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Sample records for metabolically activated role

  1. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: Its role in metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity.

  2. Role of Kynurenine Metabolism Pathway Activation in Major Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Jonathan

    A proportion of depressed individuals show evidence of inflammation. Both animal, quasi-experimental, and longitudinal studies indicate that inflammatory processes may play a causal role in the developmental of depressive illness. While there may be multiple causal pathways through which inflammatory processes affect mood, activation of the kynurenine pathway is essential for the development of depression-like behavior in rodents. Studies of hepatitis C or cancer patients receiving treatment with inflammation-inducing medications show increased activation of the kynurenine pathway and decreased levels of tryptophan that correlate with inflammation-induced depression. Further, this treatment has been shown to lead to increased production of neurotoxic kynurenine pathway metabolites such as quinolinic acid (QA). Similarly, in non-medically ill patients with major depression, multiple studies have found activation of the kynurenine pathway and/or preferential activation of the neurotoxic (QA) pathway at the expense of the production of the NMDA antagonist, kynurenic acid. Initially, activation of the kynurenine pathway was believed to precipitate depressive symptoms by depleting brain serotonin, however, the weight of the evidence now suggests that an imbalance between neurotoxic and neuroprotective metabolites may be the principal driver of depression; conceivably via its effects on glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  3. [The role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors in metabolic balance disturbances under stress].

    PubMed

    Dushkin, M I; Khrapova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Some aspects of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) involvement in regulation of stress-dependent biological processes leading to insulin resistance, lipid imbalance, hypertension and inflammation are reviewed. Analysis of literature data clearly shows the main role of PPAR in stress signal transduction following to metabolic disbalance development under prolonged stress conditions. The interplay of three PPAR isoforms functional activity with metabolic process disturbances during stress is under special emphasis. Taking into account experimental data described in literature we suggest that PPAR activation under acute stress is an adaptive response while stable PPAR hyperexpression under prolonged stress can cause insulin resistance, hypertension, and visceral obesity. The strategy of PPAR using as pharmacological targets in metabolic syndrome correction is under consideration.

  4. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gene polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Zhou, Hui; Shen, Chong; Yu, Lu-Gang; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Guo, Zhi-Rong

    2015-05-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are the serious public health problems worldwide. Moreover, it is estimated that MetS patients have about five-fold greater risk of the T2DM development compared with people without the syndrome. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are a subgroup of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors which play an important role in the pathogenesis of MetS and T2DM. All three members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) nuclear receptor subfamily, PPARα, PPARβ/δ and PPARγ are critical in regulating insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and blood pressure. Recently, more and more studies indicated that the gene polymorphism of PPARs, such as Leu(162)Val and Val(227)Ala of PPARα, +294T > C of PPARβ/δ, Pro(12)Ala and C1431T of PPARγ, are significantly associated with the onset and progressing of MetS and T2DM in different population worldwide. Furthermore, a large body of evidence demonstrated that the glucose metabolism and lipid metabolism were influenced by gene-gene interaction among PPARs genes. However, given the complexity pathogenesis of metabolic disease, it is unlikely that genetic variation of a single locus would provide an adequate explanation of inter-individual differences which results in diverse clinical syndromes. Thus, gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions associated with T2DM and MetS need future comprehensive studies.

  5. The roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and its association with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, collectively known as the metabolic syndrome or syndrome X, is one of the most challenging health problems facing industrialized countries. The nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs alpha (α), beta (β) also known as delta (δ), and gamma (γ)), have well-documented roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. Pharmacologically, PPARα is activated by fibrate hypolipidemic drugs, whereas PPARγ is activated by insulin sensitizers thiazolidinediones (TZDs). No marketed drug is yet available for PPARβ(δ). The identification of fibrates and TZDs as respective ligands for PPARα and PPARγ was a groundbreaking finding that sparked notable pharmaceutical interest in PPARs as potential drug targets for treatment of the metabolic syndrome. Limiting side effects associated with clinical use of TZDs have emerged in recent years. New and novel PPAR drugs with broad safety margins and therapeutic potentials for the metabolic syndrome are in development. These include partial, dual, or pan PPAR agonists; PPAR antagonists; and selective PPAR modulators. The objective of this chapter is to highlight the therapeutic benefits of targeting more than one PPAR subtype in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome. The pros and cons observed during clinical use of TZDs and the strategies and progress made in the production of new generations of safe and effective PPAR ligands are discussed. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  7. Deciphering the role of aspartate and prephenate aminotransferase activities in plastid nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; El-Azaz, Jorge; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts and plastids of nonphotosynthetic plant cells contain two aspartate (Asp) aminotransferases: a eukaryotic type (Asp5) and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying Asp and prephenate aminotransferase activities (PAT). We have identified the entire Asp aminotransferase gene family in Nicotiana benthamiana and isolated and cloned the genes encoding the isoenzymes with plastidic localization: NbAsp5 and NbPAT. Using a virus-induced gene silencing approach, we obtained N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbAsp5 and/or NbPAT. Phenotypic and metabolic analyses were conducted in silenced plants to investigate the specific roles of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids within the plastid. The NbAsp5 silenced plants had no changes in phenotype, exhibiting similar levels of free Asp and glutamate as control plants, but contained diminished levels of asparagine and much higher levels of lysine. In contrast, the suppression of NbPAT led to a severe reduction in growth and strong chlorosis symptoms. NbPAT silenced plants exhibited extremely reduced levels of asparagine and were greatly affected in their phenylalanine metabolism and lignin deposition. Furthermore, NbPAT suppression triggered a transcriptional reprogramming in plastid nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, our results indicate that NbPAT has an overlapping role with NbAsp5 in the biosynthesis of Asp and a key role in the production of phenylalanine for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The analysis of NbAsp5/NbPAT cosilenced plants highlights the central role of both plastidic aminotransferases in nitrogen metabolism; however, only NbPAT is essential for plant growth and development.

  8. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in kidney tubular transport, metabolism, and disease.

    PubMed

    Rajani, Roshan; Pastor-Soler, Nuria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2017-09-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor that regulates cellular energy balance, transport, growth, inflammation, and survival functions. This review explores recent work in defining the effects of AMPK on various renal tubular epithelial ion transport proteins as well as its role in kidney injury and repair in normal and disease states. Recently, several groups have uncovered additional functions of AMPK in the regulation of kidney and transport proteins. These new studies have focused on the role of AMPK in the kidney in the setting of various diseases such as diabetes, which include evaluation of the effects of the hyperglycemic state on podocyte and tubular cell function. Other recent studies have investigated how reduced kidney mass, polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and fibrosis affect AMPK activation status. A general theme of several conditions that lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is that AMPK activity is abnormally suppressed relative to that in normal kidneys. Thus, the idea that AMPK activation may be a therapeutic strategy to slow down the progression of CKD has emerged. In addition to drugs such as metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide that are classically used as AMPK activators, recent studies have identified the therapeutic potential of other compounds that function at least partly as AMPK activators, such as salicylates, statins, berberine, and resveratrol, in preventing the progression of CKD. AMPK in the kidney plays a unique role at the crossroads of energy metabolism, ion and water transport, inflammation, and stress. Its potential role in modulating recovery from vs. progression of acute and chronic kidney injury has been the topic of recent research findings. The continued study of AMPK in kidney physiology and disease has improved our understanding of these physiological and pathological processes and offers great hope for therapeutic avenues for the increasing population at risk to develop kidney

  9. Role of lipoprotein lipase activity on lipoprotein metabolism and the fate of circulating triglycerides in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Herrera, E; Lasunción, M A; Gomez-Coronado, D; Aranda, P; López-Luna, P; Maier, I

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism that induces maternal hypertriglyceridemia in late normal pregnancy, and its physiologic significance are reviewed as a model of the effects of sex steroids on lipoprotein metabolism. In the pregnant rat, maternal carcass fat content progressively increases up to day 19 of gestation, then declines at day 21. The decline may be explained by the augmented lipolytic activity in adipose tissue that is seen in late pregnancy in the rat. This change causes maternal circulating free fatty acids and glycerol levels to rise. Although the liver is the main receptor organ for these metabolites, liver triglyceride content is reduced. Circulating triglycerides and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride levels are highly augmented in the pregnant rat, indicating that liver-synthesized triglycerides are rapidly released into the circulation. Similar increments in circulating VLDL-triglycerides are seen in pregnant women during the third trimester of gestation. This increase is coincident with a decrease in plasma postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity, indicating a reduced removal of circulating triglycerides by maternal tissues or a redistribution in their use among the different tissues. During late gestation in the rat, tissue lipoprotein lipase activity varies in different directions; it decreases in adipose tissue, the liver, and to a smaller extent the heart, but increases in placental and mammary gland tissue. These changes play an important role in the fate of circulating triglycerides, which are diverted from uptake by adipose tissue to uptake by the mammary gland for milk synthesis, and probably by the placenta for hydrolysis and transfer of released nonesterified fatty acids to the fetus. After 24 hours of starvation, lipoprotein lipase activity in the liver greatly increases in the rat in late pregnancy; this change is not seen in virgin animals. This alteration is similar to that seen in liver triglyceride content and plasma ketone body

  10. Mitochondrial metabolism during daily torpor in the dwarf Siberian hamster: role of active regulated changes and passive thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason C L; Gerson, Alexander R; Staples, James F

    2007-11-01

    During daily torpor in the dwarf Siberian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, metabolic rate is reduced by 65% compared with the basal rate, but the mechanisms involved are contentious. We examined liver mitochondrial respiration to determine the possible role of active regulated changes and passive thermal effects in the reduction of metabolic rate. When assayed at 37 degrees C, state 3 (phosphorylating) respiration, but not state 4 (nonphosphorylating) respiration, was significantly lower during torpor compared with normothermia, suggesting that active regulated changes occur during daily torpor. Using top-down elasticity analysis, we determined that these active changes in torpor included a reduced substrate oxidation capacity and an increased proton conductance of the inner mitochondrial membrane. At 15 degrees C, mitochondrial respiration was at least 75% lower than at 37 degrees C, but there was no difference between normothermia and torpor. This implies that the active regulated changes are likely more important for reducing respiration at high temperatures (i.e., during entrance) and/or have effects other than reducing respiration at low temperatures. The decrease in respiration from 37 degrees C to 15 degrees C resulted predominantly from a considerable reduction of substrate oxidation capacity in both torpid and normothermic animals. Temperature-dependent changes in proton leak and phosphorylation kinetics depended on metabolic state; proton leakiness increased in torpid animals but decreased in normothermic animals, whereas phosphorylation activity decreased in torpid animals but increased in normothermic animals. Overall, we have shown that both active and passive changes to oxidative phosphorylation occur during daily torpor in this species, contributing to reduced metabolic rate.

  11. Role of dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase in the metabolic activation of dimethylinitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Lai, D Y; Myers, S C; Woo, Y T; Greene, E J; Friedman, M A; Argus, M F; Arcos, J C

    1979-01-01

    In vivo administration to rats of the mixed-function oxidase modifiers 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN) or beta-naphthoflavnoe (beta-f) inhibits the hepatic microsome-catalyzed in vitro binding of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) to DNA. This parallels their effect on DMN-demethylase I, regarded to be the sole activating step in DMN carcinogenesis and fails to account for the previously observed anomaly that MC and PCN inhibit, while beta-NF enhances, the hepatocarcinogenic activity of DMN. The in vitro binding of DMN is clearly dependent on microsomes and NADPH, and is strongly enhanced by soluble cytoplasmic proteins; the presence of the latter has no effect. however, on the relative response to pretreatment by the modifiers. In mice beta-NF enhances and PCN inhibits DMN-demethylase I; beta-NF has no effect on either the cytochrome P-450 level or on the LD50, while PCN strongly increases the cytochrome P-450 level but without influencing the LD50. Neither of the two modifiers has any effect in mice on the host-mediated mutagenicity of DMN in a dose-response study, except for the highest dose of DMN (200 mg/kg) where PCN pretreatment significantly enhanced mutagenicity. To account for the anomalous observations, other potential pathways of DMN metabolism have been explored. Whole rat liver nuclei or isolated nuclear membrane fractions contain no DMN-demethylase or diethylnitrosamine-deethylase activity. In a microsomal mixed-function amine-oxidase assay system neither purified enzyme preparations nor whole microsomes catalyze NADPH oxidation in the presence of DMN as substrate. In addition, the purified enzyme does not catalyze formaldehyde production in the DMN-demethylase assay system. Benzylamine, a typical inhibitor of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO), is a potent inhibitor of DMN-demethylase activity, but microsomes are devoid of MAO activity. Furthermore, purified MAO has no DMN-demethylase activity. The differential effect

  12. Deciphering the Role of Aspartate and Prephenate Aminotransferase Activities in Plastid Nitrogen Metabolism1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Fernando; El-Azaz, Jorge; Ávila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts and plastids of nonphotosynthetic plant cells contain two aspartate (Asp) aminotransferases: a eukaryotic type (Asp5) and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying Asp and prephenate aminotransferase activities (PAT). We have identified the entire Asp aminotransferase gene family in Nicotiana benthamiana and isolated and cloned the genes encoding the isoenzymes with plastidic localization: NbAsp5 and NbPAT. Using a virus-induced gene silencing approach, we obtained N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbAsp5 and/or NbPAT. Phenotypic and metabolic analyses were conducted in silenced plants to investigate the specific roles of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids within the plastid. The NbAsp5 silenced plants had no changes in phenotype, exhibiting similar levels of free Asp and glutamate as control plants, but contained diminished levels of asparagine and much higher levels of lysine. In contrast, the suppression of NbPAT led to a severe reduction in growth and strong chlorosis symptoms. NbPAT silenced plants exhibited extremely reduced levels of asparagine and were greatly affected in their phenylalanine metabolism and lignin deposition. Furthermore, NbPAT suppression triggered a transcriptional reprogramming in plastid nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, our results indicate that NbPAT has an overlapping role with NbAsp5 in the biosynthesis of Asp and a key role in the production of phenylalanine for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The analysis of NbAsp5/NbPAT cosilenced plants highlights the central role of both plastidic aminotransferases in nitrogen metabolism; however, only NbPAT is essential for plant growth and development. PMID:24296073

  13. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or ∼20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an ∼70% decrease (or ∼3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼35% decrease (or ∼25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an ∼50% increase (or ∼35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼30% increase (or ∼25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the model simulations of exercise response are consistent with the hypothesis that mitochondrial NADH

  14. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M; Cabrera, Marco E

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or approximately 20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an approximately 70% decrease (or approximately 3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an approximately 35% decrease (or approximately 25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an approximately 50% increase (or approximately 35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an approximately 30% increase (or approximately 25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the

  15. Regulation of energy metabolism during social interactions in rainbow trout: A role for AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Kathleen M; Craig, Paul M; Dhillon, Rashpal S; Lau, Gigi Y; Richards, Jeffrey G

    2017-08-02

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined in pairs form social hierarchies in which subordinate fish typically experience fasting and high circulating cortisol levels, resulting in low growth rates. The present study investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mediating metabolic adjustments associated with social status in rainbow trout. After 3 d of social interaction, liver AMPK activity in subordinate trout was significantly higher than that of dominant or sham (fish handled in the same fashion as paired fish but held individually) trout. Elevated liver AMPK activity in subordinate fish likely reflected a significantly higher ratio of phosphorylated AMPK (phospho-AMPK) to total AMPK protein, which was accompanied by significantly higher AMPKα1 relative mRNA abundance. Liver ATP and creatine phosphate (CrP) concentrations in subordinate fish also were elevated, perhaps as a result of AMPK activity. Sham fish that were fasted for 3 d exhibited effects parallel to those of subordinate fish, suggesting that low food intake was an important trigger of elevated AMPK activity in subordinate fish. Effects on white muscle appeared to be influenced by the physical activity associated with social interaction. Overall, muscle AMPK activity was significantly higher in dominant and subordinate trout than sham fish. Muscle phospho-AMPK:total AMPK protein abundance was highest in subordinate fish, while muscle AMPKα1 relative mRNA abundance was elevated by social dominance. Muscle ATP and CrP concentrations were high in dominant and subordinate fish at 6 h of interaction, decreasing significantly thereafter. Collectively, the findings of the present study support a role for AMPK in mediating the liver and white muscle metabolic adjustments associated with social hierarchy formation in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

  16. The role of sebaceous gland activity and scalp microfloral metabolism in the etiology of seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff.

    PubMed

    Ro, Byung In; Dawson, Thomas L

    2005-12-01

    Most common scalp flaking disorders show a strong correlation with sebaceous gland (SG) activity. Early SG activity in the neonate results in microfloral colonization and cradle cap. After maternal hormonal control subsides, there is little SG activity until puberty, when the SG turns on under sex hormone control. When the SG activity increases, the present but low Malassezia population has a new food source and proliferates, resulting in the scalp itching and flaking common to greater than 50% of adults. Dry scalp flaking, dandruff, and seborrheic dermatitis are chronic scalp manifestations of similar etiology differing only in severity. The common etiology is a convergence of three factors: (1) SG secretions, (2) microfloral metabolism, and (3) individual susceptibility. Dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis (D/SD) are more than superficial stratum corneum disorders, including alteration of the epidermis with hyperproliferation, excess lipids, interdigitation of the corneal envelope, and parakeratosis. The pathogenic role of Malassezia in D/SD has recently been elucidated, and is focused on their lipid metabolism. Malassezia restricta and M. globosa require lipids. They degrade sebum, free fatty acids from triglycerides, consume specific saturated fatty acids, and leave behind the unsaturates. Penetration of the modified sebaceous secretions results in inflammation, irritation, and scalp flaking.

  17. Expression and Function of mARC: Roles in Lipogenesis and Metabolic Activation of Ximelagatran.

    PubMed

    Neve, Etienne P A; Köfeler, Harald; Hendriks, Delilah F G; Nordling, Åsa; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Mkrtchian, Souren; Näslund, Erik; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Recently two novel enzymes were identified in the outer mitochondrial membrane, mARC1 and mARC2. These molybdenum containing enzymes can reduce a variety of N-hydroxylated compounds, such as N-hydroxy-guanidines and sulfohydroxamic acids, as well as convert nitrite into nitric oxide (NO). However, their endogenous functions remain unknown. Here we demonstrate a specific developmental pattern of expression of these enzymes. mARC1, but not mARC2, was found to be expressed in fetal human liver, whereas both, in particular mARC2, are abundant in adult liver and also expressed in omental and subcutaneous fat. Caloric diet restriction of obese patients caused a decreased expression of mARC2 in liver, similar to that seen in the livers of starved rats. Knock down of mARC2 expression by siRNA in murine adipocytes had statistically significant effect on the level of diglycerides and on the fatty acid composition of some triglycerides, concomitantly a clear trend toward the reduced formation of most of triglyceride and phospholipid species was observed. The involvement of mARC2 in the metabolism of the hepatotoxic drug ximelagatran was evaluated in hepatocytes and adipocytes. Ximelagatran was shown to cause oxidative stress and knock down of mARC2 in adipocytes prevented ximelagatran induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In conclusion, our data indicate that mARC1 and mARC2 have different developmental expression profiles, and that mARC2 is involved in lipogenesis, is regulated by nutritional status and responsible for activation of ximelagatran into a mitotoxic metabolite(s).

  18. Dynamic roles of p53-mediated metabolic activities in ROS-induced stress responses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Le; Hickman, Justin H; Wang, Shang-Jui; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a multifaceted polypeptide that impedes tumorigenesis by regulating a diverse array of cellular processes. Triggered by a wide variety of stress stimuli, p53 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in the canonical tumor suppression pathways of apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and senescence. We recently discovered a novel mechanism whereby p53 inhibits cystine uptake through repression of the SLC7A11 gene to mediate ferroptosis. Importantly, this p53-SLC7A11 axis is preserved in the p53(3KR) mutant, and contributes to its ability to suppress tumorigenesis in the absence of the classical tumor suppression mechanisms. Here, we report that wild type p53 can induce both apoptosis and ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that p53's functional N-terminal domain is required for its capacity to regulate oxidative stress responses and ferroptosis. Notably, activated p53 dynamically modulates intracellular ROS, causing an initial reduction and a subsequent increase of ROS levels. Taken together, these data implicate ferroptosis as an additional component of the cell death program induced by wild type p53 in human cancer cells, and reveal a complex and dynamic role of p53 in oxidative stress responses.

  19. Role of Metabolic Activation and the TRPA1 Receptor in the Sensory Irritation Response to Styrene and Naphthalene

    PubMed Central

    Lanosa, Michael J.; Willis, Daniel N.; Jordt, Sven; Morris, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The current study was aimed at examining the role of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activation and the electrophile-sensitive transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 receptor (TRPA1) in mediating the sensory irritation response to styrene and naphthalene. Toward this end, the sensory irritation to these vapors was measured in female C57Bl/6J mice during 15-min exposure via plethysmographic measurement of the duration of braking at the onset of each expiration. The sensory irritation response to 75 ppm styrene and 7 ppm naphthalene was diminished threefold or more in animals pretreated with the CYP450 inhibitor metyrapone, providing evidence of the role of metabolic activation in the response to these vapors. The sensory irritation response to styrene (75 ppm) and naphthalene (7.6 ppm) was virtually absent in TRPA1−/− knockout mice, indicating the critical role of this receptor in mediating the response. Thus, these results support the hypothesis that styrene and naphthalene vapors initiate the sensory irritation response through TRPA1 detection of their CYP450 metabolites. PMID:20176620

  20. Modelling the optimal timing in metabolic pathway activation-use of Pontryagin's Maximum Principle and role of the Golden section.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Li, Pu; Schuster, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    The time course of enzyme concentrations in metabolic pathways can be predicted on the basis of the optimality criterion of minimizing the time period in which an essential product is generated. This criterion is in line with the widely accepted view that high fitness requires high pathway flux. Here, based on Pontryagin's Maximum Principle, a method is developed to solve the corresponding constrained optimal control problem in an almost exclusively analytical way and, thus, to calculate optimal enzyme profiles, when linear, irreversible rate laws are assumed. Three different problem formulations are considered and the corresponding optimization results are derived. Besides the minimization of transition time, we consider an operation time in which 90% of the substrate has been converted into product. In that case, only the enzyme at the lower end of the pathway rather than all enzymes are active in the last phase. In all cases, biphasic or multiphasic time courses are obtained. The biological meaning of the results in terms of a consecutive just-in-time expression of metabolic genes is discussed. For the special case of two-enzyme systems, the role of the Golden section in the solution is outlined.

  1. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S R; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2016-08-18

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression.

  2. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  3. Cytosolic [Ca(2+)] modulates basal GLUT1 activity and plays a permissive role in its activation by metabolic stress and insulin in rat epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, R A; Porras, O H; Castro, J; Barros, L F

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the role of cytosolic free calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) in the stimulation of GLUT1 by metabolic stress and insulin. Chelation of [Ca(2+)]c with bapta, introduced in rat liver epithelial Clone 9 cells in the acetoxymethyl (AM) form, decreased their basal rate of 2-deoxyglucose uptake in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal inhibition at 75 microM bapta was by 38 +/- 8% (n = 8). The effect was partially reversed by ionomycin. Basal sugar uptake was also decreased by lowering extracellular [Ca(2+)] in ionomycin-permeabilized cells. Increasing [Ca(2+)]c over its resting level of 168 +/- 32 (n = 27) had no affect on sugar uptake. Chelation of [Ca(2+)]c did not change the abundance of surface GLUT1 and had no significant effect on the affinity of GLUT1 for sugars. In addition, calcium chelation abolished the activation of GLUT1 by azide, arsenate, 2,4-dinitrophenol and insulin. However, [Ca(2+)]c did not increase in the presence of azide. We conclude that [Ca(2+)]c, near or below its resting level, modulates GLUT1 activity over a considerable range and plays a permissive role in the activation of the carrier by metabolic stress and insulin.

  4. The Role of Myeloid Cell Activation and Arginine Metabolism in the Pathogenesis of Virus-Induced Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    When an antiviral immune response is generated, a balance must be reached between two opposing pathways: the production of proinflammatory and cytotoxic effectors that drive a robust antiviral immune response to control the infection and regulators that function to limit or blunt an excessive immune response to minimize immune-mediated pathology and repair tissue damage. Myeloid cells, including monocytes and macrophages, play an important role in this balance, particularly through the activities of the arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2; iNOS) and arginase 1 (Arg1). Nitric oxide (NO) production by iNOS is an important proinflammatory mediator, whereas Arg1-expressing macrophages contribute to the resolution of inflammation and wound repair. In the context of viral infections, expression of these enzymes can result in a variety of outcomes for the host. NO has direct antiviral properties against some viruses, whereas during other virus infections NO can mediate immunopathology and/or inhibit the antiviral immune response to promote chronic infection. Arg1 activity not only has important wound healing functions but can also inhibit the antiviral immune response during some viral infections. Thus, depending on the specific virus and the tissue(s) involved, the activity of both of these arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes can either exacerbate or limit the severity of virus-induced disease. In this review, we will discuss a variety of viral infections, including HIV, SARS-CoV, LCMV, HCV, RSV, and others, where myeloid cells influence the control and clearance of the virus from the host, as well as the severity and resolution of tissue damage, via the activities of iNOS and/or Arg1. Clearly, monocyte/macrophage activation and arginine metabolism will continue to be important areas of investigation in the context of viral infections. PMID:25250029

  5. The emerging role of constitutive androstane receptor and its cross talk with liver X receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor A in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Mengxi; Xie, Wen; Zhai, Yonggong

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of lipid metabolism is central to energy homeostasis in higher multicellular organisms. Lipid homeostasis depends on factors that are able to transduce metabolic parameters into regulatory events representing the fundamental components of the general control system. Nuclear receptors form a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors implicated in various physiological functions including energy metabolism. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), initially identified as a xenobiotic-sensing receptor, may also have roles in lipid homeostasis. The nuclear receptors liver X receptors (LXRs, NR1H2/3) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, NR1C) have been known for their roles in lipid metabolism. LXR is a sterol sensor that promotes lipogenesis, whereas PPARα controls a variety of genes in several pathways of lipid metabolism. This chapter focuses primarily on the role of CAR in lipid metabolism directly or through its cross talk with LXRs and PPARα. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  7. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young C. Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S.; Park, Jae H.; Kim, Sung Y.

    2007-08-15

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards.

  8. Elucidating the role of the phenylacetic acid metabolic complex in the pathogenic activity of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Faith E; Glassbrook, Norman J; Danehower, David A; Cubeta, Marc A

    2012-01-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani produces phytotoxic phenylacetic acid (PAA) and hydroxy (OH-) and methoxy (MeO-) derivatives of PAA. However, limited information is available on the specific role that these compounds play in the development of Rhizoctonia disease symptoms and concentration(s) required to induce a host response. Reports that PAA inhibits the growth of R. solani conflict with the established ability of the fungus to produce and metabolize PAA. Experiments were conducted to clarify the role of the PAA metabolic complex in Rhizoctonia disease. In this study the concentration of PAA and derivatives required to induce tomato root necrosis and stem canker, in the absence of the fungus, and the concentration that inhibits mycelial growth of R. solani were determined. The effect of exogenous PAA and derivatives of PAA on tomato seedling growth also was investigated. Growth of tomato seedlings in medium containing 0.1-7.5 mM PAA and derivatives induced necrosis of up to 85% of root system. Canker development resulted from injection of tomato seedling stems with 7.5 mM PAA, 3-OH-PAA, or 3-MeO-PAA. PAA in the growth medium reduced R. solani biomass, with 50% reduction observed at 7.5 mM. PAA, and derivatives were quantified from the culture medium of 14 isolates of R. solani belonging to three distinct anastomosis groups by GC-MS. The quantities ranged from below the limit of detection to 678 nM, below the concentrations experimentally determined to be phytotoxic. Correlation analyses revealed that isolates of R. solani that produced high PAA and derivatives in vitro also caused high mortality on tomato seedlings. The results of this investigation add to the body of evidence that the PAA metabolic complex is involved in Rhizoctonia disease development but do not indicate that production of these compounds is the primary or the only determinant of pathogenicity.

  9. Brain energy metabolism in glutamate-receptor activation and excitotoxicity: role for APC/C-Cdh1 in the balance glycolysis/pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Patricia; Almeida, Angeles; Bolaños, Juan P

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of brain energy metabolism strongly suggest that glutamate receptor-mediated neurotransmission is coupled with molecular signals that switch-on glucose utilization pathways to meet the high energetic requirements of neurons. Failure to adequately coordinate energy supply for neurotransmission ultimately results in a positive amplifying loop of receptor over-activation leading to neuronal death, a process known as excitotoxicity. In this review, we revisited current concepts in excitotoxic mechanisms, their involvement in energy substrate utilization, and the signaling pathways that coordinate both processes. In particular, we have focused on the novel role played by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-Cdh1, in cell metabolism. Our laboratory identified 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3) -a key glycolytic-promoting enzyme- as an APC/C-Cdh1 substrate. Interestingly, APC/C-Cdh1 activity is inhibited by over-activation of glutamate receptors through a Ca(2+)-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, by inhibiting APC/C-Cdh1 activity, glutamate-receptors activation promotes PFKFB3 stabilization, leading to increased glycolysis and decreased pentose-phosphate pathway activity. This causes a loss in neuronal ability to regenerate glutathione, triggering oxidative stress and delayed excitotoxicity. Further investigation is critical to identify novel molecules responsible for the coupling of energy metabolism with glutamatergic neurotransmission and excitotoxicity, as well as to help developing new therapeutic strategies against neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Metabolic fitness: physical activity and health].

    PubMed

    Saltin, Bengt; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2002-04-15

    Physical inactivity is strongly associated with an increased risk of premature disease and death, and the falling level of physical activity in Denmark (as in many other countries) makes physical inactivity a major life-style risk factor in many western countries today. Both aerobic fitness (maximum oxygen uptake) and metabolic capacity of the muscles are important in this matter. The present paper focuses on the role of the metabolic capacity/fitness of muscle, because this appears to be especially critical for the development of metabolic-related diseases and thus for the health of the individual. A definition of metabolic fitness is proposed as the ratio between mitochondrial capacity for substrate utilisation and maximum oxygen uptake of the muscle. Indirect means of determining this parameter are discussed. Skeletal muscle is an extraordinarily plastic tissue and metabolic capacity/fitness changes quickly when the level of physical activity is altered. High metabolic fitness includes an elevated use of fat at rest and during exercise. The capacity for glucose metabolism is also enhanced in trained muscle. Some of these adaptations to physical activity are explained. Exercise-induced activation of genes coding for proteins involved in metabolism is described as an underlying mechanism for some of these adaptations. The increased gene expression is of relatively short duration, which implies that a certain regularity of physical activity is required to maintain high metabolic fitness. Thus, metabolic fitness is directly related to how much the muscle is used, but even low levels of physical activity have a beneficial effect on metabolic fitness and the overall health of the individual.

  11. Natural forms of vitamin E: metabolism, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and the role in disease prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The Vitamin E family consists of four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. α-Tocopherol (αT) is the predominant form of vitamin E in tissues and its deficiency leads to ataxia in humans. However, results from many clinical studies do not support protective roles of αT in disease prevention in people with adequate nutrient status. On the other hand, recent mechanistic studies indicate that other forms of vitamin E such as γ-tocopherol (γT), δ-tocopherol (δT) and γ-tocotrienol (γTE) have unique antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that are superior to αT in prevention and therapy against chronic diseases. These vitamin E forms scavenge reactive nitrogen species, inhibit cyclooxygenase- and 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed eicosanoids and suppress pro-inflammatory signaling such as NF-κB and STAT3/6. Unlike αT, other vitamin E forms are significantly metabolized to carboxychromanols via cytochrome P-450 (CYP4F2)-initiated side-chain ω-oxidation. Long-chain carboxychromanols, esp.13’-carboxychromanols, are shown to have stronger anti-inflammatory effects than un-metabolized vitamins and may therefore contribute to beneficial effects of vitamin E forms in vivo. Consistent with mechanistic findings, animal and human studies show that γT and tocotrienols may be useful against inflammation-associated diseases. This review focuses on non-αT forms of vitamin E with respect to their metabolism, anti-inflammatory effects and mechanisms and in vivo efficacy in preclinical models as well as human clinical intervention studies. PMID:24704972

  12. Metabolic cost of extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The data on metabolic rates during Skylab extravehicular activities are presented and compared with prior experience during Gemini and Apollo. Difficulties experienced with Gemini extravehicular activities are reviewed. The effect of a pressure suit on metabolic rate is discussed and the life support equipment capabilities of each life support system are reviewed. The methods used to measure metabolic rate, utilizing bioinstrumentation and operational data on the life support system, are described. Metabolic rates are correlated with different activities. Metabolic rates in Skylab were found to be within the capacities of the life support systems and to be similar to the metabolic rates experienced during Apollo lunar 1/6-g extravehicular activities. They were found to range from 100 kcal/h to 500 kcal/h, during both 1/6-g and zero-g extravehicular activities. The average metabolic rates measured during long extravehicular activities were remarkably consistent and appeared to be a function of crew pacing of activity rather than to the effort involved in individual tasks.

  13. Role of melatonin in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Ahmet; Topal, Turgut; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2009-12-01

    Although the human genome has remained unchanged over the last 10,000 years, our lifestyle has become progressively more divergent from those of our ancient ancestors. This maladaptive change became apparent with the Industrial Revolution and has been accelerating in recent decades. Socially, we are people of the 21st century, but genetically we remain similar to our early ancestors. In conjunction with this discordance between our ancient, genetically-determined biology and the nutritional, cultural and activity patterns in contemporary Western populations, many diseases have emerged. Only a century ago infectious disease was a major cause of mortality, whereas today non-infectious chronic diseases are the greatest cause of death in the world. Epidemics of metabolic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome and certain cancers) have become major contributors to the burden of poor health and they are presently emerging or accelerating, in most developing countries. One major lifestyle consequence is light at night and subsequent disrupted circadian rhythms commonly referred to as circadian disruption or chronodisruption. Mounting evidence reveals that particularly melatonin rhythmicity has crucial roles in a variety of metabolic functions as an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory chronobiotic and possibly as an epigenetic regulator. This paper provides a brief outline about metabolic dysregulation in conjunction with a disrupted melatonin rhythm.

  14. KINETICS OF MODULATORY ROLE OF Cyperus esculentus L. ON THE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF KEY CARBOHYDRATE METABOLIZING ENZYMES

    PubMed Central

    Sabiu, Saheed; Ajani, Emmanuel Oladipo; Sunmonu, Taofik Olatunde; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: The continuous search for new lead compounds as viable inhibitors of specific enzymes linked to carbohydrate metabolism has intensified. Cyperus esculentus L. is one of the therapeutically implicated botanicals against several degenerative diseases including diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated the antioxidant and mechanism(s) of inhibitory potential of aqueous extract of C. esculentus on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. The extract was investigated for its radical scavenging and hypoglycaemic potentials using standard experimental procedures. Lineweaver-Burke plot was used to predict the manner in which the enzymes were inhibited. Results: The data obtained revealed that the extract moderately and potently inhibited the specific activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, respectively. The inhibition was concentration-related with respective IC50 values of 5.19 and 0.78 mg/mL relative to that of the control (3.72 and 3.55 mg/mL). The extract also significantly scavenged free radicals and the effects elicited could be ascribed to its phytoconstituents. Conclusion: The respective competitive and non-competitive mode of action of the extract is due to its inhibitory potentials on the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Going forward, in addition to completely characterize the exact compound(s) responsible for the elicited activity in this study, pertinent attention will be given to the in vivo evaluation of the identified constituents. PMID:28638866

  15. KINETICS OF MODULATORY ROLE OF Cyperus esculentus L. ON THE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF KEY CARBOHYDRATE METABOLIZING ENZYMES.

    PubMed

    Sabiu, Saheed; Ajani, Emmanuel Oladipo; Sunmonu, Taofik Olatunde; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2017-01-01

    The continuous search for new lead compounds as viable inhibitors of specific enzymes linked to carbohydrate metabolism has intensified. Cyperus esculentus L. is one of the therapeutically implicated botanicals against several degenerative diseases including diabetes mellitus. This study evaluated the antioxidant and mechanism(s) of inhibitory potential of aqueous extract of C. esculentus on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. The extract was investigated for its radical scavenging and hypoglycaemic potentials using standard experimental procedures. Lineweaver-Burke plot was used to predict the manner in which the enzymes were inhibited. The data obtained revealed that the extract moderately and potently inhibited the specific activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, respectively. The inhibition was concentration-related with respective IC50 values of 5.19 and 0.78 mg/mL relative to that of the control (3.72 and 3.55 mg/mL). The extract also significantly scavenged free radicals and the effects elicited could be ascribed to its phytoconstituents. The respective competitive and non-competitive mode of action of the extract is due to its inhibitory potentials on the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Going forward, in addition to completely characterize the exact compound(s) responsible for the elicited activity in this study, pertinent attention will be given to the in vivo evaluation of the identified constituents.

  16. Cooperative effects of hepatitis B virus and TNF may play important roles in the activation of metabolic pathways through the activation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β are often observed in the sera of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. It is well known that these cytokines activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-signaling, and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether HBV or HBV X protein (HBx) enhanced the activation of NF-κB in the presence of TNF and/or IL-1β, and their effects on the expression of metabolic pathway‑associated genes. We examined whether HBV or HBx enhanced cytokine-induced activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes, using a reporter assay, in the presence or absence of TNF and/or IL-1β. The expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1), one of the NF-κB target genes was also examined. The expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells in the presence or absence of TNF was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Human hepatocytes expressed TNF receptors and IL-1 receptors. NF-κB was activated by cooperation between HBx and TNF in human hepatocytes. We observed IGFBP1 expression in HBV infection and that a number of metabolic pathway-associated genes were upregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, compared with HepG2 cells with or without TNF treatment. We observed the cooperative effects of HBV and TNF which enhanced the activation of NF-κB as well as upregulated the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in hepatocytes. These effects may be important in the development of HBV-associated metabolic syndrome.

  17. Cooperative effects of hepatitis B virus and TNF may play important roles in the activation of metabolic pathways through the activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β are often observed in the sera of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. It is well known that these cytokines activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-signaling, and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether HBV or HBV X protein (HBx) enhanced the activation of NF-κB in the presence of TNF and/or IL-1β, and their effects on the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes. We examined whether HBV or HBx enhanced cytokine-induced activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes, using a reporter assay, in the presence or absence of TNF and/or IL-1β. The expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1), one of the NF-κB target genes was also examined. The expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells in the presence or absence of TNF was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Human hepatocytes expressed TNF receptors and IL-1 receptors. NF-κB was activated by cooperation between HBx and TNF in human hepatocytes. We observed IGFBP1 expression in HBV infection and that a number of metabolic pathway-associated genes were upregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, compared with HepG2 cells with or without TNF treatment. We observed the cooperative effects of HBV and TNF which enhanced the activation of NF-κB as well as upregulated the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in hepatocytes. These effects may be important in the development of HBV-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:27315566

  18. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Plays an Important Evolutionary Conserved Role in the Regulation of Glucose Metabolism in Fish Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Leonardo J.; Vraskou, Yoryia; Palstra, Arjan P.; Planas, Josep V.

    2012-01-01

    AMPK, a master metabolic switch, mediates the observed increase of glucose uptake in locomotory muscle of mammals during exercise. AMPK is activated by changes in the intracellular AMP∶ATP ratio when ATP consumption is stimulated by contractile activity but also by AICAR and metformin, compounds that increase glucose transport in mammalian muscle cells. However, the possible role of AMPK in the regulation of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle has not been investigated in other vertebrates, including fish. In this study, we investigated the effects of AMPK activators on glucose uptake, AMPK activity, cell surface levels of trout GLUT4 and expression of GLUT1 and GLUT4 as well as the expression of enzymes regulating glucose disposal and PGC1α in trout myotubes derived from a primary muscle cell culture. We show that AICAR and metformin significantly stimulated glucose uptake (1.6 and 1.3 fold, respectively) and that Compound C completely abrogated the stimulatory effects of the AMPK activators on glucose uptake. The combination of insulin and AMPK activators did not result in additive nor synergistic effects on glucose uptake. Moreover, exposure of trout myotubes to AICAR and metformin resulted in an increase in AMPK activity (3.8 and 3 fold, respectively). We also provide evidence suggesting that stimulation of glucose uptake by AMPK activators in trout myotubes may take place, at least in part, by increasing the cell surface and mRNA levels of trout GLUT4. Finally, AICAR increased the mRNA levels of genes involved in glucose disposal (hexokinase, 6-phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase and citrate synthase) and mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α) and did not affect glycogen content or glycogen synthase mRNA levels in trout myotubes. Therefore, we provide evidence, for the first time in non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting a potentially important role of AMPK in stimulating glucose uptake and utilization in the skeletal muscle of fish. PMID:22359576

  19. METABOLISM AND METABOLIC ACTIVATION OF CHEMICALS: IN-SILICO SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of metabolism in prioritizing chemicals according to their potential adverse health effects is extremely important because innocuous parents can be transformed into toxic metabolites. This work presents the TIssue MEtabolism Simulator (TIMES) platform for simulating met...

  20. The role of non-rapid eye movement slow-wave activity in prefrontal metabolism across young and middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Wilckens, Kristine A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Hasler, Brant P; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L; Franzen, Peter L; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Kupfer, David J; Price, Julie C; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate and, in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this relationship interacted with age. Fifty-two participants aged 25-61 years were enrolled into studies that included polysomnography and a (18) [F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography scan during wakefulness. Absolute and relative measures of NREM slow wave activity were assessed. Semiquantitative and relative measures of cerebral metabolism were collected to assess whole brain and regional metabolism, focusing on two regions of interest: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. Greater relative slow wave activity was associated with greater dorsolateral prefrontal metabolism. Age and slow wave activity interacted significantly in predicting semiquantitative whole brain metabolism and outside regions of interest in the posterior cingulate, middle temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, such that greater slow-wave activity was associated with lower metabolism in the younger participants and greater metabolism in the older participants. These results suggest that slow-wave activity is associated with cerebral metabolism during wakefulness across the adult lifespan within regions important for executive function. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in regulation of enzymes involved in metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a model of rat liver progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Vondrácek, Jan; Krcmár, Pavel; Procházková, Jirina; Trilecová, Lenka; Gavelová, Martina; Skálová, Lenka; Szotáková, Barbora; Buncek, Martin; Radilová, Hana; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2009-07-15

    In contrast to hepatocytes, there is only limited information about the expression and activities of enzymes participating in metabolic activation of environmental mutagens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in liver progenitor cells. In rat liver "stem-like" WB-F344 cell line, sharing many characteristics with rat liver progenitor cells, PAHs are efficiently activated to their ultimate genotoxic metabolites forming DNA adducts. The present study aimed to characterize expression/activities of enzymes of two major pathways involved in the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP): cytochrome P450 (CYP) family 1 enzymes and cytosolic aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). We report here that, apart from induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and the corresponding enzymatic activity, both BaP and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced rat 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C9) expression and activity. In contrast, the aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 was not induced by either treatment. Thus, both CYP1 and AKR metabolic pathways were inducible in the model of liver progenitor cells. BaP and TCDD were efficient inducers of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression and activity in WB-F344 cells, a principal enzyme of cellular antioxidant defense. Both compounds also induced expression of transcription factor NRF2, involved in control of enzymes protecting cells from oxidative stress. However, although BaP induced a significant formation of reactive oxygen species, it did not induce expression of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting that induction of oxidative stress by BaP was limited. Using shRNA against the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), we found that similar to CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, the AKR1C9 induction was AhR-dependent. Moreover, constitutive AKR1C9 levels in AhR-deficient rat BP8 hepatoma cells were significantly lower than in their AhR-positive 5L variant, thus supporting possible role of AhR in regulation of AKR1C9 expression. Taken together, both

  2. The role of metabolism in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Rayman, Margaret P; Gualillo, Oreste; Sellam, Jérémie; van der Kraan, Peter; Fearon, Ursula

    2017-05-01

    Metabolism is important for cartilage and synovial joint function. Under adverse microenvironmental conditions, mammalian cells undergo a switch in cell metabolism from a resting regulatory state to a highly metabolically activate state to maintain energy homeostasis. This phenomenon also leads to an increase in metabolic intermediates for the biosynthesis of inflammatory and degradative proteins, which in turn activate key transcription factors and inflammatory signalling pathways involved in catabolic processes, and the persistent perpetuation of drivers of pathogenesis. In the past few years, several studies have demonstrated that metabolism has a key role in inflammatory joint diseases. In particular, metabolism is drastically altered in osteoarthritis (OA) and aberrant immunometabolism may be a key feature of many phenotypes of OA. This Review focuses on aberrant metabolism in the pathogenesis of OA, summarizing the current state of knowledge on the role of impaired metabolism in the cells of the osteoarthritic joint. We also highlight areas for future research, such as the potential to target metabolic pathways and mediators therapeutically.

  3. The Many Roles of Glutamate in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid glutamate is a major metabolic hub in many organisms and as such is involved in diverse processes in addition to its role in protein synthesis. Nitrogen assimilation, nucleoside, amino acid, and cofactor biosynthesis, as well as secondary natural product formation all utilize glutamate in some manner. Glutamate also plays a role in the catabolism of certain amines. Understanding glutamate's role in these various processes can aid in genome mining for novel metabolic pathways or the engineering of pathways for bioremediation or chemical production of valuable compounds. PMID:26323613

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels. PMID:18288277

  5. Role of the alpha2-isoform of AMP-activated protein kinase in the metabolic response of the heart to no-flow ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Carjaval, Karla; Beauloye, Christophe; Ginion, Audrey; Mateo, Philippe; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Horman, Sandrine; Vaulont, Sophie; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Viollet, Benoit; Hue, Louis; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Bertrand, Luc

    2006-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major sensor and regulator of the energetic state of the cell. Little is known about the specific role of AMPKalpha(2), the major AMPK isoform in the heart, in response to global ischemia. We used AMPKalpha(2)-knockout (AMPKalpha(2)(-/-)) mice to evaluate the consequences of AMPKalpha(2) deletion during normoxia and ischemia, with glucose as the sole substrate. Hemodynamic measurements from echocardiography of hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice during normoxia showed no significant modification compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, the response of hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice to no-flow ischemia was characterized by a more rapid onset of ischemia-induced contracture. This ischemic contracture was associated with a decrease in ATP content, lactate production, glycogen content, and AMPKbeta(2) content. Hearts from AMPKalpha(2)(-/-) mice were also characterized by a decreased phosphorylation state of acetyl-CoA carboxylase during normoxia and ischemia. Despite an apparent worse metabolic adaptation during ischemia, the absence of AMPKalpha(2) does not exacerbate impairment of the recovery of postischemic contractile function. In conclusion, AMPKalpha(2) is required for the metabolic response of the heart to no-flow ischemia. The remaining AMPKalpha(1) cannot compensate for the absence of AMPKalpha(2).

  6. Critical State of Energy Metabolism in Brain Slices: The Principal Role of Oxygen Delivery and Energy Substrates in Shaping Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Anton; Zilberter, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The interactive vasculo-neuro-glial system controlling energy supply in the brain is absent in vitro where energy provision is determined by experimental conditions. Despite the fact that neuronal activity is extremely energy demanding, little has been reported on the state of energy metabolism in submerged brain slices. Without this information, the arbitrarily chosen oxygenation and metabolic provisions make questionable the efficient oxidative metabolism in slices. We show that in mouse hippocampal slices (postnatal day 19–44), evoked neuronal discharges, spontaneous network activity (initiated by 4-aminopyridine), and synaptic stimulation-induced NAD(P)H autofluorescence depend strongly on the oxygen availability. Only the rate of perfusion as high as ~15 ml/min (95% O2) provided appropriate oxygenation of a slice. Lower oxygenation resulted in the decrease of both local field potentials and spontaneous network activity as well as in significant modulation of short-term synaptic plasticity. The reduced oxygen supply considerably inhibited the oxidation phase of NAD(P)H signaling indicating that the changes in neuronal activity were paralleled by the decrease in aerobic energy metabolism. Interestingly, the dependence of neuronal activity on oxygen tension was clearly shifted toward considerably larger pO2 values in slices when compared to in vivo conditions. With sufficient pO2 provided by a high perfusion rate, partial substitution of glucose in ACSF for β-hydroxybutyrate, pyruvate, or lactate enhanced both oxidative metabolism and synaptic function. This suggests that the high pO2 in brain slices is compulsory for maintaining oxidative metabolism, and glucose alone is not sufficient in fulfilling energy requirements during neuronal activity. Altogether, our results demonstrate that energy metabolism determines the functional state of neuronal network, highlighting the need for the adequate metabolic support to be insured in the in vitro experiments. PMID

  7. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1's functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes.

  8. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1’s functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes. PMID:26936955

  9. Pancreatic islets and their roles in metabolic programming.

    PubMed

    Barella, Luiz Felipe; de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic data have confirmed that undernutrition or overnutrition during critical periods of life can result in metabolic dysfunction, leading to the development of obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes, later in life. These studies have contributed to the concept of the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD), which involves metabolic programming patterns. Beyond the earlier phases of development, puberty can be an additional period of plasticity, during which any insult can lead to changes in metabolism. Impaired brain development, associated with imbalanced autonomous nervous system activity due to metabolic programming, is pivotal to the creation of pathophysiology. Excess glucocorticoid exposure, due to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis deregulation, is also involved in malprogramming in early life. Additionally, the pancreatic islets appear to play a decisive role in the setup and maintenance of these metabolic dysfunctions as key targets of metabolic programming, and epigenetic mechanisms may underlie these changes. Moreover, studies have indicated the possibility that deprogramming renders the islets able to recover their functioning after malprogramming. In this review, we discuss the key roles of the pancreatic islets as targets of malprogramming; however, we also discuss their roles as important targets for the treatment and prevention of metabolic diseases.

  10. Role of cytochromes P450 in metabolism of carcinogenic aristolochic acid I: evidence of their contribution to aristolochic acid I detoxication and activation in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Stiborova, Marie; Mares, Jaroslav; Levova, Katerina; Pavlickova, Jana; Barta, Frantisek; Hodek, Petr; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H

    2011-01-01

    The herbal drug aristolochic acid (AA) derived from Aristolochia species has been shown to be the cause of aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and their urothelial malignancies. One of the common features of AAN and BEN is that not all individuals exposed to AA suffer from nephropathy and tumor development. One cause for these different responses may be individual differences in the activities of the enzymes catalyzing the biotransformation of AA. Thus, the identification of enzymes principally involved in the metabolism of AAI, the major toxic component of AA, and detailed knowledge of their catalytic specificities is of major importance. Therefore, the present study has been designed to evaluate the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative detoxification and reductive activation of AAI in a rat model. DNA adduct formation was investigated by the nuclease P1 version of the 32P-postlabeling method. The CYP-mediated formation of a detoxication metabolite of AAI, 8-hydroxyaristolochic acid I (AAIa), in vitro in rat hepatic microsomes was determined by HPLC. Rat hepatic CYPs both detoxicate AAI by its oxidation to AAIa and reductively activate this carcinogen to a cyclic N-acylnitrenium ion forming AAI-DNA adducts in vitro. To define the role of hepatic CYPs in AAI demethylation and activation, the modulation of AAIa and AAI-DNA adduct formation by CYP inducers and selective CYP inhibitors was investigated. Based on these studies, we attribute the major role of CYP1A1 and 1A2 in AAI detoxication by its demethylation to AAIa, and, under hypoxic conditions also to AAI activation to species forming DNA adducts. Using microsomes of Baculovirus transfected insect cells (Supersomes™) containing recombinantly expressed rat CYPs, NADPH:CYP reductase and/or cytochrome b5, a major role of CYP1A1 and 1A2 in both reactions in vitro was confirmed. Based on the results found in this and former studies we propose that AAI activation and

  11. Mechanisms of olfactory toxicity of the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile: Essential roles of CYP2A5 and target-tissue metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Fang; Zhou Xin; Behr, Melissa; Fang Cheng; Horii, Yuichi; Gu Jun; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Ding Xinxin

    2010-11-15

    The herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitril (DCBN) is a potent and tissue-specific toxicant to the olfactory mucosa (OM). The toxicity of DCBN is mediated by cytochrome P450 (P450)-catalyzed bioactivation; however, it is not known whether target-tissue metabolic activation is essential for toxicity. CYP2A5, expressed abundantly in both liver and OM, was previously found to be one of the P450 enzymes active in DCBN bioactivation in vitro. The aims of this study were to determine the role of CYP2A5 in DCBN toxicity in vivo, by comparing the extents of DCBN toxicity between Cyp2a5-null and wild-type (WT) mice, and to determine whether hepatic microsomal P450 enzymes (including CYP2A5) are essential for the DCBN toxicity, by comparing the extents of DCBN toxicity between liver-Cpr-null (LCN) mice, which have little P450 activity in hepatocytes, and WT mice. We show that the loss of CYP2A5 expression did not alter systemic clearance of DCBN (at 25 mg/kg); but it did inhibit DCBN-induced non-protein thiol depletion and cytotoxicity in the OM. Thus, CYP2A5 plays an essential role in mediating DCBN toxicity in the OM. In contrast to the results seen in the Cyp2a5-null mice, the rates of systemic DCBN clearance were substantially reduced, while the extents of DCBN-induced nasal toxicity were increased, rather than decreased, in the LCN mice, compared to WT mice. Therefore, hepatic P450 enzymes, although essential for DCBN clearance, are not necessary for DCBN-induced OM toxicity. Our findings form the basis for a mechanism-based approach to assessing the potential risks of DCBN nasal toxicity in humans.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bragt, M C E; Popeijus, H E

    2008-05-23

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is rapidly increasing. This syndrome is characterized by metabolic disturbances, such as abnormal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and a low-grade inflammatory state. PPARs play an important role in these metabolic processes, which makes them effective targets for treatment and prevention of the metabolic syndrome. Synthetic PPAR agonists, such as fibrates and thiazolidinediones are already used to treat hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus, respectively. Besides synthetic ligands, dietary fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives can also bind to an activate PPARs. As demonstrated with ligand-binding assays, PPARs have a clear preference of binding polyunsaturated fatty acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids are also very effective in binding PPARs, whereas saturated fatty acids are poor PPAR binders. However, ligand binding does not necessarily mean transcriptional activation. Therefore, it is important to investigate transactivation properties of dietary fatty acids as PPAR agonists and their role in metabolic reactions. Furthermore, human intervention studies comparing the effects of natural versus synthetic ligands side-by-side may reveal specific fatty acids that exert beneficial PPAR-mediated metabolic effects. The ability of PPARs to sense fatty acids and to mediate lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism and the inflammatory state makes them excellent targets for dietary modulation in order to prevent and treat the metabolic syndrome and associated diseases. This review discusses the role and function of PPARs and their ligands in light of the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Industry as a metabolic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, B

    1992-01-01

    The concept of "industrial economic metabolism" can provide a bridge to better understanding between environmentalists and industry. In nature each individual or species reacts to natural stimuli, competing with others for resources, extending its domain until it loses comparative advantage and comes to equilibrium with an adjacent competitor. Those species that succeed over time flourish; those that do not, diminish or disappear. Nature's rule book has no moral or ethical ingredient beyond self-interest. Corporate metabolisms are remarkably similar to those of nature. They too react to stimuli, collect and use resources, and grow or perish based on how effectively they compete. Corporate management recognizes and responds naturally and efficiently to cost and price signals. Through them it selects resources and converts them into useful products. The efficiency with which this is done is measured by profit, the lifeblood of the corporation and its means of growth. Profit thus provides a discipline on corporate behavior, encouraging efficient performers, and, by its absence, weeding out others. Unfettered by influences other than economics, the path to corporate success is unlikely to be a compassionate one. The dilemma of the manager is that to do what is socially "right" often conflicts with what must be done to survive and prosper. Fortunately, corporations' behavior can be altered by society when their purely economic role comes into conflict with other human values. The environment and the economy are not separate systems but intertwined to form a complex natural and social setting. The human-designed economic system depends on natural resource inputs, and in turn its metabolic wastes can overload the ecological system, threatening the long-term survivability of both. Increasing concern for the environment now gives the farsighted manager new latitude. There are competitive benefits in some pollution prevention. But there are not sufficiently strong forces to

  14. Role for Mitochondrial Oxidants as Regulators of Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Shino; Takeda, Kazuyo; Yu, Zu-Xi; Ferrans, Victor J.; Finkel, Toren

    2000-01-01

    Leakage of mitochondrial oxidants contributes to a variety of harmful conditions ranging from neurodegenerative diseases to cellular senescence. We describe here, however, a physiological and heretofore unrecognized role for mitochondrial oxidant release. Mitochondrial metabolism of pyruvate is demonstrated to activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). This metabolite-induced rise in cytosolic JNK1 activity is shown to be triggered by increased release of mitochondrial H2O2. We further demonstrate that in turn, the redox-dependent activation of JNK1 feeds back and inhibits the activity of the metabolic enzymes glycogen synthase kinase 3β and glycogen synthase. As such, these results demonstrate a novel metabolic regulatory pathway activated by mitochondrial oxidants. In addition, they suggest that although chronic oxidant production may have deleterious effects, mitochondrial oxidants can also function acutely as signaling molecules to provide communication between the mitochondria and the cytosol. PMID:10982848

  15. Antiproliferative activity of the ellagic acid-derived gut microbiota isourolithin A and comparison with its urolithin A isomer: the role of cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Núñez-Sánchez, María Ángeles; García-Villalba, Rocío; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Urolithins, metabolites produced by the gut microbiota from ellagic acid, have been acknowledged with cancer chemopreventive activity. Although urolithin A (Uro-A) has been reported to be the most active one, 10-50 % of humans can also produce the isomer isourolithin A (IsoUro-A). However, no biological activity for IsoUro-A has been reported so far. Herein, we describe for the first time the antiproliferative effect of IsoUro-A, compared to Uro-A, against both human colon cancer (Caco-2) and normal (CCD18-Co) cell lines. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT and Trypan blue exclusion assays. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry and apoptosis measured by the Annexin V/PI method. Finally, urolithins metabolism was analyzed by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS. IsoUro-A inhibited the proliferation of Caco-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, though it was significantly lower than Uro-A (IC50 = 69.7 ± 4.5 and 49.2 ± 3.8 μM at 48 h, respectively). Both urolithins arrested Caco-2 cell cycle at S and G2/M phases and induced apoptosis at concentrations previously found in human colon tissues. Notably, Caco-2 cells glucuronidated more efficiently IsoUro-A than Uro-A (~50 vs. ~20 % of conversion after 48 h, respectively). Both Uro-A and IsoUro-A glucuronides did not exert antiproliferative effects. In addition, cell growth inhibition was higher in Caco-2 than in normal cells. IsoUro-A exerts strong antiproliferative activity, which is reduced by the extensive glucuronidation at 9-position in cancer cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether the in vitro structure-activity relationship found for Uro-A and IsoUro-A plays any role in humans.

