Science.gov

Sample records for metabolites

  1. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  2. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context.

  3. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context. PMID:26939265

  4. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  5. Mexiletine metabolites: a review.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine belongs to class IB antiarrhythmic drugs and it is still considered a drug of choice for treating myotonias. However some patients do not respond to mexiletine or have significant side effects limiting its use; thus, alternatives to this drug should be envisaged. Mexiletine is extensive metabolized in humans via phase I and phase II reactions. Only a small fraction (about 10%) of the dose of mexiletine administered is recovered without modifications in urine. Although in the past decades Mex metabolites were reported to be devoid of biological activity, recent studies seem to deny this assertion. Actually, several hydroxylated metabolites showed pharmacological activity similar to that of Mex, thus contributing to its clinical profile. Purpose of this review is to summarize all the studies proposed till now about mexiletine metabolites, regarding structureactivity relationship studies as well as synthetic strategies. Biological and analytical studies will be also reported. PMID:25723511

  6. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites.

  7. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well.

  8. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well. PMID:8905087

  9. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  10. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  11. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research. PMID:21509189

  12. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research.

  13. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  14. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  15. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...

  16. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  17. Tear metabolite changes in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, D; Zieske, JD; Sejersen, H; Sarker-Nag, A; Asara, John M; Hjortdal, J

    2015-01-01

    While efforts have been made over the years, the exact cause of keratoconus (KC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify alterations in endogenous metabolites in the tears of KC patients compared with age-matched healthy subjects. Three groups were tested: 1) Age-matched controls with no eye disease (N=15), 2) KC – patients wearing Rigid Gas permeable lenses (N=16), and 3) KC – No Correction (N=14). All samples were processed for metabolomics analysis using LC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 296 different metabolites of which >40 were significantly regulated between groups. Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis had significant changes, such as 3-phosphoglycerate and 1,3 diphopshateglycerate. As a result the citric acid cycle (TCA) was also affected with notable changes in Isocitrate, aconitate, malate, and acetylphosphate, up regulated in Group 2 and/or 3. Urea cycle was also affected, especially in Group 3 where ornithine and aspartate were up-regulated by at least 3 fold. The oxidation state was also severely affected. Groups 2 and 3 were under severe oxidative stress causing multiple metabolites to be regulated when compared to Group 1. Group 2 and 3, both showed significant down regulation in GSH-to-GSSG ratio when compared to Group 1. Another indicator of oxidative stress, the ratio of lactate – pyruvate was also affected with Groups 2 and 3 showing at least a 2-fold up regulation. Overall, our data indicate that levels of metabolites related to urea cycle, TCA cycle and oxidative stress are highly altered in KC patients. PMID:25579606

  18. Two metabolites from Aspergillus flavipes.

    PubMed

    Clark, A M; Hufford, C D; Robertson, L W

    1977-01-01

    Two novel fungal metabolites, N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol (1a) and asperphenamate (2) were isolated from the culture filtrate and mycelium of Aspergillus flavipes ATCC 11013. N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol was identified by direct comparison with an authentic sample. The structure of asperphenamate is proposed as (S)-N-benzoyl-phenylalanine-(S)-2-benzamido-3-phenyl propyl ester, based on chemical and spectroscopic evidence. PMID:875642

  19. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Cellular responses to stress and toxic insults: Adaptation, injury, and death. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. TNT metabolites in animal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; Griest, W.H.; Tan, E.; Guzman, C.; Caton, J.E.; Ho, C.-H.; Tomkins, B.A.

    1991-06-01

    Analyses for TNT and nine potential metabolites (TNT-related compounds) were made in deer, rabbit, and quail tissues (muscle and liver) taken from the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP), Childersburg, Alabama. The listed TNT-related compounds are 2,4,6- trinitrotoluene (parent compound); 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene; 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene; 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene; 4-amino-2,6- dinitrotoluene; 2,4,6-trinitrobenzyl alcohol; 2,4,6-trinitrobenzoic acid; 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene; 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene; and 2,6,2',6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene. The procedure for extraction of these compounds from animal tissue required homogenization in acetonitrile, and subsequent partitioning into chloroform. Quantitative determination of extracted compounds was obtained by chromatographic separation on a mixed-mode HPLC column in which the phase bonded to the silica surface contained both a C18 (reversed-phase function) and a secondary amine (anion exchange function) incorporated into a single ligand. A ternary mobile phase gradient containing pH 5.1 phosphate buffer, methanol, and acetonitrile was used in separation. An experimental verification of the metabolism of TNT and the detection (or absence) of the selected metabolites was performed in mice subacutely dosed with 100 milligrams per kilogram of ({sup 14}C)-TNT. These studies show that the TNT-related compounds of concern do accumulate in muscle and liver tissue of the mouse under the experimental conditions imposed, but at concentrations below the 1.2 ppM level. However, products other than TNT and free metabolites may be accumulating since some ({sup 14}C) was found to be nonextractable. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  2. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  3. Complicating factors in safety testing of drug metabolites: Kinetic differences between generated and preformed metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant . E-mail: thomayant_prueksaritanont@merck.com; Lin, Jiunn H.; Baillie, Thomas A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to provide a scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding the proposed toxicology testing of synthetic drug metabolites as a means of ensuring adequate nonclinical safety evaluation of drug candidates that generate metabolites considered either to be unique to humans or are present at much higher levels in humans than in preclinical species. We put forward a number of theoretical considerations and present several specific examples where the kinetic behavior of a preformed metabolite given to animals or humans differs from that of the corresponding metabolite generated endogenously from its parent. The potential ramifications of this phenomenon are that the results of toxicity testing of the preformed metabolite may be misleading and fail to characterize the true toxicological contribution of the metabolite when formed from the parent. It is anticipated that such complications would be evident in situations where (a) differences exist in the accumulation of the preformed versus generated metabolites in specific tissues, and (b) the metabolite undergoes sequential metabolism to a downstream product that is toxic, leading to differences in tissue-specific toxicity. Owing to the complex nature of this subject, there is a need to treat drug metabolite issues in safety assessment on a case-by-case basis, in which a knowledge of metabolite kinetics is employed to validate experimental paradigms that entail administration of preformed metabolites to animal models.

  4. A new paradigm for known metabolite identification in metabonomics/metabolomics: metabolite identification efficiency.

    PubMed

    Everett, Jeremy R

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE) and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE), both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  5. A New Paradigm for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Metabolite Identification Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Jeremy R.

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE) and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE), both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field. PMID:25750701

  6. Accuracy investigation of phthalate metabolite standards.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Éric; Leblanc, Alain; Simard, Yves; Thellen, Claude

    2012-05-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous compounds whose metabolites are usually determined in urine for biomonitoring studies. Following suspect and unexplained results from our laboratory in an external quality-assessment scheme, we investigated the accuracy of all phthalate metabolite standards in our possession by comparing them with those of several suppliers. Our findings suggest that commercial phthalate metabolite certified solutions are not always accurate and that lot-to-lot discrepancies significantly affect the accuracy of the results obtained with several of these standards. These observations indicate that the reliability of the results obtained from different lots of standards is not equal, which reduces the possibility of intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory comparisons of results. However, agreements of accuracy have been observed for a majority of neat standards obtained from different suppliers, which indicates that a solution to this issue is available. Data accuracy of phthalate metabolites should be of concern for laboratories performing phthalate metabolite analysis because of the standards used. The results of our investigation are presented from the perspective that laboratories performing phthalate metabolite analysis can obtain accurate and comparable results in the future. Our findings will contribute to improving the quality of future phthalate metabolite analyses and will affect the interpretation of past results.

  7. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS. PMID:16787159

  8. Familial resemblance for serum metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Beekman, Marian; Pool, René; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Adamski, Jerzy; Prehn, Cornelia; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; de Craen, Anton J M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-10-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of familial resemblance for the concentrations in human serum of more than 100 metabolites, measured using a targeted metabolomics platform. Age- and sex-corrected monozygotic twin correlations, midparent-offspring regression coefficients, and spouse correlations in subjects from two independent cohorts (Netherlands Twin Register and Leiden Longevity Study) were estimated for each metabolite. In the Netherlands Twin Register subjects, who were largely fasting, we found significant monozygotic twin correlations for 121 out of 123 metabolites. Heritability was confirmed by midparent-offspring regression. For most detected metabolites, the correlations between spouses were considerably lower than those between twins, indicating a contribution of genetic effects to familial resemblance. Remarkably high heritability was observed for free carnitine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.66), for the amino acids serine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77) and threonine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.64), and for phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C40:3 (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77). For octenoylcarnitine, a consistent point estimate of approximately 0.50 was found for the spouse correlations in the two cohorts as well as for the monozygotic twin correlation, suggesting that familiality for this metabolite is explained by shared environment. We conclude that for the majority of metabolites targeted by the used metabolomics platform, the familial resemblance of serum concentrations is largely genetic. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the heritability of fasting serum metabolite concentrations, which is relevant for biomarker research. PMID:23985338

  9. Secondary metabolites from Rubiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Martins, Daiane; Nunez, Cecilia Veronica

    2015-07-22

    This study describes some characteristics of the Rubiaceae family pertaining to the occurrence and distribution of secondary metabolites in the main genera of this family. It reports the review of phytochemical studies addressing all species of Rubiaceae, published between 1990 and 2014. Iridoids, anthraquinones, triterpenes, indole alkaloids as well as other varying alkaloid subclasses, have shown to be the most common. These compounds have been mostly isolated from the genera Uncaria, Psychotria, Hedyotis, Ophiorrhiza and Morinda. The occurrence and distribution of iridoids, alkaloids and anthraquinones point out their chemotaxonomic correlation among tribes and subfamilies. From an evolutionary point of view, Rubioideae is the most ancient subfamily, followed by Ixoroideae and finally Cinchonoideae. The chemical biosynthetic pathway, which is not so specific in Rubioideae, can explain this and large amounts of both iridoids and indole alkaloids are produced. In Ixoroideae, the most active biosysthetic pathway is the one that produces iridoids; while in Cinchonoideae, it produces indole alkaloids together with other alkaloids. The chemical biosynthetic pathway now supports this botanical conclusion.

  10. Metabolism and metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, FA; Hu, D; Kania-Korwel, I; Lehmler, HJ; Ludewig, G; Hornbuckle, KC; Duffel, MW; Bergman, A; Robertson, LW

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is complex and has an impact on toxicity and thereby assessment of PCB risks. A large number of reactive and stable metabolites are formed in the processes of biotransformation in biota in general and in humans in particular. The aim of this document is to provide an overview of PCB metabolism and to identify metabolites of concern and their occurrence. Emphasis is given to mammalian metabolism of PCBs and their hydroxyl, methylsulfonyl, and sulfated metabolites, especially those that persist in human blood. Potential intracellular targets and health risks are also discussed. PMID:25629923

  11. Analytical Methods for Secondary Metabolite Detection.

    PubMed

    Taibon, Judith; Strasser, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium brunneum, Beauveria bassiana, and B. brongniartii are widely applied as biological pest control agent in OECD countries. Consequently, their use has to be flanked by a risk management approach, which includes the need to monitor the fate of their relevant toxic metabolites. There are still data gaps claimed by regulatory authorities pending on their identification and quantification of relevant toxins or secondary metabolites. In this chapter, analytical methods are presented allowing the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the relevant toxic B. brongniartii metabolite oosporein and the three M. brunneum relevant destruxin (dtx) derivatives dtx A, dtx B, and dtx E. PMID:27565501

  12. Analytical Methods for Secondary Metabolite Detection.

    PubMed

    Taibon, Judith; Strasser, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium brunneum, Beauveria bassiana, and B. brongniartii are widely applied as biological pest control agent in OECD countries. Consequently, their use has to be flanked by a risk management approach, which includes the need to monitor the fate of their relevant toxic metabolites. There are still data gaps claimed by regulatory authorities pending on their identification and quantification of relevant toxins or secondary metabolites. In this chapter, analytical methods are presented allowing the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the relevant toxic B. brongniartii metabolite oosporein and the three M. brunneum relevant destruxin (dtx) derivatives dtx A, dtx B, and dtx E.

  13. Trichoderma secondary metabolites that affect plant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vinale, Francesco; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Ruocco, Michelina; Wood, Sheridan; Lorito, Matteo

    2012-11-01

    Recently, there have been many exciting new developments relating to the use of Trichoderma spp. as agents for biocontrol of pathogens and as plant growth promoters. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the positive effects of these microorganisms on the plant host. One factor that contributes to their beneficial biological activities is related to the wide variety of metabolites that they produce. These metabolites have been found not only to directly inhibit the growth and pathogenic activities of the parasites, but also to increase disease resistance by triggering the system of defence in the plant host. In addition, these metabolites are also capable of enhancing plant growth, which enables the plant to counteract the disease with compensatory vegetative growth by the augmented production of root and shoot systems. This review takes into account the Trichoderma secondary metabolites that affect plant metabolism and that may play an important role in the complex interactions of this biocontrol agent with the plant and pathogens.

