with high confidence. This number corresponds to 44% of the predicted M. smegmatis proteome and includes most of the predicted metabolic enzymes. Compared with glucose-grown cells, 162 proteins showed differential abundance in acetate- or propionate-grown cells. Among these, acetate-grown cells showed a higher abundance of proteins that could constitute a functional glycerate pathway. Gene inactivation experiments confirmed that both the glyoxylate shunt and the glycerate pathway are operational in M. smegmatis. In addition to proteins with annotated functions, we demonstrate carbon source-dependent differential abundance of proteins that have not been functionally characterized. These proteins might play as-yet-unidentified roles in mycobacterial carbon metabolism. This study reveals several novel features of carbon assimilation in M. smegmatis, which suggests significant functional plasticity of metabolic networks in this organism. PMID:24997995

  5. Quantitative mass spectrometry reveals plasticity of metabolic networks in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Tarun; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Chiappe, Diego; Moniatte, Marc; McKinney, John D

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a remarkable ability to persist within the human host as a clinically inapparent or chronically active infection. Fatty acids are thought to be an important carbon source used by the bacteria during long term infection. Catabolism of fatty acids requires reprogramming of metabolic networks, and enzymes central to this reprogramming have been targeted for drug discovery. Mycobacterium smegmatis, a nonpathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis, is often used as a model system because of the similarity of basic cellular processes in these two species. Here, we take a quantitative proteomics-based approach to achieve a global view of how the M. smegmatis metabolic network adjusts to utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled proteins identified a total of 3,067 proteins with high confidence. This number corresponds to 44% of the predicted M. smegmatis proteome and includes most of the predicted metabolic enzymes. Compared with glucose-grown cells, 162 proteins showed differential abundance in acetate- or propionate-grown cells. Among these, acetate-grown cells showed a higher abundance of proteins that could constitute a functional glycerate pathway. Gene inactivation experiments confirmed that both the glyoxylate shunt and the glycerate pathway are operational in M. smegmatis. In addition to proteins with annotated functions, we demonstrate carbon source-dependent differential abundance of proteins that have not been functionally characterized. These proteins might play as-yet-unidentified roles in mycobacterial carbon metabolism. This study reveals several novel features of carbon assimilation in M. smegmatis, which suggests significant functional plasticity of metabolic networks in this organism.

  6. Metabolic Network Analysis-Based Identification of Antimicrobial Drug Targets in Category A Bioterrorism Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents. PMID:24454817

  7. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-09-15

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability.

  8. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  9. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability. PMID:25222563

  10. Resource allocation in metabolic networks: kinetic optimization and approximations by FBA.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Regensburger, Georg; Steuer, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Based on recent theoretical results on optimal flux distributions in kinetic metabolic networks, we explore the congruences and differences between solutions of kinetic optimization problems and results obtained by constraint-based methods. We demonstrate that, for a certain resource allocation problem, kinetic optimization and standard flux balance analysis (FBA) give rise to qualitatively different results. Furthermore, we introduce a variant of FBA, called satFBA, whose predictions are in qualitative agreement with kinetic optimization.

  11. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R.; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  12. Basic and applied uses of genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Douglas; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Feist, Adam M

    2013-01-01

    The genome-scale model (GEM) of metabolism in the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 has been in development for over a decade and is now in wide use. GEM-enabled studies of E. coli have been primarily focused on six applications: (1) metabolic engineering, (2) model-driven discovery, (3) prediction of cellular phenotypes, (4) analysis of biological network properties, (5) studies of evolutionary processes, and (6) models of interspecies interactions. In this review, we provide an overview of these applications along with a critical assessment of their successes and limitations, and a perspective on likely future developments in the field. Taken together, the studies performed over the past decade have established a genome-scale mechanistic understanding of genotype–phenotype relationships in E. coli metabolism that forms the basis for similar efforts for other microbial species. Future challenges include the expansion of GEMs by integrating additional cellular processes beyond metabolism, the identification of key constraints based on emerging data types, and the development of computational methods able to handle such large-scale network models with sufficient accuracy. PMID:23632383

  13. Prediction of Metabolic Gene Biomarkers for Neurodegenerative Disease by an Integrated Network-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), have become more and more common among aged people worldwide. One hallmark of NDs is the presence of intracellular accumulation of specific pathogenic proteins that may result from abnormal function of metabolic processes. Previously, we have developed a computational method named Met-express that predicted key enzyme-coding genes in cancer development by integrating cancer gene coexpression network with the metabolic network. Here, we applied Met-express to predict key enzyme-coding genes in both PD and HD. Functional enrichment analysis and literature review of predicted genes suggested that there might be some common pathogenic metabolic pathways for PD and HD. We further found that the predicted genes had significant functional association with known disease genes, with some of them already documented as biomarkers or therapeutic targets for NDs. As such, the predicted metabolic genes may be of use as novel biomarkers not only for ND diagnosis but also for potential therapeutic treatments. PMID:26064912

  14. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha JM

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17670.001 PMID:27383050

  15. Genome-wide analysis reveals gene expression and metabolic network dynamics during embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Daoquan; Venglat, Prakash; Tibiche, Chabane; Yang, Hui; Risseeuw, Eddy; Cao, Yongguo; Babic, Vivijan; Cloutier, Mathieu; Keller, Wilf; Wang, Edwin; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-05-01

    Embryogenesis is central to the life cycle of most plant species. Despite its importance, because of the difficulty associated with embryo isolation, global gene expression programs involved in plant embryogenesis, especially the early events following fertilization, are largely unknown. To address this gap, we have developed methods to isolate whole live Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryos as young as zygote and performed genome-wide profiling of gene expression. These studies revealed insights into patterns of gene expression relating to: maternal and paternal contributions to zygote development, chromosomal level clustering of temporal expression in embryogenesis, and embryo-specific functions. Functional analysis of some of the modulated transcription factor encoding genes from our data sets confirmed that they are critical for embryogenesis. Furthermore, we constructed stage-specific metabolic networks mapped with differentially regulated genes by combining the microarray data with the available Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes metabolic data sets. Comparative analysis of these networks revealed the network-associated structural and topological features, pathway interactions, and gene expression with reference to the metabolic activities during embryogenesis. Together, these studies have generated comprehensive gene expression data sets for embryo development in Arabidopsis and may serve as an important foundational resource for other seed plants. PMID:21402797

  16. Parameter estimation for metabolic networks with two stage Bregman regularization homotopy inversion algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Xi-cheng

    2014-02-21

    Metabolism is a very important cellular process and its malfunction contributes to human disease. Therefore, building dynamic models for metabolic networks with experimental data in order to analyze biological process rationally has attracted a lot of attention. Owing to the technical limitations, some unknown parameters contained in models need to be estimated effectively by means of the computational method. Generally, problems of parameter estimation of nonlinear biological network are known to be ill condition and multimodal. In particular, with the increasing amount and enlarging the scope of parameters, many optimization algorithms often fail to find a global solution. In this paper, two-stage variable factor Bregman regularization homotopy method is proposed. Discrete homotopy is used to identify the possible extreme region and continuous homotopy is executed for the purpose of stability of path tracing in the special region. Meanwhile, Latin hypercube sampling is introduced to get the good initial guess value and a perturbation strategy is developed to jump out of the local optimum. Three metabolic network inverse problems are investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24060619

  17. Metabolic Covariant Network in Relation to Nigrostriatal Degeneration in Carbon Monoxide Intoxication-Related Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Nai-Ching; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lee, Chen-Chang; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Presence of parkinsonian features after carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is well known and the severity was found to relate to the pre-synaptic dopaminergic deficits. There is no systemic study to analyse the functional network involved in CO-related Parkinsonism. Forty-five CO-related parkinsonism patients and 25 aged-matched controls completed the 3D T1-weighted imaging and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to assess the structural and functional brain differences between the patients and controls. Spatial covariant networks responsible for distinguishing patients and controls were constructed using independent component analysis. For validation, the pre-synaptic dopaminergic functional network was established by regression model using striatal TRODAT-1 SPECT as the independent variable. The clinical significance of both networks was determined by correlation with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Compared with controls, the spatial covariant signals of FDG-PET were significantly lower in the medial and lateral frontal, caudate nucleus, dorsomedial prefrontal areas, and temporal-parietal regions while the spatial intensities correlated significantly with UPDRS total scores. The functional network that correlated with striatum pre-synaptic dopaminergic uptakes included the midbrain, thalamus, caudate, lateral frontal cortex, ventral striatum, ventral, or dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Both networks overlapped considerably and the topographies reflected structural damage pattern. Our study provides evidence that glucose metabolism in CO-parkinsonism patients pertains to an organized covariant pattern in the cortical regions that is spatially coherent with the cortical map of pre-synaptic dopamine deficits. As the fronto-temporal, striatum, and temporal-parietal areas were involved, the unique metabolic covariant network suggests a different pathophysiology in CO

  18. New insights into Dehalococcoides mccartyi metabolism from a reconstructed metabolic network-based systems-level analysis of D. mccartyi transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Ahsanul; Waller, Alison S; Hug, Laura A; Provart, Nicholas J; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Organohalide respiration, mediated by Dehalococcoides mccartyi, is a useful bioremediation process that transforms ground water pollutants and known human carcinogens such as trichloroethene and vinyl chloride into benign ethenes. Successful application of this process depends on the fundamental understanding of the respiration and metabolism of D. mccartyi. Reductive dehalogenases, encoded by rdhA genes of these anaerobic bacteria, exclusively catalyze organohalide respiration and drive metabolism. To better elucidate D. mccartyi metabolism and physiology, we analyzed available transcriptomic data for a pure isolate (Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195) and a mixed microbial consortium (KB-1) using the previously developed pan-genome-scale reconstructed metabolic network of D. mccartyi. The transcriptomic data, together with available proteomic data helped confirm transcription and expression of the majority genes in D. mccartyi genomes. A composite genome of two highly similar D. mccartyi strains (KB-1 Dhc) from the KB-1 metagenome sequence was constructed, and operon prediction was conducted for this composite genome and other single genomes. This operon analysis, together with the quality threshold clustering analysis of transcriptomic data helped generate experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the function of a number of hypothetical proteins and the poorly understood mechanism of energy conservation in D. mccartyi. We also identified functionally enriched important clusters (13 for strain 195 and 11 for KB-1 Dhc) of co-expressed metabolic genes using information from the reconstructed metabolic network. This analysis highlighted some metabolic genes and processes, including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, and transport that potentially play important roles in organohalide respiration. Overall, this study shows the importance of an organism's metabolic reconstruction in analyzing various "omics" data to obtain improved understanding of the

  19. New insights into Dehalococcoides mccartyi metabolism from a reconstructed metabolic network-based systems-level analysis of D. mccartyi transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Ahsanul; Waller, Alison S; Hug, Laura A; Provart, Nicholas J; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Organohalide respiration, mediated by Dehalococcoides mccartyi, is a useful bioremediation process that transforms ground water pollutants and known human carcinogens such as trichloroethene and vinyl chloride into benign ethenes. Successful application of this process depends on the fundamental understanding of the respiration and metabolism of D. mccartyi. Reductive dehalogenases, encoded by rdhA genes of these anaerobic bacteria, exclusively catalyze organohalide respiration and drive metabolism. To better elucidate D. mccartyi metabolism and physiology, we analyzed available transcriptomic data for a pure isolate (Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195) and a mixed microbial consortium (KB-1) using the previously developed pan-genome-scale reconstructed metabolic network of D. mccartyi. The transcriptomic data, together with available proteomic data helped confirm transcription and expression of the majority genes in D. mccartyi genomes. A composite genome of two highly similar D. mccartyi strains (KB-1 Dhc) from the KB-1 metagenome sequence was constructed, and operon prediction was conducted for this composite genome and other single genomes. This operon analysis, together with the quality threshold clustering analysis of transcriptomic data helped generate experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the function of a number of hypothetical proteins and the poorly understood mechanism of energy conservation in D. mccartyi. We also identified functionally enriched important clusters (13 for strain 195 and 11 for KB-1 Dhc) of co-expressed metabolic genes using information from the reconstructed metabolic network. This analysis highlighted some metabolic genes and processes, including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, and transport that potentially play important roles in organohalide respiration. Overall, this study shows the importance of an organism's metabolic reconstruction in analyzing various "omics" data to obtain improved understanding of the

  20. Inferring metabolic networks using the Bayesian adaptive graphical lasso with informative priors

    PubMed Central

    PETERSON, CHRISTINE; VANNUCCI, MARINA; KARAKAS, CEMAL; CHOI, WILLIAM; MA, LIHUA; MALETIĆ-SAVATIĆ, MIRJANA

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic processes are essential for cellular function and survival. We are interested in inferring a metabolic network in activated microglia, a major neuroimmune cell in the brain responsible for the neuroinflammation associated with neurological diseases, based on a set of quantified metabolites. To achieve this, we apply the Bayesian adaptive graphical lasso with informative priors that incorporate known relationships between covariates. To encourage sparsity, the Bayesian graphical lasso places double exponential priors on the off-diagonal entries of the precision matrix. The Bayesian adaptive graphical lasso allows each double exponential prior to have a unique shrinkage parameter. These shrinkage parameters share a common gamma hyperprior. We extend this model to create an informative prior structure by formulating tailored hyperpriors on the shrinkage parameters. By choosing parameter values for each hyperprior that shift probability mass toward zero for nodes that are close together in a reference network, we encourage edges between covariates with known relationships. This approach can improve the reliability of network inference when the sample size is small relative to the number of parameters to be estimated. When applied to the data on activated microglia, the inferred network includes both known relationships and associations of potential interest for further investigation. PMID:24533172

  1. Reconfiguration of the Achene and Receptacle Metabolic Networks during Strawberry Fruit Development1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fait, Aaron; Hanhineva, Kati; Beleggia, Romina; Dai, Nir; Rogachev, Ilana; Nikiforova, Victoria J.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Aharoni, Asaph

    2008-01-01

    The anatomy of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit, in which the achene is found on the outer part of the fruit, makes it an excellent species for studying the regulation of fruit development. It can provide a model for the cross talk between primary and secondary metabolism, whose role is of pivotal importance in the process. By combining gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with the aim of addressing the metabolic regulation underlying fruit seed development, we simultaneously analyzed the composition of primary and secondary metabolites, separately, in achene and receptacle during fruit ripening of strawberry cultivar Herut. The results from these analyses suggest that changes in primary and secondary metabolism reflect organ and developmental specificities. For instance, the receptacle was characterized by increases in sugars and their direct derivatives, while the achene was characterized by a major decrease in the levels of carbon- and nitrogen-rich compounds, with the exception of storage-related metabolites (e.g. raffinose). Furthermore, the receptacle, and to a lesser extent the achene, exhibited dynamic fluctuations in the levels and nature of secondary metabolites across the ripening process. In the receptacle, proanthocyanidins and flavonol derivatives characterized mainly early developmental stages, while anthocyanins were abundant in the mature red stage; in the achene, ellagitannin and flavonoids were abundant during early and late development, respectively. Correlation-based network analysis suggested that metabolism is substantially coordinated during early development in either organ. Nonetheless, a higher degree of connectivity within and between metabolic pathways was measured in the achenes. The data are discussed within the context of current models both of the interaction of primary and secondary metabolism and of the metabolic interaction between the different plant organs. PMID:18715960

