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Sample records for metabolism final progress

  1. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology [sic], Metabolism. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Charles

    2001-08-10

    The Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism [and Molecular Biology] was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, New Hampshire, August 5-10, 2001. The conference was attended by 135 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Ecology and genetic elements; Genomics and evolution; Ecology, genomes and gene regulation; Replication and recombination; Chromatin and transcription; Gene regulation; Post-transcription processing; Biochemistry and metabolism; Proteomics and protein structure; Metabolism and physiology. The featured speaker addressed the topic: ''Archaeal viruses, witnesses of prebiotic evolution?''

  2. Teratogen metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.G.

    1983-01-31

    This study indicates Thalidomide is metabolized by a classic cytochrome P450 monoxygenase system to a product which inhibits attachment of cells to concanavalin A coated dishes. Hydrolysis products of Thalidomide and its active metabolite do not inhibit attachement. We have initiated additional studies with methylene chloride extracts of particulate and of volatile hydrocarbon emissions of a domestic oil burner. These studies show low levels of inhibitory activity are uniformly present in these extracts.

  3. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Josef Michl

    2011-10-31

    In this project we have established guidelines for the design on organic chromophores suitable for producing high triplet yields via singlet fission. We have proven their utility by identifying a chromophore of a structural class that had never been examined for singlet fission before, 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, and demonstrating in two independent ways that a thin layer of this material produces a triplet yield of 200% within experimental error. We have also designed a second chromophore of a very different type, again of a structural class that had not been examined for singlet fission before, and found that in a thin layer it produces a 70% triplet yield. Finally, we have enhanced the theoretical understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of the singlet fission process.

  4. Regulation of terpene metabolism. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: function of monoterpene catabolism; pathways and enzymes of monoterpene catabolism; ultrastructure of oil glands; pathways and enzymes of monoterpene biosynthesis; and regulation of metabolism in peppermints. (ACR)

  5. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. Carelli

    2003-11-03

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four

  6. The toxicology and metabolism of nickel compounds: Final technical progress report for the period from 1 December 1985 to 31 August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    The toxicology of nickel compounds was investigated in rats and the metabolism of nickel was studied in humans. Lipid peroxidation is one of the molecular mechanisms of acute toxicity of NiCl/sub 2/ in rats. The thymus is a target organ of acute nickel toxicity, as evidenced by the thymic involution that occurs within 24 hours after parenteral administration of NiCl/sub 2/ to rats. The lung is the primary target organ of subacute nickel toxicity in rats, as manifested by marked bronchoalveolar proliferation and degenerative changes in the pulmonary vascular endothelium of rats after 3 to 6 weeks of daily sc injections of NiCl/sub 2/. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction provides an accurate, sensitive, and practical routine method for analysis of nickel concentrations in body fluids and tissues of human subjects to monitor environmental, occupational, or iatrogenic exposures to nickel compounds. 11 refs.

  7. 1995 PVUSA progress report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1995, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions, and serves as the final report under Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s project management.

  8. Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M. Falco

    2012-09-13

    This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

  9. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  10. (Regulation of teopene metabolism). Progress report. [Mentha piperita

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in elucidating the biosynthesis of several monoterpenes in the peppermint is described. Tracer studies were performed to clarify metabolic pathways involved. Several growth regulators were screened for their influence on monoterpene composition and yield in peppermint and sage. (DT)

  11. Poultry waste digester. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, J.C.H.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and low-cost poultry waste digester (PWD) was constructed at North Carolina State University's Poultry Research Farm at Raleigh, N.C. The PWD system was designed to process a daily output of 600 kg of manure from 4000 caged laying hens. The system consisted of two digesters connected in series, a heating system, a hot water tank, and other metering equipment. The primary and secondary digesters were horizontal cylinders located partially below ground level. They were made of Red Mud plastic lining, supported in the insulated trenches, and covered with insulated roofs. The primary digester volume was 15 m/sup 3/ with an 8 m/sup 3/ liquid volume and a gas head-space above the liquid. The secondary digester volume was 30 m/sup 3/ with a 16 m/sup 3/ liquid volume. The temperature (50/sup 0/C) of the primary digester was maintained by the hot dilution water added with manure and a SolaRoll heating mat laid underneath the plastic lining. The design, operation, performance, energy balance, and economics of the digester are discussed and evaluated in this final progress report.

  12. Regulation of terpene metabolism. Progress report, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the metabolism of terpenes by peppermint (Menta piperita) are described. The studies describe the characterization of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and catabolism of terpenes and the ultrastructure of the oil glands. 10 refs. (DT)

  13. Central carbon metabolism in the progression of mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Adam D.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing belief that the metabolic program of breast tumor cells could be a therapeutic target. Yet, without detailed information on central carbon metabolism in breast tumors it is impossible to know which metabolic pathways to target, and how their inhibition might influence different stages of breast tumor progression. Here we perform the first comprehensive profiling of central metabolism in the MCF10 model of mammary carcinoma, where the steps of breast tumor progression (transformation, tumorigenicity and metastasis) can all be examined in the context of the same genetic background. The metabolism of [U-13C]-glucose by a series of progressively more aggressive MCF10 cell lines was tracked by 2D NMR and mass spectrometry. From this analysis the flux of carbon through distinct metabolic reactions was quantified by isotopomer modeling. The results indicate widespread changes to central metabolism upon cellular transformation including increased carbon flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), the TCA cycle, as well as increased synthesis of glutamate, glutathione and fatty acids (including elongation and desaturation). The de novo synthesis of glycine increased upon transformation as well as at each subsequent step of breast tumor cell progression. Interestingly, the major metabolic shift in metastatic cells is a large increase in the de novo synthesis of proline. This work provides the first comprehensive view of changes to central metabolism as a result of breast tumor progression. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10549-007-9732-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17879159

  14. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  15. [Regulation of terpene metabolism: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-12-31

    We have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis in sage and peppermint, and on biosynthetic enzymes. We have confirmed that monoterpene turnover does occur, have deciphered the function of this process in plants, delineated the essential features of the catabolic pathways for camphor and menthone, and initiated studies on the relevant enzymology. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation (yield and composition) depends on the balance between biosynthetic and catabolic events, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally regulated and very closely associated with senescence (collapse) of the oil glands. We have demonstrated that foliar applied bioregulators influence terpene composition and yield, probably by a combination of effects in oil gland development and by more direct alteration of enzyme levels. These studies have provided a practical means for modifying terpene composition and yield and, moreover, have provided a powerful approach to studying developmental regulation in intact plants, explants and tissue culture systems. We have thus developed the fundamental background knowledge needed as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of terpene metabolism.

  16. (Regulation of terpene metabolism: Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis in sage and peppermint, and on biosynthetic enzymes. We have confirmed that monoterpene turnover does occur, have deciphered the function of this process in plants, delineated the essential features of the catabolic pathways for camphor and menthone, and initiated studies on the relevant enzymology. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation (yield and composition) depends on the balance between biosynthetic and catabolic events, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally regulated and very closely associated with senescence (collapse) of the oil glands. We have demonstrated that foliar applied bioregulators influence terpene composition and yield, probably by a combination of effects in oil gland development and by more direct alteration of enzyme levels. These studies have provided a practical means for modifying terpene composition and yield and, moreover, have provided a powerful approach to studying developmental regulation in intact plants, explants and tissue culture systems. We have thus developed the fundamental background knowledge needed as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of terpene metabolism.

  17. Metabolic Reprograming of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tannahill, Gillian Margaret; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Accumulation of brain damage in progressive MS is partly the result of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) attacking myelin sheaths in the CNS. Although there is no cure yet for MS, significant advances have been made in the development of disease modifying agents. Unfortunately, most of these drugs fail to reverse established neurological deficits and can have adverse effects. Recent evidence suggests that MPs polarization is accompanied by profound metabolic changes, whereby pro-inflammatory MPs (M1) switch toward glycolysis, whereas anti-inflammatory MPs (M2) become more oxidative. It is therefore possible that reprograming MPs metabolism could affect their function and repress immune cell activation. This mini review describes the metabolic changes underpinning macrophages polarization and anticipates how metabolic re-education of MPs could be used for the treatment of MS. Key points: Inflammation in progressive MS is mediated primarily by MPs.Cell metabolism regulates the function of MPs.DMAs can re-educate the metabolism of MPs to promote healing. PMID:25814990

  18. The Role of Sarcosine Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Progression12

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amjad P; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M; Ateeq, Bushra; Asangani, Irfan A; Athanikar, Jyoti N; Yocum, Anastasia K; Mehra, Rohit; Siddiqui, Javed; Palapattu, Ganesh; Wei, John T; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer (PCa) progression identified markedly elevated levels of sarcosine (N-methyl glycine) in metastatic PCa and modest but significant elevation of the metabolite in PCa urine. Here, we examine the role of key enzymes associated with sarcosine metabolism in PCa progression. Consistent with our earlier report, sarcosine levels were significantly elevated in PCa urine sediments compared to controls, with a modest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.71. In addition, the expression of sarcosine biosynthetic enzyme, glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), was elevated in PCa tissues, while sarcosine dehydrogenase (SARDH) and pipecolic acid oxidase (PIPOX), which metabolize sarcosine, were reduced in prostate tumors. Consistent with this, GNMT promoted the oncogenic potential of prostate cells by facilitating sarcosine production, while SARDH and PIPOX reduced the oncogenic potential of prostate cells by metabolizing sarcosine. Accordingly, addition of sarcosine, but not glycine or alanine, induced invasion and intravasation in an in vivo PCa model. In contrast, GNMT knockdown or SARDH overexpression in PCa xenografts inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, these studies substantiate the role of sarcosine in PCa progression. PMID:23633921

  19. The role of sarcosine metabolism in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad P; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M; Ateeq, Bushra; Asangani, Irfan A; Athanikar, Jyoti N; Yocum, Anastasia K; Mehra, Rohit; Siddiqui, Javed; Palapattu, Ganesh; Wei, John T; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2013-05-01

    Metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer (PCa) progression identified markedly elevated levels of sarcosine (N-methyl glycine) in metastatic PCa and modest but significant elevation of the metabolite in PCa urine. Here, we examine the role of key enzymes associated with sarcosine metabolism in PCa progression. Consistent with our earlier report, sarcosine levels were significantly elevated in PCa urine sediments compared to controls, with a modest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.71. In addition, the expression of sarcosine biosynthetic enzyme, glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), was elevated in PCa tissues, while sarcosine dehydrogenase (SARDH) and pipecolic acid oxidase (PIPOX), which metabolize sarcosine, were reduced in prostate tumors. Consistent with this, GNMT promoted the oncogenic potential of prostate cells by facilitating sarcosine production, while SARDH and PIPOX reduced the oncogenic potential of prostate cells by metabolizing sarcosine. Accordingly, addition of sarcosine, but not glycine or alanine, induced invasion and intravasation in an in vivo PCa model. In contrast, GNMT knockdown or SARDH overexpression in PCa xenografts inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, these studies substantiate the role of sarcosine in PCa progression. PMID:23633921

  20. 23 CFR 140.609 - Progress and final vouchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Progress and final vouchers. 140.609 Section 140.609 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... submitted for the Federal share of bonds retired or about to be retired, including eligible interest...

  1. 23 CFR 140.609 - Progress and final vouchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Progress and final vouchers. 140.609 Section 140.609 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... submitted for the Federal share of bonds retired or about to be retired, including eligible interest...

  2. 23 CFR 140.609 - Progress and final vouchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Progress and final vouchers. 140.609 Section 140.609 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... submitted for the Federal share of bonds retired or about to be retired, including eligible interest...

  3. 23 CFR 140.609 - Progress and final vouchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Progress and final vouchers. 140.609 Section 140.609 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... submitted for the Federal share of bonds retired or about to be retired, including eligible interest...

  4. 23 CFR 140.609 - Progress and final vouchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Progress and final vouchers. 140.609 Section 140.609 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT PROCEDURES REIMBURSEMENT... submitted for the Federal share of bonds retired or about to be retired, including eligible interest...

  5. Gender Differences in Adipocyte Metabolism and Liver Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Otto K.-W.; Cheng, Alfred S.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the third most common cancer type and the second leading cause of deaths in men. Large population studies have demonstrated remarkable gender disparities in the incidence and the cumulative risk of liver cancer. A number of emerging risk factors regarding metabolic alterations associated with obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia have been ascribed to the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) and ultimately liver cancer. The deregulation of fat metabolism derived from excessive insulin, glucose, and lipid promotes cancer-causing inflammatory signaling and oxidative stress, which eventually triggers the uncontrolled hepatocellular proliferation. This review presents the current standing on the gender differences in body fat compositions and their mechanistic linkage with the development of NAFLD-related liver cancer, with an emphasis on genetic, epigenetic and microRNA control. The potential roles of sex hormones in instructing adipocyte metabolic programs may help unravel the mechanisms underlying gender dimorphism in liver cancer and identify the metabolic targets for disease management. PMID:27703473

  6. Metabolic, autophagic, and mitophagic activities in cancer initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hjelmeland, Anita; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is a complex disease marked by uncontrolled cell growth and invasion. These processes are driven by the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that promote cancer initiation and progression. Contributing to genome changes are the regulation of oxidative stress and reactive species-induced damage to molecules and organelles. Redox regulation, metabolic plasticity, autophagy, and mitophagy play important and interactive roles in cancer hallmarks including sustained proliferation, activated invasion, and replicative immortality. However, the impact of these processes can differ depending on the signaling pathways altered in cancer, tumor type, tumor stage, and/or the differentiation state. Here, we highlight some of the representative studies on the impact of oxidative and nitrosative activities, mitochondrial bioenergetics, metabolism, and autophagy and mitophagy in the context of tumorigenesis. We discuss the implications of these processes for cellular activities in cancer for anti-cancer-based therapeutics. PMID:27372165

  7. Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontal Disease Progression in Men.

    PubMed

    Kaye, E K; Chen, N; Cabral, H J; Vokonas, P; Garcia, R I

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of 3 or more risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is associated with periodontal disease, but few studies have been prospective in design. This study's aim was to determine whether metabolic syndrome predicts tooth loss and worsening of periodontal disease in a cohort of 760 men in the Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study and Normative Aging Study who were followed up to 33 y from 1981 to 2013. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. Waist circumference was measured in units of 0.1 cm following a normal expiration. Fasting blood samples were measured in duplicate for glucose, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein. Calibrated periodontists served as dental examiners. Periodontal outcome events on each tooth were defined as progression to predefined threshold levels of probing pocket depth (≥5 mm), clinical attachment loss (≥5 mm), mobility (≥0.5 mm), and alveolar bone loss (≥40% of the distance from the cementoenamel junction to the root apex, on radiographs). Hazards ratios (95% confidence intervals) of tooth loss or a periodontitis event were estimated from tooth-level extended Cox proportional hazards regression models that accounted for clustering of teeth within individuals and used time-dependent status of metabolic syndrome. Covariates included age, education, smoking status, plaque level, and initial level of the appropriate periodontal disease measure. Metabolic syndrome as defined by the International Diabetes Federation increased the hazards of tooth loss (1.39; 1.08 to 1.79), pocket depth ≥5 mm (1.37; 1.14 to 1.65), clinical attachment loss ≥5 mm (1.19; 1.00 to 1.41), alveolar bone loss ≥40% (1.25; 1.00 to 1.56), and tooth mobility ≥0.5 mm (1.43; 1.07 to 1.89). The number of positive metabolic syndrome conditions was also associated with each of these outcomes. These findings suggest that the metabolic disturbances that

  8. Recent Research Progress in Natural Bioactive Constituents against Lipid Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nie, Lirong; Song, Hang; He, Ai; Yao, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolic disorder refers to the dyslipidemia in the plasma. Abnormal working or lipid metabolism process leads to supernormal increase of one or multi kinds of lipids in plasma. It is a significant risk factor for many diseases and has become a serious danger to the mankind health. The clinical drugs adjusting lipid levels have a great variety in the market, side effects and adverse reactions. Meanwhile, many Chinese herbal medicines and natural medicines have the unnegligible role of regulating lipid metabolism, which become the research focus of medical workers in past decades. With advantages of fewer side effects, abundant resources and multi-target functions, terrestrial and marine bioactive constituents are proved as one of the important sources of the lead compounds in drug discovery and have been widely applied in the treatment and prevention of lipid metabolic diseases. In this paper, the recent advancements and current status of natural medicinal ingredients mainly based on lipid-lowering activities were reviewed in detail. Moreover, their bioactivity screening and important mechanisms in hyperlipemia progression were summarized and compared. It was also selectively introduced about related structural modification and new drug development on the basis of promising lead compounds. Finally, the current problems and possible prospects of natural constituents against lipid metabolism disorder in the future were discussed. PMID:27086784

  9. Modeling strategies to study metabolic pathways in progression to type 1 diabetes--Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Marinković, Tijana; Orešič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Seroconversion to islet autoimmunity is preceded by metabolic disturbances in children who later progress to overt type 1 diabetes (T1D). The underlying metabolic pathways and the interaction of metabolic and immune system factors involved in progression to the disease are however poorly understood. There is a clear need for mathematical models which capture the temporal and spatial complexity of early pathogenesis of T1D. Here we review the early attempts to model the development of islet autoimmunity and T1D, including the models which emphasize the potential beneficial role of autoimmune response in specific circumstances, such as to 'correct' for the early metabolic disturbances. We also highlight the genome-scale metabolic modeling as a promising new avenue to study metabolism and its interactions with the immune system in T1D.

  10. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-12-31

    Progress in understanding of the metabolism of monoterpenes by peppermint and spearmint is recorded including the actions of two key enzymes, geranyl pyrophosphate:limonene cyclase and a UDP-glucose dependent glucosyl transferase; concerning the ultrastructure of oil gland senescence; enzyme subcellular localization; regulation of metabolism; and tissue culture systems.

  11. Kidney cancer progression linked to shifts in tumor metabolism

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have uncovered a connection between how tumor cells use energy from metabolic processes and the aggressiveness of the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by phototrophic bacteria: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Gibson, J.

    1986-12-19

    Vast quantities of aromatic compounds in the form of lignin, lignin derivatives, and aromatic pollutants are continually being introduced into the biosphere and much of this material accumulates in anaerobic environments. This project seeks to elucidate anaerobic routes of benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate metabolism by the photorophic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Recent evidence suggests that diverse aromatics must first be metabolized to form one or the other of these compounds prior to cleavage of the aromatic ring and so these pathways probably play general role as major degradative routes. R. palustris is particularly well suited for these studies because its ability to separate carbon metabolism from energy generating mechanisms frees it from the thermodynamic constraints that restrict the anaerobic metabolism of aromatics by pure cultures of fermentative bacteria. Studies include identification of the number and specificity of enzymes involved in benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate metabolism, identification of cofactors and electron carriers involved in each pathway, and a determination of the precise nature of the products formed. Mutants that are blocked in aromatic metabolism have been isolated. These mutants will be used, together with physiological approaches, to identify compounds (inducers and repressors) that regulate the expression of genes for aromatic degradation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Obesity and cancer progression: is there a role of fatty acid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Balaban, Seher; Lee, Lisa S; Schreuder, Mark; Hoy, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression. PMID:25866768

  14. Measuring cell cycle progression kinetics with metabolic labeling and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Helen; Wong, Judy

    2012-01-01

    metabolic processes for each cell cycle stage are useful in blocking the progression of the cell cycle to the next stage. For example, the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea halts cells at the G1/S juncture by limiting the supply of deoxynucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. Other notable chemicals include treatment with aphidicolin, a polymerase alpha inhibitor for G1 arrest, treatment with colchicine and nocodazole, both of which interfere with mitotic spindle formation to halt cells in M phase and finally, treatment with the DNA chain terminator 5-fluorodeoxyridine to initiate S phase arrest. Treatment with these chemicals is an effective means of synchronizing an entire population of cells at a particular phase. With removal of the chemical, cells rejoin the cell cycle in unison. Treatment of the test agent following release from the cell cycle blocking chemical ensures that the drug response elicited is from a uniform, cell cycle stage-specific population. However, since many of the chemical synchronizers are known genotoxic compounds, teasing apart the participation of various response pathways (to the synchronizers vs. the test agents) is challenging. Here we describe a metabolic labeling method for following a subpopulation of actively cycling cells through their progression from the DNA replication phase, through to the division and separation of their daughter cells. Coupled with flow cytometry quantification, this protocol enables for measurement of kinetic progression of the cell cycle in the absence of either mechanically- or chemically- induced cellular stresses commonly associated with other cell cycle synchronization methodologies. In the following sections we will discuss the methodology, as well as some of its applications in biomedical research. PMID:22665142

  15. Studies in iodine metabolism. Progress report, 1982-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1983-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the period 1982 to 1983 in the following areas: (1) monitoring of animal thyroids for /sup 129/I, /sup 125/I, /sup 131/I, /sup 226/Ra, and /sup 228/Ra; and (2) neonatal hypo-l thyroidism in laboratory rats. (ACR)

  16. Metabolism of gambogic acid in rats: a rare intestinal metabolic pathway responsible for its final disposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ding, Li; Hu, Linlin; Qian, Wenjuan; Jin, Shaohong; Sun, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2011-04-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) is a promising natural anticancer candidate. Although the anticancer activity of GA has been well demonstrated, information regarding the metabolic fate of GA is limited. Previous studies suggested that GA is mainly excreted into intestinal tract in rats through bile after intravenous administration, whereas only traces appeared in the feces, suggesting that GA is metabolized extensively in the intestine. However, there has been no report about the intestinal metabolism of GA either in animals or humans. In this study, large amounts of two sulfonic acid metabolites of GA were found in the feces samples of rats after intravenous administration, and their structures were identified as 10-α sulfonic acid GA and 10-β sulfonic acid GA by comparison of the retention times and spectral data with those of synthesized reference substances using liquid chromatography-diode array detector-tandem mass spectrometry. This rare intestinal metabolic pathway mainly involves Michael addition of the sulfite ion to the 9,10 carbon-carbon double bond of α,β-unsaturated ketone. In addition, a more detailed metabolic profile in rats is proposed, according to the results of in vitro and in vivo studies. It was found that GA can be metabolized by a variety of routes, including monooxidation, hydration, glutathionylation, glucuronidation, and glucosidation in the liver of rats. These findings provide information on the major metabolic soft spot of GA in the intestine and liver of rats, which is not only useful in the future human metabolic study of this compound but also of value in the metabolic studies of GA analogs.

  17. Extra focal convective suppressing solar collector. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This progress report describes work done on the Extra Focal Convective Suppressing Solar Collector. The topics of the report include sensor refinement for the tracking electronics, tracking controller refinement, system optics evaluation, absorber system material evaluation and performance, tracking hardware evaluation and refinement, and full scale prototype construction and testing.

  18. (Regulation of terpene metabolism). Progress report. [Mentha piperita

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the regulation of monoterpene metabolism in M. piperita were conducted. All of the steps from the acyclic precursor geranyl pyrophosphate to the various menthol isomers have been demonstrated. The first intermediate to accumulate in vivo is d-pulegone. The emphasis has been on the demonstration, partial purification and characterization of the relevant enzymes in the pathway. The studies on the isopiperitenol dehydrogenase and isopiperitenone isomerase have been completed. We are not studying the endocyclic double-bond reductase (NADPH-dependent) and, based on substrate specificity studies and the previously demonstrated isomerization of cis- isopulegone to pulegone, are now virtually convinced that the major pathway to menthol(s) in peppermint involves reduction of isopiperitenone to isopulegone and isomerication of isopulegone to pulegone. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado, Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.R., ed.

    2004-05-12

    OAK-B135 The results and progress of research funded by DOE grant number DOE-FG03-95ER40913 at the University of Colorado at Boulder is described. Includes work performed at the HERMES experiment at DESY to study the quark structure of the nucleon and the hadronization process in nuclei, as well as hadronic reactions studied at LAMPF, KEK, and Fermilab.

  20. BCAT1 expression associates with ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in altered disease metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Guillemette, Chantal; Gobeil, Stéphane; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2015-10-13

    Previously, we have identified the branched chain amino-acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) gene as notably hypomethylated in low-malignant potential (LMP) and high-grade (HG) serous epithelial ovarian tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. Here we show that BCAT1 is strongly overexpressed in both LMP and HG serous epithelial ovarian tumors, which probably correlates with its hypomethylated status. Knockdown of the BCAT1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation, migration and invasion and inhibited cell cycle progression. BCAT1 silencing was associated with the suppression of numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, and the induction of some tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Moreover, BCAT1 suppression resulted in downregulation of numerous genes implicated in lipid production and protein synthesis, suggesting its important role in controlling EOC metabolism. Further metabolomic analyses were indicative for significant depletion of most amino acids and different phospho- and sphingolipids following BCAT1 knockdown. Finally, BCAT1 suppression led to significantly prolonged survival time in xenograft model of advanced peritoneal EOC. Taken together, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of BCAT1 in ovarian carcinogenesis and identify this transaminase as a novel EOC biomarker and putative EOC therapeutic target.

  1. BCAT1 expression associates with ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in altered disease metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Guillemette, Chantal; Gobeil, Stéphane; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the branched chain amino-acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) gene as notably hypomethylated in low-malignant potential (LMP) and high-grade (HG) serous epithelial ovarian tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. Here we show that BCAT1 is strongly overexpressed in both LMP and HG serous epithelial ovarian tumors, which probably correlates with its hypomethylated status. Knockdown of the BCAT1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation, migration and invasion and inhibited cell cycle progression. BCAT1 silencing was associated with the suppression of numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, and the induction of some tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Moreover, BCAT1 suppression resulted in downregulation of numerous genes implicated in lipid production and protein synthesis, suggesting its important role in controlling EOC metabolism. Further metabolomic analyses were indicative for significant depletion of most amino acids and different phospho- and sphingolipids following BCAT1 knockdown. Finally, BCAT1 suppression led to significantly prolonged survival time in xenograft model of advanced peritoneal EOC. Taken together, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of BCAT1 in ovarian carcinogenesis and identify this transaminase as a novel EOC biomarker and putative EOC therapeutic target. PMID:26372729

  2. Newborn screening of metabolic disorders: recent progress and future developments.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Piero; Lim, James S; Tortorelli, Silvia; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Matern, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry has been the main driver behind a significant expansion in newborn screening programs. The ability to detect more than 40 conditions by a single test underscores the need to better understand the clinical and laboratory characteristics of the conditions being tested, and the complexity of pattern recognition and differential diagnoses of one or more elevated markers. The panel of conditions recommended by the American College of Medical Genetics, including 20 primary conditions and 22 secondary targets that are detectable by tandem mass spectrometry has been adopted as the standard of care in the vast majority of US states. The evolution of newborn screening is far from being idle as a large number of infectious, genetic, and metabolic conditions are currently under investigation at variable stages of test development and clinical validation. In the US, a formal process with oversight by the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders and Genetic Diseases in Newborns and Children has been established for nomination and evidence-based review of new candidate conditions. If approved, these conditions could be added to the uniform panel and consequently pave the way to large scale implementation.

  3. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  4. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B; Mishra, Sasmita; Ei-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J; Hill, R Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Housman, David E; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Morrow, Eric M

    2016-09-20

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  5. Final Progress Report for Ionospheric Dusty Plasma In the Laboratory [Smokey Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Scott

    2010-09-28

    “Ionospheric Dusty Plasma in the Laboratory” is a research project with the purpose of finding and reproducing the characteristics of plasma in the polar mesosphere that is unusually cold (down to 140 K) and contains nanometer-sized dust particles. This final progress report summarizes results from four years of effort that include a final year with a no-cost extension.

  6. Final Progress Report for FG02-89ER14030

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Maureen R

    2011-10-26

    have provided more information on stromule formation and function and the actin-myosin machinery that mediates the intracellular trafficking that is required for photosynthesis and metabolism to operate efficiently within the plant cell.

  7. 1993 annual final progress report: July 1992 through June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Crotty, G.; Chen, Z.; Sana, P.; Salami, J.; Doolittle, A.; Pang, A.; Pham, T.

    1994-11-01

    This is the first annual report since the Inauguration of the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Development (UCEP) at Georgia Tech. The essential objective of the Center is to improve the fundamental understanding of the science and technology of advanced PV devices and materials, to provide training and enrich the educational experience of students in the field, and to increase US competitiveness by providing guidelines to industry and DOE for achieving cost-effective and high efficiency PV devices. These objectives are to be accomplished through a combination of research and education. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments, including modeling, processing, and characterization of cast multicrystalline silicon solar cells; use of modeling and PCD measurements to develop a road map for progressing toward 20% multicrystalline and 25% single crystalline cells; the development of a novel PECVD SiN/SiO{sub 2} AR coating that also provides good surface passivation; PECVD deposited SiO{sub 2} films with record low S and D{sub it} at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface; and educational activities and accomplishments.

  8. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  9. Final Progress Report: SPECT Assay of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, Ronald, J.

    2004-09-30

    During the past project period, we proposed to collaborate closely with DOE’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab or JLab) to design a compact, ultra-high-resolution, high-sensitivity gamma camera for quantifying brain-tumor distributions of I-131. We also proposed to continue our on-going research in developing and evaluating pinhole collimation for quantitative ultra-high-resolution imaging of I-131-labeled MAbs. We have made excellent progress in accomplishing much of the research related to pinhole collimation. Many of the most significant results have been presented in peer-reviewed journal articles and conference proceedings. We have also made good progress in collaborating with JLab's Detector Group in developing a compact, ultra-high-resolution, gamma camera. A prototype I-131 imager was delivered to Duke on May 28, 2003. Our research results are summarized in the following sections. A. JLAB-DUKE DEDICATED BRAIN-TUMOR IMAGING SYSTEM A.1. Determination of Optimal Collimator Design During the current project period a prototype I-131 dedicated brain imager has been designed and built. Computer simulations and analysis of alternate designs were performed at Duke to determine an optimal collimator design. Collimator response was characterized by spatial resolution and sensitivity. Both geometric (non-penetrative) and penetrative sensitivities were considered in selecting an optimal collimator design. Based on these simulation results, two collimator designs were selected and built by external vendors. Initial imaging results were obtained using these collimators. B. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF SPECT RECONSTRUCTION SOFTWARE FOR JLAB-DUKE CAMERA B.1. Modeling Thick Septa and Collimator Holes: Geometrical-Phantom Study A geometrical phantom was designed to illuminate spatial resolution effects. The phantom includes a uniformly attenuating medium that consists of all voxels within an elliptical cylinder that is centered on the axis of rotation

  10. Branched chain amino acid metabolism profiles in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald G; Reily, Michael D; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Vaillancourt, Richard R; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a globally widespread disease of increasing clinical significance. The pathological progression of the disease from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been well defined, however, the contribution of altered branched chain amino acid metabolomic profiles to the progression of NAFLD is not known. The three BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine and valine are known to mediate activation of several important hepatic metabolic signaling pathways ranging from insulin signaling to glucose regulation. The purpose of this study is to profile changes in hepatic BCAA metabolite levels with transcriptomic changes in the progression of human NAFLD to discover novel mechanisms of disease progression. Metabolomic and transcriptomic data sets representing the spectrum of human NAFLD (normal, steatosis, NASH fatty, and NASH not fatty livers) were utilized for this study. During the transition from steatosis to NASH, increases in the levels of leucine (127% of normal), isoleucine (139%), and valine (147%) were observed. Carnitine metabolites also exhibited significantly elevated profiles in NASH fatty and NASH not fatty samples and included propionyl, hexanoyl, lauryl, acetyl and butyryl carnitine. Amino acid and BCAA metabolism gene sets were significantly enriched among downregulated genes during NASH. These cumulative alterations in BCAA metabolite and amino acid metabolism gene profiles represent adaptive physiological responses to disease-induced hepatic stress in NASH patients.

  11. Gene therapy for inborn errors of liver metabolism: progress towards clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    The treatment for inborn errors of liver metabolism is based on dietary, drug, and cell therapies (orthotopic liver transplantation). However, significant morbidity and mortality still remain, and alternative strategies are needed. Gene replacement therapy has the potential of providing a definitive cure for patients with these diseases. Significant progress has been made in the pre-clinical arena and achievement of efficacy in different animal models has been reported using multiple gene transfer technologies. This article summarizes the gene transfer strategies being investigated, the pre-clinical data, and the available early clinical results for inborn errors of liver metabolism. PMID:19490653

  12. The Warburg effect in tumor progression: mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as an anti-metastasis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming; Cai, Qingsong

    2015-01-28

    Compared to normal cells, cancer cells strongly upregulate glucose uptake and glycolysis to give rise to increased yield of intermediate glycolytic metabolites and the end product pyruvate. Moreover, glycolysis is uncoupled from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in cancer cells. Consequently, the majority of glycolysis-derived pyruvate is diverted to lactate fermentation and kept away from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. This metabolic phenotype is known as the Warburg effect. While it has become widely accepted that the glycolytic intermediates provide essential anabolic support for cell proliferation and tumor growth, it remains largely elusive whether and how the Warburg metabolic phenotype may play a role in tumor progression. We hereby review the cause and consequence of the restrained oxidative metabolism, in particular in the context of tumor metastasis. Cells change or lose their extracellular matrix during the metastatic process. Inadequate/inappropriate matrix attachment generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes a specific type of cell death, termed anoikis, in normal cells. Although anoikis is a barrier to metastasis, cancer cells have often acquired elevated threshold for anoikis and hence heightened metastatic potential. As ROS are inherent byproducts of oxidative metabolism, forced stimulation of glucose oxidation in cancer cells raises oxidative stress and restores cells' sensitivity to anoikis. Therefore, by limiting the pyruvate flux into mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, the Warburg effect enables cancer cells to avoid excess ROS generation from mitochondrial respiration and thus gain increased anoikis resistance and survival advantage for metastasis. Consistent with this notion, pro-metastatic transcription factors HIF and Snail attenuate oxidative metabolism, whereas tumor suppressor p53 and metastasis suppressor KISS1 promote mitochondrial oxidation. Collectively, these

  13. Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.Y. Hwang

    2006-10-04

    The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and

  14. Mapping cancer cell metabolism with13C flux analysis: Recent progress and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Duckwall, Casey Scott; Murphy, Taylor Athanasaw; Young, Jamey Dale

    2013-01-01

    The reprogramming of energy metabolism is emerging as an important molecular hallmark of cancer cells. Recent discoveries linking specific metabolic alterations to cancer development have strengthened the idea that altered metabolism is more than a side effect of malignant transformation, but may in fact be a functional driver of tumor growth and progression in some cancers. As a result, dysregulated metabolic pathways have become attractive targets for cancer therapeutics. This review highlights the application of13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) to map the flow of carbon through intracellular biochemical pathways of cancer cells. We summarize several recent applications of MFA that have identified novel biosynthetic pathways involved in cancer cell proliferation and shed light on the role of specific oncogenes in regulating these pathways. Through such studies, it has become apparent that the metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells are not as homogeneous as once thought, but instead depend strongly on the molecular alterations and environmental factors at play in each case. PMID:23961260

  15. Repeat cross-sectional data on the progression of the metabolic syndrome in Ossabaw miniature swine

    PubMed Central

    McKenney-Drake, Mikaela L.; Rodenbeck, Stacey D.; Owen, Meredith K.; Schultz, Kyle A.; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Tune, Johnathan D.; Sturek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ossabaw miniature swine were fed an excess calorie, atherogenic diet for 6, 9, or 12 months. Increased body weight, hypertension, and increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides are described in Table 1. For more detailed interpretations and conclusions about the data, see our associated research study, “Biphasic alterations in coronary smooth muscle Ca2+ regulation during coronary artery disease progression in metabolic syndrome” McKenney-Drake, et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27158656

  16. Effect of SO/sub 2/ on light modulation of plant metabolism. Progress report, June 1, 1982-May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Research progress is reported on investigations into the effect of light on the activity of enzymes involved in stomatal metabolism. The effects of sulfite, arsenite, and SO/sub 2/ on this light-mediated system have been studied. (ACR)

  17. Liver inflammation and metabolic signaling in ApcMin/+ mice: the role of cachexia progression.

    PubMed

    Narsale, Aditi A; Enos, Reilly T; Puppa, Melissa J; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Murphy, E Angela; Fayad, Raja; Pena, Majorette O'; Durstine, J Larry; Carson, James A

    2015-01-01

    The ApcMin/+ mouse exhibits an intestinal tumor associated loss of muscle and fat that is accompanied by chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. Since the liver governs systemic energy demands through regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, it is likely that the liver is a pathological target of cachexia progression in the ApcMin/+ mouse. The purpose of this study was to determine if cancer and the progression of cachexia affected liver endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress, inflammation, metabolism, and protein synthesis signaling. The effect of cancer (without cachexia) was examined in wild-type and weight-stable ApcMin/+ mice. Cachexia progression was examined in weight-stable, pre-cachectic, and severely-cachectic ApcMin/+ mice. Livers were analyzed for morphology, glycogen content, ER-stress, inflammation, and metabolic changes. Cancer induced hepatic expression of ER-stress markers BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein), IRE-1α (endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1), and inflammatory intermediate STAT-3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). While gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA expression was suppressed by cancer, glycogen content or protein synthesis signaling remained unaffected. Cachexia progression depleted liver glycogen content and increased mRNA expression of glycolytic enzyme PFK (phosphofrucktokinase) and gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK. Cachexia progression further increased pSTAT-3 but suppressed p-65 and JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) activation. Interestingly, progression of cachexia suppressed upstream ER-stress markers BiP and IRE-1α, while inducing its downstream target CHOP (DNA-damage inducible transcript 3). Cachectic mice exhibited a dysregulation of protein synthesis signaling, with an induction of p-mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), despite a suppression of Akt (thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1) and S6 (ribosomal protein S6) phosphorylation. Thus, cancer

  18. Control of sugar transport and metabolism in Zymomonas mobilis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1995-09-01

    This research deals with the physiology and genetics of sugar transport and metabolic control in Zymomonas mobilis. The specific objectives of the grant as as follows: First, the complex interactions of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms on regulation of the glf operon will be investigated. Second, the structure and function of the unique glucose facilitator will be examined by a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, making use of the genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Third, the possibility that physical association or indirect interactions between the glucose facilitator and glucokinase are involved in metabolic control will be analyzed. Fourth, the Z. mobilis glucose transport and phosphorylation system will be utilized to metabolically engineer recombinant E. coli with altered cell pool metabolite profiles. Work on the third and fourth objectives is complete, work on the first and second objectives is progressing nicely. Publication of this work has been admittedly slow, due primarily to a change n location of the research program from the University of Nebraska to The Ohio State University. However, it should be noted that much of the unpublished data outlined below represented completed studies, and are contained in graduate student theses which are being prepared for submission this summer. Since a full year remains in the current funding period, and the new laboratory is now up and running, we fully expect to make reasonable progress on the remaining objectives and to publish the results in a timely fashion.

  19. Targeting metabolic flexibility by simultaneously inhibiting respiratory complex I and lactate generation retards melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Chaube, Balkrishna; Malvi, Parmanand; Singh, Shivendra Vikram; Mohammad, Naoshad; Meena, Avtar Singh; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma is a largely incurable skin malignancy owing to the underlying molecular and metabolic heterogeneity confounded by the development of resistance. Cancer cells have metabolic flexibility in choosing either oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) or glycolysis for ATP generation depending upon the nutrient availability in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the involvement of respiratory complex I and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in melanoma progression. We show that inhibition of complex I by metformin promotes melanoma growth in mice via elevating lactate and VEGF levels. In contrast, it leads to the growth arrest in vitro because of enhanced extracellular acidification as a result of increased glycolysis. Inhibition of LDH or lactate generation causes decrease in glycolysis with concomitant growth arrest both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking lactate generation in metformin-treated melanoma cells results in diminished cell proliferation and tumor progression in mice. Interestingly, inhibition of either LDH or complex I alone does not induce apoptosis, whereas inhibiting both together causes depletion in cellular ATP pool resulting in metabolic catastrophe induced apoptosis. Overall, our study suggests that LDH and complex I play distinct roles in regulating glycolysis and cell proliferation. Inhibition of these two augments synthetic lethality in melanoma.

  20. Microbial Regulation of Glucose Metabolism and Cell-Cycle Progression in Mammalian Colonocytes

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Wali, Aminah; Brylawski, Bruna P.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    A prodigious number of microbes inhabit the human body, especially in the lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, yet our knowledge of how they regulate metabolic pathways within our cells is rather limited. To investigate the role of microbiota in host energy metabolism, we analyzed ATP levels and AMPK phosphorylation in tissues isolated from germfree and conventionally-raised C57BL/6 mice. These experiments demonstrated that microbiota are required for energy homeostasis in the proximal colon to a greater extent than other segments of the GI tract that also harbor high densities of bacteria. This tissue-specific effect is consistent with colonocytes utilizing bacterially-produced butyrate as their primary energy source, whereas most other cell types utilize glucose. However, it was surprising that glucose did not compensate for butyrate deficiency. We measured a 3.5-fold increase in glucose uptake in germfree colonocytes. However, 13C-glucose metabolic-flux experiments and biochemical assays demonstrated that they shifted their glucose metabolism away from mitochondrial oxidation/CO2 production and toward increased glycolysis/lactate production, which does not yield enough ATPs to compensate. The mechanism responsible for this metabolic shift is diminished pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) levels and activity. Consistent with perturbed PDH function, the addition of butyrate, but not glucose, to germfree colonocytes ex vivo stimulated oxidative metabolism. As a result of this energetic defect, germfree colonocytes exhibited a partial block in the G1-to-S-phase transition that was rescued by a butyrate-fortified diet. These data reveal a mechanism by which microbiota regulate glucose utilization to influence energy homeostasis and cell-cycle progression of mammalian host cells. PMID:23029553

  1. Altered Metabolic Homeostasis in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Mechanisms of Energy Imbalance and Contribution to Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Zara A; Ngo, Shyuan T; Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A; Steyn, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurones, which leads to paralysis and death in an average of 3 years following diagnosis. The cause of ALS is unknown, but there is substantial evidence that metabolic factors, including nutritional state and body weight, affect disease progression and survival. This review provides an overview of the characteristics of metabolic dysregulation in ALS focusing on mechanisms that lead to disrupted energy supply (at a whole-body and cellular level) and altered energy expenditure. We discuss how a decrease in energy supply occurs in parallel with an increase in energy demand and leads to a state of chronic energy deficit which has a negative impact on disease outcome in ALS. We conclude by presenting potential and tested strategies to compensate for, or correct this energy imbalance, and speculate on promising areas for further research. PMID:27400276

  2. [Impact of lipid metabolism parameters on the development and progression of coronary artery disease : An update].