  14. Isoprenoid and metabolite profiling of plant trichomes.

    PubMed

    Balcke, Gerd U; Bennewitz, Stefan; Zabel, Sebastian; Tissier, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Plant glandular trichomes are specialized secretory structures located on the surface of the aerial parts of plants with large biosynthetic capacity, often with terpenoids as output molecules. The collection of plant trichomes requires a method to separate trichomes from leaf epidermal tissues. For metabolite profiling, trichome tissue needs to be rapidly quenched in order to maintain the indigenous state of intracellular intermediates. Appropriate extraction and chromatographic separation methods must be available, which address the wide-ranging polarity of metabolites. In this chapter, a protocol for trichome harvest using a frozen paint brush is presented. A work flow for broad-range metabolite profiling using LC-MS(2) analysis is described, which is applicable to assess very hydrophilic isoprenoid precursors as well as more hydrophobic metabolites from trichomes and other plant tissues. PMID:24777798

  15. Cellular toxicity of nicotinamide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Słomińska, Ewa; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Swierczyński, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are almost 100 different substances called uremic toxins. Nicotinamide derivatives are known as new family of uremic toxins. These uremic compounds play a role in an increased oxidative stress and disturbances in cellular repair processes by inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. New members of this family were discovered and described. Their toxic properties were a subject of recent studies. This study evaluated the concentration of 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-triphosphate (4PYTP) and 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-monophosphate (4PYMP) in erythrocytes of patients with chronic renal failure. Serum and red blood cells were collected from chronic renal failure patients on conservative treatment, those treated with hemodialysis, and at different times from those who underwent kidney transplantation. Healthy volunteers served as a control group. Nicotinamide metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry based on originally discovered and described method. Three novel compounds were described: 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside (4PYR), 4PYMP, and 4PYTP. 4PYR concentration was elevated in the serum, whereas 4PYMP and 4PYTP concentrations were augmented in erythrocytes of dialysis patients. Interestingly, concentrations of these compounds were less elevated during the treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs). After successful kidney transplantation, concentrations of 4PYR and 4PYMP normalized according to the graft function, whereas that of 4PYTP was still elevated. During the incubation of erythrocytes in the presence of 4PYR, concentration of 4PYMP rose very rapidly while that of 4PYTP increased slowly. Therefore, we hypothesized that 4PYR, as a toxic compound, was actively absorbed by erythrocytes and metabolized to the 4PYMP and 4PYTP, which may interfere with function and life span of these cells. PMID:22200423

  16. Blood metabolites during basketball competitions.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelkrim, Nidhal; Castagna, Carlo; El Fazaa, Saloua; Tabka, Zouhaier; El Ati, Jalila

    2009-05-01

    This study examined basketball game blood hormonal and metabolite responses in 38 (8 guards, 18 forwards, and 12 centers) male national elite-junior players (age, 18.2 +/- 0.5 years; height, 1.89 +/- 0.1 m; body mass, 80.3 +/- 6.7 kg; body fat, 8.2 +/- 5.6%; maximum oxygen uptake Vo2max], 52.8 +/- 2.4 mlxkgxmin). At the moment of the investigation, players had 8 +/- 1.6 years of competitive experience. Blood samples were collected at the beginning, at halftime, and at fulltime of 6 junior competitive games (Tunisian under 19 basketball championship). Game intensity was assessed monitoring heart rates (HR). During the game, players attained 93 +/- 2% of maximal HR. Triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations significantly increased during the game, most markedly so in the second half. Postgame TG and FFA concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower for guards (1.48 +/- 0.22 and 0.88 +/- 0.14 mmolxL, respectively) than for centers (1.88 +/- 0.30 and 1.08 +/- 0.09 mmolxL, respectively). Plasma glucose significantly increased at halftime (from 4.05 +/- 1.27 to 5.98 +/- 0.88 mmolxL; p < 0.001) but decreased in the second half. Serum insulin (INS) progressively decreased for all players during the game, whereas serum cortisol increased at the end of the first half (from 333 +/- 129 to 487 +/- 209 nmolxL; p < 0.001) to remain increased throughout the second half.Basketball game demands seem to induce significant metabolic-hormonal changes on players. Higher values of HR and glycemia were observed in the first half, but a more important increase of lipolytic variables was recorded in the second half. Changes in metabolic markers are role-dependent.

  17. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions. PMID:20398381

  18. The significance of lichens and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Huneck, S

    1999-12-01

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  19. The Significance of Lichens and Their Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneck, S.

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  20. Secondary metabolites in bryophytes: an ecological aspect.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chun-Feng; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2009-03-01

    Bryophytes frequently grow in an unfavorable environment as the earliest land plants, and inevitably biosynthesize secondary metabolites against biotic or abiotic stress. They not only defend against the plant competition, microbial attack, and insect or animal predation, but also function in UV protection, drought tolerance, and freezing survival. This review covers the ecological aspect of secondary metabolites in bryophytes and is taxonomically presented according to the ecological significances.

  1. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions.

  2. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  3. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  4. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  5. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  6. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  7. KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database for retrieving the relationships between metabolites and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Afendi, Farit Mochamad; Parvin, Aziza Kawsar; Ono, Naoaki; Tanaka, Ken; Hirai Morita, Aki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    Databases (DBs) are required by various omics fields because the volume of molecular biology data is increasing rapidly. In this study, we provide instructions for users and describe the current status of our metabolite activity DB. To facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between the metabolites of organisms and the chemical-level contribution of metabolites to human health, we constructed a metabolite activity DB known as the KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB. It comprises 9,584 triplet relationships (metabolite-biological activity-target species), including 2,356 metabolites, 140 activity categories, 2,963 specific descriptions of biological activities and 778 target species. Approximately 46% of the activities described in the DB are related to chemical ecology, most of which are attributed to antimicrobial agents and plant growth regulators. The majority of the metabolites with antimicrobial activities are flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. The metabolites with plant growth regulatory effects include plant hormones. Over half of the DB contents are related to human health care and medicine. The five largest groups are toxins, anticancer agents, nervous system agents, cardiovascular agents and non-therapeutic agents, such as flavors and fragrances. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB is integrated within the KNApSAcK Family DBs to facilitate further systematized research in various omics fields, especially metabolomics, nutrigenomics and foodomics. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB could also be utilized for developing novel drugs and materials, as well as for identifying viable drug resources and other useful compounds.

  8. [Secondary Metabolites from Marine Microorganisms. I. Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinomycetes].

    PubMed

    Orlova, T I; Bulgakova, V G; Polin, A N

    2015-01-01

    Review represents data on new active metabolites isolated from marine actinomycetes published in 2007 to 2014. Marine actinomycetes are an unlimited source of novel secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Among them there are antibiotics, anticancer compounds, inhibitors of biochemical processes.

  9. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future.

  10. Improved metabolite profile smoothing for flux estimation.

    PubMed

    Dromms, Robert A; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    As genome-scale metabolic models become more sophisticated and dynamic, one significant challenge in using these models is to effectively integrate increasingly prevalent systems-scale metabolite profiling data into them. One common data processing step when integrating metabolite data is to smooth experimental time course measurements: the smoothed profiles can be used to estimate metabolite accumulation (derivatives), and thus the flux distribution of the metabolic model. However, this smoothing step is susceptible to the (often significant) noise in experimental measurements, limiting the accuracy of downstream model predictions. Here, we present several improvements to current approaches for smoothing metabolite time course data using defined functions. First, we use a biologically-inspired mathematical model function taken from transcriptional profiling and clustering literature that captures the dynamics of many biologically relevant transient processes. We demonstrate that it is competitive with, and often superior to, previously described fitting schemas, and may serve as an effective single option for data smoothing in metabolic flux applications. We also implement a resampling-based approach to buffer out sensitivity to specific data sets and allow for more accurate fitting of noisy data. We found that this method, as well as the addition of parameter space constraints, yielded improved estimates of concentrations and derivatives (fluxes) in previously described fitting functions. These methods have the potential to improve the accuracy of existing and future dynamic metabolic models by allowing for the more effective integration of metabolite profiling data.

  11. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  12. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S. )

    1990-02-26

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and {beta}-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6{prime}exomethylene SV (I), 6{prime}CH{sub 2}OH-SV (II), 6{prime}COOH-SV (III) and a {beta}-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6{prime} is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However {sup 3}H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding {sup 14}C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man.

  13. [Treatment of leprosy by human metabolites].

    PubMed

    Mester de Parajd, L; Mester de Parajd, M

    1986-01-01

    We are interested for other human metabolites than desoxyfructo-serotonin (DFS), showing antileprosy activity. This is the case of desoxyfructo-5-hydroxytryptophan and of some liposoluble derivatives of DFS. The time of resorption and penetration into M. leprae infected tissue, is very different for these metabolites. For this reason the simultaneous application of these compounds may represent some advantage in the treatment of multibacillar form of leprosy. The use of DFS together with the antileprosy diet "NAL" have the supplementary advantage to stabilize the DFS level in the serum during the treatment. PMID:3105224

  14. Mutagenicity of dimethylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, K; Ohba, H; Hasegawa, A; Sawamura, R; Okada, S

    1989-10-01

    The genotoxic effects of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), one of the main metabolites of inorganic arsenics in mammals, and its further metabolites were investigated using Escherichia coli B tester strains. When H/r30R (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and Hs30R (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+) cells were incubated with DMAA for 3 h in liquid NB medium, many more revertants appeared in sealed tubes than in the control, but this was not the case in unsealed tubes, suggesting that volatile metabolites of DMAA caused the mutagenesis. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine, known to be volatile metabolites in microorganisms, were detected in the gas phase of DMAA-added tester strain cell suspensions in sealed tubes. Among these arsines, dimethylarsine was mutagenic in WP2 (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and WP2uvrA (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+), while trimethylarsine was not. The mutagenesis induced by dimethylarsine required oxygen gas in the assay system; the number of revertants markedly increased in an oxygen-replaced system and diminished in a nitrogen-replaced one. These results suggest that the reaction product(s) between dimethylarsine and molecular oxygen is responsible for the mutagenesis. The significance of this mutagenesis in the genetoxic action of inorganic arsenics is discussed.

  15. Microbial metabolism part 13 metabolites of hesperetin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal culture, Mucor ramannianus (ATCC 2628) transformed hesperitin to four metabolites: 4'-methoxy -5, 7, 8, 3'-tetrahydroxyflavanone (8-hydroxyhesperetin), 5, 7, 3', 4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone (eriodictyol), 4'-methoxy-5, 3'-dihydroxyflavanone 7-sulfate (hesperetin 7-sulfate) and 5, 7, 3'-tri...

  16. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction.

  17. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  18. Aspirin-triggered metabolites of EFAs.

    PubMed

    Makriyannis, Alexandros; Nikas, Spyros P

    2011-10-28

    Aspirin triggers the biosynthesis of oxygenated metabolites from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In a preceding issue, Serhan et al. (2011) describe a novel aspirin-triggered DHA pathway for the biosynthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule. PMID:22035788

  19. Eleven microbial metabolites of 6-hydroxyflavanone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Hydroxyflavanone (1) when fermented with fungal culture Cunninghamella blakesleeana (ATCC 8688a) yielded flavanone 6-O-ß-D-glucopyranoside (2), flavanone 6-sulfate (3), and 6-hydroxyflavanone 7-sulfate (4). Aspergillus alliaceus (ATCC 10060) also transformed 1 to metabolite 3 as well as 4'-hydrox...

  20. [Synthesis of metabolites and enantiomers of prolintane].

    PubMed

    Rücker, G; Neugebauer, M; Zhong, D

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of 15 possible metabolites of prolintane (1) (Katovit) which is used in the treatment of blood pressure disregulations is described. Furthermore, the preparation of the enantiomers of 1 is reported, starting with R-(+)- and S-(-)-phenylalaninol respectively. PMID:1605711

  1. Discovering the secondary metabolite potential encoded within Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the secondary metabolite potential of the insect pathogens Metarhizium and Beauveria, including a bioinformatics analysis of secondary metabolite genes for which no products are yet identified....

  2. METLIN: MS/MS metabolite data from the MAGGIE Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    METLIN is a metabolite database for metabolomics containing over 50,000 structures, it also represents a data management system designed to assist in a broad array of metabolite research and metabolite identification by providing public access to its repository of current and comprehensive MS/MS metabolite data. An annotated list of known metabolites and their mass, chemical formula, and structure are available on the METLIN website. Each metabolite is conveniently linked to outside resources such as the the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for further reference and inquiry. MS/MS data is also available on many of the metabolites. The list is expanding continuously as more metabolite information is being deposited and discovered. [from http://metlin.scripps.edu/] Metlin is a component of the MAGGIE Project. MAGGIE is funded by the DOE Genomics: GTL and is an acronym for "Molecular Assemblies, Genes, and Genomics Integrated Efficiently."