  2. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolic Network in Mycobacterium vanbaaleniiPYR-1 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Holland, Ricky D.; Chen, Hongyan; Kim, Dae-Wi; Gao, Yuan; Yu, Li-Rong; Baek, Songjoon; Baek, Dong-Heon; Ahn, Hongsik; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated a metabolic network (MN) from Mycobacterium vanbaaleniiPYR-1 for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the perspective of structure, behavior, and evolution, in which multilayer omics data are integrated. Initially, we utilized a high-throughput proteomic analysis to assess the protein expression response of M. vanbaaleniiPYR-1 to seven different aromatic compounds. A total of 3,431 proteins (57.38% of the genome-predicted proteins) were identified, which included 160 proteins that seemed to be involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Based on the proteomic data and the previous metabolic, biochemical, physiological, and genomic information, we reconstructed an experiment-based system-level PAH-MN. The structure of PAH-MN, with 183 metabolic compounds and 224 chemical reactions, has a typical scale-free nature. The behavior and evolution of the PAH-MN reveals a hierarchical modularity with funnel effects in structure/function and intimate association with evolutionary modules of the functional modules, which are the ring cleavage process (RCP), side chain process (SCP), and central aromatic process (CAP). The 189 commonly upregulated proteins in all aromatic hydrocarbon treatments provide insights into the global adaptation to facilitate the PAH metabolism. Taken together, the findings of our study provide the hierarchical viewpoint from genes/proteins/metabolites to the network via functional modules of the PAH-MN equipped with the engineering-driven approaches of modularization and rationalization, which may expand our understanding of the metabolic potential of M. vanbaaleniiPYR-1 for bioremediation applications. PMID:21725022

  3. Integrated Modeling of Gene Regulatory and Metabolic Networks in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuyi; Minch, Kyle J; Rustad, Tige R; Hobbs, Samuel; Zhou, Suk-Lin; Sherman, David R; Price, Nathan D

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the causative bacterium of tuberculosis, a disease responsible for over a million deaths worldwide annually with a growing number of strains resistant to antibiotics. The development of better therapeutics would greatly benefit from improved understanding of the mechanisms associated with MTB responses to different genetic and environmental perturbations. Therefore, we expanded a genome-scale regulatory-metabolic model for MTB using the Probabilistic Regulation of Metabolism (PROM) framework. Our model, MTBPROM2.0, represents a substantial knowledge base update and extension of simulation capability. We incorporated a recent ChIP-seq based binding network of 2555 interactions linking to 104 transcription factors (TFs) (representing a 3.5-fold expansion of TF coverage). We integrated this expanded regulatory network with a refined genome-scale metabolic model that can correctly predict growth viability over 69 source metabolite conditions and predict metabolic gene essentiality more accurately than the original model. We used MTBPROM2.0 to simulate the metabolic consequences of knocking out and overexpressing each of the 104 TFs in the model. MTBPROM2.0 improves performance of knockout growth defect predictions compared to the original PROM MTB model, and it can successfully predict growth defects associated with TF overexpression. Moreover, condition-specific models of MTBPROM2.0 successfully predicted synergistic growth consequences of overexpressing the TF whiB4 in the presence of two standard anti-TB drugs. MTBPROM2.0 can screen in silico condition-specific transcription factor perturbations to generate putative targets of interest that can help prioritize future experiments for therapeutic development efforts.

  4. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP . PMID:26542446

  5. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP .

  6. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  7. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects.

  8. A Systems Genetic Analysis of High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism and Network Preservation across Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Langfelder, Peter; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Paul, Eric; Davis, Richard; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Horvath, Steve; Mehrabian, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    We report a systems genetics analysis of high density lipoproteins (HDL) levels in an F2 intercross between inbred strains CAST/EiJ and C57BL/6J. We previously showed that there are dramatic differences in HDL metabolism in a cross between these strains, and we now report co-expression network analysis of HDL that integrates global expression data from liver and adipose with relevant metabolic traits. Using data from a total of 293 F2 intercross mice, we constructed weighted gene co-expression networks and identified modules (subnetworks) associated with HDL and clinical traits. These were examined for genes implicated in HDL levels based on large human genome-wide associations studies (GWAS) and examined with respect to conservation between tissue and sexes in a total of 9 data sets. We identify genes that are consistently ranked high by association with HDL across the 9 data sets. We focus in particular on two genes, Wfdc2 and Hdac3, that are located in close proximity to HDL QTL peaks where causal testing indicates that they may affect HDL. Our results provide a rich resource for studies of complex metabolic interactions involving HDL. PMID:21807117

  9. Metabolic networks to generate pyruvate, PEP and ATP from glycerol in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Alhasawi, Azhar; Thomas, Sean C; Appanna, Vasu D

    2016-04-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of the biodiesel industry. In this study we report on the metabolic networks involved in its transformation into pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP. When the nutritionally-versatile Pseudomonas fluorescens was exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a mineral medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source, the microbe reconfigured its metabolism to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) primarily via substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). This alternative ATP-producing stratagem resulted in the synthesis of copious amounts of PEP and pyruvate. The production of these metabolites was mediated via the enhanced activities of such enzymes as pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). The high energy PEP was subsequently converted into ATP with the aid of pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPS) and pyruvate kinase (PK) with the concomitant formation of pyruvate. The participation of the phospho-transfer enzymes like adenylate kinase (AK) and acetate kinase (ACK) ensured the efficiency of this O2-independent energy-generating machinery. The increased activity of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) in the stressed bacteria provided the necessary precursors to fuel this process. This H2O2-induced anaerobic life-style fortuitously evokes metabolic networks to an effective pathway that can be harnessed into the synthesis of ATP, PEP and pyruvate. The bioconversion of glycerol to pyruvate will offer interesting economic benefit. PMID:26920481

  10. Cross‐talk between circadian clocks, sleep‐wake cycles, and metabolic networks: Dispelling the darkness

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan

    2016-01-01

    Integration of knowledge concerning circadian rhythms, metabolic networks, and sleep‐wake cycles is imperative for unraveling the mysteries of biological cycles and their underlying mechanisms. During the last decade, enormous progress in circadian biology research has provided a plethora of new insights into the molecular architecture of circadian clocks. However, the recent identification of autonomous redox oscillations in cells has expanded our view of the clockwork beyond conventional transcription/translation feedback loop models, which have been dominant since the first circadian period mutants were identified in fruit fly. Consequently, non‐transcriptional timekeeping mechanisms have been proposed, and the antioxidant peroxiredoxin proteins have been identified as conserved markers for 24‐hour rhythms. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of interdependencies amongst circadian rhythms, sleep homeostasis, redox cycles, and other cellular metabolic networks. We speculate that systems‐level investigations implementing integrated multi‐omics approaches could provide novel mechanistic insights into the connectivity between daily cycles and metabolic systems. PMID:26866932

  11. Integrated Analysis of Metabolite and Transcript Levels Reveals the Metabolic Shifts That Underlie Tomato Fruit Development and Highlight Regulatory Aspects of Metabolic Network Behavior1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carrari, Fernando; Baxter, Charles; Usadel, Björn; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Zanor, Maria-Ines; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Nikiforova, Victoria; Centero, Danilo; Ratzka, Antje; Pauly, Markus; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2006-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a well-studied model of fleshy fruit development and ripening. Tomato fruit development is well understood from a hormonal-regulatory perspective, and developmental changes in pigment and cell wall metabolism are also well characterized. However, more general aspects of metabolic change during fruit development have not been studied despite the importance of metabolism in the context of final composition of the ripe fruit. In this study, we quantified the abundance of a broad range of metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, analyzed a number of the principal metabolic fluxes, and in parallel analyzed transcriptomic changes during tomato fruit development. Metabolic profiling revealed pronounced shifts in the abundance of metabolites of both primary and secondary metabolism during development. The metabolite changes were reflected in the flux analysis that revealed a general decrease in metabolic activity during ripening. However, there were several distinct patterns of metabolite profile, and statistical analysis demonstrated that metabolites in the same (or closely related) pathways changed in abundance in a coordinated manner, indicating a tight regulation of metabolic activity. The metabolite data alone allowed investigations of likely routes through the metabolic network, and, as an example, we analyze the operational feasibility of different pathways of ascorbate synthesis. When combined with the transcriptomic data, several aspects of the regulation of metabolism during fruit ripening were revealed. First, it was apparent that transcript abundance was less strictly coordinated by functional group than metabolite abundance, suggesting that posttranslational mechanisms dominate metabolic regulation. Nevertheless, there were some correlations between specific transcripts and metabolites, and several novel associations were identified that could provide potential targets for manipulation of fruit compositional traits

  12. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Dale A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Karve, Abhijit A; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Chen, Jay; Martin, Madhavi Z; Jawdy, Sara; Weston, David; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  13. Investigating host-pathogen behavior and their interaction using genome-scale metabolic network models.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Priyanka P; Raghunathan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Genome Scale Metabolic Modeling methods represent one way to compute whole cell function starting from the genome sequence of an organism and contribute towards understanding and predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. About 80 models spanning all the kingdoms of life from archaea to eukaryotes have been built till date and used to interrogate cell phenotype under varying conditions. These models have been used to not only understand the flux distribution in evolutionary conserved pathways like glycolysis and the Krebs cycle but also in applications ranging from value added product formation in Escherichia coli to predicting inborn errors of Homo sapiens metabolism. This chapter describes a protocol that delineates the process of genome scale metabolic modeling for analysing host-pathogen behavior and interaction using flux balance analysis (FBA). The steps discussed in the process include (1) reconstruction of a metabolic network from the genome sequence, (2) its representation in a precise mathematical framework, (3) its translation to a model, and (4) the analysis using linear algebra and optimization. The methods for biological interpretations of computed cell phenotypes in the context of individual host and pathogen models and their integration are also discussed. PMID:25048144

  14. Investigating host-pathogen behavior and their interaction using genome-scale metabolic network models.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Priyanka P; Raghunathan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Genome Scale Metabolic Modeling methods represent one way to compute whole cell function starting from the genome sequence of an organism and contribute towards understanding and predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. About 80 models spanning all the kingdoms of life from archaea to eukaryotes have been built till date and used to interrogate cell phenotype under varying conditions. These models have been used to not only understand the flux distribution in evolutionary conserved pathways like glycolysis and the Krebs cycle but also in applications ranging from value added product formation in Escherichia coli to predicting inborn errors of Homo sapiens metabolism. This chapter describes a protocol that delineates the process of genome scale metabolic modeling for analysing host-pathogen behavior and interaction using flux balance analysis (FBA). The steps discussed in the process include (1) reconstruction of a metabolic network from the genome sequence, (2) its representation in a precise mathematical framework, (3) its translation to a model, and (4) the analysis using linear algebra and optimization. The methods for biological interpretations of computed cell phenotypes in the context of individual host and pathogen models and their integration are also discussed.

  15. Networks of energetic and metabolic interactions define dynamics in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Embree, Mallory; Liu, Joanne K; Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M; Zengler, Karsten

    2015-12-15

    Microorganisms form diverse communities that have a profound impact on the environment and human health. Recent technological advances have enabled elucidation of community diversity at high resolution. Investigation of microbial communities has revealed that they often contain multiple members with complementing and seemingly redundant metabolic capabilities. An understanding of the communal impacts of redundant metabolic capabilities is currently lacking; specifically, it is not known whether metabolic redundancy will foster competition or motivate cooperation. By investigating methanogenic populations, we identified the multidimensional interspecies interactions that define composition and dynamics within syntrophic communities that play a key role in the global carbon cycle. Species-specific genomes were extracted from metagenomic data using differential coverage binning. We used metabolic modeling leveraging metatranscriptomic information to reveal and quantify a complex intertwined system of syntrophic relationships. Our results show that amino acid auxotrophies create additional interdependencies that define community composition and control carbon and energy flux through the system while simultaneously contributing to overall community robustness. Strategic use of antimicrobials further reinforces this intricate interspecies network. Collectively, our study reveals the multidimensional interactions in syntrophic communities that promote high species richness and bolster community stability during environmental perturbations.

  16. A Network Flow Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolism in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lu, Hanjing; Fath, Brian D; Zheng, Hongmei; Sun, Xiaoxi; Li, Yanxian

    2016-08-16

    Rapid urbanization results in high nitrogen flows and subsequent environmental consequences. In this study, we identified the main metabolic components (nitrogen inputs, flows, and outputs) and used ecological network analysis to track the direct and integral (direct + indirect) metabolic flows of nitrogen in Beijing, China, from 1996 to 2012 and to quantify the structure of Beijing's nitrogen metabolic processes. We found that Beijing's input of new reactive nitrogen (Q, which represents nitrogen obtained from the atmosphere or nitrogen-containing materials used in production and consumption to support human activities) increased from 431 Gg in 1996 to 507 Gg in 2012. Flows to the industry, atmosphere, and household, and components of the system were clearly largest, with total integrated inputs plus outputs from these nodes accounting for 31, 29, and 15%, respectively, of the total integral flows for all paths. The flows through the sewage treatment and transportation components showed marked growth, with total integrated inputs plus outputs increasing to 3.7 and 5.2 times their 1996 values, respectively. Our results can help policymakers to locate the key nodes and pathways in an urban nitrogen metabolic system so they can monitor and manage these components of the system. PMID:27406465

  17. Network environ perspective for urban metabolism and carbon emissions: a case study of Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2012-04-17

    Cities are considered major contributors to global warming, where carbon emissions are highly embedded in the overall urban metabolism. To examine urban metabolic processes and emission trajectories we developed a carbon flux model based on Network Environ Analysis (NEA). The mutual interactions and control situation within the urban ecosystem of Vienna were examined, and the system-level properties of the city's carbon metabolism were assessed. Regulatory strategies to minimize carbon emissions were identified through the tracking of the possible pathways that affect these emission trajectories. Our findings suggest that indirect flows have a strong bearing on the mutual and control relationships between urban sectors. The metabolism of a city is considered self-mutualistic and sustainable only when the local and distal environments are embraced. Energy production and construction were found to be two factors with a major impact on carbon emissions, and whose regulation is only effective via ad-hoc pathways. In comparison with the original life-cycle tracking, the application of NEA was better at revealing details from a mechanistic aspect, which is crucial for informed sustainable urban management.