  16. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Role of oxytocin in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia; Tilelli, Cristiane Queixa; Brito, Nilton Almeida; Brito, Márcia Nascimento

    2013-07-01

    The basic mechanisms that lead obesity are not fully understood; however, several peptides undoubtedly play a role in regulating body weight. Obesity, a highly complex metabolic disorder, involves central mechanisms that control food intake and energy expenditure. Previous studies have shown that central or peripheral oxytocin administration induces anorexia. Recently, in an apparent discrepancy, rodents that were deficient in oxytocin or the oxytocin receptor were shown to develop late-onset obesity without changing their total food intake, which indicates the physiological importance of oxytocin to body metabolism. Oxytocin is synthesized not only within magnocellular and parvocellular neurons but also in several organs, including the ovary, uterus, placenta, testis, thymus, kidney, heart, blood vessels, and skin. The presence of oxytocin receptors in neurons, the myometrium and myoepithelial cells is well recognized; however, this receptor has also been identified in other tissues, including the pancreas and adipose tissue. The oxytocin receptor is a typical class I G protein-coupled receptor that is primarily linked to phospholipase C-β via Gq proteins but can also be coupled to other G proteins, leading to different functional effects. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge of the effects of oxytocin on controlling energy metabolism, focusing primarily on the role of oxytocin on appetite regulation, thermoregulation, and metabolic homeostasis.

  18. Regulatory Role for Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein/StarD2 in the Metabolic Response to Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Alpha (PPARα)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Kanno, Keishi; Scapa, Erez F.; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StarD2) is abundantly expressed in liver and is regulated by PPARα. When fed the synthetic PPARα ligand fenofibrate, Pctp−/− mice exhibited altered lipid and glucose metabolism. Microarray profiling of livers from fenofibrate fed wild type and Pctp−/− mice revealed differential expression of a broad array of metabolic genes, as well as their regulatory transcription factors. PC-TP expression in cell culture controlled the activities of both PPARα and HNF4α, suggesting that the mechanism by which it modulates hepatic metabolism is at least in part via activation of transcription factors that govern nutrient homeostasis. PMID:20045742

  19. Role of Sirtuin 1 in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jose P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2010-09-01

    Sirtuin proteins are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases. Originally discovered in yeast as gene-silencing proteins, they subsequently emerged as key regulators of life span in yeast and other lower species. Recent identification and characterization of mammalian Sirtuin homologs have revealed a widespread spectrum of biological activities in gene regulation linked to cell survival, cell apoptosis and metabolism. These findings have stimulated several drug discovery efforts. Here, we review current knowledge of the biological functions and possible pharmacological implications of Sirtuin 1, the most characterized member of the mammalian Sirtuin family, in glucose and fat metabolism.

  20. Physiological and pathophysiological roles of NAMPT and NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garten, Antje; Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; de Giorgis, Tommaso; Kiess, Wieland

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a regulator of the intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pool. NAD is an essential coenzyme involved in cellular redox reactions and is a substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes. In various metabolic disorders and during ageing, levels of NAD are decreased. Through its NAD-biosynthetic activity, NAMPT influences the activity of NAD-dependent enzymes, thereby regulating cellular metabolism. In addition to its enzymatic function, extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) has cytokine-like activity. Abnormal levels of eNAMPT are associated with various metabolic disorders. NAMPT is able to modulate processes involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and related disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by influencing the oxidative stress response, apoptosis, lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation and insulin resistance. NAMPT also has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism, is often overexpressed in tumour tissues and is an experimental target for antitumour therapies. In this Review, we discuss current understanding of the functions of NAMPT and highlight progress made in identifying the physiological role of NAMPT and its relevance in various human diseases and conditions, such as obesity, NAFLD, T2DM, cancer and ageing.

  1. The role of the gut microbiota in metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Aafke W F; Kersten, Sander

    2015-08-01

    The global prevalence of obesity and related comorbidities has increased considerably over the past decades. In addition to an increase in food consumption and a reduction in physical activity, growing evidence implicates the microorganisms in our gastrointestinal tract, referred to as the gut microbiota, in obesity and related metabolic disturbances. The composition of the gut microbiota can fluctuate markedly within an individual and between individuals. Changes in gut microbial composition may be unfavorable and predispose an individual to disease. Studies in mice that are germ free, mice that are cohoused, and mice that are treated with antibiotics have provided some evidence that changes in gut microbiota may causally contribute to metabolic disorders. Several mechanisms have been proposed and explored that may mediate the effects of the gut microbiota on metabolic disorders. In this review, we carefully analyze the literature on the connection between the gut microbiota and metabolic health, with a focus on studies demonstrating a causal relation and clarifying potential underlying mechanisms. Despite a growing appreciation for a role of the gut microbiota in metabolic health, more experimental evidence is needed to substantiate a cause-and-effect relationship. If a clear causal relationship between the gut microbiota and metabolic health can be established, dietary interventions can be targeted toward improving gut microbial composition in the prevention and perhaps even the treatment of metabolic diseases. © FASEB.

  2. The role of hepatokines in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    The liver is known to be involved in the natural history of the ongoing epidemics of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In particular, the liver has a role in increased glucose production and dysregulated lipoprotein metabolism, conditions that are often found in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Additionally, several proteins that are exclusively or predominantly secreted from the liver are now known to directly affect glucose and lipid metabolism. In analogy to the functional proteins released from adipose tissue and skeletal muscle-adipokines and myokines-these liver-derived proteins are known as hepatokines. The first hepatokine that has been proven to have a major pathogenetic role in metabolic diseases is α2-HS-glycoprotein (fetuin-A). Production of this glycoprotein is increased in steatotic and inflamed liver, but not in expanded and dysregulated adipose tissue. Thus, research into this molecule and other hepatokines is expected to aid in differentiating between the contribution of liver and those of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.

  3. The role of p53 in cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing-ding; Qin, Zheng-hong; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene has recently been shown to mediate metabolic changes in cells under physiological and pathological conditions. It has been revealed that p53 regulates energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and amino acid metabolism through balancing glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) as well as the autophagy pathway. p53 is activated by metabolic stress through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. p53 regulates OXPHOS through the transcriptional regulation of fructose-2,6-bisphosophatase, TP53-induced glycolysis regulator (TIGAR) and synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase (SCO2) subunit of complex IV of the electron transport chain. p53 also indirectly influences the energy metabolism through regulating glucose transporter (GLUT) expression, glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). In addition, p53 regulates autophagy to provide cell metabolites for surviving through damage regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM1). Here we review the recent findings to elucidate the important role of p53 in cell metabolism. PMID:20729871

  4. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Yu. Yu.; Spichkov, A. N.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha'(ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO 2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  5. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Osipov YuYu; Spichkov, A N; Filipenkov, S N

    1998-01-01

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha' (ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  6. Circadian Control of Cardiac Metabolism: Physiologic Roles and Pathologic Implications.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of the day, the heart is challenged with dramatic fluctuations in energetic demand and nutrient availability. It is therefore not surprising that rhythms in cardiac metabolism have been reported at multiple levels, including the utilization of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. Evidence has emerged suggesting that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is in large part responsible for governing cardiac metabolic rhythms. In doing so, the cardiomyocyte clock temporally partitions ATP generation for increased contractile function during the active period, promotes nutrient storage at the end of the active period, and facilitates protein turnover (synthesis and degradation) during the beginning of the sleep phase. This review highlights the roles of cardiac metabolism rhythms as well as the potential pathological consequences of their impairment.

  7. An autonomous metabolic role for Spen

    PubMed Central

    Hazegh, Kelsey E.; D’Alessandro, Angelo; Monks, Jenifer; McManaman, James L.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Reis, Tânia

    2017-01-01

    Preventing obesity requires a precise balance between deposition into and mobilization from fat stores, but regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. Drosophila Split ends (Spen) is the founding member of a conserved family of RNA-binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation and frequently mutated in human cancers. We find that manipulating Spen expression alters larval fat levels in a cell-autonomous manner. Spen-depleted larvae had defects in energy liberation from stores, including starvation sensitivity and major changes in the levels of metabolic enzymes and metabolites, particularly those involved in β-oxidation. Spenito, a small Spen family member, counteracted Spen function in fat regulation. Finally, mouse Spen and Spenito transcript levels scaled directly with body fat in vivo, suggesting a conserved role in fat liberation and catabolism. This study demonstrates that Spen is a key regulator of energy balance and provides a molecular context to understand the metabolic defects that arise from Spen dysfunction. PMID:28640815

  8. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    PubMed Central

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  9. Brain glucose metabolism: Role of Wnt signaling in the metabolic impairment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Pedro; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2017-06-15

    The brain is an organ that has a high demand for glucose. In the brain, glucose is predominantly used in energy production, with almost 70% of the energy used by neurons. The importance of the energy requirement in neurons is clearly demonstrated by the fact that all neurodegenerative disorders exhibit a critical metabolic impairment that includes decreased glucose uptake/utilization and decreased mitochondrial activity, with a consequent diminution in ATP production. In fact, in Alzheimer's disease, the measurement of the general metabolic rate of the brain has been reported to be an accurate tool for diagnosis. Additionally, the administration of metabolic activators such as insulin/glucagon-like peptide 1 can improve memory/learning performance. Despite the importance of energy metabolism in the brain, little is known about the cellular pathways involved in the regulation of this process. Several reports postulate a role for Wnt signaling as a general metabolic regulator. Thus, in the present review, we discuss the antecedents that support the relationship between Wnt signaling and energy metabolism in the Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Viral Activation of Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Erica L.; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To ensure optimal environments for their replication and spread, viruses have evolved to alter many host cell pathways. In the last decade, metabolomic studies have shown that eukaryotic viruses induce large-scale alterations in host cellular metabolism. Most viruses examined to date induce aerobic glycolysis also known as the Warburg effect. Many viruses tested also induce fatty acid synthesis as well as glutaminolysis. These modifications of carbon source utilization by infected cells can increase available energy for virus replication and virion production, provide specific cellular substrates for virus particles and create viral replication niches while increasing infected cell survival. Each virus species also likely requires unique metabolic changes for successful spread and recent research has identified additional virus-specific metabolic changes induced by many virus species. A better understanding of the metabolic alterations required for each virus may lead to novel therapeutic approaches through targeted inhibition of specific cellular metabolic pathways. PMID:25812764

  11. Role for NGF in augmented sympathetic nerve response to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Xing, Jihong; Li, Jianhua

    2012-10-15

    Arterial blood pressure and heart rate responses to static contraction of the hindlimb muscles are greater in rats whose femoral arteries were previously ligated than in control rats. Also, the prior findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor (NGF) is increased in sensory neurons-dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of occluded rats. However, the role for endogenous NGF in engagement of the augmented sympathetic and pressor responses to stimulation of mechanically and/or metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction after femoral artery ligation has not been specifically determined. In the present study, both afferent nerves and either of them were activated by muscle contraction, passive tendon stretch, and arterial injection of lactic acid into the hindlimb muscles. Data showed that femoral occlusion-augmented blood pressure response to contraction was significantly attenuated by a prior administration of the NGF antibody (NGF-Ab) into the hindlimb muscles. The effects of NGF neutralization were not seen when the sympathetic nerve and pressor responses were evoked by stimulation of mechanically sensitive muscle afferent nerves with tendon stretch in occluded rats. In addition, chemically sensitive muscle afferent nerves were stimulated by lactic acid injected into arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles after the prior NGF-Ab, demonstrating that the reflex muscle responses to lactic acid were significantly attenuated. The results of this study further showed that NGF-Ab attenuated an increase in acid-sensing ion channel subtype 3 (ASIC3) of DRG in occluded rats. Moreover, immunohistochemistry was employed to examine the number of C-fiber and A-fiber DRG neurons. The data showed that distribution of DRG neurons with different thin fiber phenotypes was not notably altered when NGF was infused into the hindlimb muscles. However, NGF increased expression of ASIC3 in DRG neurons with C-fiber but not A-fiber. Overall, these data

  12. Role of plasma membrane transporters in muscle metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, A; Fandos, C; Palacín, M

    2000-01-01

    Muscle plays a major role in metabolism. Thus it is a major glucose-utilizing tissue in the absorptive state, and changes in muscle insulin-stimulated glucose uptake alter whole-body glucose disposal. In some conditions, muscle preferentially uses lipid substrates, such as fatty acids or ketone bodies. Furthermore, muscle is the main reservoir of amino acids and protein. The activity of many different plasma membrane transporters, such as glucose carriers and transporters of carnitine, creatine and amino acids, play a crucial role in muscle metabolism by catalysing the influx or the efflux of substrates across the cell surface. In some cases, the membrane transport process is subjected to intense regulatory control and may become a potential pharmacological target, as is the case with the glucose transporter GLUT4. The goal of this review is the molecular characterization of muscle membrane transporter proteins, as well as the analysis of their possible regulatory role. PMID:10903126

  13. Pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease: Role of oxidative metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a predominant etiological factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases, resulting in fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves complex and still unclear biological processes, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a preeminent role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of ALD. Ethanol oxidative metabolism influences intracellular signaling pathways and deranges the transcriptional control of several genes, leading to fat accumulation, fibrogenesis and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Acetaldehyde is known to be toxic to the liver and alters lipid homeostasis, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and increasing sterol regulatory element binding protein activity via an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. AMPK activation by ROS modulates autophagy, which has an important role in removing lipid droplets. Acetaldehyde and aldehydes generated from lipid peroxidation induce collagen synthesis by their ability to form protein adducts that activate transforming-growth-factor-β-dependent and independent profibrogenic pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Furthermore, activation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to ethanol metabolism plays a key role in the development and progression of ALD. Acetaldehyde alters the intestinal barrier and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by disrupting tight and adherent junctions in human colonic mucosa. Acetaldehyde and LPS induce Kupffer cells to release ROS and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to neutrophils infiltration. In addition, alcohol consumption inhibits natural killer cells that are cytotoxic to HSCs and thus have an important antifibrotic function in the liver. Ethanol metabolism may also interfere with cell

  14. Biochemistry of primary headaches: role of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, G; Cevoli, S; Colavito, D; Leon, A

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of migraine as well as cluster headache (CH) is yet a debated question. In this review, we discuss the possible role of the of tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism in the pathogenesis of these primary headaches. These include the abnormalities in the synthesis of neurotransmitters: high level of DA, low level of NE and very elevated levels of octopamine and synephrine (neuromodulators) in plasma of episodic migraine without aura and CH patients. We hypothesize that the imbalance between the levels of neurotransmitters and elusive amines synthesis is due to a metabolic shift directing tyrosine toward an increased decarboxylase and reduced hydroxylase enzyme activities. The metabolic shift of the tyrosine is favored by a state of neuronal hyperexcitability and a reduced mitochondrial activity present in migraine. In addition we present biochemical studies performed in chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache patients to verify if the same anomalies of the tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism are present in these primary headaches and, if so, their possible role in the chronicity process of CM and CTTH. The results show that important abnormalities of tyrosine metabolism are present only in CM patients (very high plasma levels of DA, NE and tryptamine). Tryptamine plasma levels were found significantly lower in both CM and CTTH patients. In view of this, we propose that migraine and, possibly, CH attacks derive from neurotransmitter and neuromodulator metabolic abnormalities in a hyperexcitable and hypoenergetic brain that spread from the frontal lobe, downstream, resulting in abnormally activated nuclei of the pain matrix. The low tryptamine plasma levels found in CM and CTTH patients suggest that these two primary chronic headaches are characterized by a common insufficient serotoninergic control of the pain threshold.

  15. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  16. A metabolic prosurvival role for PML in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carracedo, Arkaitz; Weiss, Dror; Leliaert, Amy K; Bhasin, Manoj; de Boer, Vincent C J; Laurent, Gaelle; Adams, Andrew C; Sundvall, Maria; Song, Su Jung; Ito, Keisuke; Finley, Lydia S; Egia, Ainara; Libermann, Towia; Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Puigserver, Pere; Haigis, Marcia C; Maratos-Flier, Elefteria; Richardson, Andrea L; Schafer, Zachary T; Pandolfi, Pier P

    2012-09-01

    Cancer cells exhibit an aberrant metabolism that facilitates more efficient production of biomass and hence tumor growth and progression. However, the genetic cues modulating this metabolic switch remain largely undetermined. We identified a metabolic function for the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene, uncovering an unexpected role for this bona fide tumor suppressor in breast cancer cell survival. We found that PML acted as both a negative regulator of PPARγ coactivator 1A (PGC1A) acetylation and a potent activator of PPAR signaling and fatty acid oxidation. We further showed that PML promoted ATP production and inhibited anoikis. Importantly, PML expression allowed luminal filling in 3D basement membrane breast culture models, an effect that was reverted by the pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis of breast cancer biopsies revealed that PML was overexpressed in a subset of breast cancers and enriched in triple-negative cases. Indeed, PML expression in breast cancer correlated strikingly with reduced time to recurrence, a gene signature of poor prognosis, and activated PPAR signaling. These findings have important therapeutic implications, as PML and its key role in fatty acid oxidation metabolism are amenable to pharmacological suppression, a potential future mode of cancer prevention and treatment.

  17. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Nibedita; Berger, Allison J.; Koenig, Erik; Bannerman, Bret; Garnsey, James; Bernard, Hugues; Hales, Paul; Maldonado Lopez, Angel; Yang, Yu; Donelan, Jill; Jordan, Kristen; Tirrell, Stephen; Stringer, Bradley; Xia, Cindy; Hather, Greg; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Rhodes, Nelson; Amidon, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT) KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition. PMID:26709701

  18. Viral activation of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Erica L; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    To ensure optimal environments for their replication and spread, viruses have evolved to alter many host cell pathways. In the last decade, metabolomic studies have shown that eukaryotic viruses induce large-scale alterations in host cellular metabolism. Most viruses examined to date induce aerobic glycolysis also known as the Warburg effect. Many viruses tested also induce fatty acid synthesis as well as glutaminolysis. These modifications of carbon source utilization by infected cells can increase available energy for virus replication and virion production, provide specific cellular substrates for virus particles and create viral replication niches while increasing infected cell survival. Each virus species also likely requires unique metabolic changes for successful spread and recent research has identified additional virus-specific metabolic changes induced by many virus species. A better understanding of the metabolic alterations required for the replication of each virus may lead to novel therapeutic approaches through targeted inhibition of specific cellular metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of Alcohol Metabolism in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vonlaufen, Alain; Wilson, Jeremy S.; Pirola, Romano C.; Apte, Minoti V.

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the major cause of chronic inflammation of the pancreas (i.e., chronic pancreatitis). Although it has long been thought that alcoholic pancreatitis is a chronic disease from the outset, evidence is accumulating to indicate that chronic damage in the pancreas may result from repeated attacks of acute tissue inflammation and death (i.e., necroinflammation). Initially, research into the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis was related to ductular and sphincteric abnormalities. In recent years, the focus has shifted to the type of pancreas cell that produces digestive juices (i.e., acinar cell). Alcohol now is known to exert a number of toxic effects on acinar cells. Notably, acinar cells have been shown to metabolize alcohol (i.e., ethanol) via both oxidative (i.e., involving oxygen) and nonoxidative pathways. The isolation and study of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)—the key effectors in the development of connective tissue fibers (i.e., fibrogenesis) in the pancreas—has greatly enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic stellate cells become activated in response to ethanol and acetaldehyde, a toxic byproduct of alcohol metabolism. In addition, PSCs have the capacity to metabolize alcohol via alcohol dehydrogenase (the major oxidizing enzyme for ethanol). The fact that only a small percentage of heavy alcoholics develop chronic pancreatitis has led to the search for precipitating factors of the disease. Several studies have investigated whether variations in ethanol-metabolizing enzymes may be a trigger factor for chronic pancreatitis, but no definite relationship has been established so far. PMID:17718401

  20. Metabolically healthy obesity: what is the role of sedentary behaviour?

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua A; Kivimaki, Mika; Batty, G David; Hamer, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The role of sedentary behaviour in metabolically healthy obesity is unknown. We examined cross-sectional differences in television viewing time across metabolic and obesity phenotypes, hypothesizing that healthy obese individuals spend less time viewing television than their unhealthy counterparts. A nationally representative sample of 4931 older adults in England (mean age 65.1; SD=8.9 years) was drawn from the 2008/9 wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Average weekly television viewing time was derived from two questions about weekday and weekend viewing. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2), and metabolically healthy as having <2 metabolic abnormalities (low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, hyperglycaemia, high inflammation). After adjusting for covariates including chronic illness, functional limitations and physical activity, mean weekly viewing times were 4.7 (95% confidence interval 2.9, 6.5), 5.8 (2.5, 9.0) and 7.8 (5.7, 9.8) h higher in unhealthy non-obese, healthy obese, and unhealthy obese groups respectively, compared to the healthy non-obese group (p for heterogeneity <0.001). A common type of leisure-time sedentary behaviour varies across metabolic and obesity phenotypes. However, healthy obesity is not explained through differences in leisure-time sedentary behaviour. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Chul; Lee, Kyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Yoon, Do-Young

    2008-01-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α, γ, and σ) are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators. PMID:18566691

  2. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  3. A novel physiological role for cardiac myoglobin in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Esfeld, Sonja; Coman, Cristina; Ahrends, Robert; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Flögel, Ulrich; Rassaf, Tienush; Totzeck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Continuous contractile activity of the heart is essential and the required energy is mostly provided by fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Myocardial lipid accumulation can lead to pathological responses, however the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The role of myoglobin in dioxygen binding in cardiomyocytes and oxidative skeletal muscle has widely been appreciated. Our recent work established myoglobin as a protector of cardiac function in hypoxia and disease states. We here unravel a novel role of cardiac myoglobin in governing FA metabolism to ensure the physiological energy production through β-oxidation, preventing myocardial lipid accumulation and preserving cardiac functions. In vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy unveils a 3-fold higher deposition of lipids in mouse hearts lacking myoglobin, which was associated with depressed cardiac function compared to wild-type hearts as assessed by echocardiography. Mass spectrometry reveals a marked increase in tissue triglycerides with preferential incorporation of palmitic and oleic acids. Phospholipid levels as well as the metabolome, transcriptome and proteome related to FA metabolism tend to be unaffected by myoglobin ablation. Our results reveal a physiological role of myoglobin in FA metabolism with the lipid accumulation-suppressing effects of myoglobin preventing cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:28230173

  4. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity of ethyl acetate fraction of Rhododendron arboreum Smith flowers in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and its role in regulating carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neeraj; Amresh, G; Sahu, P K; Rao, Ch V; Singh, Anil Pratap

    2012-09-01

    To explore and identify the most potent antihyperglycemic fraction from the ethanol extract of Rhododendron arboreum (R. arboreum) flowers. Normal and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats were treated with all four fractions of R. arboreum flowers for short term and with fraction 3 for long term study. On completion of the treatment, a range of indicators were tested including fasting blood glucose, plasma protein, haemoglobin A1C, insulin secretion, body weight, blood lipid profile and carbohydrate metabolism regulating enzymes of liver. In short term study, the fraction 3 (Active fraction) produced a significant (P<0.000 1) reduction (73.6%) in blood glucose level at a dose of 200 mg/kg after the treatment in the diabetic rats. Administration of active fraction (200 and 400 mg/kg) once daily for 30 d in streptozotocin diabetic rats resulted in a significant (P<0.001 to P<0.000 1) fall in blood glucose level, hemoglobin A1C, serum urea and creatinine with significant but a increase in insulin level similar to standard drug glybenclamide. Further, the active fraction showed antihyperlipidemic activity as evidenced by significant (P<0.001 to P<0.000 1) decreases in serum serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density cholesterol levels coupled together with elevation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the diabetic rats. The active fraction of R. arboreum flowers decreases streptozotocin induced hyperglycemia by promoting insulin secretion and glycolysis and by decreasing gluconeogenesis.

  5. Stress-induced changes in glutamate dehydrogenase activity imply its role in adaptation to C and N metabolism in lupine embryos.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Skrok, Albert; Dabert, Mirosława

    2010-01-01

    The modifying effect of sucrose on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity and isoenzyme pattern was investigated in isolated embryos of lupine (Lupinus luteus L.), cultured in vitro in a medium with sucrose (+S) or without sucrose (-S) and exposed to cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) stress. Sucrose starvation of lupine embryos led to a rapid increase in the specific activity of GDH, immunoreactive beta-polypeptide and it was accompanied by appearance of new cathodal isoforms of enzyme. This suggests that isoenzymes induced in lupine embryos by sucrose starvation combine into GDH hexamers with the predominance of beta-GDH subunits synthetized under GDH1 gene control. The addition of sucrose to the medium caused an opposite effect. Along with upregulation of catabolic activity of GDH by sucrose starvation, activity of proteolytic enzymes was also induced. These data can point to regulatory mechanism implying a sucrose dependent repression of the GDH1 gene according to the mechanism of catabolic repression. Treatment of embryos with Cd(2+) or Pb(2+) resulted in ammonium accumulation in the tissues, accompanied by an increase in anabolic activity of GDH and activity of anodal isoenzymes, in both (+S) and (-S) embryos without new de novo synthesis of alpha subunit proteins. Thus, GDH isoenzyme profiles may reflect the physiological function of GDH, which appears to be an important link of metabolic adaptation in cells, aimed at using carbon sources other than sugar during carbohydrate starvation (catabolic activity of GDH) and protecting plant tissues against ammonium accumulated because of heavy metal stress (anabolic activity of GDH).

  6. Metabolic activation and inactivation of chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Pelkonen, O.; Vaehaekangas, K.

    1980-09-01

    Chemical carcinogens are metabolized by numerous pathways catalyzed by enzymes in endoplasmic reticulum and other parts of the cell. Reactions in which functional groups are created are especially important in the activation of polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogens to ultimate carcinogenic forms, although other enzymes may also participate in the activation of other chemical carcinogens. The reasons why carcinogens act on specific target tissues are incompletely understood, although differences in enzyme profiles between tissues certainly contribute to the target tissue variability. The concept of metabolic activation of carcinogens by body's own enzymes has led to the development of short-term assay systems, which essentially measure the production of biologically active metabolites from potential carcinogens.

  7. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-08

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. The role of serum osteoprotegerin and receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand in metabolic bone disease of women after obesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Balsa, José A; Lafuente, Christian; Gómez-Martín, Jesús M; Galindo, Julio; Peromingo, Roberto; García-Moreno, Francisca; Rodriguez-Velasco, Gloria; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2016-11-01

    Metabolic bone disease may appear as a complication of obesity surgery. Because an imbalance in the osteoprotegerin and receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand system may underlie osteoporosis, we aimed to study this system in humans in the metabolic bone disease occurring after obesity surgery. In this study we included sixty women with a mean age of 47 ± 10 years studied 7 ± 2 years after bariatric surgery. The variables studied were bone mineral density, β-isomer of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen cross-links (a bone resorption marker), the bone formation markers osteocalcin and N-terminal propeptide of procollagen 1, serum osteoprotegerin and receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. Serum osteoprotegerin inversely correlated with the bone remodeling markers osteocalcin, β-isomer of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen cross-links and N-terminal propeptide of procollagen 1. The osteoprotegerin and receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand ratio also correlated inversely with serum parathormone and osteocalcin. Bone mineral density at the lumbar spine was associated with age (β = -0.235, P = 0.046), percentage of weight loss (β = 0.421, P = 0.001) and osteoprotegerin and receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand ratio (β = 0.259, P = 0.029) in stepwise multivariate analysis (R (2) = 0.29, F = 7.49, P < 0.001). Bone mineral density at the hip site was associated only with percentage of weight loss (β = 0.464, P < 0.001) in stepwise multivariate regression (R (2) = 0.21, F = 15.1, P < 0.001). These data show that the osteoprotegerin and receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand system is associated with bone markers and bone mineral density at the lumbar spine after obesity surgery.

  9. The role of dietary fat in adipose tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2007-10-01

    Energy intake and expenditure tend on average to remain adjusted to each other in order to maintain a stable body weight, which is only likely to be sustained if the fuel mix oxidised is equivalent to the nutrient content of the diet. Whereas protein and carbohydrate degradation and oxidation are closely adjusted to their intakes, fat balance regulation is less precise and that fat is more likely to be stored than oxidised. It has been demonstrated that dietary fatty acids have an influence not only on the fatty acid composition of membrane phospholipids, thus modulating several metabolic processes that take place in the adipocyte, but also on the composition and the quantity of different fatty acids in adipose tissue. Moreover, dietary fatty acids also modulate eicosanoid presence, which have hormone-like activities in lipid metabolism regulation in adipose tissue. Until recently, the adipocyte has been considered to be no more than a passive tissue for storage of excess energy. However, there is now compelling evidence that adipocytes have a role as endocrine secretory cells. Some of the adipokines produced by adipose tissue, such as leptin and adiponectin, act on adipose tissue in an autocrine/paracrine manner to regulate adipocyte metabolism. Furthermore, dietary fatty acids may influence the expression of adipokines. The nutrients are among the most influential of the environmental factors that determine the way adipose tissue genes are expressed by functioning as regulators of gene transcription. Therefore, not only dietary fat amount but also dietary fat composition influence adipose tissue metabolism.

  10. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic activity of ethyl acetate fraction of Rhododendron arboreum Smith flowers in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and its role in regulating carbohydrate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Neeraj; Amresh, G; Sahu, PK; Rao, Ch V; Singh, Anil Pratap

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore and identify the most potent antihyperglycemic fraction from the ethanol extract of Rhododendron arboreum (R. arboreum) flowers. Methods Normal and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats were treated with all four fractions of R. arboreum flowers for short term and with fraction 3 for long term study. On completion of the treatment, a range of indicators were tested including fasting blood glucose, plasma protein, haemoglobin A1C, insulin secretion, body weight, blood lipid profile and carbohydrate metabolism regulating enzymes of liver. Results In short term study, the fraction 3 (Active fraction) produced a significant (P<0.000 1) reduction (73.6%) in blood glucose level at a dose of 200 mg/kg after the treatment in the diabetic rats. Administration of active fraction (200 and 400 mg/kg) once daily for 30 d in streptozotocin diabetic rats resulted in a significant (P<0.001 to P<0.000 1) fall in blood glucose level, hemoglobin A1C, serum urea and creatinine with significant but a increase in insulin level similar to standard drug glybenclamide. Further, the active fraction showed antihyperlipidemic activity as evidenced by significant (P<0.001 to P<0.000 1) decreases in serum serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density cholesterol levels coupled together with elevation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the diabetic rats. Conclusions The active fraction of R. arboreum flowers decreases streptozotocin induced hyperglycemia by promoting insulin secretion and glycolysis and by decreasing gluconeogenesis. PMID:23569997

  11. Role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Soleiman; Masrour-Roudsari, Jila

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) recognized as a major cause of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, has become one of the major public health challenges worldwide. The pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is multiple and still poorly understood. No single factor has yet been identified as an underlying causal factor. There is a growing belief, however, that obesity, especially visceral obesity, may play an important role in the development of the syndrome. Visceral adiposity seems to be an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and elevated blood pressure. An increasing number of studies confirm that oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and angiogenesis all play important roles in the pathogenesis of MS. Chronic hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in tissues prone to complications in patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress occurs in a cellular system when the production of free radical moieties exceeds the antioxidant capacity of that system. If cellular antioxidants do not remove free radicals, radicals attack and damage proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The oxidized or nitrosylated products of free radical attack have decreased biological activity, leading to loss of energy metabolism, cell signaling, transport, and other major functions. These altered products are also targeted for proteosome degradation, further decreasing cellular function. Accumulation of such injury ultimately leads a cell to die through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In conclusion, a puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that free radical overgeneration may be considered the key in the generation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26557292

  12. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. Methods First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Results Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. Conclusions The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported. PMID:23988084

  13. [The role of metabolic syndrome in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Dítě, Petr; Přinosilová, Jitka; Dovrtělová, Lenka; Kupka, Tomáš; Nechutová, Hana; Kianička, Bohuslav; Břegová, Bohdana; Kunovský, Lumír; Martínek, Arnošt; Souček, Miroslav

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its components play an important part in the development of not only cardiovascular conditions, but also digestive and pancreaticobiliary system diseases. The aim of our study is to present a comprehensive overview of the diseases where metabolic syndrome is an inducing risk factor, or where it affects the course of the disease. Metabolic syndrome is a significant risk factor of induction of gastroesophageal reflux and its complication, which is Barretts esophagus. Metabolic syndrome was described as the disease closely linked to idiopathic intestinal inflammations, diseases of the biliary tree and pancreas. Acute pancreatitis, both its development in obese individuals and the burden of its course, are in close correlation with metabolic syndrome, similarly as the course of chronic, mainly alcoholic pancreatitis. Study of non-alcoholic steatopancreatitis presents a challenge, most importantly with regard to the function of pancreatic B cells in obese individuals. Non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis and its forms may as much as lead to the stage of cirrhosis of the liver and they pose a risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Metabolic syndrome was also described in a population study as a risk factor for carcinoma of the colon. Metabolic syndrome and its components present an important risk factor in relation to inducing some benign as well as malignant gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary diseases. A systemic approach to influencing the metabolic syndrome and its components is therefore one of the important approaches to influencing the development and course of not only cardiovascular conditions.

  14. Role of multifaceted regulators in cancer glucose metabolism and their clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhao, Yuelong; Cao, Ya; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism, “aerobic glycolysis” or “Warburg effect”, is a hallmark of human cancers. There is a cluster of “multifaceted regulators”, which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. They can not only modulate the activities of specific enzymes, but also act as transcriptional activators to regulate the expression of metabolism related genes. Additionally, they can crosstalk with other key factors involved in glucose metabolism and work together to initiate multiple oncogenic processes. These “multifaceted regulators”, especially p53, HIF-1, TIGAR and microRNA, will be focused in this review. And we will comprehensively illustrate their regulatory effects on cancer glucose metabolism, and further elaborate on their clinical significance. In-depth elucidation the role of “multifaceted regulators” in cancer glucose metabolism will provide us novel insights in cancer research field and offer promising therapeutic targets for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26934324

  15. The role of the carnitine system in human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Foster, Daniel W

    2004-11-01

    Metabolism cycles daily between the fed and fasted states. The pathways of energy production are reversible and distinct. In the anabolic (fed) state, the liver stores glucose as glycogen, and fatty acid/triglyceride synthesis is active. In the catabolic (fasted) state, the liver becomes a glucose producer, lipogenesis is slowed, and fatty acid oxidation/ketogenesis is activated. The rate-limiting step for the latter is vested in the carnitine/carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) system, and the off/on regulator of this is malonyl CoA. The AMP-induced protein kinase primarily determines the concentration of malonyl CoA. Four other systems have significant influence: two on fatty acid oxidation and two on lipogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-1 alpha, a master regulator of metabolism, induces hepatic gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in the catabolic phase. Deficiency of stearoyl CoA desaturase, although having no role in gluconeogenesis, powerfully induces fatty acid oxidation and weight loss despite increased food intake in rodents. Major stimulators of lipogenesis are carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein and the Insig system. The malonyl CoA-regulated CPT system has been firmly established in humans. The other systems have not yet been confirmed in humans, but likely are active there as well. Activation of fatty acid oxidation has considerable clinical promise for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, steatohepatitis, and lipotoxic damage to the heart.

  16. Role of estradiol in intrinsic hindbrain AMPK regulation of hypothalamic AMPK, metabolic neuropeptide, and norepinephrine activity and food intake in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Alenazi, F S H; Ibrahim, B A; Al-Hamami, H; Shakiya, M; Briski, K P

    2016-02-09

    This study addressed the hypothesis that dorsomedial hindbrain adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) imposes inherent estradiol-dependent control of hypothalamic AMPK, neuropeptide, and norepinephrine (NE) activity and feeding in the female rat. Estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized rats were injected with the AMPK inhibitor compound c (Cc) or vehicle into the caudal fourth ventricle (CV4) prior to micropunch-dissection of individual hypothalamic metabolic loci or assessment of food intake. Cc decreased hindbrain dorsal vagal complex phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) in both E and O; tissue ATP levels were reduced by this treatment in O only. In E/Cc, pAMPK expression was diminished in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and ventromedial (VMH) and paraventricular (PVH) nuclei; only PVH pAMPK was suppressed by this treatment in O/Cc. Cc decreased PVH corticotropin-releasing hormone and arcuate (ARH) proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y in O, but suppressed only POMC in E. O/Cc exhibited both augmented (PVH, VMH) and decreased (LHA, ARH) hypothalamic NE content, whereas Cc treatment of E elevated preoptic and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus NE. Cc completely or incompletely repressed feeding in E versus O, respectively. Results implicate dorsomedial hindbrain AMPK in physiological stimulus-induced feeding in females. Excepting POMC, hypothalamic neuropeptide responses to this sensor may be contingent on estrogen. Estradiol likely designates hypothalamic targets of altered NE signaling due to hindbrain AMPK activation. Divergent changes in NE content of hypothalamic loci in O/Cc uniquely demonstrate sensor-induced bimodal catecholamine signaling to those sites. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic Activity - Skylab Experiment M171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Metabolic Activity experiment (M171), a medical evaluation facility designed to measure astronauts' metabolic changes while on long-term space missions. The experiment obtained information on astronauts' physiological capabilities and limitations and provided data useful in the design of future spacecraft and work programs. Physiological responses to physical activity was deduced by analyzing inhaled and exhaled air, pulse rate, blood pressure, and other selected variables of the crew while they performed controlled amounts of physical work with a bicycle ergometer. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  18. The emerging role of the intestine in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William D; Zwingelstein, Catherine; Rondinone, Cristina M

    2011-07-01

    The intestine is an important metabolic organ that has gained attention in recent years for the newly identified role that it plays in the pathophysiology of various metabolic diseases including obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Recent insights regarding the role of enteroendocrine hormones, such as GIP, GLP-1, and PYY in metabolic diseases, as well as the emerging role of the gut microbial community and gastric bypass bariatric surgeries in modulating metabolic function and dysfunction have sparked a wave of interest in understanding the mechanisms involved, in an effort to identify new therapeutics and novel regulators of metabolism. This review summarizes the current evidence that the gastrointestinal tract has a key role in the development of obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and diabetes and discusses the possible players that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Physical activity for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Luca; Moscatiello, Simona; Malavolti, Marcella; Marzocchi, Rebecca; Marchesini, Giulio

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its various features (obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) are increasing worldwide and constitute a severe risk for the sustainability of the present universal Italian health care system. Lifestyle interventions should be the first therapeutic strategy to prevent/treat metabolic diseases, far before pharmacologic treatment. The role of diet and weight loss has been fully ascertained, whereas the role of physical activity is frequently overlooked both by physicians and by patients. Physical activity has favorable effects on all components of the metabolic syndrome and on the resulting cardiovascular risk, the cornerstone in the development of cardiometabolic diseases. The quantity and the frequency of physical activity necessary to produce beneficial effects has not been defined as yet, but brisk walking is considered particularly appropriate, as it can be practiced by a large number of individuals, without any additional cost, and has a low rate of injury. The effects of exercise and leisure time physical activity extend from prevention to treatment of the various components of the metabolic syndrome, as well as to mood and quality of life. Any effort should be done to favor adherence to protocols of physical activity in the community.

  20. Molybdenum: biological activity and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R

    2005-11-07

    Molybdenum and tungsten are available to all organisms, with molybdenum having the far greater abundance and availability. Molybdenum occurs in a wide range of metalloenzymes in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and animals, while tungsten was found to be essential only for a limited range of bacteria. In order to gain biological activity, molybdenum has to be complexed by a pterin compound, thus forming a molybdenum cofactor. In this article I will review the way that molybdenum takes from uptake into the cell, via formation of the molybdenum cofactor and its storage, to the final modification of molybdenum cofactor and its insertion into apo-metalloenzymes.

  1. Roles of FGF19 in liver metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kir, S; Kliewer, S A; Mangelsdorf, D J

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is an ileum-derived postprandial enterokine that governs bile acid and nutrient metabolism. Synthesis of FGF19 is up-regulated by bile acids and, conversely, bile acid synthesis is down-regulated by FGF19. FGF19 also controls gallbladder volume. FGF19 has been shown to have profound effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent studies have described FGF19 as a postprandial regulator of hepatic glucose and protein metabolism. Like insulin, FGF19 induces protein and glycogen synthesis and suppresses gluconeogenesis in liver. However, unlike insulin, FGF19 does not stimulate lipogenesis. A key difference between FGF19 and insulin lies in their use of different cellular signaling pathways. The beneficial effects of FGF19 on liver metabolism raise the question of whether FGF19 and its variants can be used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of diabetes.

  2. Type-f thioredoxins have a role in the short-term activation of carbon metabolism and their loss affects growth under short-day conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Belén; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Lindahl, Marika; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2016-03-01

    Redox regulation plays a central role in the adaptation of chloroplast metabolism to light. Extensive biochemical analyses in vitro have identified f-type thioredoxins (Trxs) as the most important catalysts for light-dependent reduction and activation of the enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle. However, the precise function of type f Trxs in vivo and their impact on plant growth are still poorly known. To address this issue we have generated an Arabidopsis thaliana double knock-out mutant, termed trxf1f2, devoid of both f1 and f2 Trxs. Despite the essential function previously proposed for f-type Trxs, the visible phenotype of the trxf1f2 double mutant was virtually indistinguishable from the wild type when grown under a long-day photoperiod. However, the Trx f-deficient plants showed growth inhibition under a short-day photoperiod which was not rescued at high light intensity. The absence of f-type Trxs led to significantly lower photosynthetic electron transport rates and higher levels of non-photochemical energy quenching. Notably, the Trx f null mutant suffered from a shortage of photosystem I electron acceptors and delayed activation of carbon dioxide fixation following a dark-light transition. Two redox-regulated Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and Rubisco activase, showed retarded and incomplete reduction in the double mutant upon illumination, compared with wild-type plants. These results show that the function of f-type Trxs in the rapid activation of carbon metabolism in response to light is not entirely compensated for by additional plastid redox systems, and suggest that these Trxs have an important role in the light adjustment of photosynthetic metabolism.

  3. Type-f thioredoxins have a role in the short-term activation of carbon metabolism and their loss affects growth under short-day conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Belén; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Lindahl, Marika; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Redox regulation plays a central role in the adaptation of chloroplast metabolism to light. Extensive biochemical analyses in vitro have identified f-type thioredoxins (Trxs) as the most important catalysts for light-dependent reduction and activation of the enzymes of the Calvin–Benson cycle. However, the precise function of type f Trxs in vivo and their impact on plant growth are still poorly known. To address this issue we have generated an Arabidopsis thaliana double knock-out mutant, termed trxf1f2, devoid of both f1 and f2 Trxs. Despite the essential function previously proposed for f-type Trxs, the visible phenotype of the trxf1f2 double mutant was virtually indistinguishable from the wild type when grown under a long-day photoperiod. However, the Trx f-deficient plants showed growth inhibition under a short-day photoperiod which was not rescued at high light intensity. The absence of f-type Trxs led to significantly lower photosynthetic electron transport rates and higher levels of non-photochemical energy quenching. Notably, the Trx f null mutant suffered from a shortage of photosystem I electron acceptors and delayed activation of carbon dioxide fixation following a dark–light transition. Two redox-regulated Calvin–Benson cycle enzymes, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and Rubisco activase, showed retarded and incomplete reduction in the double mutant upon illumination, compared with wild-type plants. These results show that the function of f-type Trxs in the rapid activation of carbon metabolism in response to light is not entirely compensated for by additional plastid redox systems, and suggest that these Trxs have an important role in the light adjustment of photosynthetic metabolism. PMID:26842981

  4. Role of metabolism in furazolidone pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotun, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial, /sup 14/C-furazolidone (N-(5-nitro-2-furfurylidene)-3-amino-2-oxazolidinone), in the male Wistar rat was defined and related to the agent's in vitro bacterial and hepatic metabolism. The parmacokinetic profiles after intravenous and oral administration (5 mg/kg) were deemed irregular because of the presence of transient rises in blood levels of the drug over time. The drug was also rapidly cleared from the body. Within 48 hours, 100% of the total administered radioactivity was excreted. Approximately 90% was excreted in the urine and 10% was excreted in the feces. The irregular profiles were not attributable to metabolism by the blood enzymes. Incubation of the drug in rat blood for 2 hours did not result in any significant degradation of the drug. The irregular profiles were not due to enterohepatic recirculation. The kinetics profiles were still irregular after catheterizing the bile duct and no furazolidone was detected in the bile. Metabolism of /sup 14/C-furazolidone in microsomal and cytosolic fractions of rat liver was very rapid. Maximum metabolism was achieved within five minutes. Pretreating the rats or the incubates with unlabelled furazolidone increased the rate and extent of metabolism. In microsomes, addition of allopurinol as a pretreatment decreased the production of polar metabolites. In the cytosol, addition of allopurinol to the incubate as a pretreatment resulted in an increased production of lipophilic metabolites. Pretreating the rats with allopurinol resulted in inconsistent findings in the in vitro metabolism.

  5. A predominate role of CYP1A2 for the metabolism of nabumetone to the active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, Miia; Hofmann, Ute; Klein, Kathrin; Mürdter, Thomas; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2009-05-01

    Nabumetone, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, requires biotransformation into 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), a close structural analog to naproxen, to achieve its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite its wide use, the enzymes involved in metabolism have not been identified. In the present study, several in vitro approaches were used to identify the cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme(s) responsible for 6-MNA formation. In human liver microsomes (HLMs) 6-MNA formation displayed monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent K(m) and V(max) values (mean +/- S.D.) of 75.1 +/- 15.3 microM and 1304 +/- 226 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and formation rate of 6-MNA varied approximately 5.5-fold (179-983 pmol/min/mg protein). 6-MNA activity correlated strongly with both CYP1A2-mediated phenacetin O-deethylation activity and CYP1A2 protein content (r = 0.85 and 0.74, respectively; p < 0.0001 for both). Additional correlations were found with model activities of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. Of 11 cDNA-expressed recombinant P450s used, recombinant CYP1A2 was the major form catalyzing the 6-MNA formation with an apparent K(m) of 45 microM and V(max) of 8.7 pmol/min/pmol P450. Minor fractions were catalyzed by recombinant P450s CYP1A1, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1. Experiments with P450-selective chemical inhibitors and monoclonal anti-P450 antibodies showed that furafylline, a mechanism-based inhibitor CYP1A2, and anti-CYP1A2 antibody markedly inhibited 6-MNA formation, whereas inhibitors for other P450s did not show significant inhibitory effects. Taken together, these studies indicate that the formation of the active metabolite of nabumetone, 6-MNA, is predominantly catalyzed by CYP1A2 in HLMs with only minor contribution of other P450s.

  6. Roles of phosphatidate phosphatase enzymes in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) enzymes catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate, yielding diacylglycerol and inorganic phosphate. In eukaryotic cells, PAP activity has a central role in the synthesis of phospholipids and triacylglycerol through its product diacylglycerol, and it also generates and/or degrades lipid-signaling molecules that are related to phosphatidate. There are two types of PAP enzyme, Mg2+ dependent (PAP1) and Mg2+ independent (PAP2), but only genes encoding PAP2 enzymes had been identified until recently, when a gene (PAH1) encoding a PAP1 enzyme was found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This discovery has revealed a molecular function of the mammalian protein lipin, a deficiency of which causes lipodystrophy in mice. With molecular information now available for both types of PAP, the specific roles of these enzymes in lipid metabolism are being clarified. PMID:17079146

  7. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    He, T; Venema, K; Priebe, M G; Welling, G W; Brummer, R-J M; Vonk, R J

    2008-08-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the fermentation metabolites and how these processes would play a role in the pathophysiology of lactose intolerance. We suggest that the balance between the removal and production rate of osmotic-active components (lactose, and intermediate metabolites, e.g. lactate, succinate, etc.) in the colon is a key factor in the development of symptoms. The involvement of the colon may provide the basis for designing new targeted strategies for dietary and clinical management of lactose intolerance.

  8. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    PubMed Central

    Camporeale, Annalisa; Demaria, Marco; Monteleone, Emanuele; Giorgi, Carlotta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo; Poli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3C/C) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3C/C MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3C/C MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms. PMID:25089666

  9. Physical activity in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Biological aging is typically associated with a progressive increase in body fat mass and a loss of lean body mass. Owing to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. Lifestyle modification, specifically changes in diet, physical activity, and exercise, is considered the cornerstone of obesity management. However, for most overweight people it is difficult to lose weight permanently through diet or exercise. Thus, prevention of weight gain is thought to be more effective than weight loss in reducing obesity rates. A key question is whether physical activity can extenuate age-related weight gain and promote metabolic health in adults. Current guidelines suggest that adults should accumulate about 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity daily to prevent unhealthy weight gain. Because evidence suggests that resistance training may promote a negative energy balance and may change body fat distribution, it is possible that an increase in muscle mass after resistance training may be a key mediator leading to better metabolic control.