    PubMed

    Sinning, D; Leistner, D M; Landmesser, U

    2016-06-01

    Disorders of lipid metabolism play a major role in the development and progression of coronary artery disease. Dyslipidemia therefore plays a central role in therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular events associated with coronary artery disease. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between various lipid metabolism parameters, the risk of developing coronary artery disease and progression of a pre-existing disease. In particular, increased levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), reduced levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), as well as high levels of triglycerides and increased lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels can be taken into account when assessing the risk stratification of patients for primary prevention of coronary artery disease. Lifestyle and dietary changes, intensified statin therapy and possibly the addition of ezetimibe remain the major interventions in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease, as they improve the prognosis particularly by lowering levels of LDL-C. Recently, genetic studies have contributed to extending our understanding of the relationship between lipid metabolism and coronary artery disease. A causal role for progression of coronary artery disease could be demonstrated for LDL-C, Lpa and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL), which could not be demonstrated for HDL-C in various studies. Furthermore, the effect of reduction of LDL-C by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibition and by the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor anacetrapib on cardiovascular events is currently being investigated in large clinical outcome study programs.

  3. Progress and challenges in developing metabolic footprints from diet in human gut microbial cometabolism.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Linda C; Raiten, Daniel J; Hubbard, Van S; Starke-Reed, Pamela

    2015-05-01

    Homo sapiens harbor trillions of microbes, whose microbial metagenome (collective genome of a microbial community) using omic validation interrogation tools is estimated to be at least 100-fold that of human cells, which comprise 23,000 genes. This article highlights some of the current progress and open questions in nutrition-related areas of microbiome research. It also underscores the metabolic capabilities of microbial fermentation on nutritional substrates that require further mechanistic understanding and systems biology approaches of studying functional interactions between diet composition, gut microbiota, and host metabolism. Questions surrounding bacterial fermentation and degradation of dietary constituents (particularly by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) and deciphering how microbial encoding of enzymes and derived metabolites affect recovery of dietary energy by the host are more complex than previously thought. Moreover, it is essential to understand to what extent the intestinal microbiota is subject to dietary control and to integrate these data with functional metabolic signatures and biomarkers. Many lines of research have demonstrated the significant role of the gut microbiota in human physiology and disease. Probiotic and prebiotic products are proliferating in the market in response to consumer demand, and the science and technology around these products are progressing rapidly. With high-throughput molecular technologies driving the science, studying the bidirectional interactions of host-microbial cometabolism, epithelial cell maturation, shaping of innate immune development, normal vs. dysfunctional nutrient absorption and processing, and the complex signaling pathways involved is now possible. Substantiating the safety and mechanisms of action of probiotic/prebiotic formulations is critical. Beneficial modulation of the human microbiota by using these nutritional and biotherapeutic strategies holds considerable promise as next

  4. Progress and challenges in developing metabolic footprints from diet in human gut microbial cometabolism.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Linda C; Raiten, Daniel J; Hubbard, Van S; Starke-Reed, Pamela

    2015-05-01

    Homo sapiens harbor trillions of microbes, whose microbial metagenome (collective genome of a microbial community) using omic validation interrogation tools is estimated to be at least 100-fold that of human cells, which comprise 23,000 genes. This article highlights some of the current progress and open questions in nutrition-related areas of microbiome research. It also underscores the metabolic capabilities of microbial fermentation on nutritional substrates that require further mechanistic understanding and systems biology approaches of studying functional interactions between diet composition, gut microbiota, and host metabolism. Questions surrounding bacterial fermentation and degradation of dietary constituents (particularly by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) and deciphering how microbial encoding of enzymes and derived metabolites affect recovery of dietary energy by the host are more complex than previously thought. Moreover, it is essential to understand to what extent the intestinal microbiota is subject to dietary control and to integrate these data with functional metabolic signatures and biomarkers. Many lines of research have demonstrated the significant role of the gut microbiota in human physiology and disease. Probiotic and prebiotic products are proliferating in the market in response to consumer demand, and the science and technology around these products are progressing rapidly. With high-throughput molecular technologies driving the science, studying the bidirectional interactions of host-microbial cometabolism, epithelial cell maturation, shaping of innate immune development, normal vs. dysfunctional nutrient absorption and processing, and the complex signaling pathways involved is now possible. Substantiating the safety and mechanisms of action of probiotic/prebiotic formulations is critical. Beneficial modulation of the human microbiota by using these nutritional and biotherapeutic strategies holds considerable promise as next

  5. Effect of SO/sub 2/ on light modulation of plant metabolism. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    This progress report briefly notes conclusions of work done on SO/sub 2/ effect on light modulation of plant metabolism. Conclusions include: effect of light activation on kinetic parameters of fructosebisphosphatase - for this enzyme K/sub m/ decreases and V/sub max/ increases as a result of light activation; and the effect of sulfite and arsenite on light activation in 2 Pisum cultivars - the differences in sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ is directly reflected in differences in a thylakoid bound factor (LEM) to SO/sub 2/.

  6. [Cytokines profile and metabolic activity of neutrophils of peripheral blood when progressing neoplasma].

    PubMed

    Abakumova, T V; Antoneeva, I I; Gening, T P; Gening, S O; Dolgova, D R; Fomina, A V

    2014-01-01

    The neutrophil is considered as the peculiar monocelled sekretorny gland realizing the effector potential including by secretion of soluble products - cytokines and for today. Influence of a tumor on functional activity of neutrophils depends on type, localization and a stage of its development. In our research dynamics of metabolic and of neutrophils of peripheral blood, the contents in a lysate and serums of blood of cytokines of IL-1β, 1Ra, 2, 6, 10, 18, TNF-α, IFN-γ and is studied when progressing a cervical cancer. Cytokines and metabolism indicators - activity of, determined by an immunofermental method, level of cationic proteins, a share of active cages in the spontaneous NST-test were cytochemical. It is shown that when progressing cervical cancer against increase in total of neutrophils significant decrease in their, aerobic and anaerobic bacterial action, decrease in the IL-1β and IL-1 Ra level, and also IFN-γ takes place at TNF-α increase, increase of production of matrix metalloproteinas-2 on Ib-IIa of a stage of a disease that allows to assume emergence at this stage of cervical cancer of pro-tumoral effect of neutrophils.

  7. Current progress of targetron technology: development, improvement and application in metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Jie; Cui, Gu-Zhen; Cui, Qiu

    2015-06-01

    Targetrons are mobile group II introns that can recognize their DNA target sites by base-pairing RNA-DNA interactions with the aid of site-specific binding reverse transcriptases. Targetron technology stands out from recently developed gene targeting methods because of the flexibility, feasibility, and efficiency, and is particularly suitable for the genetic engineering of difficult microorganisms, including cellulolytic bacteria that are considered promising candidates for biomass conversion via consolidated bioprocessing. Along with the development of the thermotargetron method for thermophiles, targetron technology becomes increasingly important for the metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms aiming at biofuel/chemical production. To summarize the current progress of targetron technology and provide new insights on the use of the technology, this paper reviews the retrohoming mechanisms of both mesophilic and thermophilic targetron methods based on various group II introns, investigates the improvement of targetron tools for high target efficiency and specificity, and discusses the current applications in the metabolic engineering for bacterial producers. Although there are still intellectual property and technical restrictions in targetron applications, we propose that targetron technology will contribute to both biochemistry research and the metabolic engineering for industrial productions.

  8. Non-fluent progressive aphasia: cerebral metabolic patterns and brain reserve.

    PubMed

    Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Pohl, Corina; Drzezga, Alexander; Kurz, Alexander

    2007-02-16

    Functional imaging studies suggest that brain reserve allows patients with Alzheimer's disease with more years of schooling to cope better with brain damage. No studies exist on patients with non-fluent progressive aphasia (NFPA). We aimed to explore metabolic patterns of patients with NFPA and to provide evidence for brain reserve in NFPA. 11 right-handed patients with NFPA and 16 age-matched controls underwent (18)F-FDG PET imaging. Scans of patients and controls were compared in SPM2. A linear regression analysis with glucose metabolism as dependent variable and years of schooling as the independent variable, adjusted for age, gender, and a total score of the CERAD neuropsychological battery was conducted. The NFPA group showed a hypometabolism of the left hemisphere including the middle frontal, and inferior temporal and angular gyri, and the bilateral caudate nuclei and thalami (p(corr)<0.05). The regression analysis revealed a significant inverse association between education and glucose metabolism in the left inferior temporal, parahippocampal, and supramarginal gyri (p(corr)<0.05). We conclude that brain reserve is also present in NFPA. PMID:17184752

  9. Obesity dependent metabolic signatures associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J.; Caballería, J.; Martínez-Arranz, I.; Domínguez-Díez, A.; Alonso, C.; Muntané, J.; Pérez-Cormenzana, M.; García-Monzón, C.; Mayo, R.; Martín-Duce, A.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Iacono, O. Lo; Tordjman, J.; Andrade, R.J.; Pérez-Carreras, M.; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y.; Tran, A.; Fernández-Escalante, C.; Arévalo, E.; García–Unzueta, M.; Clement, K.; Crespo, J.; Gual, P.; Gómez-Fleitas, M.; Martínez-Chantar, M.L.; Castro, A.; Lu, S.C.; Vázquez-Chantada, M.; Mato, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH) is still very limited. Despite the growing number of studies linking the disease with altered serum metabolite levels, an obstacle to the development of metabolome-based NAFLD predictors has been the lack of large cohort data from biopsy-proven patients matched for key metabolic features such as obesity. We studied 467 biopsied individuals with normal liver histology (n=90) or diagnosed with NAFLD (steatosis, n=246; NASH, n=131), randomly divided into estimation (80% of all patients) and validation (20% of all patients) groups. Qualitative determinations of 540 serum metabolite variables were performed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). The metabolic profile was dependent on patient body-mass index (BMI), suggesting that the NAFLD pathogenesis mechanism may be quite different depending on an individual’s level of obesity. A BMI-stratified multivariate model based on the NAFLD serum metabolic profile was used to separate patients with and without NASH. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.87 in the estimation and 0.85 in the validation group. The cutoff (0.54) corresponding to maximum average diagnostic accuracy (0.82) predicted NASH with a sensitivity of 0.71 and a specificity of 0.92 (negative/positive predictive values = 0.82/0.84). The present data, indicating that a BMI-dependent serum metabolic profile may be able to reliably distinguish NASH from steatosis patients, have significant implications for the development of NASH biomarkers and potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22364559

  10. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production. Progress report, June 1990--May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-04-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  11. [Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-07-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux? Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control? The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  12. Global reprogramming of transcription and metabolism in Medicago truncatula during progressive drought and after rewatering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Yi; Cruz de Carvalho, Maria H; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Kang, Yun; Allen, Stacy N; Huhman, David V; Tang, Yuhong; Murray, Jeremy; Sumner, Lloyd W; Udvardi, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume forage crop native to the arid and semi-arid environments of the Mediterranean. Given its drought-adapted nature, it is an ideal candidate to study the molecular and biochemical mechanisms conferring drought resistance in plants. Medicago plants were subjected to a progressive drought stress over 14 d of water withholding followed by rewatering under controlled environmental conditions. Based on physiological measurements of plant water status and changes in morphology, plants experienced mild, moderate and severe water stress before rehydration. Transcriptome analysis of roots and shoots from control, mildly, moderately and severely stressed, and rewatered plants, identified many thousands of genes that were altered in expression in response to drought. Many genes with expression tightly coupled to the plant water potential (i.e. drought intensity) were identified suggesting an involvement in Medicago drought adaptation responses. Metabolite profiling of drought-stressed plants revealed the presence of 135 polar and 165 non-polar compounds in roots and shoots. Combining Medicago metabolomic data with transcriptomic data yielded insight into the regulation of metabolic pathways operating under drought stress. Among the metabolites detected in drought-stressed Medicago plants, myo-inositol and proline had striking regulatory profiles indicating involvement in Medicago drought tolerance. Global transcriptional and metabolic responses to drought and rewatering were investigated in Medicago truncatula, a naturally drought-adapted model legume species. Integration of metabolomic and transcriptomic data yielded insights into the regulation of metabolic pathways underlying drought-stress adaptation. Many genes and metabolites with expression tightly coupled to drought intensity were identified, suggesting active involvement in Medicago drought resistance. These could prove useful targets for future translational approaches to improve

  13. [Progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lu, Yayao; Peng, Bo; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and uridine 5-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are critical enzymes for drug metabolism. Both chemical drugs and traditional Chinese medicines are converted to more readily excreted compounds by drug metabolizing enzymes in human livers. Because of the disparate expression of CYP and UGT enzymes among different individuals, accurate quantification of these enzymes is essential for drug pharmacology, drug-drug interactions and drug clinical applications. The research progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes in the recent decade is reviewed. PMID:26536756

  14. [Progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lu, Yayao; Peng, Bo; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and uridine 5-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are critical enzymes for drug metabolism. Both chemical drugs and traditional Chinese medicines are converted to more readily excreted compounds by drug metabolizing enzymes in human livers. Because of the disparate expression of CYP and UGT enzymes among different individuals, accurate quantification of these enzymes is essential for drug pharmacology, drug-drug interactions and drug clinical applications. The research progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes in the recent decade is reviewed.

  15. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Final progress report, July 1981-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, M.R.

    1981-11-01

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, and general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and through the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the final period from July 1981 to September 1981. This is the last quarterly progress report to be issued for this program.

  16. The role of proteomics in progressing insights into plant secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Esteso, María J.; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Morante-Carriel, Jaime A.; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2015-01-01

    The development of omics has enabled the genome-wide exploration of all kinds of biological processes at the molecular level. Almost every field of plant biology has been analyzed at the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic level. Here we focus on the particular contribution that proteomic technologies have made in progressing knowledge and characterising plant secondary metabolism (SM) pathways since early expectations were created 15 years ago. We analyzed how three major issues in the proteomic analysis of plant SM have been implemented in various research studies. These issues are: (i) the selection of a suitable plant material rich in secondary metabolites of interest, such as specialized tissues and organs, and in vitro cell cultures; (ii) the proteomic strategy to access target proteins, either a comprehensive or a differential analysis; (iii) the proteomic approach, represented by the hypothesis-free discovery proteomics and the hypothesis-driven targeted proteomics. We also examine to what extent the most-advanced technologies have been incorporated into proteomic research in plant SM and highlight some cutting edge techniques that would strongly benefit the progress made in this field. PMID:26217358

  17. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in research to evaluate the impact of utilization of fossil fuels on surface water is reported. Analyses of regulatory mechanisms of growth and rates of carbon cycling center on evaluation of quantitative control interactions among the microflora of the pelagial zones of several lakes of progressively greater eutrophy, littoral photosynthetic producer-decomposer complex, and allochthonous inorganic-organic influxes and their biotic processing. The underlying thesis is that quantification of the dynamic carbon fluxes among these components and their rate control mechanisms by physical and chemical factors are fundamental to elucidation of the rate functions of lake eutrophication. A major portion of the research has been directed towards the fate and nutrient mechanisms regulating qualitative and quantitative utilization and losses of organic carbon synthesized within lakes and their drainage basins. It has become increasingly apparent that the wetland and littoral flora, and attendant epiphytic and benthic microflora, have major regulatory controls on biogeochemical cycling of whole lake systems. A major effort on factors regulating the metabolism of littoral macrophytes and attached algae has been coupled to integrated studies on their decomposition and the fate of detrital dissolved and particulate organic matter. These organic products are being coupled to influences on enzymatic activity and inorganic nutrient cycling.

  18. Extreme Performance Scalable Operating Systems Final Progress Report (July 1, 2008 - October 31, 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D; Shende, Sameer

    2011-10-31

    This is the final progress report for the FastOS (Phase 2) (FastOS-2) project with Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Oregon (UO). The project started at UO on July 1, 2008 and ran until April 30, 2010, at which time a six-month no-cost extension began. The FastOS-2 work at UO delivered excellent results in all research work areas: * scalable parallel monitoring * kernel-level performance measurement * parallel I/0 system measurement * large-scale and hybrid application performance measurement * onlne scalable performance data reduction and analysis * binary instrumentation

  19. Regulation of terpene metabolism. Final technical report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1996-12-31

    This research focuses on the following topics: the biosynthesis and catabolism of monoterpenes; the organization of monoterpene metabolism; the developmental regulation of monoterpene metabolism; the flux control of precursor supply; and the integration of monoterpene and higher terpenoid metabolism.

  20. Role of body composition and metabolic profile in Barrett’s oesophagus and progression to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di Caro, Simona; Cheung, Wui Hang; Fini, Lucia; Keane, Margaret G.; Theis, Belinda; Haidry, Rehan; Di Renzo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Lovat, Laurence; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk for Barrett’s oesophagus (BE) on the basis of body composition, metabolic pathways, adipokines and metabolic syndrome (MS), as well as their role in cancer progression. Methods In patients with and without BE at gastroscopy, data on MS, BMI, waist/hip ratio for abdominal obesity (AO) and body fat percentage by bioimpedance were obtained. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, lipid, serum adiponectin and leptin levels were measured. The homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) was used to estimate insulin resistance. Histological findings for BE were correlated with the above parameters. Risk factors for BE identified using univariate analysis were entered into a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 250 patients and 224 controls (F/M: 189/285, mean age 58.08±15.51 years) were enroled. In the BE and control groups, 39.6 versus 31.3% were overweight, 32 versus 22.8% were obese, 75.6 versus 51.3% had AO, and 28.1 versus 18.9% were metabolically obese, respectively. AO [odds ratio (OR) 3.08], increased body fat percentage (OR 2.29), and higher BMI (overweight: OR 2.04; obese: OR 2.26) were significantly associated with BE. A positive trend was found in Normal Weight Obese Syndrome (OR 1.69). MS was associated with BE (overweight: OR 3.05; obese: OR 5.2; AO: OR 8.08). Insulin levels (P=0.05) and HOMA-IR (P<0.001) were higher in BE. AO was the only independent risk factor associated with BE (OR 1.65; P=0.02) and high-grade dysplasia (OR 2.44) on multivariate analysis. Conclusion AO was strongly associated with BE and dysplasia. BE was associated with MS and higher insulin/HOMA-IR, suggesting the activation of specific metabolic pathways in patients with altered body composition. PMID:26671515

  1. Correlating Structure and Function of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Progress and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric F.; Connick, J. Patrick; Reed, James R.; Backes, Wayne L.; Desai, Manoj C.; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D. Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches. PMID:24130370

  2. Correlating structure and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes: progress and ongoing challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric F; Connick, J Patrick; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L; Desai, Manoj C; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Scott, Emily E

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches.

  3. Testosterone deficiency induced by progressive stages of diabetes mellitus impairs glucose metabolism and favors glycogenesis in mature rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Rato, Luís; Alves, Marco G; Duarte, Ana I; Santos, Maria S; Moreira, Paula I; Cavaco, José E; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its prodromal stage, pre-diabetes, is rapidly increasing among young men, leading to disturbances in testosterone synthesis. However, the impact of testosterone deficiency induced by these progressive stages of diabetes on the metabolic behavior of Sertoli cells remains unknown. We evaluated the effects of testosterone deficiency associated with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes on Sertoli cells metabolism, by measuring (1) the expression and/or activities of glycolysis and glycogen metabolism-related proteins and (2) the metabolite secretion/consumption in Sertoli cells obtained from rat models of different development stages of the disease, to unveil the mechanisms by which testosterone deregulation may affect spermatogenesis. Glucose and pyruvate uptake were decreased in cells exposed to the testosterone concentration found in pre-diabetic rats (600nM), whereas the decreased testosterone concentrations found in type 2 diabetic rats (7nM) reversed this profile. Lactate production was not altered, although the expression and/or activity of lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter 4 were affected by progressive testosterone-deficiency. Sertoli cells exposed to type 2 diabetic conditions exhibited intracellular glycogen accumulation. These results illustrate that gradually reduced levels of testosterone, induced by progressive stages of diabetes mellitus, favor a metabolic reprogramming toward glycogen synthesis. Our data highlights a pivotal role for testosterone in the regulation of spermatogenesis metabolic support by Sertoli cells, particularly in individuals suffering from metabolic diseases. Such alterations may be in the basis of male subfertility/infertility associated with the progression of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Cyclin D1-CDK4 Controls Glucose Metabolism Independently of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjin; Dominy, John E.; Choi, Yoon Jong; Jurczak, Michael; Tolliday, Nicola; Camporez, Joao Paulo; Chim, Helen; Lim, Ji-Hong; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Yang, Xiaoyong; Vazquez, Francisca; Sicinski, Piotr; Shulman, Gerald I.; Puigserver, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Insulin constitutes a major evolutionarily conserved hormonal axis for maintaining glucose homeostasis1-3; dysregulation of this axis causes diabetes2,4. PGC-1α links insulin signaling to the expression of glucose and lipid metabolic genes5-7. GCN5 acetylates PGC-1α and suppresses its transcriptional activity, whereas SIRT1 deacetylates and activates PGC-1α8,9. Although insulin is a mitogenic signal in proliferative cells10,11, whether components of the cell cycle machinery contribute to insulin’s metabolic action is poorly understood. Herein, we report that insulin activates cyclin D1-CDK4, which, in turn, increases GCN5 acetyltransferase activity and suppresses hepatic glucose production independently of cell cycle progression. Through a cell-based high throughput chemical screen, we identified a CDK4 inhibitor that potently decreases PGC-1α acetylation. Insulin/GSK3β signaling induces cyclin D1 protein stability via sequestering cyclin D1 in the nucleus. In parallel, dietary amino acids increase hepatic cyclin D1 mRNA transcripts. Activated cyclin D1-CDK4 kinase phosphorylates and activates GCN5, which then acetylates and inhibits PGC-1α activity on gluconeogenic genes. Loss of hepatic cyclin D1 results in increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. In diabetic models, cyclin D1-CDK4 is chronically elevated and refractory to fasting/feeding transitions; nevertheless further activation of this kinase normalizes glycemia. Our findings show that insulin uses components of the cell cycle machinery in post-mitotic cells to control glucose homeostasis independently of cell division. PMID:24870244

  5. Global reprogramming of transcription and metabolism in Medicago truncatula during progressive drought and after rewatering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yi; Cruz DE Carvalho, Maria H; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Kang, Yun; Allen, Stacy N; Huhman, David V; Tang, Yuhong; Murray, Jeremy; Sumner, Lloyd W; Udvardi, Michael K

    2014-11-01

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume forage crop native to the arid and semi-arid environments of the Mediterranean. Given its drought-adapted nature, it is an ideal candidate to study the molecular and biochemical mechanisms conferring drought resistance in plants. Medicago plants were subjected to a progressive drought stress over 14 d of water withholding followed by rewatering under controlled environmental conditions. Based on physiological measurements of plant water status and changes in morphology, plants experienced mild, moderate and severe water stress before rehydration. Transcriptome analysis of roots and shoots from control, mildly, moderately and severely stressed, and rewatered plants, identified many thousands of genes that were altered in expression in response to drought. Many genes with expression tightly coupled to the plant water potential (i.e. drought intensity) were identified suggesting an involvement in Medicago drought adaptation responses. Metabolite profiling of drought-stressed plants revealed the presence of 135 polar and 165 non-polar compounds in roots and shoots. Combining Medicago metabolomic data with transcriptomic data yielded insight into the regulation of metabolic pathways operating under drought stress. Among the metabolites detected in drought-stressed Medicago plants, myo-inositol and proline had striking regulatory profiles indicating involvement in Medicago drought tolerance. PMID:24661137

  6. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  7. R6/2 Huntington’s disease Mice Develop Early and Progressive Abnormal Brain Metabolism and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda-Prado, E; Popp, S; Khan, U; Stefanov, D; Rodriguez, J; Menalled, L; Dow-Edwards, D; Small, SA; Moreno, H

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark feature of Huntington's disease pathology is the atrophy of brain regions including, but not limited to, the striatum. Though MRI studies have identified structural CNS changes in several HD mouse models, the functional consequences of HD pathology during the progression of the disease have yet to be investigated using in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To address this issue, we first established the structural and functional MRI phenotype of juvenile HD mouse model R6/2 at early and advanced stages of disease. Significantly higher fMRI-signals (relative cerebral blood volumes-rCBV) and atrophy were observed in both age groups in specific brain regions. Next, fMRI results were correlated with electrophysiological analysis, which showed abnormal increases in neuronal activity in affected brain regions- thus identifying a mechanism accounting for the abnormal fMRI findings. [14C] deoxyglucose (2DG) maps to investigate patterns of glucose utilization were also generated. An interesting mismatch between increases in rCBV and decreases in glucose uptake was observed. Finally, we evaluated the sensitivity of this mouse line to audiogenic seizures early in the disease course. We found that R6/2 mice had an increased susceptibility to develop seizures. Together, these findings identified seizure activity in R6/2 mice, and show that neuroimaging measures sensitive to oxygen metabolism can be used as in vivo biomarkers, preceding the onset of an overt behavioral phenotype. Since fMRI-rCBV can also be obtained in patients, we propose that it may serve as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic responses in humans and HD mouse models. PMID:22573668

  8. Maitake Mushroom Extracts Ameliorate Progressive Hypertension and Other Chronic Metabolic Perturbations in Aging Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Harry G.; Echard, Bobby; Bagchi, Debasis; Perricone, Nicholas V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the ability of two commercially-available fractions labeled SX and D derived from the edible maitake mushroom to overcome many age-associated metabolic perturbations such as progressive, age-related elevation of blood pressure, over activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), decreased insulin sensitivity, and inflammation in an in vivo laboratory model. Design and Method: We divided forty mature, female Sprague-Dawley rats (SD) into five groups of eight. SD ingested regular rat chow containing added sucrose (20% w/w). The groups received baseline diet alone (control) or baseline diet containing captopril, niacin-bound chromium, maitake fraction SX, or maitake fraction D. In addition to blood pressure readings, the following procedures were implemented: losartan and insulin challenges, evaluation of serum ACE activity, glucose tolerance testing, blood chemistries, LNAME challenge, and measurement of various circulating cytokines. Results: We found that implementation of all test conditions stopped the gradual elevation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the SD over the four months of study, even reversing some of the previous elevation that occurred over time. In general, the treatment groups showed decreased activity of the RAS estimated by less lowering of SBP after losartan challenge and decreased serum ACE activity and were more sensitive to exogenous insulin challenge. TNFa levels decreased in all four test groups suggesting a lessening of the inflammatory state. Conclusions: We believe our data suggest that maitake mushroom fractions lessen age-related hypertension, at least in part, via effects on the RAS; enhance insulin sensitivity; and reduce some aspects of inflammation -- actions that should lead to a longer, healthier life span. PMID:20567593

  9. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  10. Recent progress in vitamin D metabolism and the chemistry of vitamin D metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Schnoes, H.K.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of vitamin D and the elucidation of the vitamin D endocrine system are illustrated by selected examples of recent chemical work in our laboratories. One of these is the isolation and identification of vitamin D/sub 3/ as the antirachitic substance produced in irradiated skin. A second is the isolation and identification of the calcitroic acid, a major metabolite of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ with potential function. A third is the isolation and identification of 25-hydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/-26,23-lactone, a major metabolite of vitamin D in the plasma of animals given large amounts of vitamin D. A fourth is a detailed study of 24,24-difluoro-25-hydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ to test whether 24-hydroxylation plays an important role in the function of vitamin D. Other important developments include the chemical synthesis of high specific activity radioactive vitamin D metabolites for use in the elucidation of their molecular mechanism of action, cellular sites of action, and in quantitative metabolite assays. Finally, recent progress in synthetic methodology, providing a convenient route to 1..cap alpha..-hydroxylated vitamin D compounds, is summarized.

  11. Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1987--February 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-03

    Department of Energy Participation in the Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project began officially on November 9, 1987. Even though their financial participation began at this time, they will receive technical information from the start of the project which was on January 1, 1987. The Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project is progressing in Phase I with the majority of the emphasis on facility design, site characterization and the environmental work. The site characterization field work is estimated to be completed by the end of February with the final report completion towards the end of Phase I. The facility design effort is close to the 40% level. It is anticipated that all permits will be applied for in Phase I and most of them will be granted by the end of Phase I. The obtaining of the private financing continues to be a major activity in the project. All of the financing must be in place before the continuation for DOE funding to Phase II will be applied for.

  12. Final Technical Progress Report: Development of Low-Cost Suspension Heliostat; December 7, 2011 - December 6, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, W.

    2013-01-01

    Final technical progress report of SunShot Incubator Solaflect Energy. The project succeeded in demonstrating that the Solaflect Suspension Heliostat design is viable for large-scale CSP installations. Canting accuracy is acceptable and is continually improving as Solaflect improves its understanding of this design. Cost reduction initiatives were successful, and there are still many opportunities for further development and further cost reduction.

  13. Schaumburg Early Education Center (SEEC): Sixth Progress Performance Report 1978-1979. Final Report (Outreach) 1976-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Consolidated School District 54, Schaumburg, IL.

    The document presents the sixth progress performance report for 1978-1979 and a final outreach report (focusing on demonstration activities) for 1976-1979 for the Schaumburg (Illinois) Early Education Center (SEEC), a Piaget based early education program for 3 to 5 year olds with developmental delays in the following areas: language,…

  14. Quantitative Tools for Dissection of Hydrogen-Producing Metabolic Networks-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Dismukes, G.Charles.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2012-10-19

    During this project we have pioneered the development of integrated experimental-computational technologies for the quantitative dissection of metabolism in hydrogen and biofuel producing microorganisms (i.e. C. acetobutylicum and various cyanobacteria species). The application of these new methodologies resulted in many significant advances in the understanding of the metabolic networks and metabolism of these organisms, and has provided new strategies to enhance their hydrogen or biofuel producing capabilities. As an example, using mass spectrometry, isotope tracers, and quantitative flux-modeling we mapped the metabolic network structure in C. acetobutylicum. This resulted in a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of central carbon metabolism that could not have been obtained using genomic data alone. We discovered that biofuel production in this bacterium, which only occurs during stationary phase, requires a global remodeling of central metabolism (involving large changes in metabolite concentrations and fluxes) that has the effect of redirecting resources (carbon and reducing power) from biomass production into solvent production. This new holistic, quantitative understanding of metabolism is now being used as the basis for metabolic engineering strategies to improve solvent production in this bacterium. In another example, making use of newly developed technologies for monitoring hydrogen and NAD(P)H levels in vivo, we dissected the metabolic pathways for photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. This investigation led to the identification of multiple targets for improving hydrogen production. Importantly, the quantitative tools and approaches that we have developed are broadly applicable and we are now using them to investigate other important biofuel producers, such as cellulolytic bacteria.

  15. Recent Progress in Metabolic Signaling Pathways Regulating Aging and Life Span

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The NIH Summit, Advances in Geroscience: Impact on Health Span and Chronic Disease, discusses several aspects of cellular degeneration that underlie susceptibility to chronic aging-associated diseases, morbidity, and mortality. In particular, the session on Metabolism focuses on the interrelationship between signal transduction, intermediary metabolism, and metabolic products and byproducts that contribute to pathophysiologic phenotypes and detrimental effects that occur during the aging process, thus leading to susceptibility to disease. Although it is well established that many metabolic pathways (ie, oxidative phosphorylation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake) decline with age, it often remains uncertain if these are a cause or consequence of the aging process. Moreover, the mechanisms accounting for the decline in metabolic function remain enigmatic. Several novel and unexpected concepts are emerging that will help to define the roles of altered metabolic control in the degenerative mechanisms of aging. This brief review summarizes several of the topics to be discussed in the metabolism of aging session (http://www.geron.org/About%20Us/nih-geroscience-summit). PMID:24833582

  16. Implications of quantum metabolism and natural selection for the origin of cancer cells and tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul; Demetrius, Lloyd A.; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2012-03-01

    Empirical studies give increased support for the hypothesis that the sporadic form of cancer is an age-related metabolic disease characterized by: (a) metabolic dysregulation with random abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA, and (b) metabolic alteration - the compensatory upregulation of glycolysis to offset mitochondrial impairments. This paper appeals to the theory of Quantum Metabolism and the principles of natural selection to formulate a conceptual framework for a quantitative analysis of the origin and proliferation of the disease. Quantum Metabolism, an analytical theory of energy transduction in cells inspired by the methodology of the quantum theory of solids, elucidates the molecular basis for differences in metabolic rate between normal cells, utilizing predominantly oxidative phosphorylation, and cancer cells utilizing predominantly glycolysis. The principles of natural selection account for the outcome of competition between the two classes of cells. Quantum Metabolism and the principles of natural selection give an ontogenic and evolutionary rationale for cancer proliferation and furnish a framework for effective therapeutic strategies to impede the spread of the disease.

  17. Carbon metabolism in legume nodules. Progress report, July 1982-July 1983

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The goal is to understand how the legume nodule metabolizes carbohydrate to provide energy and reductant for symbiotic fixation. The working hypothesis has been that the plant cytosol is microacrobic and that some carbon metabolism may be via anaerobic pathways similar to those in roots of flood tolerant plants. A method of analyzing redox changes in intact mitochondria, bacteroids or bacteria was adapted; a method of manipulating nitrogenase activity by oxygen inhibition was developed; the production of alcohol by soybean nodules was studied; and enzymes metabolizing alcohol/aldehyde were found in other nitrogen fixing systems. (ACR)

  18. Comprehensive Plasma Metabolomic Analyses of Atherosclerotic Progression Reveal Alterations in Glycerophospholipid and Sphingolipid Metabolism in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vi T.; Huang, Aric; Zhong, Lexy H.; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of atherogenesis are not clear. In this study, comprehensive plasma metabolomics were used to investigate early-stage atherosclerotic development and progression in chow-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice at 5, 10 and 15 weeks of age. Comprehensive plasma metabolomic profiles, based on 4365 detected metabolite features, differentiate atherosclerosis-prone from atherosclerosis-resistant models. Metabolites in the sphingomyelin pathway were significantly altered prior to detectable lesion formation and at all subsequent time-points. The cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol pathway was up-regulated during stage I of atherosclerosis, while metabolites in the phosphatidylethanolamine and glycosphingolipid pathways were augmented in mice with stage II lesions. These pathways, involving glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, were also significantly affected during the course of atherosclerotic progression. Our findings suggest that distinct plasma metabolomic profiles can differentiate the different stages of atherosclerotic progression. This study reveals that alteration of specific, previously unreported pathways of glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism are associated with atherosclerosis. The clear difference in the level of several metabolites supports the use of plasma lipid profiling as a diagnostic tool of atherogenesis. PMID:27721472

  19. Improved methods for water shutoff. Final technical progress report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S.; Liang, J.T.; Schrader, R.; Hagstrom, J. II; Liu, J.; Wavrik, K.

    1998-10-01

    In the United States, more than 20 billion barrels of salt water are produced each year during oilfield operations. A tremendous economic incentive exists to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. This three-year research project had three objectives. The first objective was to identify chemical blocking agents that will (a) during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and with screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and (b) at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resistant breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients. The second objective was to identify schemes that optimize placement of the above blocking agents. The third objective was to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that to another phase (e.g., oil or gas). The authors also wanted to identify conditions that maximize this phenomenon. This project consisted of three tasks, each of which addressed one of the above objectives. This report describes work performed during the third and final period of the project. During this three-year project, they: (1) Developed a procedure and software for sizing gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells; (2) Developed a method (based on interwell tracer results) to determine the potential for applying gel treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs; (3) Characterized gel properties during extrusion through fractures; (4) Developed a method to predict gel placement in naturally fractured reservoirs; (5) Made progress in elucidating the mechanism for why some gels can reduce permeability to water more than that to oil; (6) Demonstrated the limitations of using water/oil ratio diagnostic plots to distinguish between channeling and coning; and (7) Proposed a philosophy for diagnosing and attacking water

  20. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  1. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loewus, F.A.; Seib, P.A.

    1991-12-31

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  2. Twenty-five years of progress in bilirubin metabolism (1952-77).

    PubMed Central

    Billing, B H

    1978-01-01

    This review deals with the development of our understanding of the chemistry of bilirubin and its glucuronide derivatives during the years 1952-1977. It examines the relation between haem metabolism and bilirubin formation and our present knowledge of hepatic transport of bilirubin. The heterogeneity of familial hyperbilirubinaemia is discussed. PMID:98394

  3. Newborn Screening for Genetic-Metabolic Diseases: Progress, Principles and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Neil A.

    This monograph, designed for persons involved in the organization and regulation of screening of newborns infants for Phenylketonuria (PKU) and other genetic-metabolic diseases reviews new developments in the field, makes recommendations, and provides information about specific conditions other than PKU that are detectable by screening. Discussed…

  4. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-08-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  5. The Correlation of PPARα Activity and Cardiomyocyte Metabolism and Structure in Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy during Heart Failure Progression

    PubMed Central

    Czarnowska, E.; Domal-Kwiatkowska, D.; Reichman-Warmusz, E.; Bierla, J. B.; Sowinska, A.; Ratajska, A.; Goral-Radziszewska, K.; Wojnicz, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to define relationship between PPARα expression and metabolic-structural characteristics during HF progression in hearts with DCM phenotype. Tissue endomyocardial biopsy samples divided into three groups according to LVEF ((I) 45–50%, n = 10; (II) 30–40%, n = 15; (III) <30%, n = 15; and control (donor hearts, >60%, n = 6)) were investigated. The PPARα mRNA expression in the failing hearts was low in Group (I), high in Group (II), and comparable to that of the control in Group (III). There were analogous changes in the expression of FAT/CD36 and CPT-1 mRNA in contrast to continuous overexpression of GLUT-4 mRNA and significant increase of PDK-4 mRNA in Group (II). In addition, significant structural changes of cardiomyocytes with glycogen accumulation were accompanied by increased expression of PPARα. For the entire study population with HF levels of FAT/CD36 mRNA showed a strong tendency of negative correlation with LVEF. In conclusion, PPARα elevated levels may be a direct cause of adverse remodeling, both metabolic and structural. Thus, there is limited time window for therapy modulating cardiac metabolism and protecting cardiomyocyte structure in failing heart. PMID:26981112

  6. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Sandoval, Nathalie; Reyes, María; Gonzalez, Priscila; Gajardo, Monica; Morales, Erik; Neira, Amalia; Razmilic, Iván; Yuri, José A; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE-/- mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE-/- mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice. PMID:26075004

  7. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Sandoval, Nathalie; Reyes, María; Gonzalez, Priscila; Gajardo, Monica; Morales, Erik; Neira, Amalia; Razmilic, Iván; Yuri, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE−/− mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE−/− mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice. PMID:26075004

  8. The Emerging Role of Disturbed CoQ Metabolism in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Botham, Kathleen M.; Napolitano, Mariarosaria; Bravo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterised by the accumulation of triacylglycerol in the liver, is the most common liver disorder, the causes of its development and progression to the more serious non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) remain incompletely understood. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a key factor in both these processes, and mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are also believed to play a part. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a powerful antioxidant found in all cell membranes which has an essential role in mitochondrial respiration and also has anti-inflammatory properties. NAFLD has been shown to be associated with disturbances in plasma and liver CoQ concentrations, but the relationship between these changes and disease development and progression is not yet clear. Dietary supplementation with CoQ has been found to be hepatoprotective and to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation as well as improving mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that it may be beneficial in NAFLD. However, studies using animal models or patients with NAFLD have given inconclusive results. Overall, evidence is now emerging to indicate that disturbances in CoQ metabolism are involved in NAFLD development and progression to NASH, and this highlights the need for further studies with human subjects to fully clarify its role. PMID:26633474

  9. Seminar on Foci for Progress in Scientific Publications: A Summary and Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH.

    A one-day seminar was convened on November 4, 1969, to consider problems involved in communicating scientific information and the progress that has been made in improving the scientific publication mechanism. Thirty participants representing different types of information producers, users, and organizations contributed to the seminar discussion.…

  10. A Report on Early State and Local Progress towards WIA Implementation. Final Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Ronald; Kogan, Deborah; Kreutzer, Suzanne; Wiegand, Andrew; Baker, Alberta; Carrick, Gardner; McCarthy, Carole

    Early state and local progress toward implementation of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) was reviewed. Data were collected through visits to selected sites in Florida, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Vermont and a 90-item Workforce System Information and Evaluation (WSIE) data collection form. The following aspects of WIA…

  11. Perspectives on Progress: The School-to-Work National Customer Dialogues. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Forum Inst., Washington, DC.

    "Perspectives on Progress: The School-to-Work (STW) National Customer Dialogues" was a series of six regional and two national discussions that were held between December 1999 and July 2000 to gather the views of more than 700 employers, educators, labor union representatives, students, parents, community-based organizations, and state and local…

  12. Slow Progress In Finalizing Measles And Rubella Elimination In The European Region.

    PubMed

    Biellik, Robin; Davidkin, Iria; Esposito, Susanna; Lobanov, Andrey; Kojouharova, Mira; Pfaff, Günter; Santos, José Ignacio; Simpson, John; Mamou, Myriam Ben; Butler, Robb; Deshevoi, Sergei; Huseynov, Shahin; Jankovic, Dragan; Shefer, Abigail

    2016-02-01

    All countries in the World Health Organization European Region committed to eliminating endemic transmission of measles and rubella by 2015, and disease incidence has decreased dramatically. However, there was little progress between 2012 and 2013, and the goal will likely not be achieved on time. Genuine political commitment, increased technical capacity, and greater public awareness are urgently needed, especially in Western Europe. PMID:26858387

  13. FY08 LDRD Final Report Probabilistic Inference of Metabolic Pathways from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    SciTech Connect

    D'haeseleer, P

    2009-03-01

    Metagenomic 'shotgun' sequencing of environmental microbial communities has the potential to revolutionize microbial ecology, allowing a cultivation-independent, yet sequence-based analysis of the metabolic capabilities and functions present in an environmental sample. Although its intensive sequencing requirements are a good match for the continuously increasing bandwidth at sequencing centers, the complexity, seemingly inexhaustible novelty, and 'scrambled' nature of metagenomic data is also proving a tremendous challenge for analysis. In fact, many metagenomics projects do not go much further than providing a list of novel gene variants and over- or under-represented functional gene categories. In this project, we proposed to develop a set of novel metagenomic sequence analysis tools, including a binning method to group sequences by species, inference of phenotypes and metabolic pathways from these reconstructed species, and extraction of coarse-grained flux models. We proposed to closely collaborate with the DOE Joint Genome Institute to align these tools with their metagenomics analysis needs and the developing IMG/M metagenomics pipeline. Results would be cross-validated with simulated metagenomic data using a testing platform developed at the JGI.