  18. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  19. Gene Duplication and Phenotypic Changes in the Evolution of Mammalian Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bekaert, Michaël; Conant, Gavin C.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic networks attempt to describe the complete suite of biochemical reactions available to an organism. One notable feature of these networks in mammals is the large number of distinct proteins that catalyze the same reaction. While the existence of these isoenzymes has long been known, their evolutionary significance is still unclear. Using a phylogenetically-aware comparative genomics approach, we infer enzyme orthology networks for sixteen mammals as well as for their common ancestors. We find that the pattern of isoenzymes copy-number alterations (CNAs) in these networks is suggestive of natural selection acting on the retention of certain gene duplications. When further analyzing these data with a machine-learning approach, we found that that the pattern of CNAs is also predictive of several important phenotypic traits, including milk composition and geographic range. Integrating tools from network analyses, phylogenetics and comparative genomics both allows the prediction of phenotypes from genetic data and represents a means of unifying distinct biological disciplines. PMID:24489850

  20. Systematic construction of kinetic models from genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Natalie J; Lubitz, Timo; Smallbone, Kieran; Klipp, Edda; Mendes, Pedro; Liebermeister, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative effects of environmental and genetic perturbations on metabolism can be studied in silico using kinetic models. We present a strategy for large-scale model construction based on a logical layering of data such as reaction fluxes, metabolite concentrations, and kinetic constants. The resulting models contain realistic standard rate laws and plausible parameters, adhere to the laws of thermodynamics, and reproduce a predefined steady state. These features have not been simultaneously achieved by previous workflows. We demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the workflow by translating the yeast consensus metabolic network into a kinetic model. Despite crudely selected data, the model shows realistic control behaviour, a stable dynamic, and realistic response to perturbations in extracellular glucose concentrations. The paper concludes by outlining how new data can continuously be fed into the workflow and how iterative model building can assist in directing experiments. PMID:24324546

  1. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

  2. The Nrf2 regulatory network provides an interface between redox and intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hayes, John D; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2, also called Nfe2l2) is a transcription factor that regulates the cellular redox status. Nrf2 is controlled through a complex transcriptional/epigenetic and post-translational network that ensures its activity increases during redox perturbation, inflammation, growth factor stimulation and nutrient/energy fluxes, thereby enabling the factor to orchestrate adaptive responses to diverse forms of stress. Besides mediating stress-stimulated induction of antioxidant and detoxification genes, Nrf2 contributes to adaptation by upregulating the repair and degradation of damaged macromolecules, and by modulating intermediary metabolism. In the latter case, Nrf2 inhibits lipogenesis, supports β-oxidation of fatty acids, facilitates flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, and increases NADPH regeneration and purine biosynthesis; these observations suggest Nrf2 directs metabolic reprogramming during stress.

  3. The Metabolic Network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: Systemic Properties of Autotrophic Growth1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Henning; Zilliges, Yvonne; Lockau, Wolfgang; Steuer, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria have attracted growing attention as potential host organisms for the production of valuable organic products and provide an ideal model to understand oxygenic photosynthesis and phototrophic metabolism. To obtain insight into the functional properties of phototrophic growth, we present a detailed reconstruction of the primary metabolic network of the autotrophic prokaryote Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The reconstruction is based on multiple data sources and extensive manual curation and significantly extends currently available repositories of cyanobacterial metabolism. A systematic functional analysis, utilizing the framework of flux-balance analysis, allows the prediction of essential metabolic pathways and reactions and allows the identification of inconsistencies in the current annotation. As a counterintuitive result, our computational model indicates that photorespiration is beneficial to achieve optimal growth rates. The reconstruction process highlights several obstacles currently encountered in the context of large-scale reconstructions of metabolic networks. PMID:20616194

  4. Fast computation of minimal cut sets in metabolic networks with a Berge algorithm that utilizes binary bit pattern trees.

    PubMed

    Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Beurton-Aimar, Marie; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Minimal cut sets are a valuable tool for analyzing metabolic networks and for identifying optimal gene intervention strategies by eliminating unwanted metabolic functions and keeping desired functionality. Minimal cut sets rely on the concept of elementary flux modes, which are sets of indivisible metabolic pathways under steady-state condition. However, the computation of minimal cut sets is nontrivial, as even medium-sized metabolic networks with just 100 reactions easily have several hundred million elementary flux modes. We developed a minimal cut set tool that implements the well-known Berge algorithm and utilizes a novel approach to significantly reduce the program run time by using binary bit pattern trees. By using the introduced tree approach, the size of metabolic models that can be analyzed and optimized by minimal cut sets is pushed to new and considerably higher limits.

  5. Towards finding the linkage between metabolic and age-related disorders using semantic gene data network analysis.

    PubMed

    Uzzal Hossain, Mohammad; Zaffar Shibly, Abu; Md Omar, Taimur; Tous Zohora, Fatama; Sara Santona, Umme; Hossain, Md Jakir; Hosen Khoka, Md Sadek; Ara Keya, Chaman; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    A metabolic disorder (MD) occurs when the metabolic process is disturbed. This process is carried out by thousands of enzymes participating in numerous inter-dependent metabolic pathways. Critical biochemical reactions that involve the processing and transportation of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids are affected in metabolic diseases. Therefore, it is of interest to identify the common pathways of metabolic disorders by building protein-protein interactions (PPI) for network analysis. The molecular network linkages between MD and age related diseases (ARD) are intriguing. Hence, we created networks of protein-protein interactions that are related with MD and ARD using relevant known data in the public domain. The network analysis identified known MD associated proteins and predicted genes and or its products of ARD in common pathways. The genes in the common pathways were isolated from the network and further analyzed for their co-localization and shared domains. Thus, a model hypothesis is proposed using interaction networks that are linked between MD and ARD. This data even if less conclusive finds application in understanding the molecular mechanism of known diseases in relation to observed molecular events.

  6. Reconstruction and In Silico Analysis of Metabolic Network for an Oleaginous Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pengcheng; Hua, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    With the emergence of energy scarcity, the use of renewable energy sources such as biodiesel is becoming increasingly necessary. Recently, many researchers have focused their minds on Yarrowia lipolytica, a model oleaginous yeast, which can be employed to accumulate large amounts of lipids that could be further converted to biodiesel. In order to understand the metabolic characteristics of Y. lipolytica at a systems level and to examine the potential for enhanced lipid production, a genome-scale compartmentalized metabolic network was reconstructed based on a combination of genome annotation and the detailed biochemical knowledge from multiple databases such as KEGG, ENZYME and BIGG. The information about protein and reaction associations of all the organisms in KEGG and Expasy-ENZYME database was arranged into an EXCEL file that can then be regarded as a new useful database to generate other reconstructions. The generated model iYL619_PCP accounts for 619 genes, 843 metabolites and 1,142 reactions including 236 transport reactions, 125 exchange reactions and 13 spontaneous reactions. The in silico model successfully predicted the minimal media and the growing abilities on different substrates. With flux balance analysis, single gene knockouts were also simulated to predict the essential genes and partially essential genes. In addition, flux variability analysis was applied to design new mutant strains that will redirect fluxes through the network and may enhance the production of lipid. This genome-scale metabolic model of Y. lipolytica can facilitate system-level metabolic analysis as well as strain development for improving the production of biodiesels and other valuable products by Y. lipolytica and other closely related oleaginous yeasts. PMID:23236514

  7. Spatial memory extinction differentially affects dorsal and ventral hippocampal metabolic activity and associated functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; González-Pardo, Héctor; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L; Conejo, Nélida M

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies showed the involvement of brain regions associated with both spatial learning and associative learning in spatial memory extinction, although the specific role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and the extended hippocampal system including the mammillary body in the process is still controversial. The present study aimed to identify the involvement of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, together with cortical regions, the amygdaloid nuclei, and the mammillary bodies in the extinction of a spatial memory task. To address these issues, quantitative cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied as a metabolic brain mapping method. Rats were trained in a reference memory task using the Morris water maze, followed by an extinction procedure of the previously acquired memory task. Results show that rats learned successfully the spatial memory task as shown by the progressive decrease in measured latencies to reach the escape platform and the results obtained in the probe test. Spatial memory was subsequently extinguished as shown by the descending preference for the previously reinforced location. A control naïve group was added to ensure that brain metabolic changes were specifically related with performance in the spatial memory extinction task. Extinction of the original spatial learning task significantly modified the metabolic activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, the amygdala and the mammillary bodies. Moreover, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral mammillary body and the retrosplenial cortex were differentially recruited in the spatial memory extinction task, as shown by group differences in brain metabolic networks. These findings provide new insights on the brain regions and functional brain networks underlying spatial memory, and specifically spatial memory extinction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Spatial memory extinction differentially affects dorsal and ventral hippocampal metabolic activity and associated functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; González-Pardo, Héctor; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L; Conejo, Nélida M

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies showed the involvement of brain regions associated with both spatial learning and associative learning in spatial memory extinction, although the specific role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and the extended hippocampal system including the mammillary body in the process is still controversial. The present study aimed to identify the involvement of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, together with cortical regions, the amygdaloid nuclei, and the mammillary bodies in the extinction of a spatial memory task. To address these issues, quantitative cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied as a metabolic brain mapping method. Rats were trained in a reference memory task using the Morris water maze, followed by an extinction procedure of the previously acquired memory task. Results show that rats learned successfully the spatial memory task as shown by the progressive decrease in measured latencies to reach the escape platform and the results obtained in the probe test. Spatial memory was subsequently extinguished as shown by the descending preference for the previously reinforced location. A control naïve group was added to ensure that brain metabolic changes were specifically related with performance in the spatial memory extinction task. Extinction of the original spatial learning task significantly modified the metabolic activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, the amygdala and the mammillary bodies. Moreover, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral mammillary body and the retrosplenial cortex were differentially recruited in the spatial memory extinction task, as shown by group differences in brain metabolic networks. These findings provide new insights on the brain regions and functional brain networks underlying spatial memory, and specifically spatial memory extinction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102086

  9. Computing minimal nutrient sets from metabolic networks via linear constraint solving

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As more complete genome sequences become available, bioinformatics challenges arise in how to exploit genome sequences to make phenotypic predictions. One type of phenotypic prediction is to determine sets of compounds that will support the growth of a bacterium from the metabolic network inferred from the genome sequence of that organism. Results We present a method for computationally determining alternative growth media for an organism based on its metabolic network and transporter complement. Our method predicted 787 alternative anaerobic minimal nutrient sets for Escherichia coli K–12 MG1655 from the EcoCyc database. The program automatically partitioned the nutrients within these sets into 21 equivalence classes, most of which correspond to compounds serving as sources of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur, or combinations of these essential elements. The nutrient sets were predicted with 72.5% accuracy as evaluated by comparison with 91 growth experiments. Novel aspects of our approach include (a) exhaustive consideration of all combinations of nutrients rather than assuming that all element sources can substitute for one another(an assumption that can be invalid in general) (b) leveraging the notion of a machinery-duplicating constraint, namely, that all intermediate metabolites used in active reactions must be produced in increasing concentrations to prevent successive dilution from cell division, (c) the use of Satisfiability Modulo Theory solvers rather than Linear Programming solvers, because our approach cannot be formulated as linear programming, (d) the use of Binary Decision Diagrams to produce an efficient implementation. Conclusions Our method for generating minimal nutrient sets from the metabolic network and transporters of an organism combines linear constraint solving with binary decision diagrams to efficiently produce solution sets to provided growth problems. PMID:23537498

  10. The response of the metabolic network of the red blood cell to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Lu, Zuhong

    2005-01-01

    The response of the metabolic network of human red blood cell is investigated using the E-Cell simulation system when pyruvate kinase (PK) is deficient. The results that several downstream metabolites of the glycolysis pathway accumulate are in a good agreement with experimental data reported in literatures. This accumulation results in the reaction that phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes reversing its direction. Mathematical analysis to the simulation results shows that the PGK-catalyzing reaction reversing its direction happens simultaneously with an abrupt change of the second derivative of the ATP quantity. PMID:17282332

  11. Recent advances in elementary flux modes and yield space analysis as useful tools in metabolic network studies.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Predrag; Koller, Martin; Braunegg, Gerhart

    2015-09-01

    A review of the use of elementary flux modes (EFMs) and their applications in metabolic engineering covered with yield space analysis (YSA) is presented. EFMs are an invaluable tool in mathematical modeling of biochemical processes. They are described from their inception in 1994, followed by various improvements of their computation in later years. YSA constitutes another precious tool for metabolic network modeling, and is presented in details along with EFMs in this article. The application of these techniques is discussed for several case studies of metabolic network modeling provided in respective original articles. The article is concluded by some case studies in which the application of EFMs and YSA turned out to be most useful, such as the analysis of intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) formation and consumption in Cupriavidus necator, including the constraint-based description of the steady-state flux cone of the strain's metabolic network, the profound analysis of a continuous five-stage bioreactor cascade for PHA production by C. necator using EFMs and, finally, the study of metabolic fluxes in the metabolic network of C. necator cultivated on glycerol.

  12. Systematic analysis of conservation relations in Escherichia coli genome-scale metabolic network reveals novel growth media.

    PubMed

    Imielinski, Marcin; Belta, Calin; Rubin, Harvey; Halász, Adam

    2006-04-15

    A biochemical species is called producible in a constraints-based metabolic model if a feasible steady-state flux configuration exists that sustains its nonzero concentration during growth. Extreme semipositive conservation relations (ESCRs) are the simplest semipositive linear combinations of species concentrations that are invariant to all metabolic flux configurations. In this article, we outline a fundamental relationship between the ESCRs of a metabolic network and the producibility of a biochemical species under a nutrient media. We exploit this relationship in an algorithm that systematically enumerates all minimal nutrient sets that render an objective species weakly producible (i.e., producible in the absence of thermodynamic constraints) through a simple traversal of ESCRs. We apply our results to a recent genome scale model of Escherichia coli metabolism, in which we traverse the 51 anhydrous ESCRs of the metabolic network to determine all 928 minimal aqueous nutrient media that render biomass weakly producible. Applying irreversibility constraints, we find 287 of these 928 nutrient sets to be thermodynamically feasible. We also find that an additional 365 of these nutrient sets are thermodynamically feasible in the presence of oxygen. Since biomass producibility is commonly used as a surrogate for growth in genome scale metabolic models, our results represent testable hypotheses of alternate growth media derived from in silico analysis of the E. coli genome scale metabolic network.