  10. Physical activity in obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Biological aging is typically associated with a progressive increase in body fat mass and a loss of lean body mass. Owing to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. Lifestyle modification, specifically changes in diet, physical activity, and exercise, is considered the cornerstone of obesity management. However, for most overweight people it is difficult to lose weight permanently through diet or exercise. Thus, prevention of weight gain is thought to be more effective than weight loss in reducing obesity rates. A key question is whether physical activity can extenuate age-related weight gain and promote metabolic health in adults. Current guidelines suggest that adults should accumulate about 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity daily to prevent unhealthy weight gain. Because evidence suggests that resistance training may promote a negative energy balance and may change body fat distribution, it is possible that an increase in muscle mass after resistance training may be a key mediator leading to better metabolic control. PMID:23167451

  11. The role of leptin in regulating bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Jagriti; Farr, Olivia M.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin was initially best known for its role in energy homeostasis and regulation of energy expenditure. In the past few years we have realized that leptin also plays a major role in neuroendocrine regulation and bone metabolism. Here, we review the literature on indirect and direct pathways through which leptin acts to influence bone metabolism and discuss bone abnormalities related to leptin deficiency in both animal and human studies. The clinical utility of leptin in leptin deficient individuals and its potential to improve metabolic bone disease are also discussed. We are beginning to understand the critical role leptin plays in bone metabolism; future randomized studies are needed to fully assess the potential and risk – benefit of leptin's use in metabolic bone disease particularly in leptin deficient individuals. PMID:25497343

  12. Protein PYY and its role in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Price, Samantha L; Bloom, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    The hormone PYY is released from the distal gut in response to nutrient ingestion. Numerous studies have shown that PYY3-36, the most abundant circulating isoform of PYY, reduces food intake when given to obese rodents and humans. Its infusion to mimic postprandial levels in fasting subjects inhibits appetite, suggesting a physiological role in postprandial satiety. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Neuronal activity within several brain areas appears to be modified following peripheral administration of PYY3-36 and a direct effect on the central nervous system is possible. Several studies suggest that PYY3-36 levels are reduced in obesity and are elevated following gastric bypass surgery, possibly contributing to the increased feelings of satiety following this procedure. Whether PYY has a role in the regulation of energy expenditure is currently unclear. However, due to the clear appetite-inhibitory effect of PYY, this hormone continues to be investigated as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of obesity. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Metabolism in T cell activation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Erika L

    2015-01-01

    When naïve or memory T cells encounter foreign antigen along with proper co-stimulation they undergo rapid and extensive clonal expansion. In mammals, this type of proliferation is fair1y unique to cells of the adaptive immune system and requires a considerable expenditure of energy and cellular resources. While research has often focused on the roles of cytokines, antigenic signals, and co-stimulation in guiding T cell responses, data indicate that, at a fundamental level, it is cellular metabolism that regulates T cell function and differentiation and therefore influences the final outcome of the adaptive immune response. This review will focus on some earlier fundamental observations regarding T cell bioenergetics and its role in regulating cellular function, as well as recent work that suggests that manipulating the immune response by targeting lymphocyte metabolism could prove useful in treatments against infection and cancer. PMID:20189791

  14. A key role for transketolase-like 1 in tumor metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Moralli, Santiago; Aguilar, Esther; Marin, Silvia; Coy, Johannes F.; Dewerchin, Mieke; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Meca-Cortés, Oscar; Notebaert, Leen; Ghesquière, Bart; Eelen, Guy; Thomson, Timothy M.; Carmeliet, Peter; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming, a crucial cancer hallmark, shifts metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle or lipogenesis, to enable the growth characteristics of cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) orchestrates aerobic glycolysis, fatty acid and nucleic acid synthesis, glutamine metabolism, protection against oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Furthermore, silencing of TKTL1 reduced the levels of sphingolipids such as lactosylceramide (a sphingolipid regulating cell survival, proliferation and angiogenesis) and phosphatidylinositol (which activates PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling). Thus, in addition to its well-known roles in glucose and amino acid metabolism, TKTL1 also regulates lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our study provides unprecedented evidence that TKTL1 plays central roles in major metabolic processes subject to reprogramming in cancer cells and thus identifies TKTL1 as a promising target for new anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27391434

  15. Role of cellular cholesterol metabolism in vascular cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yifan; Hsu, Jeffrey J; Lu, Jinxiu; Ting, Tabitha C; Miyazaki, Makoto; Demer, Linda L; Tintut, Yin

    2011-09-23

    Vascular calcification impairs vessel compliance and increases the risk of cardiovascular events. We found previously that liver X receptor agonists, which regulate intracellular cholesterol homeostasis, augment PKA agonist- or high phosphate-induced osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Because cholesterol is an integral component of the matrix vesicles that nucleate calcium mineral, we examined the role of cellular cholesterol metabolism in vascular cell mineralization. The results showed that vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from LDL receptor null (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, which have impaired cholesterol uptake, had lower levels of intracellular cholesterol and less osteogenic differentiation, as indicated by alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization, compared with WT cells. PKA activation with forskolin acutely induced genes that promote cholesterol uptake (LDL receptor) and biosynthesis (HMG-CoA reductase). In WT cells, inhibition of cholesterol uptake by lipoprotein-deficient serum attenuated forskolin-induced matrix mineralization, which was partially reversed by the addition of cell-permeable cholesterol. Prolonged activation of both uptake and biosynthesis pathways by cotreatment with a liver X receptor agonist further augmented forskolin-induced matrix mineralization. Inhibition of either cholesterol uptake, using Ldlr(-/-) cells, or of cholesterol biosynthesis, using mevastatin-treated WT cells, failed to inhibit matrix mineralization due to up-regulation of the respective compensatory pathway. Inhibition of both pathways simultaneously using mevastatin-treated Ldlr(-/-) cells did inhibit forskolin-induced matrix mineralization. Altogether, the results suggest that up-regulation of cholesterol metabolism is essential for matrix mineralization by vascular cells.

  16. The Role of Hydrogen for Sulfurimonas denitrificans’ Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuchen; Perner, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Sulfurimonas denitrificans was originally isolated from coastal marine sediments. It can grow with thiosulfate and nitrate or sulfide and oxygen. Recently sequencing of its genome revealed that it encodes periplasmic and cytoplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenases but the role of hydrogen for its metabolism has remained unknown. We show the first experimental evidence that S. denitrificans can indeed express a functional hydrogen uptake active hydrogenase and can grow on hydrogen. In fact, under the provided conditions it grew faster and denser on hydrogen than on thiosulfate alone and even grew with hydrogen in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. In our experiments, at the time points tested, the hydrogen uptake activity appeared to be related to the periplasmic hydrogenase and not to the cytoplasmic hydrogenase. Our data suggest that under the provided conditions S. denitrificans can grow more efficiently with hydrogen than with thiosulfate. PMID:25170905

  17. Fatty acid synthase plays a role in cancer metabolism beyond providing fatty acids for phospholipid synthesis or sustaining elevations in glycolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Hopperton, Kathryn E; Duncan, Robin E; Bazinet, Richard P; Archer, Michael C

    2014-01-15

    Fatty acid synthase is over-expressed in many cancers and its activity is required for cancer cell survival, but the role of endogenously synthesized fatty acids in cancer is unknown. It has been suggested that endogenous fatty acid synthesis is either needed to support the growth of rapidly dividing cells, or to maintain elevated glycolysis (the Warburg effect) that is characteristic of cancer cells. Here, we investigate both hypotheses. First, we compared utilization of fatty acids synthesized endogenously from (14)C-labeled acetate to those supplied exogenously as (14)C-labeled palmitate in the culture medium in human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We found that cancer cells do not produce fatty acids that are different from those derived from exogenous palmitate, that these fatty acids are esterified to the same lipid and phospholipid classes in the same proportions, and that their distribution within neutral lipids is not different from untransformed cells. These results suggest that endogenously synthesized fatty acids do not fulfill a specific function in cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells excrete endogenously synthesized fatty acids, suggesting that they are produced in excess of requirements. We next investigated whether lipogenic activity is involved in the maintenance of high glycolytic activity by culturing both cancer and non-transformed cells under anoxic conditions. Although anoxia increased glycolysis 2-3 fold, we observed no concomitant increase in lipogenesis. Our results indicate that breast cancer cells do not have a specific qualitative or quantitative requirement for endogenously synthesized fatty acids and that increased de novo lipogenesis is not required to sustain elevations in glycolytic activity induced by anoxia in these cells.

  18. Roles of leptin in bone metabolism and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu Xu; Yang, Tianfu

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue has been more accepted as an active contributor to whole body homeostasis, rather than just a fat depot, since leptin, a 16 kDa protein, was discovered as the product of the obese gene in 1994. With more and more studies conducted on this hormone, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between adipose tissue and bone, which have important effects on each other. Bone is the source of many hormones, such as osteocalcin, that can affect energy metabolism and then the anabolism or catabolism of fat tissue. In contrast, the adipose tissue synthesizes and releases a series of adipokines, which are involved in bone metabolism through direct or indirect effects on bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, leptin, one of the most important cytokines derived from fat tissue, seems to account for the largest part of effects on bone, through direct or indirect involvement in bone remodeling and by playing a significant role in many bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, bone tumors and even fractures. In this review, we will discuss the progress in leptin research, particularly focusing on the roles of leptin in bone diseases.

  19. Wallops and its role in depressed metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holton, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    Facilities and organization at the Wallops station are reviewed and some current research work is described that pertains to noise abatement studies as well as some testing phases on V/STOL aircraft. Radiation biology results of various space flights are reviewed and some efforts for the Regulatory Biology Program, involving depressed metabolism aspects of space travel are detailed.

  20. Role of Autophagy in Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Sidney Y.; Xu, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of multiple metabolic risk factors including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Over the past decades, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome has increased dramatically, imposing a devastating, pandemic health threat. More importantly, individuals with metabolic syndrome are at an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and overall cardiovascular diseases. One of the common comorbidities of metabolic syndrome is heart anomalies leading to the loss of cardiomyocytes, cardiac dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. Up-to-date, a plethora cell signaling pathways have been postulated for the pathogenesis of cardiac complications in obesity including lipotoxicity, inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and sympathetic overactivation although the precise mechanism of action underscoring obesity-associated heart dysfunction remains elusive. Recent evidence has indicated a potential role of protein quality control in components of metabolic syndrome. Within the protein quality control system, the autophagy-lysosome pathway is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for bulk degradation of large intracellular organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy has been demonstrated to play an indispensible role in the maintenance of cardiac geometry and function under both physiological and pathological conditions. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology of cardiac anomalies under obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this mini review, we will discuss on how autophagy is involved in the regulation of cardiac function in obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:24810277

  1. Fatty acid synthase plays a role in cancer metabolism beyond providing fatty acids for phospholipid synthesis or sustaining elevations in glycolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hopperton, Kathryn E.; Duncan, Robin E.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Archer, Michael C.

    2014-01-15

    Fatty acid synthase is over-expressed in many cancers and its activity is required for cancer cell survival, but the role of endogenously synthesized fatty acids in cancer is unknown. It has been suggested that endogenous fatty acid synthesis is either needed to support the growth of rapidly dividing cells, or to maintain elevated glycolysis (the Warburg effect) that is characteristic of cancer cells. Here, we investigate both hypotheses. First, we compared utilization of fatty acids synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-labeled acetate to those supplied exogenously as {sup 14}C-labeled palmitate in the culture medium in human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We found that cancer cells do not produce fatty acids that are different from those derived from exogenous palmitate, that these fatty acids are esterified to the same lipid and phospholipid classes in the same proportions, and that their distribution within neutral lipids is not different from untransformed cells. These results suggest that endogenously synthesized fatty acids do not fulfill a specific function in cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells excrete endogenously synthesized fatty acids, suggesting that they are produced in excess of requirements. We next investigated whether lipogenic activity is involved in the maintenance of high glycolytic activity by culturing both cancer and non-transformed cells under anoxic conditions. Although anoxia increased glycolysis 2–3 fold, we observed no concomitant increase in lipogenesis. Our results indicate that breast cancer cells do not have a specific qualitative or quantitative requirement for endogenously synthesized fatty acids and that increased de novo lipogenesis is not required to sustain elevations in glycolytic activity induced by anoxia in these cells. - Highlights: • Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is over-expressed in cancer but its function is unknown. • We compare

  2. The role of mitochondria in metabolism and cell death.

    PubMed

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Ouchida, Amanda Tomie; Norberg, Erik

    2017-01-15

    Mitochondria are complex organelles that play a central role in energy metabolism, control of stress responses and are a hub for biosynthetic processes. Beyond its well-established role in cellular energetics, mitochondria are critical mediators of signals to propagate various cellular outcomes. In addition mitochondria are the primary source of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and are involved in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, they contain a self-destructive arsenal of apoptogenic factors that can be unleashed to promote cell death, thus displaying a shared platform for metabolism and apoptosis. In the present review, we will give a brief account on the integration of mitochondrial metabolism and apoptotic cell death.

  3. Role of TG-interacting factor (Tgif) in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pramfalk, Camilla; Eriksson, Mats; Parini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    TG interacting factors (Tgifs) 1 and 2 are members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) superfamily of homeodomain proteins. These two proteins bind to the same DNA sequence and share a conserved C-terminal repression domain. Mutations in TGIF1 have been linked to holoprosencephaly, which is a human genetic disease that affects craniofacial development. As these proteins can interact with the ligand binding domain of retinoid X receptor α, a common heterodimeric partner of several nuclear receptors [e.g., liver X receptors (LXRs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)], Tgif1 and Tgif2 might repress other transcriptional pathways activated by lipids. In line with this, Tgif1 interacts with LXRα and Tgif1 null mice have increased expression of the two Lxrα target genes apolipoproteins (Apo) c2 and a4. Also, we have recently identified Tgif1 to function as a transcriptional repressor of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (gene name SOAT2). As no studies yet have shown involvement of Tgif2 in the lipid metabolism, this review will focus on the role of Tgif1 in lipid and cholesterol metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Emerging roles of lipid metabolism in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiangjian; Cheng, Can; Tan, Zheqiong; Li, Namei; Tang, Min; Yang, Lifang; Cao, Ya

    2017-04-11

    Cancer cells frequently display fundamentally altered cellular metabolism, which provides the biochemical foundation and directly contributes to tumorigenicity and malignancy. Rewiring of metabolic programmes, such as aerobic glycolysis and increased glutamine metabolism, are crucial for cancer cells to shed from a primary tumor, overcome the nutrient and energy deficit, and eventually survive and form metastases. However, the role of lipid metabolism that confers the aggressive properties of malignant cancers remains obscure. The present review is focused on key enzymes in lipid metabolism associated with metastatic disease pathogenesis. We also address the function of an important membrane structure-lipid raft in mediating tumor aggressive progression. We enumerate and integrate these recent findings into our current understanding of lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer metastasis accompanied by new and exciting therapeutic implications.

  5. Cinnamic compound metabolism in human skin and the role metabolism may play in determining relative sensitisation potency.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Connie; Hotchkiss, Sharon A M; Pease, Camilla K Smith

    2003-02-01

    trans-Cinnamaldehyde and trans-cinnamic alcohol cause allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in humans; cinnamaldehyde is a more potent sensitiser than cinnamic alcohol. These two chemicals are principal constituents of the European Standard 'Fragrance Mix', as used in patch testing diagnostics of sensitisation to fragrances by clinical dermatologists. As contact sensitisers are usually protein reactive compounds, it is hypothesised that cinnamic alcohol (not protein-reactive) is a 'prohapten' that requires metabolic activation, presumably by cutaneous oxidoreductases, to the protein-reactive cinnamaldehyde (a 'hapten'). It is postulated that cinnamaldehyde can be detoxified by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) to cinnamic acid and/or by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) to cinnamic alcohol. Hence, a variety of metabolic pathways may contribute to the relative exposures and hence sensitising potencies of cinnamic alcohol and cinnamaldehyde. To evaluate the extent of cinnamaldehyde and cinnamic alcohol metabolism in human skin and provide evidence for the role of cutaneous ADH and ALDH in such metabolism. The extent of cinnamic alcohol and aldehyde metabolism was investigated in human skin homogenates and sub-cellular fractions. A high performance liquid chromatography method was used for analysis of skin sample extracts. Studies were conducted in the presence and absence of the ADH/cytochrome P450 inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole and the cytosolic ALDH inhibitor, disulfiram. Differential metabolism of cinnamic alcohol and cinnamaldehyde was observed in various subcellular fractions: skin cytosol was seen to be the major site of cinnamic compound metabolism. Significant metabolic inhibition was observed using 4-methylpyrazole and disulfiram in whole skin homogenates and cytosolic fractions only. This study has demonstrated that cutaneous ADH and ALDH activities, located within defined subcellular compartments, play important roles in the activation and detoxification of CAlc and CAld in

  6. Roles of microRNA on cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advanced studies of microRNAs (miRNAs) have revealed their manifold biological functions, including control of cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell death. However, it seems that their roles as key regulators of metabolism have drawn more and more attention in the recent years. Cancer cells display increased metabolic autonomy in comparison to non-transformed cells, taking up nutrients and metabolizing them in pathways that support growth and proliferation. MiRNAs regulate cell metabolic processes through complicated mechanisms, including directly targeting key enzymes or transporters of metabolic processes and regulating transcription factors, oncogenes / tumor suppressors as well as multiple oncogenic signaling pathways. MiRNAs like miR-375, miR-143, miR-14 and miR-29b participate in controlling cancer cell metabolism by regulating the expression of genes whose protein products either directly regulate metabolic machinery or indirectly modulate the expression of metabolic enzymes, serving as master regulators, which will hopefully lead to a new therapeutic strategy for malignant cancer. This review focuses on miRNA regulations of cancer cell metabolism,including glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and insulin production, lipid metabolism and amino acid biogenesis, as well as several oncogenic signaling pathways. Furthermore, the challenges of miRNA-based strategies for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics have been discussed. PMID:23164426

  7. Roles of microRNA on cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Li, Hongbin; Zeng, Xiao; Yang, Pengbo; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Xia; Liang, Shufang

    2012-11-20

    Advanced studies of microRNAs (miRNAs) have revealed their manifold biological functions, including control of cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell death. However, it seems that their roles as key regulators of metabolism have drawn more and more attention in the recent years. Cancer cells display increased metabolic autonomy in comparison to non-transformed cells, taking up nutrients and metabolizing them in pathways that support growth and proliferation. MiRNAs regulate cell metabolic processes through complicated mechanisms, including directly targeting key enzymes or transporters of metabolic processes and regulating transcription factors, oncogenes / tumor suppressors as well as multiple oncogenic signaling pathways. MiRNAs like miR-375, miR-143, miR-14 and miR-29b participate in controlling cancer cell metabolism by regulating the expression of genes whose protein products either directly regulate metabolic machinery or indirectly modulate the expression of metabolic enzymes, serving as master regulators, which will hopefully lead to a new therapeutic strategy for malignant cancer. This review focuses on miRNA regulations of cancer cell metabolism,including glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and insulin production, lipid metabolism and amino acid biogenesis, as well as several oncogenic signaling pathways. Furthermore, the challenges of miRNA-based strategies for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics have been discussed.

  8. Occurrence, metabolism, metabolic role, and industrial uses of bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A J; Dawes, E A

    1990-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), of which polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is the most abundant, are bacterial carbon and energy reserve materials of widespread occurrence. They are composed of 3-hydroxyacid monomer units and exist as a small number of cytoplasmic granules per cell. The properties of the C4 homopolymer PHB as a biodegradable thermoplastic first attracted industrial attention more than 20 years ago. Copolymers of C4 (3-hydroxybutyrate [3HB]) and C5 (3-hydroxyvalerate [3HV]) monomer units have modified physical properties; e.g., the plastic is less brittle than PHB, whereas PHAs containing C8 to C12 monomers behave as elastomers. This family of materials is the centre of considerable commercial interest, and 3HB-co-3HV copolymers have been marketed by ICI plc as Biopol. The known polymers exist as 2(1) helices with the fiber repeat decreasing from 0.596 nm for PHB to about 0.45 nm for C8 to C10 polymers. Novel copolymers with a backbone of 3HB and 4HB have been obtained. The native granules contain noncrystalline polymer, and water may possibly act as a plasticizer. Although the biosynthesis and regulation of PHB are generally well understood, the corresponding information for the synthesis of long-side-chain PHAs from alkanes, alcohols, and organic acids is still incomplete. The precise mechanisms of action of the polymerizing and depolymerizing enzymes also remain to be established. The structural genes for the three key enzymes of PHB synthesis from acetyl coenzyme A in Alcaligenes eutrophus have been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Polymer molecular weights appear to be species specific. The factors influencing the commercial choice of organism, substrate, and isolation process are discussed. The physiological functions of PHB as a reserve material and in symbiotic nitrogen fixation and its presence in bacterial plasma membranes and putative role in transformability and calcium signaling are also considered. PMID:2087222

  9. Role of RIP140 in metabolic tissues: connections to disease.

    PubMed

    White, Roger; Morganstein, Daniel; Christian, Mark; Seth, Asha; Herzog, Birger; Parker, Malcolm G

    2008-01-09

    The control of physiological processes requires the regulation and coordination of many different signals and is determined in part by the activation and repression of expression of specific target genes. RIP140 is a ligand dependent coregulator of many nuclear receptors that influence such diverse processes as muscle metabolism, adipocyte and hepatocyte function, and reproduction. Recent evidence has shown that the ability of RIP140 to regulate nuclear receptor function is determined by the relative level of RIP140 expression in comparison with other cofactors, by post-translational modifications and by interactions with additional transcription factors. As a result it is becoming apparent that RIP140, via its interplay with other coregulators, plays a fundamental role in determining both the normal and pathogenic physiological state.

  10. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Proteins into Infected Cells Suggests an Active Role of Microsporidia in the Control of Host Programs and Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Senderskiy, Igor V.; Timofeev, Sergey A.; Seliverstova, Elena V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs. PMID:24705470

  11. Secretion of Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae proteins into infected cells suggests an active role of microsporidia in the control of host programs and metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Senderskiy, Igor V; Timofeev, Sergey A; Seliverstova, Elena V; Pavlova, Olga A; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tools of the intracellular protozoan pathogens Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida for manipulation of host cell machinery have been the focus of investigation for approximately two decades. Microsporidia, fungi-related microorganisms forming another large group of obligate intracellular parasites, are characterized by development in direct contact with host cytoplasm (the majority of species), strong minimization of cell machinery, and acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system. All the aforementioned features are suggestive of the ability of microsporidia to modify host metabolic and regulatory pathways. Seven proteins of the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae with predicted signal peptides but without transmembrane domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Western-blot analysis with antibodies against recombinant products showed secretion of parasite proteins from different functional categories into the infected host cell. Secretion of parasite hexokinase and α/β-hydrolase was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, this method showed specific accumulation of A. locustae hexokinase in host nuclei. Expression of hexokinase, trehalase, and two leucine-rich repeat proteins without any exogenous signal peptide led to their secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris. In contrast, α/β-hydrolase was not found in the culture medium, though a significant amount of this enzyme accumulated in the yeast membrane fraction. These results suggest that microsporidia possess a broad set of enzymes and regulatory proteins secreted into infected cells to control host metabolic processes and molecular programs.

  12. Metabolic activity of microorganisms in evaporites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Giver, L. J.; White, M. R.; Mancinelli, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline salt is generally considered so hostile to most forms of life that it has been used for centuries as a preservative. Here, we present evidence that prokaryotes inhabiting a natural evaporite crust of halite and gypsum are metabolically active while inside the evaporite for at least 10 months. In situ measurements demonstrated that some of these "endoevaporitic" microorganisms (probably the cyanobacterium Synechococcus Nageli) fixed carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification was not observed. Our results quantified the slow microbial activity that can occur in salt crystals. Implications of this study include the possibility that microorganisms found in ancient evaporite deposits may have been part of an evaporite community.

  13. Metabolic activity of microorganisms in evaporites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Giver, L. J.; White, M. R.; Mancinelli, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline salt is generally considered so hostile to most forms of life that it has been used for centuries as a preservative. Here, we present evidence that prokaryotes inhabiting a natural evaporite crust of halite and gypsum are metabolically active while inside the evaporite for at least 10 months. In situ measurements demonstrated that some of these "endoevaporitic" microorganisms (probably the cyanobacterium Synechococcus Nageli) fixed carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification was not observed. Our results quantified the slow microbial activity that can occur in salt crystals. Implications of this study include the possibility that microorganisms found in ancient evaporite deposits may have been part of an evaporite community.

  14. Metabolic activity of microorganisms in evaporites.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, L J; Giver, L J; White, M R; Mancinelli, R L

    1994-06-01

    Crystalline salt is generally considered so hostile to most forms of life that it has been used for centuries as a preservative. Here, we present evidence that prokaryotes inhabiting a natural evaporite crust of halite and gypsum are metabolically active while inside the evaporite for at least 10 months. In situ measurements demonstrated that some of these "endoevaporitic" microorganisms (probably the cyanobacterium Synechococcus Nageli) fixed carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification was not observed. Our results quantified the slow microbial activity that can occur in salt crystals. Implications of this study include the possibility that microorganisms found in ancient evaporite deposits may have been part of an evaporite community.

  15. The emerging role of p53 in exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2014-03-01

    The major tumour suppressor protein, p53, is one of the most well-studied proteins in cell biology. Often referred to as the Guardian of the Genome, the list of known functions of p53 include regulatory roles in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, angiogenesis, DNA repair and cell senescence. More recently, p53 has been implicated as a key molecular player regulating substrate metabolism and exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. In this context, the study of p53 therefore has obvious implications for both human health and performance, given that impaired mitochondrial content and function is associated with the pathology of many metabolic disorders such as ageing, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer, as well as reduced exercise performance. Studies on p53 knockout (KO) mice collectively demonstrate that ablation of p53 content reduces intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial yield, reduces cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α protein content whilst also reducing mitochondrial respiration and increasing reactive oxygen species production during state 3 respiration in IMF mitochondria. Additionally, p53 KO mice exhibit marked reductions in exercise capacity (in the magnitude of 50 %) during fatiguing swimming, treadmill running and electrical stimulation protocols. p53 may regulate contractile-induced increases in mitochondrial content via modulating mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) content and/or activity, given that p53 KO mice display reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA, Tfam messenger RNA and protein levels. Furthermore, upon muscle contraction, p53 is phosphorylated on serine 15 and subsequently translocates to the mitochondria where it forms a complex with Tfam to modulate expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the COX complex. In human skeletal muscle, the exercise-induced phosphorylation of p53(Ser15) is enhanced in conditions

  16. Metabolic activation/deactivation reactions during perinatal development.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, G W; Lui, E M; Lamartiniere, C A

    1979-01-01

    The role of metabolic activation/deactivation reactions during development is evaluated in relation to developmental pharmacology and toxicology. Enzyme systems evaluated include the mixed-function oxidases (aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and oxidative demethylation), epoxide hydration and conjugation (glutathione conjugation, sulfation, and glucuronidation). Placental transfer and milk secretion of chemicals are discussed in relation to maternal, placental, and fetal metabolism. Normal patterns of enzyme development can be modified in two ways: (1) enzyme induction and (2) enzyme imprinting. Postnatal induction of the mixed-function oxidases and glucuronyl-transferase following treatment of pregnant rats with TCDD is shown to be caused primarily by newborn exposure to TCDD in milk. Structure-activity relationship are defined for the perinatal induction of hepatic enzymes by the pure PCBs. PCBs are divided into two classes: P-450 inducers and P-448 inducers. Imprinting or programming of hepatic metabolism is a function of the sexual differentiation of enzyme activity; male and female activities are similar in prepubertal animals, whereas pronounced sex differences are evident in adults. Treatment of newborn rats (days 2--6) with diethystilbestrol or testosterone resulted in a feminization (decrease) of mixed-function oxidation and glucuronidation in adult males. No changes were seen in immature males or females or adult females. This effect appears to be irreversible and is under pituitary-hypothalamic-gonadal control. In addition to the feminization of enzyme activity, neonatal exposure to hormonally active chemicals also feminizes the hepatic response to cadmium in resultant adult animals. PMID:510244

  17. Sedentary Activity Associated With Metabolic Syndrome Independent of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bankoski, Andrea; Harris, Tamara B.; McClain, James J.; Brychta, Robert J.; Caserotti, Paolo; Chen, Kong Y.; Berrigan, David; Troiano, Richard P.; Koster, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined the association between objectively measured sedentary activity and metabolic syndrome among older adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were from 1,367 men and women, aged ≥60 years who participated in the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Sedentary time during waking hours was measured by an accelerometer (<100 counts per minute). A sedentary bout was defined as a period of time >5 min. A sedentary break was defined as an interruption in sedentary time (≥100 counts per minute). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria. RESULTS On average, people spent 9.5 h (65% of wear time) as sedentary. Compared with people without metabolic syndrome, people with metabolic syndrome spent a greater percentage of time as sedentary (67.3 vs. 62.2%), had longer average sedentary bouts (17.7 vs. 16.7 min), had lower intensity during sedentary time (14.8 vs. 15.8 average counts per minute), and had fewer sedentary breaks (82.3 vs. 86.7), adjusted for age and sex (all P < 0.01). A higher percentage of time sedentary and fewer sedentary breaks were associated with a significantly greater likelihood of metabolic syndrome after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, education, alcohol consumption, smoking, BMI, diabetes, heart disease, and physical activity. The association between intensity during sedentary time and metabolic syndrome was borderline significant. CONCLUSIONS The proportion of sedentary time was strongly related to metabolic risk, independent of physical activity. Current results suggest older people may benefit from reducing total sedentary time and avoiding prolonged periods of sedentary time by increasing the number of breaks during sedentary time. PMID:21270206

  18. Emerging role of metabolic signaling in synovial joint remodeling and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    June, Ronald K; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Long, Fanxing; Griffin, Timothy M

    2016-12-01

    Obesity and associated metabolic diseases collectively referred to as the metabolic syndrome increase the risk of skeletal and synovial joint diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA). The relationship between obesity and musculoskeletal diseases is complex, involving biomechanical, dietary, genetic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors. Recent findings illustrate how changes in cellular metabolism and metabolic signaling pathways alter skeletal development, remodeling, and homeostasis, especially in response to biomechanical and inflammatory stressors. Consequently, a better understanding of the energy metabolism of diarthrodial joint cells and tissues, including bone, cartilage, and synovium, may lead to new strategies to treat or prevent synovial joint diseases such as OA. This rationale was the basis of a workshop presented at the 2016 Annual ORS Meeting in Orlando, FL on the emerging role of metabolic signaling in synovial joint remodeling and OA. The topics we covered included (i) the relationship between metabolic syndrome and OA in clinical and pre-clinical studies; (ii) the effect of biomechanical loading on chondrocyte metabolism; (iii) the effect of Wnt signaling on osteoblast carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism with respect to bone anabolism; and (iv) the role of AMP-activated protein kinase in chondrocyte energetic and biomechanical stress responses in the context of cartilage injury, aging, and OA. Although challenges exist for measuring in vivo changes in synovial joint tissue metabolism, the findings presented herein provide multiple lines of evidence to support a central role for disrupted cellular energy metabolism in the pathogenesis of OA. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2048-2058, 2016.

  19. Identifying Metabolically Active Chemicals Using a Consensus ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are abundant throughout the environment and can alter neurodevelopment, behavior, and reproductive success of humans and other species by perturbing signaling pathways related to the estrogen receptor (ER). A recent study compared results across 18 ER-related assays in the ToxCast™ in vitro screening program to predict the likelihood of a chemical exhibiting in vivo estrogenic activity, with the purpose of eliminating chemicals that may produce a false signal by interfering with the technological attributes of an individual assay. However, flaws in in vitro assay design can also prevent induction of signal activity by EDCs. Another reason for not observing activity for some EDCs in in vitro assays is that metabolic activation is required to perturb ER-related pathways. In the current study, 1,024 chemicals were identified as lacking ER activity after establishing a consensus across each of the 18 ER-related in vitro assays, and nearly 2,000 primary and 3,700 secondary unique metabolites were predicted for these chemicals. The ER binding activity for each metabolite was then predicted using an existing ER activity quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) consensus model. Binding activity was predicted for 2-3% of the metabolites within each generation. Of the inactive parent compounds generating at least one metabolite predicted to have ER-binding activity, nearly 30% were found to have metabolites from both gene

  20. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  1. The role of mitochondrial transport in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Passarella, Salvatore; Atlante, Anna; Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia

    2003-04-01

    Since mitochondria are closed spaces in the cell, metabolite traffic across the mitochondrial membrane is needed to accomplish energy metabolism. The mitochondrial carriers play this function by uniport, symport and antiport processes. We give here a survey of about 50 transport processes catalysed by more than 30 carriers with a survey of the methods used to investigate metabolite transport in isolated mammalian mitochondria. The role of mitochondria in metabolic pathways including ammoniogenesis, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial shuttles etc. is also reported in more detail, mainly in the light of the existence of new transport processes.

  2. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shengxi; Cao, Jianmei; Feng, Qin; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:24062792

  3. Metabolism and physiologic roles of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Oski, F A

    1977-10-01

    Antioxidant effect of vitamin E averts hemolytic anemia in low-birthweight infants fed formula rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. Tocopherol supplementation has also been shown to decrease the incidence and severity of retrolental fibroplasia and the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Although the vitamin lowers platelet hyperaggregability, its role as an antithrombotic agent is still unclear.

  4. Novel metabolic roles of L-arginine in body energy metabolism and possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hristina, K; Langerholc, T; Trapecar, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the body can synthesize L-arginine, exogenous supplementation may be sometimes necessary, especially in particular conditions which results in depleted endogenous source. Among diseases and states when exogenous supplementation may be necessary are: burns, severe wounds, infections, insufficient circulation, intensive physical activity or sterility. In recent time, the attention was paid to the use of L-arginine supplementation by athletes during intensive sport activity, to enhance tissue growth and general performance, to potentiate the ergogenic potential and muscle tolerance to high intensive work and gas exchange threshold, to decrease ammonia liberation and recovery performance period and to improve wound healing. High-intensity exercise produces transient hyperammoniemia, presumably due to AMP catabolism. Catabolic pathways of AMP may involve its deamination or dephosphorylation, mainly in order to compensate fall in adenylate enrgy charge (AEC), due to AMP rise. The enzymes of purine metabolism have been documented to be particularly sensitive to the effect of dietary L-arginine supplementation. L-arginine supplementation leads to redirection of AMP deamination on account of increased AMP dephosphorylation and subsequent adenosine production and may increase ATP regeneration via activation of AMP kinase (AMPK) pathway. The central role of AMPK in regulating cellular ATP regeneration, makes this enzyme as a central control point in energy homeostasis. The effects of L-arginine supplementation on energy expenditure were successful independently of age or previous disease, in young sport active, elderly, older population and patients with angina pectoris.

  5. The role of osteocalcin in human glucose metabolism: marker or mediator?

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Sarah L.; Centi, Amanda; Smith, Steven R.; Gundberg, Caren

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports an association between the skeleton and energy metabolism. These interactions are mediated by a variety of hormones, cytokines and nutrients. Here, the evidence for a role of osteocalcin in the regulation of glucose metabolism in humans is reviewed. Osteocalcin is a bone matrix protein that regulates hydroxyapatite size and shape through its vitamin-K-dependent γ-carboxylated form. In circulation, the concentration of osteocalcin is a measure of bone formation. The undercarboxylated form of osteocalcin is reported to be active in glucose metabolism in mice. Total serum osteocalcin concentrations in humans are inversely associated with measures of glucose metabolism; however, human data are inconclusive with regard to the role of uncarboxylated osteocalcin in glucose metabolism because most studies do not account for the influence of vitamin K on the proportion of undercarboxylated osteocalcin or differentiate between the total and uncarboxylated forms of osteocalcin. Furthermore, most human studies do not concomitantly measure other bone turnover markers to isolate the role of osteocalcin as a measure of bone formation from its effect on glucose metabolism. Carefully designed studies are required to define the role of osteocalcin and its carboxylated or undercarboxylated forms in the regulation of glucose metabolism in humans. PMID:23147574

  6. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  7. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, H Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  9. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  10. Resveratrol inhibits polyphosphoinositide metabolism in activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2005-08-15

    The effects of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) on activation responses and the polyphosphoinositide metabolism in human blood platelets have been studied. Resveratrol partially inhibited secretory responses (liberation of dense granule nucleotides and lysosomal acid hydrolases), microparticle formation and protein phosphorylations induced by thrombin. The effects of resveratrol on phosphoinositide metabolites, phosphatidate (PtdOH), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns-4(5)-P), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns-4,5-P2), phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4-P2) and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4,5-P3) were monitored in blood platelets prelabelled with [32P]Pi. Resveratrol not only inhibited the marked increase in levels of PtdOH in platelets activated by thrombin (0.1 U/ml) but it decreased the steady state levels of the other polyphosphoinositide metabolites. The distribution of 32P in phosphoinositides in activated platelets was consistent with inhibition of CDP-DAG inositol transferase and a weak inhibition of PtdIns-4(5)-P kinase. These observations show that resveratrol has a profound effect on phospholipids, particularly on polyphosphoinositide metabolism, and may decrease the amount of PtdIns-4,5-P2 available for signalling in these cells.

  11. Identifying Metabolically Active Chemicals Using a Consensus ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Traditional toxicity testing provides insight into the mechanisms underlying toxicological responses but requires a high investment in a large number of resources. The new paradigm of testing approaches involves rapid screening studies able to evaluate thousands of chemicals across hundreds of biological targets through use of in vitro assays. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are of concern due to their ability to alter neurodevelopment, behavior, and reproductive success of humans and other species. A recent integrated computational model examined results across 18 ER-related assays in the ToxCast in vitro screening program to eliminate chemicals that produce a false signal by possibly interfering with the technological attributes of an individual assay. However, in vitro assays can also lead to false negatives when the complex metabolic processes that render a chemical bioactive in a living system might be unable to be replicated in an in vitro environment. In the current study, the influence of metabolism was examined for over 1,400 chemicals considered inactive using the integrated computational model. Over 2,000 first-generation and over 4,000 second-generation metabolites were generated for the inactive chemicals using in silico techniques. Next, a consensus model comprised of individual structure activity relationship (SAR) models was used to predict ER-binding activity for each of the metabolites. Binding activity was predicted for 8-10% of the meta

  12. Metabolic responses to simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Rendon, Lisa R.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic control of the liquid cooling garment (LCG) worn by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA) would more efficiently regulate astronaut thermal comfort and improve astronaut productivity. An experiment was conducted in which subjects performed exercise profiles on a unique, supine upper body ergometer to elicit physiological and thermal responses similar to those achieved during zero-g EVAs. Results were analyzed to quantify metabolic rate, various body temperatures, and other heat balance parameters. Such data may lead to development of a microprocessor-based system to automatically maintain astronaut heat balance during extended EVAs.

  13. Metabolic responses to simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Rendon, Lisa R.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic control of the liquid cooling garment (LCG) worn by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA) would more efficiently regulate astronaut thermal comfort and improve astronaut productivity. An experiment was conducted in which subjects performed exercise profiles on a unique, supine upper body ergometer to elicit physiological and thermal responses similar to those achieved during zero-g EVAs. Results were analyzed to quantify metabolic rate, various body temperatures, and other heat balance parameters. Such data may lead to development of a microprocessor-based system to automatically maintain astronaut heat balance during extended EVAs.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/β and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  15. The role of RNA metabolism in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abou Al-Shaar, H; Shariff, RK; Albakr, A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neurodegenerative disorders are commonly encountered in medical practices. Such diseases can lead to major morbidity and mortality among the affected individuals. The molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is not yet clear. Recent literature has revealed that mutations in RNA-binding proteins are a key cause of several human neuronal-based diseases. This review discusses the role of RNA metabolism in neurological diseases with specific emphasis on roles of RNA translation and microRNAs in neurodegeneration, RNA-mediated toxicity, repeat expansion diseases and RNA metabolism, molecular pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, and neurobiology of survival motor neuron (SMN) and spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:27785391

  16. ROLE OF FERREDOXIN IN THE METABOLISM OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN.

    PubMed

    VALENTINE, R C; WOLFE, R S

    1963-05-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana) and R. S. Wolfe. Role of ferredoxin in the metabolism of molecular hydrogen. J. Bacteriol. 85:1114-1120. 1963.-The metabolism of molecular hydrogen by Clostridium pasteurianum, Micrococcus lactilyticus (Veillonella alcalescens), and several other anaerobic bacteria was studied. Oxidation of hydrogen, using several electron-accepting substrates including triphosphopyridine nucleotide, uric acid, xanthine, nitrite, and hydroxylamine, required ferredoxin in conjunction with hydrogenase. Evolution of hydrogen from pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate, hypoxanthine, and dithionite was mediated by ferredoxin. On the basis of these findings, a unitary hypothesis for biological hydrogen evolution is proposed in which ferredoxin plays a key role.

  17. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  18. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  19. Insights into the Regulatory Role of Non-coding RNAs in Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy O.; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents a complex disease originated from alterations in several genes leading to disturbances in important signaling pathways in tumor biology, favoring heterogeneity that promotes adaptability and pharmacological resistance of tumor cells. Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as an important hallmark of cancer characterized by the presence of aerobic glycolysis, increased glutaminolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as an altered mitochondrial energy production. The metabolic switches that support energetic requirements of cancer cells are closely related to either activation of oncogenes or down-modulation of tumor-suppressor genes, finally leading to dysregulation of cell proliferation, metastasis and drug resistance signals. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as one important kind of molecules that can regulate altered genes contributing, to the establishment of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, diverse metabolic signals can regulate ncRNA expression and activity at genetic, transcriptional, or epigenetic levels. The regulatory landscape of ncRNAs may provide a new approach for understanding and treatment of different types of malignancies. In this review we discuss the regulatory role exerted by ncRNAs on metabolic enzymes and pathways involved in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. We also review how metabolic stress conditions and tumoral microenvironment influence ncRNA expression and activity. Furthermore, we comment on the therapeutic potential of metabolism-related ncRNAs in cancer. PMID:27551267

  20. The Role of Hepcidin in Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of hepcidin production results in a variety of iron disorders. Hepcidin deficiency is the cause of iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis, iron-loading anemias, and hepatitis C. Hepcidin excess is associated with anemia of inflammation, chronic kidney disease and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of this new knowledge are beginning to emerge. Dr. Ernest Beutler played a significant role in advancing our understanding of the function of hepcidin. This review is dedicated to his memory. PMID:19907144

  1. Role of CAR and PXR in Xenobiotic Sensing and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Ong, Su Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The xenobiotic detoxification system, which protects the human body from external chemicals, comprises drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters whose expressions are regulated by pregnane X receptor (PXR) and the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The progress made in a large number of recent studies calls for a timely review to summarize and highlight these key discoveries. Areas covered This review summarizes recent advances in elucidating the roles of PXR and CAR in the xenobiotic detoxification system and highlights the progress in understanding the regulation of PXR and CAR activity at the post-translational levels, as well as the structural basis for the regulation of these two xenobiotic sensors. Expert opinion Future efforts are needed to discover novel agonists and antagonists with species and isoform selectivity, to systematically understand the regulation of PXR and CAR at multiple levels (transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels) in response to xenobiotics exposure, and to solve the structures of the full-length receptors, which will be enabled by improved protein expression and purification techniques and approaches. In addition, more efforts will be needed to validate PXR and CAR as disease-related therapeutic targets and thus expand their roles as master xenobiotic sensors. PMID:22554043

  2. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  3. Role of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2013-12-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract harbors trillions of bacteria, most of which are commensal and have adapted over time to the milieu of the human colon. Their many metabolic interactions with each other, and with the human host, influence human nutrition and metabolism in diverse ways. Our understanding of these influences has come through breakthroughs in the molecular profiling of the phylogeny and the metabolic capacities of the microbiota. The gut microbiota produce a variety of nutrients including short-chain fatty acids, B vitamins, and vitamin K. Because of their ability to interact with receptors on epithelial cells and subepithelial cells, the microbiota also release a number of cellular factors that influence human metabolism. Thus, they have potential roles in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and cognition, which extend well beyond their traditional contribution to nutrition. This review explores the roles of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism, and the putative mechanisms underlying these effects. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Metabolic roles of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases.

    PubMed

    Vida, András; Márton, Judit; Mikó, Edit; Bai, Péter

    2017-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is an evolutionarily conserved reaction that had been associated with numerous cellular processes such as DNA repair, protein turnover, inflammatory regulation, aging or metabolic regulation. The metabolic regulatory tasks of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are complex, it is based on the regulation of metabolic transcription factors (e.g. SIRT1, nuclear receptors, SREBPs) and certain cellular energy sensors. PARP over-activation can cause damage to mitochondrial terminal oxidation, while the inhibition of PARP-1 or PARP-2 can induce mitochondrial oxidation by enhancing the mitotropic tone of gene transcription and signal transduction. These PARP-mediated processes impact on higher order metabolic regulation that modulates lipid metabolism, circadian oscillations and insulin secretion and signaling. PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-7 are related to metabolic diseases such as diabetes, alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD, NAFLD), or on a broader perspective to Warburg metabolism in cancer or the metabolic diseases accompanying aging.

  5. Cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase: Characterization, inhibition, and metabolic role in taurine formation

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase, an enzyme that plays a major role in the formation of taurine from cysteine, has been purified from rat liver to homogeneity and characterized. The physical properties of the enzyme were studied, along with its substrate specificity. Multiple forms of the enzyme were found in rat liver, kidney, and brain with isoelectric points ranging from pH 5.6 to 4.9. These multiple forms did not differ in their substrate specificity. It was found by using gel electrofocusing and polyclonal antibodies raised to the liver enzyme that the different forms of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase are identical in the various rat tissues studied. Various inhibitors of the enzyme were tested both in vitro and in vivo in order to evaluate the role of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase in taurine formation in mammalian tissues. In in vitro studies, cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase was irreversibly inhibited by {beta}-ethylidene-DL-aspartate (Ki = 10 mM), and competitive inhibition was found using mercaptomethylsuccinate (Ki = 0.1 mM) and D-cysteinesulfinate (Ki = 0.32 mM) when L-cysteinesulfinate was used as a substrate. In order to be able to test these inhibitors in vivo, L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate was evaluated as a probe for the in vivo measurement of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity. The metabolism of cysteinesulfonate and the product of its transamination, {beta}-sulfopyruvate, was studied, and it was found that L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate is an accurate and convenient probe for cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity. Using L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate, it was found that D-cysteinesulfinate inhibits cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity by greater than 90% in the intact mouse and that inhibition lasts for up to fifteen hours.

  6. Normal Roles for Dietary Fructose in Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Maren R.

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many well-documented metabolic effects linked to the fructose component of a very high sugar diet, a healthy diet is also likely to contain appreciable fructose, even if confined to that found in fruits and vegetables. These normal levels of fructose are metabolized in specialized pathways that synergize with glucose at several metabolic steps. Glucose potentiates fructose absorption from the gut, while fructose catalyzes glucose uptake and storage in the liver. Fructose accelerates carbohydrate oxidation after a meal. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that fructose may also play a role in the secretion of insulin and GLP-1, and in the maturation of preadipocytes to increase fat storage capacity. Therefore, fructose undergoing its normal metabolism has the interesting property of potentiating the disposal of a dietary carbohydrate load through several routes. PMID:25100436

  7. Normal roles for dietary fructose in carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Maren R

    2014-08-05

    Although there are many well-documented metabolic effects linked to the fructose component of a very high sugar diet, a healthy diet is also likely to contain appreciable fructose, even if confined to that found in fruits and vegetables. These normal levels of fructose are metabolized in specialized pathways that synergize with glucose at several metabolic steps. Glucose potentiates fructose absorption from the gut, while fructose catalyzes glucose uptake and storage in the liver. Fructose accelerates carbohydrate oxidation after a meal. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that fructose may also play a role in the secretion of insulin and GLP-1, and in the maturation of preadipocytes to increase fat storage capacity. Therefore, fructose undergoing its normal metabolism has the interesting property of potentiating the disposal of a dietary carbohydrate load through several routes.

  8. Vitamins and glucose metabolism: The role of static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Lahbib, Aïda; Ghodbane, Soumaya; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2014-12-01

    This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of static magnetic fields (SMF) bioeffects and vitamins and glucose metabolism. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: Static magnetic field and glucose metabolism, static magnetic field and vitamins and the role of vitamins on glucose metabolism. Considering these articles comprehensively, the conclusions are as follows: The primary cause of changes in cells after incubation in external SMF is disruption of free radical metabolism and elevation of their concentration. Such disruption causes oxidative stress leading to an unsteadiness of glucose level and insulin release. Moreover, based on available data, it was concluded that exposure to SMF alters plasma levels of vitamin A, C, D and E; these parameters can take part in disorder of glucose homeostasis and insulin release.

  9. Model-driven multi-omic data analysis elucidates metabolic immunomodulators of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bordbar, Aarash; Mo, Monica L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Jones, Marcus B.; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-06-26

    Macrophages are central players in the immune response, manifesting divergent phenotypes to control inflammation and innate immunity through the release of cytokines and other regulatory factor-dependent signaling pathways. In recent years, the focus on metabolism has been reemphasized as critical signaling and regulatory pathways of human pathophysiology, ranging from cancer to aging, often converge on metabolic responses. Here, we used genome-scale modeling and multi-omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) analysis to assess metabolic features critical for macrophage functions. We constructed a genome-scale metabolic network for the RAW 264.7 cell line to determine metabolic modulators of macrophage activation. Metabolites well-known to be associated with immunoactivation (e.g., glucose and arginine) and immunosuppression (e.g., tryptophan and vitamin D3) were amongst the most critical effectors. Intracellular metabolic mechanisms linked to critical suppressive effectors were then assessed, identifying a suppressive role for de novo nucleotide synthesis. Finally, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of macrophage activation are identified by analyzing multi-omic data obtained from LPS-stimulated RAW cells in the context of our flux-based predictions. Our study demonstrates metabolism's role in regulating activation may be greater than previously anticipated and elucidates underlying metabolic connections between activation and metabolic effectors.

  10. Apollo experience report: Assessment of metabolic expenditures. [extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Hawkins, W. R.; Humbert, G. F.; Nelson, L. J.; Vogel, S. J.; Kuznetz, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A significant effort was made to assess the metabolic expenditure for extravehicular activity on the lunar surface. After evaluation of the real-time data available to the flight controller during extravehicular activity, three independent methods of metabolic assessment were chosen based on the relationship between heart rate and metabolic production, between oxygen consumption and metabolic production, and between the thermodynamics of the liquid-cooled garment and metabolic production. The metabolic assessment procedure is analyzed and discussed. Real-time use of this information by the Apollo flight surgeon is discussed. Results and analyses of the Apollo missions and comments concerning future applications are included.

  11. Metabolically active Crenarchaeota in Altamira Cave.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Juan M; Portillo, M Carmen; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-01-01

    Altamira Cave contains valuable paleolithic paintings dating back to 15,000 years. The conservation of these unique paintings is attracting increasing interest, and so, understanding microbial proliferation in Altamira Cave represents a prioritary objective. Here, we show for the first time that members of the Crenarchaeota were metabolically active components of developing microbial communities. RNA was extracted directly from the studied environment, and a number of 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the low-temperature Crenarchaeota were detected. Although low-temperature Crenarchaeota detected in a variety of ecosystems by using molecular techniques remain uncultured, this RNA-based study confirms an active participation of the Crenarchaeota in cave biogeochemical cycles.

  12. [Relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yao, Chong-hua; Zuo, Hui-juan; Kong, Ling-zhi; Yang, Xiao-guang; Zhai, Feng-ying

    2006-08-15

    To investigate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome (MS). A multi-stage stratified cluster sampling was conducted in 132 sampling 218,920 residents, aged 44.3 +/- 15.3 (15 - 96), in the 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities of the mainland China according to the program of the National Nutrition and Health Survey. Questionnaire survey, interview, physical examination, measurement of biochemical indices, and dietary investigation were done. Information of physical activity and measurement of fasting glucose and/or glucose 2 hours after meal, blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were obtained in 50,494 participants. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Chinese Medical Association's definition. The intensity of physical activity was divided into 3 categories according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of US/American College of Sports Medicine criteria. 50,495 subjects, 23,932 males (47.4%) and 26,562 females (52.6%), were diagnosed as with MS. The MS incidence of those with high intensity of physical activity was lower by 60% in comparison with those with low intensity of physical activity (odds ratio 0.60, 95% CI: 0.362 - 0.443) adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and alcohol intake. The risk of MS in those with moderate intensity of physical activity of 151 - 300 minutes/week was slightly decreased compared to those with moderate intensity of physical activity of 90 - 150 minutes/week, (odds ratio 0.935, 95% CI: 0.685 - 1.277), however, the risk of MS in those with the moderate intensity of physical activity over 300 minutes/week increased slightly (OR = 1.269, 95% CI: 0.923 - 1.745). The risk of MS in those with low-level physical activity of 301 - 420 minutes/week was lower by 35% in comparison with those with the low-level physical activity of 90 - 150 minutes/week (95% CI: 0.451 - 0.933), however, the risk of MS in those with the low-level physical activity over 420

  13. Teaching the role of mitochondrial transport in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Passarella, Salvatore; Atlante, Anna

    2007-03-01

    Studies from our laboratories over recent years have uncovered the existence, and established the properties of a variety of mitochondrial transporters. The properties of these transporters throw light on a variety of biochemical phenomena that were previously poorly understood. In particular the role of mitochondrial transport in energy metabolism has been investigated under a variety of physio-pathological conditions. Consistently we describe the procedure to investigate mitochondrial traffic in isolated mitochondria as a model system for students to learn. Here we report some observations that contribute to novel knowledge of the role of mitochondria in glycolysis, urea and purine nucleotide cycle, and nitrogen metabolism with particular reference to the malate/oxaloacetate shuttle and fumarate, glutamine, and lactate metabolism. Copyright © 2007 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Uniqueness of Entamoeba sulfur metabolism: sulfolipid metabolism that plays pleiotropic roles in the parasitic life cycle.

    PubMed

    Mi-Ichi, Fumika; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2017-09-07

    Sulfur metabolism is ubiquitous and terminally synthesizes various biomolecules that are crucial for organisms, such as sulfur-containing amino acids and co-factors, sulfolipids and sulfated saccharides. Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis, possesses the unique sulfur metabolism features of atypical localization and its terminal product being limited to sulfolipids. Here, we present an overall scheme of E. histolytica sulfur metabolism by relating all sulfotransferases and sulfatases to their substrates and products. Furthermore, a novel sulfur metabolite, fatty alcohol disulfates, was identified and shown to play an important role in trophozoite proliferation. Cholesteryl sulfate, another synthesized sulfolipid, was previously demonstrated to play an important role in encystation, a differentiation process from proliferative trophozoite to dormant cyst. Entamoeba survives by alternating between these two distinct forms; therefore, Entamoeba sulfur metabolism contributes to the parasitic life cycle via its terminal products. Interestingly, this unique feature of sulfur metabolism is not conserved in the nonparasitic close relative of Entamoeba, Mastigamoeba, because lateral gene transfer-mediated acquisition of sulfatases and sulfotransferases, critical enzymes conferring this feature, has only occurred in the Entamoeba lineage. Hence, our findings suggest that sulfolipid metabolism has a causal relationship with parasitism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Micromanaging metabolism-a role for miRNAs in teleost energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Jan A

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein coding RNA sequences, which are found in most eukaryotes. Since their initial discovery, miRNAs have emerged as important regulators of many biological processes. One of the most important processes profoundly regulated by miRNAs is energy metabolism. Traditionally, metabolic functions of miRNAs have been studied in genome-sequenced mammalian organisms, especially the mouse model. However, partially driven by commercial interest in aquaculture, increasingly feasible large-scale molecular techniques have resulted in the characterization of miRNA repertoires, and importantly, several genome sequences of several (commercially important) teleost species, which also hold important roles as research models in the comparative physiology of energy metabolism. This review aims to introduce the recent advances in miRNA research in teleost fish and to describe the current knowledge of miRNA function in teleost energy metabolism. The most pressing research needs and questions to determine metabolic roles of miRNAs in teleost models are presented, as well as applicable technical approaches and current bottlenecks. Rainbow trout, which possess the advantages of newly available molecular tools and a long history as comparative research model in teleost energy metabolism, are discussed as a promising research model to address these questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic pathways in immune cell activation and quiescence.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Erika L; Pearce, Edward J

    2013-04-18

    Studies of immune system metabolism ("immunometabolism") segregate along two paths. The first investigates the effects of immune cells on organs that regulate whole-body metabolism, such as adipose tissue and liver. The second explores the role of metabolic pathways within immune cells and how this regulates immune response outcome. Distinct metabolic pathways diverge and converge at many levels, and, therefore, cells face choices as to how to achieve their metabolic goals. There is interest in fully understanding how and why immune cells commit to particular metabolic fates and in elucidating the immunologic consequences of reaching a metabolic endpoint by one pathway versus another. This is particularly intriguing, given that metabolic commitment is influenced not only by substrate availability but also by signaling pathways elicited by metabolites. Thus, metabolic choices in cells enforce fate and function, and this area will be the subject of this review.