  3. Urinary excretion pattern of methaqualone metabolites in man.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, O; Danielsson, B

    1977-01-01

    A method based on selected ion monitoring for determination of five monohydroxy metabolites of methaqualone in urine has been worked out. By means of this method the time course of metabolite excretion was studied in three healthy volunteers receiving an oral therapeutic dose of methaqualone. In all subjects the main monohydroxy metabolite was conjugated 4'-hydroxymethaqualone, but the relative importance of the five metabolites showed intersubject variation. Metabolite excretion was still going on, when urine sampling was discontinued after 70 hr. Only small amounts (less than 1% of the dose during 70 hr) of unmetabolized methaqualone were excreted. On the other hand, it was confirmed that methaqualone-N1-oxide is an important metabolite. The presence of a hydroxy methoxy metabolite of methaqualone, very probably 4'-hydroxy-5'-methoxymethaqualone, as a minor metabolite was established by comparison with authentic, synthetic material. 8-Hydroxymethaqualone and 2-nitrobenz-o-toluidide, reported by other groups, could not be detected.

  4. Non-peptide metabolites from the genus Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Hamdache, Ahlem; Lamarti, Ahmed; Aleu, Josefina; Collado, Isidro G

    2011-04-25

    Bacillus species produce a number of non-peptide metabolites that display a broad spectrum of activity and structurally diverse bioactive chemical structures. Biosynthetic, biological, and structural studies of these metabolites isolated from Bacillus species are reviewed. This contribution also includes a detailed study of the activity of the metabolites described, especially their role in biological control mechanisms.

  5. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences.

  6. Preparative Microfluidic Electrosynthesis of Drug Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In vivo, a drug molecule undergoes its first chemical transformation within the liver via CYP450-catalyzed oxidation. The chemical outcome of the first pass hepatic oxidation is key information to any drug development process. Electrochemistry can be used to simulate CYP450 oxidation, yet it is often confined to the analytical scale, hampering product isolation and full characterization. In an effort to replicate hepatic oxidations, while retaining high throughput at the preparative scale, microfluidic technology and electrochemistry are combined in this study by using a microfluidic electrochemical cell. Several commercial drugs were subjected to continuous-flow electrolysis. They were chosen for their various chemical reactivity: their metabolites in vivo are generated via aromatic hydroxylation, alkyl oxidation, glutathione conjugation, or sulfoxidation. It is demonstrated that such metabolites can be synthesized by flow electrolysis at the 10 to 100 mg scale, and the purified products are fully characterized. PMID:24900614

  7. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences. PMID:26339647

  8. Gut microbiota, metabolites and host immunity.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Michelle G; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-05-27

    The microbiota - the collection of microorganisms that live within and on all mammals - provides crucial signals for the development and function of the immune system. Increased availability of technologies that profile microbial communities is facilitating the entry of many immunologists into the evolving field of host-microbiota studies. The microbial communities, their metabolites and components are not only necessary for immune homeostasis, they also influence the susceptibility of the host to many immune-mediated diseases and disorders. In this Review, we discuss technological and computational approaches for investigating the microbiome, as well as recent advances in our understanding of host immunity and microbial mutualism with a focus on specific microbial metabolites, bacterial components and the immune system. PMID:27231050

  9. Emerging role of thyroid hormone metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gnocchi, D; Steffensen, K R; Bruscalupi, G; Parini, P

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the regulation of development and metabolism in key organs. THs produce biological effects both by directly affecting gene expression through the interaction with nuclear receptors (genomic effects) and by activating protein kinases and/or ion channels (short-term effects). Such activations can be either direct, in the case of ion channels, or mediated by membrane or cytoplasmic receptors. Short-term-activated signalling pathways often play a role in the regulation of genomic effects. Several TH intermediate metabolites, which were previously considered without biological activity, have now been associated with a broad range of actions, mostly attributable to short-term effects. Here, we give an overview of the physiological roles and mechanisms of action of THs, focusing on the emerging position that TH metabolites are acquiring as important regulators of physiology and metabolism.

  10. [Basidiomycetes: A new source of secondary metabolites.].

    PubMed

    Brizuela, M A; García, L; Pérez, L; Mansur, M

    1998-06-01

    The area of natural products research is the most rapidly growing field of organic chemistry, due to the great technical developments in the isolation and identification techniques. Today, near to one million natural products -isolated from the most diverse living things- are known. Microorganisms are among the least-studied of these. Nevertheless, they offer large possibilities for the discovery of new structures and biological activities. Among the microorganisms, the Basidiomycetes present a production capacity and a range of biologically active metabolites, which have scarcely been investigated. The wide spectrum of natural products with biological activity produced by Basidiomycetes includes antimicrobial agents, antifungal, antiviral and cytotoxic activities, enzymes, plant growth regulators and flavors. These metabolites are generally grouped by their chemical origin, and the relationship between chemical structure and the different biological activities reported. The main objective of this review is to bring an updated revision of the numerous and interesting biosynthetic pathways from basidiomycetes.

  11. Three new metabolites from Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Shan; Zhou, Jin-Yan; Tan, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new metabolites, gamma-abscisolactone (1), botrytisic acids A (3) and B (4) were isolated from the fermentation broth of Botrytis cinerea TB-3-H8. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compound 2 was isolated from natural resource for the first time. The structure of 1 was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (CCDC-265897).

  12. Metabolic regulation and overproduction of primary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Sergio; Demain, Arnold L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Overproduction of microbial metabolites is related to developmental phases of microorganisms. Inducers, effectors, inhibitors and various signal molecules play a role in different types of overproduction. Biosynthesis of enzymes catalysing metabolic reactions in microbial cells is controlled by well‐known positive and negative mechanisms, e.g. induction, nutritional regulation (carbon or nitrogen source regulation), feedback regulation, etc. The microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Fermentative production of these compounds is still an important goal of modern biotechnology. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavour, or increase its nutritive values. The contribution of microorganisms goes well beyond the food and health industries with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum‐derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. Additional applications of primary metabolites lie in their impact as precursors of many pharmaceutical compounds. The roles of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance as time goes on. In the early years of fermentation processes, development of producing strains initially depended on classical strain breeding involving repeated random mutations, each followed by screening or selection. More recently, methods of molecular genetics have been used for the overproduction of primary metabolic products. The development of modern tools of molecular biology enabled more rational approaches for strain improvement. Techniques of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis, as well as metabolic flux analysis. have recently been introduced in order to identify new and

  13. Three new metabolites from Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Shan; Zhou, Jin-Yan; Tan, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Three new metabolites, gamma-abscisolactone (1), botrytisic acids A (3) and B (4) were isolated from the fermentation broth of Botrytis cinerea TB-3-H8. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compound 2 was isolated from natural resource for the first time. The structure of 1 was further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (CCDC-265897). PMID:19003608

  14. Phthalate Metabolites, Consumer Habits and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Hohenblum, Philipp; Scharf, Sigrid; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are multifunctional chemicals used in a wide variety of consumer products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether levels of urinary phthalate metabolites in urine samples of Austrian mothers and their children were associated with consumer habits and health indicators. Within an Austrian biomonitoring survey, urine samples from 50 mother-child pairs of five communities (two-stage random stratified sampling) were analysed. The concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites were determined, and a questionnaire was administered. Monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (5OH-MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (5oxo-MEHP), mono-(5-carboxy-2-ethylpentyl) phthalate (5cx-MEPP), and 3-carboxy-mono-propyl phthalate (3cx-MPP) could be quantified in the majority of samples. Significant correlations were found between the use of hair mousse, hair dye, makeup, chewing gum, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles and the diethyl phthalate (DEP) metabolite MEP. With regard to health effects, significant associations of MEP in urine with headache, repeated coughing, diarrhoea, and hormonal problems were observed. MBzP was associated with repeated coughing and MEHP was associated with itching.

  15. Pyrazinone protease inhibitor metabolites from Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Bong; Crawford, Jason M

    2016-08-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a bioluminescent entomopathogenic bacterium that undergoes phenotypic variation and lives in mutualistic association with nematodes of the family Heterorhabditidae. The pair infects and kills insects, and during their coordinated lifecycle, the bacteria produce an assortment of specialized metabolites to regulate its mutualistic and pathogenic roles. As part of our search for new specialized metabolites from the Photorhabdus genus, we examined organic extracts from P. luminescens grown in an amino-acid-rich medium based on the free amino-acid levels found in the circulatory fluid of its common insect prey, the Galleria mellonella larva. Reversed-phase HPLC/UV/MS-guided fractionation of the culture extracts led to the identification of two new pyrazinone metabolites, lumizinones A (1) and B (2), together with two N-acetyl dipeptides (3 and 4). The lumizinones were produced only in the phenotypic variant associated with nematode development and insect pathogenesis. Their chemical structures were elucidated by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and high-resolution ESI-QTOF-MS spectral data. The absolute configurations of the amino acids in 3 and 4 were determined by Marfey's analysis. Compounds 1-4 were evaluated for their calpain protease inhibitory activity, and lumizinone A (1) showed inhibition with an IC50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) value of 3.9 μm. PMID:27353165

  16. Phthalate Metabolites, Consumer Habits and Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Hohenblum, Philipp; Scharf, Sigrid; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are multifunctional chemicals used in a wide variety of consumer products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether levels of urinary phthalate metabolites in urine samples of Austrian mothers and their children were associated with consumer habits and health indicators. Within an Austrian biomonitoring survey, urine samples from 50 mother-child pairs of five communities (two-stage random stratified sampling) were analysed. The concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites were determined, and a questionnaire was administered. Monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (5OH-MEHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (5oxo-MEHP), mono-(5-carboxy-2-ethylpentyl) phthalate (5cx-MEPP), and 3-carboxy-mono-propyl phthalate (3cx-MPP) could be quantified in the majority of samples. Significant correlations were found between the use of hair mousse, hair dye, makeup, chewing gum, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles and the diethyl phthalate (DEP) metabolite MEP. With regard to health effects, significant associations of MEP in urine with headache, repeated coughing, diarrhoea, and hormonal problems were observed. MBzP was associated with repeated coughing and MEHP was associated with itching. PMID:27428989

  17. The WEIZMASS spectral library for high-confidence metabolite identification

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Nir; Rogachev, Ilana; Heinig, Uwe; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Battat, Maor; Wyner, Hilary; Zheng, Shuning; Wehrens, Ron; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of metabolites is an essential, yet problematic, aspect of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics assays. The current repertoire of definitive annotations of metabolite spectra in public MS databases is limited and suffers from lack of chemical and taxonomic diversity. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of the data prevents the development of universally applicable metabolite annotation tools. Here we present a combined experimental and computational platform to advance this key issue in metabolomics. WEIZMASS is a unique reference metabolite spectral library developed from high-resolution MS data acquired from a structurally diverse set of 3,540 plant metabolites. We also present MatchWeiz, a multi-module strategy using a probabilistic approach to match library and experimental data. This strategy allows efficient and high-confidence identification of dozens of metabolites in model and exotic plants, including metabolites not previously reported in plants or found in few plant species to date. PMID:27571918

  18. The WEIZMASS spectral library for high-confidence metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Shahaf, Nir; Rogachev, Ilana; Heinig, Uwe; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Battat, Maor; Wyner, Hilary; Zheng, Shuning; Wehrens, Ron; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of metabolites is an essential, yet problematic, aspect of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics assays. The current repertoire of definitive annotations of metabolite spectra in public MS databases is limited and suffers from lack of chemical and taxonomic diversity. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of the data prevents the development of universally applicable metabolite annotation tools. Here we present a combined experimental and computational platform to advance this key issue in metabolomics. WEIZMASS is a unique reference metabolite spectral library developed from high-resolution MS data acquired from a structurally diverse set of 3,540 plant metabolites. We also present MatchWeiz, a multi-module strategy using a probabilistic approach to match library and experimental data. This strategy allows efficient and high-confidence identification of dozens of metabolites in model and exotic plants, including metabolites not previously reported in plants or found in few plant species to date. PMID:27571918

  19. The WEIZMASS spectral library for high-confidence metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Shahaf, Nir; Rogachev, Ilana; Heinig, Uwe; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Battat, Maor; Wyner, Hilary; Zheng, Shuning; Wehrens, Ron; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of metabolites is an essential, yet problematic, aspect of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics assays. The current repertoire of definitive annotations of metabolite spectra in public MS databases is limited and suffers from lack of chemical and taxonomic diversity. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of the data prevents the development of universally applicable metabolite annotation tools. Here we present a combined experimental and computational platform to advance this key issue in metabolomics. WEIZMASS is a unique reference metabolite spectral library developed from high-resolution MS data acquired from a structurally diverse set of 3,540 plant metabolites. We also present MatchWeiz, a multi-module strategy using a probabilistic approach to match library and experimental data. This strategy allows efficient and high-confidence identification of dozens of metabolites in model and exotic plants, including metabolites not previously reported in plants or found in few plant species to date.