  14. Metabolic Therapy with Deanna Protocol Supplementation Delays Disease Progression and Extends Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Csilla; Poff, Angela M.; Held, Heather E.; Landon, Carol S.; Goldhagen, Craig R.; Mavromates, Nicholas; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may

  15. Metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ari, Csilla; Poff, Angela M; Held, Heather E; Landon, Carol S; Goldhagen, Craig R; Mavromates, Nicholas; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may prolong

  16. Response to diet-induced obesity produces time-dependent induction and progression of metabolic osteoarthritis in rat knees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kelsey H; Hart, David A; Reimer, Raylene A; Seerattan, Ruth A; Herzog, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Obesity, and corresponding chronic-low grade inflammation, is associated with the onset and progression of knee OA. The origin of this inflammation is poorly understood. Here, the effect of high fat, high sucrose (HFS) diet induced obesity (DIO) on local (synovial fluid), and systemic (serum) inflammation is evaluated after a 12-week obesity induction and a further 16-week adaptation period. For 12-weeks of obesity induction, n = 40 DIO male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed a HFS diet while the control group (n = 14) remained on chow. DIO rats were allocated to prone (DIO-P, top 33% based on weight change) or resistant (DIO-R, bottom 33%) groups at 12-weeks. Animals were euthanized at 12- and after an additional 16-weeks on diet (28-weeks). At sacrifice, body composition and knee joints were collected and assessed. Synovial fluid and sera were profiled using cytokine array analysis. At 12-weeks, DIO-P animals demonstrated increased Modified Mankin scores compared to DIO-R and chow (p = 0.026), and DIO-R had higher Mankin scores compared to chow (p = 0.049). While numerous systemic and limited synovial fluid inflammatory markers were increased at 12-weeks in DIO animals compared to chow, by 28-weeks there were limited systemic differences but marked increases in local synovial fluid inflammatory marker concentrations. Metabolic OA may manifest from an initial systemic inflammatory disturbance. Twelve weeks of obesity induction leads to a unique inflammatory profile and induction of metabolic OA which is altered after a further 16-weeks of obesity and HFS diet intake, suggesting that obesity is a dynamic, progressive process. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1010-1018, 2016.

  17. The Role of DNA Methylation in the Metabolic Memory Phenomenon Associated With the Continued Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Clinical and experimental studies have shown that diabetic retinopathy progression does not halt after termination of hyperglycemia, suggesting a “metabolic memory” phenomenon. DNA is highly dynamic, and cytosine methylation changes can last for several years. In diabetes, DNA methylation regulates expression of many genes associated with retinal mitochondrial homeostasis. Our aim was to investigate the role of DNA methylation in the metabolic memory. Methods Reversal of 4 days of 20 mM glucose by 4 to 8 days of 5 mM glucose, in the presence/absence of Dnmt inhibitor (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine), was investigated on DNA methylation and its machinery in human retinal endothelial cells. The key parameters were confirmed in the retina from diabetic rats maintained in good glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin ∼6%) for 3 months after 3 months of poor control (glycated hemoglobin >10%). Results DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt 1) remained active after 4 days of normal glucose that followed 4 days of high glucose, and mtDNA stayed hypermethylated with impaired transcription. Hydroxymethylating enzyme Tet2, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (regulated by hydroxymethylation) also remained upregulated. But, 8 days of normal glucose after 4 days of high glucose ameliorated mtDNA methylation and MMP-9 hydroxymethylation. Direct Dnmt targeting by Aza during the reversal period benefited methylation status of mtDNA and MMP-9 DNA. Similarly, reinstitution of good control after 3 months of poor control in rats did not reverse diabetes-induced increase in retinal Dnmt1 and Tet2, and alter the methylation status of mtDNA and MMP-9. Conclusions Retinal DNA methylation-hydroxymethylation machinery does not benefit immediately from reversal of hyperglycemia. Maintenance of good glycemic control for longer duration, and/or direct targeting DNA methylation ameliorates continuous mitochondrial damage, and could retard/halt diabetic retinopathy progression. PMID:27787562

  18. Decreased Expression of Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase Associates with Glucose Metabolism and Tumor Progression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hidenari; Sugimachi, Keishi; Komatsu, Hisateru; Ueda, Masami; Masuda, Takaaki; Uchi, Ryutaro; Sakimura, Shotaro; Nambara, Sho; Saito, Tomoko; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ito, Shuhei; Terashima, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi; Mimori, Koshi

    2016-06-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, is reduced in expression in certain cancers where it has been hypothesized to act as a tumor suppressor, including in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we report functional evidence supporting this hypothesis, providing a preclinical rationale to develop FBP1 as a therapeutic target for HCC treatment. Three independent cohorts totaling 594 cases of HCC were analyzed to address clinical significance. Lower FBP1 expression associated with advanced tumor stage, poor overall survival, and higher tumor recurrence rates. In HCC cell lines, where endogenous FBP1 expression is low, engineering its ectopic overexpression inhibited tumor growth and intracellular glucose uptake by reducing aerobic glycolysis. In patient specimens, promoter methylation and copy-number loss of FBP1 were independently associated with decreased FBP1 expression. Similarly, FBP1 downregulation in HCC cell lines was also associated with copy-number loss. HCC specimens exhibiting low expression of FBP1 had a highly malignant phenotype, including large tumor size, poor differentiation, impaired gluconeogenesis, and enhanced aerobic glycolysis. The effects of FBP1 expression on prognosis and glucose metabolism were confirmed by gene set enrichment analysis. Overall, our findings established that FBP1 downregulation in HCC contributed to tumor progression and poor prognosis by altering glucose metabolism, and they rationalize further study of FBP1 as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in HCC patients. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3265-76. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197151

  19. Pediatric non alcoholic fatty liver disease: old and new concepts on development, progression, metabolic insight and potential treatment targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children. NAFLD has emerged to be extremely prevalent, and predicted by obesity and male gender. It is defined by hepatic fat infiltration >5% hepatocytes, in the absence of other causes of liver pathology. It includes a spectrum of disease ranging from intrahepatic fat accumulation (steatosis) to various degrees of necrotic inflammation and fibrosis (non-alcoholic steatohepatatis [NASH]). NAFLD is associated, in children as in adults, with severe metabolic impairments, determining an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. It can evolve to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, with the consequent need for liver transplantation. Both genetic and environmental factors seem to be involved in the development and progression of the disease, but its physiopathology is not yet entirely clear. In view of this mounting epidemic phenomenon involving the youth, the study of NAFLD should be a priority for all health care systems. This review provides an overview of current and new clinical-histological concepts of pediatric NAFLD, going through possible implications into patho-physiolocical and therapeutic perspectives. PMID:23530957

  20. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS. PMID:27507559

  1. Progress in drug development for Alzheimer's disease: An overview in relation to mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2016-10-01

    Current possibilities of Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment are very limited and are based on administration of cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine. Newly synthesized drugs affect multiple AD pathophysiological pathways and can act as inhibitors of cholinesterases (AChE, BuChE), inhibitors of monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B), modulators of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, modulators of amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase and antioxidants. Effects of clinically used as well as newly developed AD drugs were studied in relation to energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions, including oxidative phosphorylation, activities of enzymes of citric acid cycle or electron transfer system, mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium homeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species and MAO activity. PMID:27094132

  2. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C{sub 10}) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C{sub 15} C{sub 20}, C{sub 30}, C{sub 40}) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C{sub 15}) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  3. Altered intramuscular lipid metabolism relates to diminished insulin action in men, but not women, in progression to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Leigh; Bergman, Bryan C; Hunerdosse, Devon M; Eckel, Robert H

    2010-11-01

    Whether sex differences in intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) metabolism underlie sex differences in the progression to diabetes are unknown. Therefore, the current study examined IMTG concentration and fractional synthesis rate (FSR) in obese men and women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) vs. those with prediabetes (PD). PD (n = 13 men and 7 women) and NGT (n = 7 men and 12 women) groups were matched for age and anthropometry. Insulin action was quantified using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]-glucose. IMTG concentration was measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and FSR by GC/combustion isotope ratio MS (C-IRMS), from muscle biopsies taken after infusion of [U-(13)C]palmitate during 4 h of rest. In PD men, the metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of glucose was lower during the clamp (4.71 ± 0.77 vs. 8.62 ± 1.26 ml/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/min, P = 0.04; with a trend for lower glucose rate of disappearance (Rd), P = 0.07), in addition to higher IMTG concentration (41.2 ± 5.0 vs. 21.2 ± 3.4 µg/mg dry weight, P ≤ 0.01), lower FSR (0.21 ± 0.03 vs. 0.42 ± 0.06 %/h, P ≤ 0.01), and lower oxidative capacity (P = 0.03) compared to NGT men. In contrast, no difference in Rd, IMTG concentration, or FSR was seen in PD vs. NGT women. Surprisingly, glucose Rd during the clamp was not different between NGT men and women (P = 0.25) despite IMTG concentration being higher (42.6 ± 6.1 vs. 21.2 ± 3.4 µg/mg dry weight, P = 0.03) and FSR being lower (0.23 ± 0.04 vs. 0.42 ± 0.06 %/h, P = 0.02) in women. Alterations in IMTG metabolism relate to diminished insulin action in men, but not women, in the progression toward diabetes. PMID:20379150

  4. Assisting Black and Rural Caregivers of Elders with Dementia: Progressive Training through Trusted Resources. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coogle, Constance L., Ed.; Finley, Ruth B., Ed.

    A program was developed in Virginia to train Black and rural family caregivers of persons with dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. This final program report begins with project briefs that summarize major products and findings, program objectives and accomplishments, and dissemination activities. Chapter 1 addresses issues related to…

  5. Intermolecular potential functions and high resolution molecular spectroscopy of weakly bound complexes. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Muenter, J.S.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year in research supported by this grant. Two papers published in this period are briefly discussed. The general goal of the work is to consolidate the understanding of experimental results through a theoretical model of intermolecular potential energy surfaces. Progress in the experimental and theoretical phases of the program are presented and immediate goals outlined. The ability to construct analytic intermolecular potential functions that accurately predict the energy of interaction between small molecules will have great impact in many areas of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology.

  6. [Experimental and theoretical plasma physics program]. [Final progress report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.

    1983-12-31

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, the authors summarize the technical progress in five major areas: (1) RF interaction with plasmas including wave propagation and RF heating, (2) spheromak formation, equilibrium, and stability; (3) stability of nonaxisymmetric systems (EBT, mirrors, etc.); (4) stability theory of toroidal plasmas (tokamak, RFP, etc); and (5) nonlinear theory.

  7. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Harold

    2001-07-26

    The Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut, July 22-27, 2001. The conference was attended by 121 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Environmental and applied genomics, Cell-to-cell signaling and multicellular behavior, Emerging technologies and methods, Novel metabolisms and ecosystems, Directed evolution of enzymes and pathways, Symbiotic and trophic relationships, Synthesis and application of novel biopolymers, and Microbes at the oxic-anoxic interface. There was also a special lecture titled ''Under the umbrella of the big tree: microbial biology into the 21st century.''

  8. Recent Progress on Bile Acid Receptor Modulators for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping

    2016-07-28

    Bile acids are steroid-derived molecules synthesized in the liver, secreted from hepatocytes into the bile canaliculi, and subsequently stored in the gall bladder. During the feeding, bile flows into the duodenum, where it contributes to the solubilization and digestion of lipid-soluble nutrients. After a meal, bile-acid levels increase in the intestine, liver, and also in the systemic circulation. Therefore, serum bile-acid levels serve as an important sensing mechanism for nutrient and energy. Recent studies have described bile acids as versatile signaling molecules endowed with systemic endocrine functions. Bile acids are ligands for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1, M-BAR, and BG37) and nuclear hormone receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR; also known as NR1H4). Acting through these diverse signaling pathways, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose homeostasis, and energy expenditure. These bile-acid-controlled signaling pathways have become the source of promising novel drug targets to treat common metabolic and hepatic diseases. PMID:26878262

  9. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1990--March 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-12-31

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target ``regulatory`` enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C{sub 15}-C{sub 30}) produced by oil glands.

  10. Experimental Program Final Technical Progress Report: 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Edward R.

    2014-09-12

    This is the final technical report of the grant DE-FG02-04ER41301 to the University of Colorado at Boulder entitled "Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics" and describes the results of our funded activities during the period 15 February 2007 to 30 September 2012. These activities were primarily carried out at Fermilab, RHIC, and the German lab DESY. Significant advances in these experiments were carried out by members of the Colorado group and are described in detail.

  11. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Vanessa R.; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A.; Alves, Marco G.; Silva, Branca M.

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  12. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

  13. Effects of Growth Hormone (GH) Therapy Withdrawal on Glucose Metabolism in Not Confirmed GH Deficient Adolescents at Final Height

    PubMed Central

    Prodam, Flavia; Savastio, Silvia; Genoni, Giulia; Babu, Deepak; Giordano, Mara; Ricotti, Roberta; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Bona, Gianni; Bellone, Simonetta

    2014-01-01

    Context, objective Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, in particular after treatment in children and adults with pre-existing metabolic risk factors. Our aims were. i) to evaluate the effect on glucose metabolism of rhGH treatment and withdrawal in not confirmed GHD adolescents at the achievement of adult height; ii) to investigate the impact of GH receptor gene genomic deletion of exon 3 (d3GHR). Design, setting We performed a longitudinal study (1 year) in a tertiary care center. Methods 23 GHD adolescent were followed in the last year of rhGH treatment (T0), 6 (T6) and 12 (T12) months after rhGH withdrawal with fasting and post-OGTT evaluations. 40 healthy adolescents were used as controls. HOMA-IR, HOMA%β, insulinogenic (INS) and disposition (DI) indexes were calculated. GHR genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. Results In the group as a whole, fasting insulin (p<0.05), HOMA-IR (p<0.05), insulin and glucose levels during OGTT (p<0.01) progressively decreased from T0 to T12 becoming similar to controls. During rhGH, a compensatory insulin secretion with a stable DI was recorded, and, then, HOMAβ and INS decreased at T6 and T12 (p<0.05). By evaluating the GHR genotype, nDel GHD showed a decrease from T0 to T12 in HOMA-IR, HOMAβ, INS (p<0.05) and DI. Del GHD showed a gradual increase in DI (p<0.05) and INS with a stable HOMA-IR and higher HDL-cholesterol (p<0.01). Conclusions In not confirmed GHD adolescents the fasting deterioration in glucose homeostasis during rhGH is efficaciously coupled with a compensatory insulin secretion and activity at OGTT. The presence of at least one d3GHR allele is associated with lower glucose levels and higher HOMA-β and DI after rhGH withdrawal. Screening for the d3GHR in the pediatric age may help physicians to follow and phenotype GHD patients also by a metabolic point of view. PMID:24498035

  14. RECENT PROGRESS DESIGNING COMPACT SUPERCONDUCTING FINAL FOCUS MAGNETS FOR THE ILC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER, B.

    2005-10-17

    QDO, the final focus (FF) magnet closest to the interaction point (P) for the ILC 20 mr crossing angle layout, must provide strong focusing yet be adjustable to accommodate collision energy changes for energy scans and low energy calibration ruling. But it must be compact to allow disrupted beam and Beamstrahlung coming from the IP to pass outside into an independent instrumented beam line to a high-power beam absorber. The QDO design builds upon BNL experience making direct wind superconducting magnets. We present test results for a QDO magnetic test prototype and introduce a new shielded magnet design, to replace the previous side-by-side design concept, that greatly simplifies the field correction scheme and holds promise of working for crossing angles as small as 14 mr.

  15. Final Progress Report: Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Cometabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2010-02-19

    Our goal within the overall project is to demonstrate the presence and abundance of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) enzymes and their genes within the microbial community of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Area North (TAN) site. MMOs are thought to be the primary catalysts of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater at this location. The actual presence of the proteins making up MMO complexes would provide direct evidence for its participation in TCE degradation. The quantitative estimation of MMO genes and their translation products (sMMO and pMMO proteins) and the knowledge about kinetics and substrate specificity of MMOs will be used to develop mathematical models of the natural attenuation process in the TAN aquifer. The model will be particularly useful in prediction of TCE degradation rate in TAN and possibly in the other DOE sites. Bacteria known as methanotrophs produce a set of proteins that assemble to form methane monooxygenase complexes (MMOs), enzymes that oxidize methane as their natural substrate, thereby providing a carbon and energy source for the organisms. MMOs are also capable of co-metabolically transforming chlorinated solvents like TCE into nontoxic end products such as carbon dioxide and chloride. There are two known forms of methane monooxygenase, a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO) and a cytoplasmic soluble form (sMMO). pMMO consists of two components, pMMOH (a hydroxylase comprised of 47-, 27-, and 24-kDa subunits) and pMMOR (a reductase comprised of 63 and 8-kDa subunits). sMMO consists of three components: a hydroxylase (protein A-250 kDa), a dimer of three subunits (α2β2γ2), a regulatory protein (protein B-15.8 kDa), and a reductase (protein C-38.6 kDa). All methanotrophs will produce a methanol dehydrogenase to channel the product of methane oxidation (methanol) into the central metabolite formaldehyde. University of Idaho (UI) efforts focused on proteomic analyses using mass

  16. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal Process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal Process enhances low-rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,5000 to 9,000 British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb), by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the ACCP Demonstration Project team was to expand SynCoal market awareness and acceptability for both the products and the technology. The ACCP Project team continued to focus on improving the operation, developing commercial markets, and improving the SynCoal products as well as the product`s acceptance.

  17. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  18. Final Progress Report for Award DE-FG07-05ID14637.pdf

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Dixon

    2012-03-09

    2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missions in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.

  19. Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

  20. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40 m/s can be achieved with

  1. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA: the progress towards the final pixel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, Claudio; Piro, Luigi; Cea, Donatella; Colasanti, Luca; Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Gatti, Flavio; Bagliani, Daniela; Biasotti, Michele; Corsini, Dario; Pizzigoni, Giulio; Torrioli, Guido; Barbera, Marco; Mineo, Teresa; Perinati, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    related to one of the last sample produced (namely AC-S5), and steps to reach the final detector design will be discussed.

  2. Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas B. Kirchner

    2002-03-22

    in diameter and approximately 22 cm long. A thin ''marker layer'' of white soil was added to the top of each column followed by a thin layer of soil that had been spiked with 137Cs, cerium and lanthanum was applied to the surface. Approximately 900 cm of water (the equivalent of about 30 years of rainfall) was then applied at a rate of 3.2 L d-1. All of the activity contained in the soil core appeared to be in the top few mm of soil, i.e. there was virtually no movement of the 134Cs labeled particles. Finally, a library of object-oriented model components was created using Visual Basic to support the construction of contaminant transport models. These components greatly simplify the task of building 1- to 3- dimensional simulation models for risk assessment. The model components created under this funding were subsequently applied to help answer questions regarding risks from irrigation associated with potential releases from the Yucca Mountain waste repository.

  3. Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.Y. Hwang; R.C. Greenlund

    2002-12-31

    Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.

  4. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Herbert J

    2012-02-06

    The BIOMOL grant was for 'Local System Support for PDB Biological Unit Search and Display' to augment Rasmol's [Bernstein 2000] [Sayle, Milner-White 1995] existing macromolecular display functions with new capabilities by taking advantage of recent increases in local computing power in order to move functionality that is now scattered among various local and remote systems into one local package. Work included new algorithms for molecular surface display, an extended format for Protein Data Bank Entries, work on issues relating to the integration of multiple diffraction images formats.

  5. Effect on SO/sub 2/ light modulation of plant metabolism. Final progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of sulfite and arsenite on light activation in two pisum cultivars was examined. The experiments indicate that the difference in sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ is directly reflected in sensitivity of a thylakoid bound factor to SO/sub 2/. 2 figs. (DT)

  6. Serum metabolomic profiling facilitates the non-invasive identification of metabolic biomarkers associated with the onset and progression of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Puchades-Carrasco, Leonor; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Pérez-Rambla, Clara; García-García, Francisco; Lucas, Rut; Calabuig, Silvia; Blasco, Ana; Dopazo, Joaquín; Camps, Carlos; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio

    2016-03-15

    Lung cancer (LC) is responsible for most cancer deaths. One of the main factors contributing to the lethality of this disease is the fact that a large proportion of patients are diagnosed at advanced stages when a clinical intervention is unlikely to succeed. In this study, we evaluated the potential of metabolomics by 1H-NMR to facilitate the identification of accurate and reliable biomarkers to support the early diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).We found that the metabolic profile of NSCLC patients, compared with healthy individuals, is characterized by statistically significant changes in the concentration of 18 metabolites representing different amino acids, organic acids and alcohols, as well as different lipids and molecules involved in lipid metabolism. Furthermore, the analysis of the differences between the metabolic profiles of NSCLC patients at different stages of the disease revealed the existence of 17 metabolites involved in metabolic changes associated with disease progression.Our results underscore the potential of metabolomics profiling to uncover pathophysiological mechanisms that could be useful to objectively discriminate NSCLC patients from healthy individuals, as well as between different stages of the disease. PMID:26883203

  7. Serum metabolomic profiling facilitates the non-invasive identification of metabolic biomarkers associated with the onset and progression of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puchades-Carrasco, Leonor; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Pérez-Rambla, Clara; García-García, Francisco; Lucas, Rut; Calabuig, Silvia; Blasco, Ana; Dopazo, Joaquín; Camps, Carlos; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is responsible for most cancer deaths. One of the main factors contributing to the lethality of this disease is the fact that a large proportion of patients are diagnosed at advanced stages when a clinical intervention is unlikely to succeed. In this study, we evaluated the potential of metabolomics by 1H-NMR to facilitate the identification of accurate and reliable biomarkers to support the early diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We found that the metabolic profile of NSCLC patients, compared with healthy individuals, is characterized by statistically significant changes in the concentration of 18 metabolites representing different amino acids, organic acids and alcohols, as well as different lipids and molecules involved in lipid metabolism. Furthermore, the analysis of the differences between the metabolic profiles of NSCLC patients at different stages of the disease revealed the existence of 17 metabolites involved in metabolic changes associated with disease progression. Our results underscore the potential of metabolomics profiling to uncover pathophysiological mechanisms that could be useful to objectively discriminate NSCLC patients from healthy individuals, as well as between different stages of the disease. PMID:26883203

  8. Progressive inhibition by water deficit of cell wall extensibility and growth along the elongation zone of maize roots is related to increased lignin metabolism and progressive stelar accumulation of wall phenolics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling; Linker, Raphael; Gepstein, Shimon; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Neumann, Peter M

    2006-02-01

    Water deficit caused by addition of polyethylene glycol 6000 at -0.5 MPa water potential to well-aerated nutrient solution for 48 h inhibited the elongation of maize (Zea mays) seedling primary roots. Segmental growth rates in the root elongation zone were maintained 0 to 3 mm behind the tip, but in comparison with well-watered control roots, progressive growth inhibition was initiated by water deficit as expanding cells crossed the region 3 to 9 mm behind the tip. The mechanical extensibility of the cell walls was also progressively inhibited. We investigated the possible involvement in root growth inhibition by water deficit of alterations in metabolism and accumulation of wall-linked phenolic substances. Water deficit increased expression in the root elongation zone of transcripts of two genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase 1 and 2, after only 1 h, i.e. before decreases in wall extensibility. Further increases in transcript expression and increased lignin staining were detected after 48 h. Progressive stress-induced increases in wall-linked phenolics at 3 to 6 and 6 to 9 mm behind the root tip were detected by comparing Fourier transform infrared spectra and UV-fluorescence images of isolated cell walls from water deficit and control roots. Increased UV fluorescence and lignin staining colocated to vascular tissues in the stele. Longitudinal bisection of the elongation zone resulted in inward curvature, suggesting that inner, stelar tissues were also rate limiting for root growth. We suggest that spatially localized changes in wall-phenolic metabolism are involved in the progressive inhibition of wall extensibility and root growth and may facilitate root acclimation to drying environments.

  9. Metabolic products, mass spectral analyses, and synthesis of toxic trichothecenes. Final report, 15 April 1982-14 July 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, C.J.

    1985-07-31

    A mass spectral library of the trichothecenes was developed and delivered to USAMRIID. The structure of Fusarochromanone (causes bone deformation) was elucidated and the biological activity of this metabolite was determined. Metabolic studies of T-2 toxin were determined in chickens and the metabolites were identified. Similarly, a kinetic study of T-2 metabolism was done using a cow as the subject. De-epoxy-diacetoxyscirpenol was found in a Fusarium culture for the first time and de-epoxy-T2 tetraol was found in cow urine for the first time. Morphologic lesions of T-2 toxin in the cat were described.

  10. Lipidomics to analyze the influence of diets with different EPA:DHA ratios in the progression of Metabolic Syndrome using SHROB rats as a model.

    PubMed

    Dasilva, Gabriel; Pazos, Manuel; García-Egido, Eduardo; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Torres, Josep Lluis; Giralt, Montserrat; Nogués, María-Rosa; Medina, Isabel

    2016-08-15

    The role of specific proportions of ω-3 EPA and DHA, in the modulation of inflammation and oxidative stress markers associated to the progression of Metabolic Syndrome was investigated. Potential inflammatory eicosanoids and docosanoids were discussed together to biomarkers of CVD, obesity, inflammation and oxidative stress in an animal model of metabolic disorders. Results evidenced a noteworthy health effect of 1:1 and 2:1 EPA:DHA proportions over 1:2 EPA:DHA based diets through a down-regulation in the production of strong pro-inflammatory ω-6 eicosanoids, a decrement of biomarkers of oxidative stress, and a modulation of fatty acid desaturase activities and plasma and membrane PUFAs towards greater anti-inflammatory profiles. Outcomes contribute to the general knowledge on the health benefits of marine lipids and their role on the progress of MetS, inflammation and oxidative stress. Results shed light on controversial protective mechanisms of EPA and DHA to better design dietary interventions aimed at reducing MetS. PMID:27006231

  11. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk in the Autonomic Nervous System and Its Possible Role in the Progression of Metabolic Syndrome: A New Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Orellana, Juan A.; Retamal, Mauricio A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the following physiological alterations: increase in abdominal fat, insulin resistance, high concentration of triglycerides, low levels of HDL, high blood pressure, and a generalized inflammatory state. One of the pathophysiological hallmarks of this syndrome is the presence of neurohumoral activation, which involve autonomic imbalance associated to hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, enhanced sympathetic drive has been linked to the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarct, and obstructive sleep apnea. Glial cells, the most abundant cells in the central nervous system, control synaptic transmission, and regulate neuronal function by releasing bioactive molecules called gliotransmitters. Recently, a new family of plasma membrane channels called hemichannels has been described to allow the release of gliotransmitters and modulate neuronal firing rate. Moreover, a growing amount of evidence indicates that uncontrolled hemichannel opening could impair glial cell functions, affecting synaptic transmission and neuronal survival. Given that glial cell functions are disturbed in various metabolic diseases, we hypothesize that progression of MS may relies on hemichannel-dependent impairment of glial-to-neuron communication by a mechanism related to dysfunction of inflammatory response and mitochondrial metabolism of glial cells. In this manuscript, we discuss how glial cells may contribute to the enhanced sympathetic drive observed in MS, and shed light about the possible role of hemichannels in this process. PMID:26648871

  12. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk in the Autonomic Nervous System and Its Possible Role in the Progression of Metabolic Syndrome: A New Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; Orellana, Juan A; Retamal, Mauricio A

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the following physiological alterations: increase in abdominal fat, insulin resistance, high concentration of triglycerides, low levels of HDL, high blood pressure, and a generalized inflammatory state. One of the pathophysiological hallmarks of this syndrome is the presence of neurohumoral activation, which involve autonomic imbalance associated to hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, enhanced sympathetic drive has been linked to the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarct, and obstructive sleep apnea. Glial cells, the most abundant cells in the central nervous system, control synaptic transmission, and regulate neuronal function by releasing bioactive molecules called gliotransmitters. Recently, a new family of plasma membrane channels called hemichannels has been described to allow the release of gliotransmitters and modulate neuronal firing rate. Moreover, a growing amount of evidence indicates that uncontrolled hemichannel opening could impair glial cell functions, affecting synaptic transmission and neuronal survival. Given that glial cell functions are disturbed in various metabolic diseases, we hypothesize that progression of MS may relies on hemichannel-dependent impairment of glial-to-neuron communication by a mechanism related to dysfunction of inflammatory response and mitochondrial metabolism of glial cells. In this manuscript, we discuss how glial cells may contribute to the enhanced sympathetic drive observed in MS, and shed light about the possible role of hemichannels in this process.

  13. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1989-03-15

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  14. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated here were the effects of microwave (MW) radiation (2450-MHz, continuous-wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 + or - 4.2 W/kg) and convention heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 C. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-aminO-2, 3-dihydro-1, 4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photomer. A significant stimulation after after MW exposure (p < 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 C-incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation, compared to incubator controls, was also detected after sham treatment. No significant difference existed between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the MW and sham-exposed groups. Exposure to MW radiation, under normothermic (37 + or - 0.03 C) conditions, appears to have no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between MW or sham-exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator did not exceed 35.9 C, and 39 minutes were required for the temperature to rise from 22 to 35.9 C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and redio-frequency radiation studies in vitro.

  15. Photons, Photosynthesis, and High-Performance Computing: Challenges, Progress, and Promise of Modeling Metabolism in Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Graf, P.; Alber, D. M.; Kim, K.; Murray, G.; Posewitz, M.; Seibert, M.

    2008-01-01

    The complexity associated with biological metabolism considered at a kinetic level presents a challenge to quantitative modeling. In particular, the relatively sparse knowledge of parameters for enzymes with known kinetic responses is problematic. The possible space of these parameters is of high-dimension, and sampling of such a space typifies a combinatorial explosion of possible dynamic states. However, with sufficient quantitative transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data at hand, these challenges could be met by high-performance software with sampling, fitting, and optimization capabilities. With this in mind, we present the High-Performance Systems Biology Toolkit HiPer SBTK, an evolving software package to simulate, fit, and optimize metabolite concentrations and fluxes within the space of rate and binding parameters associated with detailed enzyme kinetic models. We present our chosen modeling paradigm for the formulation of metabolic pathway models, the means to address the challenge of representing such models in a precise and persistent fashion using the standardized Systems Biology Markup Language, and our second-generation model of H2-associated Chlamydomonas metabolism. Processing of such models for hierarchically parallelized simulation and optimization, job specification by the user through a GUI interface, software capabilities and initial scaling data, and the mapping of the computation to biological questions is also discussed. Moreover, we present near-term future software and model development goals.

  16. Summer investigations into the metabolic diversity of the microbial world. Progress report, May 5, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Breznak, J.; Dworkin, M.

    1993-05-17

    The philosophy of the course described here is to underscore the essence of microbiology which is diversity>: diversity of morphology and cellular development, behavior, and metabolic and physiological functions. Emphasis is on microbes other than those customarily covered in conventional microbiology courses and includes: the archaebacteria, extremophiles, and array of obligate anaerobes, various phototrophs, and those microbes exhibiting complex developmental cycles. Also included are microbes carrying out a variety of transformations of organic and inorganic compounds, as well as those which normally occur in symbiotic association with other microbes or with higher forms of life.

  17. Main research accomplishments since the grant was last reviewed competitively. [Final technical progress report, November 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1993-11-01

    This project deals with the characterization of DNA repair genes and their encoded proteins involved in the incision step of excision repair and in postreplication repair and mutagenesis following exposure to UV light in eukaryotes: the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans. Summarized in this report is progress in achieving the goals of this project.

  18. Reading Achievement in Disadvantaged Children as a Consequence of Non Verbal Perceptual Training. Final Technical Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David; Deblinger, Jo Ann

    The theoretical orientation based on perceptual development, proposed by Piaget in 1961, is the starting point of this investigation. According to Piaget, the perception of the young child is "centered" on dominant aspects of the field. With maturity, perception becomes "decentered" and progressively freed from the field. The visual training…

  19. Progression of alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: common metabolic aspects of innate immune system and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shuhei; Takahashi, Shougo; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kumagai, Takeshi; Nagata, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the innate immune system and oxidative stress caused by gut-derived endotoxins play a key role in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Intracellular mechanisms associated with endotoxin-induced signaling play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of ALD. It is now widely accepted that activation of the innate immune system and increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other mediators play an important role in the development of ALD. Accumulating evidence suggests that alcohol-mediated upregulation of CYP2E1 expression may initiate lipid peroxidation via reactive oxygen species. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a liver disease characterized by histopathological features similar to those observed in ALD, but in the absence of significant alcohol consumption. Initial efforts to clarify the mechanisms that promote the progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis somewhat artificially divided disease mechanisms into "first and second hits." This model considered the development of steatosis to be the "first hit," increasing the sensitivity of the liver to the putative "second hit," leading to hepatocyte injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress. We have emphasized the important role of gut-derived bacterial toxins, the innate immune system, and oxidative stress in the common pathogenic mechanism in ALD and NASH progression.

  20. Final Technical Progress Report; Closeout Certifications; CSSV Newsletter Volume I; CSSV Newsletter Volume II; CSSV Activity Journal; CSSV Final Financial Report

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Johnny L; Geter, Kerry

    2013-08-23

    This Project?s third year of implementation in 2007-2008, the final year, as designated by Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), in cooperation with the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) Inc., in an effort to promote research and research training programs in computational science ? scientific visualization (CSSV). A major goal of the Project was to attract the energetic and productive faculty, graduate and upper division undergraduate students of diverse ethnicities to a program that investigates science and computational science issues of long-term interest to the Department of Energy (DoE) and the nation. The breadth and depth of computational science?scientific visualization and the magnitude of resources available are enormous for permitting a variety of research activities. ECSU?s Computational Science-Science Visualization Center will serve as a conduit for directing users to these enormous resources.

  1. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  2. Final Technical Progress Report: High-Efficiency Low-Cost Thin-Film GaAs Photovoltaic Module Development Program; July 14, 2010 - January 13, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, L.

    2012-03-01

    This is the final technical progress report of the High-Efficiency Low-Cost Thin-Film GaAs Photovoltaic Module Development Program. Alta Devices has successfully completed all milestones and deliverables established as part of the NREL PV incubator program. During the 18 months of this program, Alta has proven all key processes required to commercialize its solar module product. The incubator focus was on back end process steps directed at conversion of Alta's high quality solar film into high efficiency 1-sun PV modules. This report describes all program deliverables and the work behind each accomplishment.

  3. Effect of petroleum-related pollutants on Aurelia growth and development. Final progress report, September 12, 1977-August 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Spangenberg, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Petroleum-related hydrocarbons were tested using the Aurelia Metamorphosis Test System. In addition, extensive studies were made of the effects of Alaskan crude petroleum oil, cadmium, and sodium azide on Aurelia metamorphosis. The Aurelia Budding Test System was applied to phenol, aniline, and naphthalene and the Aurelia Genetic Modification Test System was developed to determine whether chemically-treated organisms had genetic damage which could be revealed in progeny over a long period of time. The Aurelia Genetic Modification Test System was applied to aniline, phenol, Alaskan crude petroleum oil, and sodium azide-treated organisms. It is concluded that the Aurelia can be used effectively to ferret out subtle effects of marine pollutants as well as far-reaching effects passed on through progeny over a long period of time. Pollutant effects are most rapidly revealed, however, in organisms undergoing metamorphosis especially with regard to effects related to iodine metabolism, calcium metabolism, and behavioral and morphological teratology. The premise is that specific effects of environmental pollutants must be known in order that these effects may be neutralized or prevented. Through an understanding of mechanisms of action of various pollutant components in simple indicator organisms such as Aurelia, it may ultimately be possible to maintain high standards of energy production and to have a safe and productive marine environment at the same time.

  4. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  5. Training Speech-Language Pathologists To Serve Culturally Diverse Populations: A Model for the 21st Century. Final Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of a project designed to train specialized professionals in speech-language pathology to provide diagnostic, management, and preventative services to culturally diverse populations including African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asian Americans whose needs are often neglected or…

  6. 40 CFR 60.2845 - How do I comply with the increment of progress for achieving final compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Commenced Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2845 How do I... specified in the final control plan, so that, if the affected incinerator is brought online, all necessary process changes and air pollution control devices would operate as designed....

  7. 40 CFR 60.2845 - How do I comply with the increment of progress for achieving final compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Commenced Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2845 How do I... specified in the final control plan, so that, if the affected incinerator is brought online, all necessary process changes and air pollution control devices would operate as designed....

  8. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report for the period November 1, 1996--October 31, 1997, and final report

    SciTech Connect

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Blanchard, J.P.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1997-08-01

    During FY97, the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute personnel have participated in the ARIES-RS and the ARIES-ST projects. The main areas of effort are: (1) neutronics analysis; (2) shielding of components and personnel; (3) neutron wall loading distribution; (4) radiation damage to in-vessel components; (5) components lifetimes; (6) embrittled materials designs issues; (7) stress and structural analysis; (8) activation, LOCA, and safety analysis; (9) support and fabrication of components; (10) vacuum system; and (11) maintenance. Progress made in these areas are summarized.

  9. Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project. Final quarterly technical progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, G.

    1993-05-24

    This Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the period ending March 31, 1993 summarizes the work done to data by Tampella Power Corporation and Enviropower, Inc. on the integrated combined-cycle power plant project. Efforts were concentrated on the Toms Creek PDS (Preliminary Design and Studies). Tampella Power Corporation`s efforts were concentrated on the Toms Creek Preliminary Process Flow Diagram (PFD) and Piping and Instrument Diagrams (P&IDs). Tampella Power Corporation also prepared Heat and Material Balances (H&MBs) for different site-specific cases.

  10. Development of a Coal Quality Expert. Final technical progress report No. 12, [January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-12

    During the past quarter, Tasks 3, 4, 5, and 6 were active. Task 3 Pilot Scale Combustion Testing activity included data analysis of pilot- and bench-scale combustion samples in support of the development of CQE slogging and fouling models. Under Task 4, field testing at the fifth host utility site -- New England Power Service Company`s Brayton Point Unit 3 -- was completed in March with the testing of the alternate coal. Test plans were finalized for the sixth and final field test to be performed at Brayton Point Unit 2 in April 1993. Tasks 5 and 6 activities were directed at design and development of CQE base classes and objects, continued formulation and integration of CQE algorithms and submodels, development of the user interface prototype, and preparation of the Fireside Advisor.

  11. Organization of the R chromosome region in maize: Final progress report, June 1, 1983--May 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kermicle, J.

    1989-02-01

    For the present study, insertional mutagenesis using transposable sequences proved the most effective means of producing /und R/ variants for fine structure study. Considerable effort was directed toward developing this means of mutagenesis. It was also necessary to describe the pattern of recombination that prevailed in this region when insertions were present. Thus some of the topics considered as separate items in the following discussion concern transposable element behavior and recombination as such. Until recently, genetic analysis had been the principal means of investigating /und R/ structure and function. With the advent of molecular cloning of maize genes by transposon tagging, a more direct means of investigating /und R/ structure was envisioned. This possibility was realized. We are now collaborating with these investigators to integrate genetic and molecular sources of evidence. This document summarizes publications of research sponsored by this grant, and recent findings that appear to be major advances but concerning which further experiments are in progress. 12 refs.

  12. Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-30

    Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

  13. Filling Knowledge Gaps in Biological Networks: integrating global approaches to understand H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Posewitz, Matthew C

    2011-06-30

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas) has numerous genes encoding enzymes that function in fermentative pathways. Among these genes, are the [FeFe]-hydrogenases, pyruvate formate lyase, pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase. We have systematically undertaken a series of targeted mutagenesis approaches to disrupt each of these key genes and omics techniques to characterize alterations in metabolic flux. Funds from DE-FG02-07ER64423 were specifically leveraged to generate mutants with disruptions in the genes encoding the [FeFe]-hydrogenases HYDA1 and HYDA2, pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), and in bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1). Additionally funds were used to conduct global transcript profiling experiments of wildtype Chlamydomonas cells, as well as of the hydEF-1 mutant, which is unable to make H2 due to a lesion in the [FeFe]-hydrogenase biosynthetic pathway. In the wildtype cells, formate, acetate and ethanol are the dominant fermentation products with traces of CO2 and H2 also being produced. In the hydEF-1 mutant, succinate production is increased to offset the loss of protons as a terminal electron acceptor. In the pfl-1 mutant, lactate offsets the loss of formate production, and in the adh1-1 mutant glycerol is made instead of ethanol. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars, and a decline in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant performs a complete rerouting of the glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Lastly, transcriptome data have been analysed for both the wildtype and hydEF-1, that correlate with our

  14. Long-term omega-3 fatty acid supplementation prevents expression changes in cochlear homocysteine metabolism and ameliorates progressive hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Partearroyo, Teresa; Vallecillo, Néstor; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Pajares, María A; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential nutrients well known for their beneficial effects, among others on cognitive development and maintenance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Previous studies have shown an inverse association between high plasma levels of PUFAs and age-related hearing loss, and the relationship between low serum folate and elevated plasma homocysteine levels and hearing loss. Therefore, we used C57BL/6J mice and long-term omega-3 supplementation to evaluate the impact on hearing by analyzing their auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) thresholds. The omega-3 group showed significantly lower ABR hearing thresholds (~25 dB sound pressure level) and higher DPOAE amplitudes in mid-high frequencies when compared to the control group. These changes did not correlate with alterations between groups in plasma homocysteine or serum folate levels as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and a microbiological method, respectively. Aging in the control group was associated with imbalanced cytokine expression toward increased proinflammatory cytokines as determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; these changes were prevented by omega-3 supplementation. Genes involved in homocysteine metabolism showed decreased expression during aging of control animals, and only alterations in Bhmt and Cbs were significantly prevented by omega-3 feeding. Western blotting showed that omega-3 supplementation precluded the CBS protein increase detected in 10-month-old controls but also produced an increase in BHMT protein levels. Altogether, the results obtained suggest a long-term protective role of omega-3 supplementation on cochlear metabolism and progression of hearing loss.