  17. The important role of sleep in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Copinschi, Georges; Leproult, Rachel; Spiegel, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Both reduction in total sleep duration with slow-wave sleep (SWS) largely preserved and alterations of sleep quality (especially marked reduction of SWS) with preservation of total sleep duration are associated with insulin resistance without compensatory increase in insulin secretion, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. When performed under rigorously controlled conditions of energy intake and physical activity, sleep restriction is also associated with a decrease in circulating levels of leptin (an anorexigenic hormone) and an increase in circulating levels of ghrelin (an orexigenic hormone), hunger and appetite. Furthermore, sleep restriction is also associated with a stimulation of brain regions sensitive to food stimuli, indicating that sleep loss may lead to obesity through the selection of high-calorie food. There is also evidence that sleep restriction could provide a permissive environment for the activation of genes that promote obesity. Indeed, the heritability of body mass index is increased in short sleepers. Thus, chronic sleep curtailment, which is on the rise in modern society, including in children, is likely to contribute to the current epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  18. The Role of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Anthelmintic Deactivation and Resistance in Helminths.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Petra; Vokřál, Ivan; Lamka, Jiří; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-06-01

    Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) modulate the biological activity and behavior of many drugs, including anthelmintics. The effects of anthelmintics can often be abolished by XMEs when the drugs are metabolized to an inefficient compound. XMEs therefore play a significant role in anthelmintic efficacy. Moreover, differences in XMEs between helminths are reflected by differences in anthelmintic metabolism between target species. Taking advantage of the newly sequenced genomes of many helminth species, progress in this field has been remarkable. The present review collects up to date information regarding the most important XMEs (phase I and phase II biotransformation enzymes; efflux transporters) in helminths. The participation of these XMEs in anthelmintic metabolism and their possible roles in drug resistance are evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of vascular oxidative stress in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ji-Youn; Siu, Kin Lung; Lob, Heinrich E; Itani, Hana; Harrison, David G; Cai, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is associated with vascular diseases that are often attributed to vascular oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that vascular oxidative stress could induce obesity. We previously developed mice that overexpress p22phox in vascular smooth muscle, tg(sm/p22phox), which have increased vascular ROS production. At baseline, tg(sm/p22phox) mice have a modest increase in body weight. With high-fat feeding, tg(sm/p22phox) mice developed exaggerated obesity and increased fat mass. Body weight increased from 32.16 ± 2.34 g to 43.03 ± 1.44 g in tg(sm/p22phox) mice (vs. 30.81 ± 0.71 g to 37.89 ± 1.16 g in the WT mice). This was associated with development of glucose intolerance, reduced HDL cholesterol, and increased levels of leptin and MCP-1. Tg(sm/p22phox) mice displayed impaired spontaneous activity and increased mitochondrial ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. In mice with vascular smooth muscle-targeted deletion of p22phox (p22phox(loxp/loxp)/tg(smmhc/cre) mice), high-fat feeding did not induce weight gain or leptin resistance. These mice also had reduced T-cell infiltration of perivascular fat. In conclusion, these data indicate that vascular oxidative stress induces obesity and metabolic syndrome, accompanied by and likely due to exercise intolerance, vascular inflammation, and augmented adipogenesis. These data indicate that vascular ROS may play a causal role in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Circadian feeding drive of metabolic activity in adipose tissue and not hyperphagia triggers overweight in mice: is there a role of the pentose-phosphate pathway?

    PubMed

    Stucchi, Paula; Gil-Ortega, Marta; Merino, Beatriz; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Cano, Victoria; Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Somoza, Beatriz; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Argente, Jesús; Valet, Philippe; Chowen, Julie Ann; Fernández-Alfonso, Marisol; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano

    2012-02-01

    High-fat (HF) diets trigger an increase in adipose tissue and body weight (BW) and disordered eating behavior. Our study deals with the hypothesis that circadian distribution of energy intake is more relevant for BW dynamics than diet composition. Four-week-old mice were exposed for 8 wk to a HF diet and compared with animals receiving control chow. HF mice progressively increased BW, decreased the amount of nocturnal (1800-0900 h) calories (energy or food intake) (30%) and increased diurnal (0900-1800 h) caloric intake (energy or food intake), although total daily intake was identical between groups. Animals were killed at 3-h intervals and plasma insulin, leptin, corticosterone, glucose, and fatty acid levels quantified. Adipose tissue was weighed, and enzymatic activities integral to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) assayed in lumbar adipose tissue. Phosphorylated AMP-dependent protein kinase and fatty acid synthase were quantified by Western blotting. In HF mice, there was a shift in the circadian oscillations of plasma parameters together with an inhibition of PPP activity and a decrease in phosphorylated AMP-dependent protein kinase and fatty acid synthase. In a second experiment, HF mice were forced to adhere to a circadian pattern of food intake similar to that in control animals. In this case, BW, adipose tissue, morning plasma parameters and PPP activity appeared to be normal. These data indicate that disordered feeding behavior can trigger BW gain independently of food composition and daily energy intake. Because PPP is the main source of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, we suggest that PPP inhibition might be an early marker of adipose dysfunction in diet-induced obesity.

  1. Role of hydrogen sulfide in skeletal muscle biology and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel endogenous gaseous signal transducer (gasotransmittor). Its emerging role in multiple facets of inter- and intra-cellular signaling as a metabolic, inflammatory, neuro and vascular modulator has been increasingly realized. Although H2S is known for its effects as an anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant molecule, the relevance of these effects in skeletal muscle biology during health and during metabolic syndromes is unclear. H2S has been implicated in vascular relaxation and vessel tone enhancement, which might lead to mitigation of vascular complications caused by the metabolic syndromes. Metabolic complications may also lead to mitochondrial remodeling by interfering with fusion and fission, therefore, leading to mitochondrial mitophagy and skeletal muscle myopathy. Mitochondrial protection by H2S enhancing treatments may mitigate deterioration of muscle function during metabolic syndromes. In addition, H2S might upregulate uncoupling proteins and might also cause browning of white fat, resulting in suppression of imbalanced cytokine signaling caused by abnormal fat accumulation. Likewise, as a source for H+ ions, it has the potential to augment anaerobic ATP synthesis. However, there is a need for studies to test these putative H2S benefits in different patho-physiological scenarios before its full-fledged usage as a therapeutic molecule. The present review highlights current knowledge with regard to exogenous and endogenous H2S roles in skeletal muscle biology, metabolism, exercise physiology and related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, and also provides future directions. PMID:25461301

  2. Role of hydrogen sulfide in skeletal muscle biology and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel endogenous gaseous signal transducer (gasotransmitter). Its emerging role in multiple facets of inter- and intra-cellular signaling as a metabolic, inflammatory, neuro and vascular modulator has been increasingly realized. Although H2S is known for its effects as an anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant molecule, the relevance of these effects in skeletal muscle biology during health and during metabolic syndromes is unclear. H2S has been implicated in vascular relaxation and vessel tone enhancement, which might lead to mitigation of vascular complications caused by the metabolic syndromes. Metabolic complications may also lead to mitochondrial remodeling by interfering with fusion and fission, therefore, leading to mitochondrial mitophagy and skeletal muscle myopathy. Mitochondrial protection by H2S enhancing treatments may mitigate deterioration of muscle function during metabolic syndromes. In addition, H2S might upregulate uncoupling proteins and might also cause browning of white fat, resulting in suppression of imbalanced cytokine signaling caused by abnormal fat accumulation. Likewise, as a source for H(+) ions, it has the potential to augment anaerobic ATP synthesis. However, there is a need for studies to test these putative H2S benefits in different patho-physiological scenarios before its full-fledged usage as a therapeutic molecule. The present review highlights current knowledge with regard to exogenous and endogenous H2S roles in skeletal muscle biology, metabolism, exercise physiology and related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, and also provides future directions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Obesity diabetes and the role of bile acids in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bile acids have many activities over and above their primary function in aiding absorption of fat and fat soluble vitamins. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol, and thus are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Bile acids stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) production in the distal small bowel and colon, stimulating insulin secretion, and therefore, are involved in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Bile acids through their insulin sensitising effect play a part in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Bile acid metabolism is altered in obesity and diabetes. Both dietary restriction and weight loss due to bariatric surgery, alter the lipid carbohydrate and bile acid metabolism. Recent research suggests that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO is a central regulator of bile, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism, but conflicting studies mean that our understanding of the complexity is not yet complete. PMID:28191525

  4. Expanding role of delta-like 4 mediated notch signaling in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Daiju; Aikawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Cardiometabolic disease, a global health threat, has been linked to chronic inflammation, in which activated macrophages play a key role. Macrophages are highly heterogeneous hematopoietic cells found in nearly every tissue in the body. Various stimuli recruit monocytes into the cardiovascular system and metabolic organs, where they differentiate to macrophages, and activate these pro-inflammatory phagocytes, leading to the initiation and development of inflammation in these organs. Key regulators of macrophage activation therefore may serve as therapeutic targets for cardiometabolic disease. The Notch signaling pathway, involving 5 ligands and 4 receptors, regulates the differentiation of various cell types during development, and also contributes to the disease processes in adults. We found that the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (Dll4) activates macrophages in vitro as determined by the induction of genes and pathways associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Our recent study demonstrated in vivo that blockade of Dll4 by a neutralizing antibody attenuates key features typical of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, such as accumulation of activated macrophages in arteries and fat; chronic atherosclerosis; arterial and valvular calcification; insulin resistance; and fatty liver. These results suggest that Dll4-mediated Notch signaling participates in the shared disease mechanisms for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the role of macrophages and Dll4/Notch signaling in the development of inflammation in both the cardiovascular system and metabolic organs. 

  5. The Expanding Role of Delta-like 4 Mediated Notch Signaling in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Daiju; Aikawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Cardiometabolic disease, a global health threat, has been linked to chronic inflammation, in which activated macrophages play a key role. Macrophages are highly heterogeneous hematopoietic cells found in nearly every tissue in the body. Various stimuli recruit monocytes into cardiovascular system and metabolic organs, where they differentiate to macrophages, and activate these pro-inflammatory phagocytes, leading to the initiation and development of inflammation in these organs. Key regulators of macrophage activation therefore may serve as therapeutic targets for the cardiometabolic disease. The Notch signaling pathway, involving five ligands and four receptors, regulates the differentiation of various cell types during development, and also contributes to the disease processes in adults. We found that the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (Dll4) activates macrophages in vitro as determined by the induction of genes and pathways associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Our recent study demonstrated in vivo that blockade of Dll4 by a neutralizing antibody attenuates key features typical of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, such as accumulation of activated macrophages in arteries and fat, chronic atherosclerosis, arterial and valvular calcification, insulin resistance, and fatty liver. These results suggest that Dll4-mediated Notch signaling participates in the shared disease mechanisms for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the role of macrophages and Dll4/Notch signaling in the development of inflammation in both cardiovascular system and metabolic organs. PMID:24025398

  6. Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Drug Metabolism: Beyond a Role as a 
Detoxifying Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the last two steps of purine catabolism in the highest uricotelic primates. XOR is an enzyme with dehydrogenase activity that, in mammals, may be converted into oxidase activity under a variety of pathophysiologic conditions. XOR activity is highly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels and may generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which trigger different consequences, ranging from cytotoxicity to inflammation. The low specificity for substrates allows XOR to metabolize a number of endogenous metabolites and a variety of exogenous compounds, including drugs. The present review focuses on the role of XOR as a drug-metabolizing enzyme, specifically for drugs with anticancer, antimicrobial, antiviral, immunosuppressive or vasodilator activities, as well as drugs acting on metabolism or inducing XOR expression. XOR has an activating role that is essential to the pharmacological action of quinone drugs, cyadox, antiviral nucleoside analogues, allopurinol, nitrate and nitrite. XOR activity has a degradation function toward thiopurine nucleotides, pyrazinoic acid, methylxanthines and tolbutamide, whose half-life may be prolonged by the use of XOR inhibitors. In conclusion, to avoid potential drug interaction risks, such as a toxic excess of drug bioavailability or a loss of drug efficacy, caution is suggested in the use of XOR inhibitors, as in the case of hyperuricemic patients affected by gout or tumor lysis syndrome, when it is necessary to simultaneously administer therapeutic substances that are activated or degraded by the drug-metabolizing activity of XOR. PMID:27458036

  7. [Role of the p53 tumor suppressor in metabolism].

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Le Cam, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is an essential downstream effector of various cellular stress response pathways that is functionally inactivated in most, if not all, tumors. Since its discovery more than 30 years ago, its role in the control of cell proliferation, senescence and cell survival has been widely described. However, growing evidences from several laboratories indicate that p53 has important transcriptional and non-transcriptional functions in the control of metabolism, including the regulation of glycolysis, glutaminolysis or mitochondrial respiration. Originally identified using in vitro cellular models, this previously underestimated role of p53 has been confirmed in vivo in various genetically engineered mouse models. These recent data suggest that p53 functions in various metabolic pathways significantly contribute to its role in adult tissue homeostasis, aging as well as tumor suppression. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  8. Role of sleep quality in the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Dorit; Dumin, Magdalena; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has assigned an important role to sleep as a modulator of metabolic homeostasis. The impact of variations in sleep duration, sleep-disordered breathing, and chronotype to cardiometabolic function encompasses a wide array of perturbations spanning from obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease risk and mortality in both adults and children. Here, we critically and extensively review the published literature on such important issues and provide a comprehensive overview of the most salient pathophysiologic pathways underlying the links between sleep, sleep disorders, and cardiometabolic functioning. PMID:27601926

  9. Requirement of metabolic activation for estrogenic activity of Pueraria mirifica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Park, J S; Cho, S D; Son, J K; Cherdshewasart, W; Kang, K S

    2002-12-01

    A wide range of chemicals derived from plant and human-made xenobiotics are reported to have hormonal activities. The present study was performed to examine the estrogenic effect of Kwao Keur, Pueraria mirifica (PM), that has been used as a rejuvenating folk medicine in Thailand, using recombinant yeast, MCF-7 cell proliferation and HepG2 cell transient transfection assay. In recombinant yeast assay, 0.025, 0.25, 2.5, 25, 2.5 x 10(2), 2.5 x 10(3), 2.5 x 10(4) ng/ml concentrations of PM did not show any estrogenic activities, while 10(-9) of 17 beta-estradiol (positive control) showed high estrogenic activity. Estrogenic activities were induced at 2.5 ng/ml to 25 microg/ml concentrations of PM in a dose-dependent manner on MCF-7 cells and the estrogenic effect of PM was blocked by tamoxifen treatment, a well-known anti-estrogen. PM also showed estrogenic effect on human hepatoma cell line, HepG2 cells, containing estrogen receptor and luciferase reporter gene. Taken together, PM in itself may have no estrogenicity in yeast system, but it has estrogenicity in MCF-7 & HepG2 cells that have human metabolic enzymes. The results indicated that PM may require metabolic activation for estrogenic activity.

  10. Investigation of the role of cytochrome P450 2B4 active site residues in substrate metabolism based on crystal structures of the ligand-bound enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Cynthia E; Kumar, Santosh; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R

    2006-11-01

    Based on the X-ray crystal structures of 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI)- and bifonazole (BIF)-bound P450 2B4, eight active site mutants at six positions were created in an N-terminal modified construct termed 2B4dH and characterized for enzyme inhibition and catalysis. I363A showed a >4-fold decrease in differential inhibition by BIF and 4-CPI (IC(50,BIF)/IC(50,4-CPI)). F296A, T302A, I363A, V367A, and V477A showed a 2-fold decreased k(cat) for 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin O-deethylation, whereas V367A and V477F showed an altered K(m). T302A, V367L, and V477A showed >4-fold decrease in total testosterone hydroxylation, whereas I363A, V367A, and V477F showed altered stereo- and regioselectivity. Interestingly, I363A showed a 150-fold enhanced k(cat)/K(m) with testosterone, and yielded a new metabolite. Furthermore, testosterone docking into three-dimensional models of selected mutants based on the 4-CPI-bound structure suggested a re-positioning of residues 363 and 477 to yield products. In conclusion, our results suggest that the 4-CPI-bound 2B4dH/H226Y crystal structure is an appropriate model for predicting enzyme catalysis.

  11. Regulation of proline metabolism in mycobacteria and its role in carbon metabolism under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Weimar, Marion R; Heikal, Adam; Cook, Gregory M

    2012-05-01

    Genes with a role in proline metabolism are strongly expressed when mycobacterial cells are exposed to nutrient starvation and hypoxia. Here we show that proline metabolism in mycobacteria is mediated by the monofunctional enzymes Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (PruA) and proline dehydrogenase (PruB). Proline metabolism was controlled by a unique membrane-associated DNA-binding protein PruC. Under hypoxia, addition of proline led to higher biomass production than in the absence of proline despite excess carbon and nitrogen. To identify the mechanism responsible for this enhanced growth, microarray analysis of wild-type Mycobacterium smegmatis versus pruC mutant was performed. Expression of the DNA repair machinery and glyoxalases was increased in the pruC mutant. Glyoxalases are proposed to degrade methylglyoxal, a toxic metabolite produced by various bacteria due to an imbalance in intermediary metabolism, suggesting the pruC mutant was under methylglyoxal stress. Consistent with this notion, pruB and pruC mutants were hypersensitive to methylglyoxal. Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate is reported to react with methylglyoxal to form non-toxic 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, thus providing a link between proline metabolism and methylglyoxal detoxification. In support of this mechanism, we show that proline metabolism protects mycobacterial cells from methylglyoxal toxicity and that functional proline dehydrogenase, but not Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, is essential for this protective effect.

  12. Metabolism plays the key roles in Th cells differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, A; Soukhtehzari, S; Ghaedi, M; Mansouri, R

    2016-12-31

    The increasing rate of autoimmunity in recent decades cannot be related to only genetic instabilities and disorders. Diet can directly influence our health. Studies have shown that there is a relationship between nutritional elements and alteration in the immune system. Among immune cells, the function of T lymphocyte is important in directing immune response. T CD4+ cells lead other immune cells to respond to pathogens by secreting cytokines. HIV+ patients, who have largely lost their T CD4+ cells, are susceptible to opportunistic infections, which do not normally affect healthy people. It seems that the metabolism of T cells is critical for their differentiation and their consequent functions. After activation, T cells need to undergo clonal expansion, which is a high energy- consuming process. Studies have shown that specific metabolites deprivation or their excess supply affects T CD4+cells subsets differentiation. Abnormal induction of subsets of T CD4+ cells causes some autoimmunity reactions and hyper-sensitivity as well, which may result from imbalance of diet uptake. In this mini-review, we describe the findings about fatty acids, glucose, amino acids, and vitamins, which are effective in determining the fates of T CD4+ cells. These findings may help us uncover the role of diet in autoimmune diseases.

  13. The role of folate metabolism in orofacial development and clefting.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Stacey E; Kennedy, Allyson E; Wyatt, Brent H; Moore, Alexander D; Pridgen, Deborah E; Cherry, Amanda M; Mavila, Catherine B; Dickinson, Amanda J G

    2015-09-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with numerous diseases and birth defects including orofacial defects. However, whether folate has a role in the face during early orofacial development has been unclear. The present study reveals that pharmacological and antisense oligonucleotide mediated inhibition of DHFR, an integral enzyme in the folate pathway, results in specific changes in the size and shape of the midface and embryonic mouth. Such defects are accompanied by a severe reduction in the muscle and cartilage jaw elements without significant change in neural crest pattern or global levels of methylation. We propose that the orofacial defects associated with DHFR deficient function are the result of decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death via DNA damage. In particular, localized apoptosis may also be depleting the cells of the face that express crucial genes for the differentiation of the jaw structures. Folate supplementation is widely known to reduce human risk for orofacial clefts. In the present study, we show that activating folate metabolism can reduce median oral clefts in the primary palate by increasing cell survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that a minor decrease in DHFR function exacerbates median facial clefts caused by RAR inhibition. This work suggests that folate deficiencies could be a major contributing factor to multifactorial orofacial defects.

  14. The role of folate metabolism in orofacial development and clefting

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Stacey E.; Kennedy, Allyson E.; Wyatt, Brent H.; Moore, Alexander D.; Pridgen, Deborah E.; Cherry, Amanda M.; Mavila, Catherine B.; Dickinson, Amanda J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with numerous diseases and birth defects including orofacial defects. However, whether folate has a role in the face during early orofacial development has been unclear. The present study reveals that pharmacological and antisense oligonucleotide mediated inhibition of DHFR, an integral enzyme in the folate pathway, results in specific changes in the size and shape of the midface and embryonic mouth. Such defects are accompanied by a severe reduction in the muscle and cartilage jaw elements without significant change in neural crest pattern or global levels of methylation. We propose that the orofacial defects associated with DHFR deficient function are the result of decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death via DNA damage. In particular, localized apoptosis may also be depleting the cells of the face that express crucial genes for the differentiation of the jaw structures. Folate supplementation is widely known to reduce human risk for orofacial clefts. In the present study, we show that activating folate metabolism can reduce median oral clefts in the primary palate by increasing cell survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that a minor decrease in DHFR function exacerbates median facial clefts caused by RAR inhibition. This work suggests that folate deficiencies could be a major contributing factor to multifactorial orofacial defects. PMID:26144049

  15. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  16. Evaluation of the Protective Role of Vitamin C on the Metabolic and Enzymatic Activities of the Liver in the Male Rats After Exposure to 2.45 GHz Of Wi-Fi Routers.

    PubMed

    Shekoohi-Shooli, F; Mortazavi, S M J; Shojaei-Fard, M B; Nematollahi, S; Tayebi, M

    2016-09-01

    The use of devices emitted microwave radiation such as mobile phones, wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) routers, etc. is increased rapidly. It has caused a great concern; the researchers should identify its effects on people's health. We evaluated the protective role of Vitamin C on the metabolic and enzymatic activities of the liver after exposure to Wi-Fi routers. 70 male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly divided into 7 groups (10 rats in each group).The first stage one -day test: Group A (received vitamin C 250 mg/kg/day orally together with 8- hour/day Wi-Fi exposure).Group B (exposed to Wi-Fi radiation). Group C (received vitamin C). Group D or Control (was neither exposed to radiation of Wi-Fi modem nor did receive vitamin C). The second phase of experiment had done for five consecutive days. It involved Group E (received vitamin C), Group F (exposed to Wi-Fi radiation), Group G (received vitamin C together with Wi-Fi radiation). The distance between animals' restrainers was 20 cm away from the router antenna. Finally, blood samples were collected and assayed the level of hepatic enzymes including alkaline phosphatase(ALP), alanine amino transferase(ALT) aspartate amino transferase (ASL), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and the concentration of Blood Glucose, Cholesterol , Triglyceride(TG),High density lipoprotein (HDL)and low density lipoprotein (LDL). Data obtained from the One day test showed an increase in concentration of blood glucose, decrease in Triglyceride level and GGT factor (P<0.05), however no observed significant difference on the Cholesterol , HDL , LDL level and hepatic enzymes activities in compare to control group. Groups of the five-day test showed reduction in the amount of blood glucose, elevation of cholesterol level and LDL relative to control group(P<0.05). WiFi exposure may exert alternations on the metabolic parameters and hepatic enzymes activities through stress oxidative and increasing of free radicals, but the use of vitamin

  17. Evaluation of the Protective Role of Vitamin C on the Metabolic and Enzymatic Activities of the Liver in the Male Rats After Exposure to 2.45 GHz Of Wi-Fi Routers

    PubMed Central

    Shekoohi-Shooli, F.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Shojaei-fard, M.B.; Nematollahi, S.; Tayebi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of devices emitted microwave radiation such as mobile phones, wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) routers, etc. is increased rapidly. It has caused a great concern; the researchers should identify its effects on people’s health. We evaluated the protective role of Vitamin C on the metabolic and enzymatic activities of the liver after exposure to Wi-Fi routers. Material and Methods: 70 male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly divided into 7 groups (10 rats in each group).The first stage one -day test: Group A (received vitamin C 250 mg/kg/day orally together with 8- hour/day Wi-Fi exposure).Group B (exposed to Wi-Fi radiation). Group C (received vitamin C). Group D or Control (was neither exposed to radiation of Wi-Fi modem nor did receive vitamin C). The second phase of experiment had done for five consecutive days. It involved Group E (received vitamin C), Group F (exposed to Wi-Fi radiation), Group G (received vitamin C together with Wi-Fi radiation). The distance between animals’ restrainers was 20 cm away from the router antenna. Finally, blood samples were collected and assayed the level of hepatic enzymes including alkaline phosphatase(ALP), alanine amino transferase(ALT) aspartate amino transferase (ASL), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and the concentration of Blood Glucose, Cholesterol , Triglyceride(TG),High density lipoprotein (HDL)and low density lipoprotein (LDL). Results: Data obtained from the One day test showed an increase in concentration of blood glucose, decrease in Triglyceride level and GGT factor (P<0.05), however no observed significant difference on the Cholesterol , HDL , LDL level and hepatic enzymes activities in compare to control group. Groups of the five-day test showed reduction in the amount of blood glucose, elevation of cholesterol level and LDL relative to control group(P<0.05). Conclusion: WiFi exposure may exert alternations on the metabolic parameters and hepatic enzymes activities through stress

  18. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein–protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism. PMID:27559298

  19. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein-protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism.

  20. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    a depth of marine sediment of 500 m, or even beneath a water column of 6 km in surface sediments. This suggests that the metabolic activity of surface microorganisms that receive nutrients through sea water percolation into the deeper parts of the sediment, or that sink with the sediment, may represent a significant fraction of the total activity observed in subsurface environments. The present results indicate also that cells in stationary phase at HHP, which preclude growth, can still have a short-term metabolic activity independent of the growth-related activity. Consequently, surface microorganisms have the ability to impact significantly and rapidly on biogeochemical cycles in deep environments.

  1. Role of glutamine and interlinked asparagine metabolism in vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongling; Vandekeere, Saar; Kalucka, Joanna; Bierhansl, Laura; Zecchin, Annalisa; Brüning, Ulrike; Visnagri, Asjad; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Goveia, Jermaine; Cruys, Bert; Brepoels, Katleen; Wyns, Sabine; Rayport, Stephen; Ghesquière, Bart; Vinckier, Stefan; Schoonjans, Luc; Cubbon, Richard; Dewerchin, Mieke; Eelen, Guy; Carmeliet, Peter

    2017-08-15

    Endothelial cell (EC) metabolism is emerging as a regulator of angiogenesis, but the precise role of glutamine metabolism in ECs is unknown. Here, we show that depriving ECs of glutamine or inhibiting glutaminase 1 (GLS1) caused vessel sprouting defects due to impaired proliferation and migration, and reduced pathological ocular angiogenesis. Inhibition of glutamine metabolism in ECs did not cause energy distress, but impaired tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle anaplerosis, macromolecule production, and redox homeostasis. Only the combination of TCA cycle replenishment plus asparagine supplementation restored the metabolic aberrations and proliferation defect caused by glutamine deprivation. Mechanistically, glutamine provided nitrogen for asparagine synthesis to sustain cellular homeostasis. While ECs can take up asparagine, silencing asparagine synthetase (ASNS, which converts glutamine-derived nitrogen and aspartate to asparagine) impaired EC sprouting even in the presence of glutamine and asparagine. Asparagine further proved crucial in glutamine-deprived ECs to restore protein synthesis, suppress ER stress, and reactivate mTOR signaling. These findings reveal a novel link between endothelial glutamine and asparagine metabolism in vessel sprouting. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. The role of interleukin-18 in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trøseid, Marius; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Arnesen, Harald

    2010-03-23

    The metabolic syndrome is thought to be associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation, and a growing body of evidence suggests that interleukin-18 (IL-18) might be closely related to the metabolic syndrome and its consequences. Circulating levels of IL-18 have been reported to be elevated in subjects with the metabolic syndrome, to be closely associated with the components of the syndrome, to predict cardiovascular events and mortality in populations with the metabolic syndrome and to precede the development of type 2 diabetes. IL-18 is found in the unstable atherosclerotic plaque, in adipose tissue and in muscle tissue, and is subject to several regulatory steps including cleavage by caspase-1, inactivation by IL-18 binding protein and the influence of other cytokines in modulating its interaction with the IL-18 receptor. The purpose of this review is to outline the role of IL-18 in the metabolic syndrome, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular risk and the potential effect of life style interventions.

  3. [Metabolism inhibition stimulates, metabolism activation inhibits cancerogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene in mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Il'nitskaia, S I

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol, an inhibitor of metabolic activation of aminoazo dyes was administered to suckling mice prior to o-aminoazotoluene (OAT). It was followed by formation of numerous preneoplastic nodules and tumors in the lungs and liver. At the same time, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine treatment decreased their number in the liver while slightly increasing them in the lung. A possible mechanism of aminoazo dye carcinogenicity is suggested.

  4. The role of estrogen in adipose tissue metabolism: insights into glucose homeostasis regulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Cho, Hyung Taek; Kim, Young Jun

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an organ with active endocrine function involved in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis via multiple metabolic signaling pathways targeting the brain, liver, skeletal muscle, pancreas, and other organs. There is increasing evidence demonstrating that the female sex hormone, estrogen, regulates adipose development and improves systemic glucose homeostasis in both males and females. The underlying mechanism linking estrogenic regulation in adipose tissue and systemic glucose metabolism has not been fully elucidated, but is thought to include interactions of estrogen receptor signaling events involving lipolytic and/or lipogenic enzyme activity, free fatty acid metabolism, and adipocytokine production. Thus, understanding the effects of estrogen replacement on adipose tissue biology and metabolism is important in determining the risk of developing obesity-related metabolic disorders in patients undergoing treatment for sex hormone deficiency. In this report, we review literature regarding the role of estrogens and their corresponding receptors in the control of adipose metabolism and glucose homeostasis in both rodents and humans. We also discuss the effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators on glucose metabolism.

  5. The role of depressed metabolism in space biology: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J.

    1973-01-01

    Organization and research activities of the entire NASA Space Biology Program are outlined. Various technical approaches are reported to study depressed metabolism particularly in the situation of 100% oxygen and reduced ambient pressures. These include hibernation and hypothermia, thermal regulation, and diluent gases.

  6. The Roles of Vitamin A in the Regulation of Carbohydrate, Lipid, and Protein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Guoxun

    2014-01-01

    Currently, two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese. This high prevalence of overweight/obesity negatively affects the health of the population, as obese individuals tend to develop several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Due to obesity’s impact on health, medical costs, and longevity, the rise in the number of obese people has become a public health concern. Both genetic and environmental/dietary factors play a role in the development of metabolic diseases. Intuitively, it seems to be obvious to link over-nutrition to the development of obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Dietary nutrients not only provide energy derived from macronutrients, but also factors such as micronutrients with regulatory roles. How micronutrients, such as vitamin A (VA; retinol), regulate macronutrient homeostasis is still an ongoing research topic. As an essential micronutrient, VA plays a key role in the general health of an individual. This review summarizes recent research progress regarding VA’s role in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. Due to the large amount of information regarding VA functions, this review focusses on metabolism in metabolic active organs and tissues. Additionally, some perspectives for future studies will be provided. PMID:26237385

  7. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children. PMID:27244776

  8. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M; Rastogi, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children.

  9. Melatonin and its possible role in mediating seasonal metabolic changes of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Pape, Carsten; Teschke, Mathias; Meyer, Bettina

    2008-04-01

    Melatonin, the chief secretory product of the vertebrate pineal gland is suspected to be a ubiquitous molecule principally involved in the transduction of photoperiodic information. Besides vertebrates, melatonin has been detected throughout phylogeny in numerous non-vertebrate taxa. In the present study, the occurrence of melatonin in Antarctic krill Euphausia superba and its possible role in mediating seasonal metabolic changes was evaluated. Melatonin was quantified by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purified extracts of eyestalks and hemolymph of krill sampled in the Lazarev Sea during the Antarctic winter and summer. In addition, oxygen uptake rates and the activities of the metabolic enzyme malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were recorded to assess the metabolic status of krill. Validation of melatonin measurements was carried out on the basis of three different extraction methods with parallel determination of melatonin by ELISA in crude extracts and in HPLC purified extracts, and after derivatization of melatonin under alkaline conditions in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A significantly higher respiration rate and MDH activity was found in summer krill than in winter krill indicating that krill was in a state of reduced metabolic activity during winter. However, neither during winter nor during summer there were detectable melatonin concentrations in the visual system or hemolymph of krill. Based on these results, we question a mediating role of melatonin in the control of seasonal metabolic changes in Antarctic krill.

  10. Metabolic activity of subsurface life in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Steven; Rutherford, Scott; Spivack, Arthur J

    2002-03-15

    Global maps of sulfate and methane in marine sediments reveal two provinces of subsurface metabolic activity: a sulfate-rich open-ocean province, and an ocean-margin province where sulfate is limited to shallow sediments. Methane is produced in both regions but is abundant only in sulfate-depleted sediments. Metabolic activity is greatest in narrow zones of sulfate-reducing methane oxidation along ocean margins. The metabolic rates of subseafloor life are orders of magnitude lower than those of life on Earth's surface. Most microorganisms in subseafloor sediments are either inactive or adapted for extraordinarily low metabolic activity.

  11. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  12. Role of the Transforming Growth Factor-β in regulating hepatocellular carcinoma oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soukupova, Jitka; Malfettone, Andrea; Hyroššová, Petra; Hernández-Alvarez, María-Isabel; Peñuelas-Haro, Irene; Bertran, Esther; Junza, Alexandra; Capellades, Jordi; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Yanes, Oscar; Zorzano, Antonio; Perales, José Carlos; Fabregat, Isabel

    2017-10-02

    Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) induces tumor cell migration and invasion. However, its role in inducing metabolic reprogramming is poorly understood. Here we analyzed the metabolic profile of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells that show differences in TGF-β expression. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), extracellular acidification rate (ECAR), metabolomics and transcriptomics were performed. Results indicated that the switch from an epithelial to a mesenchymal/migratory phenotype in HCC cells is characterized by reduced mitochondrial respiration, without significant differences in glycolytic activity. Concomitantly, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis and biosynthetic use of TCA metabolites were proved through analysis of metabolite levels, as well as metabolic fluxes from U-13C6-Glucose and U-13C5-Glutamine. This correlated with increase in glutaminase 1 (GLS1) expression, whose inhibition reduced cell migration. Experiments where TGF-β function was activated with extracellular TGF-β1 or inhibited through TGF-β receptor I silencing showed that TGF-β induces a switch from oxidative metabolism, coincident with a decrease in OCR and the upregulation of glutamine transporter Solute Carrier Family 7 Member 5 (SLC7A5) and GLS1. TGF-β also regulated the expression of key genes involved in the flux of glycolytic intermediates and fatty acid metabolism. Together, these results indicate that autocrine activation of the TGF-β pathway regulates oxidative metabolism in HCC cells.

  13. Dual Role of Arginine Metabolism in Establishing Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential. PMID:26610300

  14. Dual role of arginine metabolism in establishing pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Mayuri; Datey, Akshay; Wilson, Keith T; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-02-01

    Arginine is an integral part of host defense when invading pathogens are encountered. The arginine metabolite nitric oxide (NO) confers antimicrobial properties, whereas the metabolite ornithine is utilized for polyamine synthesis. Polyamines are crucial to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory responses. iNOS/arginase balance can determine Th1/Th2 response. Furthermore, the host arginine pool and its metabolites are utilized as energy sources by various pathogens. Apart from its role as an immune modulator, recent studies have also highlighted the therapeutic effects of arginine. This article sheds light upon the roles of arginine metabolism during pathological conditions and its therapeutic potential.

  15. Role of Sirtuins in Linking Metabolic Syndrome with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Kim, Jongpil

    2016-01-01

    Depression is now widely regarded as a common disabling disorder that affects negatively the social functioning all over the world. Depression is associated with diverse phenomenon in brain such as neuroinflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and cognitive deficit. Recent studies reported that depression occurs by various metabolic changes, leading to metabolic syndrome. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylases, known to regulate diverse biological mechanism such as longevity, genomic stability, and inflammation. The modulation of sirtuin activity has been highlighted as a promising approach to reduce neurodegenerative processes. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries regarding the potential relationship between SIRTs and depression caused by metabolic disorders (Mets). Ultimately, we suggest the possibility that SIRTs will be novel targets to alleviate neuropathogenesis induced by depression. PMID:27065808

  16. Comparing and Contrasting the Roles of AMPK and SIRT1 in Metabolic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fulco, Marcella; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2008-01-01

    The ability to adapt and respond to nutrients is an ancient cellular function, conserved from unicellular to the most complex multicellular organisms, including mammals. Mammals adapt to changes in nutritional status through the modulation of tissue-specific metabolic pathways so as to maintain energy homeostasis. At least two proteins are activated in response to reduced nutrient availability: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1. AMPK functions as a sensor of cellular energy status and as a master regulator of metabolism. When ATP levels decrease, AMPK is activated to boost ATP production and to inhibit ATP usage, thus restoring energy balance. Similarly, SIRT1 is activated in response to changes in the energy status to promote transcription of genes that mediate the metabolic response to stress, starvation, or calorie restriction. Several observations support a model where, in response to stress and reduced nutrients, a metabolic pathway is activated within which AMPK and SIRT1 concordantly function to ensure an appropriate cellular response and adaptation to environmental modifications. In this perspective, we compare and contrast the roles of SIRT1 and AMPK in several metabolic tissues and propose a working model of how the AMPK-SIRT1 axis may be regulated to control functions relevant to organismal physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:19029811

  17. Role of aquaglyceroporins and caveolins in energy and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Rodríguez, Amaia; Balaguer, Inmaculada; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-11-01

    Aquaglyceroporins and caveolins are submicroscopic integral membrane proteins that are particularly abundant in many mammalian cells. Aquaglyceroporins (AQP3, AQP7, AQP9 and AQP10) encompass a subfamily of aquaporins that allow the movement of water, but also of small solutes, such as glycerol, across cell membranes. Glycerol constitutes an important metabolite as a substrate for de novo synthesis of triacylglycerols and glucose as well as an energy substrate to produce ATP via the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In this sense, the control of glycerol influx/efflux in metabolic organs by aquaglyceroporins plays a crucial role with the dysregulation of these glycerol channels being associated with metabolic diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiac hypertrophy. On the other hand, caveolae have emerged as relevant plasma membrane sensors implicated in a wide range of cellular functions, including endocytosis, apoptosis, cholesterol homeostasis, proliferation and signal transduction. Caveolae-coating proteins, namely caveolins and cavins, can act as scaffolding proteins within caveolae by concentrating signaling molecules involved in free fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, proliferation, insulin signaling or vasorelaxation, among others. The importance of caveolae in whole-body homeostasis is highlighted by the link between homozygous mutations in genes encoding caveolins and cavins with metabolic diseases, such as lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, muscular dystrophy and insulin resistance in rodents and humans. The present review focuses on the role of aquaglyceroporins and caveolins on lipid and glucose metabolism, insulin secretion and signaling, energy production and cardiovascular homeostasis, outlining their potential relevance in the development and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  18. Role of Plasma Phospholipid Transfer Protein in Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Albers, John J.; Vuletic, Simona; Cheung, Marian C.

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of PLTP has greatly increased since the discovery of PLTP more than a quarter of century ago. A comprehensive review of PLTP is presented on the following topics: PLTP gene organization and structure; PLTP transfer properties; different forms of PLTP; characteristics of plasma PLTP complexes; relationship of plasma PLTP activity, mass and specific activity with lipoprotein and metabolic factors; role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism; PLTP and reverse cholesterol transport; insights from studies of PLTP variants; insights of PLTP from animal studies; PLTP and atherosclerosis; PLTP and signal transduction; PLTP in the brain; and PLTP in human disease. PLTP's central role in lipoprotein metabolism and lipid transport in the vascular compartment has been firmly established. However, more studies are needed to further delineate PLTP's functions in specific tissues, such as the lung, brain and adipose tissue. Furthermore, the specific role that PLTP plays in human diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, or neurodegenerative disease, remains to be clarified. Exciting directions for future research include evaluation of PLTP's physiological relevance in intracellular lipid metabolism and signal transduction, which undoubtedly will advance our knowledge of PLTP functions in health and disease. PMID:21736953

  19. Activity of isosteviol lactone on mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Braguini, Welligton L; Gomes, Maria A Biazon; de Oliveira, Brás H; Carnieri, Eva G S; Rocha, Maria Eliane M; de Oliveira, Maria Benigna M

    2003-06-05

    Isosteviol lactone (LAC), a lactone derivative of the diterpenic acid isosteviol (ISO) was evaluated for its effect on the oxidative metabolism of mitochondria isolated from rat liver. In this model, LAC (1 mM) depressed the phosphorylation efficiency, as shown by the decreased respiratory control coefficient (RCC) and ADP/O ratio. LAC (1 mM) inhibited NADH oxidase (45%), succinate oxidase (34%) and promoted low-level inhibitions on succinate dehydrogenase (13%), succinate-cytochrome c oxide-reductase (23%), cytochrome c oxidase (10%), and NADH dehydrogenase (13%). Glutamate dehydrogenase was also a target for LAC, as it was 85% inhibited by 1 mM LAC. Cyclic voltammetry data showed that LAC, as well as ISO, does not undergo redox reactions under current experimental conditions. LAC (0.05-0.75 mM) inhibited the swelling dependent on the glutamate oxidation, 50% of the effect occurring at 0.5 mM LAC. Swelling supported by KNO(3) and valinomycin was also inhibited over all concentrations used of LAC and ISO, the effect being of a lower intensity for LAC, suggesting that the modification of the structure of ISO by lactonization diminished its interaction with the membrane. This could contribute to attenuation of the toxic effects described for ISO on mitochondrial function, such as those on respiratory chain enzymatic complexes and phosphorylating activity.

  20. Regulation of Ketone Body Metabolism and the Role of PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Dean, Matthew; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketogenesis and ketolysis are central metabolic processes activated during the response to fasting. Ketogenesis is regulated in multiple stages, and a nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is one of the key transcription factors taking part in this regulation. PPARα is an important element in the metabolic network, where it participates in signaling driven by the main nutrient sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and induces hormonal mediators, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). This work describes the regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis in normal and malignant cells and briefly summarizes the positive effects of ketone bodies in various neuropathologic conditions. PMID:27983603

  1. Regulation of Ketone Body Metabolism and the Role of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Dean, Matthew; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-12-13

    Ketogenesis and ketolysis are central metabolic processes activated during the response to fasting. Ketogenesis is regulated in multiple stages, and a nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is one of the key transcription factors taking part in this regulation. PPARα is an important element in the metabolic network, where it participates in signaling driven by the main nutrient sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and induces hormonal mediators, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). This work describes the regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis in normal and malignant cells and briefly summarizes the positive effects of ketone bodies in various neuropathologic conditions.

  2. Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Alicia A; Schlaich, Markus P

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic tone is well recognised as being implicit in cardiovascular control. It is less readily acknowledged that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is integral in energy homeostasis and can exert profound metabolic effects. Accumulating data from animal and human studies suggest that central sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in the aetiology and complications of several metabolic conditions that can cluster to form the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Given the known augmented risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality associated with the MetS understanding the complex pathways underlying the metabolic derangements involved has become a priority. Many factors have been proposed to contribute to increased sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic abnormalities including obesity, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and elevated adipokine levels. Furthermore there is mounting evidence to suggest that chronic sympathetic overactivity can potentiate two of the key metabolic alterations of the MetS, central obesity and insulin resistance. This review will discuss the regulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system in metabolic control and the proposed pathophysiology linking sympathetic overactivity to metabolic abnormalities. Pharmacological and device-based approaches that target central sympathetic drive will also be discussed as possible therapeutic options to improve metabolic control in at-risk patient cohorts.

  3. Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Alicia A.; Schlaich, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic tone is well recognised as being implicit in cardiovascular control. It is less readily acknowledged that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is integral in energy homeostasis and can exert profound metabolic effects. Accumulating data from animal and human studies suggest that central sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in the aetiology and complications of several metabolic conditions that can cluster to form the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Given the known augmented risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality associated with the MetS understanding the complex pathways underlying the metabolic derangements involved has become a priority. Many factors have been proposed to contribute to increased sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic abnormalities including obesity, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and elevated adipokine levels. Furthermore there is mounting evidence to suggest that chronic sympathetic overactivity can potentiate two of the key metabolic alterations of the MetS, central obesity and insulin resistance. This review will discuss the regulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system in metabolic control and the proposed pathophysiology linking sympathetic overactivity to metabolic abnormalities. Pharmacological and device-based approaches that target central sympathetic drive will also be discussed as possible therapeutic options to improve metabolic control in at-risk patient cohorts. PMID:26064978

  4. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-09-15

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability.

  5. Connecting metabolism and reproduction: roles of central energy sensors and key molecular mediators.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that pubertal activation of the reproductive axis and maintenance of fertility are critically dependent on the magnitude of body energy reserves and the metabolic state of the organism. Hence, conditions of impaired energy homeostasis often result in deregulation of puberty and reproduction, whereas gonadal dysfunction can be associated with the worsening of the metabolic profile and, eventually, changes in body weight. While much progress has taken place in our knowledge about the neuroendocrine mechanisms linking metabolism and reproduction, our understanding of how such dynamic interplay happens is still incomplete. As paradigmatic example, much has been learned in the last two decades on the reproductive roles of key metabolic hormones (such as leptin, insulin and ghrelin), their brain targets and the major transmitters and neuropeptides involved. Yet, the molecular mechanisms whereby metabolic information is translated and engages into the reproductive circuits remain largely unsolved. In this work, we will summarize recent developments in the characterization of the putative central roles of key cellular energy sensors, such as mTOR, in this phenomenon, and will relate these with other molecular mechanisms likely contributing to the brain coupling of energy balance and fertility. In doing so, we aim to provide an updated view of an area that, despite still underdeveloped, may be critically important to fully understand how reproduction and metabolism are tightly connected in health and disease.

  6. The role of testosterone in the metabolic syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Saad, Farid; Gooren, Louis

    2009-03-01

    Over the last three decades it has become apparent that testosterone plays a significant role in the maintenance of bone and muscle mass, in erythropoiesis, and in mental functions. But testosterone is also a key player in glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of risk factors predisposing to late onset diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The main components of the syndrome are visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, raised blood pressure and dyslipidaemia (elevated triglycerides, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol),and a pro-inflammatory and thrombogenic state. Cross-sectional epidemiological studies have reported a direct correlation between plasma testosterone and insulin sensitivity, and low testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, dramatically illustrated by androgen deprivation in men with prostate carcinoma. Lower total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin(SHBG) predict a higher incidence of the metabolic syndrome. There is now evidence to argue that hypotestosteronaemia should be an element in the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Administration of testosterone to hypogonadal men reverses the unfavorable risk profile for the development of diabetes and atherosclerosis. Testosterone should be regarded as a pivotal hormone for men's health.

  7. Role of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase in Carcinogen and Chemotherapeutic Drug Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, B; Falkner, K Cameron; Cave, Matt C; Prough, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide insight into which human cytochromes P450 (CYPs) may be involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens and anticancer drugs. A historical overview of this field and the development of literature using relevant animal models and expressed human CYPs have provided information about which specific CYPs may be involved in carcinogen metabolism. Definition of the biochemical properties of CYP activity came from several groups who studied the reaction stoichiometry of butter yellow and benzo[α]pyrene, including their role in induction of these enzyme systems. This chapter will list as much as is known about the human CYPs involved in carcinogen and anticancer drug metabolism, as well as summarize studies with rodent CYPs. A review of three major classes of anticancer drugs and their metabolism in humans is covered for cyclophosphamide, procarbazine, and anthracycline antibiotics, cancer chemotherapeutic compounds extensively metabolized by CYPs. The emerging information about human CYP gene polymorphisms as well as other enzymes involved in foreign compound metabolism provides considerable information about how these genetic variants affect carcinogen and anticancer drug metabolism. With information available from individual's genomic sequences, consideration of populations who may be at risk due to environmental exposure to carcinogens or how to optimize their cancer therapy regimens to enhance efficacy of the anticancer drugs appears to be an important field of study to benefit individuals in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Minireview: Roles of Fibroblast Growth Factors 19 and 21 in Metabolic Regulation and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fangfang; Yu, Lechu; Lin, Xiufei; Cheng, Peng; He, Luqing; Li, Xiaokun; Lu, Xuemian; Tan, Yi; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19 and FGF21 are hormones that regulate metabolic processes particularly during feeding or starvation, thus ultimately influencing energy production. FGF19 is secreted by the intestines during feeding and negatively regulates bile acid synthesis and secretion, whereas FGF21 is produced in the liver during fasting and plays a crucial role in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as maintaining energy homeostasis. FGF19 and FGF21 are regarded as late-acting hormones because their functions are only used after insulin and glucagon have completed their actions. Although FGF19 and FGF21 are activated under different conditions, they show extensively functional overlap in terms of improving glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, weight loss, and lipid, and energy metabolism, particularly in pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular and renal diseases. Most patients with these metabolic diseases exhibit reduced serum FGF19 levels, which might contribute to its etiology. In addition, the simultaneous increase in serum FGF21 levels is likely a compensatory response to reduced FGF19 levels, and the 2 proteins concertedly maintain metabolic homeostasis. Here, we review the physiological and pharmacological cross talk between FGF19 and FGF21 in relation to the regulation of endocrine metabolism and various chronic diseases. PMID:26308386

  9. Physical activity patterns and metabolic syndrome in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Hastert, Theresa A; Gong, Jian; Campos, Hannia; Baylin, Ana

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether total physical activity or activity patterns are associated with metabolic syndrome and its components. Participants include 1994 controls from a case-control study of non-fatal myocardial infarction in Costa Rica (1994-2004). Physical activity was assessed via self-administered questionnaire and patterns were identified using principal components analysis. Metabolic syndrome was assessed via blood samples and anthropometry measurements from in-home study visits. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using log binomial regression. Adjusted least squares means of metabolic syndrome components were calculated by quintile of total activity and pattern scores. Four activity patterns were identified: rest/sleep, agricultural, light indoor activity, and manual labor. Total activity was not associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was 20% lower in participants with the highest scores on the agricultural job pattern compared to those with the lowest (PR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.68-0.94). Higher total activity was associated with lower triglycerides and lower HDL cholesterol. Higher scores on each pattern were inversely associated with metabolic syndrome components, particularly waist circumference and fasting blood glucose. Patterns or types of physical activity may be more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome and its components than total activity levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical activity patterns and metabolic syndrome in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Hastert, Theresa A.; Gong, Jian; Campos, Hannia; Baylin, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether total physical activity or activity patterns are associated with metabolic syndrome and its components. Methods Participants include 1,994 controls from a case-control study of non-fatal myocardial infarction in Costa Rica (1994–2004). Physical activity was assessed via self-administered questionnaire and patterns were identified using principal components analysis. Metabolic syndrome was assessed via blood samples and anthropometry measurements from in-home study visits. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using log binomial regression. Adjusted least squares means of metabolic syndrome components were calculated by quintile of total activity and pattern scores. Results Four activity patterns were identified: rest/sleep, agricultural, light indoor activity, and manual labor. Total activity was not associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was 20% lower in participants with the highest scores on the agricultural job pattern compared to those with the lowest (PR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.68–0.94). Higher total activity was associated with lower triglycerides and lower HDL cholesterol. Higher scores on each pattern were inversely associated with metabolic syndrome components, particularly waist circumference and fasting blood glucose. Conclusions Patterns or types of physical activity may be more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome and its components than total activity levels. PMID:25445330

  11. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants.Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis.

  12. Regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and activation by glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ghazwani, Mohammed; Liu, Ke; Huang, Yixian; Chang, Na; Fan, Jie; He, Fengtian; Li, Liying; Bu, Shizhong; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao; Li, Song

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, which is mainly caused by accumulation of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The mechanisms of activation and proliferation of HSCs, two key events after liver damage, have been studied for many years. Here we report a novel pathway to control HSCs by regulating glutamine metabolism. We demonstrated that the proliferation of HSCs is critically dependent on glutamine that is used to generate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and non-essential amino acid (NEAA). In addition, both culture- and in vivo-activated HSCs have increased glutamine utilization and increased expression of genes related to glutamine metabolism, including GLS (glutaminase), aspartate transaminase (GOT1) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1). Inhibition of these enzymes, as well as glutamine depletion, had a significant inhibitory effect on HSCs activation. In addition to providing energy expenditure, conversion of glutamine to proline is enhanced. The pool of free proline may also be increased via downregulation of POX expression. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in the regulation of glutamine metabolism, as well as TGF-β1, c-Myc, and Ras signalings, via transcriptional upregulation and repression of key metabolic enzymes in this pathway. Finally, changes in glutamine metabolism were also found in mouse liver tissue following CCl4-induced acute injury. Glutamine metabolism plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and activation of HSCs. Strategies that are targeted at glutamine metabolism may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  13. Role of PKCδ in Insulin Sensitivity and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyao; Vienberg, Sara G.; Bezy, Olivier; O’Neill, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)δ has been shown to be increased in liver in obesity and plays an important role in the development of hepatic insulin resistance in both mice and humans. In the current study, we explored the role of PKCδ in skeletal muscle in the control of insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism by generating mice in which PKCδ was deleted specifically in muscle using Cre-lox recombination. Deletion of PKCδ in muscle improved insulin signaling in young mice, especially at low insulin doses; however, this did not change glucose tolerance or insulin tolerance tests done with pharmacological levels of insulin. Likewise, in young mice, muscle-specific deletion of PKCδ did not rescue high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance or glucose intolerance. However, with an increase in age, PKCδ levels in muscle increased, and by 6 to 7 months of age, muscle-specific deletion of PKCδ improved whole-body insulin sensitivity and muscle insulin resistance and by 15 months of age improved the age-related decline in whole-body glucose tolerance. At 15 months of age, M-PKCδKO mice also exhibited decreased metabolic rate and lower levels of some proteins of the OXPHOS complex suggesting a role for PKCδ in the regulation of mitochondrial mass at older age. These data indicate an important role of PKCδ in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial homeostasis in skeletal muscle with aging. PMID:26307588

  14. Neural activity triggers neuronal oxidative metabolism followed by astrocytic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Kasischke, Karl A; Vishwasrao, Harshad D; Fisher, Patricia J; Zipfel, Warren R; Webb, Watt W

    2004-07-02

    We have found that two-photon fluorescence imaging of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) provides the sensitivity and spatial three-dimensional resolution to resolve metabolic signatures in processes of astrocytes and neurons deep in highly scattering brain tissue slices. This functional imaging reveals spatiotemporal partitioning of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism between astrocytes and neurons during focal neural activity that establishes a unifying hypothesis for neurometabolic coupling in which early oxidative metabolism in neurons is eventually sustained by late activation of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle. Our model integrates existing views of brain energy metabolism and is in accord with known macroscopic physiological changes in vivo.