  20. Prediction of Estrogenic Bioactivity of Environmental Chemical Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline L; Mansouri, Kamel; Judson, Richard; Browne, Patience

    2016-09-19

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is using in vitro data generated from ToxCast/Tox21 high-throughput screening assays to assess the endocrine activity of environmental chemicals. Considering that in vitro assays may have limited metabolic capacity, inactive chemicals that are biotransformed into metabolites with endocrine bioactivity may be missed for further screening and testing. Therefore, there is a value in developing novel approaches to account for metabolism and endocrine activity of both parent chemicals and their associated metabolites. We used commercially available software to predict metabolites of 50 parent compounds, out of which 38 chemicals are known to have estrogenic metabolites, and 12 compounds and their metabolites are negative for estrogenic activity. Three ER QSAR models were used to determine potential estrogen bioactivity of the parent compounds and predicted metabolites, the outputs of the models were averaged, and the chemicals were then ranked based on the total estrogenicity of the parent chemical and metabolites. The metabolite prediction software correctly identified known estrogenic metabolites for 26 out of 27 parent chemicals with associated metabolite data, and 39 out of 46 estrogenic metabolites were predicted as potential biotransformation products derived from the parent chemical. The QSAR models estimated stronger estrogenic activity for the majority of the known estrogenic metabolites compared to their parent chemicals. Finally, the three models identified a similar set of parent compounds as top ranked chemicals based on the estrogenicity of putative metabolites. This proposed in silico approach is an inexpensive and rapid strategy for the detection of chemicals with estrogenic metabolites and may reduce potential false negative results from in vitro assays. PMID:27509301

  1. New Methodology for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Topological Metabolite Identification Carbon Efficiency (tMICE).

    PubMed

    Sanchon-Lopez, Beatriz; Everett, Jeremy R

    2016-09-01

    A new, simple-to-implement and quantitative approach to assessing the confidence in NMR-based identification of known metabolites is introduced. The approach is based on a topological analysis of metabolite identification information available from NMR spectroscopy studies and is a development of the metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE) method. New topological metabolite identification indices are introduced, analyzed, and proposed for general use, including topological metabolite identification carbon efficiency (tMICE). Because known metabolite identification is one of the key bottlenecks in either NMR-spectroscopy- or mass spectrometry-based metabonomics/metabolomics studies, and given the fact that there is no current consensus on how to assess metabolite identification confidence, it is hoped that these new approaches and the topological indices will find utility.

  2. Detection and characterization of clostebol sulfate metabolites in Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Pozo, Oscar J; Garrostas, Lorena; Esquivel, Argitxu; Matabosch, Xavier; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Ventura, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic testosterone derivatives which undergo extensive metabolism in man. Differences in the excretion of phase II metabolites are strongly associated with inter-individual and inter-ethnic variations. Sulfate metabolites have been described as long-term metabolites for some AAS. Clostebol is the 4-chloro derivative of testosterone and the aim of the present study was the evaluation of clostebol sulfate metabolites in Caucasian population by LC-MS/MS technology. Clostebol was orally administered to four healthy Caucasian male volunteers, and excretion study urines were collected up to 31 days. Several analytical strategies (neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and selected reaction monitoring acquisitions modes) were applied to detect sulfate metabolites in post-administration samples. Sixteen sulfate metabolites were detected, five of them having detectability times above 10 days (S1a, S2a, S3b, S3g and S4b). Interestingly, metabolite S1a could be detected up to the last collected sample of all excretion studies and it was characterized by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as 4ξ-chloro-5α-androst-3β-ol-17-one 3β-sulfate. Thus, monitoring of S1a improves the detection time of clostebol misuse with respect to the commonly monitored metabolites, excreted in the glucuronide fraction. Importantly, this new metabolite can be incorporated into recently developed LC-MS/MS screening methods base on the direct detection of phase II metabolites. PMID:27085012

  3. Maternal and Infant Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations: Are They Related?

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, S; Calafat, Antonia Maria; Liu, Fan; Swan, Shanna Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Phthalates are synthetic chemicals that are ubiquitous in our society and may have adverse health effects in humans. Detectable concentrations of phthalate metabolites have been found in adults and children, but no studies have examined the relationship between maternal and infant phthalate metabolite concentrations. Objective We investigated the relationship between maternal and infant urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations. Methods We measured nine phthalate metabolites in urine samples from 210 mother/infant pairs collected on the same study visit day (1999–2005) and obtained demographic history from questionnaires. Using multivariate linear regression analyses, we examined the degree to which maternal urine phthalate metabolite concentration predicted infant phthalate metabolite concentration. All analyses were adjusted for infant age, creatinine concentration, and race. Results Correlation coefficients between phthalate metabolite concentrations in the urine of mothers and their infants were generally low but increased with decreasing age of infant. In multivariate analyses, mother’s phthalate metabolite concentrations were significantly associated with infants’ concentrations for six phthalate metabolites: monobenzyl phthalate, monoethyl phthalate, monoisobutyl phthalate, and three metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate: mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxy-hexyl) phthalate and mono(2-ethyl-5-oxo-hexyl) phthalate (p-values for all coefficients <0.05). Discussion Mother’s urine phthalate metabolite concentration is significantly associated with infant urine phthalate metabolite concentration for six phthalate metabolites. It is plausible that shared exposures to phthalates in the immediate surrounding environment accounted for these relationships, but other unidentified sources may also contribute to infants’ phthalate exposures. This study indicates the importance of further identifying infant phthalate exposures

  4. Endogenous cross-talk of fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Kevin J.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Doyle, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) synthesis in fungi requires a ready supply of proteogenic and non-proteogenic amino acids which are subsequently incorporated into the nascent NRP via a thiotemplate mechanism catalyzed by NRP synthetases. Substrate amino acids can be modified prior to or during incorporation into the NRP, or following incorporation into an early stage amino acid-containing biosynthetic intermediate. These post-incorporation modifications involve a range of additional enzymatic activities including but not exclusively, monooxygenases, methyltransferases, epimerases, oxidoreductases, and glutathione S-transferases which are essential to effect biosynthesis of the final NRP. Likewise, polyketide biosynthesis is directly by polyketide synthase megaenzymes and cluster-encoded ancillary decorating enzymes. Additionally, a suite of additional primary metabolites, for example: coenzyme A (CoA), acetyl CoA, S-adenosylmethionine, glutathione (GSH), NADPH, malonyl CoA, and molecular oxygen, amongst others are required for NRP and polyketide synthesis (PKS). Clearly these processes must involve exquisite orchestration to facilitate the simultaneous biosynthesis of different types of NRPs, polyketides, and related metabolites requiring identical or similar biosynthetic precursors or co-factors. Moreover, the near identical structures of many natural products within a given family (e.g., ergot alkaloids), along with localization to similar regions within fungi (e.g., conidia) suggests that cross-talk may exist, in terms of biosynthesis and functionality. Finally, we speculate if certain biosynthetic steps involved in NRP and PKS play a role in cellular protection or environmental adaptation, and wonder if these enzymatic reactions are of equivalent importance to the actual biosynthesis of the final metabolite. PMID:25601857

  5. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Alamifovir and Its Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clark; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Golor, Georg; Watanabe, Hikari; Sasaki, Akira; Yeo, Kwee Poo; Soon, Danny; Sinha, Vikram P.; Flanagan, Shawn D.; He, Minxia M.; Wise, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    Alamifovir, a purine nucleotide analogue prodrug, and its hydrolyzed derivatives have shown preclincal efficacy activity against wild-type and lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus. Two studies were conducted to examine the single- and multiple-dose alamifovir pharmacokinetics after oral administration in healthy males. In study 1, subjects were given single doses (0.2 to 80 mg), with a subset receiving 20 mg in a fed state. Study 2 subjects were dosed with 2.5 to 15 mg twice daily for 15 days. Plasma samples were collected over 72 h in study 1 and over 24 h on days 1 and 15 in study 2. Concentrations of alamifovir and its major metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry methods. The data were analyzed using a noncompartmental technique. Although alamifovir was rapidly absorbed, there was limited systemic exposure due to its rapid hydrolysis and formation of at least three metabolites, suggesting that alamifovir acts as a prodrug. The major metabolites detected were 602074 and 602076, with 602075 detectable only in higher-dose groups. Maximum 602074 plasma concentration was achieved at approximately 0.5 h (Tmax) and declined with a 1- to 2-h terminal half-life (t1/2). Maximum concentrations of 602076 (Cmax) averaged 10% of the 602074 Cmax and reached Tmax in 2.5 h with a 4-h t1/2. Food appeared to decrease the extent of absorption of the compound. Multiple dosing resulted in minimal accumulation, and the concentrations following multiple doses could be predicted using the single-dose data. Alamifovir was well tolerated and the pharmacokinetics were characterized in these studies. PMID:15855501

  6. MASS SPECTROMETRY IMAGING FOR DRUGS AND METABOLITES

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Sturm, Robert; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that provides two- and three-dimensional spatial maps of multiple compounds in a single experiment. This technique has been routinely applied to protein, peptide, and lipid molecules with much less research reporting small molecule distributions, especially pharmaceutical drugs. This review’s main focus is to provide readers with an up-to-date description of the substrates and compounds that have been analyzed for drug and metabolite composition using MSI technology. Additionally, ionization techniques, sample preparation, and instrumentation developments are discussed. PMID:21515430

  7. Antimycobacterial activity of lichen metabolites in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K; Chung, G A; Skúlason, V G; Gissurarson, S R; Vilhelmsdóttir, M

    1998-04-01

    Several compounds, whose structures represent the most common chemical classes of lichen metabolites, were screened for in vitro activity against Mycobacterium aurum, a non-pathogenic organism with a similar sensitivity profile to M. tuberculosis. Of the compounds tested, usnic acid from Cladonia arbuscula exhibited the highest activity with an MIC value of 32 microg/ml. Atranorin and lobaric acid, both isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum, salazinic acid from Parmelia saxatilis and protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica all showed MIC values >/=125 microg/ml. PMID:9795033

  8. Novel sulfur-containing microbial metabolite of primaquine.

    PubMed

    Hufford, C D; Baker, J K; McChesney, J D; Clark, A M

    1986-08-01

    Microbial metabolism studies of the antimalarial drug primaquine, using Streptomyces roseochromogenus (ATCC 13400) have produced an N-acetylated metabolite and a methylene-linked dimeric product, both of which have been previously reported, and a novel sulfur-containing microbial metabolite. The structure of the metabolite as a sulfur-linked dimer was proposed on the basis of spectral and chemical data. The molecular formula C34H44N6O4S was established from field-desorption mass spectroscopy and analytical data. The 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data firmly established that the novel metabolite was a symmetrically substituted dimer of primaquine N-acetate with a sulfur atom linking the two units at C-5. The metabolite has been shown to be a mixture of stereoisomers which can equilibrate in solution. This observation was confirmed by microbial synthesis of the metabolite from optically active primaquine. PMID:3767340

  9. Applications and advances of metabolite biosensors for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Evans, Trent; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2015-09-01

    Quantification and regulation of pathway metabolites is crucial for optimization of microbial production bioprocesses. Genetically encoded biosensors provide the means to couple metabolite sensing to several outputs invaluable for metabolic engineering. These include semi-quantification of metabolite concentrations to screen or select strains with desirable metabolite characteristics, and construction of dynamic metabolite-regulated pathways to enhance production. Taking inspiration from naturally occurring systems, biosensor functions are based on highly diverse mechanisms including metabolite responsive transcription factors, two component systems, cellular stress responses, regulatory RNAs, and protein activities. We review recent developments in biosensors in each of these mechanistic classes, with considerations towards how these sensors are engineered, how new sensing mechanisms have led to improved function, and the advantages and disadvantages of each of these sensing mechanisms in relevant applications. We particularly highlight recent examples directly using biosensors to improve microbial production, and the great potential for biosensors to further inform metabolic engineering practices.