  15. Positron tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Final progress report, April 15, 1989--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Enhancement of MAb tumor localization by hyperthermia also was proposed. Studies were to have been performed with both {sup 18}F and {sup 124}I; however, the lack of its availability (until quite recently) prevented experiments with {sup 124}I. Instead, two additional lines of inquiry were initiated in which they utilized aspects of the radiofluorination chemistries originally developed for MAbs for labeling chemotactic peptides and meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) analogues with {sup 18}F. This final report summarizes the original specific aims and the main research accomplishments in studies of mouse, dog and human models.

  16. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-12-31

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  17. Parallel logic programming and parallel systems software and hardware. Progress report (Final), 1 April 1988-31 March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Minker, J.

    1989-07-29

    This progress report summarizes work performed under AFOSR-88-0152 on parallel logic programming, problem solving, and deductive data bases. A parallel problem-solving system, PRISM (Parallel Inference System), that was implemented on McMOB was ported to the BBN Butterfly machine. Two versions of PRISM were developed and are operational on the Butterfly: a message-passing ring-structure system and a shared-memory system. Experimental testing of PRISM on McMOB continued, while experiments were also conducted on the Butterfly systems. Three enhancements were made and completed during the grant period. These are: a capability to handle negated queries and a capability to assert and retract statements. In addition to the above, work continued in the area of informative answers to queries in deductive data bases. A thesis was completed on the subject. An interpreter was developed and is running, that can take restricted natural language as input and can respond with a cooperative natural language output. In the area of parallel software development, the following were accomplished. Theoretical work on slicing/splicing was completed. Tools were provided for software development using artificial-intelligence techniques. AI software for massively parallel architectures was started.

  18. Chemical and geochemical studies off the coast of Washington. Final report of progress, July 1983-July 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes progress from July 1983 through conclusion in July 1985 of a series of marine chemical and geochemical investigations involving both laboratory studies and field studies off the coast of Washington. Most of our field work the past few years has been on the Washington continental shelf, slope, and the submarine canyons indenting the shelf north of the Columbia River. Our aim has been to provide basic data required to characterize underlying chemical and physical processes and their rates which control the distribution, concentrations, and ultimate fate of some of the potentially hazardous agents associated with fossil fuel and/or nuclear power production or transportation. We concentrated on several processes which we feel are of special importance in the sea, and developed methodologies and expertise to study them. Laboratory and field experiments and theories derived from them were used iteratively to investigate: (1) vertical transfer of trace chemicals from surface seawaters to underlying waters and sediments; (2) processes which may transfer certain chemicals from sediments back into the overlying water column; (3) redox processes which besides changing valence states of certain chemicals may alter their precipitation/dissolution tendencies, their biological availability and/or toxicity; and (4) accumulation histories of potentially hazardous chemicals in sediments during the past 100 years.

  19. Construction of a genome-wide human BAC-Unigene resource. Final progress report, 1989--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C.S.; Xu, R.X.; Wang, M.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes (non-redundant, unigene sets of cDNA representing EST clusters) are available for human alone. A total of 44,000 Unigene cDNA clones have been supplied by Research Genetics. Unigenes, or cDNAs are excellent resource for map building for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms -- as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDNA clones -- thus making library screening by colony hybridization as well as pooled library PCR possible. The authors have developed an efficient and robust procedure to screen genomic libraries with large number of DNA probes. Secondly, the linkage and order of expressed sequences, or genes are highly conserved among human, mouse and other mammalian species. Therefore, mapping with cDNA markers rather than random anonymous STSs will greatly facilitate comparative, evolutionary studies as well as physical map building. They have currently deconvoluted over 10,000 Unigene probes against a 4X coverage human BAC clones from the approved library D by high density colony hybridization method. 10,000 batches of Unigenes are arrayed in an imaginary 100 X 100 matrix from which 100 row pools and 100 column pools are obtained. Library filters are hybridized with pooled probes, thus reducing the number of hybridization required for addressing the positives for each Unigene from 10,000 to 200. Details on the experimental scheme as well as daily progress report is posted on the Web site (http://www.tree.caltech.edu).

  20. Highly nucleophilic acetylide, vinyl, and vinylidene complexes. Final progress report, 1 January 1991--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1994-10-04

    In the course of this research the authors found that the anionic alkynyl complex [Cp{prime}(CO)(PPh{sub 3})Mn-C{triple_bond}C-CH{sub 3}]{sup {minus}} can be generated in situ by the addition of two equivalents of n-BuLi to a solution of the carbene complex Cp{prime}(CO)(PPh{sub 3})Mn{double_bond}C(OMe)CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}. It was also found that the highly nucleophilic propynyl complex [Cp(CO)(PPh{sub 3})Mn-C{triple_bond}C-Me]{sup {minus}} reacts with a variety of aldehydes and ketones in the presence of BF{sub 3}{center_dot}Et{sub 2}O to give, after quenching with MeOH, a series of cationic vinylcarbyne complexes of the general form [Cp(CO)(PPh{sub 3})Mn{triple_bond}C-C(Me){double_bond}C(R)(R{prime})]BF{sub 4}. The cationic alkylidyne complexes [Cp(CO){sub 2}M{triple_bond}C-CH{sub 2}R]{sup +} [M = Re, R = H, M = Mn, R = H, Me, Ph] have been found to undergo facile deprotonation to give the corresponding neutral vinylidene complexes Cp(CO){sub 2}M{double_bond}C{double_bond}C(H)R. The authors have also investigated reactions relevant to the halide promoted Fe and Ru catalyzed carbonylation of nitroaromatics. The final part of this work has involved investigations of metal-oxo complexes.

  1. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin. Final progress report, May 1, 1990--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-12-31

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/{mu}), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of {sup 14}C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ({sup 3}H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The {sup 14}C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with {sup 14}C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  2. Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Loferski, J.J.

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

  3. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of combined progressive exercise on metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors: rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is increasingly present in breast cancer survivors, possibly worsened by cancer-related treatments, such as chemotherapy. MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, co-morbidities that could impair the survivorship experience, and possibly lead to cancer recurrence. Exercise has been shown to positively influence quality of life (QOL), physical function, muscular strength and endurance, reduce fatigue, and improve emotional well-being; however, the impact on MetS components (visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension) remains largely unknown. In this trial, we aim to assess the effects of combined (aerobic and resistance) exercise on components of MetS, as well as on physical fitness and QOL, in breast cancer survivors soon after completing cancer-related treatments. Methods/Design This study is a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating the effects of a 16-week supervised progressive aerobic and resistance exercise training intervention on MetS in 100 breast cancer survivors. Main inclusion criteria are histologically-confirmed breast cancer stage I-III, completion of chemotherapy and/or radiation within 6 months prior to initiation of the study, sedentary, and free from musculoskeletal disorders. The primary endpoint is MetS; secondary endpoints include: muscle strength, shoulder function, cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, bone mineral density, and QOL. Participants randomized to the Exercise group participate in 3 supervised weekly exercise sessions for 16 weeks. Participants randomized to the Control group are offered the same intervention after the 16-week period of observation. Discussion This is the one of few RCTs examining the effects of exercise on MetS in breast cancer survivors. Results will contribute a better understanding of metabolic disease-related effects of resistance and

  4. Final Report: Filling Knowledge Gaps in Biological Networks: Integrated Global Approaches to Understand H{sub 2} Metabolism in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Arthur

    2012-05-01

    The major goal of our part of this project has been to generate mutants in fermentation metabolism and begin to decipher how lesions in the pathways associated with fermentation metabolism impact both H{sub 2} production and the production of other metabolites that accumulate as cells become anoxic. We are also trying to understand how metabolic pathways are regulated as O{sub 2} in the environment becomes depleted.

  5. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  6. Predicting the accumulation of well-metabolized chemicals by fish from measured rates of in vitro intrinsic clearance: Progress made and challenges ahead

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several groups have extrapolated in vitro metabolism data for fish to the intact animal and used this information as an input to models of chemical bioconcentration. These “proof of concept” studies show that incorporating in vitro metabolism data into the models sub...

  7. Glycogen metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zois, Christos E; Favaro, Elena; Harris, Adrian L

    2014-11-01

    Since its identification more than 150 years ago, there has been an extensive characterisation of glycogen metabolism and its regulatory pathways in the two main glycogen storage organs of the body, i.e. liver and muscle. In recent years, glycogen metabolism has also been demonstrated to be upregulated in many tumour types, suggesting it is an important aspect of cancer cell pathophysiology. Here, we provide an overview of glycogen metabolism and its regulation, with a focus on its role in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. The various methods to detect glycogen in tumours in vivo are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the targeting of glycogen metabolism as a strategy for cancer treatment.

  8. "Target-Site" Drug Metabolism and Transport.

    PubMed

    Foti, Robert S; Tyndale, Rachel F; Garcia, Kristine L P; Sweet, Douglas H; Nagar, Swati; Sharan, Satish; Rock, Dan A

    2015-08-01

    The recent symposium on "Target-Site" Drug Metabolism and Transport that was sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the 2014 Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego is summarized in this report. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter activity at the site of therapeutic action can affect the efficacy, safety, and metabolic properties of a given drug, with potential outcomes including altered dosing regimens, stricter exclusion criteria, or even the failure of a new chemical entity in clinical trials. Drug metabolism within the brain, for example, can contribute to metabolic activation of therapeutic drugs such as codeine as well as the elimination of potential neurotoxins in the brain. Similarly, the activity of oxidative and conjugative drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung can have an effect on the efficacy of compounds such as resveratrol. In addition to metabolism, the active transport of compounds into or away from the site of action can also influence the outcome of a given therapeutic regimen or disease progression. For example, organic anion transporter 3 is involved in the initiation of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and may have a role in how uremic toxins enter pancreatic β-cells and ultimately contribute to the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes. Finally, it is likely that a combination of target-specific metabolism and cellular internalization may have a significant role in determining the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates, a finding which has resulted in the development of a host of new analytical methods that are now used for characterizing the metabolism and disposition of antibody-drug conjugates. Taken together, the research summarized herein can provide for an increased understanding of potential barriers to drug efficacy and allow for a more rational approach for developing safe and effective therapeutics.

  9. Metabolic studies of neptunium in the adult baboon: retention, distribution, kinetics, and enhanced excretion by chelation therapy. Technical progress report summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    These investigations provided additional data on the uptake, distribution, retention and excretion of Np-237, Np-239 and Pa-233 in baboons following single intravenous or gavage administration. The influence of oxidation state, chemical medium, pH, mass, etc. on the metabolism of these radionuclides is related.

  10. Cores from the Salton Sea scientific drilling program: Metamorphic reaction progress as a function of chemical and thermal environment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Papike, J.J.; Shearer, C.K.

    1987-05-13

    The study investigated the downhole progressive metamorphism at the Salton Sea site by monitoring and evaluating discontinuous and continuous metamorphic reactions. The main emphasis was placed on: (1) the addition of petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical data to the Salton Sea data base; (2) determination of downhole reactions; (3) evaluation of the progress of individual continuous reaction (epsilon) and the overall reaction progress (epsilon/sub T/) during the transition from one metamorphic zone to the next; and (4) evaluation and correlation of mineral reactions and reaction progress with mineral phase and organic material geothermometry. To these ends, thirty-three samples from the Salton Sea core were analyzed for: (1) quantitative modal mineralogy using the x-ray diffraction reference intensity method (RIM), (2) 30 major and trace elements in the whole rock and (3) mineral chemistry and structural state. In addition, a subset of these samples were used for temperature determinations using vitrinite reflectivity.

  11. Right on TARGET: glutamine metabolism in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikov, Boris; Jeon, Young Joo; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Ronai, Ze'ev A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies highlight the importance of glutamine metabolism in metabolic reprogramming, which underlies cancer cell addiction to glutamine. Examples for the dependence on glutamine metabolism are seen across different tumor types as during different phases of cancer development, progression and response to therapy. In this perspective, we assess the possibility of targeting glutamine metabolism as a therapeutic modality for cancer. PMID:26425657

  12. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism: Biogeochemistry and controls of nutrient flux dynamics to fresh waters. Technical progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1992-12-31

    The land-water interface region consists of two major components: the wetland, and the down-gradient adjacent littoral floating-leaved and submersed, macrophyte communities. Because of the importance of very high production and nutrient turnover of attached microbiota, a major emphasis of this investigation was placed upon these biota and their metabolic capacities for assimilation and release of organic compounds and nutrient retention and cycling. Examination of the capacities of wetland littoral communities to regulate fluxes of nutrients and organic compounds often has been limited to input-output analyses. These input-output data are an integral part of these investigations, but most of the research effort concentrated on the biotic and metabolic mechanisms that control fluxes and retention capacities and their effects upon biota in the down-gradient waters. The important regulatory capacities of dissolved organic compounds on enzyme reactivity was examined experimentally and coupled to the wetland-littoral organic carbon flux budgets.

  13. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism: Biogeochemistry and controls of nutrient flux dynamics in lakes: Technical progress report, 1 July 1988--30 June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This research concentrates on the importance of dissolved organic matter as the key functional way that the high littoral and wetland contributions regulates freshwater ecosystem metabolism (both running and standing waters). Much of this contribution is a result of the high DOM loadings and the slow but large decomposition of this massive dissolved detrital organic matter. The evidence for these concepts was gathered over the years both in these studies and many others, so that the pervasiveness of detrital dynamics is universally found as a major component of aquatic ecosystem metabolism. A second major area involves coupling the land-water interface metabolism to pelagic regulation via nutrient regulation. The research of the current studies focused upon (1) the physiological couplings between epiphytic periphyton and the supporting submersed macrophytes, and (2) the physiological capabilities of algae and bacteria to utilize enzymatically dissolved organic phosphorus compounds has been and is being examined rigorously along gradients from the littoral through the pelagic regions. The dissolved organic polyphenolic compounds of littoral and wetland macrophyte origins have been shown to be complex and inhibit phosphatase and other enzyme activities, and thereby regulate availability and uptake kinetics of limiting nutrients and subsequent growth. 323 refs., 26 figs.

  14. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  15. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  16. White coat hypertension in definition of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Kaya, Hasan; Seyhanli, Mahmut; Yalcin, Atilla

    2008-07-01

    Although white coat hypertension (WCH) is believed to have an effect on health, there is no term defining WCH in metabolic syndrome. Consecutive patients 20 years old or older who underwent a check-up were included. The study included 1068 cases. The prevalences of hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and WCH were similar to excess weight in that they increased significantly until the seventh decade of life and decreased thereafter significantly (P < 0.05 in most steps). On the other hand, the prevalences of hypertension (HT), diabetes mellitus (DM), and coronary heart disease (CHD) always increased significantly with age without any decrease (P < 0.05 in most steps), indicating their irreversibility in contrast to the reversibility of excess weight, hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, IGT, and WCH. Metabolic syndrome is a reversible progression step between health and irreversible final diseases terminating with increased mortality and disabilities. Thus, the definition of metabolic syndrome should include reversible metabolic risk factors such as excess weight (overweight and obesity), hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, IGT, and WCH, instead of irrevesible diseases such as DM, HT, CHD, and stroke that have already developed and require drug therapy. After development of one of the final metabolic diseases, the term metabolic syndrome probably loses most of its significance, since from that point on, nonpharmaceutical approaches such as lifestyle changes, diet, and exercise will provide little benefit to prevent development of the others, most likely due to the cumulative effects of the risk factors on body systems over a long period of time.

  17. Lipid metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beloribi-Djefaflia, S; Vasseur, S; Guillaumond, F

    2016-01-01

    Many human diseases, including metabolic, immune and central nervous system disorders, as well as cancer, are the consequence of an alteration in lipid metabolic enzymes and their pathways. This illustrates the fundamental role played by lipids in maintaining membrane homeostasis and normal function in healthy cells. We reviewed the major lipid dysfunctions occurring during tumor development, as determined using systems biology approaches. In it, we provide detailed insight into the essential roles exerted by specific lipids in mediating intracellular oncogenic signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and bidirectional crosstalk between cells of the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Finally, we summarize the advances in ongoing research aimed at exploiting the dependency of cancer cells on lipids to abolish tumor progression. PMID:26807644

  18. Fundamentals of cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors reprogram pathways of nutrient acquisition and metabolism to meet the bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox demands of malignant cells. These reprogrammed activities are now recognized as hallmarks of cancer, and recent work has uncovered remarkable flexibility in the specific pathways activated by tumor cells to support these key functions. In this perspective, we provide a conceptual framework to understand how and why metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumor cells, and the mechanisms linking altered metabolism to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Understanding these concepts will progressively support the development of new strategies to treat human cancer. PMID:27386546

  19. Fundamentals of cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2016-05-01

    Tumors reprogram pathways of nutrient acquisition and metabolism to meet the bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox demands of malignant cells. These reprogrammed activities are now recognized as hallmarks of cancer, and recent work has uncovered remarkable flexibility in the specific pathways activated by tumor cells to support these key functions. In this perspective, we provide a conceptual framework to understand how and why metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumor cells, and the mechanisms linking altered metabolism to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Understanding these concepts will progressively support the development of new strategies to treat human cancer. PMID:27386546

  20. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  1. Simultaneous metabolism of chloro- and methyl-aromatic compounds by selected bacterial strains. Final report, 20 August 1991-19 August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Focht, D.D.

    1993-05-27

    Microorganisms are frequently able to degrade anthropogenic materials using pathways that evolved for the assimilation of related naturally-occurring compounds. Complications can arise, however, during the metabolism of mixtures when incompatible intermediates are formed from different components. The breakdown of chloro- and methyl-aromatics, for example, produces catechols which are oxidized differently: chlorocatechols are normally cleaved by ortho fission and methylcatechols by meta fission. If both systems act simultaneously, suicide substrates or dead-end metabolites are usually formed. Nevertheless, bacteria differ in their, ability to cope with such mixtures. A unique bacterium, Pseudomonas cepacia MB2 was isolated by selective enrichment on 2-methylbenzoate, yet was also able to fortuitously utilize 3-chloro-2-methylbenzoate as a sole carbon source. This strain is unique in its ability to utilize an aromatic acid containing both a methyl and chloro substituent via the metafission pathway without the production of suicidal products.

  2. Metabolic Panel

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually ... kidneys and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The ...

  3. Metabolic acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Acidosis - metabolic ... Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys ... from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known ...

  4. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  5. Federal Assistance Program Quarterly Project Progress Report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information Dissemination, Public Outreach, and Technical Analysis Activities. Reporting Period: January 1 - March 31, 2001 [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, John W.

    2002-03-22

    The final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association and the Washington State University Energy Program.

  6. How does cancer cell metabolism affect tumor migration and invasion?

    PubMed

    Han, Tianyu; Kang, De; Ji, Daokun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Weihua; Fu, Minggui; Xin, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Accordingly, identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control whether or not tumor cells become "directed walkers" is a crucial issue of cancer research. The deregulation of cell migration during cancer progression determines the capacity of tumor cells to escape from the primary tumors and invade adjacent tissues to finally form metastases. The ability to switch from a predominantly oxidative metabolism to glycolysis and the production of lactate even when oxygen is plentiful is a key characteristic of cancer cells. This metabolic switch, known as the Warburg effect, was first described in 1920s, and affected not only tumor cell growth but also tumor cell migration. In this review, we will focus on the recent studies on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumor cell migration and invasion. Understanding the new aspects on molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling tumor cell migration is critical for development of therapeutic strategies for cancer patients.

  7. Effects of the radioprotector WR-1065 on aspects of DNA metabolism and cell cycle progression in CHO AA8 and human HSF4 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murley, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotector WR-1065 (2-[(aminopropyl) amino]ethanethiol) is known to protect mammalian cells from the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation exposure, but the exact mechanisms involved in this protection are not fully known. The effect of WR-1065 on a variety of cellular processes in two cell lines was examined to determine how it may provide protection. Incubation of Chinese hamster ovary AA8 cells in 4 mM WR-1065 did not significantly affect the DNA synthetic rate. Autoradiographic analysis of heavily labeled nuclei of AA8 cells showed no significant difference in the size of the S phase population of WR-1065 treated versus control cells for up to 3 h. An examination of the effect of WR-1065 on repair synthesis, as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cells exposed to 15 Gy of gamma-rays, showed no difference between treated and sham treated cells for up to 2 h exposure time. A significant reduction in the amount of UDS was seen in cells treated with the protector for 2.5 and 3h. WR-1065 concentrations ranging from 0.5 mM to 4 mM were not cytotoxic to normal human skin fibroblast cells (HSF4) for exposure to [sup 137]Cs gamma-rays resulted in a protection factor of 3.5, almost twice that observed for AA8 cells with 4 mM Wr-1065. Growth of AA8 cells in either alpha-minimal essential medium or McCoy's 5 a medium did not affect the alteration in cell cycle progression observed. These data suggest that perturbations in cell cycle progression, rather than direct effects on the rate of DNA synthesis, could play a role in the increased survival and reduced mutation frequencies observed in the presence of WR-1065 by allowing more time for the repair of DNA damage prior to division.

  8. Effects of organophosphorus anticholinesterase compounds on brain glucose and energy metabolism. Final summary report, 1 October 1981-29 February 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, M.A.; Miller, A.L.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of Soman and paraoxon on cerebral metabolic rate (CMRg) and the levels of various metabolites in rate brain were investigated. In non-convulsing animals, 0.8 of the paraoxon LD50 and 0.5 of the Soman LD50 tended to lower CMRg. A higher dose of Soman, 0.8-0.95 of the LD50, resulted in convulsive seizures in some but not all of the animals. In convulsing rats the CMRg and lactate levels were elevated primarily in the cortex and thalamus/basal ganglia. Decreased ATP and glucose levels with an elevated CMRg and lactate concentration was observed in the cortex, suggesting that Soman may be uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. Pretreatment with atropine prevented the behavioral manifestations and the elevated CMRg but not the hyperglycemia produced by an 0.8 LD50 dose of Soman. These results suggest that Soman-induced convulsions are similar to those produced by other central nervous system (CNS) excitatory agents in that only certain brain regions are affected. The use of atropine to block the CNS disturbances produced by Soman appears to be effective also does not result in the extensive depression of CMRg observed with TAB, a mixture of trimedoxime, atropine and benactyzine.

  9. The male sterility 8 mutation of maize disrupts the temporal progression of the transcriptome and results in mis-regulation of metabolic functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxue; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.; Li, Kathy H.; Fernandes, John F.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Walbot, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Maize anther ontogeny is complex with expression of more than 30,000 genes over four days of cell proliferation, cell fate acquisition, and the start of meiosis. Although many male-sterile mutants disrupt these key steps, few have been investigated in detail. The terminal phenotypes of maize male-sterile 8 (ms8) are small anthers exhibiting meiotic failure. Here we document much earlier defects: ms8 epidermal cells are normal in number but fail to elongate, and there are fewer, larger tapetal cells that retain rather than secrete their contents. ms8 meiocytes separate early, have extra space between them occupied by excess callose, and the meiotic dyads abort. Thousands of transcriptome changes occur in ms8 including ectopic activation of genes not expressed in fertile siblings, failure to express some genes, differential expression compared to fertile siblings and about 40% of the differentially expressed transcripts appear precociously. There is a high correlation between mRNA accumulation assessed by microarray hybridization and qRT-PCR. Sixty-three differentially expressed proteins were identified after 2-D gel electrophoresis followed by LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy), including those involved in metabolism, plasmodesmatal remodeling, and cell division. The majority of these were not identified by differential RNA expression demonstrating the importance of proteomics to define developmental mutants. PMID:20626649

  10. Field evaluation of gas-lift and progressive-cavity pumps as effective dewatering methods for coalbed methane wells. Final report, April 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Hollingsworth, F.C.; Beavers, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    Field evaluations of gas-lift and progressive-cavity pumps were conducted to determine their effectiveness as dewatering techniques for coalbed-methane wells in the Warrior Coal Field. AMPCO installed a gas-lift system in AMPCO Well No. 6. Problems included poor performance of all gas-lift valve designs and higher instantaneous water production rates than anticipated due to heading and unloading. The test provided the conclusion that gas lift is an effective start-up dewatering tool for initial removal of large amounts of water and solids but that in use as a long-term dewatering tool, needs additional evaluation relative to capital cost, valve design, and extended performance.

  11. Summary of activities and accomplishments. Volume IV. A proposal to develop a method for the detection of HE employing chemiluminescence reactions. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    This is the final and fourth quarter report for the study of high explosive (HE) detection by coupling the chemistry of HE with that of luminol reaction, a well-known chemiluminescence (CL) reaction. Our accomplishments include: success in coupling HE and CL chemistry reliably; the capability to use a micellized solvent to concentrate HE; and the basis for design instrumentation that may exhibit better sensitivity and lower levels of detection than that exhibited by the laboratory apparatus used for this study. On the basis of these results we are prepared to recommend further study.

  12. Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    From July 1994 through May 1998, direct process residue (DPR) hydrogenolysis has been studied in the laboratory, at a small Pilot Plant, and finally at a larger Pilot Plant within Dow Corning`s Carrollton, Kentucky plant. The system reacts filtered DPR with monomer at high temperature and pressure. The process demonstrates DPR conversion up to 86%. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. A larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning`s Barry, Wales site.

  13. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Final report (includes technical progress report for October 1994--January 1995), September 1994--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document presents a modeling and control study of the Fluid Bed Gasification (FBG) unit at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The work is performed under contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384. The purpose of this study is to generate a simple FBG model from process data, and then use the model to suggest an improved control scheme which will improve operation of the gasifier. The work first developes a simple linear model of the gasifier, then suggests an improved gasifier pressure and MGCR control configuration, and finally suggests the use of a multivariable control strategy for the gasifier.

  14. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  15. Nuclear Island Engineering MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor] preliminary and final designs. Technical progress report, December 12, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy (DOE)-funded work performed by General Atomics (GA) under the Nuclear Island Engineering (NIE)-Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR) Preliminary and Final Designs Contract DE-AC03-89SF17885 for the period December 12, 1988 through September 30, 1989. This reporting period is the first (partial) fiscal year of the 5-year contract performance period. The objective of DOE`s MHTGR program is to advance the design from the conceptual design phase into preliminary design and then on to final design in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) design review and approval of the MHTGR Design Team, is focused on the Nuclear Island portion of the technology and design, primarily in the areas of the reactor and internals, fuel characteristics and fuel fabrication, helium services systems, reactor protection, shutdown cooling, circulator design, and refueling system. Maintenance and implementation of the functional methodology, plant-level analysis, support for probabilistic risk assessment, quality assurance, operations, and reliability/availability assessments are included in GA`s scope of work.

  16. [Rare metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Wendel, U; Burgard, P

    2007-12-01

    Rare metabolic diseases are chronic, progressive, present frequently with a life-threatening course and may result in severe handicaps. They demand high diagnostic and therapeutic standards and efforts from physicians and patients. The challenge for society and health systems in dealing with patients affected by one of these diseases is to offer comprehensive service by a multi-professional team of specialists and evidence-based as well as economic (i.e. necessary, sufficient and effective) treatment. Patients and families should be treated in specialized metabolic centres guaranteeing continuous improvement of the scientific and clinical principles of treatment, standardized outcome evaluation, strict quality assurance as well as optimal psychosocial care and counselling. Networking of national and international metabolic centres seems imperative for clinical research in the field of rare metabolic diseases in order to provide adequate sample sizes and to yield substantial results.

  17. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Zhang, Cheng; Larsson, Erik; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-10-16

    The gut microbiota has been proposed as an environmental factor that promotes the progression of metabolic diseases. Here, we investigated how the gut microbiota modulates the global metabolic differences in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and two white adipose tissue depots obtained from conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free (GF) mice using gene expression data and tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs). We created a generic mouse metabolic reaction (MMR) GEM, reconstructed 28 tissue-specific GEMs based on proteomics data, and manually curated GEMs for small intestine, colon, liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism. To validate our predictions, we measured the level of AAs and N-acetylated AAs in the hepatic portal vein of CONV-R and GF mice. Finally, we simulated the metabolic differences between the small intestine of the CONV-R and GF mice accounting for the content of the diet and relative gene expression differences. Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice.

  18. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Zhang, Cheng; Larsson, Erik; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been proposed as an environmental factor that promotes the progression of metabolic diseases. Here, we investigated how the gut microbiota modulates the global metabolic differences in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and two white adipose tissue depots obtained from conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free (GF) mice using gene expression data and tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs). We created a generic mouse metabolic reaction (MMR) GEM, reconstructed 28 tissue-specific GEMs based on proteomics data, and manually curated GEMs for small intestine, colon, liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism. To validate our predictions, we measured the level of AAs and N-acetylated AAs in the hepatic portal vein of CONV-R and GF mice. Finally, we simulated the metabolic differences between the small intestine of the CONV-R and GF mice accounting for the content of the diet and relative gene expression differences. Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice. PMID:26475342

  19. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  20. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  1. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phases 2 and 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The goals of this program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: {gt} 47% efficiency (HHV); NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {gt} 10% NSPS; coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all sold wastes benign; and cost of electricity 90% of present plant. Work reported herein is from Task 1.3 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design, Task 2,2 HITAF Air Heater, and Task 2.4 Duct Heater Design. The impact on cycle efficiency from the integration of various technology advances is presented. The criteria associated with a commercial HIPPS plant design as well as possible environmental control options are presented. The design of the HITAF air heaters, both radiative and convective, is the most critical task in the program. In this report, a summary of the effort associated with the radiative air heater designs that have been considered is provided. The primary testing of the air heater design will be carried out in the UND/EERC pilot-scale furnace; progress to date on the design and construction of the furnace is a major part of this report. The results of laboratory and bench scale activities associated with defining slag properties are presented. Correct material selection is critical for the success of the concept; the materials, both ceramic and metallic, being considered for radiant air heater are presented. The activities associated with the duct heater are also presented.

  2. Magnesium and disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Frank C

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium is actively involved in a number of metabolic reactions as an important co-factor, with special emphasis on carbohydrate metabolism. After a brief overview of the regulation of intra- and extracellular magnesium, the present review first describes the regulatory role of magnesium in important metabolic pathways involved in energy metabolism and glycaemic control. Next the clinical significance of hypomagnesaemic conditions with regard to the management of glucose in prediabetic stages, such as insulin resistance/impaired glucose tolerance and in type 2 diabetes mellitus are characterized. Cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies suggest that a reduced dietary magnesium intake serves as a risk factor for the incidence of both impaired glucose regulation and type 2 diabetes. Mechanisms that might be responsible for diabetes-associated hypomagnesaemia are discussed. Furthermore, the role of hypomagnesaemia in the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications are addressed. Finally, the available literature on the effects of magnesium supplementation on glycaemic control parameters during prediabetic conditions (preventive approach) as well as type 2 diabetes mellitus (therapeutic approach) are reviewed systematically. There is considerable evidence that chronic magnesium supplementation may delay the progression from impaired glucose regulation to type 2 diabetes; however, the effects of oral magnesium supplementation as an adjunct therapy for type 2 diabetes are quite heterogeneous with respect to the various measures of glycaemic control. The results of this review suggest a requirement for critical consideration of the pros and cons of magnesium replacement therapy, based on variables such as magnesium status, stage of disease and glycaemic control.

  3. Metabolic Constraints on the Eukaryotic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2009-04-01

    Mutualism, obligate mutualism, symbiosis, and the eukaryotic ‘fusion’ of Serial Endosymbiosis Theory represent progressively more rapid and less distorted real-time communication between biological structures instantiating information sources. Such progression in accurate information transmission requires, in turn, progressively greater channel capacity that, through the homology between information source uncertainty and free energy density, requires ever more energetic metabolism. The eukaryotic transition, according to this model, may have been entrained by an ecosystem resilience shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism.

  4. Development and testing of a commercial scale coal-fired combustion system -- Phase 3. Final technical progress report, September 26, 1990--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Litka, A.; Breault, R.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of work performed in the development and testing of a coal-fired space heating system for the commercial market sector. Although coal is the most plentiful energy resource in the US, its use since World War II has been largely restricted to utility power generation for environmental and economic reasons. Within the commercial sector, oil and natural gas are the predominant heating fuels for office buildings, apartment complexes, and similar structures. Generally, these buildings require firing rates of 1 to 10 million Btu/hr. The objective of this program was to design, build, and test a coal-based heating system for this sector, and determine the economic viability and market potential for the system. Coal water slurry (CWS) fuel was chosen as the fuel form for this development effort. CWS eliminates the need to use dry pulverized coal with its attendant handling, metering, and dusting problems, as well as its explosive potential. A brief description of the overall system design is given in this report, as well as a discussion of the unique features of the system configuration and key components. This is followed by a summary of the testing performed, including a comparison between system performance and program goals. Finally, the results of the economic evaluation are presented, along with a commercialization plan for the technology. A key issue in the eventual commercialization of the technology is the availability of a competitively priced coal water slurry fuel. Predicted prices and availability of CWS are discussed.

  5. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  7. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies. PMID:27616316

  8. Studies of transport pathways of Th, U, rare earths, Ra-228, and Ra-226 from soil to plants and farm animals: Final progress report, 1983-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Linsalata, P

    1988-07-01

    This report consists of three parts. Part 1 discusses a field study conducted in an area of enhanced, natural radioactivity to assess the soil to edible vegetable concentration ratios (CR = concentration in dry vegetable/concentration in dry soil) of Th-232, Th-230, Ra-226, Ra-228, and the light rare earth elements (REE's), La, Ce, and Nd. Twenty-eight soil, and approximately 42 vegetable samples consisting of relatively equal numbers of seven varieties, were obtained from 11 farms on the Pocos de Caldas Plateau in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. This region is the site of a major natural analogue study to assess the mobilization and retardation processes affecting thorium and the REE's at the Morro do Ferro ore body, and uranium series radionuclides at the Osamu Utsumi open pit uranium mine. Thorium (IV) serves as a chemical analogue for quadrivalent plutonium, the light REE's (III) as chemical analogues for trivalent americium and curium, and uranium (VI) as an analogue for transuranics with stable oxidation states above IV, e.g., Pu(VI). Part 2 includes our final measurement results for naturally occurring light rare earth elements (REE's include La, Ce, Nd, and SM), U-series and Th-series radionuclides in adult farm animal tissues, feeds and soils. Our findings on soil-to-tissue concentration ratios (CR's) and the comparative behavior of these elements in farm animals raised under natural conditions by local farmers are presented. Part 3 summarizes our findings to date on the distribution and mobilization of Th-232, light rare earth elements (LREE), U-238 and Ra-228 in the MF basin. Estimates of first order, present day, mobilization rate constants resulting from ground water solubilization and seepage/stream transport are calculated using revised inventory estimates for the occurrence of these elements in the ore body and annual flux estimates for the transport of these elements away from the ore body. 151 refs., 20 figs., 40 tabs.

  9. Is Cancer a Metabolic Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Coller, Hilary A.

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer has historically been viewed as a disorder of proliferation, recent evidence has suggested that it should also be considered a metabolic disease. Growing tumors rewire their metabolic programs to meet and even exceed the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of continuous cell growth. The metabolic profile observed in cancer cells often includes increased consumption of glucose and glutamine, increased glycolysis, changes in the use of metabolic enzyme isoforms, and increased secretion of lactate. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors have been discovered to have roles in cancer-associated changes in metabolism as well. The metabolic profile of tumor cells has been suggested to reflect the rapid proliferative rate. Cancer-associated metabolic changes may also reveal the importance of protection against reactive oxygen species or a role for secreted lactate in the tumor microenvironment. This article reviews recent research in the field of cancer metabolism, raising the following questions: Why do cancer cells shift their metabolism in this way? Are the changes in metabolism in cancer cells a consequence of the changes in proliferation or a driver of cancer progression? Can cancer metabolism be targeted to benefit patients? PMID:24139946

  10. Progressive hemifacial atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sande, Abhijeet; Risbud, Mukund; Kshar, Avinash; Paranjpe, Arati Oka

    2013-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg Syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by a slow and progressive but self-limited atrophy affecting one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration are unknown. A cerebral disturbance of fat metabolism has been proposed as a primary cause. Possible factors that are involved in the pathogenesis include trauma, viral infections, heredity, endocrine disturbances and auto-immunity. The most common complications that appear in association to this disorder are: trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Characteristically, the atrophy progresses slowly for several years and, it becomes stable. The objective of this work is, through the presentation of a clinical case, to accomplish a literature review concerning general characteristics, etiology, physiopathology and treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy. PMID:23878573

  11. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christopher J; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research.

  12. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  13. (Regulation of terpene metabolism. ) Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1984-01-01

    This research program represents a very broad-based approach to understanding the biochemistry of the monoterpene and sesquiterpene constituents of the essential oils. This program includes basic research on the pathways, enzymes and mechanisms of terpene biosynthesis and catabolism, on the physiology of essential oil production, and on the morphology and development of oil glands, as well as practical approaches to manipulating essential oil composition and yield. As a natural extension of research on monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint we have explored some aspects of possible regulatory mechanisms. Tentative evidence has been obtained for developmental regulation of the levels of biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Extracellular metabolic energetics can promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Loo, Jia Min; Scherl, Alexis; Nguyen, Alexander; Man, Fung Ying; Weinberg, Ethan; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Saltz, Leonard; Paty, Philip B; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-01-29

    Colorectal cancer primarily metastasizes to the liver and globally kills over 600,000 people annually. By functionally screening 661 microRNAs (miRNAs) in parallel during liver colonization, we have identified miR-551a and miR-483 as robust endogenous suppressors of liver colonization and metastasis. These miRNAs convergently target creatine kinase, brain-type (CKB), which phosphorylates the metabolite creatine, to generate phosphocreatine. CKB is released into the extracellular space by metastatic cells encountering hepatic hypoxia and catalyzes production of phosphocreatine, which is imported through the SLC6A8 transporter and used to generate ATP—fueling metastatic survival. Combinatorial therapeutic viral delivery of miR-551a and miR-483-5p through single-dose adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery significantly suppressed colon cancer metastasis, as did CKB inhibition with a small-molecule inhibitor. Importantly, human liver metastases express higher CKB and SLC6A8 levels and reduced miR-551a/miR-483 levels relative to primary tumors. We identify the extracellular space as an important compartment for malignant energetic catalysis and therapeutic targeting. PMID:25601461

  15. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  16. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  17. A link between lipid metabolism and epithelial-mesenchymal transition provides a target for colon cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Álvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Vargas, Teodoro; Molina, Susana; García, Belén; Herranz, Jesús; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Reglero, Guillermo; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna; Feliu, Jaime; Malumbres, Marcos; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    The alterations in carbohydrate metabolism that fuel tumor growth have been extensively studied. However, other metabolic pathways involved in malignant progression, demand further understanding. Here we describe a metabolic acyl-CoA synthetase/stearoyl-CoA desaturase ACSL/SCD network causing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that promotes migration and invasion of colon cancer cells. The mesenchymal phenotype produced upon overexpression of these enzymes is reverted through reactivation of AMPK signaling. Furthermore, this network expression correlates with poorer clinical outcome of stage-II colon cancer patients. Finally, combined treatment with chemical inhibitors of ACSL/SCD selectively decreases cancer cell viability without reducing normal cells viability. Thus, ACSL/SCD network stimulates colon cancer progression through conferring increased energetic capacity and invasive and migratory properties to cancer cells, and might represent a new therapeutic opportunity for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26451612

  18. IDH2 inhibition in AML: Finally progress?

    PubMed

    Stein, Eytan M

    2015-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to alpha ketoglutarate. IDH occurs in three isoforms, IDH1, located in the cytoplasm, IDH2 located in the mitochondria, and IDH3, which functions as part of the TCA cycle. Mutations in the active site of IDH1 at position R132 and an analogous mutation in the IDH2 gene at position R172 have been discovered. Notably, many cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mutations in R172 and R140. The impact of these mutations and early results of inhibiting mutant IDH2 with the reversible inhibitor AG-221 are discussed in this review. PMID:26590767

  19. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  20. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. ESG-CET Final Progress Title

    SciTech Connect

    Don Middleton

    2011-10-06

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG software - now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) - has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  2. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  3. Fireplace boiler system. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DePalmo, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The results showed that the fireplace boiler system can generate more heat than a conventional gas fired furnace (because of controls) and can generate higher temperatures at the various supply registers. In addition, the distribution of heat from the fireplace boiler system results in better thermal confort since the furnace fan is continuous rather than intermittent as in a conventional system. It is important to reiterate the fact that the system incorporates a pressure-temperature relief valve and an expansion tank to further alleviate any potential high temperature conditions. The second objective was partially fulfilled in view of the fact that, on a mild summer day (ambient temperature 83/sup 0/F), the fireplace boiler system, operating on incoming service water (75/sup 0/F) generated a cooling effect that could aid a conventional central air conditioning system in providing total house comfort. However, operating alone, only a ventilation effect could be generated. These results showed that with an ice pack, placed on the fireplace boiler, the water temperature rose 5/sup 0/F, depicting the fact that heat transfer was taking place while the water in the system is being circulated. The information gained from these tests results leads one to believe that an ice pack chilled water system, adequately designed, constructed and insulated could be added to the existing fireplace boiler system and a total air conditioning effect could be obtained.