  13. Yeast 5 – an expanded reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Efforts to improve the computational reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae biochemical reaction network and to refine the stoichiometrically constrained metabolic models that can be derived from such a reconstruction have continued since the first stoichiometrically constrained yeast genome scale metabolic model was published in 2003. Continuing this ongoing process, we have constructed an update to the Yeast Consensus Reconstruction, Yeast 5. The Yeast Consensus Reconstruction is a product of efforts to forge a community-based reconstruction emphasizing standards compliance and biochemical accuracy via evidence-based selection of reactions. It draws upon models published by a variety of independent research groups as well as information obtained from biochemical databases and primary literature. Results Yeast 5 refines the biochemical reactions included in the reconstruction, particularly reactions involved in sphingolipid metabolism; updates gene-reaction annotations; and emphasizes the distinction between reconstruction and stoichiometrically constrained model. Although it was not a primary goal, this update also improves the accuracy of model prediction of viability and auxotrophy phenotypes and increases the number of epistatic interactions. This update maintains an emphasis on standards compliance, unambiguous metabolite naming, and computer-readable annotations available through a structured document format. Additionally, we have developed MATLAB scripts to evaluate the model’s predictive accuracy and to demonstrate basic model applications such as simulating aerobic and anaerobic growth. These scripts, which provide an independent tool for evaluating the performance of various stoichiometrically constrained yeast metabolic models using flux balance analysis, are included as Additional files 1, 2 and 3. Conclusions Yeast 5 expands and refines the computational reconstruction of yeast metabolism and improves the predictive accuracy of a

  14. A disease-specific metabolic brain network associated with corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Niethammer, Martin; Tang, Chris C; Feigin, Andrew; Allen, Patricia J; Heinen, Lisette; Hellwig, Sabine; Amtage, Florian; Hanspal, Era; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Poston, Kathleen L; Meyer, Philipp T; Leenders, Klaus L; Eidelberg, David

    2014-11-01

    Corticobasal degeneration is an uncommon parkinsonian variant condition that is diagnosed mainly on clinical examination. To facilitate the differential diagnosis of this disorder, we used metabolic brain imaging to characterize a specific network that can be used to discriminate corticobasal degeneration from other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Ten non-demented patients (eight females/two males; age 73.9 ± 5.7 years) underwent metabolic brain imaging with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for atypical parkinsonism. These individuals were diagnosed clinically with probable corticobasal degeneration. This diagnosis was confirmed in the three subjects who additionally underwent post-mortem examination. Ten age-matched healthy subjects (five females/five males; age 71.7 ± 6.7 years) served as controls for the imaging studies. Spatial covariance analysis was applied to scan data from the combined group to identify a significant corticobasal degeneration-related metabolic pattern that discriminated (P < 0.001) the patients from the healthy control group. This pattern was characterized by bilateral, asymmetric metabolic reductions involving frontal and parietal cortex, thalamus, and caudate nucleus. These pattern-related changes were greater in magnitude in the cerebral hemisphere opposite the more clinically affected body side. The presence of this corticobasal degeneration-related metabolic topography was confirmed in two independent testing sets of patient and control scans, with elevated pattern expression (P < 0.001) in both disease groups relative to corresponding normal values. We next determined whether prospectively computed expression values for this pattern accurately discriminated corticobasal degeneration from multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy (the two most common atypical parkinsonian syndromes) on a single case basis. Based upon this measure, corticobasal degeneration was successfully distinguished from

  15. optGpSampler: An Improved Tool for Uniformly Sampling the Solution-Space of Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Megchelenbrink, Wout; Huynen, Martijn; Marchiori, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Constraint-based models of metabolic networks are typically underdetermined, because they contain more reactions than metabolites. Therefore the solutions to this system do not consist of unique flux rates for each reaction, but rather a space of possible flux rates. By uniformly sampling this space, an estimated probability distribution for each reaction’s flux in the network can be obtained. However, sampling a high dimensional network is time-consuming. Furthermore, the constraints imposed on the network give rise to an irregularly shaped solution space. Therefore more tailored, efficient sampling methods are needed. We propose an efficient sampling algorithm (called optGpSampler), which implements the Artificial Centering Hit-and-Run algorithm in a different manner than the sampling algorithm implemented in the COBRA Toolbox for metabolic network analysis, here called gpSampler. Results of extensive experiments on different genome-scale metabolic networks show that optGpSampler is up to 40 times faster than gpSampler. Application of existing convergence diagnostics on small network reconstructions indicate that optGpSampler converges roughly ten times faster than gpSampler towards similar sampling distributions. For networks of higher dimension (i.e. containing more than 500 reactions), we observed significantly better convergence of optGpSampler and a large deviation between the samples generated by the two algorithms. Availability: optGpSampler for Matlab and Python is available for non-commercial use at: http://cs.ru.nl/~wmegchel/optGpSampler/. PMID:24551039

  16. Genome-scale reconstruction and system level investigation of the metabolic network of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methylotrophic microorganisms are playing a key role in biogeochemical processes - especially the global carbon cycle - and have gained interest for biotechnological purposes. Significant progress was made in the recent years in the biochemistry, genetics, genomics, and physiology of methylotrophic bacteria, showing that methylotrophy is much more widespread and versatile than initially assumed. Despite such progress, system-level description of the methylotrophic metabolism is currently lacking, and much remains to understand regarding the network-scale organization and properties of methylotrophy, and how the methylotrophic capacity emerges from this organization, especially in facultative organisms. Results In this work, we report on the integrated, system-level investigation of the metabolic network of the facultative methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, a valuable model of methylotrophic bacteria. The genome-scale metabolic network of the bacterium was reconstructed and contains 1139 reactions and 977 metabolites. The sub-network operating upon methylotrophic growth was identified from both in silico and experimental investigations, and 13C-fluxomics was applied to measure the distribution of metabolic fluxes under such conditions. The core metabolism has a highly unusual topology, in which the unique enzymes that catalyse the key steps of C1 assimilation are tightly connected by several, large metabolic cycles (serine cycle, ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway, TCA cycle, anaplerotic processes). The entire set of reactions must operate as a unique process to achieve C1 assimilation, but was shown to be structurally fragile based on network analysis. This observation suggests that in nature a strong pressure of selection must exist to maintain the methylotrophic capability. Nevertheless, substantial substrate cycling could be measured within C2/C3/C4 inter-conversions, indicating that the metabolic network is highly versatile around a flexible

  17. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Novichkov, Pavel; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Kazanov, Marat D.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Kovaleva, Galina Y.; Permina, Elizabeth A.; Laikova, Olga N.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arkin, Adam P.; Dubchak, Inna; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Despite the growing number of genome-scale gene expression studies, our abilities to convert the results of these studies into accurate regulatory annotations and to project them from model to other organisms are extremely limited. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. However, even orthologous regulators with conserved DNA-binding motifs may control substantially different gene sets, revealing striking differences in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli. Multiple examples of regulatory network rewiring include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), and numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp).

  18. Genome-Scale Reconstruction and Analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Metabolic Network Facilitates Applications in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Miguel; Bielecka, Agata; Regenhardt, Daniela; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-01

    A cornerstone of biotechnology is the use of microorganisms for the efficient production of chemicals and the elimination of harmful waste. Pseudomonas putida is an archetype of such microbes due to its metabolic versatility, stress resistance, amenability to genetic modifications, and vast potential for environmental and industrial applications. To address both the elucidation of the metabolic wiring in P. putida and its uses in biocatalysis, in particular for the production of non-growth-related biochemicals, we developed and present here a genome-scale constraint-based model of the metabolism of P. putida KT2440. Network reconstruction and flux balance analysis (FBA) enabled definition of the structure of the metabolic network, identification of knowledge gaps, and pin-pointing of essential metabolic functions, facilitating thereby the refinement of gene annotations. FBA and flux variability analysis were used to analyze the properties, potential, and limits of the model. These analyses allowed identification, under various conditions, of key features of metabolism such as growth yield, resource distribution, network robustness, and gene essentiality. The model was validated with data from continuous cell cultures, high-throughput phenotyping data, 13C-measurement of internal flux distributions, and specifically generated knock-out mutants. Auxotrophy was correctly predicted in 75% of the cases. These systematic analyses revealed that the metabolic network structure is the main factor determining the accuracy of predictions, whereas biomass composition has negligible influence. Finally, we drew on the model to devise metabolic engineering strategies to improve production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a class of biotechnologically useful compounds whose synthesis is not coupled to cell survival. The solidly validated model yields valuable insights into genotype–phenotype relationships and provides a sound framework to explore this versatile bacterium and to

  19. On the Effect of Preferential Sampling in Spatial Prediction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of the sampling locations in a spatial network is often guided by practical demands. In particular, typically, locations are preferentially chosen to capture high values of a response, for example, air pollution levels in environmental monitoring. Then, model estimatio...

  20. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  1. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  2. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  3. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  4. Emergence of soft communities from geometric preferential attachment.

    PubMed

    Zuev, Konstantin; Boguñá, Marián; Bianconi, Ginestra; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-04-29

    All real networks are different, but many have some structural properties in common. There seems to be no consensus on what the most common properties are, but scale-free degree distributions, strong clustering, and community structure are frequently mentioned without question. Surprisingly, there exists no simple generative mechanism explaining all the three properties at once in growing networks. Here we show how latent network geometry coupled with preferential attachment of nodes to this geometry fills this gap. We call this mechanism geometric preferential attachment (GPA), and validate it against the Internet. GPA gives rise to soft communities that provide a different perspective on the community structure in networks. The connections between GPA and cosmological models, including inflation, are also discussed.

  5. Emergence of Soft Communities from Geometric Preferential Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Konstantin; Boguñá, Marián; Bianconi, Ginestra; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-04-01

    All real networks are different, but many have some structural properties in common. There seems to be no consensus on what the most common properties are, but scale-free degree distributions, strong clustering, and community structure are frequently mentioned without question. Surprisingly, there exists no simple generative mechanism explaining all the three properties at once in growing networks. Here we show how latent network geometry coupled with preferential attachment of nodes to this geometry fills this gap. We call this mechanism geometric preferential attachment (GPA), and validate it against the Internet. GPA gives rise to soft communities that provide a different perspective on the community structure in networks. The connections between GPA and cosmological models, including inflation, are also discussed.

  6. A systems biology approach to reconcile metabolic network models with application to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Reza; Fallah-Mehrabadi, Jalil; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Zahiri, Javad; Javad Niroomand, Mohammad; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-07-19

    Production of biofuels has been one of the promising efforts in biotechnology in the past few decades. The perspective of these efforts can be reduction of increasing demands for fossil fuels and consequently reducing environmental pollution. Nonetheless, most previous approaches did not succeed in obviating many big challenges in this way. In recent years systems biology with the help of microorganisms has been trying to overcome these challenges. Unicellular cyanobacteria are widespread phototrophic microorganisms that have capabilities such as consuming solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth and thus can be a suitable chassis for the production of valuable organic materials such as biofuels. For the ultimate use of metabolic potential of cyanobacteria, it is necessary to understand the reactions that are taking place inside the metabolic network of these microorganisms. In this study, we developed a Java tool to reconstruct an integrated metabolic network of a cyanobacterium (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803). We merged three existing reconstructed metabolic networks of this microorganism. Then, after modeling for biofuel production, the results from flux balance analysis (FBA) disclosed an increased yield in biofuel production for ethanol, isobutanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and propanol. The numbers of blocked reactions were also decreased for 2-methyl-1-butanol production. In addition, coverage of the metabolic network in terms of the number of metabolites and reactions was increased in the new obtained model. PMID:27265370

  7. Metabolic network motifs can provide novel insights into evolution: The evolutionary origin of Eukaryotic organelles as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shellman, Erin R.; Chen, Yu; Lin, Xiaoxia; Burant, Charles F.; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees are typically constructed using genetic and genomic data, and provide robust evolutionary relationships of species from the genomic point of view. We present an application of network motif mining and analysis of metabolic pathways that when used in combination with phylogenetic trees can provide a more complete picture of evolution. By using distributions of three-node motifs as a proxy for metabolic similarity, we analyze the ancestral origin of Eukaryotic organelles from the metabolic point of view to illustrate the application of our motif mining and analysis network approach. Our analysis suggests that the hypothesis of an early proto-Eukaryote could be valid. It also suggests that a δ- or ε-Proteobacteria may have been the endosymbiotic partner that gave rise to modern mitochondria. Our evolutionary analysis needs to be extended by building metabolic network reconstructions of species from the phylum Crenarchaeota, which is considered to be a possible archaeal ancestor of the eukaryotic cell. In this paper, we also propose a methodology for constructing phylogenetic trees that incorporates metabolic network signatures to identify regions of genomically-estimated phylogenies that may be spurious. We find that results generated from our approach are consistent with a parallel phylogenetic analysis using the method of feature frequency profiles. PMID:25462333

  8. Metabolic network reconstruction and flux variability analysis of storage synthesis in developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Computational simulation of large-scale biochemical networks can be used to analyze and predict the metabolic behavior of an organism, such as a developing seed. Based on the biochemical literature, pathways databases and decision rules defining reaction directionality we reconstructed bna572, a stoichiometric metabolic network model representing Brassica napus seed storage metabolism. In the highly compartmentalized network about 25% of the 572 reactions are transport reactions interconnecting nine subcellular compartments and the environment. According to known physiological capabilities of developing B. napus embryos, four nutritional conditions were defined to simulate heterotrophy or photoheterotrophy, each in combination with the availability of inorganic nitrogen (ammonia, nitrate) or amino acids as nitrogen sources. Based on mathematical linear optimization the optimal solution space was comprehensively explored by flux variability analysis, thereby identifying for each reaction the range of flux values allowable under optimality. The range and variability of flux values was then categorized into flux variability types. Across the four nutritional conditions, approximately 13% of the reactions have variable flux values and 10-11% are substitutable (can be inactive), both indicating metabolic redundancy given, for example, by isoenzymes, subcellular compartmentalization or the presence of alternative pathways. About one-third of the reactions are never used and are associated with pathways that are suboptimal for storage synthesis. Fifty-seven reactions change flux variability type among the different nutritional conditions, indicating their function in metabolic adjustments. This predictive modeling framework allows analysis and quantitative exploration of storage metabolism of a developing B. napus oilseed.

  9. On correlated reaction sets and coupled reaction sets in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Hosseini, Zhaleh

    2015-08-01

    Two reactions are in the same "correlated reaction set" (or "Co-Set") if their fluxes are linearly correlated. On the other hand, two reactions are "coupled" if nonzero flux through one reaction implies nonzero flux through the other reaction. Flux correlation analysis has been previously used in the analysis of enzyme dysregulation and enzymopathy, while flux coupling analysis has been used to predict co-expression of genes and to model network evolution. The goal of this paper is to emphasize, through a few examples, that these two concepts are inherently different. In other words, except for the case of full coupling, which implies perfect correlation between two fluxes (R(2) = 1), there are no constraints on Pearson correlation coefficients (CC) in case of any other type of (un)coupling relations. In other words, Pearson CC can take any value between 0 and 1 in other cases. Furthermore, by analyzing genome-scale metabolic networks, we confirm that there are some examples in real networks of bacteria, yeast and human, which approve that flux coupling and flux correlation cannot be used interchangeably.