  15. Evidence for metabolic activity of airborne bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatigny, M. A.; Wolochow, H.

    1974-01-01

    Aerosols of the bacterium Serratia marcescens, and of uniformly labeled C-14 glucose were produced simultaneously and mixed in tubing leading to an aerosol chamber. During a subsequent period of about 5 hrs, carbon dioxide was produced metabolically within the chamber, and labeled material incorporated within the suspended particles first increased then decreased. This constitutes the first direct evidence of microbial metabolism of bacteria suspended in the air.

  16. Review of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells as determined through isotopic labeling and network analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wentao; Keibler, Mark A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-02-10

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an indispensable part of contemporary cancer research. During the past 10 years, the use of stable isotopic tracers and network analysis have unveiled a number of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells. Here, we review such pathways along with the particular tracers and labeling observations that led to the discovery of their rewiring in cancer cells. The list of such pathways comprises the reductive metabolism of glutamine, altered glycolysis, serine and glycine metabolism, mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) induced reprogramming and the onset of acetate metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate the critical role of isotopic labeling and network analysis in identifying these pathways. The alterations described in this review do not constitute a complete list, and future research using these powerful tools is likely to discover other cancer-related pathways and new metabolic targets for cancer therapy.

  17. Metabolic problems in northeastern Thailand: possible role of vanadium.

    PubMed

    Sitprija, V; Tungsanga, K; Tosukhowong, P; Leelhaphunt, N; Kruerklai, D; Sriboonlue, P; Saew, O

    1993-01-01

    Common metabolic problems in northeastern Thailand include renal stone disease, distal renal tubular acidosis, hypokalemic periodic paralysis, sudden unexplained nocturnal death and malnutrition-related diabetes mellitus. There is evidence of decreased activity of Na,K-ATPase and H,K-ATPase. A preliminary study was made of the vanadium concentration in the soil and water in northeastern Thailand. The urinary and tissue vanadium concentrations were also determined in the northeastern villagers. The soil was found to have high vanadium content. The vanadium content was also high in the urine, kidneys and lungs of the villagers. It is postulated that these metabolic problems are attributed to the inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and H,K-ATPase activity by vanadium.

  18. Role of interleukins in obesity: implications for metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Febbraio, Mark A

    2014-06-01

    It has been two decades since the discovery that pro-inflammatory cytokines are expressed in obesity. This initial work was the catalyst for the now-accepted paradigm that nutrient overload promotes inflammation and links the metabolic and immune systems, where inflammation may be pathological. However, inflammation is an adaptive and, importantly, an energy-consuming process. Indeed, the rapid mobilization of stored energy reserves by cytokines such as the interleukins, is critical to mounting any successful inflammatory response. Thus, the role of the interleukins in metabolism and energy homeostasis is more complex than first thought and recent evidence is mounting that, for several interleukins, although excess production is negative, blockade or insufficiency is equally undesirable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MicroRNA in Metabolic Re-Programming and Their Role in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Marco; Amati, Monica; Santarelli, Lory; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    The process of metabolic re-programing is linked to the activation of oncogenes and/or suppression of tumour suppressor genes, which are regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). The interplay between oncogenic transformation-driven metabolic re-programming and modulation of aberrant miRNAs further established their critical role in the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer by creating a tumorigenesis-prone microenvironment, thus orchestrating processes of evasion to apoptosis, angiogenesis and invasion/migration, as well metastasis. Given the involvement of miRNAs in tumour development and their global deregulation, they may be perceived as biomarkers in cancer of therapeutic relevance. PMID:27213336

  20. Ornithine and its role in metabolic diseases: An appraisal.

    PubMed

    Sivashanmugam, Muthukumaran; J, Jaidev; V, Umashankar; K N, Sulochana

    2017-02-01

    Ornithine is a non-essential amino acid produced as an intermediate molecule in urea cycle. It is a key substrate for the synthesis of proline, polyamines and citrulline. Ornithine also plays an important role in the regulation of several metabolic processes leading to diseases like hyperorithinemia, hyperammonemia, gyrate atrophy and cancer in humans. However, the mechanism of action behind the multi-faceted roles of ornithine is yet to be unraveled completely. Several types of cancers are also characterized by excessive polyamine synthesis from ornithine by different rate limiting enzymes. Hence, in this review we aim to provide extensive insights on potential roles of ornithine in many of the disease related cellular processes and also on the structural features of ornithine interacting proteins, enabling development of therapeutic modalities.

  1. Role of Nuclear Receptor SHP in Metabolism and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Wang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0B2) is a unique member of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that contains the dimerization and ligand-binding domain found in other family members, but lacks the conserved DNA binding domain. The ability of SHP to bind directly to multiple NRs is crucial for its physiological function as a transcriptional inhibitor of gene expression. A wide variety of interacting partners for SHP have been identified, indicating the potential for SHP to regulate an array of genes in different biological pathways. In this review, we summarize studies concerning the structure and target genes of SHP and discuss recent progress in understanding the function of SHP in bile acid, cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and drug metabolism. In addition, we review the regulatory role of SHP in microRNA (miRNA) regulation, liver fibrosis and cancer progression. The fact that SHP controls a complex set of genes in multiple metabolic pathways suggests the intriguing possibility of developing new therapeutics for metabolic diseases, including fatty liver, dyslipidemia and obesity, by regulating SHP with small molecules. To achieve this goal, more progress regarding SHP ligands and protein structure will be required. Besides its metabolic regulatory function, studies by us and other groups provide strong evidence that SHP plays a critical role in the development of cancer, particularly liver and breast cancer. An increased understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which SHP regulates the development of cancers will be critical in applying knowledge of SHP in diagnostic, therapeutic or preventive strategies for specific cancers. PMID:20970497

  2. Metabolic syndrome, its pathophysiology and the role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujam; Ohta, Yoshiji; Espino, Javier; Pariente, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ana B; Mohamed, Mahaneem; Zakaria, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterised by symptoms of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in MetS are complex and involved dysregulation of many biochemical and physiological regulatory mechanisms of the body. Elevated levels of low density lipoproteins like VLDL, and LDL with reduction of HDL seen in patients with MetS contribute to atherogenic dyslipedemia. Melatonin has been suggested to be effective in improving MetS through its anti-hyperlipidemic action. Melatonin reduced both adiposity, and body weight in experimental animal studies and also attenuated weight gain and obesityinduced metabolic alterations and this effect of melatonin is attributed to its anti-oxidative effects. Melatonin administration has been shown to inhibit insulin release by acting through both MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors present in pancreatic β-cells. Melatonin also increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in animals fed with either high fat or high sucrose diet. Melatonin exerts most of its beneficial actions by acting through MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors present in various tissues of the body and some of the metabolic actions of melatonin have been blocked by melatonin antagonist like luzindole. Ramelteon, the newly available melatonin agonist will also have more promising role in the control of MetS. The numbers of patents are available with regard to treatment of MetS. Drug related to antidepressant fluoxetine is used for treatment of MetS (US Patent No. 2008001400450). Anti-oxidants like S-adenosyl-methionine, Vitamin E, and Vitamin C have been found beneficial in treating MetS (US Patent No. 8063024). Melatonin being a powerful Antioxidant will have a promising role in treating patients with metabolic syndrome.

  3. Intra-myocellular fatty acid metabolism plays a critical role in mediating responses to dietary restriction in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Katewa, Subhash D.; Demontis, Fabio; Kolipinski, Marysia; Hubbard, Allan; Gill, Matthew S.; Perrimon, Norbert; Melov, Simon; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Summary Changes in fat content have been associated with dietary restriction (DR), but whether they play a causal role in mediating various responses to DR remains unknown. We demonstrate that upon DR, Drosophila melanogaster shift their metabolism towards increasing both fatty acid synthesis and breakdown, which is required for various responses to DR. Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis or oxidation genes specifically in the muscle tissue inhibited lifespan extension upon DR. Furthermore, DR enhances spontaneous activity of flies which was found to be dependent on the enhanced fatty acid metabolism. This increase in activity was found to be at least partially required for the lifespan extension upon DR. Over-expression of adipokinetic hormone (dAKH), the functional ortholog of glucagon, enhances fat metabolism, spontaneous activity and lifespan. Together, these results suggest that enhanced fat metabolism in the muscle and physical activity play a key role in the protective effects of DR. PMID:22768842

  4. Cytosolic calcium coordinates mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Amit K; Ivannikov, Maxim V; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R; Macleod, Gregory T

    2012-01-25

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations that blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+ and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11 nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13 nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates, [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs.

  5. Cytosolic Calcium Coordinates Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism with Presynaptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Amit K.; Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Lu, Zhongmin; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Macleod, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Most neurons fire in bursts, imposing episodic energy demands, but how these demands are coordinated with oxidative phosphorylation is still unknown. Here, using fluorescence imaging techniques on presynaptic termini of Drosophila motor neurons (MNs), we show that mitochondrial matrix pH (pHm), inner membrane potential (Δψm), and NAD(P)H levels ([NAD(P)H]m) increase within seconds of nerve stimulation. The elevations of pHm, Δψm, and [NAD(P)H]m indicate an increased capacity for ATP production. Elevations in pHm were blocked by manipulations which blocked mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, including replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+, and application of either tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or KB-R7943, indicating that it is Ca2+ that stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism. To place this phenomenon within the context of endogenous neuronal activity, the firing rates of a number of individually identified MNs were determined during fictive locomotion. Surprisingly, although endogenous firing rates are significantly different, there was little difference in presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]c) between MNs when each fires at its endogenous rate. The average [Ca2+]c level (329±11nM) was slightly above the average Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondria (281±13nM). In summary, we show that when MNs fire at endogenous rates [Ca2+]c is driven into a range where mitochondria rapidly acquire Ca2+. As we also show that Ca2+ stimulates presynaptic mitochondrial energy metabolism, we conclude that [Ca2+]c levels play an integral role in coordinating mitochondrial energy metabolism with presynaptic activity in Drosophila MNs. PMID:22279208

  6. Membrane lipid alterations in the metabolic syndrome and the role of dietary oils.

    PubMed

    Perona, Javier S

    2017-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of pathological conditions, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and low HDL levels that is of great concern worldwide, as individuals with metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance, the key feature of the metabolic syndrome, might be at the same time cause and consequence of impaired lipid composition in plasma membranes of insulin-sensitive tissues like liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Diet intervention has been proposed as a powerful tool to prevent the development of the metabolic syndrome, since healthy diets have been shown to have a protective role against the components of the metabolic syndrome. Particularly, dietary fatty acids are capable of modulating the deleterious effects of these conditions, among other mechanisms, by modifications of the lipid composition of the membranes in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, there is still scarce data based of high-level evidence on the effects of dietary oils on the effects of the metabolic syndrome and its components. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of dietary oils on improving alterations of the components of the metabolic syndrome. It also examines their influence in the modulation of plasma membrane lipid composition and in the functionality of membrane proteins involved in insulin activity, like the insulin receptor, GLUT-4, CD36/FAT and ABCA-1, and their effect in the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and cholesterol, and, in turn, the key features of the metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A central role of eNOS in the protective effect of wine against metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Federico; Miranda-Rottmann, Soledad; Urquiaga, Inés

    2006-01-01

    The positive health effects derived from moderate wine consumption are pleiotropic. They appear as improvements in cardiovascular risk factors such as plasma lipids, haemostatic mechanisms, endothelial function and antioxidant defences. The active principles would be ethanol and mainly polyphenols. Results from our and other laboratories support the unifying hypothesis that the improvements in risk factors after red wine consumption are mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Many genes are involved, but the participation of eNOS would be a constant feature. The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors associated with high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The National Cholesterol Education Programmmes Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEPATP III) clinical definition of the metabolic syndrome requires the presence of at least three risk factors, from among abdominal obesity, high plasma triacylglycerols, low plasma HDL, high blood pressure and high fasting plasma glucose. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the metabolic syndrome are not known. Since metabolic syndrome apparently affects 10-30% of the population in the world, research on its pathogenesis and control is needed. The recent finding that eNOS knockout mice present a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors comparable to those of the metabolic syndrome suggests that defects in eNOS function may cause human metabolic syndrome. These mice are hypertensive, insulin resistant and dyslipidemic. Further support for a pathogenic role of eNOS comes from the finding in humans that eNOS polymorphisms associate with insulin resistance and diabetes, with hypertension, with inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and with albuminuria. So, the data sustain the hypothesis that eNOS enhancement should reduce metabolic syndrome incidence and its consequences. Therefore red wine, since it enhances eNOS function, should be considered as a potential tool for the control of metabolic

  8. Intracellular coenzymes as natural biomarkers for metabolic activities and mitochondrial anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, Ahmed A

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in energy metabolism, programmed cell death and oxidative stress. Mutated mitochondrial DNA in diseased cells compromises the structure of key enzyme complexes and, therefore, mitochondrial function, which leads to a myriad of health-related conditions such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes and aging. Early detection of mitochondrial and metabolic anomalies is an essential step towards effective diagnoses and therapeutic intervention. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) play important roles in a wide range of cellular oxidation–reduction reactions. Importantly, NADH and FAD are naturally fluorescent, which allows noninvasive imaging of metabolic activities of living cells and tissues. Furthermore, NADH and FAD autofluorescence, which can be excited using distinct wavelengths for complementary imaging methods and is sensitive to protein binding and local environment. This article highlights recent developments concerning intracellular NADH and FAD as potential biomarkers for metabolic and mitochondrial activities. PMID:20406068

  9. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2016-08-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism interaction is likely to go well beyond taxonomic, correlative observations. In fact, most advances in the field relate to the functional and metabolic capabilities of these microorganisms and their influence on mucosal immunity and systemic inflammation. An intricate relationship between the microbiome and the diet of the host is now fully recognized, with the microbiota having an important role in the degradation of polysaccharides into active metabolites. This Review summarizes the current knowledge on the metabolic role of the microbiota in health and rheumatic disease, including the advances in pharmacomicrobiomics and its potential use in diagnostics, therapeutics and personalized medicine.

  10. Palmitic acid stimulates energy metabolism and inhibits insulin/PI3K/AKT signaling in differentiated human neuroblastoma cells: The role of mTOR activation and mitochondrial ROS production.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Sánchez-Alegría, Karina; Gómez-Inclán, Cecilia; Ferrera, Patricia; Arias, Clorinda

    2017-09-15

    The high consumption of saturated lipids has been largely associated with the increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases. In particular, saturated fatty acids such as palmitic acid (PA) have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. However, how neurons develop insulin resistance in response to lipid overload is not fully understood. Here, we used cultured rat cortical neurons and differentiated human neuroblastoma cells to demonstrate that PA blocks insulin-induced metabolic activation, inhibits the activation of the insulin/PI3K/Akt pathway and activates mTOR kinase downstream of Akt. Despite the fact that fatty acids are not normally used as a significant source of fuel by neural cells, we also found that short-term neuronal exposure to PA reduces the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, indicating that PA modifies the neuronal energy balance. Finally, inhibiting mitochondrial ROS production with mitoTEMPO prevented the deleterious effect of PA on insulin signaling. This work provides novel evidence of the mechanisms behind saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and its metabolic consequences on neuronal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Photorespiration: metabolic pathways and their role in stress protection.

    PubMed Central

    Wingler, A; Lea, P J; Quick, W P; Leegood, R C

    2000-01-01

    Photorespiration results from the oxygenase reaction catalysed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. In this reaction glycollate-2-phosphate is produced and subsequently metabolized in the photorespiratory pathway to form the Calvin cycle intermediate glycerate-3-phosphate. During this metabolic process, CO2 and NH3 are produced and ATP and reducing equivalents are consumed, thus making photorespiration a wasteful process. However, precisely because of this inefficiency, photorespiration could serve as an energy sink preventing the overreduction of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and photoinhibition, especially under stress conditions that lead to reduced rates of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Furthermore, photorespiration provides metabolites for other metabolic processes, e.g. glycine for the synthesis of glutathione, which is also involved in stress protection. In this review we describe the use of photorespiratory mutants to study the control and regulation of photorespiratory pathways. In addition, we discuss the possible role of photorespiration under stress conditions, such as drought, high salt concentrations and high light intensities encountered by alpine plants. PMID:11128005

  12. The critical role of metabolic pathways in aging.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Nir; Huffman, Derek M; Muzumdar, Radhika H; Bartke, Andrzej

    2012-06-01

    Aging is characterized by a deterioration in the maintenance of homeostatic processes over time, leading to functional decline and increased risk for disease and death. The aging process is characterized metabolically by insulin resistance, changes in body composition, and physiological declines in growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and sex steroids. Some interventions designed to address features of aging, such as caloric restriction or visceral fat depletion, have succeeded in improving insulin action and life span in rodents. Meanwhile, pharmacologic interventions and hormonal perturbations have increased the life span of several mammalian species without necessarily addressing features of age-related metabolic decline. These interventions include inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin and lifetime deficiency in GH/IGF-1 signaling. However, strategies to treat aging in humans, such as hormone replacement, have mostly failed to achieve their desired response. We will briefly discuss recent advances in our understanding of the complex role of metabolic pathways in the aging process and highlight important paradoxes that have emerged from these discoveries. Although life span has been the major outcome of interest in the laboratory, a special focus is made in this study on healthspan, as improved quality of life is the goal when translated to humans.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family and its relationship to renal complications of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guan, Youfei

    2004-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. Three PPAR isoforms, designated PPARalpha, -beta/delta, and -gamma, have been identified and attracted enormous attention as a result of the key role that these receptors play in regulating adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and BP. Growing evidence points to a causative relationship between PPAR activity and the metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and albuminuria. Importantly, both PPAR-alpha activators, such as the fibric acid class of hypolipidemic drugs, and PPAR-gamma agonists, including antidiabetic thiazolidinediones, have been proved to be effective for improving diverse aspects of the metabolic syndrome. All three PPAR isoforms seem to play important roles in the development of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes. Accumulating data suggesting that PPAR may serve as potential therapeutic targets for treating the metabolic syndrome and its related renal complications have begun to emerge. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the action, ligand selectivity, and physiologic role of PPAR. Particular emphasis is placed on their pathogenic roles in the metabolic syndrome and the therapeutic utility of PPAR modulators in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  14. The Role of Master Regulators in the Metabolic/Transcriptional Coupling in Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Baca-López, Karol; Mayorga, Miguel; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Gutiérrez-Nájera, Nora; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic transformations have been reported as involved in neoplasms survival. This suggests a role of metabolic pathways as potential cancer pharmacological targets. Modulating tumor's energy production pathways may become a substantial research area for cancer treatment. The significant role of metabolic deregulation as inducing transcriptional instabilities and consequently whole-system failure, is thus of foremost importance. By using a data integration approach that combines experimental evidence for high-throughput genome wide gene expression, a non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis, nonlinear correlation networks as well as database mining, we were able to outline the role that transcription factors MEF2C and MNDA may have as main master regulators in primary breast cancer phenomenology, as well as the possible interrelationship between malignancy and metabolic dysfunction. The present findings are supported by the analysis of 1191 whole genome gene expression experiments, as well as probabilistic inference of gene regulatory networks, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of such data. Other evidence sources include pathway enrichment and gene set enrichment analyses, as well as motif comparison with a comprehensive gene regulatory network (of homologue genes) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our key finding is that the non-equilibrium free energies provide a realistic description of transcription factor activation that when supplemented with gene regulatory networks made us able to find deregulated pathways. These analyses also suggest a novel potential role of transcription factor energetics at the onset of primary tumor development. Results are important in the molecular systems biology of cancer field, since deregulation and coupling mechanisms between metabolic activity and transcriptional regulation can be better understood by taking into account the way that master regulators respond to physicochemical constraints imposed by different phenotypic conditions

  15. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeater, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the scope of the problem of obesity in the United States, noting the health risks associated with being overweight or obese (e.g., gallstones, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, and colon cancer); discussing the association of type-II diabetes mellitus with obesity; examining the effects of exercise on metabolic disease; and looking at…

  16. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeater, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the scope of the problem of obesity in the United States, noting the health risks associated with being overweight or obese (e.g., gallstones, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, and colon cancer); discussing the association of type-II diabetes mellitus with obesity; examining the effects of exercise on metabolic disease; and looking at…

  17. Women in Active Combat Roles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    good hygiene .”6 Counter-Argument An argument may be presented that women must deal with their menstrual cycle while training. By the very nature...handle combat due to perceived physical fitness shortcomings or extra hygiene necessities 4 can be solved. Additionally they prove that any cohesion...be in combat MOSs. Hygiene Considerations Another area that is a consideration for allowing women to participate in an active combat role is

  18. Metabolic Roles of Uncultivated Bacterioplankton Lineages in the Northern Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone".

    PubMed

    Thrash, J Cameron; Seitz, Kiley W; Baker, Brett J; Temperton, Ben; Gillies, Lauren E; Rabalais, Nancy N; Henrissat, Bernard; Mason, Olivia U

    2017-09-12

    Marine regions that have seasonal to long-term low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, sometimes called "dead zones," are increasing in number and severity around the globe with deleterious effects on ecology and economics. One of the largest of these coastal dead zones occurs on the continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM), which results from eutrophication-enhanced bacterioplankton respiration and strong seasonal stratification. Previous research in this dead zone revealed the presence of multiple cosmopolitan bacterioplankton lineages that have eluded cultivation, and thus their metabolic roles in this ecosystem remain unknown. We used a coupled shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approach to determine the metabolic potential of Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, SAR406, and SAR202. We recovered multiple high-quality, nearly complete genomes from all three groups as well as candidate phyla usually associated with anoxic environments-Parcubacteria (OD1) and Peregrinibacteria Two additional groups with putative assignments to ACD39 and PAUC34f supplement the metabolic contributions by uncultivated taxa. Our results indicate active metabolism in all groups, including prevalent aerobic respiration, with concurrent expression of genes for nitrate reduction in SAR406 and SAR202, and dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonia and sulfur reduction by SAR406. We also report a variety of active heterotrophic carbon processing mechanisms, including degradation of complex carbohydrate compounds by SAR406, SAR202, ACD39, and PAUC34f. Together, these data help constrain the metabolic contributions from uncultivated groups in the nGOM during periods of low DO and suggest roles for these organisms in the breakdown of complex organic matter.IMPORTANCE Dead zones receive their name primarily from the reduction of eukaryotic macrobiota (demersal fish, shrimp, etc.) that are also key coastal fisheries. Excess nutrients contributed from anthropogenic activity

  19. Role of hormones in cartilage and joint metabolism: understanding an unhealthy metabolic phenotype in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Slagboom, Eline; Chen-An, Pingping; Alexandersen, Peter; Qvist, Per; Christiansen, Claus; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Karsdal, Morten A

    2013-05-01

    Joint health is affected by local and systemic hormones. It is well accepted that systemic factors regulate the metabolism of joint tissues, and that substantial cross-talk between tissues actively contributes to homeostasis. In the current review, we try to define a subtype of osteoarthritis (OA), metabolic OA, which is dependent on an unhealthy phenotype. Peer-reviewed research articles and reviews were reviewed and summarized. Only literature readily available online, either by download or by purchase order, was included. OA is the most common joint disease and is more common in women after menopause. OA is a disease that affects the whole joint, including cartilage, subchondral bone, synovium, tendons, and muscles. The clinical endpoints of OA are pain and joint space narrowing, which is characterized by cartilage erosion and subchondral sclerosis, suggesting that cartilage is a central tissue of joint health. Thus, the joint, more specifically the cartilage, may be considered a target of endocrine function in addition to the well-described traditional risk factors of disease initiation and progression such as long-term loading of the joint due to obesity. Metabolic syndrome affects a range of tissues and may in part be molecularly described as a dysregulation of cytokines, adipokines, and hormones (e.g., estrogen and thyroid hormone). Consequently, metabolic imbalance may both directly and indirectly influence joint health and cartilage turnover, altering the progression of diseases such as OA. There is substantial evidence for a connection between metabolic health and development of OA. We propose that more focus be directed to understanding this connection to improve the management of menopausal health and associated comorbidities.

  20. Metabolism, toxicity and anticancer activities of arsenic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Khairul, Islam; Wang, Qian Qian; Jiang, Yu Han; Wang, Chao; Naranmandura, Hua

    2017-01-01

    A variety of studies indicated that inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites have paradoxical effects, namely, carcinogenic and anticancer effects. Epidemiological studies have shown that long term exposure to arsenic can increase the risk of cancers of lung, skin or bladder in man, which is probably associated with the arsenic metabolism. In fact, the enzymatic conversion of inorganic arsenic by Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) to mono- and dimethylated arsenic species has long been considered as a major route for detoxification. However, several studies have also indicated that biomethylation of inorganic arsenic, particularly the production of trivalent methylated metabolites, is a process that activates arsenic as a toxin and a carcinogen. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently been recognized as one of the most effective drugs for the treatment of APL. However, elaboration of the cytotoxic mechanisms of arsenic and its methylated metabolites in eradicating cancer is sorely lacking. To provide a deeper understanding of the toxicity and carcinogenicity along with them use of arsenic in chemotherapy, caution is required considering the poor understanding of its various mechanisms of exerting toxicity. Thereby, in this review, we have focused on arsenic metabolic pathway, the roles of the methylated arsenic metabolites in toxicity and in the therapeutic efficacy for the treatments of solid tumors, APL and/or non-APL malignancies. PMID:28108741

  1. Metabolism, toxicity and anticancer activities of arsenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Khairul, Islam; Wang, Qian Qian; Jiang, Yu Han; Wang, Chao; Naranmandura, Hua

    2017-01-18

    A variety of studies indicated that inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites have paradoxical effects, namely, carcinogenic and anticancer effects. Epidemiological studies have shown that long term exposure to arsenic can increase the risk of cancers of lung, skin or bladder in man, which is probably associated with the arsenic metabolism. In fact, the enzymatic conversion of inorganic arsenic by Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) to mono- and dimethylated arsenic species has long been considered as a major route for detoxification. However, several studies have also indicated that biomethylation of inorganic arsenic, particularly the production of trivalent methylated metabolites, is a process that activates arsenic as a toxin and a carcinogen. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently been recognized as one of the most effective drugs for the treatment of APL. However, elaboration of the cytotoxic mechanisms of arsenic and its methylated metabolites in eradicating cancer is sorely lacking. To provide a deeper understanding of the toxicity and carcinogenicity along with them use of arsenic in chemotherapy, caution is required considering the poor understanding of its various mechanisms of exerting toxicity. Thereby, in this review, we have focused on arsenic metabolic pathway, the roles of the methylated arsenic metabolites in toxicity and in the therapeutic efficacy for the treatments of solid tumors, APL and/or non-APL malignancies.

  2. The Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones in Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mells, Jamie Eugene; Anania, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular accumulation of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the form of triglycerides constitutes the metabolic basis for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Recent data demonstrate that excess FFA hepatocyte storage is likely to lead to lipotoxicity and hepatocyte apoptosis. Hence, FFA-mediated hepatocyte injury is a key contributor to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, essential hypertension, and other common medical problems together comprise metabolic syndrome. Evidence suggests that peptide hormones from the L cells of the distal small intestine, which comprise the core of the enteroendocrine system (EES), play two key roles, serving either as incretins, or as mediators of appetite and satiety in the central nervous system. Recent data related to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and other known L-cell hormones have accumulated due to the increasing frequency of bariatric surgery, which increase delivery of bile salts to the hindgut. Bile acids are a key stimulus for the TGR5 receptor of the L cells. Enhanced bile-salt flow and subsequent EES stimulation may be central to elimination of hepatic steatosis following bariatric surgery. Although GLP-1 is a clinically relevant pharmacological analogue that drives pancreatic β-cell insulin output, GLP-1 analogues also have independent benefits via their effects on hepatocellular FFA metabolism. The authors also discuss recent data regarding the role of the major peptides released by the EES, which promote satiety and modulate energy homeostasis and utilization, as well as those that control fat absorption and intestinal permeability. Taken together, elucidating novel functions for EES-related peptides and pharmacologic development of peptide analogues offer potential far-ranging treatment for obesity-related human disease. PMID:24222092

  3. Isomaltulose is actively metabolized in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Luguang; Birch, Robert G

    2011-12-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose (Suc). It has been widely used as a nonmetabolized sugar in physiological studies aimed at better understanding the regulatory roles and transport of sugars in plants. It is increasingly used as a nutritional human food, with some beneficial properties including low glycemic index and acariogenicity. Cloning of genes for Suc isomerases opened the way for direct commercial production in plants. The understanding that plants lack catabolic capabilities for isomaltulose indicated a possibility of enhanced yields relative to Suc. However, this understanding was based primarily on the treatment of intact cells with exogenous isomaltulose. Here, we show that sugarcane (Saccharum interspecific hybrids), like other tested plants, does not readily import or catabolize extracellular isomaltulose. However, among intracellular enzymes, cytosolic Suc synthase (in the breakage direction) and vacuolar soluble acid invertase (SAI) substantially catabolize isomaltulose. From kinetic studies, the specificity constant of SAI for isomaltulose is about 10% of that for Suc. Activity varied against other Suc isomers, with V(max) for leucrose about 6-fold that for Suc. SAI activities from other plant species varied substantially in substrate specificity against Suc and its isomers. Therefore, in physiological studies, the blanket notion of Suc isomers including isomaltulose as nonmetabolized sugars must be discarded. For example, lysis of a few cells may result in the substantial hydrolysis of exogenous isomaltulose, with profound downstream signal effects. In plant biotechnology, different V(max) and V(max)/K(m) ratios for Suc isomers may yet be exploited, in combination with appropriate developmental expression and compartmentation, for enhanced sugar yields.

  4. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  5. The role of methionine metabolism in inflammatory bowel disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methionine (Met) cycle activity is critical for normal cell functions. Met metabolites S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and methylthioadenosine (MTA) are anti-inflammatory, yet their role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is poorly understood. We hypothesize that active IBD leads to changes in Met metab...

  6. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-03

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria.

  7. The Role of CYP2E1 in the Drug Metabolism or Bioactivation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    García-Suástegui, W A; Ramos-Chávez, L A; Rubio-Osornio, M; Calvillo-Velasco, M; Atzin-Méndez, J A; Guevara, J; Silva-Adaya, D

    2017-01-01

    Organisms have metabolic pathways that are responsible for removing toxic agents. We always associate the liver as the major organ responsible for detoxification of the body; however this process occurs in many tissues. In the same way, as in the liver, the brain expresses metabolic pathways associated with the elimination of xenobiotics. Besides the detoxifying role of CYP2E1 for compounds such as electrophilic agents, reactive oxygen species, free radical products, and the bioactivation of xenobiotics, CYP2E1 is also related in several diseases and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we describe the presence of phase I monooxygenase CYP2E1 in regions of the brain. We also explore the conditions where protein, mRNA, and the activity of CYP2E1 are induced. Finally, we describe the relation of CYP2E1 in brain disorders, including the behavioral relations for alcohol consumption via CYP2E1 metabolism.

  8. The Role of CYP2E1 in the Drug Metabolism or Bioactivation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    García-Suástegui, W. A.; Ramos-Chávez, L. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M.; Calvillo-Velasco, M.; Atzin-Méndez, J. A.; Guevara, J.

    2017-01-01

    Organisms have metabolic pathways that are responsible for removing toxic agents. We always associate the liver as the major organ responsible for detoxification of the body; however this process occurs in many tissues. In the same way, as in the liver, the brain expresses metabolic pathways associated with the elimination of xenobiotics. Besides the detoxifying role of CYP2E1 for compounds such as electrophilic agents, reactive oxygen species, free radical products, and the bioactivation of xenobiotics, CYP2E1 is also related in several diseases and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we describe the presence of phase I monooxygenase CYP2E1 in regions of the brain. We also explore the conditions where protein, mRNA, and the activity of CYP2E1 are induced. Finally, we describe the relation of CYP2E1 in brain disorders, including the behavioral relations for alcohol consumption via CYP2E1 metabolism. PMID:28163821

  9. Role of Janus Kinase 3 in Predisposition to Obesity-associated Metabolic Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jayshree; Verma, Raj K.; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin; Kumar, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, a worldwide epidemic, is a major risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) including diabetes and associated health complications. Recent studies indicate that chronic low-grade inflammation (CLGI) plays a key role in metabolic deterioration in the obese population. Previously, we reported that Jak3 was essential for mucosal differentiation and enhanced colonic barrier functions and its loss in mice resulted in basal CLGI and predisposition to DSS induced colitis. Since CLGI is associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, present studies determined the role of Jak3 in development of such conditions. Our data show that loss of Jak3 resulted in increased body weight, basal systemic CLGI, compromised glycemic homeostasis, hyperinsulinemia, and early symptoms of liver steatosis. Lack of Jak3 also resulted in exaggerated symptoms of metabolic syndrome by western high-fat diet. Mechanistically, Jak3 was essential for reduced expression and activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in murine intestinal mucosa and human intestinal epithelial cells where Jak3 interacted with and activated p85, the regulatory subunit of the PI3K, through tyrosine phosphorylation of adapter protein insulin receptor substrate (IRS1). These interactions resulted in activation of PI3K-Akt axis, which was essential for reduced TLR expression and TLR associated NFκB activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate the essential role of Jak3 in promoting mucosal tolerance through suppressed expression and limiting activation of TLRs thereby preventing intestinal and systemic CLGI and associated obesity and MetS. PMID:26451047

  10. Activity-based proteomic and metabolomic approaches for understanding metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hunerdosse, Devon; Nomura, Daniel K

    2014-08-01

    There are an increasing number of human pathologies that have been associated with altered metabolism, including obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most attention on metabolism has been focused on well-understood metabolic pathways and has largely ignored most of the biochemical pathways that operate in (patho)physiological settings, in part because of the vast landscape of uncharacterized and undiscovered metabolic pathways. One technology that has arisen to meet this challenge is activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) that uses activity-based chemical probes to broadly assess the functional states of both characterized and uncharacterized enzymes. This review will focus on how ABPP, coupled with inhibitor discovery platforms and functional metabolomic technologies, have led to discoveries that have expanded our knowledge of metabolism in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; EL Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  12. Physical activity and metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Loy, Veronica; Mettu, Praveen; Von Roenn, Natasha; Berkes, Jamie; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients, a population that tends to be physically inactive. The aim of this study was to characterize physical activity and evaluate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in patients more than 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to National Cholesterol Education Panel Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Physical activity, including duration, frequency, and metabolic equivalents of task (METs), was assessed. The study population consisted of 204 subjects, with 156 more than 1 year after transplantation. The median time after transplantation was 53.5 months (range = 3-299 months). The mean duration of exercise was 90 ± 142 minutes, and the mean MET score was 3.6 ± 1.5. Metabolic syndrome was observed in 58.8% of all subjects and in 63.5% of the subjects more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis involving all subjects, metabolic syndrome was associated with a time after transplantation greater than 1 year [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.389-6.092] and older age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.001-1.072). A second analysis was performed for only patients more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with lower exercise intensity (OR = 0.690, 95% CI = 0.536-0.887), older age (OR = 1.056, 95% CI = 1.014-1.101), and pretransplant diabetes (OR = 4.246, 95% CI = 1.300-13.864). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplantation, and the rate is significantly higher in patients more than 1 year after transplantation. The observation that exercise intensity is inversely related to metabolic syndrome after transplantation is novel and suggests that physical activity might provide a means for reducing metabolic syndrome complications in liver

  13. Ciprofibrate increases paraoxonase activity in patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paragh, György; Seres, Ildikó; Harangi, Mariann; Erdei, Annamária; Audikovszky, Mária; Debreczeni, Lóránd; Kovácsay, Anna; Illyés, László; Pados, Gyula

    2006-01-01

    Aims Diabetic dyslipidaemia with decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration plays a key role in enhanced atherosclerosis. The antioxidant effect of HDL is due to the influence of human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and several authors have described decreased activity of this enzyme in Type 2 diabetics and subjects with metabolic syndrome. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of daily ciprofibrate on serum PON1 and lipoprotein concentrations in patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods Fifty-one patients with metabolic syndrome were enrolled into the study. We examined the effect of 100 mg day−1 ciprofibrate treatment on lipid concentrations, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), PON1 concentrations and activity. We also investigated the calculated size of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). Results During the 3-month study, it was observed that following treatment with ciprofibrate, the serum triglyceride concentration decreased significantly (from 2.76 ± 0.9 mmol l−1 to 2.27 ± 1.6 mmol l−1; −18%; P < 0.001), while HDL-C increased significantly (from 0.95 ± 0.2 mmol l−1 to 1.2 ± 0.3 mmol l−1; 26%; P < 0.001). The oxidatively modified LDL-C concentration decreased significantly (from 137 ± 19 U l−1 to 117 ± 20 U l−1; P < 0.001), while HDL-associated apolipoprotein A1 significantly increased (from 1.35 ± 0.2 g l−1 to 1.75 ± 0.3 g l−1; P < 0.001). The LDL-C/LDL-apoB ratio, which reflects the size of LDL, increased significantly (from 0.96 ± 0.05 to 1.05 ± 0.06; P < 0.05). Serum PON1 activity was significantly elevated (from 108 ± 34 U l−1 to 129 ± 31 U l−1; P < 0.05), while standardized values for HDL-C remained significantly unchanged (PON1/HDL-C) (from 114 ± 21 to 107 ± 20; NS). Conclusion Three months of treatment with ciprofibrate favourably affected the lipid profile, increased LDL resistance to oxidation and improved antioxidant status by increasing serum paraoxonase activity in these patients. PMID

  14. Calcium-dependent activation of mitochondrial metabolism in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaspers, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous fluorophores provide a simple, but elegant means to investigate the relationship between agonist-evoked Ca2+ signals and the activation of mitochondrial metabolism. In this article, we discuss the methods and strategies to measure cellular pyridine nucleotide and flavoprotein fluorescence alone or in combination with Ca2+-sensitive indicators. These methods were developed using primary cultured hepatocytes and neurons, which contain relatively high levels of endogenous fluorophores and robust metabolic responses. Nevertheless, these methods are amendable to a wide variety of primary cell types and cell lines that maintain active mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:18854213

  15. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  16. [The role of melatonin in the development of metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Balliuzek, M F; Grinenko, T N; Kvetnaia, T V

    2009-01-01

    The level of 6-oxymelatonin sulfate, the main metabolite of melatonin (MT), in morning urine samples from patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) suggests enhanced MT production at night. This inference equally holds for aged and elderly patients despite their significantly impaired MT secretion due to age-related involution of the pineal gland. Correlation between MT hypersecretion and manifestations of MT activity also depends on the patients" age. MT test can be used as biological marker of MT and a prognostic factor of MS progress.

  17. Functional modules, structural topology, and optimal activity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is

  18. Roles of PPAR delta in lipid absorption and metabolism: a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Luquet, Serge; Gaudel, Celine; Holst, Dorte; Lopez-Soriano, Joaquin; Jehl-Pietri, Chantal; Fredenrich, Alexandre; Grimaldi, Paul A

    2005-05-30

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are lipid-activated transcription factors exerting several functions in development and metabolism. PPARalpha, activated by polyunsaturated fatty acids and fibrates, is implicated in regulation of lipid metabolism, lipoprotein synthesis and metabolism and inflammatory response in liver and other tissues. PPARgamma plays important roles in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of several cell types, including adipose cells. Its activation by thiazolidinediones results in insulin sensibilization and antidiabetic action. Until recently, the physiological functions of PPARdelta remain elusive. The utilization of specific agonists and of appropriate cellular and animal models revealed that PPARdelta has an important role in metabolic adaptation of several tissues to environmental changes. Treatment of obese animals by specific PPARdelta agonists results in normalization of metabolic parameters and reduction of adiposity. The nuclear receptor appeared to be implicated in the regulation of fatty acid burning capacities of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue by controlling the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake, beta-oxidation and energy uncoupling. PPARdelta is also implicated in the adaptive metabolic response of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise by controlling the number of oxidative myofibers. Given the results obtained with animal models, PPARdelta agonists may have therapeutic usefulness in metabolic syndrome by increasing fatty acid consumption in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

  19. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  20. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  1. The roles of nuclear receptors CAR and PXR in hepatic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Negishi, Masahiko; Kodama, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were originally characterized as transcription factors regulating the hepatic genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes. Recent works have now revealed that these nuclear receptors also play the critical roles in modulating hepatic energy metabolism. While CAR and PXR directly bind to their response sequences phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) and xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) in the promoter of target genes to increase drug metabolism, the receptors also cross talk with various hormone responsive transcription factors such as forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), forkhead box A2 (FoxA2), cAMP-response element binding protein, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC 1alpha) to decrease energy metabolism through down-regulating gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis and up-regulating lipogenesis. In addition, CAR modulates thyroid hormone activity by regulating type 1 deiodinase in the regenerating liver. Thus, CAR and PXR are now placed at the crossroad where both xenobiotics and endogenous stimuli co-regulate liver function.

  2. The role of metals in carcinogenesis: biochemistry and metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, K W

    1981-01-01

    The oxyanions of vanadium, chromium, molybdenum, arsenic, and selenium are stable forms of these elements in high oxidation states which cross cell membranes using the normal phosphate and/or sulfate transport systems of the cell. Once inside the cell, these oxyanions may sulfuryl transfer reactions. Often the oxyanions serve as alternate enzyme substrates but form ester products which are hydrolytically unstable compared with the sulfate and phosphate esters and, therefore, decompose readily in aqueous solution. Arsenite and selenite are capable of reacting with sulfhydryl groups in proteins. Some cells are able to metabolize redox active oxyanions to forms of the elements in other stable oxidation states. Specific enzymes may be involved in the metabolic processes. The metabolites of these elements may form complexes with small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids which inhibit their ability to function properly. The divalent ions of beryllium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, mercury, and lead are stable forms of these elements which may mimic essential divalent ions such as magnesium, calcium, iron, copper, or zinc. These ions may complex small molecules, enzymes, and nucleic acids in such a way that the normal activity of these species is altered. Free radicals may be produced in the presence of these metal ions which damage critical cellular molecules. PMID:7023933

  3. Understanding the role of gut microbiome in metabolic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Yolanda; Olivares, Marta; Moya-Pérez, Ángela; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota structure, dynamics, and function result from interactions with environmental and host factors, which jointly influence the communication between the gut and peripheral tissues, thereby contributing to health programming and disease risk. Incidence of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes has increased during the past decades, suggesting that there have been changes in the interactions between predisposing genetic and environmental factors. Animal studies show that gut microbiota and its genome (microbiome) influence alterations in energy balance (increased energy harvest) and immunity (inflammation and autoimmunity), leading to metabolic dysfunction (e.g., insulin resistance and deficiency). Thus, although they have different origins, both disorders are linked by the association of the gut microbiota with the immune-metabolic axis. Human studies have also revealed shifts in microbiome signatures in diseased subjects as compared with controls, and a few of them precede the development of these disorders. These studies contribute to pinpointing specific microbiome components and functions (e.g., butyrate-producing bacteria) that can protect against both disorders. These could exert protective roles by strengthening gut barrier function and regulating inflammation, as alterations in these are a pathophysiological feature of both disorders, constituting common targets for future preventive approaches.

  4. [Role of incretins in the regulation of bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chizumi

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk of osteoporosis. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide/glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide(GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are incretin hormones released upon meal ingestion, and GIP and/or GLP-1 signaling is decreased in diabetic state. We have demonstrated that both GIP receptor knockout mice and GLP-1 receptor knockout mice have osteoporosis. GIP has anabolic effects on bone mainly by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation through intermittent elevation of intracellular cAMP levels. On the other hand, GLP-1 is suggested to regulate bone resorption indirectly through the thyroid C cell. Our studies show that incretins play important roles in bone metabolism by distinct mechanisms.

  5. Emerging Role of Sensory Perception in Aging and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Riera, Celine E; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Sensory perception comprises gustatory (taste) and olfactory (smell) modalities as well as somatosensory (pain, heat, and tactile mechanosensory) inputs, which are detected by a multitude of sensory receptors. These sensory receptors are contained in specialized ciliated neurons where they detect changes in environmental conditions and participate in behavioral decisions ranging from food choice to avoiding harmful conditions, thus insuring basic survival in metazoans. Recent genetic studies, however, indicate that sensory perception plays additional physiological functions, notably influencing energy homeostatic processes and longevity through neuronal circuits originating from sensory tissues. Here we review how these findings are redefining metabolic signaling and establish a prominent role of sensory neuroendocrine processes in controlling health span and lifespan, with a goal of translating this knowledge towards managing age-associated diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase: Potential Role in Mineral Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Weidong; Moe, Orson W.

    2007-04-01

    The conversion of a signal of inorganic ion concentration to a second messenger is of fundamental biologic significance. The soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) serves such a purpose by transducing divalent cation concentrations and bicarbonate concentrations into intracellular cyclic AMP levels. sAC is widely expressed and may represent a generic bicarbonate sensor providing the afferent pathway to bicarbonate-regulated biologic processes. The best described action of sAC to date is in the mediation of bicarbonate-induced changes in sperm motility. Since a number of processes in mineral metabolism—such as bone formation, bone resorption, intestinal calcium absorption, and renal calcium transport in the distal convoluted tubule—are regulated by bicarbonate, sAC may play a role at multiple levels in mineral metabolism.

  7. Role of leptin during perinatal metabolic programming and obesity.

    PubMed

    Djiane, J; Attig, L

    2008-08-01

    The incidence of obesity is rapidly increasing all over the world in epidemic proportions.The epidemia now affects young children and accumulative evidences suggest that the origin of the disease may occur during foetal development and early life. This has introduced the concept of "developmental programming" supported by experimental studies in animal models and numerous epidemiological data. This concept supports the idea that nutritional and hormonal status during pregnancy and early life could interfere irreversibly on the development of the organs involved in the control of food intake and metabolism and particularly the hypothalamic structures responsible of the establishment of the ingestive behaviour and regulation of energy expenditure. The mechanisms responsible of this developmental programming remain poorly documented. However, recent research indicate that the adipokine leptin plays a critical role in this programming.

  8. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Katsumi

    2017-02-22

    Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase), fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase), and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase). ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp(-/-) mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome.

  9. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase), fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase), and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase). ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp−/− mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome. PMID:28241431

  10. Stress and obesity: the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Bose, Mousumi; Oliván, Blanca; Laferrère, Blandine

    2009-10-01

    Chronic stress, combined with positive energy balance, may be a contributor to the increased risk for obesity, especially upper body obesity, and other metabolic diseases. This association may be mediated by alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In this review, we summarize the major research that has been conducted on the role of the HPA axis in obesity and metabolic disease. Dysregulation in the HPA axis has been associated with upper body obesity, but data are inconsistent, possibly due to methodological differences across studies. In addition to systemic effects, changes in local cortisol metabolism in adipose tissue may also influence the risk for obesity. HPA axis dysregulation may be the causal link between conditions such as maternal malnutrition and sleep deprivation with metabolic disease. The present review provides evidence for the relationship between chronic stress, alterations in HPA activity, and obesity. Understanding these associations and its interactions with other factors will be important in developing effective treatments for obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  11. Switch of metabolic status: redirecting metabolic flux for acetoin production from glycerol by activating a silent glycerol catabolism pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Tao, Fei; Xin, Bo; Liu, Hongyu; Gao, Yanyan; Zhou, Ning-Yi; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The physiological roles of silent genes are still unsolved puzzles and their application potentials are unexplored. Herein, a silent glycerol catabolism pathway encoded by glp system was activated in a Klebsiella pneumoniae mutant, of which the acetoin degradation pathway was blocked. Surprisingly, the activation produced significant effects on cellular metabolism and over 90% of the carbon flux was redirected to acetoin biosynthesis, which was formerly a minor product in this mutant. Transcription analyses suggest that the genes involved in acetoin, 1,3-propanediol and adenosyl-cobalamin biosynthesis were differentially regulated upon the glp system activation, demonstrating the cross-talk between silent and active pathways. Through pathway, cofactor and bioprocess engineering, high-level acetoin production from glycerol (32.2gL(-1), 90.8% of the theoretical value) was achieved. Our findings suggest that some silent genes represent unexplored switches of cellular metabolic status and activating them may be an easy strategy for reprogramming microorganisms into efficient cell factories. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel insights of ethylene role in strawberry cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Natalia M; Marina, María; Nardi, Cristina F; Civello, Pedro M; Martínez, Gustavo A

    2016-11-01

    Due to its organoleptic and nutraceutical qualities, strawberry fruit (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) is a worldwide important commodity. The role of ethylene in the regulation of strawberry cell wall metabolism was studied in fruit from Toyonoka cultivar harvested at white stage, when most changes associated with fruit ripening have begun. Fruit were treated with ethephon, an ethylene-releasing reagent, or with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action, maintaining a set of non-treated fruit as controls for each condition. Ethephon treated-fruit showed higher contents of hemicelluloses, cellulose and neutral sugars regarding controls, while 1-MCP-treated fruit showed a lower amount of those fractions. On the other hand, ethephon-treated fruit presented a lower quantity of galacturonic acid from ionically and covalently bound pectins regarding controls, while 1-MCP-treated fruit showed higher contents of those components. We also explored the ethylene effect over the mRNA accumulation of genes related to pectins and hemicelluloses metabolism, and a relationship between gene expression patterns and cell wall polysaccharides contents was shown. Moreover, we detected that strawberry necrotrophic pathogens growth more easily on plates containing cell walls from ethephon-treated fruit regarding controls, while a lower growth rate was observed when cell walls from 1-MCP treated fruit were used as the only carbon source, suggesting an effect of ethylene on cell wall structure. Around 60% of strawberry cell wall is made up of pectins, which in turns is 70% made by homogalacturonans. Our findings support the idea of a central role for pectins on strawberry fruit softening and a participation of ethylene in the regulation of this process.

  13. Bile Acid-Activated Receptors, Intestinal Microbiota, and the Treatment of Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Distrutti, Eleonora

    2015-11-01

    The composition of the bile acid pool is a function of the microbial metabolism of bile acids in the intestine. Perturbations of the microbiota shape the bile acid pool and modulate the activity of bile acid-activated receptors (BARs) even beyond the gastrointestinal tract, triggering various metabolic axes and altering host metabolism. Bile acids, in turn, can also regulate the composition of the gut microbiome at the highest taxonomic levels. Primary bile acids from the host are preferential ligands for the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), while secondary bile acids from the microbiota are ligands for G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). In this review, we examine the role of bile acid signaling in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and how changes in bile acid composition affect human metabolism. Bile acids may offer novel therapeutic modalities in inflammation, obesity, and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha (PPARα), a Key Regulator of Lipid Metabolism in Avians.

    PubMed

    Navidshad, Bahman; Royan, M

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids have various effects on cellular metabolism, and many of these effects are carried out through the alteration of the gene expression. Fatty acids upregulate or downregulate the expression of different genes by acting both as agonists or antagonists for nuclear hormone receptors. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. To date, three PPAR subtypes, α, β, and γ, have been recognized. PPARs regulate various target genes with a role in intracellular and extracellular lipid metabolism, mainly those involved in peroxisomal β-oxidation. PPAR controls several genes involved in lipid metabolism, including Δ-5, Δ-6, and Δ-9 desaturases, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase. The activation of PPARα might thus decrease fat deposits indirectly by raising hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation. PPARα is likely part of the regulating system of energy metabolism in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue and skeletal muscles.

  15. Role of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane in Inflammation-Mediated Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Thoudam, Themis; Jeon, Jae-Han; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Lee, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to be one of the most critical factors involved in the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. A few decades ago, the discovery of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM) was followed by the identification of its roles in regulating cellular homeostatic processes, ranging from cellular bioenergetics to apoptosis. MAM provides an excellent platform for numerous signaling pathways; among them, inflammatory signaling pathways associated with MAM play a critical role in cellular defense during pathogenic infections and metabolic disorders. However, induction of MAM causes deleterious effects by amplifying mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation through increased calcium transfer from the ER to mitochondria, thereby causing mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial components into the cytosol as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These mitochondrial DAMPs rapidly activate MAM-resident inflammasome components and other inflammatory factors, which promote inflammasome complex formation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in pathological conditions. Long-term stimulation of the inflammasome instigates chronic inflammation, leading to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of MAM and its association with inflammation-mediated metabolic diseases.