  4. Microcavity hydrogen storage. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, R. J.

    1981-05-01

    In the microcavity storage system, high pressure hydrogen is stored in hollow, glass microspheres, 5 to 150 ..mu..m. This report presents the results of an experimental study to evaluate the performance of commercially available microspheres for this application. Eight grades were evaluated and their characteristics are presented. A substantial fraction of the microsphere beds survived the conditions of storing hydrogen at pressures of 400 atm. establishing that the concept of high pressure hydrogen storage is feasible. Information was gathered on the properties of the survivor microspheres. Processes for their selective recovery are being investigated.

  5. Water & Aqueous Solutions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-09

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Water & Aqueous Solutions was held at Holderness School, New Hampshire, 8/4/02 thru 8/9/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  6. Innovative conservation housing. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttle, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new passive solar thermal storage brick was developed and tested. A new insulating curtain concept was developed to assist in passive solar heating and cooling. A steel truss was designed to replace the wood truss in solar attic applications where the wood truss typically suffers some 50% loss of structural strength. Improvements were made of the dry composting toilet and grey water recycling for homes. An algae cultivation system was created for production of food, feed, fertilizer, or biomass as needed for home, farm, or industry. New concepts were explored in the areas of economy shelter, solar hot water heating, home generation of electricity, edible landscapes and other home food production, growing of fiber crops for cottage industry, storage, insulation, solar cooking, and solar refrigeration. (LEW)

  7. The implications of relationships between human diseases and metabolic subpathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Chunquan; Shang, Desi; Li, Jing; Han, Junwei; Miao, Yingbo; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qianghu; Li, Wei; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, Xiang; Yao, Qianlan

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenging problems in the etiology of diseases is to explore the relationships between initiation and progression of diseases and abnormalities in local regions of metabolic pathways. To gain insight into such relationships, we applied the "k-clique" subpathway identification method to all disease-related gene sets. For each disease, the disease risk regions of metabolic pathways were then identified and considered as subpathways associated with the disease. We finally built a disease-metabolic subpathway network (DMSPN). Through analyses based on network biology, we found that a few subpathways, such as that of cytochrome P450, were highly connected with many diseases, and most belonged to fundamental metabolisms, suggesting that abnormalities of fundamental metabolic processes tend to cause more types of diseases. According to the categories of diseases and subpathways, we tested the clustering phenomenon of diseases and metabolic subpathways in the DMSPN. The results showed that both disease nodes and subpathway nodes displayed slight clustering phenomenon. We also tested correlations between network topology and genes within disease-related metabolic subpathways, and found that within a disease-related subpathway in the DMSPN, the ratio of disease genes and the ratio of tissue-specific genes significantly increased as the number of diseases caused by the subpathway increased. Surprisingly, the ratio of essential genes significantly decreased and the ratio of housekeeping genes remained relatively unchanged. Furthermore, the coexpression levels between disease genes and other types of genes were calculated for each subpathway in the DMSPN. The results indicated that those genes intensely influenced by disease genes, including essential genes and tissue-specific genes, might be significantly associated with the disease diversity of subpathways, suggesting that different kinds of genes within a disease-related subpathway may play significantly

  8. [Copper transport and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    In this review, copper metabolism and transport in mammalian tissues are introduced and discussed. Firstly, the copper required amounts and LD50 levels are shown to explain the difficult balances of copper in the cells between necessity and toxicity. Furthermore, on the basis of literatures published, relationship between copper-binding metallothioneins and mechanisms for the absorption and excretion of copper or hereditary copper metabolic disorders metabolism abnormality symptom are explained. Finally it has been indicated that apoptosis induced by heavy metals, especially copper was initiated by production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the cells. To understand precise mechanism for copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, further investigation will be needed to clarify the copper behaviors in normal and abnormal situations. PMID:27455798

  9. Maternal diet, bioactive molecules, and exercising as reprogramming tools of metabolic programming.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paulo C F; Elmhiri, Ghada; de Oliveira, Júlio C; Delayre-Orthez, Carine; Barella, Luiz F; Tófolo, Laize P; Fabricio, Gabriel S; Chango, Abalo; Abdennebi-Najar, Latifa

    2014-04-01

    Nutrition and lifestyle, particularly over-nutrition and lack of exercise, promote the progression and pathogenesis of obesity and metabolic diseases. Nutrition is likely the most important environmental factor that modulates the expression of genes involved in metabolic pathways and a variety of phenotypes associated with obesity and diabetes. During pregnancy, diet is a major factor that influences the organ developmental plasticity of the foetus. Experimental evidence shows that nutritional factors, including energy, fatty acids, protein, micronutrients, and folate, affect various aspects of metabolic programming. Different epigenetic mechanisms that are elicited by bioactive factors in early critical developmental ages affect the susceptibility to several diseases in adulthood. The beneficial effects promoted by exercise training are well recognised, and physical exercise may be considered one of the more prominent non-pharmacological tools that can be used to attenuate metabolic programming and to consequently ameliorate the illness provoked by metabolic diseases and reduce the prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Literature on the different outcomes of unbalanced diets and the beneficial effects of some bioactive molecules during gestation and lactation on the metabolic health of offspring, as well as the potential mechanisms underlying these effects, was reviewed. The importance of the combined effects of functional nutrition and exercise as reprogramming tools of metabolic programming is discussed in depth. Finally, this review provides recommendations to healthcare providers that may aid in the control of early programming in an attempt to optimise the health of the mother and child.

  10. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  11. Rosetta: The Final Furlong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2014-09-01

    By the time of the meeting, the Rosetta spacecraft will have formally arrived at its target comet, and final landing site selection will be in progress. One of the instruments that will be sent down to the surface of the comet is Ptolemy (a GC-MS).

  12. Urban metabolism: a review of research methodologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Urban metabolism analysis has become an important tool for the study of urban ecosystems. The problems of large metabolic throughput, low metabolic efficiency, and disordered metabolic processes are a major cause of unhealthy urban systems. In this paper, I summarize the international research on urban metabolism, and describe the progress that has been made in terms of research methodologies. I also review the methods used in accounting for and evaluating material and energy flows in urban metabolic processes, simulation of these flows using a network model, and practical applications of these methods. Based on this review of the literature, I propose directions for future research, and particularly the need to study the urban carbon metabolism because of the modern context of global climate change. Moreover, I recommend more research on the optimal regulation of urban metabolic systems.

  13. Metabolic remodeling in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guo, Tao

    2013-08-01

    Although the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) has made enormous progress over the past decades, CHF is still a tremendous medical and societal burden. Metabolic remodeling might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CHF. The characteristics and mechanisms of metabolic remodeling remained unclear, and the main hypothesis might include the changes in the availability of metabolic substrate and the decline of metabolic capability. In the early phases of the disease, metabolism shifts toward carbohydrate utilization from fatty acids (FAs) oxidation. Along with the progress of the disease, the increasing level of the hyperadrenergic state and insulin resistance cause the changes that shift back to a greater FA uptake and oxidation. In addition, a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the improvement in the metabolic capability is likely to be more significant than the selection of the substrate.

  14. Metabolic control of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kalucka, Joanna; Missiaen, Rindert; Georgiadou, Maria; Schoors, Sandra; Lange, Christian; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a metabolically demanding process, requiring the production of large amounts of energy and biomass. Not surprisingly therefore, a cell's decision to initiate division is co-determined by its metabolic status and the availability of nutrients. Emerging evidence reveals that metabolism is not only undergoing substantial changes during the cell cycle, but it is becoming equally clear that metabolism regulates cell cycle progression. Here, we overview the emerging role of those metabolic pathways that have been best characterized to change during or influence cell cycle progression. We then studied how Notch signaling, a key angiogenic pathway that inhibits endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, controls EC metabolism (glycolysis) during the cell cycle. PMID:26431254

  15. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  16. Effective date of requirement for premarket approval for transilluminator for breast evaluation and sorbent hemoperfusion system (SHS) devices for the treatment of hepatic coma and metabolic disturbances; reclassification of SHS and devices for the treatment of poisoning and drug overdose. Final order.

    PubMed

    2014-01-17

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for the transilluminator for breast evaluation and sorbent hemoperfusion system (SHS) devices for the treatment of hepatic coma and metabolic disturbances and to reclassify SHS devices for the treatment of poisoning and drug overdose, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls). PMID:24443766

  17. Metabolic Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles. Metabolic refers to chemical reactions that provide energy, nutrients and substances necessary for health and growth. ... occur when muscle cells don’t get enough energy. Without enough energy, the muscle lacks enough fuel ...

  18. Metabolic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, ...

  19. Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Nutritional Support of Patients with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Joshua A; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is characterized by profound changes in systemic and cellular metabolism that disrupt normal metabolic homeostasis. These metabolic changes can serve as biomarkers for disease severity. Lactate, a metabolite of anaerobic metabolism, is the most widely used ICU biomarker and it is incorporated into multiple management algorithms. Technological advances now make broader metabolic profiling possible, with early studies identifying metabolic changes associated with sepsis mortality. Finally, given the marked changes in metabolism in sepsis and the association of worse prognosis in patients with severe metabolic derangements, we summarize the seminal trials conducted to optimize nutrition in the ICU. PMID:27229648

  20. Regulation of Terpene Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Croteau

    2004-03-14

    OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

  1. Developmental Specification of Metabolic Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Elson, Amanda E.T.; Simerly, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus contains a core circuitry that communicates with the brainstem and spinal cord to regulate energy balance. Because metabolic phenotype is influenced by environmental variables during perinatal development, it is important to understand how these neural pathways form in order to identify key signaling pathways that are responsible for metabolic programming. Recent progress in defining gene expression events that direct early patterning and cellular specification of the hypothalamus, as well as advances in our understanding of hormonal control of central neuroendocrine pathways, suggest several key regulatory nodes that may represent targets for metabolic programming of brain structure and function. This review focuses on components of central circuitry known to regulate various aspects of energy balance and summarizes what is known about their developmental neurobiology within the context of metabolic programming. PMID:26407637

  2. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  3. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders.

    PubMed

    Depner, Christopher M; Stothard, Ellen R; Wright, Kenneth P

    2014-07-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome, and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed.

  4. Interplay between oxidant species and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, Celia; Trujillo, Madia; Castro, Laura; Trostchansky, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that energy metabolism is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and critical enzymes allied to metabolic pathways can be affected by redox reactions. This interplay between energy metabolism and ROS becomes most apparent during the aging process and in the onset and progression of many age-related diseases (i.e. diabetes, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases). As such, the capacity to identify metabolic pathways involved in ROS formation, as well as specific targets and oxidative modifications is crucial to our understanding of the molecular basis of age-related diseases and for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Herein we review oxidant formation associated with the cell's energetic metabolism, key antioxidants involved in ROS detoxification, and the principal targets of oxidant species in metabolic routes and discuss their relevance in cell signaling and age-related diseases. PMID:26741399

  5. Current perspectives between metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Micucci, Carla; Valli, Debora; Matacchione, Giulia; Catalano, Alfonso

    2016-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies linked metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer. Although metabolic syndrome may not necessarily cause cancer, it is linked to poorer cancer outcomes including increased risk of recurrence and overall mortality. This review tends to discuss the major biological and physiological alterations involved in the increase of incidence and mortality of cancer patients affected by metabolic syndrome. We focus on metabolic syndrome-associated visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) pathway as well as estrogen signaling and inflammation. Several of these factors are also involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. A better understanding of the link between metabolic syndrome and cancer may provide new insight about oncogenesis. Moreover, prevention of metabolic syndrome - related alterations may be an important aspect in the management of cancer patients during simultaneous palliative care.

  6. An overview of the crosstalk between inflammatory processes and metabolic dysregulation during diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Palomer, Xavier; Salvadó, Laia; Barroso, Emma; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are all linked to cardiovascular diseases such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Diabetic cardiomyopathy in particular, is characterized by structural and functional alterations in the heart muscle of people with diabetes that finally lead to heart failure, and which is not directly attributable to coronary artery disease or hypertension. Several mechanisms have been involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy, such as alterations in myocardial energy metabolism and calcium signaling. Metabolic disturbances during diabetic cardiomyopathy are characterized by increased lipid oxidation, intramyocardial triglyceride accumulation, and reduced glucose utilization. Overall changes result in enhanced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis of the cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, the progression of heart failure and cardiac hypertrophy usually entails a local rise in cytokines in cardiac cells and the activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Interestingly, increasing evidences are arising in the recent years that point to a potential link between chronic low-grade inflammation in the heart and metabolic dysregulation. Therefore, in this review we summarize recent new insights into the crosstalk between inflammatory processes and metabolic dysregulation in the failing heart during diabetes, paying special attention to the role of NF-κB and peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). In addition, we briefly describe the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and other pathways regulating cardiac energy metabolism, as well as their relationship with diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:23932046

  7. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  8. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities,more » we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.« less

  9. Metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, Paolo; Ferrazzi, Anna; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease, which affects 2%-3% of the population worldwide. Chronic plaque psoriasis is frequently associated with metabolic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the causal relationship between metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis has not yet been completely proven, it appears that shared genetic links, common environmental factors and/or common inflammatory pathways may underlie the development of psoriasis and comorbidities. The presence of comorbidities has important implications in the global approach to patients with psoriasis. Traditional systemic anti-psoriatic agents could negatively affect cardio-metabolic comorbidities, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used by psoriatic patients. In contrast, the recent findings that the risk of myocardial infarction is reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who respond to anti-TNF-α therapy compared to non-responders, supports the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory effect of TNF-α blockers might reduce the cardiovascular risk potentially also in psoriasis patients. Finally, patients with moderate to severe psoriasis should be treated promptly and effectively, and should be encouraged to drastically correct their modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, in particular obesity and smoking habit.

  10. Metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gisondi, Paolo; Ferrazzi, Anna; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease, which affects 2%-3% of the population worldwide. Chronic plaque psoriasis is frequently associated with metabolic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the causal relationship between metabolic comorbidities and psoriasis has not yet been completely proven, it appears that shared genetic links, common environmental factors and/or common inflammatory pathways may underlie the development of psoriasis and comorbidities. The presence of comorbidities has important implications in the global approach to patients with psoriasis. Traditional systemic anti-psoriatic agents could negatively affect cardio-metabolic comorbidities, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used by psoriatic patients. In contrast, the recent findings that the risk of myocardial infarction is reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who respond to anti-TNF-α therapy compared to non-responders, supports the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory effect of TNF-α blockers might reduce the cardiovascular risk potentially also in psoriasis patients. Finally, patients with moderate to severe psoriasis should be treated promptly and effectively, and should be encouraged to drastically correct their modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, in particular obesity and smoking habit. PMID:21251450

  11. Sleep and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health. PMID:22101912

  12. Metabolic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir V.

    Analysis of the metabolome with coverage of all of the possibly detectable components in the sample, rather than analysis of each individual metabolite at a given time, can be accomplished by metabolic analysis. Targeted and/or nontargeted approaches are applied as needed for particular experiments. Monitoring hundreds or more metabolites at a given time requires high-throughput and high-end techniques that enable screening for relative changes in, rather than absolute concentrations of, compounds within a wide dynamic range. Most of the analytical techniques useful for these purposes use GC or HPLC/UPLC separation modules coupled to a fast and accurate mass spectrometer. GC separations require chemical modification (derivatization) before analysis, and work efficiently for the small molecules. HPLC separations are better suited for the analysis of labile and nonvolatile polar and nonpolar compounds in their native form. Direct infusion and NMR-based techniques are mostly used for fingerprinting and snap phenotyping, where applicable. Discovery and validation of metabolic biomarkers are exciting and promising opportunities offered by metabolic analysis applied to biological and biomedical experiments. We have demonstrated that GC-TOF-MS, HPLC/UPLC-RP-MS and HILIC-LC-MS techniques used for metabolic analysis offer sufficient metabolome mapping providing researchers with confident data for subsequent multivariate analysis and data mining.

  13. Plant metabolic modeling: achieving new insight into metabolism and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-10-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology.

  14. Plant Metabolic Modeling: Achieving New Insight into Metabolism and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology. PMID:25344492

  15. Ferredoxin-linked chloreplast enzymes. Progress report, August 15, 1990--August 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Progress has clearly been made on all of the goals set forth in the original proposal. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out no to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADP+ interaction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique, differential chemical modification. Furthermore, the techniques developed for differential chemical modifications of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions. Finally, progress has also been made with respect to another ferredoxin-dependent enzyme involved in the earliest steps of plant nitrogen metabolism - nitrite reductase. Questions concerning the subunit composition and heme content of the enzyme have been resolved and evidence demonstrating the involvement of lysine and arginine residues in binding ferredoxin has been obtained for the first time.

  16. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  17. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Christopher J.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research. PMID:26442249

  18. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Simeonidis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information—an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering—and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration. PMID:25578304

  19. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2015-03-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  20. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  1. Disorders of Lipid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Fats (lipids) are ... carbohydrates and low in fats. Supplements of the amino acid carnitine may be helpful. The long-term outcome ...

  2. Metabolic model for diversity-generating biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tianero, Ma. Diarey; Pierce, Elizabeth; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Sardar, Debosmita; McIntosh, John A.; Heemstra, John R.; Schonrock, Zachary; Covington, Brett C.; Maschek, J. Alan; Cox, James E.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Ruffner, Duane E.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A conventional metabolic pathway leads to a specific product. In stark contrast, there are diversity-generating metabolic pathways that naturally produce different chemicals, sometimes of great diversity. We demonstrate that for one such pathway, tru, each ensuing metabolic step is slower, in parallel with the increasing potential chemical divergence generated as the pathway proceeds. Intermediates are long lived and accumulate progressively, in contrast with conventional metabolic pathways, in which the first step is rate-limiting and metabolic intermediates are short-lived. Understanding these fundamental differences enables several different practical applications, such as combinatorial biosynthesis, some of which we demonstrate here. We propose that these principles may provide a unifying framework underlying diversity-generating metabolism in many different biosynthetic pathways. PMID:26831074

  3. Metabolic model for diversity-generating biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tianero, Ma Diarey; Pierce, Elizabeth; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Sardar, Debosmita; McIntosh, John A; Heemstra, John R; Schonrock, Zachary; Covington, Brett C; Maschek, J Alan; Cox, James E; Bachmann, Brian O; Olivera, Baldomero M; Ruffner, Duane E; Schmidt, Eric W

    2016-02-16

    A conventional metabolic pathway leads to a specific product. In stark contrast, there are diversity-generating metabolic pathways that naturally produce different chemicals, sometimes of great diversity. We demonstrate that for one such pathway, tru, each ensuing metabolic step is slower, in parallel with the increasing potential chemical divergence generated as the pathway proceeds. Intermediates are long lived and accumulate progressively, in contrast with conventional metabolic pathways, in which the first step is rate-limiting and metabolic intermediates are short-lived. Understanding these fundamental differences enables several different practical applications, such as combinatorial biosynthesis, some of which we demonstrate here. We propose that these principles may provide a unifying framework underlying diversity-generating metabolism in many different biosynthetic pathways. PMID:26831074

  4. Targeting cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Romain; Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Faivre, Sandrine; de Gramont, Armand; Raymond, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2030. Current therapeutic options are limited, warranting an urgent need to explore innovative treatment strategies. Due to specific microenvironment constraints including an extensive desmoplastic stroma reaction, PDAC faces major metabolic challenges, principally hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Their connection with oncogenic alterations such as KRAS mutations has brought metabolic reprogramming to the forefront of PDAC therapeutic research. The Warburg effect, glutamine addiction, and autophagy stand as the most important adaptive metabolic mechanisms of cancer cells themselves, however metabolic reprogramming is also an important feature of the tumor microenvironment, having a major impact on epigenetic reprogramming and tumor cell interactions with its complex stroma. We present a comprehensive overview of the main metabolic adaptations contributing to PDAC development and progression. A review of current and future therapies targeting this range of metabolic pathways is provided. PMID:26164081

  5. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in “wasteful” glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Normanly, J.

    1999-11-29

    The primary goal was the characterization of tryptophan (Trp)-independent biosynthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Our work and that of others indicates that indole is a precursor to IAA in a Trp-independent pathway and the objectives of this grant have been the isolation of indole-metabolizing genes from Arabidopsis.

  7. Comparing methods for metabolic network analysis and an application to metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K

    2013-05-25

    Bioinformatics tools have facilitated the reconstruction and analysis of cellular metabolism of various organisms based on information encoded in their genomes. Characterization of cellular metabolism is useful to understand the phenotypic capabilities of these organisms. It has been done quantitatively through the analysis of pathway operations. There are several in silico approaches for analyzing metabolic networks, including structural and stoichiometric analysis, metabolic flux analysis, metabolic control analysis, and several kinetic modeling based analyses. They can serve as a virtual laboratory to give insights into basic principles of cellular functions. This article summarizes the progress and advances in software and algorithm development for metabolic network analysis, along with their applications relevant to cellular physiology, and metabolic engineering with an emphasis on microbial strain optimization. Moreover, it provides a detailed comparative analysis of existing approaches under different categories.

  8. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  9. Oxygen availability and metabolic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Michael S; Keith, Brian; Simon, M Celeste

    2016-09-23

    Oxygen availability, along with the abundance of nutrients (such as glucose, glutamine, lipids and albumin), fluctuates significantly during tumour evolution and the recruitment of blood vessels, leukocytes and reactive fibroblasts to complex tumour microenvironments. As such, hypoxia and concomitant nutrient scarcity affect large gene expression programmes, signalling pathways, diverse metabolic reactions and various stress responses. This Review summarizes our current understanding of how these adaptations are integrated in hypoxic tumour cells and their role in disease progression. PMID:27658636

  10. Glucose Metabolism in T Cells and Monocytes: New Perspectives in HIV Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Clovis S.; Cherry, Catherine L.; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Singh, Amit; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the immune system occurs in response to the recognition of foreign antigens and receipt of optimal stimulatory signals by immune cells, a process that requires energy. Energy is also needed to support cellular growth, differentiation, proliferation, and effector functions of immune cells. In HIV-infected individuals, persistent viral replication, together with inflammatory stimuli contributes to chronic immune activation and oxidative stress. These conditions remain even in subjects with sustained virologic suppression on antiretroviral therapy. Here we highlight recent studies demonstrating the importance of metabolic pathways, particularly those involving glucose metabolism, in differentiation and maintenance of the activation states of T cells and monocytes. We also discuss how changes in the metabolic status of these cells may contribute to ongoing immune activation and inflammation in HIV- infected persons and how this may contribute to disease progression, establishment and persistence of the HIV reservoir, and the development of co-morbidities. We provide evidence that other viruses such as Epstein–Barr and Flu virus also disrupt the metabolic machinery of their host cells. Finally, we discuss how redox signaling mediated by oxidative stress may regulate metabolic responses in T cells and monocytes during HIV infection. PMID:27211546

  11. Integrating gene and protein expression data with genome-scale metabolic networks to infer functional pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of cellular metabolism in the context of high-throughput -omics data has allowed us to decipher novel mechanisms of importance in biotechnology and health. To continue with this progress, it is essential to efficiently integrate experimental data into metabolic modeling. Results We present here an in-silico framework to infer relevant metabolic pathways for a particular phenotype under study based on its gene/protein expression data. This framework is based on the Carbon Flux Path (CFP) approach, a mixed-integer linear program that expands classical path finding techniques by considering additional biophysical constraints. In particular, the objective function of the CFP approach is amended to account for gene/protein expression data and influence obtained paths. This approach is termed integrative Carbon Flux Path (iCFP). We show that gene/protein expression data also influences the stoichiometric balancing of CFPs, which provides a more accurate picture of active metabolic pathways. This is illustrated in both a theoretical and real scenario. Finally, we apply this approach to find novel pathways relevant in the regulation of acetate overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli. As a result, several targets which could be relevant for better understanding of the phenomenon leading to impaired acetate overflow are proposed. Conclusions A novel mathematical framework that determines functional pathways based on gene/protein expression data is presented and validated. We show that our approach is able to provide new insights into complex biological scenarios such as acetate overflow in Escherichia coli. PMID:24314206

  12. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  13. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  14. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  15. Integrating tracer-based metabolomics data and metabolic fluxes in a linear fashion via Elementary Carbon Modes.

    PubMed

    Pey, Jon; Rubio, Angel; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos; Cascante, Marta; Planes, Francisco J

    2012-07-01

    Constraints-based modeling is an emergent area in Systems Biology that includes an increasing set of methods for the analysis of metabolic networks. In order to refine its predictions, the development of novel methods integrating high-throughput experimental data is currently a key challenge in the field. In this paper, we present a novel set of constraints that integrate tracer-based metabolomics data from Isotope Labeling Experiments and metabolic fluxes in a linear fashion. These constraints are based on Elementary Carbon Modes (ECMs), a recently developed concept that generalizes Elementary Flux Modes at the carbon level. To illustrate the effect of our ECMs-based constraints, a Flux Variability Analysis approach was applied to a previously published metabolic network involving the main pathways in the metabolism of glucose. The addition of our ECMs-based constraints substantially reduced the under-determination resulting from a standard application of Flux Variability Analysis, which shows a clear progress over the state of the art. In addition, our approach is adjusted to deal with combinatorial explosion of ECMs in genome-scale metabolic networks. This extension was applied to infer the maximum biosynthetic capacity of non-essential amino acids in human metabolism. Finally, as linearity is the hallmark of our approach, its importance is discussed at a methodological, computational and theoretical level and illustrated with a practical application in the field of Isotope Labeling Experiments.

  16. Integrating tracer-based metabolomics data and metabolic fluxes in a linear fashion via Elementary Carbon Modes.

    PubMed

    Pey, Jon; Rubio, Angel; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos; Cascante, Marta; Planes, Francisco J

    2012-07-01

    Constraints-based modeling is an emergent area in Systems Biology that includes an increasing set of methods for the analysis of metabolic networks. In order to refine its predictions, the development of novel methods integrating high-throughput experimental data is currently a key challenge in the field. In this paper, we present a novel set of constraints that integrate tracer-based metabolomics data from Isotope Labeling Experiments and metabolic fluxes in a linear fashion. These constraints are based on Elementary Carbon Modes (ECMs), a recently developed concept that generalizes Elementary Flux Modes at the carbon level. To illustrate the effect of our ECMs-based constraints, a Flux Variability Analysis approach was applied to a previously published metabolic network involving the main pathways in the metabolism of glucose. The addition of our ECMs-based constraints substantially reduced the under-determination resulting from a standard application of Flux Variability Analysis, which shows a clear progress over the state of the art. In addition, our approach is adjusted to deal with combinatorial explosion of ECMs in genome-scale metabolic networks. This extension was applied to infer the maximum biosynthetic capacity of non-essential amino acids in human metabolism. Finally, as linearity is the hallmark of our approach, its importance is discussed at a methodological, computational and theoretical level and illustrated with a practical application in the field of Isotope Labeling Experiments. PMID:22487533

  17. Endocannabinoids and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, U; Pasquali, R

    2006-01-01

    Although adjustments to nutritional lifestyle and increased physical activity remain the milestones of weight loss therapy, it is evident from the exponential increase of the number of obese subjects in Western countries that these two approaches alone are no longer able to limit this progression. This alarming phenomenon occurs in spite of a great effort exerted in the last 10 yr to shed light on the pathogenetic mechanisms inducing obesity, although many inconclusive hopes have been generated in the field of pharmacotherapeutics to tackle obesity. Among the several targets exploited in recent years, the endocannabinoid system nowadays constitutes the most promising and the most intriguing proposed so far. On one hand, our aim is to provide an overview on the role of the endocannabinoid system in the physiology of energy metabolism, on the other hand a further aim is to summarize how the system also controls food intake and energy balance by acting at both cerebral and peripheral level. PMID:16751710

  18. Diet-induced metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema

    2011-08-01

    The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH.

  19. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS)-based parallel metabolic profiling of human and mouse model serum reveals putative biomarkers associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jonathan; Alonso, Cristina; Vázquez-Chantada, Mercedes; Cormenzana, Miriam Pérez-; Mayo, Rebeca; Galán, Asier; Caballería, Juan; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Tran, Albert; Wagner, Conrad; Luka, Zigmund; Lu, Shelly C.; Castro, Azucena; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Martínez-Chantar, M. Luz; Veyrie, Nicolas; Clément, Karine; Tordjman, Joan; Gual, Philippe; Mato, José M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is the most common form of chronic liver disease in most western countries. Current NAFLD diagnosis methods (e.g. liver biopsy analysis or imaging techniques) are poorly suited as tests for such a prevalent condition, from both a clinical and financial point of view. The present work aims to demonstrate the potential utility of serum metabolic profiling in defining phenotypic biomarkers that could be useful in NAFLD management. A parallel animal model / human NAFLD exploratory metabolomics approach was employed, using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC®-MS) to analyze 42 serum samples collected from non-diabetic, morbidly obese, biopsy-proven NAFLD patients, and 17 animals belonging to the glycine N-methyltransferase knockout (GNMT-KO) NAFLD mouse model. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data revealed a series of common biomarkers that were significantly altered in the NAFLD (GNMT-KO) subjects in comparison to their normal liver counterparts (WT). Many of the compounds observed could be associated with biochemical perturbations associated with liver dysfunction (e.g. reduced Creatine) and inflammation (e.g. eicosanoid signaling). This differential metabolic phenotyping approach may have a future role as a supplement for clinical decision making in NAFLD and in the adaption to more individualized treatment protocols. PMID:20684516

  20. Targeting drug-metabolizing enzymes for effective chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Hollie I; Njar, Vincent C O; Yu, Zhen; Castro, David J; Gonzalez, Frank J; Williams, David E; Huang, Ying; Kong, Ah-Ng T; Doloff, Joshua C; Ma, Jie; Waxman, David J; Scott, Emily E

    2010-04-01

    The primary focus of chemoprevention research is the prevention of cancer using pharmacological, biological, and nutritional interventions. Chemotherapeutic approaches that have been used successfully for both the prevention and treatment of a number of human malignancies have arisen from the identification of specific agents and appropriate molecular targets. Although drug-metabolizing enzymes have historically been targeted in attempts to block the initial, genotoxic events associated with the carcinogenic process, emerging evidence supports the idea that manipulating drug-metabolizing enzymes may also be an effective strategy to be used for treating tumor progression, invasion, and, perhaps, metastasis. This report summarizes a symposium that presents some recent progress in this area. One area of emphasis is the development of a CYP17 inhibitor for treatment of prostate cancer that may also have androgen-independent anticancer activity at higher concentrations. A second focus is the use of a mouse model to investigate the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Cyp1b1 status and chemopreventative agents on transplacental cancer. A third area of focus is the phytochemical manipulation of not only cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes but also phase II inflammatory and antioxidant enzymes via the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway to block tumor progression. A final highlight is the use of prodrugs activated by P450 enzymes to halt tumor growth and considerations of dosing schedule and targeted delivery of the P450 transgene to tumor tissue. In addition to highlighting recent successes in these areas, limitations and areas that should be targeted for further investigation are discussed. PMID:20233842

  1. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, Edward

    2014-04-28

    The progress over the course of the grant period was excellent. We went from 3-D test codes to full 3-D production codes. We studied several SNe Ia. Most of the support has gone for the 3 years of support of OU graduate student Brian Friesen, who is now mature in his fourth year of research. It is unfortunate that there will be no further DOE support to see him through to the completion of his PhD.

  2. Regulation of carotenoid metabolism in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Shao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Min; Wang, Qiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids serve diverse functions in vastly different organisms that both produce and consume them. Enhanced carotenoid accumulation is of great importance in the visual and functional properties of fruits and vegetables. Significant progress has been achieved in recent years in our understanding of carotenoid biosynthesis in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using biochemical and genetics approaches. The carotenoid metabolic network is temporally and spatially controlled, and plants have evolved strategic tactics to regulate carotenoid metabolism in response to various developmental and environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the current status of studies on transcription factors and phytohormones that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis, catabolism, and storage capacity in plastids, as well as the responses of carotenoid metabolism to environmental cues in tomato fruits. Transcription factors function either in cooperation with or independently of phytohormone signaling to regulate carotenoid metabolism, providing novel approaches for metabolic engineering of carotenoid composition and content in tomato. PMID:25578270

  3. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nies, Vera J M; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Evans, Ronald M; Jonker, Johan W; Downes, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  5. Vitamin E slows down the progression of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, XI; DONG, ZHONGLI; ZHANG, FUHOU; DONG, JUNJIE; ZHANG, YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder with the characteristics of articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone alterations and synovitis. Clinical signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, restricted motion and crepitus. It is the major cause of joint dysfunction in developed nations and has enormous social and economic consequences. Current treatments focus on symptomatic relief, however, they lack efficacy in controlling the progression of this disease, which is a leading cause of disability. Vitamin E is safe to use and may delay the progression of osteoarthritis by acting on several aspects of the disease. In this review, how vitamin E may promote the maintenance of skeletal muscle and the regulation of nucleic acid metabolism to delay osteoarthritis progression is explored. In addition, how vitamin E may maintain the function of sex organs and the stability of mast cells, thus conferring a greater resistance to the underlying disease process is also discussed. Finally, the protective effect of vitamin E on the subchondral vascular system, which decreases the reactive remodeling in osteoarthritis, is reviewed. PMID:27347011

  6. Metabolic changes associated with tumor metastasis, part 2: Mitochondria, lipid and amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Porporato, Paolo E; Payen, Valéry L; Baselet, Bjorn; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic alterations are a hallmark of cancer controlling tumor progression and metastasis. Among the various metabolic phenotypes encountered in tumors, this review focuses on the contributions of mitochondria, lipid and amino acid metabolism to the metastatic process. Tumor cells require functional mitochondria to grow, proliferate and metastasize, but shifts in mitochondrial activities confer pro-metastatic traits encompassing increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS), enhanced resistance to apoptosis and the increased or de novo production of metabolic intermediates of the TCA cycle behaving as oncometabolites, including succinate, fumarate, and D-2-hydroxyglutarate that control energy production, biosynthesis and the redox state. Lipid metabolism and the metabolism of amino acids, such as glutamine, glutamate and proline are also currently emerging as focal control points of cancer metastasis.

  7. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic brain - metabolic; Mild cognitive - metabolic; MCI - metabolic ... Possible metabolic causes of dementia include: Hormonal disorders, such as Addison disease , Cushing disease Heavy metal exposure, such as ...

  8. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine in cancer progress

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hong-Wei; Jing, Qing-Chuan; Liu, Ping-Ping; Liu, Jing; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a naturally occurring bioactive sphingolipid in blood plasma, metabolizing from the hydrolysis of the membrane sphingolipid. It has been shown to exert multifunctional role in cell physiological regulation either as an intracellular second messenger or as an extracellular agent through G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Because of elevated levels of SPC in malicious ascites of patients with cancer, the role of SPC in tumor progression has prompted wide interest. The factor was reported to affect the proliferation and/or migration of many cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer cells, epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells, rat C6 glioma cells, neuroblastoma cells, melanoma cells, and human leukemia cells. This review covers current knowledge of the role of SPC in tumor. PMID:26550104

  9. Final Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    This final chapter provides observations about institutional research in community colleges derived from the preceding chapters and the issue editors' own experiences. Taken as a whole, the chapters in this issue, as well as the editors' experiences, suggest several observations about institutional research in community colleges. These include the…

  10. Analysis of metabolic flux using dynamic labelling and metabolic modelling.

    PubMed

    Fernie, A R; Morgan, J A

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes and the capacity to modulate them are a crucial component of the ability of the plant cell to react to environmental perturbations. Our ability to quantify them and to attain information concerning the regulatory mechanisms that control them is therefore essential to understand and influence metabolic networks. For all but the simplest of flux measurements labelling methods have proven to be the most informative. Both steady-state and dynamic labelling approaches have been adopted in the study of plant metabolism. Here the conceptual basis of these complementary approaches, as well as their historical application in microbial, mammalian and plant sciences, is reviewed, and an update on technical developments in label distribution analyses is provided. This is supported by illustrative cases studies involving the kinetic modelling of secondary metabolism. One issue that is particularly complex in the analysis of plant fluxes is the extensive compartmentation of the plant cell. This problem is discussed from both theoretical and experimental perspectives, and the current approaches used to address it are assessed. Finally, current limitations and future perspectives of kinetic modelling of plant metabolism are discussed. PMID:23421750

  11. Russian Cargo Craft Final Undocking

    NASA Video Gallery

    The ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle, loaded with trash, undocked from the International Space Station’s Pirs docking compartment for the final time July 30 at 5:19 p.m. EDT. The cargo ship undo...

  12. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  13. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  14. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  15. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  16. Longitudinal brain metabolic changes from amnestic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Marine; Desgranges, Béatrice; Landeau, Brigitte; Duchesnay, Edouard; Mézenge, Florence; de la Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Baron, Jean-Claude; Eustache, Francis; Chételat, Gaël

    2009-08-01

    A sensitive marker for monitoring progression of early Alzheimer's disease would help to develop and test new therapeutic strategies. The present study is aimed at investigating brain metabolism changes over time, as a potential monitoring marker, in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, according to their clinical outcome (converters or non-converters), and in relation to their cognitive decline. Seventeen amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and 18FDG-positron emission tomography scans both at inclusion and 18 months later. Baseline and follow-up positron emission tomography data were corrected for partial volume effects and spatially normalized using magnetic resonance imaging data, scaled to the vermis and compared using SPM2. 'PET-PAC' maps reflecting metabolic per cent annual changes were created for correlation analyses with cognitive decline. In the whole sample, the greatest metabolic decrease concerned the posterior cingulate-precuneus area. Converters had significantly greater metabolic decrease than non-converters in two ventro-medial prefrontal areas, the subgenual (BA25) and anterior cingulate (BA24/32). PET-PAC in BA25 and BA24/32 combined allowed complete between-group discrimination. BA25 PET-PAC significantly correlated with both cognitive decline and PET-PAC in the hippocampal region and temporal pole, while BA24/32 PET-PAC correlated with posterior cingulate PET-PAC. Finally, the metabolic change in BA8/9/10 was inversely related to that in BA25 and showed relative increase with cognitive decline, suggesting that compensatory processes may occur in this dorso-medial prefrontal region. The observed ventro-medial prefrontal disruption is likely to reflect disconnection from the hippocampus, both indirectly through the cingulum bundle and posterior cingulate cortex for BA24/32, and directly through the uncinate fasciculus for BA25. Altogether, our findings emphasize the potential of 18FDG

  17. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Chemo-Biology and OMICS: Ethanol Effects on Vitamin Metabolism During Neurodevelopment as Measured by Systems Biology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feltes, Bruno César; de Faria Poloni, Joice; Nunes, Itamar José Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a prenatal disease characterized by fetal morphological and neurological abnormalities originating from exposure to alcohol. Although FAS is a well-described pathology, the molecular mechanisms underlying its progression are virtually unknown. Moreover, alcohol abuse can affect vitamin metabolism and absorption, although how alcohol impairs such biochemical pathways remains to be elucidated. We employed a variety of systems chemo-biology tools to understand the interplay between ethanol metabolism and vitamins during mouse neurodevelopment. For this purpose, we designed interactomes and employed transcriptomic data analysis approaches to study the neural tissue of Mus musculus exposed to ethanol prenatally and postnatally, simulating conditions that could lead to FAS development at different life stages. Our results showed that FAS can promote early changes in neurotransmitter release and glutamate equilibrium, as well as an abnormal calcium influx that can lead to neuroinflammation and impaired neurodifferentiation, both extensively connected with vitamin action and metabolism. Genes related to retinoic acid, niacin, vitamin D, and folate metabolism were underexpressed during neurodevelopment and appear to contribute to neuroinflammation progression and impaired synapsis. Our results also indicate that genes coding for tubulin, tubulin-associated proteins, synapse plasticity proteins, and proteins related to neurodifferentiation are extensively affected by ethanol exposure. Finally, we developed a molecular model of how ethanol can affect vitamin metabolism and impair neurodevelopment. PMID:24816220

  18. Fetal alcohol syndrome, chemo-biology and OMICS: ethanol effects on vitamin metabolism during neurodevelopment as measured by systems biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Feltes, Bruno César; de Faria Poloni, Joice; Nunes, Itamar José Guimarães; Bonatto, Diego

    2014-06-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a prenatal disease characterized by fetal morphological and neurological abnormalities originating from exposure to alcohol. Although FAS is a well-described pathology, the molecular mechanisms underlying its progression are virtually unknown. Moreover, alcohol abuse can affect vitamin metabolism and absorption, although how alcohol impairs such biochemical pathways remains to be elucidated. We employed a variety of systems chemo-biology tools to understand the interplay between ethanol metabolism and vitamins during mouse neurodevelopment. For this purpose, we designed interactomes and employed transcriptomic data analysis approaches to study the neural tissue of Mus musculus exposed to ethanol prenatally and postnatally, simulating conditions that could lead to FAS development at different life stages. Our results showed that FAS can promote early changes in neurotransmitter release and glutamate equilibrium, as well as an abnormal calcium influx that can lead to neuroinflammation and impaired neurodifferentiation, both extensively connected with vitamin action and metabolism. Genes related to retinoic acid, niacin, vitamin D, and folate metabolism were underexpressed during neurodevelopment and appear to contribute to neuroinflammation progression and impaired synapsis. Our results also indicate that genes coding for tubulin, tubulin-associated proteins, synapse plasticity proteins, and proteins related to neurodifferentiation are extensively affected by ethanol exposure. Finally, we developed a molecular model of how ethanol can affect vitamin metabolism and impair neurodevelopment.