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Klotho: Physiology and Pathophysiology of an Endocrine Network of Mineral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolically active and perpetually remodeling calcium phosphate–based endoskeleton in terrestrial vertebrates sets the demands on whole-organism calcium and phosphate homeostasis that involves multiple organs in terms of mineral flux and endocrine cross talk. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-Klotho endocrine networks epitomize the complexity of systems biology, and specifically, the FGF23-αKlotho axis highlights the concept of the skeleton holding the master switch of homeostasis rather than a passive target organ as hitherto conceived. Other than serving as a coreceptor for FGF23, αKlotho circulates as an endocrine substance with a multitude of effects. This review covers recent data on the physiological regulation and function of the complex FGF23-αKlotho network. Chronic kidney disease is a common pathophysiological state in which FGF23-αKlotho, a multiorgan endocrine network, is deranged in a self-amplifying vortex resulting in organ dysfunction of the utmost severity that contributes to its morbidity and mortality. PMID:23398153

  11. Perspectives for a better understanding of the metabolic integration of photorespiration within a complex plant primary metabolism network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photorespiration is an important high flux metabolic pathway that is found in all oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms. It is often viewed as a closed loop that recycles carbon to fuel the Calvin cycle. However, the photorespiratory cycle is known to interact with several primary metabolic path...

  12. Integer Programming-Based Method for Designing Synthetic Metabolic Networks by Minimum Reaction Insertion in a Boolean Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiangning; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Minimum Reaction Insertion (MRI) problem for finding the minimum number of additional reactions from a reference metabolic network to a host metabolic network so that a target compound becomes producible in the revised host metabolic network in a Boolean model. Although a similar problem for larger networks is solvable in a flux balance analysis (FBA)-based model, the solution of the FBA-based model tends to include more reactions than that of the Boolean model. However, solving MRI using the Boolean model is computationally more expensive than using the FBA-based model since the Boolean model needs more integer variables. Therefore, in this study, to solve MRI for larger networks in the Boolean model, we have developed an efficient Integer Programming formalization method in which the number of integer variables is reduced by the notion of feedback vertex set and minimal valid assignment. As a result of computer experiments conducted using the data of metabolic networks of E. coli and reference networks downloaded from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database, we have found that the developed method can appropriately solve MRI in the Boolean model and is applicable to large scale-networks for which an exhaustive search does not work. We have also compared the developed method with the existing connectivity-based methods and FBA-based methods, and show the difference between the solutions of our method and the existing methods. A theoretical analysis of MRI is also conducted, and the NP-completeness of MRI is proved in the Boolean model. Our developed software is available at “http://sunflower.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~rogi/minRect/minRect.html.” PMID:24651476

  13. Integer programming-based method for designing synthetic metabolic networks by Minimum Reaction Insertion in a Boolean model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tamura, Takeyuki; Song, Jiangning; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Minimum Reaction Insertion (MRI) problem for finding the minimum number of additional reactions from a reference metabolic network to a host metabolic network so that a target compound becomes producible in the revised host metabolic network in a Boolean model. Although a similar problem for larger networks is solvable in a flux balance analysis (FBA)-based model, the solution of the FBA-based model tends to include more reactions than that of the Boolean model. However, solving MRI using the Boolean model is computationally more expensive than using the FBA-based model since the Boolean model needs more integer variables. Therefore, in this study, to solve MRI for larger networks in the Boolean model, we have developed an efficient Integer Programming formalization method in which the number of integer variables is reduced by the notion of feedback vertex set and minimal valid assignment. As a result of computer experiments conducted using the data of metabolic networks of E. coli and reference networks downloaded from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database, we have found that the developed method can appropriately solve MRI in the Boolean model and is applicable to large scale-networks for which an exhaustive search does not work. We have also compared the developed method with the existing connectivity-based methods and FBA-based methods, and show the difference between the solutions of our method and the existing methods. A theoretical analysis of MRI is also conducted, and the NP-completeness of MRI is proved in the Boolean model. Our developed software is available at "http://sunflower.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~rogi/minRect/minRect.html."

  14. Different brain networks underlying the acquisition and expression of contextual fear conditioning: a metabolic mapping study.

    PubMed

    González-Pardo, H; Conejo, N M; Lana, G; Arias, J L

    2012-01-27

    The specific brain regions and circuits involved in the acquisition and expression of contextual fear conditioning are still a matter of debate. To address this issue, regional changes in brain metabolic capacity were mapped during the acquisition and expression of contextual fear conditioning using cytochrome oxidase (CO) quantitative histochemistry. In comparison with a group briefly exposed to a conditioning chamber, rats that received a series of randomly presented footshocks in the same conditioning chamber (fear acquisition group) showed increased CO activity in anxiety-related brain regions like the ventral periaqueductal gray, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral habenula, the mammillary bodies, and the laterodorsal thalamic nucleus. Another group received randomly presented footshocks, and it was re-exposed to the same conditioning chamber one week later (fear expression group). The conditioned group had significantly higher CO activity as compared with the matched control group in the following brain regions: the ventral periaqueductal gray, the central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In addition, analysis of functional brain networks using interregional CO activity correlations revealed different patterns of functional connectivity between fear acquisition and fear expression groups. In particular, a network comprising the ventral hippocampus and amygdala nuclei was found in the fear acquisition group, whereas a closed reciprocal dorsal hippocampal network was detected in the fear expression group. These results suggest that contextual fear acquisition and expression differ as regards to the brain networks involved, although they share common brain regions involved in fear, anxiety, and defensive behavior. PMID:22173014

  15. Co-evolution of Hormone Metabolism and Signaling Networks Expands Plant Adaptive Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Ye, Mingli; Li, Bin; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-08-11

    Classically, hormones elicit specific cellular responses by activating dedicated receptors. Nevertheless, the biosynthesis and turnover of many of these hormone molecules also produce chemically related metabolites. These molecules may also possess hormonal activities; therefore, one or more may contribute to the adaptive plasticity of signaling outcomes in host organisms. Here, we show that a catabolite of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), namely phaseic acid (PA), likely emerged in seed plants as a signaling molecule that fine-tunes plant physiology, environmental adaptation, and development. This trait was facilitated by both the emergence-selection of a PA reductase that modulates PA concentrations and by the functional diversification of the ABA receptor family to perceive and respond to PA. Our results suggest that PA serves as a hormone in seed plants through activation of a subset of ABA receptors. This study demonstrates that the co-evolution of hormone metabolism and signaling networks can expand organismal resilience.

  16. Improving photosynthesis and metabolic networks for the competitive production of phototroph-derived biofuels.

    PubMed

    Work, Victoria H; D'Adamo, Sarah; Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2012-06-01

    To improve bioenergy production from photosynthetic microorganisms it is necessary to optimize an extensive network of highly integrated biological processes. Systematic advances in pathway engineering and culture modification have resulted in strains with increased yields of biohydrogen, lipids, and carbohydrates, three bioenergy foci. However, additional improvements in photosynthetic efficiency are necessary to establish a viable system for biofuel production. Advances in optimizing light capture, energy transfer, and carbon fixation are essential, as the efficiencies of these processes are the principal determinants of productivity. However, owing to their regulatory, catalytic, and structural complexities, manipulating these pathways poses considerable challenges. This review covers novel developments in the optimization of photosynthesis, carbon fixation, and metabolic pathways for the synthesis of targeted bioenergy carriers.

  17. Co-evolution of Hormone Metabolism and Signaling Networks Expands Plant Adaptive Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Ye, Mingli; Li, Bin; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-08-11

    Classically, hormones elicit specific cellular responses by activating dedicated receptors. Nevertheless, the biosynthesis and turnover of many of these hormone molecules also produce chemically related metabolites. These molecules may also possess hormonal activities; therefore, one or more may contribute to the adaptive plasticity of signaling outcomes in host organisms. Here, we show that a catabolite of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), namely phaseic acid (PA), likely emerged in seed plants as a signaling molecule that fine-tunes plant physiology, environmental adaptation, and development. This trait was facilitated by both the emergence-selection of a PA reductase that modulates PA concentrations and by the functional diversification of the ABA receptor family to perceive and respond to PA. Our results suggest that PA serves as a hormone in seed plants through activation of a subset of ABA receptors. This study demonstrates that the co-evolution of hormone metabolism and signaling networks can expand organismal resilience. PMID:27518563

  18. Exploring the metabolic network of the epidemic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 via genome-scale reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is a threatening nosocomial epidemic pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or a compromised immune system. Its high level of antibiotic resistance is an increasing concern in treatments against its infection. Strain B. cenocepacia J2315 is the most infectious isolate from CF patients. There is a strong demand to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315 to systematically analyze its metabolic capabilities and its virulence traits, and to search for potential clinical therapy targets. Results We reconstructed the genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315. An iterative reconstruction process led to the establishment of a robust model, iKF1028, which accounts for 1,028 genes, 859 internal reactions, and 834 metabolites. The model iKF1028 captures important metabolic capabilities of B. cenocepacia J2315 with a particular focus on the biosyntheses of key metabolic virulence factors to assist in understanding the mechanism of disease infection and identifying potential drug targets. The model was tested through BIOLOG assays. Based on the model, the genome annotation of B. cenocepacia J2315 was refined and 24 genes were properly re-annotated. Gene and enzyme essentiality were analyzed to provide further insights into the genome function and architecture. A total of 45 essential enzymes were identified as potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions As the first genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315, iKF1028 allows a systematic study of the metabolic properties of B. cenocepacia and its key metabolic virulence factors affecting the CF community. The model can be used as a discovery tool to design novel drugs against diseases caused by this notorious pathogen. PMID:21609491

  19. Integrated bioinformatics to decipher the ascorbic acid metabolic network in tomato.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Valentino; Bostan, Hamed; Barone, Amalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Chiusano, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Ascorbic acid is involved in a plethora of reactions in both plant and animal metabolism. It plays an essential role neutralizing free radicals and acting as enzyme co-factor in several reaction. Since humans are ascorbate auxotrophs, enhancing the nutritional quality of a widely consumed vegetable like tomato is a desirable goal. Although the main reactions of the ascorbate biosynthesis, recycling and translocation pathways have been characterized, the assignment of tomato genes to each enzymatic step of the entire network has never been reported to date. By integrating bioinformatics approaches, omics resources and transcriptome collections today available for tomato, this study provides an overview on the architecture of the ascorbate pathway. In particular, 237 tomato loci were associated with the different enzymatic steps of the network, establishing the first comprehensive reference collection of candidate genes based on the recently released tomato gene annotation. The co-expression analyses performed by using RNA-Seq data supported the functional investigation of main expression patterns for the candidate genes and highlighted a coordinated spatial-temporal regulation of genes of the different pathways across tissues and developmental stages. Taken together these results provide evidence of a complex interplaying mechanism and highlight the pivotal role of functional related genes. The definition of genes contributing to alternative pathways and their expression profiles corroborates previous hypothesis on mechanisms of accumulation of ascorbate in the later stages of fruit ripening. Results and evidences here provided may facilitate the development of novel strategies for biofortification of tomato fruit with Vitamin C and offer an example framework for similar studies concerning other metabolic pathways and species. PMID:27007138

  20. Nutrition-induced ketosis alters metabolic and signaling gene networks in liver of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Loor, Juan J; Everts, Robin E; Bionaz, Massimo; Dann, Heather M; Morin, Dawn E; Oliveira, Rosane; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Drackley, James K; Lewin, Harris A

    2007-12-19

    Dairy cows are highly susceptible after parturition to developing liver lipidosis and ketosis, which are costly diseases to farmers. A bovine microarray platform consisting of 13,257-annotated oligonucleotides was used to study hepatic gene networks underlying nutrition-induced ketosis. On day 5 postpartum, 14 Holstein cows were randomly assigned to ketosis-induction (n = 7) or control (n = 7) groups. Cows in the ketosis-induction group were fed at 50% of day 4 intake until they developed signs of clinical ketosis, and cows in the control group were fed ad libitum throughout the treatment period. Liver was biopsied at 10-14 (ketosis) or 14 days postpartum (controls). Feed restriction increased blood concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate, but decreased glucose. Liver triacylglycerol concentration also increased. A total of 2,415 genes were altered by ketosis (false discovery rate = 0.05). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed downregulation of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation, protein ubiquitination, and ubiquinone biosynthesis with ketosis. Other molecular adaptations included upregulation of genes and nuclear receptors associated with cytokine signaling, fatty acid uptake/transport, and fatty acid oxidation. Genes downregulated during ketosis included several associated with cholesterol metabolism, growth hormone signaling, proton transport, and fatty acid desaturation. Feed restriction and ketosis resulted in previously unrecognized alterations in gene network expression underlying key cellular functions and discrete metabolic events. These responses might help explain well-documented physiological adaptations to reduced feed intake in early postpartum cows and, thus, provide molecular targets that might be useful in prevention and treatment of liver lipidosis and ketosis.