  16. Interplay Between Metabolism and Oncogenic Process: Role of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aastha; Singh, Saurabh; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Pandey, Sanjay; Sandhir, Rajat; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that arises from the alterations in the composition and regulation of several genes leading to the disturbances in signaling pathways, resulting in the dysregulation of cell proliferation and death as well as the ability of transformed cells to invade the host tissue and metastasize. It is increasingly becoming clear that metabolic reprograming plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, targeting this phenotype is considered as a promising approach for the development of therapeutics and adjuvants. The process of metabolic reprograming is linked to the activation of oncogenes and/or suppression of tumor suppressor genes, which are further regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) that play important roles in the interplay between oncogenic process and metabolic reprograming. Looking at the advances made in the recent past, it appears that the translation of knowledge from research in the areas of metabolism, miRNA, and therapeutic response will lead to paradigm shift in the management of this disease. PMID:26740741

  17. Role of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane in Inflammation-Mediated Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jae-Han

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to be one of the most critical factors involved in the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. A few decades ago, the discovery of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM) was followed by the identification of its roles in regulating cellular homeostatic processes, ranging from cellular bioenergetics to apoptosis. MAM provides an excellent platform for numerous signaling pathways; among them, inflammatory signaling pathways associated with MAM play a critical role in cellular defense during pathogenic infections and metabolic disorders. However, induction of MAM causes deleterious effects by amplifying mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation through increased calcium transfer from the ER to mitochondria, thereby causing mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial components into the cytosol as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These mitochondrial DAMPs rapidly activate MAM-resident inflammasome components and other inflammatory factors, which promote inflammasome complex formation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in pathological conditions. Long-term stimulation of the inflammasome instigates chronic inflammation, leading to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of MAM and its association with inflammation-mediated metabolic diseases. PMID:28074080

  18. Role of the clock gene Rev-erbα in metabolism and in the endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Vieira, E; Merino, B; Quesada, I

    2015-09-01

    Several hormones are regulated by circadian rhythms to adjust the metabolism to the light/dark cycles and feeding/activity patterns throughout the day. Circadian rhythms are mainly governed by the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus but also by clocks present in peripheral organs, like the endocrine pancreas. Plasma glucose levels and the main pancreatic hormones insulin and glucagon also exhibit daily variations. Alterations in circadian rhythms are associated with metabolic disturbances and pathologies such as obesity and diabetes. The molecular components of central and peripheral clocks and their regulatory mechanisms are well established. Among the different clock genes, Rev-erbα is considered one of the key links between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Rev-erbα is a critical part of a negative feedback loop in the core circadian clock and modulates the clock oscillatory properties. In addition, Rev-erbα plays an important role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, thermogenesis, adipocyte and muscle differentiation as well as mitochondrial function. In the endocrine pancreas, Rev-erbα regulates insulin and glucagon secretion and pancreatic β-cell proliferation. In the present review, we discuss all these subjects and, particularly, the role of the clock gene Rev-erbα in the endocrine pancreas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Grandparenting Roles and Volunteer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jendrek, Margaret Platt

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We examine whether grandparenting roles are related to formal volunteering among older adults. Method. Logistic regression is used to examine the likelihood of volunteering based on grandchild care using data from the 2004 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (n = 13,785). Longitudinal analyses utilize treatment effects models to examine changes in volunteering for grandparents who begin nonresidential grandchild care between the 2004 and 2008 waves (n = 10,811). Results. Results show that grandparents raising coresidential grandchildren have lower odds of volunteering than grandparents providing no regular grandchild care. However, grandparents who provide nonresidential grandchild care are more likely to volunteer than grandparents not providing grandchild care and those raising a coresidential grandchild. Grandparents who provide nonresidential care for grandchildren engage in more volunteering before assuming grandchild care, and their volunteerism increases after becoming a caregiver for a grandchild. Discussion. Consistent with resource theory and the accumulation of roles, providing nonresidential grandchild care may draw grandparents into formal volunteer activity. The lower human capital resources evidenced by grandparents raising coresidential grandchildren may play a role in their lower likelihood of formal volunteering. PMID:24721748

  20. Metabolic, anabolic, and mitogenic insulin responses: A tissue-specific perspective for insulin receptor activators.

    PubMed

    Bedinger, Daniel H; Adams, Sean H

    2015-11-05

    Insulin acts as the major regulator of the fasting-to-fed metabolic transition by altering substrate metabolism, promoting energy storage, and helping activate protein synthesis. In addition to its glucoregulatory and other metabolic properties, insulin can also act as a growth factor. The metabolic and mitogenic responses to insulin are regulated by divergent post-receptor signaling mechanisms downstream from the activated insulin receptor (IR). However, the anabolic and growth-promoting properties of insulin require tissue-specific inter-relationships between the two pathways, and the nature and scope of insulin-regulated processes vary greatly across tissues. Understanding the nuances of this interplay between metabolic and growth-regulating properties of insulin would have important implications for development of novel insulin and IR modulator therapies that stimulate insulin receptor activation in both pathway- and tissue-specific manners. This review will provide a unique perspective focusing on the roles of "metabolic" and "mitogenic" actions of insulin signaling in various tissues, and how these networks should be considered when evaluating selective pharmacologic approaches to prevent or treat metabolic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. One-Carbon Metabolism in Prostate Cancer: The Role of Androgen Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Joshua M.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell metabolism differs significantly from the metabolism of non-transformed cells. This altered metabolic reprogramming mediates changes in the uptake and use of nutrients that permit high rates of proliferation, growth, and survival. The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the establishment and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and in the metabolic adaptation that takes place during this progression. In its role as a transcription factor, the AR directly affects the expression of several effectors and regulators of essential catabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Indirectly, as a modulator of the one-carbon metabolism, the AR can affect epigenetic processes, DNA metabolism, and redox balance, all of which are important factors in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on the role of AR-signaling on one-carbon metabolism in tumorigenesis. Clinical implications of one-carbon metabolism and AR-targeted therapies for PCa are discussed in this context. PMID:27472325

  2. Anatomical Grading for Metabolic Activity of Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Anton S.; Nagel, Hannes W.; Wolfrum, Christian; Burger, Irene A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advances in obesity research suggest that BAT activity, or absence thereof, may be an important factor in the growing epidemic of obesity and its manifold complications. It is thus important to assess larger populations for BAT-activating and deactivating factors. 18FDG-PET/CT is the standard method to detect and quantify metabolic BAT activity, however, the manual measurement is not suitable for large studies due to its time-consuming nature and poor reproducibility across different software and devices. Methodology/Main Findings In a retrospective study, 1060 consecutive scans of 1031 patients receiving a diagnostic 18FDG-PET/CT were examined for the presence of active BAT. Patients were classified according to a 3-tier system (supraclavicular, mediastinal, infradiaphragmatic) depending on the anatomical location of their active BAT depots, with the most caudal location being the decisive factor. The metabolic parameters (maximum activity, total volume and total glycolysis) were measured on a standard PET/CT workstation. Mean age of the population was 60±14.6y. 41.61% of patients were female. Metabolically active BAT was found in 53 patients (5.1%). Female, younger and leaner patients tended to have more active BAT, higher metabolic activity and more caudally active BAT. In total, 15 patients showed only supraclavicular, 27 additional mediastinal, and 11 infradiaphragmal activity. Interestingly, the activation of BAT always followed a cranio-caudal gradient. This anatomical pattern correlated with age and BMI as well as with all metabolic parameters, including maximum and total glycolysis (p<0.001). Conclusion Based on our data we propose a simple method to grade or quantify the degree of BAT amount/activity in patients based on the most caudally activated depot. As new modalities for BAT visualization may arise in the future, this system would allow direct comparability with other modalities, in contrary to the PET-metrics, which are

  3. Preventive role of exercise training in autonomic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters in rats under high risk of metabolic syndrome development.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Silva, Ivana Cinthya; Mostarda, Cristiano; Moreira, Edson Dias; Silva, Kleiton Augusto Santos; dos Santos, Fernando; de Angelis, Kátia; Farah, Vera de Moura Azevedo; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia

    2013-03-15

    High fructose consumption contributes to metabolic syndrome incidence, whereas exercise training promotes several beneficial adaptations. In this study, we demonstrated the preventive role of exercise training in the metabolic syndrome derangements in a rat model. Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/l) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill (FT) or kept sedentary (F) for 10 wk. Control rats treated with normal water were also submitted to exercise training (CT) or sedentarism (C). Metabolic evaluations consisted of the Lee index and glycemia and insulin tolerance test (kITT). Blood pressure (BP) was directly measured, whereas heart rate (HR) and BP variabilities were evaluated in time and frequency domains. Renal sympathetic nerve activity was also recorded. F rats presented significant alterations compared with all the other groups in insulin resistance (in mg · dl(-1) · min(-1): F: 3.4 ± 0.2; C: 4.7 ± 0.2; CT: 5.0 ± 0.5 FT: 4.6 ± 0.4), mean BP (in mmHG: F: 117 ± 2; C: 100 ± 2; CT: 98 ± 2; FT: 105 ± 2), and Lee index (in g/mm: F = 0.31 ± 0.001; C = 0.29 ± 0.001; CT = 0.27 ± 0.002; FT = 0.28 ± 0.002), confirming the metabolic syndrome diagnosis. Exercise training blunted all these derangements. Additionally, FS group presented autonomic dysfunction in relation to the others, as seen by an ≈ 50% decrease in baroreflex sensitivity and 24% in HR variability, and increases in sympathovagal balance (140%) and in renal sympathetic nerve activity (45%). These impairments were not observed in FT group, as well as in C and CT. Correlation analysis showed that both Lee index and kITT were associated with vagal impairment caused by fructose. Therefore, exercise training plays a preventive role in both autonomic and hemodynamic alterations related to the excessive fructose consumption.

  4. The Role of Dietary Cholesterol in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Related Metabolic Abnormalities: A Mini-review.

    PubMed

    Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Surendiran, Gangadaran; Goulet, Amy; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2016-10-25

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in cell biology. Dietary cholesterol or "exogenous" cholesterol accounts for approximately one-third of the pooled body cholesterol, and the remaining 70% is synthesized in the body (endogenous cholesterol). Increased dietary cholesterol intake may result in increased serum cholesterol in some individuals, while other subjects may not respond to dietary cholesterol. However, diet-increased serum cholesterol levels do not increase the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL) cholesterol ratio, nor do they decrease the size of LDL particles or HDL cholesterol levels. Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, reduced HDL cholesterol levels, and small, dense LDL particles are independent risk factors for coronary artery disease. Dietary cholesterol is the primary approach for treatment of conditions such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Recent studies have highlighted mechanisms for absorption of dietary cholesterol. These studies have help understand how dietary and/or pharmaceutical agents inhibit cholesterol absorption and thereby reduce LDL cholesterol concentrations. In this article, various aspects of cholesterol metabolism, including dietary sources, absorption, and abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism, have been summarized and discussed.

  5. The role of PHB metabolism in the symbiosis of rhizobia with legumes.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2006-07-01

    The carbon storage polymer poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a potential biodegradable alternative to plastics, which plays a key role in the cellular metabolism of many bacterial species. Most species of rhizobia synthesize PHB but not all species accumulate it during symbiosis with legumes; the reason for this remains unclear, although it was recently shown that a metabolic mutant of a nonaccumulating species retains the capacity to store PHB in symbiosis. Although the precise roles of PHB metabolism in these bacteria during infection, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation are not determined, the elucidation of these roles will influence our understanding of the metabolic nature of the symbiotic relationship. This review explores the progress that was made in determining the biochemistry and genetics of PHB metabolism. This includes the elucidation of the PHB cycle, variations in PHB metabolism among rhizobial species, and the implications of these variations, while proposing a model for the role of PHB metabolism and storage in symbiosis.

  6. Metabolic Roles of Uncultivated Bacterioplankton Lineages in the Northern Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone”

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Kiley W.; Temperton, Ben; Gillies, Lauren E.; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Henrissat, Bernard; Mason, Olivia U.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine regions that have seasonal to long-term low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, sometimes called “dead zones,” are increasing in number and severity around the globe with deleterious effects on ecology and economics. One of the largest of these coastal dead zones occurs on the continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM), which results from eutrophication-enhanced bacterioplankton respiration and strong seasonal stratification. Previous research in this dead zone revealed the presence of multiple cosmopolitan bacterioplankton lineages that have eluded cultivation, and thus their metabolic roles in this ecosystem remain unknown. We used a coupled shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approach to determine the metabolic potential of Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, SAR406, and SAR202. We recovered multiple high-quality, nearly complete genomes from all three groups as well as candidate phyla usually associated with anoxic environments—Parcubacteria (OD1) and Peregrinibacteria. Two additional groups with putative assignments to ACD39 and PAUC34f supplement the metabolic contributions by uncultivated taxa. Our results indicate active metabolism in all groups, including prevalent aerobic respiration, with concurrent expression of genes for nitrate reduction in SAR406 and SAR202, and dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonia and sulfur reduction by SAR406. We also report a variety of active heterotrophic carbon processing mechanisms, including degradation of complex carbohydrate compounds by SAR406, SAR202, ACD39, and PAUC34f. Together, these data help constrain the metabolic contributions from uncultivated groups in the nGOM during periods of low DO and suggest roles for these organisms in the breakdown of complex organic matter. PMID:28900024

  7. Cytochrome P450 2D6 and Parkinson's Disease: Polymorphism, Metabolic Role, Risk and Protection.

    PubMed

    Ur Rasheed, Mohd Sami; Mishra, Abhishek Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2017-09-04

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 is one of the most highly active, oxidative and polymorphic enzymes known to metabolize Parkinsonian toxins and clinically established anti-Parkinson's disease (PD) drugs. Albeit CYP2D6 gene is not present in rodents, its orthologs perform almost the similar function with imprecise substrate and inhibitor specificity. CYP2D6 expression and catalytic activity are found to be regulated at every stage of the central dogma except replication as well as at the epigenetic level. CYP2D6 gene codes for a set of alternate splice variants that give rise to a range of enzymes possessing variable catalytic activity. Case-control studies, meta-analysis and systemic reviews covering CYP2D6 polymorphism and PD risk have demonstrated that poor metabolizer phenotype possesses a considerable genetic susceptibility. Besides, ultra-rapid metabolizer offers protection against the risk in some populations while lack of positive or inverse association is also reported in other inhabitants. CYP2D6 polymorphisms resulting into deviant protein products with differing catalytic activity could lead to inter-individual variations, which could be explained to certain extent on the basis of sample size, life style factors, food habits, ethnicity and tools used for statistical analysis across various studies. Current article describes the role played by polymorphic CYP2D6 in the metabolism of anti-PD drugs/Parkinsonian toxins and how polymorphisms determine PD risk or protection. Moreover, CYP2D6 orthologs and their roles in rodent models of Parkinsonism have also been mentioned. Finally, a perspective on inconsistency in the findings and futuristic relevance of CYP2D6 polymorphisms in disease diagnosis and treatment has also been highlighted.

  8. Short term exposure to elevated levels of leptin reduces proximal tubule cell metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Jessica F; Grinfeld, Esther; McAinch, Andrew J; Poronnik, Philip; Hryciw, Deanne H

    2014-01-25

    Leptin plays a pathophysiological role in the kidney, however, its acute effects on the proximal tubule cells (PTCs) are unknown. In opossum kidney (OK) cells in vitro, Western blot analysis identified that exposure to leptin increases the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p44/42 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Importantly leptin (0.05, 0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 μg/ml) significantly reduced the metabolic activity of PTCs, and significantly decreased protein content per cell. Investigation of the role of p44/42 and mTOR on metabolic activity and protein content per cell, demonstrated that in the presence of MAPK inhibitor U0126 and mTOR inhibitor Ku-63794, that the mTOR pathway is responsible for the reduction in PTC metabolic activity in response to leptin. However, p44/42 and mTOR play no role the reduced protein content per cell in OKs exposed to leptin. Therefore, leptin modulates metabolic activity in PTCs via an mTOR regulated pathway.

  9. Regulatory T cells as suppressors of anti-tumor immunity: Role of metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Veronica; Di Rella, Francesca; Di Giacomo, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    Novel concepts in immunometabolism support the hypothesis that glucose consumption is also used to modulate anti-tumor immune responses, favoring growth and expansion of specific cellular subsets defined in the past as suppressor T cells and currently reborn as regulatory T (Treg) cells. During the 1920s, Otto Warburg and colleagues observed that tumors consumed high amounts of glucose compared to normal tissues, even in the presence of oxygen and completely functioning mitochondria. However, the role of the Warburg Effect is still not completely understood, particularly in the context of an ongoing anti-tumor immune response. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-derived metabolic restrictions can drive T cell hyporesponsiveness and immune tolerance. For example, several glycolytic enzymes, deregulated in cancer, contribute to tumor progression independently from their canonical metabolic activity. Indeed, they can control apoptosis, gene expression and activation of specific intracellular pathways, thus suggesting a direct link between metabolic switches and pro-tumorigenic transcriptional programs. Focus of this review is to define the specific metabolic pathways controlling Treg cell immunobiology in the context of anti-tumor immunity and tumor progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lima, William Gustavo; Marques-Oliveira, Gleuber Henrique; da Silva, Thaís Marques; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2017-09-07

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide produced by alternative tissue-specific splicing of the primary transcript of the CALC genes. CGRP is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in several organs and tissues. The presence of CGRP in the liver and brown and white adipose tissue suggests an effect of this neuropeptide on regulation of energy homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effect of CGRP on the control of energy metabolism, primarily focusing on food intake, thermoregulation and lipid metabolism in adipose tissue, liver and muscle. CGRP induces anorexia, stimulating anorexigenic neuropeptide and/or inhibiting orexigenic neuropeptide expression, through cAMP/PKA pathway activation. CGRP also induces energy expenditure, increasing the skin temperature and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. It has been also suggested that information related to peripheral lipid stores may be conveyed to the brain via CGRP-sensory innervation from adipose tissue. More recently, it was demonstrated that mice lacking αCGRP are protected from obesity induced by high-fat diet and that CGRP regulates the content of lipid in liver, muscle and adipose tissue. It is unclear the receptor responsible by CGRP effects, as well as whether this neuropeptide acts directly or indirectly in liver, muscle and adipose tissue.

  11. Biochemical and nutritional markers and antioxidant activity in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabé García, Juana; Zafrilla Rentero, Pilar; Mulero Cánovas, Juana; Gómez Jara, Purificación; Leal Hernández, Mariano; Abellán Alemán, José

    2014-01-01

    1) Nutritional assessment of the diet followed by patients with metabolic syndrome, and 2) biochemical analysis of the oxidation-reduction level in patients with metabolic syndrome. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with metabolic syndrome in Murcia. Fifty-three patients, 33 with and 20 without (control group) metabolic syndrome, were selected. The intervention consisted of completion of a recall survey and a test to nutritionally assess dietary intake. Anthropometric and laboratory variables, including those related to antioxidant activity, were also tested. Antioxidant activity was within normal limits in both groups (1.7 ± 0.2 mmol/L in the control group and 1.8 ± 0.1 mmol/L in the metabolic syndrome group) (NS). Superoxide dismutase levels were not significantly different between the groups. Mean glutathione reductase levels (U/L) were higher in the control group as compared to patients with metabolic syndrome (P<.05). As regards oxidative stress biomarkers, mean isoprostane levels were higher in the control group (4.9 ± 6.2 ng/mL) than in metabolic syndrome patients (3.5 ± 3.9 ng/mL) (P<.05). Oxidized LDL values tended to be higher in metabolic syndrome patients (96 ± 23.2U/L) as compared to the control group (86.2 ± 17.3 U/L), but differences were not significant. There is a trend to a poorer nutritional and biochemical profile in patients with metabolic syndrome, who also tend to have a greater degree of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures.

  13. Ethanol Metabolism Activates Cell Cycle Checkpoint Kinase, Chk2

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L.; Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Nuss, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse results in hepatocyte injury and impairs hepatocyte replication. We have previously shown that ethanol metabolism results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition, which is partially mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2. To further delineate the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates this G2/M arrest, we investigated the involvement of upstream regulators of Cdc2 activity. Cdc2 is activated by the phosphatase Cdc25C. The activity of Cdc25C can, in turn, be regulated by the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which is regulated by the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). To investigate the involvement of these regulators of Cdc2 activity, VA-13 cells, which are Hep G2 cells modified to efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase, were cultured in the presence or absence of 25 mM ethanol. Immunoblots were performed to determine the effects of ethanol metabolism on the activation of Cdc25C, Chk2, and ATM. Ethanol metabolism increased the active forms of ATM, and Chk2, as well as the phosphorylated form of Cdc25C. Additionally, inhibition of ATM resulted in approximately 50% of the cells being rescued from the G2/M cell cycle arrest, and ameliorated the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Our findings demonstrate that ethanol metabolism activates ATM. ATM can activate the checkpoint kinase Chk2, resulting in phosphorylation of Cdc25C, and ultimately in the accumulation of inactive Cdc2. This may, in part, explain the ethanol metabolism-mediated impairment in hepatocyte replication, which may be important in the initiation and progression of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:21924579

  14. Role of alcohol in the regulation of iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2007-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease frequently exhibit increased body iron stores, as reflected by elevated serum iron indices (transferrin saturation, ferritin) and hepatic iron concentration. Even mild to moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to increase the prevalence of iron overload. Moreover, increased hepatic iron content is associated with greater mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for iron in alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol increases the severity of disease in patients with genetic hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder common in the Caucasian population. Both iron and alcohol individually cause oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, which culminates in liver injury. Despite these observations, the underlying mechanisms of iron accumulation and the source of the excess iron observed in alcoholic liver disease remain unclear. Over the last decade, several novel iron-regulatory proteins have been identified and these have greatly enhanced our understanding of iron metabolism. For example, hepcidin, a circulatory antimicrobial peptide synthesized by the hepatocytes of the liver is now known to play a central role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review attempts to describe the interaction of alcohol and iron-regulatory molecules. Understanding these molecular mechanisms is of considerable clinical importance because both alcoholic liver disease and genetic hemochromatosis are common diseases, in which alcohol and iron appear to act synergistically to cause liver injury. PMID:17854133

  15. Sphingolipid metabolism and its role in the skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Khavandgar, Zohreh; Murshed, Monzur

    2015-03-01

    The regulators affecting skeletal tissue formation and its maintenance include a wide array of molecules with very diverse functions. More recently, sphingolipids have been added to this growing list of regulatory molecules in the skeletal tissues. Sphingolipids are integral parts of various lipid membranes present in the cells and organelles. For a long time, these macromolecules were considered as inert structural elements. This view, however, has radically changed in recent years as sphingolipids are now recognized as important second messengers for signal-transduction pathways that affect cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and programmed death. In the current review, we discuss the available data showing the roles of various sphingolipids in three different skeletal cell types-chondrocytes in cartilage and osteoblasts and osteoclasts in bone. We provide an overview of the biology of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3), an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism in the skeleton. SMPD3 is localized in the plasma membrane and has been shown to cleave sphingomyelin to generate ceramide, a bioactive lipid second messenger, and phosphocholine, an essential nutrient. SMPD3 deficiency in mice impairs the mineralization in both cartilage and bone extracellular matrices leading to severe skeletal deformities. A detailed understanding of SMPD3 function may provide a novel insight on the role of sphingolipids in the skeletal tissues.

  16. Physical Activity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Overweight in Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Davis, Catherine L.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Lewis, Richard D.; Yin, Zenong

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research suggests significant health differences between rural dwelling youth and their urban counterparts with relation to cardiovascular risk factors. This study was conducted to (1) determine relationships between physical activity and markers of metabolic syndrome, and (2) to explore factors relating to physical activity in a…

  17. Physical Activity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Overweight in Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Davis, Catherine L.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Lewis, Richard D.; Yin, Zenong

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research suggests significant health differences between rural dwelling youth and their urban counterparts with relation to cardiovascular risk factors. This study was conducted to (1) determine relationships between physical activity and markers of metabolic syndrome, and (2) to explore factors relating to physical activity in a…

  18. Role of retinoic acid metabolizing cytochrome P450s, CYP26, in inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevison, Faith; Jing, Jing; Tripathy, Sasmita; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) and its active metabolite, all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), play critical roles in regulating the differentiation, growth and migration of immune cells. Similarly, as critical signaling molecules in the regulation of the cell cycle, retinoids are important in cancers. Concentrations of atRA are tightly regulated in tissues, predominantly by the availability of retinol, synthesis of atRA by ALDH1A enzymes and metabolism and clearance of atRA by CYP26 enzymes. The ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes are expressed in several cell types in the immune system and in cancer cells. In the immune system the ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes appear to modulate RA concentrations. Consequently, alterations in the activity of ALDH1A and CYP26 enzymes are expected to change disease outcomes in inflammation. There is increasing evidence from various disease models of intestinal and skin inflammation that treatment with atRA has a positive effect on disease markers. However, whether aberrant atRA concentrations or atRA synthesis and metabolism play a role in inflammatory disease development and progression is not well understood. In cancers, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia and neuroblastoma, increasing intracellular concentrations of atRA appears to provide clinical benefit. Inhibition of the CYP26 enzymes to increase atRA concentrations and combat therapy resistance has been pursued as a drug target in these cancers. This chapter covers the current knowledge of how atRA and retinol regulate the immune system and inflammation, how retinol and atRA metabolism is altered in inflammation and cancer and what roles atRA metabolizing enzymes have in immune responses and cancers. PMID:26233912

  19. Bioirrigation impacts on sediment respiration and microbial metabolic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. A.; Lewandowski, J.; Romeijn, P.; Krause, S.

    2015-12-01

    Some bioturbators build tubes in the sediment and pump water through their burrows (ventilation). Oxygen is transferred through the burrow walls in the adjacent sediment (bioirrigation). Bioirrigation is playing a pivotal role in the mediation of biogeochemical processes in lake sediments and has the potential to enhance nutrient cycling. The present study investigates the impact of bioirrigation on lake sediment metabolism, respiration rates and in particular, the biogeochemical impacts of bioirrigation intensity as a function of organism density. We therefore apply the bioreactive Resazurin/Resorufin smart tracer system for quantifying the impact of different densities of Chironomidae (Diptera) larvae (0-2112 larvae/m2) on lake sediment respiration in a microcosm experiment. Tracer decay has been found to be proportional to the amount of the aerobic respiration at the sediment-water interface. Tracer transformation was in good agreement with Chironomidae density (correlation, r=0.9). Tracer transformation rates (and sediment respiration) were found to be correlated to Chironomidae density, with highest transformation rates observed in the microcosms with highest density of 2112 larvae/m2. This relationship was not linear though, with sediment respiration rates at the highest larvae densities declining from the linear trend predicted from lower and intermediate larvae density-respiration relationships. We interpret this effect as a density dependent suppression of the Chironomid's metabolic activity. The observations of this study have implications for eutrophied lakes with high densities of bioirrigators. Despite high density of bioirrigirrigating benthos, mineralization of the organic matter in such habitats would likely be lower than in lakes with intermediate densities of the bioturbators.

  20. The role of ABC transporters in drug resistance, metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Glavinas, Hristos; Krajcsi, Péter; Cserepes, Judit; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2004-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters form a special family of membrane proteins, characterized by homologous ATP-binding, and large, multispanning transmembrane domains. Several members of this family are primary active transporters, which significantly modulate the absorption, metabolism, cellular effectivity and toxicity of pharmacological agents. This review provides a general overview of the human ABC transporters, their expression, localization and basic mechanism of action. Then we shortly deal with the human ABC transporters as targets of therapeutic interventions in medicine, including cancer drug resistance, lipid and other metabolic disorders, and even gene therapy applications. We place a special emphasis on the three major groups of ABC transporters involved in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). These are the classical P-glycoprotein (MDR1, ABCB1), the multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs, in the ABCC subfamily), and the ABCG2 protein, an ABC half-transporter. All these proteins catalyze an ATP-dependent active transport of chemically unrelated compounds, including anticancer drugs. MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 preferentially extrude large hydrophobic, positively charged molecules, while the members of the MRP family can extrude both hydrophobic uncharged molecules and water-soluble anionic compounds. Based on the physiological expression and role of these transporters, we provide examples for their role in Absorption-Distribution-Metabolism-Excretion (ADME) and toxicology, and describe several basic assays which can be applied for screening drug interactions with ABC transporters in the course of drug research and development.

  1. Getting a Handle on the Role of Coenzyme M in Alkene Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnakumar, A.M.; Sliwa, D.; Endrizzi, J.A.; Boyd, E.S.; Ensign, S.A.; Peters, J.W.

    2009-05-20

    Coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonate; CoM) is one of several atypical cofactors discovered in methanogenic archaea which participate in the biological reduction of CO{sub 2} to methane. Elegantly simple, CoM, so named for its role as a methyl carrier in all methanogenic archaea, is the smallest known organic cofactor. It was thought that this cofactor was used exclusively in methanogenesis until it was recently discovered that CoM is a key cofactor in the pathway of propylene metabolism in the gram-negative soil microorganism Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2. A four-step pathway requiring CoM converts propylene and CO{sub 2} to acetoacetate, which feeds into central metabolism. In this process, CoM is used to activate and convert highly electrophilic epoxypropane, formed from propylene epoxidation, into a nucleophilic species that undergoes carboxylation. The unique properties of CoM provide a chemical handle for orienting compounds for site-specific redox chemistry and stereospecific catalysis. The three-dimensional structures of several of the enzymes in the pathway of propylene metabolism in defined states have been determined, providing significant insights into both the enzyme mechanisms and the role of CoM in this pathway. These studies provide the structural basis for understanding the efficacy of CoM as a handle to direct organic substrate transformations at the active sites of enzymes.

  2. The role of depressed metabolism in increased radio resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies are presented of the physiology of depressed metabolism, radio-resistance in depressed metabolic states, comparative aspects of depressed metabolism, and gastrointestinal responses to ionizing radiation. Specific data cover helium-cold induced hypothermia in white rats and hamsters, and radiation responses and intestinal absorption in the gerbil.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Monsalve, Francisco A; Pyarasani, Radha D; Delgado-Lopez, Fernando; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is estimated to affect more than one in five adults, and its prevalence is growing in the adult and pediatric populations. The most widely recognized metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics commonly manifest a prothrombotic state and a proinflammatory state as well. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) may serve as potential therapeutic targets for treating the metabolic syndrome and its related risk factors. The PPARs are transcriptional factors belonging to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. So far, three isoforms of PPARs have been identified, namely, PPAR- α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ. Various endogenous and exogenous ligands of PPARs have been identified. PPAR- α and PPAR- γ are mainly involved in regulating lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, and their agonists are used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and T2DM. Whereas PPAR- β / δ function is to regulate lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, anti-inflammation, and fatty acid oxidation and its agonists are used in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. This review mainly focuses on the biological role of PPARs in gene regulation and metabolic diseases, with particular focus on the therapeutic potential of PPAR modulators in the treatment of thrombosis.

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Targets for the Treatment of Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, Francisco A.; Pyarasani, Radha D.; Delgado-Lopez, Fernando; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is estimated to affect more than one in five adults, and its prevalence is growing in the adult and pediatric populations. The most widely recognized metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics commonly manifest a prothrombotic state and a proinflammatory state as well. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) may serve as potential therapeutic targets for treating the metabolic syndrome and its related risk factors. The PPARs are transcriptional factors belonging to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. So far, three isoforms of PPARs have been identified, namely, PPAR-α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ. Various endogenous and exogenous ligands of PPARs have been identified. PPAR-α and PPAR-γ are mainly involved in regulating lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, and their agonists are used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and T2DM. Whereas PPAR-β/δ function is to regulate lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, anti-inflammation, and fatty acid oxidation and its agonists are used in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. This review mainly focuses on the biological role of PPARs in gene regulation and metabolic diseases, with particular focus on the therapeutic potential of PPAR modulators in the treatment of thrombosis. PMID:23781121

  5. Influence of physical activity to bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Drenjančević, Ines; Davidović Cvetko, Erna

    2013-02-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifetime process. Peak bone mass is achieved in the twenties, and that value is very important for skeleton health in older years of life. Modern life style with its diet poor in nutrients, and very low intensity of physical activity negatively influences health in general, and bone health as well. Bones are adapting to changes in load, so applying mechanical strain to bones results in greater bone mass and hardness. That makes physical activity important in maintaining skeleton health. Numerous studies confirm good influence of regular exercising to bone health, and connection of physical activity in youth to better bone density in older age. To activate bone remodeling mechanisms, it is necessary to apply mechanical strain to bones by exercise. Considering global problem of bone loss and osteoporosis new ways of activating young people to practice sports and active stile of life are necessary to maintain skeleton health and health in general. This paper aims to review physiological mechanisms of bone remodeling that are influenced by physical exercise.

  6. Role of sleep and circadian disruption on energy expenditure and in metabolic predisposition to human obesity and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    McHill, A W; Wright, K P

    2017-02-01

    Weight gain, obesity and diabetes have reached alarming levels in the developed world. Traditional risk factors such as over-eating, poor nutritional choices and lack of exercise cannot fully account for the high prevalence of metabolic disease. This review paper examines the scientific evidence on two novel risk factors that contribute to dys-regulated metabolic physiology: sleep disruption and circadian misalignment. Specifically, fundamental relationships between energy metabolism and sleep and circadian rhythms and the impact of sleep and circadian disruption on metabolic physiology are examined. Millions of individuals worldwide do not obtain sufficient sleep for healthy metabolic function, and many participate in shift work and social activities at times when the internal physiological clock is promoting sleep. These behaviours predispose an individual for poor metabolic health by promoting excess caloric intake in response to reduced sleep, food intake at internal biological times when metabolic physiology is not prepared, decreased energy expenditure when wakefulness and sleep are initiated at incorrect internal biological times, and disrupted glucose metabolism during short sleep and circadian misalignment. In addition to the traditional risk factors of poor diet and exercise, disturbed sleep and circadian rhythms represent modifiable risk factors for prevention and treatment of metabolic disease and for promotion of healthy metabolism.

  7. PARP-1 inhibition increases mitochondrial metabolism through SIRT1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Péter; Canto, Carles; Oudart, Hughes; Brunyánszki, Attila; Cen, Yana; Thomas, Charles; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Huber, Aline; Kiss, Borbála; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Schreiber, Valérie; Sauve, Anthony A.; Murcia, Josiane Menissier-de; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Summary SIRT1 regulates energy homeostasis by controlling the acetylation status and activity of a number of enzymes and transcriptional regulators. The fact that NAD+ levels control SIRT1 activity confers a hypothetical basis for the design of new strategies to activate SIRT1 by increasing NAD+ availability. Here we show that the deletion of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) gene, encoding a major NAD+-consuming enzyme, increases NAD+ content and SIRT1 activity in brown adipose tissue and muscle. PARP-1−/− mice phenocopied many aspects of SIRT1 activation, such as a higher mitochondrial content, increased energy expenditure, and protection against metabolic disease. Also, the pharmacologic inhibition of PARP in vitro and in vivo increased NAD+ content, SIRT1 activity and enhanced oxidative metabolism. These data show how PARP-1 inhibition has strong metabolic implications through the modulation of SIRT1 activity, a property that not only could be useful in the management of metabolic diseases but also of cancer. PMID:21459330

  8. Discovering the role of mitochondria in the iron deficiency-induced metabolic responses of plants.

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis is a major problem, affecting both yield and quality of crops. Plants have evolved multifaceted strategies, such as reductase activity, proton extrusion, and specialised storage proteins, to mobilise Fe from the environment and distribute it within the plant. Because of its fundamental role in plant productivity, several issues concerning Fe homeostasis in plants are currently intensively studied. The activation of Fe uptake reactions requires an overall adaptation of the primary metabolism because these activities need the constant supply of energetic substrates (i.e., NADPH and ATP). Several studies concerning the metabolism of Fe-deficient plants have been conducted, but research focused on mitochondrial implications in adaptive responses to nutritional stress has only begun in recent years. Mitochondria are the energetic centre of the root cell, and they are strongly affected by Fe deficiency. Nevertheless, they display a high level of functional flexibility, which allows them to maintain the viability of the cell. Mitochondria represent a crucial target of studies on plant homeostasis, and it might be of interest to concentrate future research on understanding how mitochondria orchestrate the reprogramming of root cell metabolism under Fe deficiency. In this review, I summarise what it is known about the effect of Fe deficiency on mitochondrial metabolism and morphology. Moreover, I present a detailed view of the possible roles of mitochondria in the development of plant responses to Fe deficiency, integrating old findings with new and discussing new hypotheses for future investigations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. A systematic review of the protective role of swertiamarin in cardiac and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Leong, Xin Yu; Thanikachalam, Punniyakoti Veeraveedu; Pandey, Manisha; Ramamurthy, Srinivasan

    2016-12-01

    Swertiamarin, is a secoiridoid glycoside found in genera of Enicostemma Species (Enicostemma littorale and Enicostemma axillare) belonging to the family of gentianaceae, which has been reported to cure many diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, arthritis, malaria and abdominal ulcers. However, to the best of our knowledge, till date systematic studies to understand the molecular basis of cardiac and metabolic disease preventing properties of swertiamarin has not been reported. The present review aims to compile an up-to-date information on the progress made in the protective role of swertiamarin in cardiac and metabolic diseases with the objective of providing a guide for future research on this bioactive molecule. Information on the swertiamarin was collected from major scientific databases (Pubmed, Springer, google scholar, and Web of Science) for publication between1974-2016. In this review, the protective role of swertiamarin on cardiac and metabolic diseases was discussed. Swertiamarin reported to exhibit a wide range of biological activities such as anti-atherosclerotic, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. These activities were mainly due to its effect on various signaling pathways associated with cardiac remodeling events such as inhibition of NF-kB expression, LDL oxidation, apoptosis, inflammatory and lipid peroxidation markers and stimulation of antioxidant enzymes. Sweriamarin exhibit a wide range of biological activities. This review presents evidence supporting the point of view that swertiamarin should be considered a potential therapeutic agent against cardiac and metabolic diseases, giving rise to novel applications in their prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The dominant glutamic acid metabolic flux to produce γ-amino butyric acid over proline in Nicotiana tabacum leaves under water stress relates to its significant role in antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuili; Zhao, Li; Yu, Guanghui

    2011-08-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) and proline play a crucial role in protecting plants during various environmental stresses. Their synthesis is from the common precursor glutamic acid, which is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase and Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase respectively. However, the dominant pathway under water stress has not yet been established. To explore this, excised tobacco leaves were used to simulate a water-stress condition. The results showed GABA content was much higher than that of proline in leaves under water-deficit and non-water-deficit conditions. Specifically, the amount of GABA significantly increased compared to proline under continuous water loss for 16 h, indicating that GABA biosynthesis is the dominant pathway from glutamic acid metabolism under these conditions. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and protein Western gel-blot analysis further confirmed this. To explore the function of GABA accumulation, a system producing superoxide anion (O(2) (-) ), peroxide hydrogen (H(2) O(2) ), and singlet oxygen ((1) O(2) ) was employed to investigate the scavenging role on free-radical production. The results demonstrated that the scavenging ability of GABA for O(2) (-) , H(2) O(2) , and (1) O(2) was significantly higher than that of proline. This indicated that GABA acts as an effective osmolyte to reduce the production of reactive oxygen species under water stress.

  11. The role of metabolic reprogramming in T cell fate and function

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Weaver, Jessica; Herbel, Christoph; Seth, Pankaj; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes undergo extensive changes in their metabolic properties during their transition through various differentiation states, from naïve to effector to memory or regulatory roles. The cause and effect relationship between metabolism and differentiation is a field of intense investigation. Many recent studies demonstrate the dependency of T cell functional outcomes on metabolic pathways and the possibility of metabolic intervention to modify these functions. In this review, we describe the basic metabolic features of T cells and new findings on how these correlate with various differentiation fates and functions. We also highlight the latest information regarding the main factors that affect T cell metabolic reprogramming. PMID:28356677

  12. Adrenaline: insights into its metabolic roles in hypoglycaemia and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Verberne, A J M; Korim, W S; Sabetghadam, A; Llewellyn-Smith, I J

    2016-05-01

    Adrenaline is a hormone that has profound actions on the cardiovascular system and is also a mediator of the fight-or-flight response. Adrenaline is now increasingly recognized as an important metabolic hormone that helps mobilize energy stores in the form of glucose and free fatty acids in preparation for physical activity or for recovery from hypoglycaemia. Recovery from hypoglycaemia is termed counter-regulation and involves the suppression of endogenous insulin secretion, activation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells and activation of adrenaline secretion. Secretion of adrenaline is controlled by presympathetic neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla, which are, in turn, under the control of central and/or peripheral glucose-sensing neurons. Adrenaline is particularly important for counter-regulation in individuals with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes because these patients do not produce endogenous insulin and also lose their ability to secrete glucagon soon after diagnosis. Type 1 diabetic patients are therefore critically dependent on adrenaline for restoration of normoglycaemia and attenuation or loss of this response in the hypoglycaemia unawareness condition can have serious, sometimes fatal, consequences. Understanding the neural control of hypoglycaemia-induced adrenaline secretion is likely to identify new therapeutic targets for treating this potentially life-threatening condition.

  13. Adrenaline: insights into its metabolic roles in hypoglycaemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Korim, W S; Sabetghadam, A; Llewellyn‐Smith, I J

    2016-01-01

    Adrenaline is a hormone that has profound actions on the cardiovascular system and is also a mediator of the fight‐or‐flight response. Adrenaline is now increasingly recognized as an important metabolic hormone that helps mobilize energy stores in the form of glucose and free fatty acids in preparation for physical activity or for recovery from hypoglycaemia. Recovery from hypoglycaemia is termed counter‐regulation and involves the suppression of endogenous insulin secretion, activation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic α‐cells and activation of adrenaline secretion. Secretion of adrenaline is controlled by presympathetic neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla, which are, in turn, under the control of central and/or peripheral glucose‐sensing neurons. Adrenaline is particularly important for counter‐regulation in individuals with type 1 (insulin‐dependent) diabetes because these patients do not produce endogenous insulin and also lose their ability to secrete glucagon soon after diagnosis. Type 1 diabetic patients are therefore critically dependent on adrenaline for restoration of normoglycaemia and attenuation or loss of this response in the hypoglycaemia unawareness condition can have serious, sometimes fatal, consequences. Understanding the neural control of hypoglycaemia‐induced adrenaline secretion is likely to identify new therapeutic targets for treating this potentially life‐threatening condition. PMID:26896587

  14. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  15. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-02-19

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation.

  16. Role of the Vasopressin/Apelin Balance and Potential Use of Metabolically Stable Apelin Analogs in Water Metabolism Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Flahault, Adrien; Couvineau, Pierre; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Iturrioz, Xavier; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Apelin, a (neuro)vasoactive peptide, plays a prominent role in controlling body fluid homeostasis and cardiovascular functions. In animal models, experimental data demonstrate that intracerebroventricular injection of apelin into lactating rats inhibits the phasic electrical activity of arginine vasopressin (AVP) neurons, reduces plasma AVP levels, and increases aqueous diuresis. In the kidney, apelin increases diuresis by increasing the renal microcirculation and by counteracting the antidiuretic effect of AVP at the tubular level. Moreover, after water deprivation or salt loading, in humans and in rodents, AVP and apelin are conversely regulated to facilitate systemic AVP release and to avoid additional water loss from the kidney. Furthermore, apelin and vasopressin secretion are significantly altered in various water metabolism disorders including hyponatremia and polyuria-polydipsia syndrome. Since the in vivo half-life of apelin is in the minute range, metabolically stable apelin analogs were developed. The efficacy of these lead compounds for decreasing AVP release and increasing both renal blood flow and diuresis, make them promising candidates for the treatment of water retention and/or hyponatremic disorders. PMID:28620355

  17. Role of the Vasopressin/Apelin Balance and Potential Use of Metabolically Stable Apelin Analogs in Water Metabolism Disorders.

    PubMed

    Flahault, Adrien; Couvineau, Pierre; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Iturrioz, Xavier; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Apelin, a (neuro)vasoactive peptide, plays a prominent role in controlling body fluid homeostasis and cardiovascular functions. In animal models, experimental data demonstrate that intracerebroventricular injection of apelin into lactating rats inhibits the phasic electrical activity of arginine vasopressin (AVP) neurons, reduces plasma AVP levels, and increases aqueous diuresis. In the kidney, apelin increases diuresis by increasing the renal microcirculation and by counteracting the antidiuretic effect of AVP at the tubular level. Moreover, after water deprivation or salt loading, in humans and in rodents, AVP and apelin are conversely regulated to facilitate systemic AVP release and to avoid additional water loss from the kidney. Furthermore, apelin and vasopressin secretion are significantly altered in various water metabolism disorders including hyponatremia and polyuria-polydipsia syndrome. Since the in vivo half-life of apelin is in the minute range, metabolically stable apelin analogs were developed. The efficacy of these lead compounds for decreasing AVP release and increasing both renal blood flow and diuresis, make them promising candidates for the treatment of water retention and/or hyponatremic disorders.

  18. Predicting the Physiological Role of Circadian Metabolic Regulation in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Voytsekh, Olga; Mittag, Maria; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of reconstructed metabolic networks is steadily growing, experimental data integration into these networks is still challenging. Based on elementary flux mode analysis, we combine sequence information with metabolic pathway analysis and include, as a novel aspect, circadian regulation. While minimizing the need of assumptions, we are able to predict changes in the metabolic state and can hypothesise on the physiological role of circadian control in nitrogen metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. PMID:21887226

  19. A role for vaccinia virus protein C16 in reprogramming cellular energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mazzon, Michela; Castro, Cecilia; Roberts, Lee D.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large DNA virus that replicates in the cytoplasm and encodes about 200 proteins of which approximately 50 % may be non-essential for viral replication. These proteins enable VACV to suppress transcription and translation of cellular genes, to inhibit the innate immune response, to exploit microtubule- and actin-based transport for virus entry and spread, and to subvert cellular metabolism for the benefit of the virus. VACV strain WR protein C16 induces stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α by binding to the cellular oxygen sensor prolylhydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD)2. Stabilization of HIF-1α is induced by several virus groups, but the purpose and consequences are unclear. Here, 1H-NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry are used to investigate the metabolic alterations during VACV infection in HeLa and 2FTGH cells. The role of C16 in such alterations was examined by comparing infection to WT VACV (strain WR) and a derivative virus lacking gene C16L (vΔC16). Compared with uninfected cells, VACV infection caused increased nucleotide and glutamine metabolism. In addition, there were increased concentrations of glutamine derivatives in cells infected with WT VACV compared with vΔC16. This indicates that C16 contributes to enhanced glutamine metabolism and this may help preserve tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. These data show that VACV infection reprogrammes cellular energy metabolism towards increased synthesis of the metabolic precursors utilized during viral replication, and that C16 contributes to this anabolic reprogramming of the cell, probably via the stabilization of HIF-1α. PMID:25351724

  20. A role for vaccinia virus protein C16 in reprogramming cellular energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Michela; Castro, Cecilia; Roberts, Lee D; Griffin, Julian L; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large DNA virus that replicates in the cytoplasm and encodes about 200 proteins of which approximately 50 % may be non-essential for viral replication. These proteins enable VACV to suppress transcription and translation of cellular genes, to inhibit the innate immune response, to exploit microtubule- and actin-based transport for virus entry and spread, and to subvert cellular metabolism for the benefit of the virus. VACV strain WR protein C16 induces stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α by binding to the cellular oxygen sensor prolylhydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD)2. Stabilization of HIF-1α is induced by several virus groups, but the purpose and consequences are unclear. Here, (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry are used to investigate the metabolic alterations during VACV infection in HeLa and 2FTGH cells. The role of C16 in such alterations was examined by comparing infection to WT VACV (strain WR) and a derivative virus lacking gene C16L (vΔC16). Compared with uninfected cells, VACV infection caused increased nucleotide and glutamine metabolism. In addition, there were increased concentrations of glutamine derivatives in cells infected with WT VACV compared with vΔC16. This indicates that C16 contributes to enhanced glutamine metabolism and this may help preserve tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. These data show that VACV infection reprogrammes cellular energy metabolism towards increased synthesis of the metabolic precursors utilized during viral replication, and that C16 contributes to this anabolic reprogramming of the cell, probably via the stabilization of HIF-1α.

  1. Total physical activity volume, physical activity intensity, and metabolic syndrome: 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Churilla, James R; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2012-02-01

    This study examined the association of total physical activity volume (TPAV) and physical activity (PA) from three domains [leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), domestic, transportation] with metabolic syndrome. We also investigated the relationship between LTPA intensity and metabolic syndrome risk. Sample included adults who participated in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Physical activity measures were created for TPAV, LTPA, domestic PA, and transportational PA. For each, a six-level measure based upon no PA (level 1) and quintiles (levels 2-6) of metabolic equivalents (MET)·min·wk(-1) was created. A three-level variable associated with the current Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) PA recommendation was also created. SAS and SUDAAN were used for the statistical analysis. Adults reporting the greatest volume of TPAV and LTPA were found to be 36% [odds ratio (OR) 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49-0.83] and 42% (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.43-0.77), respectively, less likely to have metabolic syndrome. Domestic and transportational PA provided no specific level of protection from metabolic syndrome. Those reporting a TPAV that met the DHHS PA recommendation were found to be 33% (OR 0.67; 95%; CI 0.55-0.83) less likely to have metabolic syndrome compared to their sedentary counterparts. Adults reporting engaging in only vigorous-intensity LTPA were found to be 37% (OR 0.63; 95 CI 0.42-0.96) to 56% (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.29-0.67) less likely to have metabolic syndrome. Volume, intensity, and domain of PA may all play important roles in reducing the prevalence and risk of metabolic syndrome.

  2. The influence of vasopressin and related peptides on glycogen phosphorylase activity and phosphatidylinositol metabolism in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, C J; Rodrigues, L M; Hems, D A

    1979-01-01

    The relative abilities of seven vasopressin-like peptides to activate hepatic glycogen phosphorylase and stimulate phosphate incorporation into phosphatidylinositol were compared. Although the individual peptides differed in their potencies, the concentrations required to stimulate phosphatidylinositol metabolism were always greater (about 10 times) than those needed to activate phosphorylase. The molecular specificity of the hepatic vasopressin receptor and the role of vasopressin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover are discussed. PMID:444224

  3. Acute upregulation of neuronal mitochondrial type-1 cannabinoid receptor and it's role in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis after TBI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Ai; Dai, Qun; Ge, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jie

    2016-08-02

    Metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to subsequent neurodegeneration. They are all regulated by mechanisms centered around mitochondrion. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) enriched on neuronal plasma membrane. Recent evidences point to the substantial presence of CB1 receptors on neuronal mitochondrial outer membranes (mtCB1) and the activation of mtCB1 influences aerobic respiration via inhibiting mitochondrial cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/complex I pathway. The expression and role of neuronal mtCB1 under TBI are unknown. Using TBI models of cultured neurons, wild type and CB1 knockout mice, we found mtCB1 quickly upregulated after TBI. Activation of mtCB1 promoted metabolic defects accompanied with ATP shortage but protected neurons from apoptosis. Selective activation of plasma membrane CB1 showed no effects on neuronal metabolism and apoptosis. Activation of mtCB1 receptors inhibited mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I and resulted in exacerbated metabolic defects accompanied with a higher ratio of ATP reduction to oxygen consumption decrease as well as neuronal apoptosis. Further research found the remarkable accumulation of protein kinase B (AKT) on neuronal mitochondria following TBI and the activation of mtCB1 upregulated mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity. Upregulation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity showed anti-apoptosis effects and alleviated ATP shortage in metabolic defects. Taken together, we have identified mtCB1 quickly upregulate after TBI and a dual role the mtCB1 might play in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by TBI: the inhibition of mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I aggravates metabolic defects, energy insufficiency as well as neuronal apoptosis, but the coactivation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V mitigates energy insufficiency and neuronal apoptosis.

  4. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Polak, Agnieszka; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  5. Physical Activity Dimensions Associated with Impaired Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Amadid, Hanan; Johansen, Nanna B; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise; Vistisen, Dorte; Færch, Kristine; Brage, Søren; Lauritzen, Torsten; Witte, Daniel R; Sandbæk, Annelli; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2017-07-07

    Physical activity (PA) is important in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, yet little is known about the role of specific dimensions of PA, including sedentary time in subgroups at risk of impaired glucose metabolism (IGM). We applied a data driven decision tool to identify dimensions of PA associated with IGM across age, sex and body mass index (BMI) groups. This cross-sectional study included 1,501 individuals (mean (SD) age 65.6 (6.8) years) at high risk of type 2 diabetes from the ADDITION-PRO study. PA was measured by an individually calibrated combined accelerometer and heart rate monitor worn for 7 days. PA energy expenditure, time spent in different activity intensities, bout duration and sedentary time were considered determinants of IGM together with age, sex and BMI. Decision tree analysis was applied to identify subgroup-specific dimensions of PA associated with IGM. IGM was based on oral glucose tolerance test results and defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 6.1 mmol/L and/or 2-hour plasma glucose ≥ 7.8 mmol/L. Among overweight (BMI ≥ 25kg/m) men, accumulating less than 30 minutes/day of moderate-to-vigorous PA was associated with IGM, while in overweight women sedentary time was associated with IGM. Among individuals aged > 53 years with normal weight (BMI < 25kg/m), time spent in light PA was associated with IGM. None of the dimensions of PA were associated with IGM among individuals aged ≤ 53 years with normal weight. We identified subgroups in which different activity dimensions were associated with IGM. Methodology and results from this study may suggest a preliminary step towards the goal of tailoring and targeting PA interventions aimed at type 2 diabetes prevention.

  6. Lysine acetylproteome analysis suggests its roles in primary and secondary metabolism in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dan; Li, Zhi-Hai; You, Di; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-02-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic, reversible posttranslational modification that is known to play an important role in regulating the activity of many key enzymes in bacteria. Acetylproteome studies have been performed on some bacteria. However, until now, there have been no data on Actinomycetes, which are the major producers of therapeutic antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the first acetylproteome of the erythromycin-producing actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea using a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach. Using immune-affinity isolation of acetyl-peptides with an anti-acetyllysine antibody followed by nano ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (nanoUPLC-MS/MS) analysis, we identified 664 unique lysine-acetylated sites on 363 proteins. Acetylated proteins are involved in many biological processes such as protein synthesis, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, citric acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid metabolism, secondary metabolism, and the feeder metabolic pathways of erythromycin synthesis. We characterized the acetylproteome and analyzed in detail the impact of acetylation on diverse cellular functions according to Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Four motif sequences surrounding the acetylation sites (K(AC)H, K(AC)Y, K(AC)XXXXR, and K(AC)XXXXK) were found in the S. erythraea acetylproteome. These findings suggest that abundant lysine acetylation occurs in Actinomycetes, expand our current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome, and provide insight into the regulatory function of acetylation in primary and secondary metabolism.