  19. Fetal alcohol syndrome, chemo-biology and OMICS: ethanol effects on vitamin metabolism during neurodevelopment as measured by systems biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Feltes, Bruno César; de Faria Poloni, Joice; Nunes, Itamar José Guimarães; Bonatto, Diego

    2014-06-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a prenatal disease characterized by fetal morphological and neurological abnormalities originating from exposure to alcohol. Although FAS is a well-described pathology, the molecular mechanisms underlying its progression are virtually unknown. Moreover, alcohol abuse can affect vitamin metabolism and absorption, although how alcohol impairs such biochemical pathways remains to be elucidated. We employed a variety of systems chemo-biology tools to understand the interplay between ethanol metabolism and vitamins during mouse neurodevelopment. For this purpose, we designed interactomes and employed transcriptomic data analysis approaches to study the neural tissue of Mus musculus exposed to ethanol prenatally and postnatally, simulating conditions that could lead to FAS development at different life stages. Our results showed that FAS can promote early changes in neurotransmitter release and glutamate equilibrium, as well as an abnormal calcium influx that can lead to neuroinflammation and impaired neurodifferentiation, both extensively connected with vitamin action and metabolism. Genes related to retinoic acid, niacin, vitamin D, and folate metabolism were underexpressed during neurodevelopment and appear to contribute to neuroinflammation progression and impaired synapsis. Our results also indicate that genes coding for tubulin, tubulin-associated proteins, synapse plasticity proteins, and proteins related to neurodifferentiation are extensively affected by ethanol exposure. Finally, we developed a molecular model of how ethanol can affect vitamin metabolism and impair neurodevelopment. PMID:24816220

  20. cMyc-mediated activation of serine biosynthesis pathway is critical for cancer progression under nutrient deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linchong; Song, Libing; Wan, Qianfen; Wu, Gongwei; Li, Xinghua; Wang, Yinghui; Wang, Jin; Liu, Zhaoji; Zhong, Xiuying; He, Xiaoping; Shen, Shengqi; Pan, Xin; Li, Ailing; Wang, Yulan; Gao, Ping; Tang, Huiru; Zhang, Huafeng

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells are known to undergo metabolic reprogramming to sustain survival and rapid proliferation, however, it remains to be fully elucidated how oncogenic lesions coordinate the metabolic switch under various stressed conditions. Here we show that deprivation of glucose or glutamine, two major nutrition sources for cancer cells, dramatically activated serine biosynthesis pathway (SSP) that was accompanied by elevated cMyc expression. We further identified that cMyc stimulated SSP activation by transcriptionally upregulating expression of multiple SSP enzymes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SSP activation facilitated by cMyc led to elevated glutathione (GSH) production, cell cycle progression and nucleic acid synthesis, which are essential for cell survival and proliferation especially under nutrient-deprived conditions. We further uncovered that phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH), the final rate-limiting enzyme of the SSP pathway, is critical for cMyc-driven cancer progression both in vitro and in vivo, and importantly, aberrant expression of PSPH is highly correlated with mortality in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, suggesting a potential causal relation between this cMyc-regulated enzyme, or SSP activation in general, and cancer development. Taken together, our results reveal that aberrant expression of cMyc leads to the enhanced SSP activation, an essential part of metabolic switch, to facilitate cancer progression under nutrient-deprived conditions. PMID:25793315

  1. Cancer as a metabolic disease: implications for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto E; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease involving disturbances in energy production through respiration and fermentation. The genomic instability observed in tumor cells and all other recognized hallmarks of cancer are considered downstream epiphenomena of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. The disturbances in tumor cell energy metabolism can be linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria. When viewed as a mitochondrial metabolic disease, the evolutionary theory of Lamarck can better explain cancer progression than can the evolutionary theory of Darwin. Cancer growth and progression can be managed following a whole body transition from fermentable metabolites, primarily glucose and glutamine, to respiratory metabolites, primarily ketone bodies. As each individual is a unique metabolic entity, personalization of metabolic therapy as a broad-based cancer treatment strategy will require fine-tuning to match the therapy to an individual's unique physiology.

  2. Cancer as a metabolic disease: implications for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto E; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease involving disturbances in energy production through respiration and fermentation. The genomic instability observed in tumor cells and all other recognized hallmarks of cancer are considered downstream epiphenomena of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. The disturbances in tumor cell energy metabolism can be linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria. When viewed as a mitochondrial metabolic disease, the evolutionary theory of Lamarck can better explain cancer progression than can the evolutionary theory of Darwin. Cancer growth and progression can be managed following a whole body transition from fermentable metabolites, primarily glucose and glutamine, to respiratory metabolites, primarily ketone bodies. As each individual is a unique metabolic entity, personalization of metabolic therapy as a broad-based cancer treatment strategy will require fine-tuning to match the therapy to an individual's unique physiology. PMID:24343361

  3. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Gary E.

    2013-04-23

    This is the final report of a two year project entitled "Governing Nanotechnology Risks and Benefits in the Transition to Regulation: Innovative Public and Private Approaches." This project examined the role of new governance or "soft law" mechanisms such as codes of conduct, voluntary programs and partnership agreements to manage the risks of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. A series of published or in publication papers and book chapters are attached.

  4. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  5. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. [Mentha piperita, Mentha spicata

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in understanding of the metabolism of monoterpenes by peppermint and spearmint is recorded including the actions of two key enzymes, geranyl pyrophosphate:limonene cyclase and a UDP-glucose dependent glucosyl transferase; concerning the ultrastructure of oil gland senescence; enzyme subcellular localization; regulation of metabolism; and tissue culture systems.

  6. Profiling metabolic networks to study cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth and survival, and tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to aid these processes. New capabilities in the computational and bioanalytical characterization of metabolism have now emerged, facilitating the identification of unique metabolic dependencies that arise in specific cancers. By understanding the metabolic phenotype of cancers as a function of their oncogenic profiles, metabolic engineering may be applied to design synthetically lethal therapies for some tumors. This process begins with accurate measurement of metabolic fluxes. Here we review advanced methods of quantifying pathway activity and highlight specific examples where these approaches have uncovered potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass. PMID:27223822

  8. 40 CFR 35.6650 - Progress reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding 40 CFR 31.41(b)(1), the reports shall be due within 60 days after the reporting period. The final progress report shall be due 90 days after expiration or termination of the Cooperative Agreement. (b) Content. The progress report must contain the following information: (1) An explanation of...

  9. 40 CFR 35.6650 - Progress reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding 40 CFR 31.41(b)(1), the reports shall be due within 60 days after the reporting period. The final progress report shall be due 90 days after expiration or termination of the Cooperative Agreement. (b) Content. The progress report must contain the following information: (1) An explanation of...

  10. The impact of exercise on thyroid hormone metabolism in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, C

    2005-09-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of energy metabolism and may influence energy processes during physical exercise. There are controversial results concerning thyroid hormone metabolism during strenuous exercise in adult athletes and only scant data concerning the impact of strenuous exercise on thyroid hormone metabolism in children and adolescents. Although some studies demonstrate a transient change in thyroid hormones during intense physical performance, most studies agree that these changes are of minor impact, practically reflecting the relative negative energy balance during strenuous exercise. This state of hypometabolism during intense physical performance has also been confirmed in highly trained female young athletes, who may be also characterized by reproductive axis dysfunction, manifested either as luteal-phase deficiency or amenorrhea, alongside the typical constellation of low T3, insulin and leptin levels. More importantly, strenuous exercise during childhood or adolescence is mostly accompanied by a delay of skeletal maturation, and height and may have a long-lasting negative effect on growth and acquisition of maximum bone mass. In conclusion, although thyroid hormones are only transiently or insignificantly changed during strenuous exercise, adequate caloric intake should be guaranteed in highly performing young athletes in order to counteract the relative negative energy balance and prevent alterations in endocrine-metabolic profile. Moreover, when growth and pubertal progression in very young athletes are significantly impaired, a reduction in the intensity of the physical exercise should be advocated in order to guarantee better final height and adequate acquisition of bone mass.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Syndrome: Cause or Consequence of Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Contreras, Diana; Carvajal, Karla; Franco-Bocanegra, Diana; Campos-Peña, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major neurodegenerative disease affecting the elderly. Clinically, it is characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive function. Neuropathologically, it is characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ) deposited as neuritic plaques (NP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) made of abnormal and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. These lesions are capable of generating the neuronal damage that leads to cell death and cognitive failure through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence indicates the critical role of Aβ metabolism in prompting the oxidative stress observed in AD patients. However, it has also been proposed that oxidative damage precedes the onset of clinical and pathological AD symptoms, including amyloid-β deposition, neurofibrillary tangle formation, vascular malfunction, metabolic syndrome, and cognitive decline. This paper provides a brief description of the three main proteins associated with the development of the disease (Aβ, tau, and ApoE) and describes their role in the generation of oxidative stress. Finally, we describe the mitochondrial alterations that are generated by Aβ and examine the relationship of vascular damage which is a potential prognostic tool of metabolic syndrome. In addition, new therapeutic approaches targeting ROS sources and metabolic support were reported. PMID:24683436

  12. Towards a metabolic therapy of cancer?

    PubMed

    Chiu, Martina; Ottaviani, Laura; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Franchi-Gazzola, Renata; Bussolati, Ovidio

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly appreciated that cancer cells must be endowed with specific metabolic adaptations to support enhanced growth and to ensure survival under stressful conditions. On the other hand, many oncogenic mutations of protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes directly cause metabolic derangements and, conversely, mutations of enzymes have been found to underlie several forms of cancer. Thus, cancer-specific metabolic alterations are now considered among the hallmarks of malignant tumors. Most commonly, cancer cells exhibit enhanced glycolysis under aerobic conditions (the Warburg effect) but alterations in the metabolism of amino acids, such as glutamine, serine and proline are increasingly described as important metabolic features of selected tumor types. In theory, all these deranged cancer-specific metabolic pathways may constitute novel therapeutic targets, although the only "metabolic" drug in clinical use is still represented by the enzyme L-asparaginase. However, the increasing amount of experimental evidence, as well as the number of trials in progress, suggests that metabolic drugs will soon complement standard anti-cancer chemotherapy and modern biological drugs. PMID:23762991

  13. Optimization of cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2011-12-01

    The derangement of the cardiac energy substrate metabolism plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates, such as fatty acids, is the predominant metabolic pathway in the normal heart, because this provides the highest energy yield per molecule of substrate metabolized. In contrast, glucose becomes an important preferential substrate for metabolism and ATP generation under specific pathological conditions, because it can provide greater efficiency in producing high energy products per oxygen consumed compared to fatty acids. Manipulations that shift energy substrate utilization away from fatty acids toward glucose can improve the cardiac function and slow the progression of heart failure. However, insulin resistance, which is highly prevalent in the heart failure population, impedes this adaptive metabolic shift. Therefore, the acceleration of the glucose metabolism, along with the restoration of insulin sensitivity, would be the ideal metabolic therapy for heart failure. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of modifying substrate utilization to optimize cardiac metabolism in heart failure. PMID:21933140

  14. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  15. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  16. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  17. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yelton, John Martin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Korytov, Andrey; Avery, Paul; Furic, Ivan; Acosta, Darin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Field, Richard; Matchev, Konstantin; Ramond, Pierre; Thorn, Richard; Sikivie, Pierre; Ray, Heather; Tanner, David

    2013-10-10

    We report on progress in a series of different directions within high energy physics research. 1. Neutrino research in hardware and software on the Minerva and MiniBooNE experiments 2. Experimental particle physics at the hadron colliders, with emphasis on research and development and data analysis on the CMS experiment operating at the CERN LHC. This includes research on the discovery and properties on the Higgs Boson. 3. Educational outreach through the Quarknet program, taking physics research into High School classrooms. 4. Theoretical and Phenomenological High Energy research, covering a broad range of activities ranging from fundamental theoretical issues to areas of immediate phenomenological importance. 5. Experiment searches for the Axion, as part of the ADMX experiment.

  18. The evolution of fungal metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Slot, Jason C; Rokas, Antonis

    2014-12-01

    Fungi contain a remarkable range of metabolic pathways, sometimes encoded by gene clusters, enabling them to digest most organic matter and synthesize an array of potent small molecules. Although metabolism is fundamental to the fungal lifestyle, we still know little about how major evolutionary processes, such as gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), have interacted with clustered and non-clustered fungal metabolic pathways to give rise to this metabolic versatility. We examined the synteny and evolutionary history of 247,202 fungal genes encoding enzymes that catalyze 875 distinct metabolic reactions from 130 pathways in 208 diverse genomes. We found that gene clustering varied greatly with respect to metabolic category and lineage; for example, clustered genes in Saccharomycotina yeasts were overrepresented in nucleotide metabolism, whereas clustered genes in Pezizomycotina were more common in lipid and amino acid metabolism. The effects of both GD and HGT were more pronounced in clustered genes than in their non-clustered counterparts and were differentially distributed across fungal lineages; specifically, GD, which was an order of magnitude more abundant than HGT, was most frequently observed in Agaricomycetes, whereas HGT was much more prevalent in Pezizomycotina. The effect of HGT in some Pezizomycotina was particularly strong; for example, we identified 111 HGT events associated with the 15 Aspergillus genomes, which sharply contrasts with the 60 HGT events detected for the 48 genomes from the entire Saccharomycotina subphylum. Finally, the impact of GD within a metabolic category was typically consistent across all fungal lineages, whereas the impact of HGT was variable. These results indicate that GD is the dominant process underlying fungal metabolic diversity, whereas HGT is episodic and acts in a category- or lineage-specific manner. Both processes have a greater impact on clustered genes, suggesting that metabolic gene clusters

  19. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  20. Effects of catalytic mineral matter on CO/CO{sub 2} temperature and burning time for char combustion. Quarterly progress report No. 15 (Final report), October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Longwell, J.P.; Sarofim, A.F.; Lee, C.H.

    1993-12-31

    The high temperature oxidation of char is of interest in a number of applications in which coal must be burned in confined spaces including the conversion of oil-fired boilers to coal using coal-water slurries, the development of a new generation of pulverized-coal-fired cyclone burners, the injection of coal into the tuyeres of blast furnaces, the use of coal as a fuel in direct-fired gas turbines and in large-bore low-speed diesels, and entrained flow gasifiers. There is a need to understand the temperature history of char particles in conventional pulverized-coal-fired boilers to better explain the processes governing the formation of pollutants and the transformation of mineral matter. The temperature of char particle burning is the product of a strongly coupled balance between particle physical properties, heat and mass transfer, surface reaction, and CO/CO{sub 2} ratio. Particle temperature has major effects not only on the burning rate but also on ash properties and mineral matter vaporization. Measurements of the temperature of individual burning char particles have clearly demonstrated large particle-to-particle temperature variations which depend strongly on particle size and on particle composition. This report consists of two major parts. In the first part, experimental measurements of CO/CO{sub 2} ratio for a single spherocarb particle is presented along with a kinetic model which allows estimation of CO/CO{sub 2} generated at a carbon surface for temperatures higher than those reported in the experimental work. In the second part, modeling of a temperature profile during a char combustion is reported, and also progress in modeling the complex sets of coupled phenomena involving full gas phase reaction kinetics, heat transfer, and mass transfer is summarized. In the appendix progress on construction and testing of an improved electrodynamic balance is presented.

  1. Final Scientific/Technical Report, DE-FG02-06ER64171, Integrated Nucleic Acid System for In-Field Monitoring of Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity – Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden

    SciTech Connect

    Eric E. Roden

    2009-07-08

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Integrated Nucleic Acid System for In-Field Monitoring of Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Darrell Chandler (originally at Argonne National Laboratory, now with Akonni Biosystems) was the overall PI/PD for the project. The overall project goals were to (1) apply a model iron-reducer and sulfate-reducer microarray and instrumentation systems to sediment and groundwater samples from the Scheibe et al. FRC Area 2 field site, UMTRA sediments, and other DOE contaminated sites; (2) continue development and expansion of a 16S rRNA/rDNA¬-targeted probe suite for microbial community dynamics as new sequences are obtained from DOE-relevant sites; and (3) address the fundamental molecular biology and analytical chemistry associated with the extraction, purification and analysis of functional genes and mRNA in environmental samples. Work on the UW subproject focused on conducting detailed batch and semicontinuous culture reactor experiments with uranium-contaminated FRC Area 2 sediment. The reactor experiments were designed to provide coherent geochemical and microbiological data in support of microarray analyses of microbial communities in Area 2 sediments undergoing biostimulation with ethanol. A total of four major experiments were conducted (one batch and three semicontinuous culture), three of which (the batch and two semicontinuous culture) provided samples for DNA microarray analysis. A variety of other molecular analyses (clone libraries, 16S PhyloChip, RT-PCR, and T-RFLP) were conducted on parallel samples from the various experiments in order to provide independent information on microbial community response to biostimulation.

  2. Productization and Manufacturing Scaling of High-Efficiency Solar Cell and Module Products Based on a Disruptive Low-Cost, Mono-Crystalline Technology: Final Technical Progress Report, April 1, 2009 - December 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Fatemi, H.

    2012-07-01

    Final report for PV incubator subcontract with Solexel, Inc. The purpose of this project was to develop Solexel's Unique IP, productize it, and transfer it to manufacturing. Silicon constitutes a significant fraction of the total solar cell cost, resulting in an industry-wide drive to lower silicon usage. Solexel's disruptive Solar cell structure got around these challenges and promised superior light trapping, efficiency and mechanical strength, despite being significantly thinner than commercially available cells. Solexel's successful participation in this incubator project became evident as the company is now moving into commercial production and position itself to be competitive for the next Technology Pathway Partnerships (TPP) funding opportunity.

  3. Obesity, adipokines and metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmina, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The complex mechanisms linking fat excess to metabolic syndrome are not well understood, but several experimental studies have shown that altered production of adipokines plays a main role in development and progression of this disorder. In particular, reduced secretion of adiponectin has a crucial role in inducing insulin resistance but also in determining the clustering of elevated triglycerides and small, dense LDL particles. Increased leptin secretion may be responsible for sympathetic nervous system overactivity and hypertension, while reduced omentin may have an important permissive role in the development of atherogenic processes. Finally, cytokines and other adipokines (resistin, visfatin) determine and modulate the inflammatory process that is an essential component of this condition of cardiovascular risk. Because obesity is prevalent in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), it is not surprising that patients with PCOS present altered adipokine levels and increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, because of the presence of other CV risk factors (androgen excess), in PCOS adipokine dysfunction is particularly severe. Understanding and treating adipokine dysfunction in young women with PCOS is an essential component of any politics of prevention of CV diseases in the general population.

  4. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Progress report, 1988--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.; Barofsky, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    This progress report describes accomplishments under four headings, namely: The study of the relative rates of metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) targeting tumor associated antigens; Effects of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, and thioamides on the retention of radiolabeled MAbs by tumor cells; Subcellular site of radioimmunoconjugate degradation and the sizes of fragments generated by intracellular metabolism of radiolabeled antibodies; and Patterns of metabolic degradation of radioimmunoconjugates made with different techniques and with different radionuclides.

  5. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  6. Metabolic activity, experiment M171. [space flight effects on human metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab metabolic activity experiment determines if man's metabolic effectiveness in doing mechanical work is progressively altered by a simulated Skylab environment, including environmental factors such as slightly increased pCO2. This test identified several hardware/procedural anomalies. The most important of these were: (1) the metabolic analyzer measured carbon dioxide production and expired water too high; (2) the ergometer load module failed under continuous high workload conditions; (3) a higher than desirable number of erroneous blood pressure measurements were recorded; (4) vital capacity measurements were unreliable; and (5) anticipated crew personal exercise needs to be more structured.

  7. Progression of myopia.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, R H

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myopia is an important public health problem because it is common and is associated with increased risk for chorioretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, and other vision-threatening abnormalities. In animals, ocular elongation and myopia progression can be lessened with atropine treatment. This study provides information about progression of myopia and atropine therapy for myopia in humans. METHODS: A total of 214 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (118 girls and 96 boys; median age, 11 years; range, 6 to 15 years) received atropine for myopia from 1967 through 1974. Control subjects were matched by age, sex, refractive error, and date of baseline examination to 194 of those receiving atropine. Duration of treatment with atropine ranged from 18 weeks to 11.5 years (median 3.5 years). RESULTS: Median follow-up from initial to last refraction in the atropine group (11.7 years) was similar to that in the control group (12.4 years). Photophobia and blurred vision were frequently reported, but no serious adverse effects were associated with atropine therapy. Mean myopia progression during atropine treatment adjusted for age and refractive error (0.05 diopters per year) was significantly less than that among control subjects (0.36 diopters per year) (P < .001). Final refractions standardized to the age of 20 years showed a greater mean level of myopia in the control group (3.78 diopters) than in the atropine group (2.79 diopters) (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The data support the view that atropine therapy is associated with decreased progression of myopia and that beneficial effects remain after treatment has been discontinued. PMID:8719698

  8. Targeting Mitochondria as Therapeutic Strategy for Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pascale, Antonietta Valeria; Finelli, Rosa; Carillo, Anna Lisa; Annunziata, Roberto; Iaccarino, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical regulator of cell metabolism; thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many metabolic disorders. Defects in oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, or mtDNA mutations are the main causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in many pathological conditions such as IR/diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Thus, targeting mitochondria has been proposed as therapeutic approach for these conditions, leading to the development of small molecules to be tested in the clinical scenario. Here we discuss therapeutic interventions to treat mitochondrial dysfunction associated with two major metabolic disorders, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Finally, novel mechanisms of regulation of mitochondrial function are discussed, which open new scenarios for mitochondria targeting. PMID:24757426

  9. Alterations in cancer cell metabolism: the Warburg effect and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Yazdan; Zabihinpour, Zahra; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2015-05-01

    The Warburg effect means higher glucose uptake of cancer cells compared to normal tissues, whereas a smaller fraction of this glucose is employed for oxidative phosphorylation. With the advent of high throughput technologies and computational systems biology, cancer cell metabolism has been reinvestigated over the last decades toward identifying various events underlying "how" and "why" a cancer cell employs aerobic glycolysis. Significant progress has been shaped to revise the Warburg effect. In this study, we have integrated the gene expression of 13 different cancer cells with the genome-scale metabolic network of human (Recon1) based on the E-Flux method, and analyzed them based on constraint-based modeling. Results show that regardless of significant up- and down-regulated metabolic genes, the distribution of metabolic changes is similar in different cancer types. These findings support the theory that the Warburg effect is a consequence of metabolic adaptation in cancer cells.

  10. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, but whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help in balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipid levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but also the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting that the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, but whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help in balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipid levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but also the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting that the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25848677

  12. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipids levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25848677

  13. [Liver cirrhosis in metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    The most early cirrhosis is observed in newborns with neonatal hemachromatosis. Early cirrhosis occurs in hereditary tyrosinemia type I, peroxisomal diseases and glycogen storage disease (type IV). In Wilson's disease, a case complicated with cirrhosis was reported in a 4-year-old patient. Slowly progressive cirrhosis is seen in patients with familial progressive intrahepatic cholestasis. Focal biliary cirrhosis is found in cystic fibrosis of the pancreas. Moreover, many other metabolic disorders, except for urea cycle disorders, are occasionally or rarely complicated with cirrhosis. Early diagnosis and proper management could prevent the development of cirrhosis in patients with galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, etc. The occurrence of hepatoma must be monitored in these patients. Liver transplantation is indicated in a part of the patients with cirrhosis. PMID:8114297

  14. [Metabolic myopathies].

    PubMed

    Papazian, Óscar; Rivas-Chacón, Rafael

    2013-09-01

    Objetivo. Revisar las miopatias metabolicas manifestadas solamente por crisis de mialgias, calambres y rigidez musculares con dificultad para contraer los musculos afectados y el examen neurologico normal entre las crisis en niños y adolescentes. Desarrollo. Estas miopatias metabolicas se deben a deficits enzimaticos heredados en forma autosomica recesiva del metabolismo de los carbohidratos y lipidos. El resultado final es una reduccion del trifosfato de adenosina principalmente a traves de la fosforilacion oxidativa mitocondrial con disminucion de la energia disponible para la contraccion muscular. Las secundarias a trastornos del metabolismo de los carbohidratos se producen por ejercicios de alta intensidad y breves (< 10 min) y las secundarias a trastornos de los lipidos, por ejercicios de baja intensidad y prolongados (> 10 min). Los deficits enzimaticos en el primer grupo son de miofosforilasa (glucogenosis V), fosfofructocinasa muscular (glucogenosis VII), fosfoglicerato mutasa 1 (glucogenosis X) y beta enolasa (glucogenosis XIII), y en el segundo, de carnitina palmitol transferasa tipo II y de acil-CoA deshidrogenasa de cadena muy larga. Conclusiones. Las caracteristicas diferenciales de los pacientes en cada grupo y dentro de cada grupo permitiran el diagnostico clinico presuntivo inicial en la mayoria y solicitar solamente los examenes necesarios para corroborar el diagnostico. El tratamiento de las crisis consiste en hidratacion, glucosa y alcalinizacion de la orina. Las medidas preventivas son evitar el tipo de ejercicio que induce las crisis y el ayuno. No existe cura o tratamiento especifico. El pronostico es bueno con la excepcion de casos raros de insuficiencia renal aguda debido a la elevacion sanguinea de la mioglobina producto de una rabdomiolisis grave.

  15. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  16. Synthetic redesign of plant lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Richard P; Sayanova, Olga; Kim, Hae Jin; Cahoon, Edgar B; Napier, Johnathan A

    2016-07-01

    Plant seed lipid metabolism is an area of intensive research, including many examples of transgenic events in which oil composition has been modified. In the selected examples described in this review, progress towards the predictive manipulation of metabolism and the reconstitution of desired traits in a non-native host is considered. The advantages of a particular oilseed crop, Camelina sativa, as a flexible and utilitarian chassis for advanced metabolic engineering and applied synthetic biology are considered, as are the issues that still represent gaps in our ability to predictably alter plant lipid biosynthesis. Opportunities to deliver useful bio-based products via transgenic plants are described, some of which represent the most complex genetic engineering in plants to date. Future prospects are considered, with a focus on the desire to transition to more (computationally) directed manipulations of metabolism.

  17. Synthetic redesign of plant lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Richard P; Sayanova, Olga; Kim, Hae Jin; Cahoon, Edgar B; Napier, Johnathan A

    2016-07-01

    Plant seed lipid metabolism is an area of intensive research, including many examples of transgenic events in which oil composition has been modified. In the selected examples described in this review, progress towards the predictive manipulation of metabolism and the reconstitution of desired traits in a non-native host is considered. The advantages of a particular oilseed crop, Camelina sativa, as a flexible and utilitarian chassis for advanced metabolic engineering and applied synthetic biology are considered, as are the issues that still represent gaps in our ability to predictably alter plant lipid biosynthesis. Opportunities to deliver useful bio-based products via transgenic plants are described, some of which represent the most complex genetic engineering in plants to date. Future prospects are considered, with a focus on the desire to transition to more (computationally) directed manipulations of metabolism. PMID:27483205

  18. Equine atypical myopathy: A metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Karlíková, R; Široká, J; Jahn, P; Friedecký, D; Gardlo, A; Janečková, H; Hrdinová, F; Drábková, Z; Adam, T

    2016-10-01

    Atypical myopathy (AM) is a potentially fatal disease of grazing horses. It is reportedly caused by the ingestion of sycamore seeds containing toxic hypoglycin A. In order to study metabolic changes, serum and urine samples from nine horses with atypical myopathy and 12 control samples from clinically healthy horses were collected and then analysed using a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry; serum metabolic profiles as the disease progressed were also studied. Metabolic data were evaluated using unsupervised and supervised multivariate analyses. Significant differences were demonstrated in the concentrations of various glycine conjugates and acylcarnitines (C2-C26). Moreover, the concentrations of purine and pyrimidine metabolites, vitamins and their degradation products (riboflavin, trigonelline, pyridoxate, pantothenate), and selected organic and amino acids (aspartate, leucine, 2-oxoglutarate, etc.) were altered in horses with AM. These results represent a global view of altered metabolism in horses with atypical myopathy. PMID:27687939

  19. The Metabolomic Signature of Malignant Glioma Reflects Accelerated Anabolic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Bloom, Gregory; Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Eschrich, Steven; Qu, Xiaotao; Forsyth, Peter; Gillies, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward understanding glioblastoma biology through large-scale genetic and protein expression analyses, little is known about the underlying metabolic alterations promoting their aggressive phenotype. We conducted global metabolomic profiling on patient-derived glioma specimens and identified specific metabolic programs differentiating low- and high-grade tumors, with the metabolic signature of glioblastoma reflecting accelerated anabolic metabolism. When coupled with transcriptional profiles, we identified the metabolic phenotype of the mesenchymal subtype to consist of accumulation of the glycolytic intermediate phosphoenolpyruvate and decreased pyruvate kinase activity. Unbiased hierarchical clustering of metabolomic profiles identified three subclasses, which we term energetic, anabolic, and phospholipid catabolism with prognostic relevance. These studies represent the first global metabolomic profiling of glioma, offering a previously undescribed window into their metabolic heterogeneity, and provide the requisite framework for strategies designed to target metabolism in this rapidly fatal malignancy. PMID:23026133

  20. Applications of metabolic modelling to plant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Poolman, M G; Assmus, H E; Fell, D A

    2004-05-01

    In this paper some of the general concepts underpinning the computer modelling of metabolic systems are introduced. The difference between kinetic and structural modelling is emphasized, and the more important techniques from both, along with the physiological implications, are described. These approaches are then illustrated by descriptions of other work, in which they have been applied to models of the Calvin cycle, sucrose metabolism in sugar cane, and starch metabolism in potatoes.

  1. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Toulouse

    2012-04-05

    The purpose of this project was to better understand the 'Multiscale Dynamics of Relaxor Ferroelectrics'. The output of the project is summarized in the narrative. The results of the work were presented at a number of different conferences and four papers were written, the references to which are also indicated in the report and which have also been uploaded on e-link. The multiscale dynamics of relaxors was clearly identified in the three characteristic temperatures that were identified. In particular, we were the first group to identify an intermediate temperature, T*, at which the correlations between off-center ions in relaxor cross-over from being dynamic to being static and giving rise to the characteristic relaxor behavior in the dielectric constant. Other groups have now confirmed the existence of such an intermediate temperature. We also made and reported two other observations: (1) a coherent interference phenomena (EIT-like effect) near the transition of several relaxors, which provides information on the nature and mechanism of the transition; and (2) in a similar way, inelastic neutron scattering results were interpreted as resonant scattering of acoustic phonons by localized modes in polar nanodomains. In parallel with the neutron scattering work, we also developed a theory of the scattering of phonons by the above localized modes. The theoretical development is very formal at this point and did not allow an easy comparison with the experimental results. This work is in progress.

  2. Allometric scaling laws of metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Jafferson Kamphorst Leal; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Barbosa, Lauro A.

    2006-12-01

    One of the most pervasive laws in biology is the allometric scaling, whereby a biological variable Y is related to the mass M of the organism by a power law, Y=YM, where b is the so-called allometric exponent. The origin of these power laws is still a matter of dispute mainly because biological laws, in general, do not follow from physical ones in a simple manner. In this work, we review the interspecific allometry of metabolic rates, where recent progress in the understanding of the interplay between geometrical, physical and biological constraints has been achieved. For many years, it was a universal belief that the basal metabolic rate (BMR) of all organisms is described by Kleiber's law (allometric exponent b=3/4). A few years ago, a theoretical basis for this law was proposed, based on a resource distribution network common to all organisms. Nevertheless, the 3/4-law has been questioned recently. First, there is an ongoing debate as to whether the empirical value of b is 3/4 or 2/3, or even nonuniversal. Second, some mathematical and conceptual errors were found these network models, weakening the proposed theoretical arguments. Another pertinent observation is that the maximal aerobically sustained metabolic rate of endotherms scales with an exponent larger than that of BMR. Here we present a critical discussion of the theoretical models proposed to explain the scaling of metabolic rates, and compare the predicted exponents with a review of the experimental literature. Our main conclusion is that although there is not a universal exponent, it should be possible to develop a unified theory for the common origin of the allometric scaling laws of metabolism.

  3. Temporal Expression-based Analysis of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Segrè, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic flux is frequently rerouted through cellular metabolism in response to dynamic changes in the intra- and extra-cellular environment. Capturing the mechanisms underlying these metabolic transitions in quantitative and predictive models is a prominent challenge in systems biology. Progress in this regard has been made by integrating high-throughput gene expression data into genome-scale stoichiometric models of metabolism. Here, we extend previous approaches to perform a Temporal Expression-based Analysis of Metabolism (TEAM). We apply TEAM to understanding the complex metabolic dynamics of the respiratorily versatile bacterium Shewanella oneidensis grown under aerobic, lactate-limited conditions. TEAM predicts temporal metabolic flux distributions using time-series gene expression data. Increased predictive power is achieved by supplementing these data with a large reference compendium of gene expression, which allows us to take into account the unique character of the distribution of expression of each individual gene. We further propose a straightforward method for studying the sensitivity of TEAM to changes in its fundamental free threshold parameter θ, and reveal that discrete zones of distinct metabolic behavior arise as this parameter is changed. By comparing the qualitative characteristics of these zones to additional experimental data, we are able to constrain the range of θ to a small, well-defined interval. In parallel, the sensitivity analysis reveals the inherently difficult nature of dynamic metabolic flux modeling: small errors early in the simulation propagate to relatively large changes later in the simulation. We expect that handling such “history-dependent” sensitivities will be a major challenge in the future development of dynamic metabolic-modeling techniques. PMID:23209390

  4. Temporal expression-based analysis of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sara B; Reznik, Ed; Segrè, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic flux is frequently rerouted through cellular metabolism in response to dynamic changes in the intra- and extra-cellular environment. Capturing the mechanisms underlying these metabolic transitions in quantitative and predictive models is a prominent challenge in systems biology. Progress in this regard has been made by integrating high-throughput gene expression data into genome-scale stoichiometric models of metabolism. Here, we extend previous approaches to perform a Temporal Expression-based Analysis of Metabolism (TEAM). We apply TEAM to understanding the complex metabolic dynamics of the respiratorily versatile bacterium Shewanella oneidensis grown under aerobic, lactate-limited conditions. TEAM predicts temporal metabolic flux distributions using time-series gene expression data. Increased predictive power is achieved by supplementing these data with a large reference compendium of gene expression, which allows us to take into account the unique character of the distribution of expression of each individual gene. We further propose a straightforward method for studying the sensitivity of TEAM to changes in its fundamental free threshold parameter θ, and reveal that discrete zones of distinct metabolic behavior arise as this parameter is changed. By comparing the qualitative characteristics of these zones to additional experimental data, we are able to constrain the range of θ to a small, well-defined interval. In parallel, the sensitivity analysis reveals the inherently difficult nature of dynamic metabolic flux modeling: small errors early in the simulation propagate to relatively large changes later in the simulation. We expect that handling such "history-dependent" sensitivities will be a major challenge in the future development of dynamic metabolic-modeling techniques. PMID:23209390

  5. Pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease: Role of oxidative metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a predominant etiological factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases, resulting in fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves complex and still unclear biological processes, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a preeminent role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of ALD. Ethanol oxidative metabolism influences intracellular signaling pathways and deranges the transcriptional control of several genes, leading to fat accumulation, fibrogenesis and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Acetaldehyde is known to be toxic to the liver and alters lipid homeostasis, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and increasing sterol regulatory element binding protein activity via an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. AMPK activation by ROS modulates autophagy, which has an important role in removing lipid droplets. Acetaldehyde and aldehydes generated from lipid peroxidation induce collagen synthesis by their ability to form protein adducts that activate transforming-growth-factor-β-dependent and independent profibrogenic pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Furthermore, activation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to ethanol metabolism plays a key role in the development and progression of ALD. Acetaldehyde alters the intestinal barrier and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by disrupting tight and adherent junctions in human colonic mucosa. Acetaldehyde and LPS induce Kupffer cells to release ROS and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to neutrophils infiltration. In addition, alcohol consumption inhibits natural killer cells that are cytotoxic to HSCs and thus have an important antifibrotic function in the liver. Ethanol metabolism may also interfere with cell

  6. Reprogramming of energy metabolism as a driver of aging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Hanson, Richard W; Berger, Nathan A; Trubitsyn, Alexander

    2016-03-29

    Aging is characterized by progressive loss of cellular function and integrity. It has been thought to be driven by stochastic molecular damage. However, genetic and environmental maneuvers enhancing mitochondrial function or inhibiting glycolysis extend lifespan and promote healthy aging in many species. In post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, a progressive decline in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with age, and a reciprocal increase in pyruvate kinase shunt energy metabolism from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. This reduces the efficiency and total of energy generation. As a result, energy-dependent physical activity and other cellular functions decrease due to unmatched energy demand and supply. In return, decrease in physical activity accelerates this metabolic shift, forming a vicious cycle. This metabolic event is a determinant of aging, and is retarded by caloric restriction to counteract aging. In this review, we summarize these and other evidence supporting the idea that metabolic reprogramming is a driver of aging. We also suggest strategies to test this hypothesis. PMID:26919253

  7. 'Sarcobesity': a metabolic conundrum.

    PubMed

    Parr, Evelyn B; Coffey, Vernon G; Hawley, John A

    2013-02-01

    Two independent but inter-related conditions that have a growing impact on healthy life expectancy and health care costs in developed nations are an age-related loss of muscle mass (i.e., sarcopenia) and obesity. Sarcopenia is commonly exacerbated in overweight and obese individuals. Progression towards obesity promotes an increase in fat mass and a concomitant decrease in muscle mass, producing an unfavourable ratio of fat to muscle. The coexistence of diminished muscle mass and increased fat mass (so-called 'sarcobesity') is ultimately manifested by impaired mobility and/or development of life-style-related diseases. Accordingly, the critical health issue for a large proportion of adults in developed nations is how to lose fat mass while preserving muscle mass. Lifestyle interventions to prevent or treat sarcobesity include energy-restricted diets and exercise. The optimal energy deficit to reduce body mass is controversial. While energy restriction in isolation is an effective short-term strategy for rapid and substantial weight loss, it results in a reduction of both fat and muscle mass and therefore ultimately predisposes one to an unfavourable body composition. Aerobic exercise promotes beneficial changes in whole-body metabolism and reduces fat mass, while resistance exercise preserves lean (muscle) mass. Current evidence strongly supports the inclusion of resistance and aerobic exercise to complement mild energy-restricted high-protein diets for healthy weight loss as a primary intervention for sarcobesity. PMID:23201324

  8. Progress with parasite plastids.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R J M Iain

    2002-05-31

    This review offers a snapshot of our current understanding of the origin, biology, and metabolic significance of the non-photosynthetic plastid organelle found in apicomplexan parasites. These protists are of considerable medical and veterinary importance world-wide, Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria being foremost in terms of human disease. It has been estimated that approximately 8% of the genes currently recognized by the malarial genome sequencing project (now nearing completion) are of bacterial/plastid origin. The bipartite presequences directing the products of these genes back to the plastid have provided fresh evidence that secondary endosymbiosis accounts for this organelle's presence in these parasites. Mounting phylogenetic evidence has strengthened the likelihood that the plastid originated from a red algal cell. Most importantly, we now have a broad understanding of several bacterial metabolic systems confined within the boundaries of the parasite plastid. The primary ones are type II fatty acid biosynthesis and isoprenoid biosynthesis. Some aspects of heme biosynthesis also might take place there. Retention of the plastid's relict genome and its still ill-defined capacity to participate in protein synthesis might be linked to an important house-keeping process, i.e. guarding the type II fatty acid biosynthetic pathway from oxidative damage. Fascinating observations have shown the parasite plastid does not divide by constriction as in typical plants, and that plastid-less parasites fail to thrive after invading a new cell. The modes of plastid DNA replication within the phylum also have provided surprises. Besides indicating the potential of the parasite plastid for therapeutic intervention, this review exposes many gaps remaining in our knowledge of this intriguing organelle. The rapid progress being made shows no sign of slackening.

  9. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  10. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  11. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options.

  12. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Golden

    2005-03-31

    The originally funded project was geared to pursue research on regulation of photosystem II (PSII) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We characterized a locus, psfR, (psbA stimulating factor) that affects expression of the psbAI gene, which encodes the PSII protein D1. Over-expression of psfR, which encodes a protein with receiver and pseudo-receiver domains, acts at the promoter region to elevate expression of psbAI and a subset of other loci. We reoriented the remainder of the funding to make a greater impact through completion of a functional genomics project that had been initiated with funding from another agency. The goal is inactivation of each gene individually in the S. elongatus genome, and completion of the entire genome sequence. At the end of the project we will have screened all loci for involvement in circadian rhythms of gene expression and assembled an archived set of clones that can be used to create the mutations to screen for any other phenotype. During the project period we: (1) prepared a functional genomics website for S. elongatus PCC 7942 that posts sequences prior to GenBank release, and presents the strategy and progress for the genomics project (http://www.bio.tamu.edu/synecho/); (2) determined the sequence of and annotated the S. elongatus 46 kb plasmid, pANL; (3) submitted assembled sequences with annotation of 8 cosmid inserts to GenBank (313 kb), with sites of transposon insertions indicated; (4) mutagenized approximately an additional 600 kb of the genome (16 cosmids) and identified sequences flanking the mutations; (5) recombined mutagenesis substrates into the S. elongatus genome to produce gene inactivations (at the sites of transposon insertions) for approximately 415 kb of mutagenized sequence (85% of these have already been screened for circadian phenotypes) (6) identified the clpPIIclpX locus as important in determining circadian period; and (7) demonstrated effectiveness of antisense RNA for decreasing

  13. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    PETER, GARY F.

    2014-07-16

    Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set

  14. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, Thomas R.