  10. Using Hairy Roots for Production of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a wide variety of natural products, which are traditionally termed secondary metabolites and, more recently, coined specialized metabolites. While these chemical compounds are employed by plants for interactions with their environment, humans have long since explored and exploited plant secondary metabolites for medicinal and practical uses. Due to the tissue-specific and low-abundance accumulation of these metabolites, alternative means of production in systems other than intact plants are sought after. To this end, hairy root culture presents an excellent platform for producing valuable secondary metabolites. This chapter will focus on several major groups of secondary metabolites that are manufactured by hairy roots established from different plant species. Additionally, the methods for preservations of hairy roots will also be reviewed. PMID:25583225

  11. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  12. Metabolite profiling of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) phloem exudate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biofortification of staple crops with essential micronutrients relies on the efficient, long distance transport of nutrients to the developing seed. The main route of this transport in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) is via the phloem, but due to the reactive nature of some essential micronutrients (specifically Fe and Zn), they need to form ligands with metabolites for transport within the phloem. Current methods available in collecting phloem exudate allows for small volumes (μL or nL) to be collected which limits the breadth of metabolite analysis. We present a technical advance in the measurement of 79 metabolites in as little as 19.5 nL of phloem exudate. This was achieved by using mass spectrometry based, metabolomic techniques. Results Using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS), 79 metabolites were detected in wheat phloem. Of these, 53 were identified with respect to their chemistry and 26 were classified as unknowns. Using the ratio of ion area for each metabolite to the total ion area for all metabolites, 39 showed significant changes in metabolite profile with a change in wheat reproductive maturity, from 8–12 to 17–21 days after anthesis. Of these, 21 were shown to increase and 18 decreased as the plant matured. An amine group derivitisation method coupled with liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS) based metabolomics was able to quantify 26 metabolites and semi-quantitative data was available for a further 3 metabolites. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to determine metabolite profiles from extremely small volumes of phloem exudate and that this method can be used to determine variability within the metabolite profile of phloem that has occurred with changes in maturity. This is also believed to be the first report of the presence of the important metal complexing metabolite, nicotianamine in the phloem of wheat. PMID:25143779

  13. Buckwheat phenolic metabolites in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko

    2016-06-01

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench, F. tataricum Gaertner) groats and flour have been established globally as nutritional foods because of their high levels of proteins, polyphenols and minerals. In some regions, buckwheat herb is used as a functional food. In the present study, reports of in vitro studies, preclinical and clinical trials dealing with the effect of buckwheat and its metabolites were reviewed. There are numerous reports of potential health benefits of consuming buckwheat, which may be in the form of food, dietary supplements, home remedies or possibly pharmaceutical drugs; however, adverse effects, including those resulting from contamination, must be considered. There are reports of antioxidative activity of buckwheat, which contains high levels of rutin and quercetin. On the other hand, both cytotoxic and antigenotoxic effects have been shown. Reduction of hyperlipidaemia, reduction of blood pressure and improved weight regulation have been suggested. Consuming buckwheat may have a beneficial effect on diabetes, since lower postprandial blood glucose and insulin response have been reported. In addition, buckwheat metabolites, such as rutin, may have intrinsic protective effects in preserving insulin signalling. Rutin has also been suggested to have potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The literature indicates that buckwheat is safe to consume and may have various beneficial effects on human health. PMID:27046048

  14. Hairy root cultures for secondary metabolites production.

    PubMed

    Pistelli, Laura; Giovannini, Annalisa; Ruffoni, Barbara; Bertoli, Alessandra; Pistelli, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Hairy roots (HRs) are differentiated cultures of transformed roots generated by the infection of wounded higher plants with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. This pathogen causes the HR disease leading to the neoplastic growth of roots that are characterized by high growth rate in hormone free media and genetic stability. HRs produce the same phytochemicals pattern of the corresponding wild type organ. High stability and productivity features allow the exploitation of HRs as valuable biotechnological tool for the production of plant secondary metabolites. In addition, several elicitation methods can be used to further enhance their accumulation in both small and large scale production. However, in the latter case, cultivation in bioreactors should be still optimized. HRs can be also utilised as biological farm for the production of recombinant proteins, hence holding additional potential for industrial use. HR technology has been strongly improved by increased knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying their development. The present review summarizes updated aspects of the hairy root induction, genetics and metabolite production. PMID:21520711

  15. Species identification of Papaver by metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sanggil; Kim, Suncheun; Lee, Chul; Yang, Wonkyung; Park, Yuran; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Lee, Dongho; Hwang, Bang Yeon

    2011-09-10

    Papaver somniferum L. and Papaver setigerum D.C. are controlled as opium poppy in Korea because they contain narcotic substances such as morphine and codeine. It is one of the critical issues whether the plants similar to opium poppy in shape are controlled plants or not. There are more than 110 species in the genus Papaver worldwide and about 10 species in Korea. As the morphological features of some species are very similar and the alkaloid contents and the ratios among the major alkaloids vary even within the same species, it is often difficult to identify the exact species by the morphological features and/or major alkaloids analysis. To develop a new method that uses metabolite profiling for species discrimination between P. somniferum, Papaver rhoeas and P. setigerum, the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data of the alkaline extract were processed with in-house Microsoft Visual Basic(®) modules and the chemical information was analyzed through multivariate statistical analyses such as Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis (DA). The GC-MS results combined with multivariate analysis demonstrated that the metabolite profiling was an efficient technique for the classification and this method will provide a powerful tool for the identification of Korean Papaver species.

  16. Multiple tyrosine metabolites are GPR35 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huayun; Hu, Haibei; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Both kynurenic acid and 2-acyl lysophosphatidic acid have been postulated to be the endogenous agonists of GPR35. However, controversy remains whether alternative endogenous agonists exist. The molecular targets accounted for many nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones are mostly unknown. Here we report the agonist activity of multiple tyrosine metabolites at the GPR35. Tyrosine metabolism intermediates that contain carboxylic acid and/or catechol functional groups were first selected. Whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays enabled by label-free optical biosensor were then used to characterize their agonist activity in native HT-29. Molecular assays including β-arrestin translocation, ERK phosphorylation and receptor internalization confirmed that GPR35 functions as a receptor for 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, gentisate, rosmarinate, and 3-nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that multiple tyrosine metabolites are alternative endogenous ligands of GPR35, and GPR35 may represent a druggable target for treating certain diseases associated with abnormality of tyrosine metabolism. PMID:22523636

  17. Metabolite production by different Ulocladium species.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Birgitte; Hollensted, Morten

    2008-08-15

    Ulocladium, which is phylogenetically related to Alternaria, contains species that are food spoilers and plant pathogens, but also species that have potential as enzyme producers and bio-control agents. Ulocladium spp. are often found on dead vegetation, in soil, air and dust, but also on food and feedstuffs and on water-damaged building materials. The aim was to study the morphological and chemical diversity within the genus Ulocladium. Cultures of 52 Ulocladium strains were identified morphologically, and then extracted and analyzed using automated Chemical Image Analysis. Production of individual metabolites was correlated to species identity and source of isolation (substratum). Chemical analyses corroborated the morphological identifications and showed the existence of several species species-specific metabolites, of which most were known compounds. The production of curvularins was specific to Ulocladium atrum, while most species produced infectopyrones and derivatives of altertoxin I. None of the 52 Ulocladium strains produced alternariols, tenuazonic acid, altersolanols or macrosporin, which are common in species of Alternaria.

  18. Blood styrene and urinary metabolites in styrene polymerisation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M S; Lorimer, W V; Lilis, R; Selikoff, I J

    1978-01-01

    The results of the analysis of blood and urine samples for styrene and its metabolites in 491 workers in a styrene polymerisation plant in the United States are reported. The levels of exposure to styrene were estimated to be less than 10 ppm, but nevertheless styrene and metabolites were detectable in more than 50% of workers in polymerisation jobs, within 4 h of exposure. Workers involved in the manufacture and purification of styrene from ethyl benzene also had detectable blood styrene and urinary metabolites in 83% of recently exposed subjects. The relationship between styrene in blood and in subcutaneous fat and urinary metabolites as pharmacokinetic variables is discussed. PMID:737139

  19. Radioimmunoassay of methaqualone and its monohydroxy metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Berman, A R; McGrath, J P; Permisohn, R C; Cella, J A

    1975-12-01

    A commercial radioimmunoassay kit was evaluated for efficacy in detecting methaqualone or its metabolites in urine of persons receiving this drug. The drug and its unconjugated 3'- and 4'-monohydroxy metabolites could be detected equally well. The unconjugated alpha-monohydroxy metabolite was about 80% as reactive and the unconjugated 6-monohydroxy metabolite reacted only very weakly. Quantitation of the conjugated metabolites was less sensitive than of unconjugated. Nineteen urine specimens which reacted positively to radioimmunoassay and which thin-layer chromatography had shown to contain methaqualone and its metabolites were also examined by gas-liquid chromatography. Those specimens that reacted strongly to radioimmunoassay contained high concentrations of the drug or its metabolites. In the specimens examined by gas-liquid chromatography, the apparent concentrations of the metabolites were generally higher than those of the drug itself. Methaqualone in combination with its unconjugated metabolites reacted additively with the radioimmunoassay, resembling the same concentration of parent drug alone. Detection limits were between 10-200 mug/liter.

  20. Beta-orcinol metabolites from the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Panagiota; Tzakou, Olga; Vagias, Constantinos; Kefalas, Panagiotis; Roussis, Vassilios

    2007-01-01

    Four new beta-orcinol metabolites, hypotrachynic acid (1), deoxystictic acid (2), cryptostictinolide (3) and 8'-methylconstictic acid (4) along with the metabolites 8'-methylstictic acid (5), 8'-methylmenegazziaic acid (6), stictic acid (7), 8'-ethylstictic acid (8) and atranorin (9), that have been previously described, were isolated for the first time from the tissue extracts of the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta (Flörke) Hale. The structures of the new metabolites were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. Radical scavenging activity (RSA) of the metabolites isolated in adequate amounts, was evaluated using luminol chemiluminescence and comparison with Trolox. PMID:17873835

  1. Characterization of Urinary Phthalate Metabolites Among Custodians

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Simcox, Nancy J.; Wakai, Sara; Lu, Chensheng; Garza, Jennifer L.; Cherniack, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates, a ubiquitous class of chemicals found in consumer, personal care, and cleaning products, have been linked to adverse health effects. Our goal was to characterize urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and to identify work and nonwork sources among custodians using traditional cleaning chemicals and ‘green’ or environmentally preferable products (EPP). Sixty-eight custodians provided four urine samples on a workday (first void, before shift, end of shift, and before bedtime) and trained observers recorded cleaning tasks and types of products used (traditional, EPP, or disinfectant) hourly over the work shifts. Questionnaires were used to assess personal care product use. Four different phthalate metabolites [monoethyl phthalate (MEP), monomethyl phthalate (MMP), mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), and monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP)] were quantified using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Geometric means (GM) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for creatinine-adjusted urinary phthalate concentrations. Mixed effects univariate and multivariate modeling, using a random intercept for each individual, was performed to identify predictors of phthalate metabolites including demographics, workplace factors, and personal care product use. Creatinine-adjusted urinary concentrations [GM (95% CI)] of MEP, MMP, MEHP, and MBzP were 107 (91.0–126), 2.69 (2.18–3.30), 6.93 (6.00–7.99), 8.79 (7.84–9.86) µg g−1, respectively. An increasing trend in phthalate concentrations from before to after shift was not observed. Creatinine-adjusted urinary MEP was significantly associated with frequency of traditional cleaning chemical intensity in the multivariate model after adjusting for potential confounding by demographics, workplace factors, and personal care product use. While numerous demographics, workplace factors, and personal care products were statistically significant univariate predictors of MMP, MEHP, and MBzP, few

  2. Genetic Influences on Metabolite Levels: A Comparison across Metabolomic Platforms.

    PubMed

    Yet, Idil; Menni, Cristina; Shin, So-Youn; Mangino, Massimo; Soranzo, Nicole; Adamski, Jerzy; Suhre, Karsten; Spector, Tim D; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Bell, Jordana T

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling is a powerful approach to characterize human metabolism and help understand common disease risk. Although multiple high-throughput technologies have been developed to assay the human metabolome, no technique is capable of capturing the entire human metabolism. Large-scale metabolomics data are being generated in multiple cohorts, but the datasets are typically profiled using different metabolomics platforms. Here, we compared analyses across two of the most frequently used metabolomic platforms, Biocrates and Metabolon, with the aim of assessing how complimentary metabolite profiles are across platforms. We profiled serum samples from 1,001 twins using both targeted (Biocrates, n = 160 metabolites) and non-targeted (Metabolon, n = 488 metabolites) mass spectrometry platforms. We compared metabolite distributions and performed genome-wide association analyses to identify shared genetic influences on metabolites across platforms. Comparison of 43 metabolites named for the same compound on both platforms indicated strong positive correlations, with few exceptions. Genome-wide association scans with high-throughput metabolic profiles were performed for each dataset and identified genetic variants at 7 loci associated with 16 unique metabolites on both platforms. The 16 metabolites showed consistent genetic associations and appear to be robustly measured across platforms. These included both metabolites named for the same compound across platforms as well as unique metabolites, of which 2 (nonanoylcarnitine (C9) [Biocrates]/Unknown metabolite X-13431 [Metabolon] and PC aa C28:1 [Biocrates]/1-stearoylglycerol [Metabolon]) are likely to represent the same or related biochemical entities. The results demonstrate the complementary nature of both platforms, and can be informative for future studies of comparative and integrative metabolomics analyses in samples profiled on different platforms. PMID:27073872

  3. From the Lab Bench: Plant secondary metabolites: The good and the bad.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A column was written to discuss the negatives and positives of plant secondary metabolites. Primary metabolites are those metabolites that are required for survival, such as protein, carbohydrates, and lipids. Plant secondary metabolites are produced from primary metabolites and are not required f...