  1. Bistability in a Metabolic Network Underpins the De Novo Evolution of Colony Switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Jenna; Libby, Eric; Bertels, Frederic; Remigi, Philippe; Jendresen, Christian B.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Desprat, Nicolas; Buffing, Marieke F.; Sauer, Uwe; Beaumont, Hubertus J. E.; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens; Rainey, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype switching is commonly observed in nature. This prevalence has allowed the elucidation of a number of underlying molecular mechanisms. However, little is known about how phenotypic switches arise and function in their early evolutionary stages. The first opportunity to provide empirical insight was delivered by an experiment in which populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 evolved, de novo, the ability to switch between two colony phenotypes. Here we unravel the molecular mechanism behind colony switching, revealing how a single nucleotide change in a gene enmeshed in central metabolism (carB) generates such a striking phenotype. We show that colony switching is underpinned by ON/OFF expression of capsules consisting of a colanic acid-like polymer. We use molecular genetics, biochemical analyses, and experimental evolution to establish that capsule switching results from perturbation of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Of central importance is a bifurcation point at which uracil triphosphate is partitioned towards either nucleotide metabolism or polymer production. This bifurcation marks a cell-fate decision point whereby cells with relatively high pyrimidine levels favour nucleotide metabolism (capsule OFF), while cells with lower pyrimidine levels divert resources towards polymer biosynthesis (capsule ON). This decision point is present and functional in the wild-type strain. Finally, we present a simple mathematical model demonstrating that the molecular components of the decision point are capable of producing switching. Despite its simple mutational cause, the connection between genotype and phenotype is complex and multidimensional, offering a rare glimpse of how noise in regulatory networks can provide opportunity for evolution. PMID:25763575

  2. Genome-scale metabolic network guided engineering of Streptomyces tsukubaensis for FK506 production improvement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background FK506 is an important immunosuppressant, which can be produced by Streptomyces tsukubaensis. However, the production capacity of the strain is very low. Hereby, a computational guided engineering approach was proposed in order to improve the intracellular precursor and cofactor availability of FK506 in S. tsukubaensis. Results First, a genome-scale metabolic model of S. tsukubaensis was constructed based on its annotated genome and biochemical information. Subsequently, several potential genetic targets (knockout or overexpression) that guaranteed an improved yield of FK506 were identified by the recently developed methodology. To validate the model predictions, each target gene was manipulated in the parent strain D852, respectively. All the engineered strains showed a higher FK506 production, compared with D852. Furthermore, the combined effect of the genetic modifications was evaluated. Results showed that the strain HT-ΔGDH-DAZ with gdhA-deletion and dahp-, accA2-, zwf2-overexpression enhanced FK506 concentration up to 398.9 mg/L, compared with 143.5 mg/L of the parent strain D852. Finally, fed-batch fermentations of HT-ΔGDH-DAZ were carried out, which led to the FK506 production of 435.9 mg/L, 1.47-fold higher than the parent strain D852 (158.7 mg/L). Conclusions Results confirmed that the promising targets led to an increase in FK506 titer. The present work is the first attempt to engineer the primary precursor pathways to improve FK506 production in S. tsukubaensis with genome-scale metabolic network guided metabolic engineering. The relationship between model prediction and experimental results demonstrates the rationality and validity of this approach for target identification. This strategy can also be applied to the improvement of other important secondary metabolites. PMID:23705993

  3. Regulatory network of secondary metabolism in Brassica rapa: insight into the glucosinolate pathway.

    PubMed

    Pino Del Carpio, Dunia; Basnet, Ram Kumar; Arends, Danny; Lin, Ke; De Vos, Ric C H; Muth, Dorota; Kodde, Jan; Boutilier, Kim; Bucher, Johan; Wang, Xiaowu; Jansen, Ritsert; Bonnema, Guusje

    2014-01-01

    Brassica rapa studies towards metabolic variation have largely been focused on the profiling of the diversity of metabolic compounds in specific crop types or regional varieties, but none aimed to identify genes with regulatory function in metabolite composition. Here we followed a genetical genomics approach to identify regulatory genes for six biosynthetic pathways of health-related phytochemicals, i.e carotenoids, tocopherols, folates, glucosinolates, flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Leaves from six weeks-old plants of a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population, consisting of 92 genotypes, were profiled for their secondary metabolite composition, using both targeted and LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics approaches. Furthermore, the same population was profiled for transcript variation using a microarray containing EST sequences mainly derived from three Brassica species: B. napus, B. rapa and B. oleracea. The biochemical pathway analysis was based on the network analyses of both metabolite QTLs (mQTLs) and transcript QTLs (eQTLs). Co-localization of mQTLs and eQTLs lead to the identification of candidate regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols and glucosinolates. We subsequently focused on the well-characterized glucosinolate pathway and revealed two hotspots of co-localization of eQTLs with mQTLs in linkage groups A03 and A09. Our results indicate that such a large-scale genetical genomics approach combining transcriptomics and metabolomics data can provide new insights into the genetic regulation of metabolite composition of Brassica vegetables.

  4. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire L; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L; Stenson, Benjamin J; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:25120092

  5. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire L; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L; Stenson, Benjamin J; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-08-14

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis.

  6. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire L.; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R.; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J.; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L.; Stenson, Benjamin J.; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:25120092

  7. Regulatory Network of Secondary Metabolism in Brassica rapa: Insight into the Glucosinolate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pino Del Carpio, Dunia; Basnet, Ram Kumar; Arends, Danny; Lin, Ke; De Vos, Ric C. H.; Muth, Dorota; Kodde, Jan; Boutilier, Kim; Bucher, Johan; Wang, Xiaowu; Jansen, Ritsert; Bonnema, Guusje

    2014-01-01

    Brassica rapa studies towards metabolic variation have largely been focused on the profiling of the diversity of metabolic compounds in specific crop types or regional varieties, but none aimed to identify genes with regulatory function in metabolite composition. Here we followed a genetical genomics approach to identify regulatory genes for six biosynthetic pathways of health-related phytochemicals, i.e carotenoids, tocopherols, folates, glucosinolates, flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Leaves from six weeks-old plants of a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population, consisting of 92 genotypes, were profiled for their secondary metabolite composition, using both targeted and LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics approaches. Furthermore, the same population was profiled for transcript variation using a microarray containing EST sequences mainly derived from three Brassica species: B. napus, B. rapa and B. oleracea. The biochemical pathway analysis was based on the network analyses of both metabolite QTLs (mQTLs) and transcript QTLs (eQTLs). Co-localization of mQTLs and eQTLs lead to the identification of candidate regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols and glucosinolates. We subsequently focused on the well-characterized glucosinolate pathway and revealed two hotspots of co-localization of eQTLs with mQTLs in linkage groups A03 and A09. Our results indicate that such a large-scale genetical genomics approach combining transcriptomics and metabolomics data can provide new insights into the genetic regulation of metabolite composition of Brassica vegetables. PMID:25222144

  8. Endothelial-dependent vasodilators preferentially increase subendocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelc, L.R.; Gross, G.J.; Warltier, D.C.

    1986-03-05

    Interference with arachidonic acid metabolism on the effect of acetylcholine (Ach) or arachidonic acid (AA) to preferentially increase subendocardial perfusion was investigated in anesthetized dogs. Hemodynamics, regional myocardial blood flow (MBF (ml/min/g):radioactive microspheres) and the left ventricular transmural distribution of flow (endo/epi) were measured. Intracoronary infusion of Ach (10 ..mu..g/min) and AA (585 ..mu..g/min) significantly (P < .05*) increased myocardial perfusion and selectively redistributed flow to the subendocardium (increased endo/epi) without changes in systemic hemodynamics. Inhibition of phospholipase A/sub 2/ by quinacrine (Q; 600 ..mu..g/min, ic) attenuated the increase in myocardial perfusion produced by Ach but not by AA and inhibited the redistribution of flow to the subendocardium. The present results suggest that endothelium-dependent vasodilators produce a preferential increase in subendocardial perfusion via a product of AA metabolism.

  9. A genome scale metabolic network for rice and accompanying analysis of tryptophan, auxin and serotonin biosynthesis regulation under biotic stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional annotations of large plant genome projects mostly provide information on gene function and gene families based on the presence of protein domains and gene homology, but not necessarily in association with gene expression or metabolic and regulatory networks. These additional annotations a...

  10. Impulsivity is Associated with Increased Metabolism in the Fronto-Insular Network in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Rochhausen, Luisa; Maier, Franziska; Williamson, Kim L.; Drzezga, Alexander; Timmermann, Lars; Van Eimeren, Thilo; Eggers, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Various neuroimaging studies demonstrated that the fronto-insular network is implicated in impulsive behavior. We compared glucose metabolism (as a proxy measure of neural activity) among 24 patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) who presented with low or high levels of impulsivity based on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 (BIS) scores. Subjects underwent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and the voxel-wise group difference of FDG-metabolism was analyzed in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8). Subsequently, we performed a partial correlation analysis between the FDG-metabolism and BIS scores, controlling for covariates (i.e., age, sex, severity of disease and levodopa equivalent daily doses). Voxel-wise group comparison revealed higher FDG-metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and right insula in patients with higher impulsivity scores. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the FDG-metabolism and BIS scores. Our findings provide evidence that high impulsivity is associated with increased FDG-metabolism within the fronto-insular network in PD. PMID:26648853

  11. Prediction of nitrogen metabolism-related genes in Anabaena by kernel-based network analysis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shinobu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Ehira, Shigeki; Kawashima, Shuichi; Tonomura, Koichiro; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2007-03-01

    Prediction of molecular interaction networks from large-scale datasets in genomics and other omics experiments is an important task in terms of both developing bioinformatics methods and solving biological problems. We have applied a kernel-based network inference method for extracting functionally related genes to the response of nitrogen deprivation in cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 integrating three heterogeneous datasets: microarray data, phylogenetic profiles, and gene orders on the chromosome. We obtained 1348 predicted genes that are somehow related to known genes in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. While this dataset contained previously known genes related to the nitrogen deprivation condition, it also contained additional genes. Thus, we attempted to select any relevant genes using the constraints of Pfam domains and NtcA-binding sites. We found candidates of nitrogen metabolism-related genes, which are depicted as extensions of existing KEGG pathways. The prediction of functional relationships between proteins rather than functions of individual proteins will thus assist the discovery from the large-scale datasets.

  12. Edge removal balances preferential attachment and triad closing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brot, Hilla; Honig, Michal; Muchnik, Lev; Goldenberg, Jacob; Louzoun, Yoram

    2013-10-01

    Most network formation analysis studies are centered on edge addition. However, edges in real world networks often have a rapid turnover with a large number of edges added and removed between each node addition or removal steps. In such a case, quasiequilibrium is obtained between edge addition and deletion. Edges have been shown to be added to nodes with a high degree and between pairs of nodes with a high number of common neighbors. If not balanced by a degree dependent edge removal, the preference for high degree nodes and node pairs with many common neighbors is expected to increase the average degree of high degree nodes and their clustering coefficient until very large cliques will be formed. Since such large cliques are not formed in real world networks, we conclude that the edge removal probability around high degree nodes and between node pairs with many common neighbors should be higher than around other nodes. We here show the existence of such a balancing mechanism through the relation between the future edge removal probability around nodes and their degree and a similar relation between the edge removal probability and the number of common neighbors of node pairs. In some networks, this preferential detachment process represents an explicit saturation process, and in others, it represents a random deletion process accompanied by a sublinear edge preferential attachment process. A more complex mechanism emerges in directed networks where the preferential detachment can be proportional to the in and out degrees of the nodes involved. In such networks, preferential detachment is stronger for the incoming edges than for the outgoing edges. We hypothesize multiple possible mechanisms that could explain this phenomenon.

  13. Metabolic and protein interaction sub-networks controlling the proliferation rate of cancer cells and their impact on patient survival.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Bordel, Sergio

    2013-10-24

    Cancer cells can have a broad scope of proliferation rates. Here we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that allow some cancer cell lines to grow up to 4 times faster than other cell lines. The correlation of gene expression profiles with the growth rate in 60 different cell lines has been analyzed using several genome-scale biological networks and new algorithms. New possible regulatory feedback loops have been suggested and the known roles of several cell cycle related transcription factors have been confirmed. Over 100 growth-correlated metabolic sub-networks have been identified, suggesting a key role of simultaneous lipid synthesis and degradation in the energy supply of the cancer cells growth. Many metabolic sub-networks involved in cell line proliferation appeared also to correlate negatively with the survival expectancy of colon cancer patients.

  14. Diverse ways of perturbing the human arachidonic acid metabolic network to control inflammation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hu; Liu, Ying; Lai, Luhua

    2015-08-18

    Inflammation and other common disorders including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are often the result of several molecular abnormalities and are not likely to be resolved by a traditional single-target drug discovery approach. Though inflammation is a normal bodily reaction, uncontrolled and misdirected inflammation can cause inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or celecoxib are commonly used to relieve aches and pains, but often these drugs have undesirable and sometimes even fatal side effects. To facilitate safer and more effective anti-inflammatory drug discovery, a balanced treatment strategy should be developed at the biological network level. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in modeling the inflammation-related arachidonic acid (AA) metabolic network and subsequent multiple drug design. We first constructed a mathematical model of inflammation based on experimental data and then applied the model to simulate the effects of commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs. Our results indicated that the model correctly reproduced the established bleeding and cardiovascular side effects. Multitarget optimal intervention (MTOI), a Monte Carlo simulated annealing based computational scheme, was then developed to identify key targets and optimal solutions for controlling inflammation. A number of optimal multitarget strategies were discovered that were both effective and safe and had minimal associated side effects. Experimental studies were performed to evaluate these multitarget control solutions further using different combinations of inhibitors to perturb the network. Consequently, simultaneous control of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 and leukotriene A4 hydrolase, as well as 5-lipoxygenase and prostaglandin E2 synthase were found to be among the best solutions. A single compound that can bind multiple targets presents advantages including low

  15. Diverse ways of perturbing the human arachidonic acid metabolic network to control inflammation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hu; Liu, Ying; Lai, Luhua

    2015-08-18

    Inflammation and other common disorders including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are often the result of several molecular abnormalities and are not likely to be resolved by a traditional single-target drug discovery approach. Though inflammation is a normal bodily reaction, uncontrolled and misdirected inflammation can cause inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or celecoxib are commonly used to relieve aches and pains, but often these drugs have undesirable and sometimes even fatal side effects. To facilitate safer and more effective anti-inflammatory drug discovery, a balanced treatment strategy should be developed at the biological network level. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in modeling the inflammation-related arachidonic acid (AA) metabolic network and subsequent multiple drug design. We first constructed a mathematical model of inflammation based on experimental data and then applied the model to simulate the effects of commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs. Our results indicated that the model correctly reproduced the established bleeding and cardiovascular side effects. Multitarget optimal intervention (MTOI), a Monte Carlo simulated annealing based computational scheme, was then developed to identify key targets and optimal solutions for controlling inflammation. A number of optimal multitarget strategies were discovered that were both effective and safe and had minimal associated side effects. Experimental studies were performed to evaluate these multitarget control solutions further using different combinations of inhibitors to perturb the network. Consequently, simultaneous control of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 and leukotriene A4 hydrolase, as well as 5-lipoxygenase and prostaglandin E2 synthase were found to be among the best solutions. A single compound that can bind multiple targets presents advantages including low

  16. SS-mPMG and SS-GA: tools for finding pathways and dynamic simulation of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Ono, Naoaki; Yasumoto, Keiichi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Hirai, Masami Y; Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Sawada, Yuji; Yamashita, Yui; Chiba, Yukako; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Toru; Naito, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Fumihide; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2013-05-01

    Metabolomics analysis tools can provide quantitative information on the concentration of metabolites in an organism. In this paper, we propose the minimum pathway model generator tool for simulating the dynamics of metabolite concentrations (SS-mPMG) and a tool for parameter estimation by genetic algorithm (SS-GA). SS-mPMG can extract a subsystem of the metabolic network from the genome-scale pathway maps to reduce the complexity of the simulation model and automatically construct a dynamic simulator to evaluate the experimentally observed behavior of metabolites. Using this tool, we show that stochastic simulation can reproduce experimentally observed dynamics of amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this simulation, SS-mPMG extracts the metabolic network subsystem from published databases. The parameters needed for the simulation are determined using a genetic algorithm to fit the simulation results to the experimental data. We expect that SS-mPMG and SS-GA will help researchers to create relevant metabolic networks and carry out simulations of metabolic reactions derived from metabolomics data.