    2014-03-14

    We propose to extend the technique of polarized neutron scattering into new domains by continued development and application of polarized 3He spin-filters. These devices are particularly relevant to the Spallation Neutron Source, as the polarizing monochromators historically used at reactor sources will usually not be suitable polarizers, and wide-angle polarization analysis will be essential. With prior support from the Office of Science, we have developed neutron spin-filters based on the large spin dependence of the cross section for neutron capture by 3He, and applied these devices to a small angle neutron scattering spectrometer (SANS), polarized neutron reflectometers, a thermal energy single crystal diffractometer (SCD), and a thermal energy triple-axis instrument. Our developments have been adopted for application on the magnetism reflectometer at the SNS and for the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) 3He user capability. Results from both these programs are emerging. We have made significant progress in the past grant period on wide-angle polarization analysis. We have also performed several studies relevant to continuous optical pumping, including collaboration on experiments that have revealed neutron beam effects on spin filters that are continuously pumped by spin-exchange optical pumping. We contributed to an experiment on a neutron interferometer, in which the successful results obtained are directly related to both 3He cell technology and high accuracy 3He -based neutron polarimetry. Implementation of wide-angle polarization analysis will continue to be key thrust for our work in this new proposal. We will also focus on continuous optical pumping and the fundamental issues that determine the achievable 3He polarization. This project will be carried out by a collaboration involving scientists at NIST, Indiana University, Hamilton College, and the Univ. of Wisconsin who are experts in 3He polarization techniques, and materials scientists from the

  15. Roles of lipid metabolism in keloid development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenyu; Ogawa, Rei

    2013-05-01

    Keloids are common cutaneous pathological scars that are characterised by the histological accumulation of fibroblasts, collagen fibres, and clinically significant invasive growth. Although increasing lines of research on keloids have revealed genetic and environmental factors that contribute to their formation, the etiology of these scars remains unclear. Several studies have suggested the involvement of lipid metabolism, from a nutritional point of view. However, the role that lipid metabolism plays in the pathogenesis and progression of keloids has not previously been reviewed. The progress that has been made in understanding the roles of the pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in inflammation, and how they relate to the formation and progression of keloids, is also outlined. In particular, the possible relationships between mechanotransduction and lipid metabolites in keloids are explored. Mechanotransduction is the process by which physical forces are converted into biochemical signals that are then integrated into cellular responses. It is possible that lipid rafts and caveolae provide the location of lipid signaling and interactions between these signaling pathways and mechanotransduction. Moreover, interactions between lipid signaling pathway molecules and mechanotransduction molecules have been observed. A better understanding of the lipid profile changes and the functional roles lipid metabolism plays in keloids will help to identify target molecules for the development of novel interventions that can prevent, reduce, or even reverse pathological scar formation and/or progression.

  16. Respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Makarov, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the physiological indices of respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption in spacecrews under weightlessness conditions manifest themselves in increased metabolic rates, higher pulmonary ventilation volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination, energy consumption levels in proportion to reduction in neuroemotional and psychic stress, adaptation to weightlessness and work-rest cycles, and finally in a relative stabilization of metabolic processes due to hemodynamic shifts.

  17. [Metabolism of drugs. I. Basic metabolic reactions].

    PubMed

    Dyderski, Stanisław; Grzymisławski, Marian

    2005-04-01

    Pharmacologic effect of the drug results from its metabolism to metabolites showing decreased lipophilic properties and increased solubility in water. Transformations leading to inactivation of the drug are usually conducted by microsomal enzymes combined with cytochrome P-450. Main types of the metabolic reactions involved in the metabolism of exogenous substances are: oxidative reactions, hydrolysis and coupling reactions (often called second phase reactions). Estimation of the appearance of metabolites containing reactive groups (amino- or hydroxyl) should take into consideration the factor influencing the coupling reactions with glucuronic acid, sulphides, but also N-acetylation and methylation, coupling with glutathione or amino acids (mainly glycine and glutamine). Liver plays basic role in the metabolism of the drugs, but this metabolic activity appears also in the alimentary canal, where under influence of hydrochloric acid in stomach and intestine enzymes some xenobiotics are degraded. A special role is also played by intestine microflora.

  18. One-Carbon Metabolism in Prostate Cancer: The Role of Androgen Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Joshua M.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell metabolism differs significantly from the metabolism of non-transformed cells. This altered metabolic reprogramming mediates changes in the uptake and use of nutrients that permit high rates of proliferation, growth, and survival. The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the establishment and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and in the metabolic adaptation that takes place during this progression. In its role as a transcription factor, the AR directly affects the expression of several effectors and regulators of essential catabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Indirectly, as a modulator of the one-carbon metabolism, the AR can affect epigenetic processes, DNA metabolism, and redox balance, all of which are important factors in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on the role of AR-signaling on one-carbon metabolism in tumorigenesis. Clinical implications of one-carbon metabolism and AR-targeted therapies for PCa are discussed in this context. PMID:27472325

  19. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  20. Inborn errors of metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism - inborn errors of ... Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn errors of metabolism. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 205. Rezvani I, Rezvani G. An ...

  1. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  2. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  4. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Laub

    2008-12-29

    Our team of investigators from MIT (Michael Laub) and Stanford (Harley McAdams and Lucy Shapiro) conducted a multi-faceted, systematic experimental analysis of the 106 Caulobacter two-component signal transduction system proteins (62 histidine kinases and 44 response regulators) to understand how they coordinate cell cycle progression, metabolism, and response to environmental changes. These two-component signaling proteins were characterized at the genetic, biochemical, and genomic levels. The results generated by our laboratories have provided numerous insights into how Caulobacter cells sense and respond to a myriad of signals. As nearly all bacteria use two-component signaling for cell regulation, the results from this project help to deepen our general understanding of bacterial signal transduction. The tools and approaches developed can be applied to other bacteria. In particular, work from the Laub laboratory now enables the systematic, rational rewiring of two-component signaling proteins, a major advance that stands to impact synthetic biology and the development of biosensors and other designer molecular circuits. Results are summarized from our work. Each section lists publications and publicly-available resources which result from the work described.

  5. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

    2008-11-12

    The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

  6. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  7. Unique metabolic features of stem cells, cardiomyocytes, and their progenitors.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, John Antonydas; Doss, Michael Xavier; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Cadenas, Cristina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2014-04-11

    Recently, growing attention has been directed toward stem cell metabolism, with the key observation that the plasticity of stem cells also reflects the plasticity of their energy substrate metabolism. There seems to be a clear link between the self-renewal state of stem cells, in which cells proliferate without differentiation, and the activity of specific metabolic pathways. Differentiation is accompanied by a shift from anaerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial respiration. This metabolic switch of differentiating stem cells is required to cover the energy demands of the different organ-specific cell types. Among other metabolic signatures, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism is most prominent in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, whereas the fatty acid metabolic signature is unique in cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells. Identifying the specific metabolic pathways involved in pluripotency and differentiation is critical for further progress in the field of developmental biology and regenerative medicine. The recently generated knowledge on metabolic key processes may help to generate mature stem cell-derived somatic cells for therapeutic applications without the requirement of genetic manipulation. In the present review, the literature about metabolic features of stem cells and their cardiovascular cell derivatives as well as the specific metabolic gene signatures differentiating between stem and differentiated cells are summarized and discussed.

  8. Organ-Specific Cancer Metabolism and Its Potential for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Elia, Ilaria; Schmieder, Roberta; Christen, Stefan; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Targeting cancer metabolism has the potential to lead to major advances in tumor therapy. Numerous promising metabolic drug targets have been identified. Yet, it has emerged that there is no singular metabolism that defines the oncogenic state of the cell. Rather, the metabolism of cancer cells is a function of the requirements of a tumor. Hence, the tissue of origin, the (epi)genetic drivers, the aberrant signaling, and the microenvironment all together define these metabolic requirements. In this chapter we discuss in light of (epi)genetic, signaling, and environmental factors the diversity in cancer metabolism based on triple-negative and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, early- and late-stage prostate cancer, and liver cancer. These types of cancer all display distinct and partially opposing metabolic behaviors (e.g., Warburg versus reverse Warburg metabolism). Yet, for each of the cancers, their distinct metabolism supports the oncogenic phenotype. Finally, we will assess the therapeutic potential of metabolism based on the concepts of metabolic normalization and metabolic depletion.

  9. Metabolic flexibility and obesity in children and youth.

    PubMed

    Aucouturier, J; Duché, P; Timmons, B W

    2011-05-01

    The concept of metabolic flexibility describes the ability of skeletal muscle to switch between the oxidation of lipid as a fuel during fasting periods to the oxidation of carbohydrate during insulin stimulated period. Alterations in energy metabolism in adults with obesity, insulin resistance and/or type 2 diabetes induce a state of impaired metabolic flexibility, or metabolic inflexibility. Despite the increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in obese children and youth, less is known about the factors involved in the development of metabolic inflexibility in the paediatric population. Metabolic flexibility is conditioned by nutrient partitioning in response to feeding, substrate mobilization and delivery to skeletal muscle during fasting or exercising condition, and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. Our aim in this review was to identify among these factors those making obese children at risk of metabolic inflexibility. The development of ectopic rather than peripheral fat storage appears to be a factor strongly linked with a reduced metabolic flexibility. Tissue growth and maturation are determinants of impaired energy metabolism later in life but also as a promising way to reverse metabolic inflexibility given the plasticity of many tissues in youth. Finally, we have attempted to identify perspectives for future investigations of metabolic flexibility in obese children that will improve our understanding of the genesis of metabolic diseases associated with obesity. PMID:20977601

  10. Organ-Specific Cancer Metabolism and Its Potential for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Elia, Ilaria; Schmieder, Roberta; Christen, Stefan; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Targeting cancer metabolism has the potential to lead to major advances in tumor therapy. Numerous promising metabolic drug targets have been identified. Yet, it has emerged that there is no singular metabolism that defines the oncogenic state of the cell. Rather, the metabolism of cancer cells is a function of the requirements of a tumor. Hence, the tissue of origin, the (epi)genetic drivers, the aberrant signaling, and the microenvironment all together define these metabolic requirements. In this chapter we discuss in light of (epi)genetic, signaling, and environmental factors the diversity in cancer metabolism based on triple-negative and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, early- and late-stage prostate cancer, and liver cancer. These types of cancer all display distinct and partially opposing metabolic behaviors (e.g., Warburg versus reverse Warburg metabolism). Yet, for each of the cancers, their distinct metabolism supports the oncogenic phenotype. Finally, we will assess the therapeutic potential of metabolism based on the concepts of metabolic normalization and metabolic depletion. PMID:25912014

  11. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  12. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  13. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    PubMed Central

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  14. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Fred C.

    2003-01-15

    species of flagellates, Spumella sp. and Bodo sp. (identifications are tentative) were isolated from South Oyster sediments by repetitive serial dilution/extinction method. Protistan cells were cultured with Cereal leaf Prescott medium and pelleted by centrifugation. Protistan DNAs were extracted with a DNA extraction kit (Sigma Co.) and the sequencing of their SSrDNA is underway. Finally, to follow up on our collaboration of Dr. Bill Johnson (Univ. of Utah), one of the co-PIs under the same NABIR umbrella, we are pleased to report we have successfully tested antibody-ferrographic capture of protists (See previous year's report for more background). Polyclonal FITC-conjugated antibody specific for a flagellate, Spumella sp., was produced by Rockland Inc., and we now are able to enumerate that species using ferrographic capture. There are, however, some issues of non-specific staining that remain to be resolved.

  15. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  16. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  17. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  18. Modularization of genetic elements promotes synthetic metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hao; Li, Bing-Zhi; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Liu, Duo; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-11-15

    In the context of emerging synthetic biology, metabolic engineering is moving to the next stage powered by new technologies. Systematical modularization of genetic elements makes it more convenient to engineer biological systems for chemical production or other desired purposes. In the past few years, progresses were made in engineering metabolic pathway using synthetic biology tools. Here, we spotlighted the topic of implementation of modularized genetic elements in metabolic engineering. First, we overviewed the principle developed for modularizing genetic elements and then discussed how the genetic modules advanced metabolic engineering studies. Next, we picked up some milestones of engineered metabolic pathway achieved in the past few years. Last, we discussed the rapid raised synthetic biology field of "building a genome" and the potential in metabolic engineering.

  19. Metabolic selection of glycosylation defects in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Kevin J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-01

    Changes in glycosylation are often associated with disease progression, but the genetic and metabolic basis of these events is rarely understood in detail at a molecular level. This report describes a novel metabolism-based approach to the selection of mutants in glycoconjugate biosynthesis that has provided insight into regulatory mechanisms for oligosaccharide expression and metabolic flux. Unnatural intermediates are used to challenge a specific pathway and cell-surface expression of their metabolic products provides a readout of flux in that pathway and a basis for selecting genetic mutants. The approach was applied to the sialic acid metabolic pathway in human cells, yielding novel mutants with phenotypes related to the inborn metabolic defect sialuria and metastatic tumor cells.

  20. Physiology and pathophysiology of liver lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Pecere, Silvia; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Ojetti, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Liver lipid metabolism and its modulation are involved in many pathologic conditions, such as obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Metabolic disorders seem to share a similar background of low-grade chronic inflammation, even if the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to tissue and organ damage have not been completely clarified yet. The accumulation of neutral lipids in the liver is now recognized as a beneficial and protective mechanism; on the other hand, lipoperoxidation is involved in the development and progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The role of the gut microbiota in liver lipid metabolism has been the object of recent scientific investigations. It is likely that the gut microbiota is involved in a complex metabolic modulation and the translocation of gut microflora may also contribute to maintaining the low-grade inflammatory status of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, lipid metabolism pathology has vague limits and complex mechanisms, and the knowledge of these is essential to guide diagnostic and therapeutic decisions.

  1. Sustained metabolic scope.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, C C; Nagy, K A; Diamond, J

    1990-01-01

    Sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) are time-averaged metabolic rates that are measured in free-ranging animals maintaining constant body mass over periods long enough that metabolism is fueled by food intake rather than by transient depletion of energy reserves. Many authors have suggested that SusMR of various wild animal species are only a few times resting (basal or standard) metabolic rates (RMR). We test this conclusion by analyzing all 37 species (humans, 31 other endothermic vertebrates, and 5 ectothermic vertebrates) for which SusMR and RMR had both been measured. For all species, the ratio of SusMR to RMR, which we term sustained metabolic scope, is less than 7; most values fall between 1.5 and 5. Some of these values, such as those for Tour de France cyclists and breeding birds, are surely close to sustainable metabolic ceilings for the species studied. That is, metabolic rates higher than 7 times RMR apparently cannot be sustained indefinitely. These observations pose several questions: whether the proximate physiological causes of metabolic ceilings reside in the digestive tract's ability to process food or in each tissue's metabolic capacity; whether ceiling values are independent of the mode of energy expenditure; whether ceilings are set by single limiting physiological capacities or by coadjusted clusters of capacities (symmorphosis); what the ultimate evolutionary causes of metabolic ceilings are; and how metabolic ceilings may limit animals' reproductive effort, foraging behavior, and geographic distribution. PMID:2315323

  2. Metabolic theory of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock is a life threatening condition that can develop subsequent to infection. Mortality can reach as high as 80% with over 150000 deaths yearly in the United States alone. Septic shock causes progressive failure of vital homeostatic mechanisms culminating in immunosuppression, coagulopathy and microvascular dysfunction which can lead to refractory hypotension, organ failure and death. The hypermetabolic response that accompanies a systemic inflammatory reaction places high demands upon stored nutritional resources. A crucial element that can become depleted early during the progression to septic shock is glutathione. Glutathione is chiefly responsible for supplying reducing equivalents to neutralize hydrogen peroxide, a toxic oxidizing agent that is produced during normal metabolism. Without glutathione, hydrogen peroxide can rise to toxic levels in tissues and blood where it can cause severe oxidative injury to organs and to the microvasculature. Continued exposure can result in microvascular dysfunction, capillary leakage and septic shock. It is the aim of this paper to present evidence that elevated systemic levels of hydrogen peroxide are present in septic shock victims and that it significantly contributes to the development and progression of this frequently lethal condition. PMID:24892019

  3. Metabolic reconstruction, constraint-based analysis and game theory to probe genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Ruppin, Eytan; Papin, Jason A; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Schuster, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    With the advent of modern omics technologies, it has become feasible to reconstruct (quasi-) whole-cell metabolic networks and characterize them in more and more detail. Computer simulations of the dynamic behavior of such networks are difficult due to a lack of kinetic data and to computational limitations. In contrast, network analysis based on appropriate constraints such as the steady-state condition (constraint-based analysis) is feasible and allows one to derive conclusions about the system's metabolic capabilities. Here, we review methods for the reconstruction of metabolic networks, modeling techniques such as flux balance analysis and elementary flux modes and current progress in their development and applications. Game-theoretical methods for studying metabolic networks are discussed as well. PMID:20692823

  4. Metabolic reconstruction, constraint-based analysis and game theory to probe genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Ruppin, Eytan; Papin, Jason A; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Schuster, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    With the advent of modern omics technologies, it has become feasible to reconstruct (quasi-) whole-cell metabolic networks and characterize them in more and more detail. Computer simulations of the dynamic behavior of such networks are difficult due to a lack of kinetic data and to computational limitations. In contrast, network analysis based on appropriate constraints such as the steady-state condition (constraint-based analysis) is feasible and allows one to derive conclusions about the system's metabolic capabilities. Here, we review methods for the reconstruction of metabolic networks, modeling techniques such as flux balance analysis and elementary flux modes and current progress in their development and applications. Game-theoretical methods for studying metabolic networks are discussed as well.

  5. Dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Lindsay K; Fox, Todd E; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark

    2011-01-15

    Altered sphingolipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression and presents an exploitable target for the development of novel chemotherapeutics. Bioactive sphingolipid metabolites also have the potential to serve as vital biomarkers for cancer and be utilized to determine disease progression, as well as guide therapeutic regimens. Moreover, identification of these sphingolipid biomarkers is achievable based on recent technological advances in sphingolipidomics, which have aided in detection of sphingolipid metabolites through tools like mass spectrometry. Excellent reviews have previously focused on the biochemical role that sphingolipids have in cancer pathogenesis and treatment. The aim of this review is to concentrate on the critical metabolites and enzymes that contribute to the dysregulation in sphingolipid metabolism, and highlight relevant translational research that is directed towards novel therapies.

  6. Learning numerical progressions.

    PubMed

    Vitz, P C; Hazan, D N

    1974-01-01

    Learning of simple numerical progressions and compound progressions formed by combining two or three simple progressions is investigated. In two experiments, time to solution was greater for compound vs simple progressions; greater the higher the progression's solution level; and greater if the progression consisted of large vs small numbers. A set of strategies is proposed to account for progression learning based on the assumption S computes differences between integers, differences between differences, etc., in a hierarchical fashion. Two measures of progression difficulty, each a summary of the strategies, are proposed; C1 is a count of the number of differences needed to solve a progression; C2 is the same count with higher level differences given more weight. The measures accurately predict in both experiments the mean time to solve 16 different progressions with C2 being somewhat superior. The measures also predict the learning difficulty of 10 other progressions reported by Bjork (1968).

  7. Inborn Errors of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ezgu, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism are single gene disorders resulting from the defects in the biochemical pathways of the body. Although these disorders are individually rare, collectively they account for a significant portion of childhood disability and deaths. Most of the disorders are inherited as autosomal recessive whereas autosomal dominant and X-linked disorders are also present. The clinical signs and symptoms arise from the accumulation of the toxic substrate, deficiency of the product, or both. Depending on the residual activity of the deficient enzyme, the initiation of the clinical picture may vary starting from the newborn period up until adulthood. Hundreds of disorders have been described until now and there has been a considerable clinical overlap between certain inborn errors. Resulting from this fact, the definite diagnosis of inborn errors depends on enzyme assays or genetic tests. Especially during the recent years, significant achievements have been gained for the biochemical and genetic diagnosis of inborn errors. Techniques such as tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for biochemical diagnosis and microarrays and next-generation sequencing for the genetic diagnosis have enabled rapid and accurate diagnosis. The achievements for the diagnosis also enabled newborn screening and prenatal diagnosis. Parallel to the development the diagnostic methods; significant progress has also been obtained for the treatment. Treatment approaches such as special diets, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate inhibition, and organ transplantation have been widely used. It is obvious that by the help of the preclinical and clinical research carried out for inborn errors, better diagnostic methods and better treatment approaches will high likely be available.

  8. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  9. Transcriptional and metabolic effects of glucose on Streptococcus pneumoniae sugar metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Laura; Caldas, José; Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vinga, Susana; Neves, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative human pathogen that relies on carbohydrate metabolism to generate energy for growth. The nasopharynx colonized by the bacterium is poor in free sugars, but mucosa lining glycans can provide a source of sugar. In blood and inflamed tissues glucose is the prevailing sugar. As a result during progression from colonization to disease S. pneumoniae has to cope with a pronounced shift in carbohydrate nature and availability. Thus, we set out to assess the pneumococcal response to sugars found in glycans and the influence of glucose (Glc) on this response at the transcriptional, physiological, and metabolic levels. Galactose (Gal), N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and mannose (Man) affected the expression of 8 to 14% of the genes covering cellular functions including central carbon metabolism and virulence. The pattern of end-products as monitored by in vivo 13C-NMR is in good agreement with the fermentation profiles during growth, while the pools of phosphorylated metabolites are consistent with the type of fermentation observed (homolactic vs. mixed) and regulation at the metabolic level. Furthermore, the accumulation of α-Gal6P and Man6P indicate metabolic bottlenecks in the metabolism of Gal and Man, respectively. Glc added to cells actively metabolizing other sugar(s) was readily consumed and elicited a metabolic shift toward a homolactic profile. The transcriptional response to Glc was large (over 5% of the genome). In central carbon metabolism (most represented category), Glc exerted mostly negative regulation. The smallest response to Glc was observed on a sugar mix, suggesting that exposure to varied sugars improves the fitness of S. pneumoniae. The expression of virulence factors was negatively controlled by Glc in a sugar-dependent manner. Overall, our results shed new light on the link between carbohydrate metabolism, adaptation to host niches and virulence. PMID:26500614

  10. Transcriptional and metabolic effects of glucose on Streptococcus pneumoniae sugar metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Laura; Caldas, José; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Kuipers, Oscar P; Vinga, Susana; Neves, Ana R

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative human pathogen that relies on carbohydrate metabolism to generate energy for growth. The nasopharynx colonized by the bacterium is poor in free sugars, but mucosa lining glycans can provide a source of sugar. In blood and inflamed tissues glucose is the prevailing sugar. As a result during progression from colonization to disease S. pneumoniae has to cope with a pronounced shift in carbohydrate nature and availability. Thus, we set out to assess the pneumococcal response to sugars found in glycans and the influence of glucose (Glc) on this response at the transcriptional, physiological, and metabolic levels. Galactose (Gal), N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and mannose (Man) affected the expression of 8 to 14% of the genes covering cellular functions including central carbon metabolism and virulence. The pattern of end-products as monitored by in vivo (13)C-NMR is in good agreement with the fermentation profiles during growth, while the pools of phosphorylated metabolites are consistent with the type of fermentation observed (homolactic vs. mixed) and regulation at the metabolic level. Furthermore, the accumulation of α-Gal6P and Man6P indicate metabolic bottlenecks in the metabolism of Gal and Man, respectively. Glc added to cells actively metabolizing other sugar(s) was readily consumed and elicited a metabolic shift toward a homolactic profile. The transcriptional response to Glc was large (over 5% of the genome). In central carbon metabolism (most represented category), Glc exerted mostly negative regulation. The smallest response to Glc was observed on a sugar mix, suggesting that exposure to varied sugars improves the fitness of S. pneumoniae. The expression of virulence factors was negatively controlled by Glc in a sugar-dependent manner. Overall, our results shed new light on the link between carbohydrate metabolism, adaptation to host niches and virulence. PMID:26500614

  11. Genome of Bifidobacteria and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the knowledge about bifidobacteria has considerably evolved thanks to recent progress in molecular biology. The analysis of the whole genome sequences of 48 taxa of bifidobacteria offers new perspectives for their classification, especially to set up limit between two species. Indeed, several species are presenting a high homology and should be reclassified. On the other hand, some subspecies are presenting a low homology and should therefore be reclassified into different species. In addition, a better knowledge of the genome of bifidobacteria allows a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in complex carbohydrate metabolism. The genome of some species of bifidobacteria from human but also from animal origin demonstrates high presence in genes involved in the metabolism of complex oligosaccharides. Those species should be further tested to confirm their potential to metabolize complex oligosaccharides in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26761794

  12. Sestrins orchestrate cellular metabolism to attenuate aging

    PubMed Central

    Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Sestrins constitute a family of evolutionarily-conserved stress-inducible proteins that suppress oxidative stress and regulate adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. By virtue of these activities, the Sestrins serve as important regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Accordingly, inactivation of Sestrin genes in invertebrates resulted in diverse metabolic pathologies, including oxidative damage, fat accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and muscle degeneration that resemble accelerated tissue aging. Likewise, Sestrin deficiencies in mice led to accelerated diabetic progression upon obesity. Further investigation of Sestrin function and regulation should provide new insights into age-associated metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, myopathies and cancer. PMID:24055102

  13. Interactions between epigenetics and metabolism in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jihye; Johnson, Jared L.; Hanigan, Christin L.; Locasale, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by widespread transcriptional changes and metabolic alterations. While it is widely accepted that the origin of cancer can be traced to the mutations that accumulate over time, relatively recent evidence favors a similarly fundamental role for alterations in the epigenome during tumorigenesis. Changes in epigenetics that arise from post-translational modifications of histones and DNA are exploited by cancer cells to upregulate and/or downregulate the expression levels of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, respectively. Although the mechanisms behind these modifications, in particular how they lead to gene silencing and activation, are still being understood, most of the enzymatic machinery of epigenetics require metabolites as substrates or cofactors. As a result, their activities can be influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of cancer epigenetics and metabolism and provide examples of where they converge. PMID:23162793

  14. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed. PMID:25089525

  15. Rapidly Progressing Osteomyelitis of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ken; Okada, Shino; Takeuchi, Noritami; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis exists as a refractory disease even now, which usually exhibits systemic symptoms such as fever or malaise and local redness or swelling. The present paper describes a case of acute osteomyelitis of the mandible that was rapidly progressing without typical symptoms. The patient had liver cirrhosis, which should be one of the systemic factors that affect immune surveillance and metabolism. Actinomycotic druses and filaments were detected from the sequestrum. These were considered to play a role in the rapid progression of osteomyelitis without typical symptoms. There has been no evidence of local recurrence 24 months after surgery. PMID:24349802

  16. Metabolic signals and food intake. Forty years of progress.

    PubMed

    Woods, Stephen C

    2013-12-01

    The Columbia Appetitive Seminar, which began in 1972, has been a huge success in bringing together scholars interested in appetitive behavior, stimulating research and new ideas, and encouraging collaborations. At the time of the Seminar's inception, predominant views were that energy derived acutely from the utilization of glucose was a primary causative factor in determining the initiation (hunger) and offset (satiation) of meals; and that specific nuclei in the hypothalamus controlled unique aspects of motivated behaviors, such as stimulating water intake or creating a feeling of satiety. Over the ensuing 40 years, these views have given way to models of appetitive behavior utilizing complex interacting neural circuits responding to diverse signals emanating from the gastrointestinal tract, the external environment, cognitive, learned and social factors, and many more. Pivotal reports include the 1973 demonstration that cholecystokinin reduces meal size, and the discovery of leptin in 1994.

  17. Interdisciplinary Pathways for Urban Metabolism Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    With its rapid rise as a metaphor to express coupled natural-human systems in cities, the concept of urban metabolism is evolving into a series of relatively distinct research frameworks amongst various disciplines, with varying definitions, theories, models, and emphases. In industrial ecology, housed primarily within the disciplinary domain of engineering, urban metabolism research has focused on quantifying material and energy flows into, within, and out of cities, using methodologies such as material flow analysis and life cycle assessment. In the field of urban ecology, which is strongly influenced by ecology and urban planning, research focus has been placed on understanding and modeling the complex patterns and processes of human-ecological systems within urban areas. Finally, in political ecology, closely aligned with human geography and anthropology, scholars theorize about the interwoven knots of social and natural processes, material flows, and spatial structures that form the urban metabolism. This paper offers three potential interdisciplinary urban metabolism research tracks that might integrate elements of these three "ecologies," thereby bridging engineering and the social and physical sciences. First, it presents the idea of infrastructure ecology, which explores the complex, emergent interdependencies between gray (water and wastewater, transportation, etc) and green (e.g. parks, greenways) infrastructure systems, as nested within a broader socio-economic context. For cities to be sustainable and resilient over time-space, the theory follows, these is a need to understand and redesign these infrastructure linkages. Second, there is the concept of an urban-scale carbon metabolism model which integrates consumption-based material flow analysis (including goods, water, and materials), with the carbon sink and source dynamics of the built environment (e.g. buildings, etc) and urban ecosystems. Finally, there is the political ecology of the material

  18. [Alimentary, metabolic and toxic osteopathies in adults].

    PubMed

    Ellegast, H H

    1986-12-01

    Skeletal changes in deficient or badly balanced nutrition (alimentary osteopathies) and osseous changes accompanying chronic disease of internal organs and metabolic disorders (metabolic osteopathies) are discussed. Basically, the classical generalised skeletal changes such as osteoporosis, osteomalacia, fibroosteoclacia and sclerosis of the bone can occur in their pure form or as a combination of two ore more of these disorders. Finally the exogenic toxic osteopathies are discussed, nowadays fluorosis being the most important. Other external factors may be drugs such as methotrexate and antiepileptic medications.

  19. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogenesis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise. PMID:23181051

  20. METABOLISM Wnt Signaling Regulates Hepatic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Fergusson, Maria M.; Wu, J. Julie; Rovira, Ilsa I.; Liu, Jie; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lu, Teng; Bao, Jianjun; Han, Donghe; Sack, Michael N.; Finkel, Toren

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the Wnt pathway has been extensively characterized in embryogenesis, differentiation, and stem cell biology but not in mammalian metabolism. Here, using in vivo gain- and loss-of-function models, we demonstrate an important role for Wnt signaling in hepatic metabolism. In particular, β-Catenin, the downstream mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, altered serum glucose concentrations and regulated hepatic glucose production. β-catenin also modulated hepatic insulin signaling. Furthermore, β-catenin interacted with the transcription factor FoxO1 in livers from mice under starved conditions. The interaction of FoxO1 with β-catenin regulated the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the two rate-limiting enzymes in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Moreover, starvation induced the hepatic expression of mRNAs encoding different Wnt isoforms. In addition, nutrient deprivation appeared to favor the association of β-catenin with FoxO family members, rather than with members of the T cell factor of transcriptional activators. Notably, in a model of diet-induced obesity, hepatic deletion of β-catenin improved overall metabolic homeostasis. These observations implicate Wnt signaling in the modulation of hepatic metabolism and raise the possibility that Wnt signaling may play a similar role in the metabolic regulation of other tissues. PMID:21285411

  1. Integrating Crystallography into Early Metabolism Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Gabriele; Aristei, Yasmin; Goracci, Laura; Carosati, Emanuele

    Since bioavailability, activity, toxicity, distribution, and final elimination all depend on metabolic biotransformations, it would be extremely advantageous if this information to be produced early in the discovery phase. Once obtained, researchers can judge whether or not a potential candidate should be eliminated from the pipeline, or modified to improve chemical stability or safety. The use of in silico methods to predict the site of metabolism in Phase I cytochrome-mediated reactions is a starting point in any metabolic pathway prediction. This paper presents a new method, which provides the site of metabolism for any CYP-mediated reaction acting on unknown substrates. The methodology can be applied automatically to all the cytochromes whose Xray 3D structure is known, but can be also applied to homology model 3D structures. The fully automated procedure can be used to detect positions that should be protected in order to avoid metabolic degradation, or to check the suitability of a new scaffold or pro-drug. Therefore the procedure is also a valuable new tool in early ADME-Tox, where drug-safety and metabolic profile patterns must be evaluated as soon, and as early, as possible.

  2. Extensive Decoupling of Metabolic Genes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Sander, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis requires the re-organization of metabolism to support malignant proliferation. We examine how the altered metabolism of cancer cells is reflected in the rewiring of co-expression patterns among metabolic genes. Focusing on breast and clear-cell kidney tumors, we report the existence of key metabolic genes which act as hubs of differential co-expression, showing significantly different co-regulation patterns between normal and tumor states. We compare our findings to those from classical differential expression analysis, and counterintuitively observe that the extent of a gene's differential co-expression only weakly correlates with its differential expression, suggesting that the two measures probe different features of metabolism. Focusing on this discrepancy, we use changes in co-expression patterns to highlight the apparent loss of regulation by the transcription factor HNF4A in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, despite no differential expression of HNF4A. Finally, we aggregate the results of differential co-expression analysis into a Pan-Cancer analysis across seven distinct cancer types to identify pairs of metabolic genes which may be recurrently dysregulated. Among our results is a cluster of four genes, all components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which show significant loss of co-expression in tumor tissue, pointing to potential mitochondrial dysfunction in these tumor types. PMID:25961905

  3. Evolution of Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Rye, R.

    2003-12-01

    This chapter is devoted to the discussion of the evolution of metabolism, with a particular focus towards redox metabolism and the utilization of redox energy by life. We will deal with various aspects of metabolism that involve direct interaction with, and the extraction of energy from, the environment (catabolic metabolism) and will talk briefly of the reactions that affect mineral formation and dissolution. However, we will de-emphasize the aspects related to the formation of complex molecules and organisms. To some, it will be refreshingly brief; to others, somewhat superficial. This is unavoidable, as our knowledge of the details of the evolution of metabolism is at best slim. However, by piecing together aspects of the properties and history of the Earth and coupling these with what we know of today's metabolism, it is possible to at least frame several different hypotheses that, with time, should be possible to test and modify so that the next writing of this chapter might contain some intellectual entrees and not just the appetizers. Any discussion of metabolic evolution must occur in concert with a consideration of the Earth - the understanding of the forces that drove the co-evolution of life and Earth can be achieved only by considering them together. This theme will pervade this chapter, and any real understanding of the evolution of metabolism must be inexorably coupled to, and consistent with, the geological record of the Earth.The first aspect of evolution concerns the metabolic participants as we know them now (i.e., a definition of metabolic diversity), and the second concerns the sequence of events that have led to this remarkable metabolic diversity. The first part is fairly straightforward: a discussion of the domains of life, and the metabolic achievements that are expressed in the various domains, and relating metabolism to biogeochemical processes whenever possible. The second part is much more problematic. While it is possible to make up

  4. Eicosanoids in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, James P.; Eckman, Katie; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Esterle, Andrew; Chilian, William M.; Chiang, John Y.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Chronic persistent inflammation plays a significant role in disease pathology of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). MetS is a constellation of diseases that include obesity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with many of the MetS diseases. These metabolic derangements trigger a persistent inflammatory cascade, which includes production of lipid autacoids (eicosanoids) that recruit immune cells to the site of injury and subsequent expression of cytokines and chemokines that amplify the inflammatory response. In acute inflammation, the transcellular synthesis of antiinflammatory eicosanoids resolve inflammation, while persistent activation of the autacoid-cytokine-chemokine cascade in metabolic disease leads to chronic inflammation and accompanying tissue pathology. Many drugs targeting the eicosanoid pathways have been shown to be effective in the treatment of MetS, suggesting a common linkage between inflammation, MetS and drug metabolism.The cross-talk between inflammation and MetS seems apparent because of the growing evidence linking immune cell activation and metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Thus modulation of lipid metabolism through either dietary adjustment or selective drugs may become a new paradigm in the treatment of metabolic disorders. This review focuses on the mechanisms linking eicosanoid metabolism to persistent inflammation and altered lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in MetS. PMID:23433458

  5. Engineering of Secondary Metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Secondary (specialized) metabolites, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants, and other organisms, exhibit enormous structural variation, and consequently display a wide range of biological activities. Secondary metabolism improves and modulates the phenotype of the host producer. Furthermore, these biological activities have resulted in the use of secondary metabolites in a variety of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Metabolic engineering presents a powerful strategy to improve access to these valuable molecules. A critical overview of engineering approaches in secondary metabolism is presented, both in heterologous and native hosts. The recognition of the increasing role of compartmentalization in metabolic engineering is highlighted. Engineering approaches to modify the structure of key secondary metabolite classes are also critically evaluated.

  6. Drug metabolism in the skin.

    PubMed

    Baron, J M; Merk, H F

    2001-08-01

    The skin performs a wide range of active metabolic functions including xenobiotic metabolism involving metabolizing enzymes specific to the skin. In this review we focus on the role of drug metabolism: (i) in allergic reactions to substances of low molecular weight; (ii) in cutaneous vitamin A and D3 metabolism and its modulation; (iii) in the interaction of transport and metabolic enzymes in skin cells; and (iv) on novel tools for the measurement of drug metabolism in various compartments of the human skin.

  7. Oxygen, homeostasis, and metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, P W

    2000-01-01

    Even a cursory review of the literature today indicates that two views dominate experimental approaches to metabolic regulation. Model I assumes that cell behavior is quite similar to that expected for a bag of enzymes. Model II assumes that 3-D order and structure constrain metabolite behavior and that metabolic regulation theory has to incorporate structure to ever come close to describing reality. The phosphagen system may be used to illustrate that both approaches lead to very productive experimentation and significant advances are being made within both theoretical frameworks. However, communication between the two approaches or the two 'groups' is essentially nonexistent and in many cases (our own for example) some experiments are done in one framework and some in the other (implying some potential schizophrenia in the field). In our view, the primary paradox and problem which no one has solved so far is that essentially all metabolite concentrations are remarkably stable (are homeostatic) over large changes in pathway fluxes. For muscle cells O2 is one of the most perfectly homeostatic of all even though O2 delivery and metabolic rate usually correlate in a 1:1 fashion. Four explanations for this behavior are given by traditional metabolic regulation models. Additionally, there is some evidence for universal O2 sensors which could help to get us out of the paradox. In contrast, proponents of an ultrastructurally dominated view of the cell assume intracellular perfusion or convection as the main means for accelerating enzyme-substrate encounter and as a way to account for the data which have been most perplexing so far: the striking lack of correlation between changes in pathway reaction rates and changes in concentrations of pathway substrates and intermediates, including oxygen. The polarization illustrated by these two views of living cells extends throughout the metabolic regulation field (and has caused the field to progress along two surprisingly

  8. Kinetic modeling of cell metabolism for microbial production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rafael S; Hartmann, Andras; Vinga, Susana

    2016-02-10

    Kinetic models of cellular metabolism are important tools for the rational design of metabolic engineering strategies and to explain properties of complex biological systems. The recent developments in high-throughput experimental data are leading to new computational approaches for building kinetic models of metabolism. Herein, we briefly survey the available databases, standards and software tools that can be applied for kinetic models of metabolism. In addition, we give an overview about recently developed ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based kinetic models of metabolism and some of the main applications of such models are illustrated in guiding metabolic engineering design. Finally, we review the kinetic modeling approaches of large-scale networks that are emerging, discussing their main advantages, challenges and limitations. PMID:26724578

  9. Expanding the metabolic engineering toolbox with directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Abatemarco, Joseph; Hill, Andrew; Alper, Hal S

    2013-12-01

    Cellular systems can be engineered into factories that produce high-value chemicals from renewable feedstock. Such an approach requires an expanded toolbox for metabolic engineering. Recently, protein engineering and directed evolution strategies have started to play a growing and critical role within metabolic engineering. This review focuses on the various ways in which directed evolution can be applied in conjunction with metabolic engineering to improve product yields. Specifically, we discuss the application of directed evolution on both catalytic and non-catalytic traits of enzymes, on regulatory elements, and on whole genomes in a metabolic engineering context. We demonstrate how the goals of metabolic pathway engineering can be achieved in part through evolving cellular parts as opposed to traditional approaches that rely on gene overexpression and deletion. Finally, we discuss the current limitations in screening technology that hinder the full implementation of a metabolic pathway-directed evolution approach.

  10. [Metabolic intolerance to exercise].

    PubMed

    Arenas, J; Martín, M A

    2003-01-01

    Exercise intolerance (EI) is a frequent cause of medical attention, although it is sometimes difficult to come to a final diagnosis. However, there is a group of patients in whom EI is due to a metabolic dysfunction. McArdle's disease (type V glucogenosis) is due to myophosphorylase (MPL) deficiency. The ischemic exercise test shows a flat lactate curve. The most frequent mutations in the PYGM gene (MPL gene) in Spanish patients with MPL deficiency are R49X and W797R. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency is invariably associated to repetitive episodes of myoglobinuria triggered by exercise, cold, fever or fasting. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of CPT II deficiency in muscle. The most frequent mutation in the CPT2 gene is the S113L. Patients with muscle adenylate deaminase deficiency usually show either a mild myopathy or no symptom. The diagnosis is based on the absence of enzyme activity in muscle and the lack of rise of ammonia in the forearm ischemic exercise test. The mutation Q12X in the AMPD1 gene is strongly associated with the disease. Exercise intolerance is a common complaint in patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) deficiencies, although it is often overshadowed by other symptoms and signs. Only recently we have come to appreciate that exercise intolerance can be the sole presentation of defects in the mtDNA, particularly in complex I, complex III, complex IV, or in some tRNAs. In addition, myoglobinuria can be observed in patients under statin treatment, particularly if associated with fibrates, due to an alteration in the assembly of the complex IV of the MRC. PMID:12838448

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase 11 protects from diabesity and promotes metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Hnia, Karim; Blaise, Sébastien; Messaddeq, Nadia; Blanc, Stéphane; Postic, Catherine; Valet, Philippe; Tomasetto, Catherine; Rio, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    MMP11 overexpression is a bad prognostic factor in various human carcinomas. Interestingly, this proteinase is not expressed in malignant cells themselves but is secreted by adjacent non-malignant mesenchymal/stromal cells, such as cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and adipocytes (CAAs), which favors cancer cell survival and progression. As MMP11 negatively regulates adipogenesis in vitro, we hypothesized that it may play a role in whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. We used an in vivo gain- (Mmp11-Tg mice) and loss- (Mmp11−/− mice) of-function approach to address the systemic function of MMP11. Strikingly, MMP11 overexpression protects against type 2 diabetes while Mmp11−/− mice exhibit hallmarks of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, Mmp11-Tg mice were protected from diet-induced obesity and display mitochondrial dysfunction, due to oxidative stress, and metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. This Warburg-like effect observed in adipose tissues might provide a rationale for the deleterious impact of CAA-secreted MMP11, favouring tumor progression. MMP11 overexpression also leads to increased circulating IGF1 levels and the activation of the IGF1/AKT/FOXO1 cascade, an important metabolic signalling pathway. Our data reveal a major role for MMP11 in controlling energy metabolism, and provide new clues for understanding the relationship between metabolism, cancer progression and patient outcome. PMID:27126782

  12. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  13. Electric and magnetic fields and tumor progression. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keng, P.C.; Grota, L.J.; Michaelson, S.; Lu, S.T.