  7. Role for hepatic CEACAM1 in regulating fatty acid metabolism along the adipocyte-hepatocyte axis.

    PubMed

    Russo, Lucia; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Al-Share, Qusai Y; Smiley, Zachary N; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Esakov, Emily L; McInerney, Marcia F; Heinrich, Garrett; Tong, Xin; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) regulates insulin sensitivity by promoting hepatic insulin clearance and mediating suppression of fatty acid synthase activity. Feeding C57BL/6J male mice with a high-fat (HF) diet for 3-4 weeks triggered a >60% decrease in hepatic CEACAM1 levels to subsequently impair insulin clearance and cause systemic insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. This study aimed at investigating whether lipolysis drives reduction in hepatic CEACAM1 and whether this constitutes a key mechanism leading to diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Blocking lipolysis with a daily intraperitoneal injection of nicotinic acid in the last two days of a 30-day HF feeding regimen demonstrated that white adipose tissue (WAT)-derived fatty acids repressed hepatic CEACAM1-dependent regulation of insulin and lipid metabolism in 3-month-old male C57BL/6J mice. Adenoviral-mediated CEACAM1 redelivery countered the adverse metabolic effect of the HF diet on insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, visceral obesity, and energy expenditure. It also reversed the effect of HF diet on inflammation and fibrosis in WAT and liver. This assigns a causative role for lipolysis-driven decrease in hepatic CEACAM1 level and its regulation of insulin and lipid metabolism in sustaining systemic insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and other abnormalities associated with excessive energy supply. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Potential role for the VDR agonist elocalcitol in metabolic control: Evidences in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Antinozzi, Cristina; Corinaldesi, Clarissa; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Cerbelli, Bruna; Migliaccio, Silvia; Di Luigi, Luigi; Stefanantoni, Katia; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Minisola, Salvatore; Valesini, Guido; Riccieri, Valeria; Lenzi, Andrea; Crescioli, Clara

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin D plays a pivotal role to maintain skeletal muscle integrity and health. Vitamin D deficiency characterizes inflammatory myopathy (IM) and diabetes, often overlapping diseases involving skeletal muscle damage. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists likely exert beneficial effects in both IM and metabolic disturbances. We aim to evaluate in vitro the effect of elocalcitol, a non-hypercalcemic VDR agonist, on the biomolecular metabolic machinery of human skeletal muscle cells (Hfsmc), vs. insulin (I). We analyzed GLUT4, Flotillin-1, Caveolin-3 and Caveolin-1 cell expression/localization; mTOR, AKT, ERK and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation; IL-6 myokine release; VDR expression. We investigated in vivo vitamin D status in IM subjects, evaluating VDR muscular expression and serum vitamin D with metabolism-related parameters, as glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol, resistin and adiponectin. In Hfsmc, elocalcitol exerted an I-like effect, promoting GLUT4 re-localization in Flotillin-1, Caveolin-3 and Caveolin-1 positive sites and mTOR, AKT, ERK, 4E-BP1 activation; it enhanced IL-6 myokine release. IM subjects, all normoglycemic, showed VDR/vitamin D deficiency that, together with high lipidemic and resistin profile, possibly increases the risk to develop metabolic diseases. VDR agonists as elocalcitol may be therapeutic tools for skeletal muscle integrity/function maintenance, an indispensable condition for health homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Target of Rapamycin Signaling Networks in Plant Growth and Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase, a master regulator that is evolutionarily conserved among yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants, animals, and humans, integrates nutrient and energy signaling to promote cell proliferation and growth. Recent breakthroughs made possible by integrating chemical, genetic, and genomic analyses have greatly increased our understanding of the molecular functions and dynamic regulation of the TOR kinase in photosynthetic plants. TOR signaling plays fundamental roles in embryogenesis, meristem activation, root and leaf growth, flowering, senescence, and life span determination. The molecular mechanisms underlying TOR-mediated ribosomal biogenesis, translation promotion, readjustment of metabolism, and autophagy inhibition are now being uncovered. Moreover, monitoring photosynthesis-derived Glc and bioenergetics relays has revealed that TOR orchestrates unprecedented transcriptional networks that wire central metabolism and biosynthesis for energy and biomass production. In addition, these networks integrate localized stem/progenitor cell proliferation through interorgan nutrient coordination to control developmental transitions and growth. PMID:24385567

  10. Metabolic Changes Following Perinatal Asphyxia: Role of Astrocytes and Their Interaction with Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Logica, Tamara; Riviere, Stephanie; Holubiec, Mariana I.; Castilla, Rocío; Barreto, George E.; Capani, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal Asphyxia (PA) represents an important cause of severe neurological deficits including delayed mental and motor development, epilepsy, major cognitive deficits and blindness. The interaction between neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells plays a central role coupling energy supply with changes in neuronal activity. Traditionally, experimental research focused on neurons, whereas astrocytes have been more related to the damage mechanisms of PA. Astrocytes carry out a number of functions that are critical to normal nervous system function, including uptake of neurotransmitters, regulation of pH and ion concentrations, and metabolic support for neurons. In this work, we aim to review metabolic neuron-astrocyte interactions with the purpose of encourage further research in this area in the context of PA, which is highly complex and its mechanisms and pathways have not been fully elucidated to this day. PMID:27445788

  11. Metabolic Changes Following Perinatal Asphyxia: Role of Astrocytes and Their Interaction with Neurons.

    PubMed

    Logica, Tamara; Riviere, Stephanie; Holubiec, Mariana I; Castilla, Rocío; Barreto, George E; Capani, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal Asphyxia (PA) represents an important cause of severe neurological deficits including delayed mental and motor development, epilepsy, major cognitive deficits and blindness. The interaction between neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells plays a central role coupling energy supply with changes in neuronal activity. Traditionally, experimental research focused on neurons, whereas astrocytes have been more related to the damage mechanisms of PA. Astrocytes carry out a number of functions that are critical to normal nervous system function, including uptake of neurotransmitters, regulation of pH and ion concentrations, and metabolic support for neurons. In this work, we aim to review metabolic neuron-astrocyte interactions with the purpose of encourage further research in this area in the context of PA, which is highly complex and its mechanisms and pathways have not been fully elucidated to this day.

  12. The role of APP proteolytic processing in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Rothhaar, Tatjana L; Hartmann, Tobias

    2012-04-01

    Amyloid plaques in brains are one of the major pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These plaques are mainly formed by aggregated Aβ, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Therefore, APP processing and Aβ production have been one of the central scopes in AD research in the past. Now, accumulating evidence suggests that besides its pathological impact, APP and its cleavage products also contribute to physiological functions. Proteolytic cleavage of APP is tightly regulated, and several lipids such as cholesterol and sphingolipids have been shown to influence APP processing and Aβ generation. In turn, Aβ as well as other APP cleavage products plays an essential role in regulating lipid homeostasis arguing for complex regulatory cycles in which lipids control APP processing and vice versa. This balanced regulation is disrupted under pathological conditions such as in AD. This article will review the physiological function of APP and its proteolytic products, especially Aβ and AICD, in regulating lipid homeostasis and which lipid species modulate APP processing. Furthermore, we summarize the alterations in lipid metabolism observed in AD patients and AD mouse models.

  13. Role of retinal metabolism in methanol-induced retinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C.D. |; Lee, E.W.; Terzo, T.S.; Louis-Ferdinand, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    Methanol is a toxicant that causes systemic and ocular toxicity after acute exposure. The folate-reduced (FR) rat is an excellent animal model that mimics characteristic human methanol toxic responses. The present study examines the role of the methanol metabolites formaldehyde and formate in the initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. After a single oral dose of 3.0 g/kg methanol, blood methanol concentrations were not significantly different in FR rats compared with folate-sufficient (FS) (control) rats. However, FR rats treated with 3.0 g/kg methanol displayed elevated blood (14.6 mM) and vitreous humor (19.5 mM) formate levels and abnormal electroretinograms (loss of b-wave) 48 h postdose. FR rats pretreated with disulfiram (DSF) prior to 3.0 g/kg methanol treatment failed to display these symptoms. Formaldehyde was not detected in blood or vitreous humor with or without DSF treatment, suggesting that formate is the toxic metabolite in methanol-induced retinal toxicity. Additionally, creating a blood formate profile (14.2 mM at 48 h) similar to that observed in methanol-treated rats by iv infusion of pH-buffered formate does not alter the electroretinogram as is observed with methanol treatment. These data suggest that intraretinal metabolism of methanol is necessary for the formate-mediated initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Hepatic Glucocorticoid Receptor Plays a Greater Role Than Adipose GR in Metabolic Syndrome Despite Renal Compensation.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sandip K; Hutson, Irina; Harris, Charles A

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous glucocorticoid administration results in hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hepatic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, a constellation of findings known as Cushing's syndrome. These effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because GR activation in liver and adipose has been implicated in metabolic syndrome (MS), we wanted to determine the role of GR in these tissues in the development of MS. Because GR knockout (KO) mice (whole-body KO) exhibit perinatal lethality due to respiratory failure, we generated tissue-specific (liver or adipose) GRKO mice using cre-lox technology. Real-time PCR analysis of liver mRNA from dexamethasone-treated wildtype (WT) and liver GRKO mice indicated that hepatic GR regulates the expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. Interestingly, we have observed that liver-specific deletion of GR resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in kidney tissue, indicating a compensatory mechanism to maintain glucose homeostasis. We have also observed that GR plays an important role in regulating the mRNA expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism. Liver GRKO mice demonstrated decreased fat mass and liver glycogen content compared with WT mice administered dexamethasone for 2 weeks. Adipose-specific deletion of GR did not alter glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity of adipose GRKO mice compared with WT mice administrated dexamethasone. This indicates that liver GR might be more important in development of MS in dexamethasone-treated mice, whereas adipose GR plays a little role in these paradigms.

  15. The role of genetic polymorphisms in metabolism of carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Turesky, R J

    2004-04-01

    More than twenty heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) have been identified in grilled meats, fish, poultry, and tobacco smoke condensate. HAAs are carcinogens and induce tumors at multiple sites in experimental laboratory animals. Because of the widespread occurrence of HAAs in foods, these chemicals may contribute to the etiology of several common human cancers that are associated with frequent consumption of grilled meats including colon, rectum, prostate, and breast. HAAs require metabolism in order to exert their genotoxic effects. Metabolic activation occurs by N-hydroxylation, a reaction catalyzed by cytochromes p450 (CYP). Some N-hydroxy-HAA metabolites may directly react with DNA, but further metabolism by N-acetyltransferases (NATs) or sulfotransferases (SULTs) may occur to form highly reactive N-acetoxy or N-sulfonyloxy esters that readily react with DNA bases. The N-acetoxy ester of the HAA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is detoxified by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which catalyze the reduction of the reactive intermediate back to the parent amine. Some HAAs also undergo detoxification through conjugation reactions with the phase II enzymes such as UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) or SULTs to form stable, polar products that are readily eliminated. All of these xenobiotic metabolism enzyme systems (XMEs) display common genetic polymorphisms, which may affect protein expression, protein stability, catalytic activity, and thus, the biological potency of these procarcinogens. In this review, the roles of common genetic polymorphisms of XMEs involved in HAA metabolism and cancer risk are discussed.

  16. Metabolically active microbial communities in uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Akob, Denise M; Mills, Heath J; Kostka, Joel E

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop effective bioremediation strategies for radionuclide contaminants, the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities need to be better understood, especially in highly contaminated subsurface sediments for which little cultivation-independent information is available. In this study, we characterized metabolically active and total microbial communities associated with uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments along geochemical gradients. DNA and RNA were extracted and amplified from four sediment-depth intervals representing moderately acidic (pH 3.7) to near-neutral (pH 6.7) conditions. Phylotypes related to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria), Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Planctomycetes were detected in DNA- and RNA-derived clone libraries. Diversity and numerical dominance of phylotypes were observed to correspond to changes in sediment geochemistry and rates of microbial activity, suggesting that geochemical conditions have selected for well-adapted taxa. Sequences closely related to nitrate-reducing bacteria represented 28% and 43% of clones from the total and metabolically active fractions of the microbial community, respectively. This study provides the first detailed analysis of total and metabolically active microbial communities in radionuclide-contaminated subsurface sediments. Our microbial community analysis, in conjunction with rates of microbial activity, points to several groups of nitrate-reducers that appear to be well adapted to environmental conditions common to radionuclide-contaminated sites.

  17. Role of Transcription Factors in Steatohepatitis and Hypertension after Ethanol: The Epicenter of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Rais A.; Husain, Kazim; Rizvi, Syed A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces multi-organ damage, including alcoholic liver disease (ALD), pancreatitis and hypertension. Ethanol and ethanol metabolic products play a significant role in the manifestation of its toxicity. Ethanol metabolizes to acetaldehyde and produces reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase. Ethanol metabolism mediated by cytochrome-P450 2E1 causes oxidative stress due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Acetaldehyde, increased redox cellular state and ROS activate transcription factors, which in turn activate genes for lipid biosynthesis and offer protection of hepatocytes from alcohol toxicity. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and peroxisome proliferator activated-receptors (PPARs) are two key lipogenic transcription factors implicated in the development of fatty liver in alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. SREBP-1 is activated in the livers of chronic ethanol abusers. An increase in ROS activates nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) to provide protection to hepatocytes from ethanol toxicity. Under ethanol exposure, due to increased gut permeability, there is release of gram-negative bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from intestine causing activation of immune response. In addition, the metabolic product, acetaldehyde, modifies the proteins in hepatocyte, which become antigens inviting auto-immune response. LPS activates macrophages, especially the liver resident macrophages, Kupffer cells. These Kupffer cells and circulating macrophages secrete various cytokines. The level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12 have been found elevated among chronic alcoholics. In addition to elevation of these cytokines, the peripheral iron (Fe2+) is also mobilized. An increased level of hepatic iron has been observed among alcoholics. Increased ROS, IL-1

  18. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that—against general belief—neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress. PMID:24569689

  19. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF NUTRIENT TRANSPORTERS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Ian A.; Carruthers, Anthony; Vannucci, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is the obligate energetic fuel for the mammalian brain and most studies of cerebral energy metabolism assume that the vast majority of cerebral glucose utilization fuels neuronal activity via oxidative metabolism, both in the basal and activated state. Glucose transporter proteins (GLUTs) deliver glucose from the circulation to the brain: GLUT1 in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and glia; GLUT3 in neurons. Lactate, the glycolytic product of glucose metabolism, is transported into and out of neural cells by the monocarboxylate transporters: MCT1 in the BBB and astrocytes and MCT2 in neurons. The proposal of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (Pellerin and Magistretti, 1994) suggested that astrocytes play the primary role in cerebral glucose utilization and generate lactate for neuronal energetics, especially during activation. Since the identification of the GLUTs and MCTs in brain, much has been learned about their transport properties, i.e. capacity and affinity for substrate, which must be considered in any model of cerebral glucose uptake and utilization. Using concentrations and kinetic parameters of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in BBB endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons, along with the corresponding kinetic properties of the monocarboxylate transporters, we have successfully modeled brain glucose and lactate levels as well as lactate transients in response to neuronal stimulation. Simulations based on these parameters suggest that glucose readily diffuses through the basal lamina and interstitium to neurons, which are primarily responsible for glucose uptake, metabolism, and the generation of the lactate transients observed upon neuronal activation. PMID:17579656

  20. Molecular Evidence for Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ann M.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Levin, David A.; Green, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial metabolisms are responsible for critical chemical transformations in nearly all environments, including oceans, freshwater, and soil. Despite the ubiquity of bacteria in the atmosphere, little is known about the metabolic functioning of atmospheric bacterial communities. To gain a better understanding of the metabolism of bacterial communities in the atmosphere, we used a combined empirical and model-based approach to investigate the structure and composition of potentially active bacterial communities in air sampled at a high elevation research station. We found that the composition of the putatively active bacterial community (assayed via rRNA) differed significantly from the total bacterial community (assayed via rDNA). Rare taxa in the total (rDNA) community were disproportionately active relative to abundant taxa, and members of the order Rhodospirillales had the highest potential for activity. We developed theory to explore the effects of random sampling from the rRNA and rDNA communities on observed differences between the communities. We found that random sampling, particularly in cases where active taxa are rare in the rDNA community, will give rise to observed differences in community composition including the occurrence of “phantom taxa”, taxa which are detected in the rRNA community but not the rDNA community. We show that the use of comparative rRNA/rDNA techniques can reveal the structure and composition of the metabolically active portion of bacterial communities. Our observations suggest that metabolically active bacteria exist in the atmosphere and that these communities may be involved in the cycling of organic compounds in the atmosphere. PMID:27252689

  1. Association of Active and Sedentary Behaviors with Postmenopausal Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Matthews, Charles E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Falk, Roni T.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may reduce endogenous estrogens but few studies have assessed effects on estrogen metabolism and none have evaluated sedentary behavior in relation to estrogen metabolism. We assessed relationships between accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior and 15 urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among postmenopausal controls from a population-based breast cancer case-control study conducted in Poland (2000-2003). Methods Postmenopausal women (N=542) were ages 40 to 72 years and not currently using hormone therapy. Accelerometers, worn for seven days, were used to derive measures of average activity (counts/day) and sedentary behavior (<100 counts/min/day). EM were measured in 12-hour urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. EM were analyzed individually, in metabolic pathways (C-2, -4, or -16), and as ratios relative to parent estrogens. Geometric means of EM by tertiles of accelerometer-measures, adjusted for age and body mass, were computed using linear models. Results High activity was associated with lower levels of estrone and estradiol (p-trend=0.01) while increased sedentary time was positively associated with these parent estrogens (p-trend=0.04). Inverse associations were observed between high activity and 2-methoxyestradiol, 4-methoxyestradiol, 17-epiestriol and 16-epiestriol (p-trend=0.03). Sedentary time was positively associated with methylated catechols in the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways (p-trend≤0.04). Women in the highest tertile of activity had increased hydroxylation at the C-2, -4, and -16 sites relative to parent estrogens (p-trend≤0.02) while increased sedentary time was associated with a lower 16-pathway:parent estrogen ratio (p-trend=0.01). Conclusions Higher activity was associated with lower urinary estrogens, possibly through increased estrogen hydroxylation and subsequent metabolism, while sedentary behavior may reduce metabolism. PMID:26460631

  2. [The role of PPARs and their isoforms in metabolic disorders related to insulin resistance and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, N A; Iarmysh, N V

    2011-01-01

    PPARs play the key role in energy homeostasis, inflammation, development of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, therefore the special attention is spared to synthesis of the ligand PPARs (fibrates, thiazolidinediones). Three isoforms of PPARs are activated by the fatty acids and their derivatives - eukosanoides. Polymorphism of the Pro 12Ala gene PPARG2 affects the sensitiveness of tissues to insulin and the risk of the development diabetes. It is assumed that the PPAR polymorphism is related to the differential answer on pharmacotherapy that is the foundation for development of the personification of the drug application and the estimate of prognosis.

  3. Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Dae Hun; Kong, Min Jeong; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Beom Soo; Kang, Wonku; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2011-04-01

    A possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced toxicity was investigated in mammalian cell cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with intestinal bacteria, either Bifidobacterium longum HY81 or Bifidobacterium adolescentis, for 24 h, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media. The bacterial growth was not affected up to 10 mM arbutin in the culture medium. When the toxicity of bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was tested in the HepG2 cell lines, the medium with arbutin was more toxic than either parent arbutin only or bacteria cultured medium without arbutin, indicating that metabolic activation might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. In addition, bacteria cultured medium with arbutin could suppress LPS and ConA mitogenicity in splenocyte cultures prepared from normal mice. The results indicate that the present toxicity testing system might be applied for assessing the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced toxicity in mammalian cell cultures.

  4. Metabolic activation of o-phenylphenol to a major cytotoxic metabolite, phenylhydroquinone: role of human CYP1A2 and rat CYP2C11/CYP2E1.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, S; Ohta, K; Miyajima, A; Kurebayashi, H; Sunouchi, M; Shimizu, M; Murayama, N; Matsumoto, Y; Fukuoka, M; Ohno, Y

    2000-10-01

    1. The in vitro metabolic activation of o-phenylphenol has been evaluated as yielding a toxic metabolite, 2,5-dihydroxybiphenyl (phenylhydroquinone), by p-hydroxylation in liver microsomes of rat and human. The involvement of rat CYP2C11, CYP2E1 and human CYP1A2 in the p-hydroxylation of o-phenylphenol is suggested. 2. 2,3- and phenylhydroquinone, which induced DNA single-strand scission in the presence of 1 microM CuCl2, were the most cytotoxic chemicals examined to cultured mammalian cell lines among o-phenylphenol, m-phenylphenol, p-phenylphenol, 2,2'-, 4,4'-, 2,3- and phenylhydroquinone. 3. Rat and human liver microsomes catalysed the formation of phenylhydroquinone, but not 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl, using o-phenylphenol as a substrate. A higher rate of metabolic activation of o-phenylphenol was observed with livers of the male than the female rats by 5.6- and 2.6-fold respectively. 4. Inhibitory antibodies against the male-specific CYP2C11 inhibited hepatic o-phenylphenol p-hydroxylation in the male F344 and Sprague-Dawley rat by > 70%. Liver microsomes from the isoniazid-treated rats produced 1.8- and 3-fold induction of o-phenylphenol p-hydroxylation and chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation (a CYP2E1-dependent activity) respectively. 5. Human CYP1A2, expressed by baculovirus-mediated cDNA expression systems, exhibited a remarkably higher capacity for o-phenylphenol p-hydroxylation at concentrations of 5 (> 5-fold), 50 (> 2-fold) and 500 microM (> 2-fold) than CYP2A, CYP2B, CYP2Cs, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 on the basis of pmol P450. 6. Among various CYP inhibitors tested here, 7,8-benzoflavone and furafylline, typical human CYP1A2 inhibitors, inhibited the microsomal p-hydroxylation of o-phenylphenol in human livers most potently by 70 and 50% respectively. 7. The results thus indicate the involvement of rat CYP2C11/CYP2E1 and human CYP1A2 in the hepatic p-hydroxylation of o-phenylphenol.

  5. Role of thyroid hormone in postnatal circulatory and metabolic adjustments.

    PubMed Central

    Breall, J A; Rudolph, A M; Heymann, M A

    1984-01-01

    To assess the role of the early postnatal surge in plasma thyroid hormone concentrations on cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations, we measured cardiac output, total oxygen consumption, and plasma triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations in three groups of lambs in the first 6 h after delivery. 15 fetal lambs were prepared at gestational ages of 128-129 d by placing catheters in the brachiocephalic artery, descending aorta, distal inferior vena cava, left atrium, and pulmonary artery so that measurements could be made soon after delivery. They were divided into three groups: Group I comprised five control animals; Group II consisted of five fetuses in which thyroidectomy was performed at surgery at 129 d gestation; and Group III consisted of five animals in which thyroidectomy was performed at term gestation during delivery by caesarian section, prior to severing the umbilical cord. The lambs in Group I exhibited a rapid postnatal rise in T3 concentrations, similar to that described previously, reaching a peak value of about 5 ng/ml. Although the postnatal surge in T3 concentration was arrested in Group II and III animals, Group II had no detectable plasma T3, while the Group III animals had T3 concentrations of about 0.8 ng/ml, which were within the range previously reported for term lamb fetuses. The lambs in group II showed 40-50% lower left ventricular outputs (190 vs. 297 ml/kg per min), systemic blood flows (155 vs. 286 ml/kg per min), and oxygen consumptions (9.8 vs. 20.2 ml/kg per min) as compared with Group I animals over the entire 6-h period. The lambs in Group II also had significantly lower heart rates (131 vs. 192 beats/min) and mean systemic arterial pressures (56 vs. 72 torr). However, there were no significant differences for any of these measurements between the Group III and Group I lambs. The reduction in cardiac output in the Group II animals were reflected in a significantly lower blood flow to the peripheral circulation, but there were no

  6. Indole and Tryptophan Metabolism: Endogenous and Dietary Routes to Ah Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor recognized for its role in xenobiotic metabolism. The physiologic function of AHR has expanded to include roles in immune regulation, organogenesis, mucosal barrier function, and the cell cycle. These functions are likely dependent upon ligand-mediated activation of the receptor. High-affinity ligands of AHR have been classically defined as xenobiotics, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins. Identification of endogenous AHR ligands is key to understanding the physiologic functions of this enigmatic receptor. Metabolic pathways targeting the amino acid tryptophan and indole can lead to a myriad of metabolites, some of which are AHR ligands. Many of these ligands exhibit species selective preferential binding to AHR. The discovery of specific tryptophan metabolites as AHR ligands may provide insight concerning where AHR is activated in an organism, such as at the site of inflammation and within the intestinal tract. PMID:26041783

  7. Metabolic correlatives of brain activity in a FOS epilepsy patient.

    PubMed

    Peca, Stefano; Carnì, Marco; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Aprile, Teresa; Hagberg, Gisela E; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Manfredi, Mario; Mangia, Silvia; Garreffa, Girolamo; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2010-02-01

    The correlation and the interactions between neuronal activity and underlying metabolic dynamics are still a matter of debate, especially in pathological conditions. This study reports findings obtained on a subject suffering from fixation-off sensitivity (FOS) epilepsy, exploited as a model system of triggerable anomalous electrical activity. Functional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy was used to investigate the metabolic response to visual spike-inducing stimuli in a single voxel placed in the temporo-occipital lobe of a FOS epilepsy patient. MRS measurements were additionally performed on a control group of five healthy volunteers. The FOS patient also underwent an EEG session with the same stimulus paradigm. Uniquely in the FOS patient, glutamate and glutamine concentration increased during the first 10 min of stimulation and then returned to baseline. On the other hand, FOS-induced epileptic activity (spiking) endured throughout all the stimulation epoch. The observed metabolic dynamics may be likely linked to a complex interplay between alterations of the metabolic pathways of glutamate and modulation of the neuronal activity. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Disturbances to neurotransmitter levels and their metabolic enzyme activity in a freshwater planarian exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-Pin; Li, Mei-Hui; Chen, Jhih-Sheng; Chung, Szu-Yao; Lee, Hui-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Using specific neurobehaviors as endpoints, previous studies suggested that planarian neurotransmission systems could be targets of Cd neurotoxicity. However, direct evidence for disturbed neurotransmission systems by Cd in treated planarians is still lacking. In planarians, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play critical roles in neuromuscular function, but little is known about their metabolic degradation. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to determine the appearances of DA, 5-HT, and their metabolic products in the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica, characterize the activity of enzymes involved in their metabolism, and investigate the effects of Cd on planarian 5-HTergic and DAergic neurotransmission systems. Only DA, 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were found in planarian tissues. Further enzymatic study revealed the activity of planarian monoamine oxidase (MAO) but not catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). These findings suggest that planarian MAO catalyzes the metabolism of 5-HT into 5-HIAA. However, DA metabolites from the MAO-involved metabolic pathway were not found, which might be due to a lack of COMT activity. Finally, in Cd-treated planarians, tissue levels of 5-HT and DA were decreased and MAO activity altered, suggesting that planarian neurotransmission systems are disturbed following Cd treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Imbalance between protective (adiponectin) and prothrombotic (Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1) adipokines in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Ashok Kumar; Jain, Anju; Goswami, Binita; Bhatnagar, M K; Bhatacharjee, Jayashree

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) consists of a constellation of metabolic abnormalities that confer increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Visceral adipose tissue actively produces a variety of adipokines that interact in various obesity related disorders such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and heart diseases. Adiponectin has protective role in the vascular physiology while Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a prothrombotic and consequent deleterious effect on the endothelium. We attempted to assess the putative imbalance if any between these two mediators in subjects with metabolic syndrome in the Indian context. We enrolled 50 diagnosed case of metabolic syndrome as per International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria and 50 healthy volunteers as control. Clinical evaluation included anthropometric, routine biochemical analysis as well as adiponectin and PAI-1 measurement. Subject with MS had significantly lower adiponectin (9.8±1.0 vs 16±1.1 μg/ml) and higher PAI-1 (232±87 vs 185±96 ng/ml). A statistically significant correlation was observed between adiponectin and HDL levels (r=0.388, p=0.005). Subjects with MS have lower adiponectin and higher PAI-1 levels as compared to controls. The subsequent tilt toward a more prothrombotic and pro inflammatory milieu in the vascular endothelium may be pathognomonic of metabolic syndrome. This understanding of the still undiscovered subtle vascular alterations may help in the better management of obesity and MS. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  11. The physiological roles and metabolism of ascorbate in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Szilvia Z; Schansker, Gert; Garab, Győző

    2013-06-01

    Ascorbate is a multifunctional metabolite in plants. It is essential for growth control, involving cell division and cell wall synthesis and also involved in redox signaling, in the modulation of gene expression and regulation of enzymatic activities. Ascorbate also fulfills crucial roles in scavenging reactive oxygen species, both enzymatically and nonenzymatically, a well-established phenomenon in the chloroplasts stroma. We give an overview on these important physiological functions and would like to give emphasis to less well-known roles of ascorbate, in the thylakoid lumen, where it also plays multiple roles. It is essential for photoprotection as a cofactor for violaxanthin de-epoxidase, a key enzyme in the formation of nonphotochemical quenching. Lumenal ascorbate has recently also been shown to act as an alternative electron donor of photosystem II once the oxygen-evolving complex is inactivated and to protect the photosynthetic machinery by slowing down donor-side induced photoinactivation; it is yet to be established if ascorbate has a similar role in the case of other stress effects, such as high light and UV-B stress. In bundle sheath cells, deficient in oxygen evolution, ascorbate provides electrons to photosystem II, thereby poising cyclic electron transport around photosystem I. It has also been shown that, by supporting linear electron transport through photosystem II in sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells, in which oxygen evolution is largely inhibited, externally added ascorbate enhances hydrogen production. For fulfilling its multiple roles, Asc has to be transported into the thylakoid lumen and efficiently regenerated; however, very little is known yet about these processes.

  12. Regulatory role of zinc during aluminium-induced altered carbohydrate metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2012-03-01

    Aluminium is considered an environmental neurotoxicant and causes many neurological disorders, whereas zinc is vital for many biological functions. The present study was carried out to investigate the role of Zn, if any, in mitigating the adverse effects inflicted by Al on carbohydrate metabolism in rat brain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 140-160 g were divided into four different groups: normal control, Al-treated (100 mg/kg b.w./day in drinking water via oral gavage), Zn-treated (227mg/liter in drinking water), and combined Al- and Zn-treated rats. All the treatments were continued for 2 months, and their effects on carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes were studied. Additionally, expressions of the proteins glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and protein phosphatase (PP1), which help in regulating carbohydrate energy metabolism, were also studied. Al treatment resulted in increased activities of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), glucose-6-isomerase (G6I), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), whereas the activities of hexokinase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and glycogen content were decreased. Moreover, no significant change was observed in the biochemical parameters upon Zn supplementation alone. However, Zn supplementation to Al-treated rats was able to reduce significantly the Al-induced increased activities of G6P, G6I, and LDH, but it elevated the levels of hexokinase, SDH, and glycogen. Furthermore, Al treatment increased the protein expression of GSK3 and decreased the PP1 expression, which were found to be reversed upon Zn administration. Hence, Zn is effective in regulating theAl-induced alterations in carbohydrate metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Role of Alcohol Metabolism in Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Susan S.; Baker, Robert D.; Liu, Wensheng; Nowak, Norma J.; Zhu, Lixin

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Previous studies suggested that intestinal bacteria produced more alcohol in obese mice than lean animals. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate whether alcohol is involved in the pathogenesis of NASH, the expression of inflammation, fibrosis and alcohol metabolism related genes in the liver tissues of NASH patients and normal controls (NCs) were examined by microarray (NASH, n = 7; NC, n = 4) and quantitative real-time PCR (NASH, n = 6; NC, n = 6). Genes related to liver inflammation and fibrosis were found to be elevated in NASH livers compared to normal livers. The most striking finding is the increased gene transcription of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes, genes for catalase and cytochrome P450 2E1, and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the increased expression of ADH1 and ADH4 in NASH livers (NASH, n = 9; NC, n = 4). Conclusions/Significance The augmented activity of all the available genes of the pathways for alcohol catabolism suggest that 1) alcohol concentration was elevated in the circulation of NASH patients; 2) there was a high priority for the NASH livers to scavenge alcohol from the circulation. Our data is the first human evidence that suggests alcohol may contribute to the development of NAFLD. PMID:20221393

  14. Biogeography of Metabolically Active Microbial Populations within the Subseafloor Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Shepard, A.; St. Peter, C.; Mills, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial life in deep marine sediments is widespread, metabolically active and diverse. Evidence of prokaryotic communities in sediments as deep as 800 m below the seafloor (mbsf) have been found. By recycling carbon and nutrients through biological and geochemical processes, the deep subsurface has the potential to remain metabolically active over geologic time scales. While a vast majority of the subsurface biosphere remains under studied, recent advances in molecular techniques and an increased focus on microbiological sampling during IODP expeditions have provided the initial steps toward better characterizations of the microbial communities. Coupling of geochemistry and RNA-based molecular analysis is essential to the description of the active microbial populations within the subsurface biosphere. Studies based on DNA may describe the taxa and metabolic pathways from the total microbial community within the sediment, whether the cells sampled were metabolically active, quiescent or dead. Due to a short lifespan within a cell, only an RNA-based analysis can be used to identify linkages between active populations and observed geochemistry. This study will coalesce and compare RNA sequence and geochemical data from Expeditions 316 (Nankai Trough), 320 (Pacific Equatorial Age Transect), 325 (Great Barrier Reef) and 329 (South Pacific Gyre) to evaluate the biogeography of microbial lineages actively altering the deep subsurface. The grouping of sediments allows for a wide range of geochemical environments to be compared, including two environments limited in organic carbon. Significant to this study is the use of similar extraction, amplification and simultaneous 454 pyrosequencing on all sediment populations allowing for robust comparisons with similar protocol strengths and biases. Initial trends support previously described reduction of diversity with increasing depth. The co-localization of active reductive and oxidative lineages suggests a potential cryptic

  15. Role of metabolic gases in bubble formation during hypobaric exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, P. P.; Conkin, J.; Powell, M. R.; Waligora, J. M.; Chhikara, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that metabolic gases play a role in the initial explosive growth phase of bubble formation during hypobaric exposures. Models that account for optimal internal tensions of dissolved gases to predict the probability of occurrence of venous gas emboli were statistically fitted to 426 hypobaric exposures from National Aeronautics and Space Administration tests. The presence of venous gas emboli in the pulmonary artery was detected with an ultrasound Doppler detector. The model fit and parameter estimation were done by using the statistical method of maximum likelihood. The analysis results were as follows. 1) For the model without an input of noninert dissolved gas tissue tension, the log likelihood (in absolute value) was 255.01. 2) When an additional parameter was added to the model to account for the dissolved noninert gas tissue tension, the log likelihood was 251.70. The significance of the additional parameter was established based on the likelihood ratio test (P < 0.012). 3) The parameter estimate for the dissolved noninert gas tissue tension participating in bubble formation was 19. 1 kPa (143 mmHg). 4) The additional gas tissue tension, supposedly due to noninert gases, did not show an exponential decay as a function of time during denitrogenation, but it remained constant. 5) The positive sign for this parameter term in the model is characteristic of an outward radial pressure of gases in the bubble. This analysis suggests that dissolved gases other than N2 in tissues may facilitate the initial explosive bubble-growth phase.

  16. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  17. Enumerating Minimal Active Metabolic Pathways by Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Takehide; Inoue, Katsumi

    In systems biology, identifying vital functions like glycolysis from a given metabolic pathway is important to understand living organisms. In this paper, we particularly focus on the problem of enumerating minimal active pathways producing target metabolites from source metabolites. We represent the problem in propositional formulas and solve it through minimal model generation. An advantage of our method is that each solution satisfies qualitative laws of biochemical reactions. Moreover, we can calculate such solutions for a cellular scale metabolic pathway within a few seconds. In experiments, we have applied our method to a whole Escherichia coli metabolic pathway. As a result, we found a minimal set of reactions corresponding to the conventional glycolysis pathway described in a biological database EcoCyc.

  18. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor-B in metabolic homoeostasis: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zafar,  Mohammad Ishraq; Zheng, Juan; Kong, Wen; Ye, Xiaofeng; Gou, Luoning; Regmi, Anita

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose tissue and skeletal muscles in lean individuals respond to meal-induced hyperinsulinemia by increase in perfusion, the effect not observed in patients with metabolic syndrome. In conditions of hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridemia, this insufficient vascularization leads to the liberation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disruption of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and endothelial signalling responsible for the uptake of circulating fatty acids (FAs), whose accumulation in skeletal muscles and adipose tissue is widely associated with the impairment of insulin signalling. While the angiogenic role of VEGF-A and its increased circulating concentrations in obesity have been widely confirmed, the data related to the metabolic role of VEGF-B are diverse. However, recent discoveries indicate that this growth factor may be a promising therapeutic agent in patients with metabolic syndrome. Preclinical studies agree over two crucial metabolic effects of VEGF-B: (i) regulation of FAs uptake and (ii) regulation of tissue perfusion via activation of VEGF-A/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) 2 (VEGFR2) pathway. While in some preclinical high-fat diet studies, VEGF-B overexpression reverted glucose intolerance and stimulated fat burning, in others it further promoted accumulation of lipids and lipotoxicity. Data from clinical studies point out the changes in circulating or tissue expression levels of VEGF-B in obese compared with lean patients. Potentially beneficial effects of VEGF-B, achieved through enhanced blood flow (increased availability of insulin and glucose uptake in target organs) and decreased FAs uptake (prevention of lipotoxicity and improved insulin signalling), and its safety for clinical use, remain to be clarified through future translational research. PMID:28798193

  19. Structure and Function of Human Xylulokinase, an Enzyme with Important Roles in Carbohydrate Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Richard D.; Bulloch, Esther M. M.; Dickson, James M. J.; Loomes, Kerry M.; Baker, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    d-Xylulokinase (XK; EC 2.7.1.17) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of d-xylulose (Xu) to produce xylulose 5-phosphate (Xu5P). In mammals, XK is the last enzyme in the glucuronate-xylulose pathway, active in the liver and kidneys, and is linked through its product Xu5P to the pentose-phosphate pathway. XK may play an important role in metabolic disease, given that Xu5P is a key regulator of glucose metabolism and lipogenesis. We have expressed the product of a putative human XK gene and identified it as the authentic human d-xylulokinase (hXK). NMR studies with a variety of sugars showed that hXK acts only on d-xylulose, and a coupled photometric assay established its key kinetic parameters as Km(Xu) = 24 ± 3 μm and kcat = 35 ± 5 s−1. Crystal structures were determined for hXK, on its own and in complexes with Xu, ADP, and a fluorinated inhibitor. These reveal that hXK has a two-domain fold characteristic of the sugar kinase/hsp70/actin superfamily, with glycerol kinase as its closest relative. Xu binds to domain-I and ADP to domain-II, but in this open form of hXK they are 10 Å apart, implying that a large scale conformational change is required for catalysis. Xu binds in its linear keto-form, sandwiched between a Trp side chain and polar side chains that provide exquisite hydrogen bonding recognition. The hXK structure provides a basis for the design of specific inhibitors with which to probe its roles in sugar metabolism and metabolic disease. PMID:23179721

  20. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor-B in metabolic homoeostasis: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Mohammad Ishraq; Zheng, Juan; Kong, Wen; Ye, Xiaofeng; Gou, Luoning; Regmi, Anita; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2017-08-31

    It has been shown that adipose tissue and skeletal muscles in lean individuals respond to meal-induced hyperinsulinemia by increase in perfusion, the effect not observed in patients with metabolic syndrome. In conditions of hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridemia, this insufficient vascularization leads to the liberation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disruption of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and endothelial signalling responsible for the uptake of circulating fatty acids (FAs), whose accumulation in skeletal muscles and adipose tissue is widely associated with the impairment of insulin signalling. While the angiogenic role of VEGF-A and its increased circulating concentrations in obesity have been widely confirmed, the data related to the metabolic role of VEGF-B are diverse. However, recent discoveries indicate that this growth factor may be a promising therapeutic agent in patients with metabolic syndrome. Preclinical studies agree over two crucial metabolic effects of VEGF-B: (i) regulation of FAs uptake and (ii) regulation of tissue perfusion via activation of VEGF-A/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) 2 (VEGFR2) pathway. While in some preclinical high-fat diet studies, VEGF-B overexpression reverted glucose intolerance and stimulated fat burning, in others it further promoted accumulation of lipids and lipotoxicity. Data from clinical studies point out the changes in circulating or tissue expression levels of VEGF-B in obese compared with lean patients. Potentially beneficial effects of VEGF-B, achieved through enhanced blood flow (increased availability of insulin and glucose uptake in target organs) and decreased FAs uptake (prevention of lipotoxicity and improved insulin signalling), and its safety for clinical use, remain to be clarified through future translational research. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    PubMed

    Beijer, Emiel; Schoenmakers, Janna; Vijgen, Guy; Kessels, Fons; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Schrauwen, Patrick; Wouters, Miel; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; Teule, Jaap; Brans, Boudewijn

    2012-03-05

    Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT). Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and so-called brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activation, but its quantitative impact on energy expenditure and weight loss is controversial. Prospective clinical studies can address the potential role of BAT in cancer cachexia using (18)F-fluoro- deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning, with careful consideration of co-factors such as diet, exposure to the cold, physical activity and body mass index, that all seem to act on BAT recruitment and activity.

  2. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    PubMed Central

    Beijer, Emiel; Schoenmakers, Janna; Vijgen, Guy; Kessels, Fons; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Schrauwen, Patrick; Wouters, Miel; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; Teule, Jaap; Brans, Boudewijn

    2012-01-01

    Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT). Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and so-called brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activation, but its quantitative impact on energy expenditure and weight loss is controversial. Prospective clinical studies can address the potential role of BAT in cancer cachexia using 18F-fluoro- deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning, with careful consideration of co-factors such as diet, exposure to the cold, physical activity and body mass index, that all seem to act on BAT recruitment and activity. PMID:25992201

  3. Metabolic activation of 2-methylfuran by rat microsomal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindranath, V.; Boyd, M.R.

    1985-05-01

    2-Methylfuran (2-MF), a constituent of cigarette smoke and coffee, causes necrosis of liver, lungs, and kidneys in rodents. 2-MF is metabolically activated by mixed-function oxidases to acetylacrolein, a reactive metabolite that binds covalently to microsomal protein. The hepatic microsomal metabolism of 2-MF to reactive metabolite required the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was dependent on incubation time and substrate concentration. The microsomal metabolism of 2-MF was inducible by pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital and was inhibited by piperonyl butoxide and N-octyl imidazole, which indicates that the metabolism of 2-MF may be mediated by cytochrome P-450. Acetylacrolein was a potent inhibitor of mixed-function oxidase and completely inhibited the microsomal metabolism of 2-MF, indicating that 2-MF is a suicide substrate for the enzyme. The sulfhydryl nucleophile cysteine was a better trapping agent of the reactive metabolite of 2-MF than N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Lysine decreased the covalent binding of 2-MF metabolites, presumably by reacting with the aldehyde group of acetylacrolein. In addition, in the presence of NADPH, 2-MF was bioactivated by both pulmonary and renal cortical microsomes to reactive metabolites that were covalently bound to microsomal proteins.

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase: an emerging drug target to regulate imbalances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism to treat cardio-metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Filippov, Sergey; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Newton, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor of energy metabolism at the cellular as well as whole-body level. It is activated by low energy status that triggers a switch from ATP-consuming anabolic pathways to ATP-producing catabolic pathways. AMPK is involved in a wide range of biological activities that normalizes lipid, glucose, and energy imbalances. These pathways are dysregulated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents a clustering of major cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and energy imbalances. Clearly, there is an unmet medical need to find a molecule to treat alarming number of patients with MetS. AMPK, with multifaceted activities in various tissues, has emerged as an attractive drug target to manage lipid and glucose abnormalities and maintain energy homeostasis. A number of AMPK activators have been tested in preclinical models, but many of them have yet to reach to the clinic. This review focuses on the structure-function and role of AMPK in lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism. The mode of action of AMPK activators, mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical and clinical findings as well as future prospects of AMPK as a drug target in treating cardio-metabolic disease are discussed. PMID:22798688

  5. Seasonal changes in thermal environment and metabolic enzyme activity in the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin).

    PubMed

    Williard, Amanda Southwood; Harden, Leigh Anne

    2011-04-01

    Diamondback terrapins experience broad fluctuations in temperature on both a daily and seasonal basis in their estuarine environment. We measured metabolic enzyme activity in terrapin muscle tissue to assess thermal dependence and the role of temperature in seasonal metabolic downregulation in this species. Activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), citrate synthase (CS), and cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) was assayed at 10, 20, 30, and 40 °C for tissue collected during summer and winter. The Q(10) for enzyme activity varied between 1.31 and 2.11 within the temperature range at which terrapins were active (20-40 °C). The Q(10) for LDH, CS, and CCO varied between 1.39 and 1.76 and between 10 and 20 °C, but PK exhibited heightened thermal sensitivity within this lower temperature range, with a Q(10) of 2.90 for summer-collected tissue and 5.55 for winter-collected tissue. There was no significant effect of season on activity of LDH or PK, but activity of CS and CCO was significantly lower in winter-collected tissue compared with summer-collected tissue. Results indicate that temperature effects contribute to seasonal metabolic downregulation and dormancy in terrapins, but other environmental factors (i.e. oxygen availability), as well as seasonal shifts in blood biochemistry and circulating hormones may also play an important role.

  6. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  7. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  8. Potential role of the N-MYC downstream-regulated gene family in reprogramming cancer metabolism under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Young; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis and lactate fermentation supplies cancer cells with intermediate metabolites, which are used as macromolecule precursors. The oncogene MYC contributes to such aerobic metabolism by activating the expression of numerous genes essential for glycolysis and mitochondrial biogenesis. However, to survive and evolve in a hypoxic tumor milieu, cancer cells must revise MYC-driven metabolism because the mitochondrial respiratory chain provides free electrons to generate oxygen free radicals with inefficient production of ATP due to oxygen depletion. Instead, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) takes over the role of MYC in glycolysis, but suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis and activity to protect cells from such threats. Recently, the N-MYC downstream-regulated gene (NDRG) family has received attention as potential biomarkers of cancer prognosis. NDRGs are repressed MYC-dependently in various cancers, but induced under hypoxia because HIF-1 directly activates their promoters and indirectly de-represses them by antagonizing MYC. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the reprogramming of cancer metabolism via the counterbalance between MYC and HIF-1, and discuss the proven and putative roles of the NDRG family in adjusting cancer metabolism according to the ambient oxygen level. PMID:27447861

  9. Metabolic syndrome pathophysiology: the role of adipose tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several physiopathological explanations for the metabolic syndrome have been proposed involving insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and ectopic fat accumulation following adipose tissue saturation. However, current concepts create several paradoxes, including limited cardiovascular risk reducti...

  10. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  11. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  12. Roles of the gut in the metabolic syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Fändriks, L

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors (central obesity, hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and arterial hypertension), indicating an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. The gastrointestinal tract is seldom discussed as an organ system of principal importance for metabolic diseases. The present overview connects various metabolic research lines into an integrative physiological context in which the gastrointestinal tract is included. Strong evidence for the involvement of the gut in the metabolic syndrome derives from the powerful effects of weight-reducing (bariatric) gastrointestinal surgery. In fact, gastrointestinal surgery is now recommended as a standard treatment option for type 2 diabetes in obesity. Several gut-related mechanisms that potentially contribute to the metabolic syndrome will be presented. Obesity can be caused by hampered release of satiety-signalling gut hormones, reduced meal-associated energy expenditure and microbiota-assisted harvest of energy from nondigestible food ingredients. Adiposity per se is a well-established risk factor for hyperglycaemia. In addition, a leaky gut mucosa can trigger systemic inflammation mediating peripheral insulin resistance that together with a blunted incretin response aggravates the hyperglycaemic state. The intestinal microbiota is strongly associated with obesity and the related metabolic disease states, although the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Enterorenal signalling has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension and postprandial triglyceride-rich chylomicrons; in addition, intestinal cholesterol metabolism probably contributes to atherosclerosis. It is likely that in the future, the metabolic syndrome will be treated according to novel pharmacological principles interfering with gastrointestinal functionality.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in the control of bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Costas; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2007-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that regulate the storage and catabolism of dietary fats. PPARs constitute molecular targets for the treatment of human metabolic disorders, and also play a crucial role in inflammatory-related disease and cancer. Recent evidence has revealed the presence of three different PPAR isotypes (alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) in different cells of the bone tissue, as well as the possible role of PPAR ligands in bone turnover. In the present review, the latest knowledge of the expression of PPARs in bone tissue and the diverse effects of PPAR ligands on bone metabolism is summarized. PPARs, especially of the gamma isotype, could be targets for the treatment of diverse bone diseases such as osteoporosis and osteopenia related to either diabetes or aging.

  14. Caliceal diverticular calculi: is there a role for metabolic evaluation?

    PubMed

    Liatsikos, E N; Bernardo, N O; Dinlenc, C Z; Kapoor, R; Smith, A D

    2000-07-01

    We report our experience with the treatment and incidence of metabolic abnormalities in patients presenting with caliceal diverticular stones. We retrospectively evaluated 49 patients with caliceal diverticular stones (group 1) and 44 with simple renal stones (group 2). Each group successfully underwent percutaneous treatment. Mean stone size was 1.7 and 2.5 cm. in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Metabolic evaluation was available in 25 group 1 and 22 group 2 patients. Mean followup was 73.2 and 70. 8 months, respectively. We achieved a stone-free rate of 95. 9% in group 1 and 100% in group 2. There was no metabolic abnormality in 75% of the group 1 patients, while 12% had type II absorptive hypercalciuria, 8% hyperuricosuric hypercalciuria and 4% hyperoxaluria. There were no metabolic abnormalities in 22.7% of the group 2 patients, while 9%, 18% and 9% had types I to III absorptive hypercalciuria, respectively, 13.6% hyperuricosuric hypercalciuria, 13.6% hyperoxaluria, 4.5% hypocitruria and 9% type II absorptive hypercalciuria associated with hypocitruria. Our results reveal a low incidence of associated metabolic abnormalities in patients with caliceal diverticular stones. Thus, we believe that metabolic abnormalities do not promote caliceal diverticular calculous formation.

  15. Role of Akt and Ca2+ on cell permeabilization via connexin43 hemichannels induced by metabolic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Salas, Daniela; Puebla, Carlos; Lampe, Paul D; Lavandero, Sergio; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-07-01

    Connexin hemichannels are regulated under physiological and pathological conditions. Metabolic inhibition, a model of ischemia, promotes surface hemichannel activation associated, in part, with increased surface hemichannel levels, but little is known about its underlying mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of Akt on the connexin43 hemichannel's response induced by metabolic inhibition. In HeLa cells stably transfected with rat connexin43 fused to EGFP (HeLa43 cells), metabolic inhibition induced a transient Akt activation necessary to increase the amount of surface connexin43. The increase in levels of surface connexin43 was also found to depend on an intracellular Ca2+ signal increase that was partially mediated by Akt activation. However, the metabolic inhibition-induced Akt activation was not significantly affected by intracellular Ca2+ chelation. The Akt-dependent increase in connexin43 hemichannel activity in HeLa43 cells also occurred after oxygen-glucose deprivation, another ischemia-like condition, and in cultured cortical astrocytes (endogenous connexin43 expression system) under metabolic inhibition. Since opening of hemichannels has been shown to accelerate cell death, inhibition of Akt-dependent phosphorylation of connexin43 hemichannels could reduce cell death induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent advances in the role of cortisol and metabolic syndrome in age-related degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Stefanelli, Manuela; Falaschi, Giulia Maria; Toussan, Lavinia; Ferri, Claudio; Falaschi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) presents an increasing prevalence in elderly people. A significant role in MetS is played by the stress response and cortisol. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity is increased by central (loss of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors) and peripheral (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1, hyperactivity) mechanisms. The HPA hyperactivity has been found in chronic diseases affecting the endocrine (abdominal obesity with MetS, type 2 diabetes), cardiovascular (atherosclerosis, essential hypertension), and nervous systems (dementia, depression), in aging. A novel therapeutic approach (11β-HSD1 inhibition) is promising in treating the HPA axis hyperactivity in chronic diseases with MetS. A large-scale national clinical trial (AGICO, AGIng, and COrtisol study) has been proposed by our group to evaluate the role of cortisol and MetS in the main pathologies of aging (vascular and degenerative dementia, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, abdominal obesity).

  17. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-03-11

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

  18. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  19. Homocysteine Activates B Cells via Regulating PKM2-Dependent Metabolic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiacheng; Lü, Silin; Liu, Huiying; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Changtao; Xu, Qingbo

    2017-01-01

    The overactivation of immune cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy)-accelerated atherosclerosis. Homocysteine (Hcy) activates B cell proliferation and Ab secretion; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects remain largely unknown. Metabolic reprogramming is critical for lymphocyte activation and effector function. In this study, we showed that Hcy-activated B cells displayed an increase in both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, with a tendency to shift toward the latter, as well as an accumulation of intermediates in the pentose phosphate pathway, to provide energy and biosynthetic substrates for cell growth and function. Mechanistically, Hcy increased both the protein expression and glycolytic enzyme activity of the pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme 2 (PKM2) in B cells, whereas the PKM2 inhibitor shikonin restored Hcy-induced metabolic changes, as well as B cell proliferation and Ab secretion both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that PKM2 plays a critical role in metabolic reprogramming in Hcy-activated B cells. Further investigation revealed that the Akt–mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathway was involved in this process, as the mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin inhibited Hcy-induced changes in PKM2 enzyme activity and B cell activation. Notably, shikonin treatment effectively attenuated HHcy-accelerated atherosclerotic lesion formation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PKM2 is required to support metabolic reprogramming for Hcy-induced B cell activation and function, and it might serve as a critical regulator in HHcy-accelerated initiation of atherosclerosis. PMID:27903739

  20. Cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism in heart failure: Role of cardiolipin and sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Dolinsky, Vernon W; Cole, Laura K; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids accounts for the majority of cardiac ATP production in the heart. Fatty acid utilization by cardiac mitochondria is controlled at the level of fatty acid uptake, lipid synthesis, mobilization and mitochondrial import and oxidation. Consequently defective mitochondrial function appears to be central to the development of heart failure. Cardiolipin is a key mitochondrial phospholipid required for the activity of the electron transport chain. In heart failure, loss of cardiolipin and tetralinoleoylcardiolipin helps to fuel the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species that are a by-product of inefficient mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I and III. In this vicious cycle, reactive oxygen species generate lipid peroxides and may, in turn, cause oxidation of cardiolipin catalyzed by cytochrome c leading to cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Hence, preservation of cardiolipin and mitochondrial function may be keys to the prevention of heart failure development. In this review, we summarize cardiac energy metabolism and the important role that fatty acid uptake and metabolism play in this process and how defects in these result in heart failure. We highlight the key role that cardiolipin and sirtuins play in cardiac mitochondrial β-oxidation. In addition, we review the potential of pharmacological modulation of cardiolipin through the polyphenolic molecule resveratrol as a sirtuin-activator in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, we provide novel experimental evidence that resveratrol treatment increases cardiolipin in isolated H9c2 cardiac myocytes and tetralinoleoylcardiolipin in the heart of the spontaneously hypertensive rat and hypothesize that this leads to improvement in mitochondrial function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk.