  4. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis.

  5. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A. John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J.; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term ‘drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide. PMID:26241769

  6. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term 'drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide. PMID:26241769

  7. Unique metabolites protect earthworms against plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liebeke, Manuel; Strittmatter, Nicole; Fearn, Sarah; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Fuchser, Jens; Wallis, David; Palchykov, Vitalii; Robertson, Jeremy; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David J; McPhail, David; Takáts, Zoltán; Bundy, Jacob G

    2015-08-04

    All higher plants produce polyphenols, for defence against above-ground herbivory. These polyphenols also influence the soil micro- and macro-fauna that break down plant leaf litter. Polyphenols therefore indirectly affect the fluxes of soil nutrients and, ultimately, carbon turnover and ecosystem functioning in soils. It is unknown how earthworms, the major component of animal biomass in many soils, cope with high-polyphenol diets. Here, we show that earthworms possess a class of unique surface-active metabolites in their gut, which we term 'drilodefensins'. These compounds counteract the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on earthworm gut enzymes, and high-polyphenol diets increase drilodefensin concentrations in both laboratory and field populations. This shows that drilodefensins protect earthworms from the harmful effects of ingested polyphenols. We have identified the key mechanism for adaptation to a dietary challenge in an animal group that has a major role in organic matter recycling in soils worldwide.

  8. Secondary metabolites: applications on cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Sasso, S; Scrano, L; Bonomo, M G; Salzano, G; Bufo, S A

    2013-01-01

    Biological sciences and related bio-technology play a very important role in research projects concerning protection and preservation of cultural heritage for future generations. In this work secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga) ICMP 11096 strain and crude extract of glycoalkaloids from Solanaceae plants, were tested against a panel of microorganisms isolated from calcarenite stones of two historical bridges located in Potenza and in Campomaggiore (Southern Italy). The isolated bacteria belong to Bacillus cereus and Arthrobacter agilis species, while fungi belong to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Coprinellus, Fusarium, Rhizoctonio and Stemphylium genera. Bga broth (unfiltered) and glycoalkaloids extracts were able to inhibit the growth of all bacterial isolates. Bga culture was active against fungal colonies, while Solanaceae extract exerted bio-activity against Fusarium and Rhizoctonia genera.

  9. Encapsulates for Food Bioconversions and Metabolite Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breguet, Véronique; Vojinovic, Vojislav; Marison, Ian W.

    The control of production costs in the food industry must be very strict as a result of the relatively low added value of food products. Since a wide variety of enzymes and/or cells are employed in the food industry for starch processing, cheese making, food preservation, lipid hydrolysis and other applications, immobilization of the cells and/or enzymes has been recognized as an attractive approach to improving food processes while minimizing costs. This is due to the fact that biocatalyst immobilization allows for easier separation/purification of the product and reutilization of the biocatalyst. The advantages of the use of immobilized systems are many, and they have a special relevance in the area of food technology, especially because industrial processes using immobilized biosystems are usually characterized by lower capital/energy costs and better logistics. The main applications of immobilization, related to the major processes of food bioconversions and metabolite production, will be described and discussed in this chapter.

  10. Lipid Metabolites from the Mushroom Meripilus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Catenia, Francesca; Altieri, Tiziano; Zacchigna, Marina; Procida, Giuseppe; Zilic, Jelena; Zigon, Dusan; Cichelli, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    The phytochemical investigation of the methanolic extract of the white rot fungus Meripilus giganteus resulted in the isolation and identification of complex mixtures of free fatty acids (1), monoacylglycerols (2), cerebrosides (3), ergosterol (4) and ergosterol peroxide (5). The structures of the isolated lipid metabolites (1-5) were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant activity of the whole MeOH extract of the fungus was evaluated through in vitro model systems, such as 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide anion. In all two systems, the results indicated that the extract of the fungus showed the same free-radical-scavenging activity with SC50 data of 47.70 µg/mL, compared with the positive control quercetin (DPPH assay). None of the isolated compounds (1-5) showed a significant activity. Compounds 2-4 were isolated from Meripilus giganteus for the first time.

  11. Screening botanical extracts for quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B M; Bolton, J L; van Breemen, R B

    2001-11-01

    Botanical dietary supplements represent a significant share of the growing market for alternative medicine in the USA, where current regulations do not require assessment of their safety. To help ensure the safety of such products, an in vitro assay using pulsed ultrafiltration and LC-MS-MS has been developed to screen botanical extracts for the formation of electrophilic and potentially toxic quinoid species upon bioactivation by hepatic cytochromes P450. Rat liver microsomes were trapped in a flow-through chamber by an ultrafiltration membrane, and samples containing botanical extracts, GSH and NADP(H), were flow-injected into the chamber. Botanical compounds that were metabolized to reactive intermediates formed stable GSH adducts mimicking a common in vivo detoxification pathway. If present in the ultrafiltrate, GSH conjugates were detected using LC-MS-MS with precursor ion scanning followed by additional characterization using product ion scanning and comparison to standard compounds. As expected, no GSH adducts of reactive metabolites were found in extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), which are under investigation as botanical dietary supplements for the management of menopause. However, extracts of Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees (sassafras), Symphytum officinale L. (comfrey), and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), all of which are known to contain compounds that are either carcinogenic or toxic to mammals, produced GSH adducts during this screening assay. Several compounds that formed GSH conjugates including novel metabolites of rosmarinic acid were identified using database searching and additional LC-MS-MS studies. This assay should be useful as a preliminary toxicity screen during the development of botanical dietary supplements. A positive test suggests that additional toxicological studies are warranted before human consumption of a botanical product.

  12. Screening botanical extracts for quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B M; Bolton, J L; van Breemen, R B

    2001-11-01

    Botanical dietary supplements represent a significant share of the growing market for alternative medicine in the USA, where current regulations do not require assessment of their safety. To help ensure the safety of such products, an in vitro assay using pulsed ultrafiltration and LC-MS-MS has been developed to screen botanical extracts for the formation of electrophilic and potentially toxic quinoid species upon bioactivation by hepatic cytochromes P450. Rat liver microsomes were trapped in a flow-through chamber by an ultrafiltration membrane, and samples containing botanical extracts, GSH and NADP(H), were flow-injected into the chamber. Botanical compounds that were metabolized to reactive intermediates formed stable GSH adducts mimicking a common in vivo detoxification pathway. If present in the ultrafiltrate, GSH conjugates were detected using LC-MS-MS with precursor ion scanning followed by additional characterization using product ion scanning and comparison to standard compounds. As expected, no GSH adducts of reactive metabolites were found in extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), which are under investigation as botanical dietary supplements for the management of menopause. However, extracts of Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees (sassafras), Symphytum officinale L. (comfrey), and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), all of which are known to contain compounds that are either carcinogenic or toxic to mammals, produced GSH adducts during this screening assay. Several compounds that formed GSH conjugates including novel metabolites of rosmarinic acid were identified using database searching and additional LC-MS-MS studies. This assay should be useful as a preliminary toxicity screen during the development of botanical dietary supplements. A positive test suggests that additional toxicological studies are warranted before human consumption of a botanical product. PMID:11712913

  13. Urinary Metabolite Markers of Precocious Puberty*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying; Li, Pin; Zhang, Yongyu; Cui, Lulu; Guo, Zi; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Li, Xin; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Liu, Yumin; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of precocious puberty (PP, the appearance of signs of pubertal development at an abnormally early age), is rapidly rising, concurrent with changes of diet, lifestyles, and social environment. The current diagnostic methods are based on a hormone (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) stimulation test, which is costly, time-consuming, and uncomfortable for patients. The lack of molecular biomarkers to support simple laboratory tests, such as a blood or urine test, has been a long standing bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis and evaluation of PP. Here we report a metabolomic study using an ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Urine metabolites from 163 individuals were profiled, and the metabolic alterations were analyzed after treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) with triptorelin depot. A panel of biomarkers selected from >70 differentially expressed urinary metabolites by receiver operating characteristic and logistic regression analysis provided excellent predictive power with high sensitivity and specificity for PP. The altered metabolic profile of the PP patients was characterized by three major perturbed metabolic pathways: catecholamine, serotonin metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle, presumably resulting from activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Treatment with triptorelin depot was able to normalize these three altered pathways. Additionally, significant changes in the urine levels of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and 5-hydroxykynurenamine in the CPP group suggest that the development of CPP condition may involve an alteration in symbiotic gut microbial composition. PMID:22027199

  14. Urinary metabolite markers of precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Li, Pin; Zhang, Yongyu; Cui, Lulu; Guo, Zi; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Li, Xin; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Liu, Yumin; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of precocious puberty (PP, the appearance of signs of pubertal development at an abnormally early age), is rapidly rising, concurrent with changes of diet, lifestyles, and social environment. The current diagnostic methods are based on a hormone (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) stimulation test, which is costly, time-consuming, and uncomfortable for patients. The lack of molecular biomarkers to support simple laboratory tests, such as a blood or urine test, has been a long standing bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis and evaluation of PP. Here we report a metabolomic study using an ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Urine metabolites from 163 individuals were profiled, and the metabolic alterations were analyzed after treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) with triptorelin depot. A panel of biomarkers selected from >70 differentially expressed urinary metabolites by receiver operating characteristic and logistic regression analysis provided excellent predictive power with high sensitivity and specificity for PP. The altered metabolic profile of the PP patients was characterized by three major perturbed metabolic pathways: catecholamine, serotonin metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle, presumably resulting from activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Treatment with triptorelin depot was able to normalize these three altered pathways. Additionally, significant changes in the urine levels of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and 5-hydroxykynurenamine in the CPP group suggest that the development of CPP condition may involve an alteration in symbiotic gut microbial composition.

  15. Synthesis of an Albendazole Metabolite: Characterization and HPLC Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Graciela; Davyt, Danilo; Gordon, Sandra; Incerti, Marcelo; Nunez, Ivana; Pezaroglo, Horacio; Scarone, Laura; Serra, Gloria; Silvera, Mauricio; Manta, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    In this laboratory activity, students are introduced to the synthesis of an albendazole metabolite obtained by a sulfide oxidation reaction. Albendazole as well as its metabolite, albendazole sulfoxide, are used as anthelmintic drugs. The oxidation reagent is H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] in acetic acid. The reaction is environmental friendly,…

  16. Influence of abiotic stress signals on secondary metabolites in plants

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2011-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are unique sources for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors, and industrially important biochemicals. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the environment and in overcoming stress conditions. Environmental factors viz. temperature, humidity, light intensity, the supply of water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Drought, high salinity, and freezing temperatures are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth of plants and the productivity of crops. Plant cell culture technologies have been effective tools for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites under in vitro conditions and for plant improvement. This brief review summarizes the influence of different abiotic factors include salt, drought, light, heavy metals, frost etc. on secondary metabolites in plants. The focus of the present review is the influence of abiotic factors on secondary metabolite production and some of important plant pharmaceuticals. Also, we describe the results of in vitro cultures and production of some important secondary metabolites obtained in our laboratory. PMID:22041989

  17. Role of active metabolites in the use of opioids.

    PubMed

    Coller, Janet K; Christrup, Lona L; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2009-02-01

    The opioid class of drugs, a large group, is mainly used for the treatment of acute and chronic persistent pain. All are eliminated from the body via metabolism involving principally CYP3A4 and the highly polymorphic CYP2D6, which markedly affects the drug's function, and by conjugation reactions mainly by UGT2B7. In many cases, the resultant metabolites have the same pharmacological activity as the parent opioid; however in many cases, plasma metabolite concentrations are too low to make a meaningful contribution to the overall clinical effects of the parent drug. These metabolites are invariably more water soluble and require renal clearance as an important overall elimination pathway. Such metabolites have the potential to accumulate in the elderly and in those with declining renal function with resultant accumulation to a much greater extent than the parent opioid. The best known example is the accumulation of morphine-6-glucuronide from morphine. Some opioids have active metabolites but at different target sites. These are norpethidine, a neurotoxic agent, and nordextropropoxyphene, a cardiotoxic agent. Clinicians need to be aware that many opioids have active metabolites that will become therapeutically important, for example in cases of altered pathology, drug interactions and genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Thus, dose individualisation and the avoidance of adverse effects of opioids due to the accumulation of active metabolites or lack of formation of active metabolites are important considerations when opioids are used.

  18. Influence of abiotic stress signals on secondary metabolites in plants.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Ravishankar, Gokare Aswathanarayana

    2011-11-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are unique sources for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors, and industrially important biochemicals. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the environment and in overcoming stress conditions. Environmental factors viz. temperature, humidity, light intensity, the supply of water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Drought, high salinity, and freezing temperatures are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth of plants and the productivity of crops. Plant cell culture technologies have been effective tools for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites under in vitro conditions and for plant improvement. This brief review summarizes the influence of different abiotic factors include salt, drought, light, heavy metals, frost etc. on secondary metabolites in plants. The focus of the present review is the influence of abiotic factors on secondary metabolite production and some of important plant pharmaceuticals. Also, we describe the results of in vitro cultures and production of some important secondary metabolites obtained in our laboratory.