  17. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Levering, Jennifer; Fiedler, Tomas; Sieg, Antje; van Grinsven, Koen W A; Hering, Silvio; Veith, Nadine; Olivier, Brett G; Klett, Lara; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Teusink, Bas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Kummer, Ursula

    2016-08-20

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes M49. Initially, we based the reconstruction on genome annotations and already existing and curated metabolic networks of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis. This initial draft was manually curated with the final reconstruction accounting for 480 genes associated with 576 reactions and 558 metabolites. In order to constrain the model further, we performed growth experiments of wild type and arcA deletion strains of S. pyogenes M49 in a chemically defined medium and calculated nutrient uptake and production fluxes. We additionally performed amino acid auxotrophy experiments to test the consistency of the model. The established genome-scale model can be used to understand the growth requirements of the human pathogen S. pyogenes and define optimal and suboptimal conditions, but also to describe differences and similarities between S. pyogenes and related lactic acid bacteria such as L. lactis in order to find strategies to reduce the growth of the pathogen and propose drug targets. PMID:26970054

  18. Continuous modeling of metabolic networks with gene regulation in yeast and in vivo determination of rate parameters.

    PubMed

    Moisset, P; Vaisman, D; Cintolesi, A; Urrutia, J; Rapaport, I; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2012-09-01

    A continuous model of a metabolic network including gene regulation to simulate metabolic fluxes during batch cultivation of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed. The metabolic network includes reactions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycerol and ethanol synthesis and consumption, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and protein synthesis. Carbon sources considered were glucose and then ethanol synthesized during growth on glucose. The metabolic network has 39 fluxes, which represent the action of 50 enzymes and 64 genes and it is coupled with a gene regulation network which defines enzyme synthesis (activities) and incorporates regulation by glucose (enzyme induction and repression), modeled using ordinary differential equations. The model includes enzyme kinetics, equations that follow both mass-action law and transport as well as inducible, repressible, and constitutive enzymes of metabolism. The model was able to simulate a fermentation of S. cerevisiae during the exponential growth phase on glucose and the exponential growth phase on ethanol using only one set of kinetic parameters. All fluxes in the continuous model followed the behavior shown by the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) obtained from experimental results. The differences obtained between the fluxes given by the model and the fluxes determined by the MFA do not exceed 25% in 75% of the cases during exponential growth on glucose, and 20% in 90% of the cases during exponential growth on ethanol. Furthermore, the adjustment of the fermentation profiles of biomass, glucose, and ethanol were 95%, 95%, and 79%, respectively. With these results the simulation was considered successful. A comparison between the simulation of the continuous model and the experimental data of the diauxic yeast fermentation for glucose, biomass, and ethanol, shows an extremely good match using the parameters found. The small discrepancies between the fluxes obtained through MFA and those predicted by the differential

  19. Combined Use of Genome-Wide Association Data and Correlation Networks Unravels Key Regulators of Primary Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Si; Alseekh, Saleh; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Mutwil, Marek; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Brotman, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    Plant primary metabolism is a highly coordinated, central, and complex network of biochemical processes regulated at both the genetic and post-translational levels. The genetic basis of this network can be explored by analyzing the metabolic composition of genetically diverse genotypes in a given plant species. Here, we report an integrative strategy combining quantitative genetic mapping and metabolite‒transcript correlation networks to identify functional associations between genes and primary metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) was used to identify metabolic quantitative trait loci (mQTL). Correlation networks built using metabolite and transcript data derived from a previously published time-course stress study yielded metabolite‒transcript correlations identified by covariation. Finally, results obtained in this study were compared with mQTL previously described. We applied a statistical framework to test and compare the performance of different single methods (network approach and quantitative genetics methods, representing the two orthogonal approaches combined in our strategy) with that of the combined strategy. We show that the combined strategy has improved performance manifested by increased sensitivity and accuracy. This combined strategy allowed the identification of 92 candidate associations between structural genes and primary metabolites, which not only included previously well-characterized gene‒metabolite associations, but also revealed novel associations. Using loss-of-function mutants, we validated two of the novel associations with genes involved in tyrosine degradation and in β-alanine metabolism. In conclusion, we demonstrate that applying our integrative strategy to the largely untapped resource of metabolite–transcript associations can facilitate the discovery of novel metabolite-related genes. This integrative strategy is not limited to A. thaliana, but generally applicable to other plant

  20. Combining Quantitative Genetics Approaches with Regulatory Network Analysis to Dissect the Complex Metabolism of the Maize Kernel1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Weiwei; Liu, Haijun; Yang, Ning; Luo, Jie; Xiao, Yingjie; Pan, Qingchun; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Yan, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies have allowed us to better understand the genetic architecture underlying naturally occurring plant metabolic variance. Here, we use two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations to dissect the genetic architecture of natural variation of 155 metabolites measured in the mature maize (Zea mays) kernel. Overall, linkage mapping identified 882 metabolic QTLs in both RIL populations across two environments, with an average of 2.1 QTLs per metabolite. A large number of metabolic QTLs (more than 65%) were identified with moderate effects (r2 = 2.1%–10%), while a small portion (less than 35%) showed major effects (r2 > 10%). Epistatic interactions between these identified loci were detected for more than 30% of metabolites (with the proportion of phenotypic variance ranging from 1.6% to 37.8%), implying that genetic epistasis is not negligible in determining metabolic variation. In total, 57 QTLs were validated by our previous genome-wide association study on the same metabolites that provided clues for exploring the underlying genes. A gene regulatory network associated with the flavonoid metabolic pathway was constructed based on the transcriptional variations of 28,769 genes in kernels (15 d after pollination) of 368 maize inbred lines. A large number of genes (34 of 58) in this network overlapped with previously defined genes controlled by maize PERICARP COLOR1, while three of them were identified here within QTL intervals for multiple flavonoids. The deeply characterized RIL populations, elucidation of metabolic phenotypes, and identification of candidate genes lay the foundation for maize quality improvement. PMID:26556794

  1. Dissecting and engineering metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Interest in thermophilic bacteria as live-cell catalysts in biofuel and biochemical industry has surged in recent years, due to their tolerance of high temperature and wide spectrum of carbon-sources that include cellulose. However their direct employment as microbial cellular factories in the highly demanding industrial conditions has been hindered by uncompetitive biofuel productivity, relatively low tolerance to solvent and osmic stresses, and limitation in genome engineering tools. In this work we review recent advances in dissecting and engineering the metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for improving the traits of key interest in biofuel industry: cellulose degradation, pentose-hexose co-utilization, and tolerance of thermal, osmotic, and solvent stresses. Moreover, new technologies enabling more efficient genetic engineering of thermophiles were discussed, such as improved electroporation, ultrasound-mediated DNA delivery, as well as thermo-stable plasmids and functional selection systems. Expanded applications of such technological advancements in thermophilic microbes promise to substantiate a synthetic biology perspective, where functional parts, module, chassis, cells and consortia were modularly designed and rationally assembled for the many missions at industry and nature that demand the extraordinary talents of these extremophiles.

  2. Different biochemical mechanisms ensure network-wide balancing of reducing equivalents in microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe

    2009-04-01

    To sustain growth, the catabolic formation of the redox equivalent NADPH must be balanced with the anabolic demand. The mechanisms that ensure such network-wide balancing, however, are presently not understood. Based on 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactor specificities for all relevant central metabolic enzymes, we have quantified catabolic NADPH production in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Paracoccus versutus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Zymomonas mobilis. For six species, the estimated NADPH production from glucose catabolism exceeded the requirements for biomass synthesis. Exceptions were P. fluorescens, with balanced rates, and E. coli, with insufficient catabolic production, in which about one-third of the NADPH is supplied via the membrane-bound transhydrogenase PntAB. P. versutus and B. subtilis were the only species that appear to rely on transhydrogenases for balancing NADPH overproduction during growth on glucose. In the other four species, the main but not exclusive redox-balancing mechanism appears to be the dual cofactor specificities of several catabolic enzymes and/or the existence of isoenzymes with distinct cofactor specificities, in particular glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. An unexpected key finding for all species, except E. coli and B. subtilis, was the lack of cofactor specificity in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, which contrasts with the textbook view of the pentose phosphate pathway dehydrogenases as being NADP+ dependent.

  3. Systemic properties of metabolic networks lead to an epistasis-based model for heterosis.

    PubMed

    Fiévet, Julie B; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The genetic and molecular approaches to heterosis usually do not rely on any model of the genotype-phenotype relationship. From the generalization of Kacser and Burns' biochemical model for dominance and epistasis to networks with several variable enzymes, we hypothesized that metabolic heterosis could be observed because the response of the flux towards enzyme activities and/or concentrations follows a multi-dimensional hyperbolic-like relationship. To corroborate this, we used the values of systemic parameters accounting for the kinetic behaviour of four enzymes of the upstream part of glycolysis, and simulated genetic variability by varying in silico enzyme concentrations. Then we "crossed" virtual parents to get 1,000 hybrids, and showed that best-parent heterosis was frequently observed. The decomposition of the flux value into genetic effects, with the help of a novel multilocus epistasis index, revealed that antagonistic additive-by-additive epistasis effects play the major role in this framework of the genotype-phenotype relationship. This result is consistent with various observations in quantitative and evolutionary genetics, and provides a model unifying the genetic effects underlying heterosis. PMID:19916003

  4. LmSmdB: an integrated database for metabolic and gene regulatory network in Leishmania major and Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyanka; Mandlik, Vineetha; Singh, Shailza

    2016-03-01

    A database that integrates all the information required for biological processing is essential to be stored in one platform. We have attempted to create one such integrated database that can be a one stop shop for the essential features required to fetch valuable result. LmSmdB (L. major and S. mansoni database) is an integrated database that accounts for the biological networks and regulatory pathways computationally determined by integrating the knowledge of the genome sequences of the mentioned organisms. It is the first database of its kind that has together with the network designing showed the simulation pattern of the product. This database intends to create a comprehensive canopy for the regulation of lipid metabolism reaction in the parasite by integrating the transcription factors, regulatory genes and the protein products controlled by the transcription factors and hence operating the metabolism at genetic level.

  5. 15 CFR 700.14 - Preferential scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.14 Preferential scheduling. (a)...

  6. Distribution and metabolism of L- and D-triiodothyronine (T3) in the rat: preferential accumulation of L-T3 by hepatic and cardiac nuclei as a probable explanation of the differential biological potency of T3 enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H L; Trence, D; Oppenheimer, J H; Jiang, N S; Jump, D B

    1983-10-01

    Previous studies have reported markedly lower biological potency of D-T3 than would be predicted from its relative affinity for the specific nuclear L-T3 receptor as measured in vitro. Studies were undertaken to define the basis of this discrepancy. In vitro studies of the relative binding affinities of [125I]L-T3 and [125I]D-T3 using either whole nuclei or partially purified solubilized receptor confirmed several previous reports which had indicated only small relative differences. The mean L/D binding ratio of all in vitro studies was 1.43. In contrast, we determined from measurement of final alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity that the potency ratio (L/D) after seven daily injections of graded doses of L- and D-T3 was 6.7 for liver, with 95% confidence limits of 4.1 to 10.8, and 15.9 for heart, with 95% confidence limits of 5.1 to 50.2. Difference in biological potency could not be attributed to differences in the metabolism of L- and D-T3. Thus, tracer [125I]L- and [125I]D-T3 studies showed that the mean residence time, t, of L-T3 was not different from that of D-T3 [10.6 +/- (SE) 3.1 h vs. 11.4 +/- 3.8 h]. The MCR for L-T3 was 19.1 +/- 4.4 ml/h . 100 g BW and for D-T3, 26.1 +/- 5.6 ml/h . 100 g BW. The volume of distribution of L-T3 (181 ml/100 g BW) was 68% that of D-T3 (263 ml/100 g BW), in part owing to the 27% greater plasma binding (bp) of L-T3. Moreover, the calculated free hormone clearance (MCR X bp) of D-T3 was only 8% greater than for L-T3. Throughout the 24 h after injection of the [125I]L- or D-T3, concentrations of the D-enantiomer in liver were almost twice those of [125I]L-T3, whereas in heart [125I]D-T3 concentrations were half or less those of [125I]L-T3. Nevertheless, in both liver and heart, the integrated nuclear occupancy of L-T3 was 5 to 6 times that of D-T3, approaching the ratio in biological potency observed in the tissues. Thus, selective nuclear binding of L-T3 vs. D-T3 in vivo appears to be a major determinant in the

  7. Metabolic network analysis of Bacillus clausii on minimal and semirich medium using (13)C-labeled glucose.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Torben; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-04-01

    Using (13)C-labeled glucose fed to the facultative alkalophilic Bacillus clausii producing the alkaline serine protease Savinase, the intracellular fluxes were quantified in continuous cultivation and in batch cultivation on a minimal medium. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was found to increase with increasing specific growth rate but at a much lower level than previously reported for Bacillus subtilis. Two futile cycles in the pyruvate metabolism were included in the metabolic network. A substantial flux in the futile cycle involving malic enzyme was estimated, whereas only a very small or zero flux through PEP carboxykinase was estimated, indicating that the latter enzyme was not active during growth on glucose. The uptake of the amino acids in a semirich medium containing 15 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins was estimated using fully labeled glucose in batch cultivations. It was found that leucine, isoleucine, and phenylalanine were taken up from the medium and not synthesized de novo from glucose. In contrast, serine and threonine were completely synthesized from other metabolites and not taken up from the medium. Valine, proline, and lysine were partly taken up from the medium and partly synthesized from glucose. The metabolic network analysis was extended to include analysis of growth on the semirich medium containing amino acids, and the metabolic flux distribution on this medium was estimated and compared with growth on minimal medium. PMID:12009795

  8. Genetic dissection of the polyoxin building block-carbamoylpolyoxamic acid biosynthesis revealing the “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyoxin, a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic, consists of three building blocks including a nucleoside skeleton, polyoximic acid (POIA), and carbamoylpolyoxamic acid (CPOAA), however, little is known about the “pathway redundancy” of the metabolic networks directing the CPOAA biosynthesis in the cell factories of the polyoxin producer. Results Here we report the genetic characterization of CPOAA biosynthesis with revealing a “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks. Independent mutation of the four genes (polL-N and polP) directly resulted in the accumulation of polyoxin I, suggesting their positive roles for CPOAA biosynthesis. Moreover, the individual mutant of polN and polP also partially retains polyoxin production, suggesting the existence of the alternative homologs substituting their functional roles. Conclusions It is unveiled that argA and argB in L-arginine biosynthetic pathway contributed to the “pathway redundancy”, more interestingly, argB in S. cacaoi is indispensible for both polyoxin production and L-arginine biosynthesis. These data should provide an example for the research on the “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks, and lay a solid foundation for targeted enhancement of polyoxin production with synthetic biology strategies. PMID:24314013

  9. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the

  10. Metabolic and structural connectivity within the default mode network relates to working memory performance in young healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Chételat, Gael; Fischer, Florian U; Landeau, Brigitte; Bastin, Christine; Scheurich, Armin; Perrotin, Audrey; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Drzezga, Alexander; Eustache, Francis; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Salmon, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Studies of functional connectivity suggest that the default mode network (DMN) might be relevant for cognitive functions. Here, we examined metabolic and structural connectivity between major DMN nodes, the posterior cingulate (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), in relation to normal working memory (WM). DMN was captured using independent component analysis of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data from 35 young healthy adults (27.1 ± 5.1 years). Metabolic connectivity, a correlation between FDG uptake in PCC and MPFC, was examined in groups of subjects with (relative to median) low (n=18) and high (n=17) performance on digit span backward test as an index of verbal WM. In addition, fiber tractography based on PCC and MPFC nodes as way points was performed in a subset of subjects. FDG uptake in the DMN nodes did not differ between high and low performers. However, significantly (p=0.01) lower metabolic connectivity was found in the group of low performers. Furthermore, as compared to high performers, low performers showed lower density of the left superior cingulate bundle. Verbal WM performance is related to metabolic and structural connectivity within the DMN in young healthy adults. Metabolic connectivity as quantified with FDG-PET might be a sensitive marker of the normal variability in some cognitive functions. PMID:23631988

  11. 22 CFR 1422.21 - Preferential voting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Preferential voting. 1422.21 Section 1422.21 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; GENERAL... PROCEEDINGS § 1422.21 Preferential voting. In any election in which more than two choices are on the...