    1994-12-01

    This laboratory study has rigorously investigated two previously reported biological effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. The first effect involves nighttime suppression of melatonin synthesis in the pineal glands of rats exposed to high electric fields. The second concerns the increase in colony forming ability of human colon cancer cells exposed to 1.4-G magnetic fields. Neither effect was detected in the present study. A series of published laboratory studies on rats reported that 60-Hz electric fields at various field levels up to 130 kV/m suppress the nighttime synthesis of melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland. Since melatonin is known to modulate the immune system and may inhibit cancer cell activity, changes in physiological levels of melatonin may have significant health consequences. In the repeat experiments, field exposure did not alter nighttime levels of melatonin or enzyme activities in the pineal gland. A small but statistically significant reduction of about 20% in serum melatonin was seen in exposed animals. Pineal melatonin was also unaffected by the presence of red light as a cofactor with field exposure or by time-shifting the daily field exposure period. Another study reported that 60-Hz magnetic fields can affect the colony forming ability of human cancer cells after exposure in a culture medium. In the repeat experiments, field exposure did not alter the colony forming ability of human Colo 205 cells in two different cell concentrations at plating or in two different incubation conditions. Field exposure also did not affect cell cycling in any of the four cell lines tested.

  14. Wisconsin Interlibrary Loan Telecommunications Committee and Implementation Progress. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    A 2-year review and assessment of major interlibrary loan issues and problems was conducted by the Wisconsin Interlibrary Loan Telecommunications Committee, which was charged with studying and making recommendations on the best use of telecommunications equipment for transmission of interlibrary loan and reference requests by libraries within the…

  15. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  16. Text Design for Coherence, Comprehension, and Memory. Final Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Edward J.

    A series of experimental and theoretical investigations of text inference were conducted. One applied a theory of inferable text cohesion to the devising of text structure revisions that assist comprehension and memory. Since only modest success was achieved, the next three projects went beyond text revision to the use of adjunct outlines,…

  17. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-12-31

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  18. Establishment of Northwest Building Testbeds: Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Dennis L.

    2012-08-01

    This document provides a short summary of a project jointly funded by the DOE Building Technologies Program and the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. The report the outcomes achieved in the jointly-funded project, describes major project activities, discusses future plans for the homes and data, and provides details on project costs and schedule performance.

  19. IFESS 2005 Special Session 5 Artifical Vision. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, James D.

    2005-07-05

    A special session on visual prostheses was held during the Annual Meeting of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society (IFESS), in Montreal, Canada, July 5-9, 2005. IFESS is a meeting that typically attracts researchers in implantable nerve stimulators, functional electrical stimulation, and rehabilitation. All of these areas have significant overlap with the retinal prosthesis, but these areas have decades of research behind them. The special session provided a forum for researchers with vast experience in nerve stimulation to interact with leading research in retinal and cortical visual prostheses. The grant paid for the travel and conference costs of the presenters in the session. The session was chaired by James Weiland (the PI on this grant). The session co-chair was Phil Troyk, Ph.D., from the Illinois Institute of Technology. The Department of Energy was acknowledged at the start of the session as the sponsor. The following talks were delivered: Clinical Trial of a Prototype Retinal Prosthesis James Weiland, Ph.D. Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California The U.S. Department of Energy's Artificial Sight Program Elias Greenbaum, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee A 16-Channel stimulator ASIC for use in an intracortical visual prosthesis Phillip R. Troyk, Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois Two approaches to the Optic Nerve Visual Prosthesis Jean Delbeke, M.D. University Cath de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium Design and Implementation of High Power Efficiency Modules for a Cortical Visual Stimulator Mohammad Sawan, Ph.D. Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Canada Remaining funds from the grant were used to support Dr. Weiland's travel to the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in May 2006, with DOE approval, where several projects, supported by the DOE artificial retina program, were presented.

  20. Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 5. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Fourth International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Manchester, UK on November 9--10, 1996 and was hosted by the University of Manchester. The major goals of the workshop were: (1) to collate the various genetic, cytogenetic and physical maps of human chromosome 5; (2) to integrate these maps and identify/correct discrepancies between them wherever possible; (3) to catalogue the sequence-ready contigs of the chromosome; (4) to co-ordinate the various sequencing efforts to avoid future duplication; (5) to establish the first (to the author`s knowledge) web site for the human chromosome 5 community which contains the above information in a readily accessible form.

  1. Heat conduction in partial vacuum. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J R

    1980-09-01

    Methods developed for computing conduction heat losses from evacuated solar collectors are reported. Results of such calculations are given, including the minimum vacuum necessary to effectively eliminate conduction. Experiments performed at Owens-Illinois, Inc. to assess helium penetration rates into evacuated collectors are analyzed, and estimates are given as to the likely penetration rate of atmospheric helium. Conclusions are drawn as to the probable effect of helium penetration on the lifetimes of evacuated solar collectors.

  2. Final Progress Report: Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-08-10

    Originally I was tasked fluidized bed modeling, however, I changed projects. While still working with ANSYS Fluent, I performed a study of particle tracks in glove boxes. This is useful from a Health-Physics perspective, dealing respirable particles that can be hazardous to the human body. I iteratively tested different amounts of turbulent particles in a steady-state flow. The goal of this testing was to discover how Fluent handles built-in Rosin-Rammler distributions for particle injections. I worked on the health physics flow problems and distribution analysis under the direction of two mentors, Bruce Letellier and Dave Decroix. I set up and ran particle injection calculations using Fluent. I tried different combinations of input parameters to produce sets of 500,000, 1 million, and 1.5 million particles to determine what a good test case would be for future experiments. I performed a variety of tasks in my work as an Undergraduate Student Intern at LANL this summer, and learned how to use a powerful CFD application in addition to expanding my skills in MATLAB. I enjoyed my work at LANL and hope to be able to use the experience here to further my career in the future working in a security-conscious environment. My mentors provided guidance and help with all of my projects and I am grateful for the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  3. Ceramic fabrication R D final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this research and development project has been to develop the cohesive ceramic fabrication (CCF) process and to demonstrate its application to various defense-related systems. The CCF process, which is proprietary to Ceramic Binder Systems, Inc. (CBSi), involves a binder system that yields a green ceramic having rubbery yet plastic and tacky properties. The tackiness allows green parts to be pressed together with light (hand) pressure, and the bond is maintained through firing. Fabricating of complex parts is possible via the assembly of simple shapes, easily fabricated by plastic forming and followed by firing to produce a ceramic bond. For some applications, this approach offers substantial potential cost savings over more conventional methods. Other possibilities include the potential for fabricating ceramic parts having graded properties and fabricating ceramic matrix composites.

  4. Ceramic fabrication R&D final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The goal of this research and development project has been to develop the cohesive ceramic fabrication (CCF) process and to demonstrate its application to various defense-related systems. The CCF process, which is proprietary to Ceramic Binder Systems, Inc. (CBSi), involves a binder system that yields a green ceramic having rubbery yet plastic and tacky properties. The tackiness allows green parts to be pressed together with light (hand) pressure, and the bond is maintained through firing. Fabricating of complex parts is possible via the assembly of simple shapes, easily fabricated by plastic forming and followed by firing to produce a ceramic bond. For some applications, this approach offers substantial potential cost savings over more conventional methods. Other possibilities include the potential for fabricating ceramic parts having graded properties and fabricating ceramic matrix composites.

  5. Improving the Efficient of Ernie Turner Center. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fredeen, Amy

    2011-03-21

    The objective of this project was to complete the specifications and drawings for a variable speed kitchen exhaust system and the boiler heating system which when implemented will improve the heating efficiency of the building. The design work was focused in two key areas: kitchen ventilation and heating for the Ernie Turner Center building (ETC). RSA completed design work and issued a set of 100% drawings. RSA also worked with a cost estimator to put together a detailed cost estimate for the project. The design components are summarized.

  6. Advanced Cooling Technology, Inc. final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.S.

    1993-08-12

    Tasks performed to develop an improved version of Advanced Cooling Technology`s Evaporative Subcooling System are described. Work on pump stability, improved drainage mechanism, and the American Refrigeration Institute engineering performance tests is presented.

  7. Uranium from seawater research. Final progress report, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Borzekowski, J.; Driscoll, M.J.; Best, F.R.

    1982-09-01

    During the FY 1982 campaign 14 new ion exchange resin formulations, prepared by the Rohm and Haas Company, were tested by MIT at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The best of these chelating resins was again of the acrylic amidoxime type; it picked up approximately 100 ppM uranium in seven days' exposure to seawater, which represents a factor of better than two improvement over the seven-day results for the best FY 1981 candidate (which saturated at roughly 100 ppM U after 30 days' exposure). Saturation was not reached and, within experimental accuracy, uranium accumulated at a constant rate over the seven-day period; it is speculated that a useful capacity of over 300 ppM U would be achieved. All resins of the styrenic amidoxime type were found to be an order of magnitude lower in their effective capacity for uranium in seawater than the best of the acrylic forms. Particle size effects, which were found to be less than expected from theoretical computations of both fluid and solid side mass transfer resistance, can not account for this difference. Scanning electron microscope examination by R and H scientists of ion exchange resin beads from beds subjected to seawater flow for 30 days in MIT's WHOI columns showed that the internal pores of the macro-reticular-type resins become filled with debris (of undetermined nature and effect) during exposure.

  8. Final Progress Report for the activity called AMO2010 committee

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Shapero; Michael Moloney

    2006-12-31

    The committee was charged to produce a comprehensive report on the status of AMO Science. The committee was charged to produce a report that: 1. Reviewed the field of AMO science, emphasize recent accomplishments, and identify new opportunities and compelling scientific questions; 2. Identified the impact of AMO science on other scientific fields, emerging technologies, and national needs; 3. Identified future workforce, societal and educational needs for AMO science; and 4. Made recommendations on how the US research enterprise might realize the full potential of AMO science. The committee also produced an intermediate report addressing key research issues and themes facing the research community.

  9. Research on human genetics in Iceland. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-30

    An overview is presented of a research program whose objective is to link the individual demographic data of the population of Iceland from 1840 to the present to studies in the genetics of first-cousin marriages; studies in the familiarity of breast cancer, heart disease, and mental disorders; and studies on the hereditary analysis of blood groups. (ACR)

  10. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Irving

    2009-10-31

    The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identify the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.

  11. Converting baker's waste into alcohol. Revised final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, R.; Wilson, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    All types of baker's waste (including waste from candy manufacturers) can be converted into alcohol to be used as a fuel. All types of waste at any stage in process can be converted, such as: basic ingredients (including floor sweepings); dry mixes (including floor sweepings); dough at any stage; partially or fully cooked products; and day old returned products. The basic steps are the same, only the initial preparation will vary slightly. The variation will be: amount of water to be added and amount and type of nutrients (if any) to be added. The basic steps are: slurrying, liquefying to put starch into liquid state, saccharifying to convert starch into fermentable sugars, fermentation to convert sugars into alcohol, and distillation to separate the alcohol from the mash. Each step is discussed in detail along with problems that may arise. Directions are given and materials (enzymes, yeast, etc.) and equipment are descibed briefly.

  12. Final progress report for award ER61159-1003722-000086

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Balkwill

    1999-06-04

    This project focuses on phylogenetic characterization of selected groups of microorganisms that have been isolated from deep terrestrial subsurface environments. Phylogenetic characterization is accomplished by analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) nucleotide base sequences and (in some cases) by restriction endonuclease analysis. This work addresses the primary objectives of the GEMHEX project in the Transitional Phase of the program and several priority research questions in the Origins Research Implementation Plan for the Deep Microbiology Subprogram.

  13. Progress in environmental specimen banking. Special pub. (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, S.A.; Zeisler, R.; Goldstein, G.M.

    1988-04-01

    In the past decade, interest in the concept of specimen banking for the archiving of biological and environmental samples for future analysis has increased significantly, and specimen banking is now recognized as an integral part of systematic environmental monitoring. In recent years representatives of similar programs in Japan, Canada, and Sweden have joined in these meetings to expand the exchange of information. The 10th U.S.-German Seminar of State and Planning on Environmental Specimen Banking was held. At the meeting the current status of specimen banking activities in the U.S., FRG, Canada, and Japan was presented and discussed. The publication contains the proceedings of that meeting with contributions describing various activities related to banking and analysis of samples from aquatic, atmospheric, terrestrial, and human monitoring programs.

  14. Organometallic chemistry of bimetallic compounds. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report consists of six sections: heterobimetallic dihydrides, early-late transition metal heterobimetallic compounds, amphiphilic carbene complexes and hydroxycarbene complexes, diiron compounds with bridging hydrocarbon ligands, diphosphine chelates with natural bite angles near 120 degrees, and synthesis and reactions of M=M compounds. (WET)

  15. Benchtop energetics progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario; Fossum, Emily C.; Molek, Christopher D.; Lewis, William K.

    2012-03-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for investigating the reactive chemical dynamics of mgscale energetic materials samples. We seek to advance the understanding of the reaction kinetics of energetic materials, and of the chemical influences on energetic materials sensitivity. We employ direct laser irradiation, and indirect laser-driven shock, techniques to initiate thin-film explosive samples contained in a high-vacuum chamber. Expansion of the reacting flow into vacuum quenches the chemistry and preserves reaction intermediates for interrogation via time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). By rastering the sample coupon through the fixed laser beam focus, we generate hundreds of repetitive energetic events in a few minutes. A detonation wave passing through an organic explosive, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, C5H8N4O12), is remarkably efficient in converting the solid explosive into final thermodynamically-stable gaseous products (e.g. N2, CO, CO2, H2O…). Termination of a detonation at an explosive-to-vacuum interface produces an expanding pulse of hyperthermal molecular species, with leading-edge velocities ~ 10 km/s. In contrast, deflagration (subsonic combustion) of PETN in vacuum produces mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities; consistent with expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We propose to exploit these differences in product chemical identities and molecular species velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between "detonation-like" and deflagration events. We report recent progress towards the quantitative detection of hyperthermal neutral species produced by direct laser ablation of aluminum metal and of organic energetic materials, as a step towards demonstrating the ability to discriminate slow reaction intermediates from fast thermodynamically-stable final products.

  16. Benchtop Energetics Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario

    2011-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for investigating the reactive chemical dynamics of mg-scale energetic materials samples. We seek to advance the understanding of the reaction kinetics of energetic materials, and of the chemical influences on energetic materials sensitivity. We employ direct laser irradiation, and indirect laser-driven shock, techniques to initiate thin-film explosive samples contained in a high-vacuum chamber. Expansion of the reacting flow into vacuum quenches the chemistry and preserves reaction intermediates for interrogation via time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). By rastering the sample coupon through the fixed laser beam focus, we generate hundreds of repetitive energetic events in a few minutes. A detonation wave passing through an organic explosive, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, C5H4N4O12) , is remarkably efficient in converting the solid explosive into final thermodynamically-stable gaseous products (e . g . N2, CO2, H2O...). Termination of a detonation at an explosive-to-vacuum interface produces an expanding pulse of hyperthermal molecular species, with leading-edge velocities ~10 km/s. In contrast, deflagration (subsonic combustion) of PETN in vacuum produces mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities; consistent with expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We propose to exploit these differences in product chemical identities and molecular species velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between detonation and deflagration events. In this talk we also report recent progress towards the quantitative detection of hyperthermal neutral species produced by direct laser ablation of aluminum metal and of organic energetic materials, as a step towards demonstrating the ability to discriminate slow reaction intermediates from fast thermodynamically-stable final products. Work done in collaboration with Emily Fossum, Christopher Molek, and

  17. MYC, Metabolic Synthetic Lethality, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Annie L; Dang, Chi V

    2016-01-01

    The MYC oncogene plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of human cancers. It encodes a transcription factor that has broad reaching effects on many cellular functions, most importantly in driving cell growth through regulation of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, metabolism, and cell cycle. Upon binding DNA with its partner MAX, MYC recruits factors that release paused RNA polymerases to drive transcription and amplify gene expression. At physiologic levels of MYC, occupancy of high-affinity DNA-binding sites drives 'house-keeping' metabolic genes and those involved in ribosome and mitochondrial biogenesis for biomass accumulation. At high oncogenic levels of MYC, invasion of low-affinity sites and enhancer sequences alter the transcriptome and cause metabolic imbalances, which activates stress response and checkpoints such as p53. Loss of checkpoints unleashes MYC's full oncogenic potential to couple metabolism with neoplastic cell growth and division. Cells that overexpress MYC, however, are vulnerable to metabolic perturbations that provide potential new avenues for cancer therapy. PMID:27557535

  18. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    PubMed

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  20. Attractor Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Pelta, David A.; Veguillas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background The experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a Systemic Metabolic Structure in the cell, characterized by a set of different enzymatic reactions always locked into active states (metabolic core) while the rest of the catalytic processes are only intermittently active. This global metabolic structure was verified for Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it seems to be a common key feature to all cellular organisms. In concordance with these observations, the cell can be considered a complex metabolic network which mainly integrates a large ensemble of self-organized multienzymatic complexes interconnected by substrate fluxes and regulatory signals, where multiple autonomous oscillatory and quasi-stationary catalytic patterns simultaneously emerge. The network adjusts the internal metabolic activities to the external change by means of flux plasticity and structural plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to research the systemic mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cellular enzymatic activity we have studied different catalytic activities of a dissipative metabolic network under different external stimuli. The emergent biochemical data have been analysed using statistical mechanic tools, studying some macroscopic properties such as the global information and the energy of the system. We have also obtained an equivalent Hopfield network using a Boltzmann machine. Our main result shows that the dissipative metabolic network can behave as an attractor metabolic network. Conclusions/Significance We have found that the systemic enzymatic activities are governed by attractors with capacity to store functional metabolic patterns which can be correctly recovered from specific input stimuli. The network attractors regulate the catalytic patterns, modify the efficiency

  1. Ammonia metabolism and hyperammonemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Walker, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Human adults produce around 1000 mmol of ammonia daily. Some is reutilized in biosynthesis. The remainder is waste and neurotoxic. Eventually most is excreted in urine as urea, together with ammonia used as a buffer. In extrahepatic tissues, ammonia is incorporated into nontoxic glutamine and released into blood. Large amounts are metabolized by the kidneys and small intestine. In the intestine, this yields ammonia, which is sequestered in portal blood and transported to the liver for ureagenesis, and citrulline, which is converted to arginine by the kidneys. The amazing developments in NMR imaging and spectroscopy and molecular biology have confirmed concepts derived from early studies in animals and cell cultures. The processes involved are exquisitely tuned. When they are faulty, ammonia accumulates. Severe acute hyperammonemia causes a rapidly progressive, often fatal, encephalopathy with brain edema. Chronic milder hyperammonemia causes a neuropsychiatric illness. Survivors of severe neonatal hyperammonemia have structural brain damage. Proposed explanations for brain edema are an increase in astrocyte osmolality, generally attributed to glutamine accumulation, and cytotoxic oxidative/nitrosative damage. However, ammonia neurotoxicity is multifactorial, with disturbances also in neurotransmitters, energy production, anaplerosis, cerebral blood flow, potassium, and sodium. Around 90% of hyperammonemic patients have liver disease. Inherited defects are rare. They are being recognized increasingly in adults. Deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, citrin, and pyruvate carboxylase demonstrate the roles of isolated pathways in ammonia metabolism. Phenylbutyrate is used routinely to treat inherited urea cycle disorders, and its use for hepatic encephalopathy is under investigation. PMID:25735860

  2. Polyamine Metabolism Changes in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Broshtilova, Valentina; Lozanov, Valentina; Miteva, Ljubka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Polyamines – putrescine, spermidine and spermine are polycationic compounds ubiquitous for all living organisms. They are essential for the cell growth and differentiation, the control of cell cycle progress, apoptosis, and cancerogenesis. Accumulated scientific evidence suggests the central role of polyamines in the process of keratinocytic proliferation, differentiation, and regulation. Objective: To elucidate the polyamine metabolic changes that occur in benign keratinocytic proliferation. Fifty eight patients were enrolled in the study, 31 with plaque-form of psoriasis vulgaris, which had been referred to as a model of benign keratinocytic proliferation, and 27-healthy controls. Materials and Methods: An original, innovative chromatographic method was used to detect the levels of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine in all skin samples. Results: Were significantly proven (P < 0.05). No difference was found between the polyamines levels of non-lesional psoriatic skin and healthy controls. Psoriatic lesions showed a two-time higher concentration of all polyamines in lesional, compared to non-lesional skin. Spermine had the highest concentration and highest proliferation trend, which demonstrated the importance of propylamine synthesis in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Spermine highest concentrations suggested the leading role of adenosine methionine decarboxylase (AMDC) in the pathogenesis of benign keratinocytic proliferations. Conclusions: Non-lesional skin in psoriatic patients did not show latent changes in polyamine metabolism. Psoriatic lesions demontrated two-time higher levels of the most essential biogenic polyamines compared to healthy controls. The highest level of spermine proved the crucial role of AMDC in the polyamine metabolism changes in psoriasis. Future therapeutic approaches should be focused on reduction of exogenic spermine intake, utilizing new spermine blockers, and synthesis of AMDC inhibitors. PMID:23919004

  3. Adiponectin and Metabolic Syndrome in Women at Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Mankowska, Aneta; Nowak, Lena; Sypniewska, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with premature atherosclerosis, as well as with many metabolic alterations including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Visceral fat accumulation, particularly, is closely associated with the development of metabolic syndrome. The menopause transition, as well as the early postmenopausal period, is associated with increase in total and central obesity. Among adipocytokines secreted by the adipose tissue adiponectin is the only one that has a protective role in the development of obesity-related disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This review aims to present a role that adiponectin may play during the progress of menopause in relation to development of menopausal metabolic syndrome.

  4. Final technical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel J. Candes

    2007-11-06

    In the last two dcades or so, many multiscale algorthms have been proposed to enable large scale computations which were thought as nearly intractable. For example, the fast multipole algorithm and other similar ideas have allowed to considerably speed up fundamental computations in electromagnetism, and many other fields. The thesis underlying this proposal is that traditional multiscale methods have been well-developed and it is clear that we now need new ideas in areas where traditional spatial multiscaling is ill-suited. In this context, the proposal argues that clever phase-space computations is bound to plan a crucial role in advancing algorithms and high-performance scientific computing. Our research past accomplishments have shown the existence of ideas beyond the traditional scale-space viewpoint such as new multiscale geometric representations of phase-space. We have shown that these clever representations lead to enhanced sparsity. We have shown that enhanced sparsity has significant important implications both for analysis, and for numerical applications, where sparsity allows for faster algorithms. We have implemented these ideas and built computational tools to be used as new building blocks of a new generation of wave propagation solvers. Finally, we have deployed these ideas into novel algorithms. In this last year, we assembled all these techniques and made significant progress in solving a variety of computational problems, which we then applied in selected areas of considerable scientific interest.

  5. Systems biology analysis of hepatitis C virus infection reveals the role of copy number increases in regions of chromosome 1q in hepatocellular carcinoma metabolism.

    PubMed

    Elsemman, Ibrahim E; Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Soliman, Taysir H; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide healthcare problem; however, traditional treatment methods have failed to cure all patients, and HCV has developed resistance to new drugs. Systems biology-based analyses could play an important role in the holistic analysis of the impact of HCV on hepatocellular metabolism. Here, we integrated HCV assembly reactions with a genome-scale hepatocyte metabolic model to identify metabolic targets for HCV assembly and metabolic alterations that occur between different HCV progression states (cirrhosis, dysplastic nodule, and early and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)) and healthy liver tissue. We found that diacylglycerolipids were essential for HCV assembly. In addition, the metabolism of keratan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate was significantly changed in the cirrhosis stage, whereas the metabolism of acyl-carnitine was significantly changed in the dysplastic nodule and early HCC stages. Our results explained the role of the upregulated expression of BCAT1, PLOD3 and six other methyltransferase genes involved in carnitine biosynthesis and S-adenosylmethionine metabolism in the early and advanced HCC stages. Moreover, GNPAT and BCAP31 expression was upregulated in the early and advanced HCC stages and could lead to increased acyl-CoA consumption. By integrating our results with copy number variation analyses, we observed that GNPAT, PPOX and five of the methyltransferase genes (ASH1L, METTL13, SMYD2, TARBP1 and SMYD3), which are all located on chromosome 1q, had increased copy numbers in the cancer samples relative to the normal samples. Finally, we confirmed our predictions with the results of metabolomics studies and proposed that inhibiting the identified targets has the potential to provide an effective treatment strategy for HCV-associated liver disorders. PMID:27040643

  6. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  7. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of an automatic computer controlled second generation breathing metabolic simulator (BMS). The simulator is used for evaluating and testing respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support, and resuscitation equipment. Any desired sequence of metabolic activities can be simulated on the device for up to 15 hours. The computer monitors test procedures and provides printouts of test results.

  8. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  9. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation.

  10. Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari

    2002-10-02

    This report describes the results generated during phase 1 of this project. During this phase, the main tools that are used to compute the thermal neutron scattering kernels for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide, zirconium hydride, light water, polyethylene were implemented and tested. This includes a modified NJOY/LEAPR code system, the GASKET code, and the ab initio condensed matter codes VASP and PHONON. Thermal neutron scattering kernels were generated for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide. In the case of graphite, new phonon spectra were examined. The first is a spectrum based on experiments performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the early seventies, and the second is generated using the ab initio methods. In the case of beryllium, and beryllium oxide, a synthetic approach for generating the phonon spectra was implemented. In addition, significant progress was made on an experiment to benchmark the graphite scattering kernels was made. The simulations of this experiment show that differences on the order of a few percent, in Pu-239 detector responses, can be expected due to the use of different scattering kernels. (B204) NOT A FINAL REPORT

  11. Investigational cancer drugs targeting cell metabolism in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Sborov, Douglas W; Haverkos, Bradley M; Harris, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant cell transformation and tumor progression are associated with alterations in glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis, amino acid delivery and production of reactive oxygen species. With increased understanding of the role of metabolism in tumors, there has been interest in developing agents that target tumor specific metabolic pathways. Numerous promising agents targeting altered metabolic pathways are currently in Phase I – III clinical trials. Areas covered This paper reviews the early phase clinical trial development of these agents and provides perspective on the future direction of this emerging field. Specifically, the authors describe novel and repurposed therapies, focusing on the effects of each agent on tumor metabolism and results from relevant Phase I and II clinical trials. Expert opinion Metabolism modulating agents, alone and in combinations with other classes of agents, have shown efficacy in the treatment of neoplasm, which, the authors believe, will bear positive results in future studies. Because of the significant crosstalk between metabolic pathways and oncogenic signaling pathways, the authors also believe that combining metabolic modifiers with targeted agents will be an important strategy. An increased understanding of cancer metabolism, in addition to the continued study of metabolic modulators, should lead to further advances in this nascent therapeutic field in the future. PMID:25224845

  12. Disorders of fructose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Froesch, E R

    1976-11-01

    There are fundamental differences between the metabolic fate of fructose and of glucose. Whereas the metabolism of glucose is controlled by hormones such as insulin, fructose uptake and phosphorylation in the liver occurs independently of hormones and its ultimate metabolic fate is unpredictable. Essential fructosuria, a harmless inherited anomaly of fructose metabolism, is the least harmful of the disorders of fructose metabolism. Hereditary fructose intolerance and fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency are discussed in greater detail with regard to biochemical abnormalities and clinical aspects. HFI is most serious in bottle-fed infants who cannot reject their sucrose-containing diet. Patients with HFI will have no clinical symptoms if kept on a fructose-free diet. In contrast, patients with fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency can tolerate frucose. However, severe infections precipitate attacks of hypoglycaemia and lactic acidosis.

  13. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed.

  14. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  15. Dietary boron: progress in establishing essential roles in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Curtiss D

    2012-06-01

    This review summarizes the progress made in establishing essential roles for boron in human physiology and assesses that progress in view of criteria for essentiality of elements. The evidence to date suggests that humans and at least some higher animals may use boron to support normal biological functions. These include roles in calcium metabolism, bone growth and maintenance, insulin metabolism, and completion of the life cycle. The biochemical mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood but the nature of boron biochemistry suggests further characterization of the cell signaling molecules capable of complexing with boron. Such characterization may provide insights into the biochemical function(s) of boron in humans.

  16. Lipidomics Reveals Early Metabolic Changes in Subjects with Schizophrenia: Effects of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Joseph; Baillie, Rebecca A.; Zhu, Hongjie; Buckley, Peter; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Dougherty, George G.; Yao, Jeffrey K.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need for mapping early metabolic changes in schizophrenia to capture failures in regulation of biochemical pathways and networks. This information could provide valuable insights about disease mechanisms, trajectory of disease progression, and diagnostic biomarkers. We used a lipidomics platform to measure individual lipid species in 20 drug-naïve patients with a first episode of schizophrenia (FE group), 20 patients with chronic schizophrenia that had not adhered to prescribed medications (RE group), and 29 race-matched control subjects without schizophrenia. Lipid metabolic profiles were evaluated and compared between study groups and within groups before and after treatment with atypical antipsychotics, risperidone and aripiprazole. Finally, we mapped lipid profiles to n3 and n6 fatty acid synthesis pathways to elucidate which enzymes might be affected by disease and treatment. Compared to controls, the FE group showed significant down-regulation of several n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 within the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid classes. Differences between FE and controls were only observed in the n3 class PUFAs; no differences where noted in n6 class PUFAs. The RE group was not significantly different from controls, although some compositional differences within PUFAs were noted. Drug treatment was able to correct the aberrant PUFA levels noted in FE patients, but changes in re patients were not corrective. Treatment caused increases in both n3 and n6 class lipids. These results supported the hypothesis that phospholipid n3 fatty acid deficits are present early in the course of schizophrenia and tend not to persist throughout its course. These changes in lipid metabolism could indicate a metabolic vulnerability in patients with schizophrenia that occurs early in development of the disease. PMID:23894336

  17. Metabolism, variability and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Dorne, J L C M

    2010-02-01

    For non-genotoxic carcinogens, "thresholded toxicants", Acceptable/Tolerable Daily Intakes (ADI/TDI) represent a level of exposure "without appreciable health risk" when consumed everyday or weekly for a lifetime and are derived by applying an uncertainty factor of a 100-fold to a no-observed-adverse-effect-levels (NOAEL) or to a benchmark dose. This UF allows for interspecies differences and human variability and has been subdivided to take into account toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics with even values of 10(0.5) (3.16) for the human aspect. Ultimately, such refinements allow for chemical-specific adjustment factors and physiologically based models to replace such uncertainty factors. Intermediate to chemical-specific adjustment factors are pathway-related uncertainty factors which have been derived for phase I, phase II metabolism and renal excretion. Pathway-related uncertainty factors are presented here as derived from the result of meta-analyses of toxicokinetic variability data in humans using therapeutic drugs metabolised by a single pathway in subgroups of the population. Pathway-related lognormal variability was derived for each metabolic route. The resulting pathway-related uncertainty factors showed that the current uncertainty factor for toxicokinetics (3.16) would not cover human variability for genetic polymorphism and age differences (neonates, children, the elderly). Latin hypercube (Monte Carlo) models have also been developed using quantitative metabolism data and pathway-related lognormal variability to predict toxicokinetics variability and uncertainty factors for compounds handled by several metabolic routes. For each compound, model results gave accurate predictions compared to published data and observed differences arose from data limitations, inconsistencies between published studies and assumptions during model design and sampling. Finally, under the 6(th) framework EU project NOMIRACLE (http://viso.jrc.it/nomiracle/), novel methods to

  18. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  19. Progress of the MICE experiment at RAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.

    2013-04-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration comprises one cell of the US Neutrino Factory Study II cooling channel. Results obtained on the construction of the beamline and its instrumentation (STEP I) will be reviewed, together with progress towards final measurements of ionization cooling (STEP IV and VI).

  20. Prediction of Metabolism of Drugs using Artificial Intelligence: How far have we reached?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Sharma, Anju; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Information about drug metabolism is an essential component of drug development. Modeling the drug metabolism requires identification of the involved enzymes, rate and extent of metabolism, the sites of metabolism etc. There has been continuous attempts in the prediction of metabolism of drugs using artificial intelligence in effort to reduce the attrition rate of drug candidates entering to preclinical and clinical trials. Currently, there are number of predictive models available for metabolism using Support vector machines, Artificial neural networks, Bayesian classifiers etc. There is an urgent need to review their progress so far and address the existing challenges in prediction of metabolism. In this attempt, we are presenting the currently available literature models and some of the critical issues regarding prediction of drug metabolism.

  1. Current Understanding of the Formation and Adaptation of Metabolic Systems Based on Network Theory

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Formation and adaptation of metabolic networks has been a long-standing question in biology. With recent developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics, the understanding of metabolism is progressively becoming clearer from a network perspective. This review introduces the comprehensive metabolic world that has been revealed by a wide range of data analyses and theoretical studies; in particular, it illustrates the role of evolutionary events, such as gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, and environmental factors, such as nutrient availability and growth conditions, in evolution of the metabolic network. Furthermore, the mathematical models for the formation and adaptation of metabolic networks have also been described, according to the current understanding from a perspective of metabolic networks. These recent findings are helpful in not only understanding the formation of metabolic networks and their adaptation, but also metabolic engineering. PMID:24957641

  2. Auxin metabolism and homeostasis during plant development.

    PubMed

    Ljung, Karin

    2013-03-01

    Auxin plays important roles during the entire life span of a plant. This small organic acid influences cell division, cell elongation and cell differentiation, and has great impact on the final shape and function of cells and tissues in all higher plants. Auxin metabolism is not well understood but recent discoveries, reviewed here, have started to shed light on the processes that regulate the synthesis and degradation of this important plant hormone. PMID:23404103

  3. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26327890

  4. [Charles Darwin and the problem of evolutionary progress].

    PubMed

    Iordanskiĭ, N N

    2010-01-01

    According to Ch. Darwin's evolutionary theory, evolutionary progress (interpreted as morpho-physiological progress or arogenesis in recent terminology) is one of logical results of natural selection. At the same time, natural selection does not hold any factors especially promoting evolutionary progress. Darwin emphasized that the pattern of evolutionary changes depends on organism nature more than on the pattern of environment changes. Arogenesis specificity is determined by organization of rigorous biological systems - integral organisms. Onward progressive development is determined by fundamental features of living organisms: metabolism and homeostasis. The concept of social Darwinism differs fundamentally from Darwin's ideas about the most important role of social instincts in progress of mankind. Competition and selection play secondary role in socio-cultural progress of human society.

  5. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP... database contains narrative project information, progress/impact statements, and final technical...

  6. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP... database contains narrative project information, progress/impact statements, and final technical...

  7. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP... database contains narrative project information, progress/impact statements, and final technical...

  8. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  9. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  10. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Barros, L Felipe

    2016-10-01

    The Na(+) gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na(+) -dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na(+) load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na(+) extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na(+) following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na(+) as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na(+) and the metabolic machinery. GLIA 2016;64:1667-1676. PMID:27027636

  11. Pareto optimality in organelle energy metabolism analysis.

    PubMed

    Angione, Claudio; Carapezza, Giovanni; Costanza, Jole; Lió, Pietro; Nicosia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In low and high eukaryotes, energy is collected or transformed in compartments, the organelles. The rich variety of size, characteristics, and density of the organelles makes it difficult to build a general picture. In this paper, we make use of the Pareto-front analysis to investigate the optimization of energy metabolism in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Using the Pareto optimality principle, we compare models of organelle metabolism on the basis of single- and multiobjective optimization, approximation techniques (the Bayesian Automatic Relevance Determination), robustness, and pathway sensitivity analysis. Finally, we report the first analysis of the metabolic model for the hydrogenosome of Trichomonas vaginalis, which is found in several protozoan parasites. Our analysis has shown the importance of the Pareto optimality for such comparison and for insights into the evolution of the metabolism from cytoplasmic to organelle bound, involving a model order reduction. We report that Pareto fronts represent an asymptotic analysis useful to describe the metabolism of an organism aimed at maximizing concurrently two or more metabolite concentrations.

  12. Molecular characterization of bacterial respiration on minerals. Progress report, June 1992--November, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1993-12-31

    Progress is reported towards elucidating electron transport components of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans involved in the metabolic oxidation of iron. Also included are results of an investigation into the molecular principles whereby the bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble substrates

  13. The relation of high fat diet, metabolic disturbances and brain oxidative dysfunction: modulation by hydroxy citric acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to examine the effect of high fat diet (HFD) to modulate brain dysfunction, and understand the linkages between obesity, metabolic disturbances and the brain oxidative stress (BOS) dysfunction and modulation with hydroxyl citric acid of G. Cambogia. Methods Rats were divided into 3 groups; 1st control, maintained on standard normal rat chow diet, 2nd HFD, maintained on high fat diet along 12 week and 3rd HFD+G, administered G. Cambogia for 4 weeks and each group include 8 rats. Blood, brain and abdominal fat were collected for biochemical measurements. Results HFD group showed significant increase in energy intake, final BW and BW gain. Also significant increase in weight of abdominal fat in HFD group. HFD induce metabolic disturbance through increasing the lipid profile (LDL, TG, TC), γGT and α-amylase activity, uric acid level and hyperglycemia, while decreasing creatine kinase (CK) activity. These changes associated with lowering in brain nitric oxide (NO) level and rising in serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), brain catalase activity and MDA levels as oxidative stress markers. These alterations improved by G. Cambogia that decrease BOS and increased NO level. Conclusions Rats fed HFD showed, metabolic disturbances produce hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia and increased LDL associated with increased BOS. Involvement of BuChE, NO and oxidative stress associated with metabolic disturbances in the pathophysiological progression in brain, suggesting association between obesity, metabolic disorders and brain alteration while, using G. Cambogia, ameliorate the damaging effects of the HFD via lowering feed intake and BOS. PMID:21569551

  14. Metabolic compensation during high energy output in fasting, lactating grey seals (Halichoerus grypus): metabolic ceilings revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, J A; Iverson, S J; Bowen, W D

    2000-01-01

    Lactation is the most energetically expensive period for female mammals and is associated with some of the highest sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) in vertebrates (reported as total energy throughput). Females typically deal with this energy demand by increasing food intake and the structure of the alimentary tract may act as the central constraint to ceilings on SusMR at about seven times resting or standard metabolic rate (SMR). However, demands of lactation may also be met by using a form of metabolic compensation such as reducing locomotor activities or entering torpor. In some phocid seals, cetaceans and bears, females fast throughout lactation and thus cannot offset the high energetic costs of lactation through increased food intake. We demonstrate that fasting grey seal females sustain, for several weeks, one of the highest total daily energy expenditures (DEE; 7.4 x SMR) reported in mammals, while progressively reducing maintenance metabolic expenditures during lactation through means not explained by reduction in lean body mass or behavioural changes. Simultaneously, the energy-exported in milk is progressively increased, associated with increased lipoprotein lipase activity in the mammary gland, resulting in greater offspring growth. Our results suggest that females use compensatory mechanisms to help meet the extraordinary energetic costs of lactation. Additionally, although the concepts of SusMR and ceilings on total DEE may be somewhat different in fasting lactating species, our data on phocid seals demonstrate that metabolic ceilings on milk energy output, in general, are not constrained by the same kind of peripheral limitations as are other energy-consuming tissues. In phocid seals, the high ceilings on DEE during lactation, coupled with metabolic compensation, are undoubtedly important factors enabling shortened lactation. PMID:10902691

  15. Chemical Profiles of Microalgae with Emphasis on Lipids: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J. R.; Tillett, D. M.; Suen, Y.; Hubbard, J.; Tornabene, T. G.

    1986-02-01

    This final report details progress during the third year of this subcontract. The overall objective of this subcontract was two fold: to provide the analytical capability required for selecting microalgae strains with high energy contents and to develop fundamental knowledge required for optimizing the energy yield from microalgae cultures. The progress made towards these objectives during this year is detailed in this report.

  16. Verb-Final Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogihara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a typological study of verb-final languages, the purpose of which is to examine various grammatical phenomena in verb-final languages to discover whether there are correlations between the final position of the verb and other aspects of grammar. It examines how finality of the verb interacts with argument coding in simple…

  17. Metabolic therapy: a new paradigm for managing malignant brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Mukherjee, Purna

    2015-01-28

    Little progress has been made in the long-term management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), considered among the most lethal of brain cancers. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, and high-dose radiation are generally used as the standard of care for GBM. These procedures can create a tumor microenvironment rich in glucose and glutamine. Glucose and glutamine are suggested to facilitate tumor progression. Recent evidence suggests that many GBMs are infected with cytomegalovirus, which could further enhance glucose and glutamine metabolism in the tumor cells. Emerging evidence also suggests that neoplastic macrophages/microglia, arising through possible fusion hybridization, can comprise an invasive cell subpopulation within GBM. Glucose and glutamine are major fuels for myeloid cells, as well as for the more rapidly proliferating cancer stem cells. Therapies that increase inflammation and energy metabolites in the GBM microenvironment can enhance tumor progression. In contrast to current GBM therapies, metabolic therapy is designed to target the metabolic malady common to all tumor cells (aerobic fermentation), while enhancing the health and vitality of normal brain cells and the entire body. The calorie restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) is an anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic metabolic therapy that also reduces fermentable fuels in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic therapy, as an alternative to the standard of care, has the potential to improve outcome for patients with GBM and other malignant brain cancers. PMID:25069036

  18. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Builtup Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    The damage progression and fracture of builtup composite structures was evaluated by using computational simulation to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel subjected to a bending load. The damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression, and propagation to structural collapse were simulated. An integrated computer code (CODSTRAN) was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of builtup composite structures under mechanical loading. Results showed that damage initiation and progression have a significant effect on the structural response. Also investigated was the influence of different types of bending load on the damage initiation, propagation, and final fracture of the builtup composite panel.

  19. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  20. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.