  1. A Role for Timp3 in Microbiota-Driven Hepatic Steatosis and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mavilio, Maria; Marchetti, Valentina; Fabrizi, Marta; Stöhr, Robert; Marino, Arianna; Casagrande, Viviana; Fiorentino, Loredana; Cardellini, Marina; Kappel, Ben; Monteleone, Ivan; Garret, Celine; Mauriello, Alessandro; Monteleone, Giovanni; Farcomeni, Alessio; Burcelin, Remy; Menghini, Rossella; Federici, Massimo

    2016-07-19

    The effect of gut microbiota on obesity and insulin resistance is now recognized, but the underlying host-dependent mechanisms remain poorly undefined. We find that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 knockout (Timp3(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat diet exhibit gut microbiota dysbiosis, an increase in branched chain and aromatic (BCAA) metabolites, liver steatosis, and an increase in circulating soluble IL-6 receptors (sIL6Rs). sIL6Rs can then activate inflammatory cells, such as CD11c(+) cells, which drive metabolic inflammation. Depleting the microbiota through antibiotic treatment significantly improves glucose tolerance, hepatic steatosis, and systemic inflammation, and neutralizing sIL6R signaling reduces inflammation, but only mildly impacts glucose tolerance. Collectively, our results suggest that gut microbiota is the primary driver of the observed metabolic dysfunction, which is mediated, in part, through IL-6 signaling. Our findings also identify an important role for Timp3 in mediating the effect of the microbiota in metabolic diseases.

  2. Flexible metabolism in Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana: role of the glyoxylate cycle during insect pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Barelli, Larissa; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; Bidochka, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Insect pathogenic fungi such as Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana have an increasing role in the control of agricultural insect pests and vectors of human diseases. Many of the virulence factors are well studied but less is known of the metabolism of these fungi during the course of insect infection or saprobic growth. Here, we assessed enzyme activity and gene expression in the central carbon metabolic pathway, including isocitrate dehydrogenase, aconitase, citrate synthase, malate synthase (MLS) and isocitrate lyase (ICL), with particular attention to the glyoxylate cycle when M. anisopliae and B. bassiana were grown under various conditions. We observed that ICL and MLS, glyoxylate cycle intermediates, were upregulated during growth on 2-carbon compounds (acetate and ethanol) as well as in insect haemolymph. We fused the promoter of the M. anisopliae ICL gene (Ma-icl) to a marker gene (mCherry) and showed that Ma-icl was upregulated when M. anisopliae was grown in the presence of acetate. Furthermore, Ma-icl was upregulated when fungi were engulfed by insect haemocytes as well as during appressorium formation. Addition of the ICL inhibitor 3-nitroproprionate delayed conidial germination and inhibited appressorium formation. These results show that these insect pathogenic fungi have a flexible metabolism that includes the glyoxylate cycle as an integral part of germination, pathogenesis and saprobic growth.

  3. An expanding role for purine uptake permease-like transporters in plant secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jelesko, John G.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, our understanding of the plant purine uptake permease (PUP) transporter family was primarily oriented on purine nucleobase substrates and their tissue-specific expression patterns in Arabidopsis. However, a tobacco PUP-like homolog demonstrating nicotine uptake permease activity was recently shown to affect both nicotine metabolism and root cell growth. These new findings expand the physiological role for PUP-like transporters to include plant secondary metabolism. Molecular evolution analyses of PUP-like transporters indicate they are distinct group within an ancient super family of drug and metabolite transporters (DMTs). The PUP-like family originated during terrestrial plant evolution sometime between the bryophytes and the lycophytes. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the PUP-like transporters were likely derived from a pre-existing nucleotide-sugar transporter family within the DMT super family. Within the lycophyte Selaginella, there are three paralogous groups of PUP-like transporters. One of the three PUP-like paralogous groups showed an extensive pattern of gene duplication and diversification within the angiosperm lineage, whereas the more ancestral PUP-like paralogous groups did not. Biochemical characterization of four closely related PUP-like paralogs together with model-based phylogenetic analyses indicate both subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization during the molecular evolution of angiosperm PUP-like transporters. These findings suggest that members of the PUP-like family of DMT transporters are likely involved in diverse primary and secondary plant metabolic pathways. PMID:22639664

  4. Potential role of taurine in the prevention of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imae, Masato; Asano, Toshiki; Murakami, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by the cluster of a number of metabolic abnormalities in the presence of underlying insulin resistance. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has steadily increased in all populations worldwide. Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is a sulfur-containing amino acid that is involved in a variety of physiological functions. Clinical and experimental studies show that taurine intake may be beneficial in the prevention of metabolic syndrome including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. This article reviews the effect of taurine on all of the components of metabolic syndrome. In addition, the possible mechanisms by which taurine prevents diabetes and metabolic syndrome are also discussed. Further study is needed to determine the role of taurine in the development of metabolic syndrome in humans, because there is presently limited clinical data available.

  5. Multi-dimensional Roles of Ketone Bodies in Fuel Metabolism, Signaling, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Patrycja; Crawford, Peter A

    2017-02-07

    Ketone body metabolism is a central node in physiological homeostasis. In this review, we discuss how ketones serve discrete fine-tuning metabolic roles that optimize organ and organism performance in varying nutrient states and protect from inflammation and injury in multiple organ systems. Traditionally viewed as metabolic substrates enlisted only in carbohydrate restriction, observations underscore the importance of ketone bodies as vital metabolic and signaling mediators when carbohydrates are abundant. Complementing a repertoire of known therapeutic options for diseases of the nervous system, prospective roles for ketone bodies in cancer have arisen, as have intriguing protective roles in heart and liver, opening therapeutic options in obesity-related and cardiovascular disease. Controversies in ketone metabolism and signaling are discussed to reconcile classical dogma with contemporary observations.

  6. The Contributing Role of Bile Acids to Metabolic Improvements After Obesity and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Farnaz; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Steffen, Kristine J

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and metabolic surgery (OMS) leads to several metabolic improvements, which often occur prior to substantial weight loss. Therefore, other factors in addition to weight loss contribute to the metabolic benefits. This literature review offers an overview of studies investigating bile acids (BAs) and their metabolic effects after OMS. Rearrangement of enterohepatic circulation, changes in BA synthesis, BA conjugation, intestinal reabsorption, and alterations in the gut microbiota are potential mechanisms for altered BA profiles after surgery. Increased BA levels are associated with improved glucose homeostasis and lipid profiles, which are mediated by two major receptors: the Transmembrane G-protein Coupled Receptor and the Farnesoid X Receptor. Therefore, pharmacological manipulation of BAs and their receptors may be viable targets for less invasive obesity treatment.

  7. [The role of adipokines in formation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Kravchun, P; Kadykova, O; Gabisoniia, T

    2012-12-01

    Cardio-vascular disease is an important public health problem in all developed countries.The challenge isto learn thepathogenic mechanisms of this disease.Attention of scientists of the world are drown to the role of hormones in the development of adipose tissue metabolic disorders. Adipose tissue is composed of adipocytes embedded in a loose connective tissue meshwork containing adipocyte precursors, fibroblasts, immune cells, and various other cell types. Adipose tissue was traditionally considered an energy storage depot with few interesting attributes. Due to the dramatic rise in obesity and its metabolic sequelae during the past decades, adipose tissue gained tremendous scientific interest. It is now regarded as an active endocrine organ that, in addition to regulating fat mass and nutrient homeostasis, releases a large number of bioactive mediators (adipokines) modulating hemostasis, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. The aim of our study was to examine the metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular disease. Based on identifying the nature of changes of insulin antagonists and of insulin sensitizers. We were investigated 68 patients with hypertension, which included 35 women and 33 men.Estimated distance of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and adipose tissue hormone imbalance. Our results suggest that the mechanisms underlying the progression of diabetes and obesity in patients with hypertension against metabolic disorders that manifest dysfunction of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are associated with insulinorezistense and hypervisfatinemia and hyperrezistinemia against hypoadiponektinemia occur in hypertensive patients by having diabetes mellitus type 2.

  8. Activity of anandamide (AEA) metabolic enzymes in rat placental bed.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, B M; Battista, N; Correia-da-Silva, G; Rapino, C; Maccarrone, M; Teixeira, N A

    2014-11-01

    Endocannabinoids are endogenous lipid mediators, with anandamide (AEA) being the first member identified. It is now widely accepted that AEA influences early pregnancy events and its levels, which primarily depend on its synthesis by an N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) and degradation by a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), must be tightly regulated. Previous studies demonstrated that AEA levels require in situ regulation of these respective metabolic enzymes, and thus, any disturbance in AEA levels may impact maternal remodeling processes occurring during placental development. In this study, the activities of the AEA-metabolic enzymes that result in the establishment of proper local AEA levels during rat gestation were examined. Here, we demonstrate that during placentation NAPE-PLD and FAAH activities change in a temporal manner. Our findings suggest that NAPE-PLD and FAAH create the appropriate AEA levels required for tissue remodeling in the placental bed, a process essential to pregnancy maintenance.

  9. Elucidating the role of copper in CHO cell energy metabolism using (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Qiu, Jinshu; Goudar, Chetan T

    2015-01-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis was used to understand copper deficiency-related restructuring of energy metabolism, which leads to excessive lactate production in recombinant protein-producing CHO cells. Stationary-phase labeling experiments with U-(13)C glucose were conducted on CHO cells grown under high and limiting copper in 3 L fed-batch bioreactors. The resultant labeling patterns of soluble metabolites were measured by GC-MS and used to estimate metabolic fluxes in the central carbon metabolism pathways using OpenFlux. Fluxes were evaluated 300 times from stoichiometrically feasible random guess values and their confidence intervals calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results from metabolic flux analysis exhibited significant carbon redistribution throughout the metabolic network in cells under Cu deficiency. Specifically, glycolytic fluxes increased (25%-79% relative to glucose uptake) whereas fluxes through the TCA and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were lower (15%-23% and 74%, respectively) compared with the Cu-containing condition. Furthermore, under Cu deficiency, 33% of the flux entering TCA via the pyruvate node was redirected to lactate and malate production. Based on these results, we hypothesize that Cu deficiency disrupts the electron transport chain causing ATP deficiency, redox imbalance, and oxidative stress, which in turn drive copper-deficient CHO cells to produce energy via aerobic glycolysis, which is associated with excessive lactate production, rather than the more efficient route of oxidative phosphorylation.

  10. Potential Role of Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Metabolic Syndrome-Derived Platelet Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Renato Simões

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) has become a worldwide epidemic, alongside with a high socioeconomic cost, and its diagnostic criteria must include at least three out of the five features: visceral obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and high fasting glucose levels. MetS shows an increased oxidative stress associated with platelet hyperactivation, an essential component for thrombus formation and ischemic events in MetS patients. Platelet aggregation is governed by the peroxide tone and the activity of Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) at the cell membrane. PDI redox active sites present active cysteine residues that can be susceptible to changes in plasma oxidative state, as observed in MetS. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the relationship between PDI and platelet hyperactivation under MetS and its metabolic features, in spite of PDI being a mediator of important pathways implicated in MetS-induced platelet hyperactivation, such as insulin resistance and nitric oxide dysfunction. Thus, the aim of this review is to analyze data available in the literature as an attempt to support a possible role for PDI in MetS-induced platelet hyperactivation. PMID:28053690

  11. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors under epigenetic control in placental metabolism and fetal development.

    PubMed

    Lendvai, Ágnes; Deutsch, Manuel J; Plösch, Torsten; Ensenauer, Regina

    2016-05-15

    The placental metabolism can adapt to the environment throughout pregnancy to both the demands of the fetus and the signals from the mother. Such adaption processes include epigenetic mechanisms, which alter gene expression and may influence the offspring's health. These mechanisms are linked to the diversity of prenatal environmental exposures, including maternal under- or overnutrition or gestational diabetes. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that contribute to the developmental plasticity of the placenta by regulating lipid and glucose metabolism pathways, including lipogenesis, steroidogenesis, glucose transporters, and placental signaling pathways, thus representing a link between energy metabolism and reproduction. Among the PPAR isoforms, PPARγ appears to be the main modulator of mammalian placentation. Certain fatty acids and lipid-derived moieties are the natural activating PPAR ligands. By controlling the amounts of maternal nutrients that go across to the fetus, the PPARs play an important regulatory role in placenta metabolism, thereby adapting to the maternal nutritional status. As demonstrated in animal studies, maternal nutrition during gestation can exert long-term influences on the PPAR methylation pattern in offspring organs. This review underlines the current state of knowledge on the relationship between environmental factors and the epigenetic regulation of the PPARs in placenta metabolism and offspring development. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Metabolic injury-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation dampens phospholipid degradation.

    PubMed

    Rampanelli, Elena; Orsó, Evelyn; Ochodnicky, Peter; Liebisch, Gerhard; Bakker, Pieter J; Claessen, Nike; Butter, Loes M; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; Florquin, Sandrine; Schmitz, Gerd; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2017-06-06

    The collateral effects of obesity/metabolic syndrome include inflammation and renal function decline. As renal disease in obesity can occur independently of hypertension and diabetes, other yet undefined causal pathological pathways must be present. Our study elucidate novel pathological pathways of metabolic renal injury through LDL-induced lipotoxicity and metainflammation. Our in vitro and in vivo analysis revealed a direct lipotoxic effect of metabolic overloading on tubular renal cells through a multifaceted mechanism that includes intralysosomal lipid amassing, lysosomal dysfunction, oxidative stress, and tubular dysfunction. The combination of these endogenous metabolic injuries culminated in the activation of the innate immune NLRP3 inflammasome complex. By inhibiting the sirtuin-1/LKB1/AMPK pathway, NLRP3 inflammasome dampened lipid breakdown, thereby worsening the LDL-induced intratubular phospholipid accumulation. Consequently, the presence of NLRP3 exacerbated tubular oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and malabsorption during overnutrition. Altogether, our data demonstrate a causal link between LDL and tubular damage and the creation of a vicious cycle of excessive nutrients-NLRP3 activation-catabolism inhibition during metabolic kidney injury. Hence, this study strongly highlights the importance of renal epithelium in lipid handling and recognizes the role of NLRP3 as a central hub in metainflammation and immunometabolism in parenchymal non-immune cells.

  13. Agmatine : metabolic pathway and spectrum of activity in brain.

    PubMed

    Halaris, Angelos; Plietz, John

    2007-01-01

    Agmatine is an endogenous neuromodulator that, based on animal studies, has the potential for new drug development. As an endogenous aminoguanidine compound (1-amino-4-guanidinobutane), it is structurally unique compared with other monoamines. Agmatine was long thought to be synthesised only in lower life forms, until its biosynthetic pathway (decarboxylation of arginine) was described in the mammalian brain in 1994. Human arginine decarboxylase has been cloned and shown to have 48% identity to ornithine decarboxylase. In neurons of the brain and spinal cord, agmatine is packaged into synaptic vesicles and released upon neuronal depolarisation. Other evidence of a neuromodulation role for agmatine is the presence of a specific cellular uptake mechanism and a specific metabolic enzyme (agmatinase; which forms putrescine).Initially, agmatine was conceptualised as an endogenous clonidine-displacing substance of imidazoline receptors; however, it has now been established to have affinity for several transmembrane receptors, such as alpha(2)-adrenergic, imidazoline I(1) and glutamatergic NMDA receptors. In addition to activity at these receptors, agmatine irreversibly inhibits neuronal nitric oxide synthase and downregulates inducible nitric oxide synthase. Endogenous agmatine is induced in response to stress and/or inflammation. Stressful conditions that induce agmatine include hypoxic-ischaemia and cold-restraint stress of ulcerogenic proportion. Induction of agmatine in the brain seems to occur in astrocytes, although neurons also synthesise agmatine. The effects of injected agmatine in animals include anticonvulsant-, antineurotoxic- and antidepressant-like actions. Intraperitoneal or intracerebroventricular injections of agmatine rapidly elicit antidepressant-like behavioural changes in the rodent forced swim test and tail suspension test. Intraperitoneal injections of agmatine into rats and mice also elicit acute anxiolytic-like behavioural changes in the elevated

  14. Effect of Green Light on Nitric Oxide Metabolism in Chick Embryos. A Possible Physiological Role.

    PubMed

    Titov, V Yu; Kosenko, O V; Starkova, E S; Kondratov, G V; Borkhunova, E N; Ivanova, A V

    2015-10-01

    The exposure to green light, which serves as a well-known activating factor for myogenesis during incubation of chicken eggs, contributes to intensification of embryonic metabolism of NO. A metabolic product, nitrate, is mainly accumulated in the muscles. These data suggest that light induces a NO-dependent activation of the factor, which intensifies muscle tissue development.

  15. The role of osteocalcin in human glucose metabolism: marker or mediator?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing evidence supports an association between the skeleton and energy metabolism. These interactions are mediated by a variety of hormones, cytokines, and nutrients. Here, the evidence for a role of osteocalcin in the regulation of glucose metabolism in humans is reviewed. Osteocalcin is a bon...

  16. Pleiotropic effects of apolipoprotein C3 on HDL functionality and adipose tissue metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Zvintzou, Evangelia; Lhomme, Marie; Chasapi, Stella; Filou, Serafoula; Theodoropoulos, Vassilis; Xapapadaki, Eva; Kontush, Anatol; Spyroulias, George; Tellis, Constantinos C; Tselepis, Alexandros D; Constantinou, Caterina; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2017-09-01

    APOC3 is produced mainly by the liver and intestine and approximately half of plasma APOC3 associates with HDL. Though it was believed that APOC3 associates with HDL by simple binding to preexisting particles, recent data support that biogenesis of APOC3-containing HDL (APOC3-HDL) requires Abca1. Moreover, APOC3-HDL contributes to plasma triglyceride homeostasis by preventing APOC3 association with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Interestingly, APOC3-HDL also shows positive correlation with the morbidly obese phenotype. However, the roles of APOC3 in HDL functionality and adipose tissue metabolic activity remain unknown. Therefore, here we investigated the direct effects of APOC3 expression on HDL structure and function, as well as white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) metabolic activity. C57BL/6 mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing human APOC3 or a recombinant attenuated control adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein and blood and tissue samples were collected at 5 days postinfection. HDL was then analyzed for its apolipoprotein and lipid composition and particle functionality. Additionally, purified mitochondria from BAT and WAT were analyzed for uncoupling protein 1, cytochrome c (Cytc), and Cytc oxidase subunit 4 protein levels as an indirect measure of their metabolic activity. Serum metabolomic analysis was performed by NMR. Combined, our data show that APOC3 modulates HDL structure and function, while it selectively promotes BAT metabolic activation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Phenylketonuria Pathophysiology: on the Role of Metabolic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Malgarin, Fernanda; Cararo, José Henrique; Cardoso, Fabiola; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe) metabolism caused by the deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase. This deficiency leads to the accumulation of Phe and its metabolites in tissues and body fluids of PKU patients. The main signs and symptoms are found in the brain but the pathophysiology of this disease is not well understood. In this context, metabolic alterations such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein and neurotransmitters synthesis have been described both in animal models and patients. This review aims to discuss the main metabolic disturbances reported in PKU and relate them with the pathophysiology of this disease. The elucidation of the pathophysiology of brain damage found in PKU patients will help to develop better therapeutic strategies to improve quality of life of patients affected by this condition.

  18. Phenylketonuria Pathophysiology: on the Role of Metabolic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Malgarin, Fernanda; Cararo, José Henrique; Cardoso, Fabiola; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe) metabolism caused by the deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase. This deficiency leads to the accumulation of Phe and its metabolites in tissues and body fluids of PKU patients. The main signs and symptoms are found in the brain but the pathophysiology of this disease is not well understood. In this context, metabolic alterations such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein and neurotransmitters synthesis have been described both in animal models and patients. This review aims to discuss the main metabolic disturbances reported in PKU and relate them with the pathophysiology of this disease. The elucidation of the pathophysiology of brain damage found in PKU patients will help to develop better therapeutic strategies to improve quality of life of patients affected by this condition. PMID:26425393

  19. Coupling nutrient sensing to metabolic homoeostasis: the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    André, Caroline; Cota, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is known to couple different environmental cues to the regulation of several energy-demanding functions within the cell, spanning from protein translation to mitochondrial activity. As a result, at the organism level, mTORC1 activity affects energy balance and general metabolic homoeostasis by modulating both the activity of neuronal populations that play key roles in the control of food intake and body weight, as well as by determining storage and use of fuel substrates in peripheral tissues. This review focuses on recent advances made in understanding the role of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of energy balance. More particularly, it aims at providing an overview of the status of knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying the ability of certain amino acids, glucose and fatty acids, to affect mTORC1 activity and in turn illustrates how the mTORC1 pathway couples nutrient sensing to the hypothalamic regulation of the organisms' energy homoeostasis and to the control of intracellular metabolic processes, such as glucose uptake, protein and lipid biosynthesis. The evidence reviewed pinpoints the mTORC1 pathway as an integrator of the actions of nutrients on metabolic health and provides insight into the relevance of this intracellular pathway as a potential target for the therapy of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes.

  20. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism, genotoxicity, and tumor-initiating activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E.L.C.; Daniel, F.B.; Herren-Freund, S.L.; Pereira, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HAN) are drinking water contaminants produced during chlorine disinfection. This paper evaluates metabolism, genotoxicity, and tumor-initiating activity of these chemicals. The alkylating potential of the HAN to react with the electrophile-trapping agent, 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine, followed the order dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN) > bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) > chloroacetonitrile (CAN) > dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) > trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN). When administered orally to rats, the HAN were metabolized to cyanide and excreted in the urine as thiocyanate. The extent of thiocyanate excretion was CAN > BCAN > DCAN > DDAN >> TCAN. Haloacetonitriles inhibited in vitro microsomal dimethylnitrosamine demethylase (DMN-DM) activity. The most potent inhibitors were DBAN and BCAN. The HAN produced DNA strand breaks in cultured human lymphoblastic (CCRF-CEM) cells. TCAN was the most potent DNA strand breaker. DCAN reacted with polyadenylic acid and DNA to form adducts in a cell-free system. None of the HAN initiated ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) foci when assayed for tumor-initiating activity in rat liver foci bioassay. In summary, the HAN were demonstrated to possess alkylating activity and genotoxicity in vitro and appeared after oral administration to possess biological activity as indicated by the inhibition of DMN-DM by TCAN but appeared to lack genotoxic and tumor-initiating activity in rat liver. It is proposed that if the HAN found in drinking water pose a carcinogenic hazard it would be limited to the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Potential Role of Selenoenzymes and Antioxidant Metabolism in relation to Autism Etiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Laura J.; Deth, Richard C.; Ralston, Nicholas V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are behaviorally defined, but the biochemical pathogenesis of the underlying disease process remains uncharacterized. Studies indicate that antioxidant status is diminished in autistic subjects, suggesting its pathology is associated with augmented production of oxidative species and/or compromised antioxidant metabolism. This suggests ASD may result from defects in the metabolism of cellular antioxidants which maintain intracellular redox status by quenching reactive oxygen species (ROS). Selenium-dependent enzymes (selenoenzymes) are important in maintaining intercellular reducing conditions, particularly in the brain. Selenoenzymes are a family of ~25 genetically unique proteins, several of which have roles in preventing and reversing oxidative damage in brain and endocrine tissues. Since the brain's high rate of oxygen consumption is accompanied by high ROS production, selenoenzyme activities are particularly important in this tissue. Because selenoenzymes can be irreversibly inhibited by many electrophiles, exposure to these organic and inorganic agents can diminish selenoenzyme-dependent antioxidant functions. This can impair brain development, particularly via the adverse influence of oxidative stress on epigenetic regulation. Here we review the physiological roles of selenoproteins in relation to potential biochemical mechanisms of ASD etiology and pathology. PMID:24734177

  2. Insights into the role of endonuclease V in RNA metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    García-Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Estévez, Antonio M; Ruíz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Vidal, Antonio E; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2017-08-17

    Inosine may arise in DNA as a result of oxidative deamination of adenine or misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate during replication. On the other hand, the occurrence of inosine in RNA is considered a normal and essential modification induced by specific adenosine deaminases acting on mRNA and tRNA. In prokaryotes, endonuclease V (EndoV) can recognize and cleave inosine-containing DNA. In contrast, mammalian EndoVs preferentially cleave inosine-containing RNA, suggesting a role in RNA metabolism for the eukaryotic members of this protein family. We have performed a biochemical characterization of EndoV from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. In vitro, TbEndoV efficiently processes single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides with inosine, including A to I-edited tRNA-like substrates but exhibits weak activity over DNA, except when a ribonucleotide is placed 3' to the inosine. Immunolocalization studies performed in procyclic forms indicate that TbEndoV is mainly cytosolic yet upon nutritional stress it redistributes and accumulates in stress granules colocalizing with the DEAD-box helicase TbDhh1. RNAi-mediated depletion of TbEndoV results in moderate growth defects in procyclic cells while the two EndoV alleles could be readily knocked out in bloodstream forms. Taken together, these observations suggest an important role of TbEndoV in RNA metabolism in procyclic forms of the parasite.

  3. The role of human carboxylesterases in drug metabolism: have we overlooked their importance?

    PubMed

    Laizure, S Casey; Herring, Vanessa; Hu, Zheyi; Witbrodt, Kevin; Parker, Robert B

    2013-02-01

    Carboxylesterases are a multigene family of mammalian enzymes widely distributed throughout the body that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters, amides, thioesters, and carbamates. In humans, two carboxylesterases, hCE1 and hCE2, are important mediators of drug metabolism. Both are expressed in the liver, but hCE1 greatly exceeds hCE2. In the intestine, only hCE2 is present and highly expressed. The most common drug substrates of these enzymes are ester prodrugs specifically designed to enhance oral bioavailability by hydrolysis to the active carboxylic acid after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Carboxylesterases also play an important role in the hydrolysis of some drugs to inactive metabolites. It has been widely believed that drugs undergoing hydrolysis by hCE1 and hCE2 are not subject to clinically significant alterations in their disposition, but evidence exists that genetic polymorphisms, drug-drug interactions, drug-disease interactions and other factors are important determinants of the variability in the therapeutic response to carboxylesterase-substrate drugs. The implications for drug therapy are far-reaching, as substrate drugs include numerous examples from widely prescribed therapeutic classes. Representative drugs include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, antiplatelet drugs, statins, antivirals, and central nervous system agents. As research interest increases in the carboxylesterases, evidence is accumulating of their important role in drug metabolism and, therefore, the outcomes of pharmacotherapy.

  4. Pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and bouts: role of tryptamine, arginine metabolism and α1-agonists.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, G; Bussone, G; Di Fiore, P; Perini, F; Gucciardi, A; Bolner, A; Aguggia, M; Saracco, G; Galloni, E; Giordano, G; Leon, A

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of tryptamine in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache along with that of adrenaline and noradrenaline (α-agonists) together with arginine metabolism in the origin of cluster bouts. Plasma levels of tyramine, tryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, noradrenalin, adrenalin and the markers of arginine metabolism such as arginine, homoarginine, citrulline, ADMA and NMMA, were measured in 23 chronic cluster headache patients (10 chronic cluster ab initio and 13 transformed from episodic cluster) and 28 control subjects. The plasma levels of tyramine, tryptamine, noradrenalin and adrenalin were found several times higher in chronic cluster headache patients compared to controls, whereas the plasma levels of arginine, homoarginine and citrulline were significantly lower. No differences were found in the plasma levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic, ADMA and NMMA between chronic cluster headache patients and control subjects. These results provide support for a role of tryptamine in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and, in particular, in the duration of the cluster bouts. In addition, the low levels of the nitric oxide substrates together with the high levels of noradrenalin and adrenalin suggest an activation of endothelial TAAR1 receptors followed by the release of nitric oxide in the circulation that may constitute the final step of the physiopathology of cluster crisis.

  5. Activity syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Szekeres, Petra; Violich, Mackellar; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Eliason, Erika J.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest, the behavioural ecology of deep-sea organisms is largely unknown. Much of this scarcity in knowledge can be attributed to deepwater animals being secretive or comparatively 'rare', as well as technical difficulties associated with accessing such remote habitats. Here we tested whether two species of giant marine isopod (Bathynomus giganteus, Booralana tricarinata) captured from 653 to 875 m in the Caribbean Sea near Eleuthera, The Bahamas, exhibited an activity behavioural syndrome across two environmental contexts (presence/absence of food stimulus) and further whether this syndrome carried over consistently between sexes. We also measured routine metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in response to a food stimulus in B. giganteus to assess whether these variables are related to individual differences in personality. We found that both species show an activity syndrome across environmental contexts, but the underlying mechanistic basis of this syndrome, particularly in B. giganteus, is unclear. Contrary to our initial predictions, neither B. giganteus nor B. tricarinata showed any differences between mean expression of behavioural traits between sexes. Both sexes of B. tricarinata showed strong evidence of an activity syndrome underlying movement and foraging ecology, whereas only male B. giganteus showed evidence of an activity syndrome. Generally, individuals that were more active and bolder, in a standard open arena test were also more active when a food stimulus was present. Interestingly, individual differences in metabolism were not related to individual differences in behaviour based on present data. Our study provides the first measurements of behavioural syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods.

  6. Metabolically activated steviol, the aglycone of stevioside, is mutagenic.

    PubMed Central

    Pezzuto, J M; Compadre, C M; Swanson, S M; Nanayakkara, D; Kinghorn, A D

    1985-01-01

    Stevioside, a constituent of Stevia rebaudiana, is commonly used as a noncaloric sugar substitute in Japan. Consistent with reports in the literature, we have found that stevioside is not mutagenic as judged by utilization of Salmonella typhimurium strain TM677, either in the presence or in the absence of a metabolic activating system. Similar negative results were obtained with several structurally related sweet-tasting glycosides. However, steviol, the aglycone of stevioside, was found to be highly mutagenic when evaluated in the presence of a 9000 X g supernatant fraction derived from the livers of Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Expression of mutagenic activity was dependent on both pretreatment of the rats with Aroclor 1254 and addition of NADPH; unmetabolized steviol was not active. The structurally related species, isosteviol, was not active regardless of metabolic activation. Similarly, chemical reduction of the unsaturated bond linking the carbon-16 and -17 positions of steviol resulted in the generation of two isomeric products, dihydrosteviol A and B, that were not mutagenic. In addition, ent-kaurenoic acid was found to be inactive. It is therefore clear that a metabolite of an integral component of stevioside is mutagenic; structural features of requisite importance for the expression of mutagenic activity include a hydroxy group at position 13 and an unsaturated bond joining the carbon atoms at positions 16 and 17. A potential metabolite of steviol, steviol-16 alpha,17-epoxide, was synthesized chemically and found to be ineffective as a direct-acting mutagen. Thus, although stevioside itself appears innocuous, it would seem prudent to expeditiously and unequivocally establish the human metabolic disposition of this substance. PMID:3887402

  7. Acylcarnitines: old actors auditioning for new roles in metabolic physiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A number of challenges or perturbations in metabolic pathways lead to significant increases in plasma and tissue long-chain acylcarnitines (LCAC). The LCAC and other acylcarnitines rise, for instance, in the blood and muscle during exercise bouts, as tissue acyl-CoA pools change with accelerated met...

  8. [Carbohydrate: current role in diabetes mellitus and metabolic disease].

    PubMed

    Luna López, Victoria; López Medina, José Antonio; Vázquez Gutiérrez, Mercedes; Fernández Soto, M Luisa

    2014-11-01

    There is a prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), unknown DM and stress hyperglycemia among hospital patients, and the nutritional treatment is a key part of care, where carbohydrates (CH) intake is a controversial issue. There is also a discussion on the increase of prevalence for DM, obesity and metabolic disease with refined CH or sugar. This review examines the recommendations from different scientific societies about the percentage of CH in the total calorie intake of the diabetic patient, the CH value in the glycemic index and glycemic load, the new CH included in enteral formulae and the association of refined CH with the high prevalence of DM and metabolic disease. Systematic review of literature using the electronic scientific databases Pubmed, Science Direct, Scielo, Scopus and Medline. Scientific societies are flexible about the CH intake in the diet of diabetic patients, suggesting to customize it according to each metabolic profile. Using the glycemic index and glycemic load can provide an extra benefit in the postprandial glycemic control. The new diabetes-specific enteral formulae, with fructooligosaccharides, resistant maltodextrins and fructose-free show efficacy in improving the glycemic control, although more controlled and long-term studies are needed. There is still some controversy about the links between sugar intake and DM, obesity and metabolic disease, although this relationship would be more linked to an increase of the total calorie intake than to a specific nutrient. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  10. Deletion of GLUT1 and GLUT3 Reveals Multiple Roles for Glucose Metabolism in Platelet and Megakaryocyte Function.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Trevor P; Campbell, Robert A; Funari, Trevor; Dunne, Nicholas; Balderas Angeles, Enrique; Middleton, Elizabeth A; Chaudhuri, Dipayan; Weyrch, Andrew S; Abel, E Dale

    2017-07-25

    Anucleate platelets circulate in the blood to facilitate thrombosis and diverse immune functions. Platelet activation leading to clot formation correlates with increased glycogenolysis, glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and lactic acid production. Simultaneous deletion of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and GLUT3 (double knockout [DKO]) specifically in platelets completely abolished glucose uptake. In DKO platelets, mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of non-glycolytic substrates, such as glutamate, increased. Thrombosis and platelet activation were decreased through impairment at multiple activation nodes, including Ca(2+) signaling, degranulation, and integrin activation. DKO mice developed thrombocytopenia, secondary to impaired pro-platelet formation from megakaryocytes, and increased platelet clearance resulting from cytosolic calcium overload and calpain activation. Systemic treatment with oligomycin, inhibiting mitochondrial metabolism, induced rapid clearance of platelets, with circulating counts dropping to zero in DKO mice, but not wild-type mice, demonstrating an essential role for energy metabolism in platelet viability. Thus, substrate metabolism is essential for platelet production, activation, and survival. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of nest surface temperatures and the brain in influencing ant metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nigel R; Ghaedi, Behnaz; Groenewald, Berlizé

    2016-08-01

    Thermal limits of insects can be influenced by recent thermal history: here we used thermolimit respirometry to determine metabolic rate responses and thermal limits of the dominant meat ant, Iridomyrmex purpureus. Firstly, we tested the hypothesis that nest surface temperatures have a pervasive influence on thermal limits. Metabolic rates and activity of freshly field collected individuals were measured continuously while ramping temperatures from 44°C to 62°C at 0.25°C/minute. At all the stages of thermolimit respirometry, metabolic rates were independent of nest surface temperatures, and CTmax did not differ between ants collected from nest with different surface temperatures. Secondly, we tested the effect of brain control on upper thermal limits of meat ants via ant decapitation experiments ('headedness'). Decapitated ants exhibited similar upper critical temperature (CTmax) results to living ants (Decapitated 50.3±1.2°C: Living 50.1±1.8°C). Throughout the temperature ramping process, 'headedness' had a significant effect on metabolic rate in total (Decapitated V̇CO2 140±30µlCO2mg(-1)min(-1): Living V̇CO2 250±50 CO2mg(-1)min(-1)), as well as at temperatures below and above CTmax. At high temperatures (>44°C) pre- CTmax the relationships between I. purpureus CTmax values and mass specific metabolic rates for living ants exhibited a negative slope whilst decapitated ants exhibited a positive slope. The decapitated ants also had a significantly higher Q10:25-35°C when compared to living ants (1.91±0.43 vs. 1.29±0.35). Our findings suggest that physiological responses of ants may be able to cope with increasing surface temperatures, as shown by metabolic rates across the thermolimit continuum, making them physiologically resilient to a rapidly changing climate. We also demonstrate that the brain plays a role in respiration, but critical thermal limits are independent of respiration levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolism of mometasone furoate and biological activity of the metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sahasranaman, S; Issar, M; Hochhaus, G

    2006-02-01

    To better evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the new inhaled glucocorticoid mometasone furoate (MF), the metabolism of MF was evaluated in rat and human tissues and in rat after i.v. administration. Metabolic studies with 3H-MF in human and rat plasma and S9 fractions of human and rat lung showed relatively high stability and a degradation pattern similar to that seen in buffer systems. MF was efficiently metabolized into at least five metabolites in S9 fractions of both rat and human liver. There were, however, quantitative differences in the metabolites between the two species. The apparent half-life of MF in the S9 fraction of human liver was found to be 3 times greater compared with that in rat. MET1, the most polar metabolite, was the major metabolite in rat liver fractions, whereas both MET1 and MET2 were formed to an equal extent in human liver. Metabolism and distribution studies in rats after intravenous and intratracheal administration of [1,2-(3)H]MF revealed that most of the radioactivity (approximately 90%) was present in the stomach, intestines, and intestinal contents, suggesting biliary excretion of MF and its metabolites. Radiochromatography showed that most radioactivity was associated with MET1, MET2, and MET 3. Fractionation of the high-performance liquid chromatography eluate (MET1-5) revealed that only MF [relative binding affinity (RBA) 2900] and MET2 (RBA 700) had appreciable glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity. These results suggest that MF undergoes distinct extrahepatic metabolism but generates active metabolites that might be in part responsible for the systemic side effects of MF.

  13. Global dynamic optimization approach to predict activation in metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    de Hijas-Liste, Gundián M; Klipp, Edda; Balsa-Canto, Eva; Banga, Julio R

    2014-01-06

    During the last decade, a number of authors have shown that the genetic regulation of metabolic networks may follow optimality principles. Optimal control theory has been successfully used to compute optimal enzyme profiles considering simple metabolic pathways. However, applying this optimal control framework to more general networks (e.g. branched networks, or networks incorporating enzyme production dynamics) yields problems that are analytically intractable and/or numerically very challenging. Further, these previous studies have only considered a single-objective framework. In this work we consider a more general multi-objective formulation and we present solutions based on recent developments in global dynamic optimization techniques. We illustrate the performance and capabilities of these techniques considering two sets of problems. First, we consider a set of single-objective examples of increasing complexity taken from the recent literature. We analyze the multimodal character of the associated non linear optimization problems, and we also evaluate different global optimization approaches in terms of numerical robustness, efficiency and scalability. Second, we consider generalized multi-objective formulations for several examples, and we show how this framework results in more biologically meaningful results. The proposed strategy was used to solve a set of single-objective case studies related to unbranched and branched metabolic networks of different levels of complexity. All problems were successfully solved in reasonable computation times with our global dynamic optimization approach, reaching solutions which were comparable or better than those reported in previous literature. Further, we considered, for the first time, multi-objective formulations, illustrating how activation in metabolic pathways can be explained in terms of the best trade-offs between conflicting objectives. This new methodology can be applied to metabolic networks with arbitrary

  14. Global dynamic optimization approach to predict activation in metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During the last decade, a number of authors have shown that the genetic regulation of metabolic networks may follow optimality principles. Optimal control theory has been succesfully used to compute optimal enzyme profiles considering simple metabolic pathways. However, applying this optimal control framework to more general networks (e.g. branched networks, or networks incorporating enzyme production dynamics) yields problems that are analytically intractable and/or numerically very challenging. Further, these previous studies have only considered a single-objective framework. Results In this work we consider a more general multi-objective formulation and we present solutions based on recent developments in global dynamic optimization techniques. We illustrate the performance and capabilities of these techniques considering two sets of problems. First, we consider a set of single-objective examples of increasing complexity taken from the recent literature. We analyze the multimodal character of the associated non linear optimization problems, and we also evaluate different global optimization approaches in terms of numerical robustness, efficiency and scalability. Second, we consider generalized multi-objective formulations for several examples, and we show how this framework results in more biologically meaningful results. Conclusions The proposed strategy was used to solve a set of single-objective case studies related to unbranched and branched metabolic networks of different levels of complexity. All problems were successfully solved in reasonable computation times with our global dynamic optimization approach, reaching solutions which were comparable or better than those reported in previous literature. Further, we considered, for the first time, multi-objective formulations, illustrating how activation in metabolic pathways can be explained in terms of the best trade-offs between conflicting objectives. This new methodology can be applied to

  15. Multifaceted interaction of bone, muscle, lifestyle interventions and metabolic and cardiovascular disease: role of osteocalcin.

    PubMed

    Levinger, I; Brennan-Speranza, T C; Zulli, A; Parker, L; Lin, X; Lewis, J R; Yeap, B B

    2017-03-13

    Undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) may play a role in glucose homeostasis and cardiometabolic health. This review examines the epidemiological and interventional evidence associating osteocalcin (OC) and ucOC with metabolic risk and cardiovascular disease. The complexity in assessing such correlations, due to the observational nature of human studies, is discussed. Several studies have reported that higher levels of ucOC and OC are correlated with lower fat mass and HbA1c. In addition, improved measures of glycaemic control via pharmacological and non-pharmacological (e.g. exercise or diet) interventions are often associated with increased circulating levels of OC and/or ucOC. There is also a relationship between lower circulating OC and ucOC and increased measures of vascular calcification and cardiovascular disease. However, not all studies have reported such relationship, some with contradictory findings. Equivocal findings may arise because of the observational nature of the studies and the inability to directly assess the relationship between OC and ucOC on glycaemic control and cardiovascular health in humans. Studying OC and ucOC in humans is further complicated due to numerous confounding factors such as sex differences, menopausal status, vitamin K status, physical activity level, body mass index, insulin sensitivity (normal/insulin resistance/T2DM), tissue-specific effects and renal function among others. Current observational and indirect interventional evidence appears to support a relationship between ucOC with metabolic and cardiovascular disease. There is also emerging evidence to suggest a direct role of ucOC in human metabolism. Further mechanistic studies are required to (a) clarify causality, (b) explore mechanisms involved and

  16. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Metabolically Healthy versus Unhealthy Obese and Non-Obese Individuals – The Maastricht Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Berg, Julianne D.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Schram, Miranda T.; Savelberg, Hans H. C. M.; Schaper, Nicolaas C.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Henry, Ronald M. A.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Koster, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Background Both obesity and the metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Although both frequently occur together in the same individual, obesity and the metabolic syndrome can also develop independently from each other. The (patho)physiology of “metabolically healthy obese” (i.e. obese without metabolic syndrome) and “metabolically unhealthy non-obese” phenotypes (i.e. non-obese with metabolic syndrome) is not fully understood, but physical activity and sedentary behavior may play a role. Objective To examine objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior across four groups: I) “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO); II) “metabolically unhealthy obese” (MUO); III)”metabolically healthy non-obese” (MHNO); and IV) “metabolically unhealthy non-obese” (MUNO). Methods Data were available from 2,449 men and women aged 40–75 years who participated in The Maastricht Study from 2010 to 2013. Participants were classified into the four groups according to obesity (BMI≥30kg/m2) and metabolic syndrome (ATPIII definition). Daily activity was measured for 7 days with the activPAL physical activity monitor and classified as time spent sitting, standing, and stepping. Results In our study population, 562 individuals were obese. 19.4% of the obese individuals and 72.7% of the non-obese individuals was metabolically healthy. After adjustments for age, sex, educational level, smoking, alcohol use, waking time, T2DM, history of CVD and mobility limitation, MHO (n = 107) spent, per day, more time stepping (118.2 versus 105.2 min; p<0.01) and less time sedentary (563.5 versus 593.0 min., p = 0.02) than MUO (n = 440). In parallel, MHNO (n = 1384) spent more time stepping (125.0 versus 115.4 min; p<0.01) and less time sedentary (553.3 versus 576.6 min., p<0.01) than MUNO (n = 518). Conclusion Overall, the metabolically healthy groups were less sedentary and more physically active than the

  17. Metabolic Plasticity in Resting and Thrombin Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saranya; Chacko, Balu; Sawada, Hirotaka; Kramer, Philip A.; Johnson, Michelle S.; Benavides, Gloria A.; O’Donnell, Valerie; Marques, Marisa B.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet thrombus formation includes several integrated processes involving aggregation, secretion of granules, release of arachidonic acid and clot retraction, but it is not clear which metabolic fuels are required to support these events. We hypothesized that there is flexibility in the fuels that can be utilized to serve the energetic and metabolic needs for resting and thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation. Using platelets from healthy human donors, we found that there was a rapid thrombin-dependent increase in oxidative phosphorylation which required both glutamine and fatty acids but not glucose. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation or glutamine utilization could be compensated for by increased glycolytic flux. No evidence for significant mitochondrial dysfunction was found, and ATP/ADP ratios were maintained following the addition of thrombin, indicating the presence of functional and active mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation during the early stages of aggregation. Interestingly, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation and glutaminolysis alone or in combination is not sufficient to prevent platelet aggregation, due to compensation from glycolysis, whereas inhibitors of glycolysis inhibited aggregation approximately 50%. The combined effects of inhibitors of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were synergistic in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation contribute to platelet metabolism in the resting and activated state, with fatty acid oxidation and to a smaller extent glutaminolysis contributing to the increased energy demand. PMID:25875958

  18. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James W A; Richmond, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health.

  19. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  20. A role for inherited metabolic deficits in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changsoo; Drayna, Dennis

    2012-11-01

    Stuttering is a common but poorly understood speech disorder. Consistent evidence for the involvement of genetic factors in stuttering has motivated studies aimed at identifying causative genetic variants that could shed light on the underlying molecular and cellular deficits in this disorder. Such studies have begun to identify causative genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the gene discoveries to date, and to cover the subsequent functional studies that are beginning to provide insights into how these gene mutations might cause stuttering. Surprisingly, the first variant genes to be associated with stuttering are those encoding the lysosomal targeting system, GNPTAB, GNPTG, and NAGPA. Although mutations in NAGPA have not been associated with a disorder in humans, mutations in GNPTAB and GNPTG cause mucolipidosis types II and III, which are rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders, associated with pathology of bone, connective tissue, liver, spleen, and brain. Analysis of mutations in these genes has so far identified predominantly missense mutations in stuttering, in contrast to the truncating and other mutations that result in very low GNPTAB/G enzyme activity and are historically associated with mucolipidosis. Genetic evidence for the role of lysosomal targeting mutations in stuttering has now been buttressed by biochemical studies of the mutant enzymes found in this disorder. While data on the GlcNAc-phosphotransferase encoded by GNPTAB/G remains limited and only suggestive, a study of the enzyme encoded by NAGPA has shown that the mutations found in stuttering reduce the overall cellular activity of this enzyme by about half, and that they result in deficits in intracellular processing and trafficking that lead to a reduced cellular half life. How these deficits result in the presumed speech-specific neuropathology associated with stuttering is not yet known. However these findings have opened several new lines of inquiry, including

  1. A role for inherited metabolic deficits in persistent developmental stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Changsoo; Drayna, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Stuttering is a common but poorly understood speech disorder. Consistent evidence for the involvement of genetic factors in stuttering has motivated studies aimed at identifying causative genetic variants that could shed light on the underlying molecular and cellular deficits in this disorder. Such studies have begun to identify causative genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the gene discoveries to date, and to cover the subsequent functional studies that are beginning to provide insights into how these gene mutations might cause stuttering. Surprisingly, the first variant genes to be associated with stuttering are those encoding the lysosomal targeting system, GNPTAB, GNPTG, and NAGPA. Although mutations in NAGPA have not been associated with a disorder in humans, mutations in GNPTAB and GNPTG cause mucolipidosis types II and III, which are rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders, associated with pathology of bone, connective tissue, liver, spleen, and brain. Analysis of mutations in these genes has so far identified predominantly missense mutations in stuttering, in contrast to the truncating and other mutations that result in very low GNPTAB/G enzyme activity and are historically associated with mucolipidosis. Genetic evidence for the role of lysosomal targeting mutations in stuttering has now been buttressed by biochemical studies of the mutant enzymes found in this disorder. While data on the GlcNAc phosphotransferase encoded by GNPTAB/G remains limited and only suggestive, a study of the enzyme encoded by NAGPA has shown that the mutations found in stuttering reduce the overall cellular activity of this enzyme by about half, and that they result in deficits in intracellular processing and trafficking that lead to a reduced cellular half life. How these deficits result in the presumed speech-specific neuropathology associated with stuttering is not yet known. However these findings have opened several new lines of inquiry, including

  2. Metabolic maintenance of cell asymmetry following division in activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verbist, Katherine C; Guy, Cliff S; Milasta, Sandra; Liedmann, Swantje; Kamiński, Marcin M; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2016-04-21

    Asymmetric cell division, the partitioning of cellular components in response to polarizing cues during mitosis, has roles in differentiation and development. It is important for the self-renewal of fertilized zygotes in Caenorhabditis elegans and neuroblasts in Drosophila, and in the development of mammalian nervous and digestive systems. T lymphocytes, upon activation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), can undergo asymmetric cell division, wherein the daughter cell proximal to the APC is more likely to differentiate into an effector-like T cell and the distal daughter is more likely to differentiate into a memory-like T cell. Upon activation and before cell division, expression of the transcription factor c-Myc drives metabolic reprogramming, necessary for the subsequent proliferative burst. Here we find that during the first division of an activated T cell in mice, c-Myc can sort asymmetrically. Asymmetric distribution of amino acid transporters, amino acid content, and activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is correlated with c-Myc expression, and both amino acids and mTORC1 activity sustain the differences in c-Myc expression in one daughter cell compared to the other. Asymmetric c-Myc levels in daughter T cells affect proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and these effects are altered by experimental manipulation of mTORC1 activity or c-Myc expression. Therefore, metabolic signalling pathways cooperate with transcription programs to maintain differential cell fates following asymmetric T-cell division.

  3. Metabolic inhibition enhances Ca(2+)-activated K+ current in smooth muscle cells of rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed

    Miller, A L; Morales, E; Leblanc, N R; Cole, W C

    1993-12-01

    The effect of metabolic inhibition on macroscopic and single-channel K+ currents in isolated rabbit portal vein myocytes was investigated by patch-clamp technique. Depression of adenosine triphosphate synthesis was produced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (10 mM) and either cyanide (2 mM) or dinitrophenol (50 microM). Outward quasi-steady-state current evoked by a ramp protocol and outward time-dependent current during step depolarizations were increased during metabolic inhibition. The reversal potential for quasi-steady-state current shifted negatively toward equilibrium potential of K+ during treatment consistent with a role for K+ conductance and hyperpolarization of membrane potential. The macroscopic K+ current affected was 1) voltage dependent, 2) inhibited by intracellular Ca2+ chelation and low tetraethylammonium ion (1 mM) but unaffected by 4-aminopyridine (2 mM), and 3) associated with a rise in intracellular Ca2+ assessed by indo 1. Metabolic inhibition caused an increase in voltage-dependent large-conductance K+ channel (120-130 pS) activity in cell-attached patches of myocytes bathed in physiological solution (140 mM K+ in pipette). The channels were blocked in a flickery fashion by tetraethylammonium ion (0.5 mM) and inhibited with charybdotoxin (100 nM). We conclude that metabolic inhibition increases the activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in vascular smooth muscle.

  4. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-14

    Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic pathways. A graph-theoretic analysis of E.coli's metabolic network shows that localized enzymes, in contrast to non-localized ones, form a tree-like hierarchical structure, have a higher within-group connectivity, and are traversed by a higher number of feed-forward and feedback loops than their non-localized counterparts. A Gene Ontology analysis of these enzymes reveals an enrichment of terms related to essential metabolic functions in growing cells. Given that these findings suggest a distinct metabolic role for localization, we studied the dynamics of cellular localization of the cell wall synthesizing enzymes in B. subtilis and found that enzymes localize during exponential growth but not during stationary growth. We conclude that active biochemical pathways inside the cytoplasm are organized spatially following a rule where their first or their last enzymes localize to effectively connect the different active pathways and thus could reflect the activity state of the cell's metabolic network.

  5. The role of lipid droplets in metabolic disease in rodents and humans

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Andrew S.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Kraemer, Fredric B.; McManaman, James L.; Obin, Martin S.; Puri, Vishwajeet; Yan, Qing-Wu; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Mashek, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular organelles that store neutral lipids within cells. Over the last two decades there has been a dramatic growth in our understanding of LD biology and, in parallel, our understanding of the role of LDs in health and disease. In its simplest form, the LD regulates the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids, including triacylglycerol and/or cholesterol esters. It is becoming increasingly evident that alterations in the regulation of LD physiology and metabolism influence the risk of developing metabolic diseases such as diabetes. In this review we provide an update on the role of LD-associated proteins and LDs in metabolic disease. PMID:21633178

  6. Understanding CYP2D6 and its role in tamoxifen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edith Caroline

    2013-11-01

    The gene CYP2D6 has an extremely important role in drug metabolism. "Cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6" is the official name of CYP2D6. The gene is located at position 13.1 on the long (q) arm of chromosome 21 and encodes a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes. The cytochrome P450 proteins are monooxygenases that are heavily involved in drug metabolism (Genetics Home Reference, 2013), and many drugs are activated into their biologically active compounds. Because of numerous polymorphisms, the gene also has significant person-to-person variability. To date, more than 80 distinct CYP2D6 alleles and specific types and frequencies have been associated with different ethnic groups. CYP2D6*4 is the most common variant allele in Caucasians and, in that population, has a frequency of about 25%. On the other hand, CYP2D6*10 is common in the Asian population (Stearns & Rae, 2008).

  7. Fungal Community Associated with Dactylopius (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Dactylopiidae) and Its Role in Uric Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    We studied fungal species associated with the carmine cochineal Dactylopius coccus and other non-domesticated Dactylopius species using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Thirty seven fungi were isolated in various culture media from insect males and females from different developmental stages and Dactylopius species. 26S rRNA genes and ITS sequences, from cultured fungal isolates revealed different species of Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Debaryomyces, Trametes, and Penicillium, which are genera newly associated with Dactylopius. Uric acid (UA) and uricase activity were detected in tissues extracts from different insect developmental stages. However, accumulation of high UA levels and low uricase activities were found only after antifungal treatments, suggesting an important role of fungal species in its metabolism. Additionally, uricolytic fungal isolates were identified and characterized that presumably are involved in nitrogen recycling metabolism. After metagenomic analyses from D. coccus gut and hemolymph DNA and from two published data sets, we confirmed the presence of fungal genes involved in UA catabolism, suggesting that fungi help in the nitrogen recycling process in Dactylopius by uricolysis. All these results show the importance of fungal communities in scale insects such as Dactylopius. PMID:27446001

  8. A Role for Ethylene in the Metabolism of Cyanide by Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Goudey, J. Stephen; Tittle, Forrest L.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1989-01-01

    The action of ethylene on the capacity of plant tissues to metabolize cyanide to β-cyanoalanine was examined. Beta-cyanoalanine synthase (EC 4.4.1.9) catalyzes the reaction between cyanide and cysteine to form β-cyanoalanine and hydrogen sulfide. Levels of β-cyanoalanine synthase activity in tissues of 6 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were enhanced severalfold by 1 microliter per liter ethylene. The promotive effect of ethylene increased with increasing ethylene concentrations from 0.01 to 100 microliters per liter and with the period of exposure from 3 to 24 hours. Ethylene enhanced β-cyanoalanine synthase activity in all regions of the seedling (shoots and roots, internodal regions, cotyledons). The promotive effect was eliminated by norbornadiene, a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action. Levels of β-cyanoalanine synthase in seedlings of four other dicots (Phaseolus aureas, Glycine max, Lactuca sativa, Sinapis arvensis) and two monocots (Hordeum vulgares, Triticum aestivum) were also increased in response to eth