  12. 22 CFR 1422.21 - Preferential voting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Preferential voting. 1422.21 Section 1422.21 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; GENERAL... PROCEEDINGS § 1422.21 Preferential voting. In any election in which more than two choices are on the...

  13. Kinetic hybrid models composed of mechanistic and simplified enzymatic rate laws--a promising method for speeding up the kinetic modelling of complex metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Bulik, Sascha; Grimbs, Sergio; Huthmacher, Carola; Selbig, Joachim; Holzhütter, Hermann G

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic modelling of complex metabolic networks - a central goal of computational systems biology - is currently hampered by the lack of reliable rate equations for the majority of the underlying biochemical reactions and membrane transporters. On the basis of biochemically substantiated evidence that metabolic control is exerted by a narrow set of key regulatory enzymes, we propose here a hybrid modelling approach in which only the central regulatory enzymes are described by detailed mechanistic rate equations, and the majority of enzymes are approximated by simplified(non mechanistic) rate equations (e.g. mass action, LinLog, Michaelis-Menten and power law) capturing only a few basic kinetic features and hence containing only a small number of parameters to be experimentally determined. To check the reliability of this approach, we have applied it to two different metabolic networks, the energy and redox metabolism of red blood cells, and the purine metabolism of hepatocytes, using in both cases available comprehensive mechanistic models as reference standards. Identification of the central regulatory enzymes was performed by employing only information on network topology and the metabolic data for a single reference state of the network [Grimbs S, Selbig J, Bulik S, Holzhutter HG & Steuer R (2007) Mol Syst Biol 3, 146, doi:10.1038/msb4100186].Calculations of stationary and temporary states under various physiological challenges demonstrate the good performance of the hybrid models. We propose the hybrid modelling approach as a means to speed up the development of reliable kinetic models for complex metabolic networks.

  14. The origin of modern metabolic networks inferred from phylogenomic analysis of protein architecture.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Kim, Hee Shin; Mittenthal, Jay E

    2007-05-29

    Metabolism represents a complex collection of enzymatic reactions and transport processes that convert metabolites into molecules capable of supporting cellular life. Here we explore the origins and evolution of modern metabolism. Using phylogenomic information linked to the structure of metabolic enzymes, we sort out recruitment processes and discover that most enzymatic activities were associated with the nine most ancient and widely distributed protein fold architectures. An analysis of newly discovered functions showed enzymatic diversification occurred early, during the onset of the modern protein world. Most importantly, phylogenetic reconstruction exercises and other evidence suggest strongly that metabolism originated in enzymes with the P-loop hydrolase fold in nucleotide metabolism, probably in pathways linked to the purine metabolic subnetwork. Consequently, the first enzymatic takeover of an ancient biochemistry or prebiotic chemistry was related to the synthesis of nucleotides for the RNA world. PMID:17517598

  15. Correlation network analysis reveals relationships between diet-induced changes in human gut microbiota and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Kelder, T; Stroeve, J H M; Bijlsma, S; Radonjic, M; Roeselers, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that the gut microbiota plays an important role in human metabolism and energy homeostasis and is therefore a relevant factor in the assessment of metabolic health and flexibility. Understanding of these host–microbiome interactions aids the design of nutritional strategies that act via modulation of the microbiota. Nevertheless, relating gut microbiota composition to host health states remains challenging because of the sheer complexity of these ecosystems and the large degrees of interindividual variation in human microbiota composition. Methods: We assessed fecal microbiota composition and host response patterns of metabolic and inflammatory markers in 10 apparently healthy men subjected to a high-fat high-caloric diet (HFHC, 1300 kcal/day extra) for 4 weeks. DNA was isolated from stool and barcoded 16S rRNA gene amplicons were sequenced. Metabolic health parameters, including anthropomorphic and blood parameters, where determined at t=0 and t=4 weeks. Results: A correlation network approach revealed diet-induced changes in Bacteroides levels related to changes in carbohydrate oxidation rates, whereas the change in Firmicutes correlates with changes in fat oxidation. These results were confirmed by multivariate models. We identified correlations between microbial diversity indices and several inflammation-related host parameters that suggest a relation between diet-induced changes in gut microbiota diversity and inflammatory processes. Conclusions: This approach allowed us to identify significant correlations between abundances of microbial taxa and diet-induced shifts in several metabolic health parameters. Constructed correlation networks provide an overview of these relations, revealing groups of correlations that are of particular interest for explaining host health aspects through changes in the gut microbiota. PMID:24979151

  16. Genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Yersinia pestis CO92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navid, Ali; Almaas, Eivind

    2007-03-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of bubonic plague. Using publicly available genomic, biochemical and physiological data, we have developed a constraint-based flux balance model of metabolism in the CO92 strain (biovar Orientalis) of this organism. The metabolic reactions were appropriately compartmentalized, and the model accounts for the exchange of metabolites, as well as the import of nutrients and export of waste products. We have characterized the metabolic capabilities and phenotypes of this organism, after comparing the model predictions with available experimental observations to evaluate accuracy and completeness. We have also begun preliminary studies into how cellular metabolism affects virulence.

  17. Addressing Unknown Constants and Metabolic Network Behaviors Through Petascale Computing: Understanding H2 Production in Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Alber, D.; Graf, P.; Seibert, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and, (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H{sub 2}-producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high

  18. Addressing unknown constants and metabolic network behaviors through petascale computing: understanding H2 production in green algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher; Alber, David; Graf, Peter; Kim, Kwiseon; Seibert, Michael

    2007-07-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and, (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H2-producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high-performance systems

  19. Do Karstic Unsaturated Zones Have the Fastest Preferential Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    There is strong evidence that unsaturated-zone travel times for preferential flow, unlike those for diffuse flow, mostly fall within a relatively small range, even for a wide variety of media and conditions [Nimmo, 2007, Water Resources Research]. We have calculated travel times for preferential flow observations published in the last seven years, finding a range of travel velocities with a greater maximum than was previously recognized. The instances of faster transport, however, are predominantly for karst or other materials in which water flow may strongly influence the creation and development of preferential flow paths. These findings motivate a hypothesis: in media where the matrix is soluble, erodible, or otherwise vulnerable to enlargement by flowing water, this flow acts to reduce flow impediments within a macropore network. This might be thought of as a sculpting process in which water carves its conduit into a smoother, larger, less constrictive shape, as discussed in connection with soil pipes [Jones, 2010, Hydrological Processes]. Known developmental processes of karst and epikarst are consistent with this hypothesis. Its acceptance would open doors to expanded use of optimality and thermodynamic principles to understand and predict preferential flow. It also could lead to new modes of hydraulic characterization of subsurface media with regard to unsaturated flow, which are much needed as the difficulty of measuring hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone is a major barrier to the advance of hydrologic science. In practical terms, a new guideline may be justified: in unsaturated karst or other materials in which flowing water may enhance flowpaths, preferential transport rates in general may be several times faster than through media without such pore-developmental processes.

  20. Loss of variation of state detected in soybean metabolic and human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional networks under external stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Katsumi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Okumura, Jun; Ishige, Kentaro; Suzuki, Harukazu; Nakamura, Takuji; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is sensitive to flooding stress, and flood damage at the seedling stage is a barrier to growth. We constructed two mathematical models of the soybean metabolic network, a control model and a flooded model, from metabolic profiles in soybean plants. We simulated the metabolic profiles with perturbations before and after the flooding stimulus using the two models. We measured the variation of state that the system could maintain from a state–space description of the simulated profiles. The results showed a loss of variation of state during the flooding response in the soybean plants. Loss of variation of state was also observed in a human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional network in response to a phorbol-ester stimulus. Thus, we detected a loss of variation of state under external stimuli in two biological systems, regardless of the regulation and stimulus types. Our results suggest that a loss of robustness may occur concurrently with the loss of variation of state in biological systems. We describe the possible applications of the quantity of variation of state in plant genetic engineering and cell biology. Finally, we present a hypothetical “external stimulus-induced information loss” model of biological systems. PMID:27775018

  1. Designer labels for plant metabolism: statistical design of isotope labeling experiments for improved quantification of flux in complex plant metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-27

    Metabolic fluxes are powerful indicators of cell physiology and can be estimated by isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis (MFA). The complexity of the compartmented metabolic networks of plants has constrained the application of isotope-assisted MFA to them, principally because of poor identifiability of fluxes from the measured isotope labeling patterns. However, flux identifiability can be significantly improved by a priori design of isotope labeling experiments (ILEs). This computational design involves evaluating the effect of different isotope label and isotopomer measurement combinations on flux identifiability, and thereby identifying optimal labels and measurements toward evaluating the fluxes of interest with the highest confidence. This article reports ILE designs for two major, compartmented plant metabolic pathways - the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt. Together, these pathways represent common motifs in plant metabolism including duplication of pathways in different subcellular compartments, reversible reactions and cyclic carbon flow. To compare various ILE designs, we employed statistical A- and D-optimality criteria. Our computations showed that 1,2-(13)C Glc is a powerful and robust label for the plant PPPs, given currently popular isotopomer measurement techniques (single quadrupole mass spectrometry [MS] and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR]). Further analysis revealed that this label can estimate several PPP fluxes better than the popular label 1-(13)C Glc. Furthermore, the concurrent measurement of the isotopomers of hexose and pentose moieties synthesized exclusively in the cytosol or the plastid compartments (measurable through intracellular glucose or sucrose, starch, RNA ribose and histidine) considerably improves the identifiability of PPP fluxes in the individual compartments. Additionally, MS-derived isotopomer measurements outperform NMR-derived measurements in identifying PPP fluxes. The

  2. Using isotopic tracers to assess the impact of tillage and straw management on the microbial metabolic network in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Forristal, D.; Jones, M. B.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Dijkstra, P.

    2013-12-01

    By decomposing soil organic matter, microbes gain energy and building blocks for biosynthesis and release CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, insight into the effect of management practices on microbial metabolic pathways and C use efficiency (CUE; microbial C produced per substrate C utilized) may help to predict long term changes in soil C stocks. We studied the effects of reduced (RT) and conventional tillage (CT) on the microbial central C metabolic network, using soil samples from a 12-year-old field experiment in an Irish winter wheat cropping system. Each year after harvest, straw was removed from half of the RT and CT plots or incorporated into the soil in the other half, resulting in four treatment combinations. We added 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose as metabolic tracer isotopomers to composite soil samples taken at two depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm) from each treatment and used the rate of position-specific respired 13CO2 to parameterize a metabolic model. Model outcomes were then used to calculate CUE of the microbial community. We found that the composite samples differed in CUE, but the changes were small, with values ranging between 0.757-0.783 across treatments and soil depth. Increases in CUE were associated with a decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle and reductive pentose phosphate pathway activity and increased consumption of metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Our results indicate that RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage without substantially changing CUE or any of the microbial metabolic pathways. This suggests that at our site, RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage mostly through direct effects such as increased soil C input and physical protection from decomposition, rather than by feedback responses of the microbial community.

  3. Ecological network analysis of an urban water metabolic system: model development, and a case study for Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhifeng; Fath, Brian D

    2010-09-15

    Using ecological network analysis, we analyzed the network structure and ecological relationships in an urban water metabolic system. We developed an ecological network model for the system, and used Beijing as an example of analysis based on the model. We used network throughflow analysis to determine the flows among components, and measured both indirect and direct flows. Using a network utility matrix, we determined the relationships and degrees of mutualism among six compartments--1) local environment, 2) rainwater collection, 3) industry, 4) agriculture, 5) domestic sector, and 6) wastewater recycling--which represent producer, consumer, and reducer trophic levels. The capacity of producers to provide water for Beijing decreased from 2003 to 2007, and consumer demand for water decreased due to decreasing industrial and agricultural demand; the recycling capacity of reducers also improved, decreasing the discharge pressure on the environment. The ecological relationships associated with the local environment or the wastewater recycling sector changed little from 2003 to 2007. From 2003 to 2005, the main changes in the ecological relationships among components of Beijing's water metabolic system mostly occurred between the local environment, the industrial and agricultural sectors, and the domestic sector, but by 2006 and 2007, the major change was between the local environment, the agricultural sector, and the industrial sector. The other ecological relationships did not change during the study period. Although Beijing's mutualism indices remained generally stable, the ecological relationships among compartments changed greatly. Our analysis revealed ways to further optimize this system and the relationships among compartments, thereby optimizing future urban water resources development.

  4. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many ‘unknown’ yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  5. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many 'unknown' yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  6. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many 'unknown' yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/.

  7. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termedmore » as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.« less

  8. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  9. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-le