  19. Determination of Tamoxifen and its Major Metabolites in Exposed Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tamoxifen (TAM), (Z)-1-(p-dimethylaminoethoxyphenyl)-1, 2-diphenyl-1-butene, is a nonsteroidal agent that has been used in breast cancer treatment for decades. Its major metabolites are 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), N-desmethyltamoxifen (DMT), and endoxifen. While TAM and metabolit...

  20. Yeast synthetic biology for high-value metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhubo; Liu, Yi; Guo, Juan; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-07-22

    Traditionally, high-value metabolites have been produced through direct extraction from natural biological sources which are inefficient, given the low abundance of these compounds. On the other hand, these high-value metabolites are usually difficult to be synthesized chemically, due to their complex structures. In the last few years, the discovery of genes involved in the synthetic pathways of these metabolites, combined with advances in synthetic biology tools, has allowed the construction of increasing numbers of yeast cell factories for production of these metabolites from renewable biomass. This review summarizes recent advances in synthetic biology in terms of the use of yeasts as microbial hosts for the identification of the pathways involved in the synthesis, as well as for the production of high-value metabolites.

  1. Overview of metabolite safety testing from an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shelby; Knadler, Mary Pat; Luffer-Atlas, Debra

    2010-07-01

    Regulatory guidelines on MIST were initially established in 2005 and finalized in 2008 by the US FDA and this has led to much discussion and debate on how to apply these recommendations in today's resource-constrained pharmaceutical environment. There are four aspects of MIST that impact on the field of bioanalysis: definition of a disproportionate human metabolite, establishment of nonclinical (animal) safety coverage for important human metabolites, degree of rigor in validation of bioanalytical methods to quantify metabolites when synthetic standards are available, and semiquantitation of metabolites when synthetic standards are not available. In this manuscript, each of these points has been addressed from a pharmaceutical industry standpoint, including a perspective on the necessary convergence of the fields of metabolite safety testing and bioanalysis.

  2. Matching metabolites and reactions in different metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xinjian; Ozsoyoglu, Z Meral; Ozsoyoglu, Gultekin

    2014-10-01

    Comparing and identifying matching metabolites, reactions, and compartments in genome-scale reconstructed metabolic networks can be difficult due to inconsistent naming in different networks. In this paper, we propose metabolite and reaction matching techniques for matching metabolites and reactions in a given metabolic network to metabolites and reactions in another metabolic network. We employ a variety of techniques that include approximate string matching, similarity score functions and multi-step filtering techniques, all enhanced by a set of rules based on the underlying metabolic biochemistry. The proposed techniques are evaluated by an empirical study on four pairs of metabolic networks, and significant accuracy gains are achieved using the proposed metabolite and reaction identification techniques.

  3. Profiling the reactive metabolites of xenobiotics using metabolomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Lu, Jie; Ma, Xiaochao

    2011-05-16

    A predominant pathway of xenobiotic-induced toxicity is initiated by bioactivation. Characterizing reactive intermediates will provide information on the structure of reactive species, thereby defining a potential bioactivation mechanism. Because most reactive metabolites are not stable, it is difficult to detect them directly. Reactive metabolites can form adducts with trapping reagents, such as glutathione, which makes the reactive metabolites detectable. However, it is challenging to "fish" these adducts out from a complex biological matrix, especially for adducts generated via uncommon metabolic pathways. In this regard, we developed a novel approach based upon metabolomic technologies to screen trapped reactive metabolites. The bioactivation of pulegone, acetaminophen, and clozapine were reexamined by using this metabolomic approach. In all these cases, a large number of trapped reactive metabolites were readily identified. These data indicate that this metabolomic approach is an efficient tool to profile xenobiotic bioactivation.

  4. Software-assisted serum metabolite quantification using NMR.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Sang; Hyeon, Jin-Seong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-08-31

    The goal of metabolomics is to analyze a whole metabolome under a given set of conditions, and accurate and reliable quantitation of metabolites is crucial. Absolute concentration is more valuable than relative concentration; however, the most commonly used method in NMR-based serum metabolic profiling, bin-based and full data point peak quantification, provides relative concentration levels of metabolites and are not reliable when metabolite peaks overlap in a spectrum. In this study, we present the software-assisted serum metabolite quantification (SASMeQ) method, which allows us to identify and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra using Chenomx software. This software uses the ERETIC2 utility from TopSpin to add a digitally synthesized peak to a spectrum. The SASMeQ method will advance NMR-based serum metabolic profiling by providing an accurate and reliable method for absolute quantification that is superior to bin-based quantification. PMID:27506360

  5. Characterizing protein modifications by reactive metabolites using magnetic bead bioreactors and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F

    2015-03-18

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  6. Systematic Identification of Protein-Metabolite Interactions in Complex Metabolite Mixtures by Ligand-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Yaroslav V; Kochanowski, Karl; Link, Hannes; Sauer, Uwe; Allain, Frederic H-T

    2016-05-10

    Protein-metabolite interactions play a vital role in the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Consequently, identifying such interactions is a key prerequisite for understanding cellular regulation. However, the noncovalent nature of the binding between proteins and metabolites has so far hampered the development of methods for systematically mapping protein-metabolite interactions. The few available, largely mass spectrometry-based, approaches are restricted to specific metabolite classes, such as lipids. In this study, we address this issue and show the potential of ligand-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is routinely used in drug development, to systematically identify protein-metabolite interactions. As a proof of concept, we selected four well-characterized bacterial and mammalian proteins (AroG, Eno, PfkA, and bovine serum albumin) and identified metabolite binders in complex mixes of up to 33 metabolites. Ligand-detected NMR captured all of the reported protein-metabolite interactions, spanning a full range of physiologically relevant Kd values (low micromolar to low millimolar). We also detected a number of novel interactions, such as promiscuous binding of the negatively charged metabolites citrate, AMP, and ATP, as well as binding of aromatic amino acids to AroG protein. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, we assessed the functional relevance of these novel interactions in the case of AroG and show that l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, and l-histidine act as novel inhibitors of AroG activity. Thus, we conclude that ligand-detected NMR is suitable for the systematic identification of functionally relevant protein-metabolite interactions.

  7. Using Molecular Networking for Microbial Secondary Metabolite Bioprospecting.

    PubMed

    Purves, Kevin; Macintyre, Lynsey; Brennan, Debra; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Ó; Kuttner, Eva; Ásgeirsdóttir, Margrét E; Young, Louise C; Green, David H; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; Duncan, Katherine R

    2016-01-08

    The oceans represent an understudied resource for the isolation of bacteria with the potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. In particular, actinomyces are well known to produce chemically diverse metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. This study characterised spore-forming bacteria from both Scottish and Antarctic sediments to assess the influence of isolation location on secondary metabolite production. Due to the selective isolation method used, all 85 isolates belonged to the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, with the majority of isolates belonging to the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces. Based on morphology, thirty-eight isolates were chosen for chemical investigation. Molecular networking based on chemical profiles (HR-MS/MS) of fermentation extracts was used to compare complex metabolite extracts. The results revealed 40% and 42% of parent ions were produced by Antarctic and Scottish isolated bacteria, respectively, and only 8% of networked metabolites were shared between these locations, implying a high degree of biogeographic influence upon secondary metabolite production. The resulting molecular network contained over 3500 parent ions with a mass range of m/z 149-2558 illustrating the wealth of metabolites produced. Furthermore, seven fermentation extracts showed bioactivity against epithelial colon adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating the potential for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds from these understudied locations.

  8. Detection and quantification of boscalid and its metabolites in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Jabot, Claire; Daniele, Gaëlle; Giroud, Barbara; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Belzunces, Luc P; Casabianca, Hervé; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Boscalid is a new-generation fungicide that has been detected in several bee matrices. The objective of this work was to characterize boscalid metabolites in honeybees based on in vivo experimentation, and next to verify the presence of theses metabolites into honeybees from colonies presenting troubles. A methodology based on complementary mass spectrometric tools, namely ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF) or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ) was implemented. Honeybees were sprayed with boscalid, at field rate (to induce the metabolization process) and the parent compound with its generated metabolites were then extracted using modified EU-QuEChERS method. The mass characteristics including exact mass, isotopic profile and mass fragments allowed assuming the structure of several metabolites. Some of them were unambiguously identified by comparison with synthesized analytical standards. The metabolites were resulted from hydroxylation and dechlorination of the parent compound as well as the substitution of a chlorine atom with an hydroxyl group. The metabolites were then quantified in bee samples collected from various beehives located in France. Boscalid and three of its metabolites were present in some samples at a level ranged between 0.2 and 36.3 ng/g. PMID:27179242

  9. Development of competitive immunoassays to hydroxyl containing fungicide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gough, Kevin C; Jarvis, Shila; Maddison, Ben C

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of monoclonal antibodies and the development of competitive immunoassays to pesticide metabolites of the fungicides imazalil, carbendazim and thiabendazole. The metabolite specific hydroxyl residues were used as the reactive group with which to link the metabolite to the carrier proteins Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). In each case immune responses in mice were raised and monoclonal antibodies were produced. Antibodies were developed into competitive ELISAs to the appropriate metabolite. The antibody raised to a metabolite of imazalil was optimised into a competitive ELISA format which had an assay IC50 of 7.5 μg/L and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.1 μg/L. A single antibody isolated against the metabolite of carbendazim had assay IC50s of 3.2 and 2.7 μg/L for the metabolites of carbendazim and thiabendazole respectively with an LOD of 0.38 μg/L for both. These sensitive immunoassays may have application in the monitoring of human exposure to these fungicide residues either by occupational or non-occupational routes.

  10. Detection and quantification of boscalid and its metabolites in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Jabot, Claire; Daniele, Gaëlle; Giroud, Barbara; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Belzunces, Luc P; Casabianca, Hervé; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Boscalid is a new-generation fungicide that has been detected in several bee matrices. The objective of this work was to characterize boscalid metabolites in honeybees based on in vivo experimentation, and next to verify the presence of theses metabolites into honeybees from colonies presenting troubles. A methodology based on complementary mass spectrometric tools, namely ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF) or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ) was implemented. Honeybees were sprayed with boscalid, at field rate (to induce the metabolization process) and the parent compound with its generated metabolites were then extracted using modified EU-QuEChERS method. The mass characteristics including exact mass, isotopic profile and mass fragments allowed assuming the structure of several metabolites. Some of them were unambiguously identified by comparison with synthesized analytical standards. The metabolites were resulted from hydroxylation and dechlorination of the parent compound as well as the substitution of a chlorine atom with an hydroxyl group. The metabolites were then quantified in bee samples collected from various beehives located in France. Boscalid and three of its metabolites were present in some samples at a level ranged between 0.2 and 36.3 ng/g.

  11. Using Molecular Networking for Microbial Secondary Metabolite Bioprospecting

    PubMed Central

    Purves, Kevin; Macintyre, Lynsey; Brennan, Debra; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Ó.; Kuttner, Eva; Ásgeirsdóttir, Margrét E.; Young, Louise C.; Green, David H.; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; Duncan, Katherine R.

    2016-01-01

    The oceans represent an understudied resource for the isolation of bacteria with the potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. In particular, actinomyces are well known to produce chemically diverse metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. This study characterised spore-forming bacteria from both Scottish and Antarctic sediments to assess the influence of isolation location on secondary metabolite production. Due to the selective isolation method used, all 85 isolates belonged to the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, with the majority of isolates belonging to the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces. Based on morphology, thirty-eight isolates were chosen for chemical investigation. Molecular networking based on chemical profiles (HR-MS/MS) of fermentation extracts was used to compare complex metabolite extracts. The results revealed 40% and 42% of parent ions were produced by Antarctic and Scottish isolated bacteria, respectively, and only 8% of networked metabolites were shared between these locations, implying a high degree of biogeographic influence upon secondary metabolite production. The resulting molecular network contained over 3500 parent ions with a mass range of m/z 149–2558 illustrating the wealth of metabolites produced. Furthermore, seven fermentation extracts showed bioactivity against epithelial colon adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating the potential for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds from these understudied locations. PMID:26761036

  12. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  13. Pharmaceutical metabolites in the environment: analytical challenges and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Celiz, Mary D; Tso, Jerry; Aga, Diana S

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment has been a subject of concern for the past decade because many of these emerging contaminants have been shown to persist in soil and water. Although recent studies indicate that pharmaceutical contaminants can pose long-term ecological risks, many of the investigations regarding risk assessment have only considered the ecotoxicity of the parent drug, with very little attention given to the potential contributions that metabolites may have. The scarcity of available environmental data on the human metabolites excreted into the environment or the microbial metabolites formed during environmental biodegradation of pharmaceutical residues can be attributed to the difficulty in analyzing trace amounts of previously unknown compounds in complex sample matrices. However, with the advent of highly sensitive and powerful analytical instrumentations that have become available commercially, it is likely that an increased number of pharmaceutical metabolites will be identified and included in environmental risk assessment. The present study will present a critical review of available literature on pharmaceutical metabolites, primarily focusing on their analysis and toxicological significance. It is also intended to provide an overview on the recent advances in analytical tools and strategies to facilitate metabolite identification in environmental samples. This review aims to provide insight on what future directions might be taken to help scientists in this challenging task of enhancing the available data on the fate, behavior, and ecotoxicity of pharmaceutical metabolites in the environment.

  14. Physiochemical property space distribution among human metabolites, drugs and toxins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The current approach to screen for drug-like molecules is to sieve for molecules with biochemical properties suitable for desirable pharmacokinetics and reduced toxicity, using predominantly biophysical properties of chemical compounds, based on empirical rules such as Lipinski's "rule of five" (Ro5). For over a decade, Ro5 has been applied to combinatorial compounds, drugs and ligands, in the search for suitable lead compounds. Unfortunately, till date, a clear distinction between drugs and non-drugs has not been achieved. The current trend is to seek out drugs which show metabolite-likeness. In identifying similar physicochemical characteristics, compounds have usually been clustered based on some characteristic, to reduce the search space presented by large molecular datasets. This paper examines the similarity of current drug molecules with human metabolites and toxins, using a range of computed molecular descriptors as well as the effect of comparison to clustered data compared to searches against complete datasets. Results We have carried out statistical and substructure functional group analyses of three datasets, namely human metabolites, drugs and toxin molecules. The distributions of various molecular descriptors were investigated. Our analyses show that, although the three groups are distinct, present-day drugs are closer to toxin molecules than to metabolites. Furthermore, these distributions are quite similar for both clustered data as well as complete or unclustered datasets. Conclusion The property space occupied by metabolites is dissimilar to that of drugs or toxin molecules, with current drugs showing greater similarity to toxins than to metabolites. Additionally, empirical rules like Ro5 can be refined to identify drugs or drug-like molecules that are clearly distinct from toxic compounds and more metabolite-like. The inclusion of human metabolites in this study provides a deeper insight into metabolite/drug/toxin-like properties and

  15. Immunomodulation by the estrogen metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol.

    PubMed

    Stubelius, Alexandra; Erlandsson, Malin C; Islander, Ulrika; Carlsten, Hans

    2014-07-01

    2-methoxyestradiol (2me2), a metabolite of 17β-estradiol (E2), has been tested in phase II clinical cancer trials and models of inflammation. Its effects are only partly clarified. We investigated the effects of 2me2 on the immune system, using ovariectomized or sham-operated mice treated with a high and a low dose of 2me2 (2me2H and 2me2L), E2 or vehicle. We investigated antagonism of tissue proliferation and estrogen response element (ERE) activation. Established immunomodulation by E2 was reproduced. 2me2L increased NK and T-cells from bone marrow, spleen and liver. Both 2me2H and E2 induced uterus proliferation in ovariectomized mice, but no antagonistic effects on uteri growth were seen in intact animals. Both E2 and 2me2H activated EREs. Immunomodulation by 2me2 is tissue-, and concentration dependent. E2 regulated the immune system more potently. The higher dose of 2me2 resulted in E2 like effects, important to consider when developing 2me2 as a drug.

  16. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  18. Medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites following conjugation.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Petroianu, Georg; Hosztafi, Sándor; Darvas, Ferenc; Csermely, Tamás; Adeghate, Ernest; Siddiq, Afshan; Tekes, Kornélia

    2013-10-01

    Authorities of Drug Administration in the United States of America approved about 5000 drugs for use in the therapy or management of several diseases. About two hundred of these drugs have active metabolites and the knowledge of their medicinal chemistry is important both in medical practice and pharmaceutical research. This review gives a detailed description of the medicinal chemistry of drugs with active metabolites generated after conjugation. This review focused on glucuronide-, acetyl-, sulphate- and phosphate-conjugation of drugs, converting the drug into an active metabolite. This conversion essentially changed the lipophilicity of the drug.

  19. NeeMDB: Convenient Database for Neem Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hatti, Kaushik S; Muralitharan, Lakshmi; Hegde, Rajendra; Kush, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Indian Neem tree is known for its pesticidal and medicinal properties for centuries. Structure elucidation of large number of secondary metabolites responsible for its diverse properties has been achieved. However, this data is spread over various books, scientific reports and publications and difficult to access. We have compiled and stored structural details of neem metabolites in NeeMDB, a database which can be easily accessed, queried and downloaded. NeeMDB would be central in dissipating structural information of neem secondary metabolites world over. PMID:24966540

  20. IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY OF BTEX METABOLITES IN HELA CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied exte...

  1. Phoma Saccardo: distribution, secondary metabolite production and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Deshmukh, Prajakta; Gade, Aniket; Ingle, Avinash; Kövics, György J; Irinyi, László

    2009-01-01

    Phoma Sacc. is an ubiquitous fungus, which has been reported from plants, soil, human beings, animals, and air. Some species of Phoma like P. sorghina, P. herbarum, P. exigua var. exigua, P. macrostoma, P. glomerata, Phoma macdonaldii, Phoma tracheiphila, Phoma proboscis, P. multirostrata, and Phoma foveata secrete phytotoxin and anthraquinone pigments as secondary metabolites, which have great potential for the biological control of weeds, and can be exploited for the production of mycopesticides, agrophytochemicals, and dyes. Some other species produce pharmaceutically active metabolites, viz., Sirodesmins, Phomenoic acid, Phomenolactone, Phomadecalins, Phomactin A, Phomasetin, Squalestatin-1 (S1), and Squalestatin-2 (S2). The secondary metabolites secreted by some species of Phoma are antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-HIV. Equisetin and Phomasetin obtained from species of Phoma are useful against AIDS. The main goal of the present review is to discuss secondary metabolite production by species of Phoma and their utilization as antibiotics and as biocontrol agents. PMID:19624254

  2. Ruta graveolens Extracts and Metabolites against Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Ayil-Gutiérrez, Benjamin A; Villegas-Mendoza, Jesús M; Santes-Hernndez, Zuridai; Paz-González, Alma D; Mireles-Martínez, Maribel; Rosas-García, Ninfa M; Rivera, Gildardo

    2015-11-01

    The biological activity of Ruta graveolens leaf tissue extracts obtained with different solvents (ethyl acetate, ethanol, and water) and metabolites (psoralen, 2- undecanone and rutin) against Spodoptera frugiperda was evaluated. Metabolites levels in extracts were quantified by HPLC and GC. Ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts showed 94% and 78% mortality, respectively. Additionally, psoralen metabolite showed a high mortality as cypermethrin. Metabolite quantification in extracts shows the presence of 2-undecanone (87.9 µmoles mg(-1) DW), psoralen (3.6 µmoles mg(-1) DW) and rutin (0.001 pmoles mg(-1) DW). We suggest that these concentrations of 2-undecanone and psoralen in R. graveolens leaf tissue extracts could be responsible for S. frugiperda mortality.

  3. Methaqualone metabolites in human urine after therapeutic doses.

    PubMed

    Kazyak, L; Kelley, J A; Cella, J A; Droege, R E; Hilpert, L R; Permisohn, R C

    1977-11-01

    We measured five principal metabolites of methaqualone in the urine of seven volunteers after single and multiple doses of the drug. Urine, collected for up to 72 hours after the last dose, was analyzed for methaqualone and its principal metabolites by high-resolution capillary-column gas chromatography. The major biotransformation of methaqualone under therapeutic conditions occurred through benzylic and para-hydroxylation of the o-tolyl moiety. Methaqualone itself was present in concentrations of no more than 1 mg/liter, if it could be detected at all. The observed physiological effects ant total urinary excretion of metabolites reflected the cumulative nature of the parent drug when it was administered in multiple doses. No clear relationship was found between appearance of a specific metabolite and time after ingestion of the drug, although higher amounts of 2-methyl-3-(2'-hydroxymethylphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone were noted in those individuals who tolerated the drug less well.

  4. Metabolites: messengers between the microbiota and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The mammalian intestine harbors one of the largest microbial densities on Earth, necessitating the implementation of control mechanisms by which the host evaluates the state of microbial colonization and reacts to deviations from homeostasis. While microbial recognition by the innate immune system has been firmly established as an efficient means by which the host evaluates microbial presence, recent work has uncovered a central role for bacterial metabolites in the orchestration of the host immune response. In this review, we highlight examples of how microbiota-modulated metabolites control the development, differentiation, and activity of the immune system and classify them into functional categories that illustrate the spectrum of ways by which microbial metabolites influence host physiology. A comprehensive understanding of how microbiota-derived metabolites shape the human immune system is critical for the rational design of therapies for microbiota-driven diseases.

  5. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  6. Possible endocrine disrupting effects of parabens and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Boberg, Julie; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie; Hass, Ulla

    2010-09-01

    Parabens are preservatives used in a wide range of cosmetic products, including products for children, and some are permitted in foods. However, there is concern for endocrine disrupting effects. This paper critically discusses the conclusions of recent reviews and original research papers and provides an overview of studies on toxicokinetics. After dermal uptake, parabens are hydrolyzed and conjugated and excreted in urine. Despite high total dermal uptake of paraben and metabolites, little intact paraben can be recovered in blood and urine. Paraben metabolites may play a role in the endocrine disruption seen in experimental animals and studies are needed to determine human levels of parabens and metabolites. Overall, the estrogenic burden of parabens and their metabolites in blood may exceed the action of endogenous estradiol in childhood and the safety margin for propylparaben is very low when comparing worst-case exposure to NOAELs from experimental studies in rats and mice.

  7. The chemical identification and analysis of Aspergillus nidulans secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have long been recognized to be a rich source of secondary metabolites with potential medicinal applications. The recent genomic sequencing of several Aspergillus species has revealed that many secondary metabolite gene clusters are apparently silent under standard laboratory conditions. Several successful approaches have been utilized to upregulate these genes and unearth the corresponding natural products. A straightforward, reliable method to purify and characterize new metabolites therefore should be useful. Details are provided herein on the cultivation of Aspergillus nidulans and the LC/MS analysis of the metabolic profile. Following is an explanation of silica gel chromatography, HPLC, and preparative TLC. Finally, the NMR characterization of previously unknown A. nidulans metabolites is detailed. PMID:23065610

  8. Fusarial toxins: secondary metabolites of Fusarium fungi.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Ksenija; Ivanovic, Snezana; Nesic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins occurs worldwide, even though there are geographic and climatic differences in the amounts produced and occurrence of these substances.Mycotoxins are secondary chemical metabolites of different fungi. They are natural contaminants of cereals, so their presence is often inevitable. Among many genera that produce mycotoxins, Fusarium fungi are the most widespread in cereal-growing areas of the planet. Fusarium fungi produce a diversity of mycotoxin types, whose distributions are also diverse. What is produced and where it is produced is influenced primarily by environmental conditions, and crop production and storage methods. The amount of toxin produced depends on physical (viz., moisture, relative humidity, temperature, and mechanical damage), chemical (viz., carbon dioxide,oxygen, composition of substrate, insecticides and fungicides), and biological factors (viz., plant variety, stress, insects, spore load, etc.). Moisture and temperature have a major influence on mold growth rate and mycotoxin production.Among the most toxic and prevalent fusaria) toxins are the following: zearalenone,fumonisins, moniliformin and trichothecenes (T-2/HT-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol,diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol). Zearalenone (ZEA; ZON, F-2 toxin) isaphy to estrogenic compound, primarily a field contaminant, which exhibits estrogenic activity and has been implicated in numerous mycotoxicoses of farm animals,especially pigs. Recently, evidence suggests that ZEA has potential to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells. Fumonisins are also cancer-promoting metabolites,of which Fumonisin 8 I (FBI) is the most important. Moniliformin (MON) isalso highly toxic to both animals and humans. Trichothecenes are classified as gastrointestinal toxins, dermatotoxins, immunotoxins, hematotoxins, and gene toxins.T-2 and HT-2 toxin, and diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, anguidine) are the most toxic mycotoxins among the trichothecene group. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and

  9. Fusarial toxins: secondary metabolites of Fusarium fungi.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Ksenija; Ivanovic, Snezana; Nesic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins occurs worldwide, even though there are geographic and climatic differences in the amounts produced and occurrence of these substances.Mycotoxins are secondary chemical metabolites of different fungi. They are natural contaminants of cereals, so their presence is often inevitable. Among many genera that produce mycotoxins, Fusarium fungi are the most widespread in cereal-growing areas of the planet. Fusarium fungi produce a diversity of mycotoxin types, whose distributions are also diverse. What is produced and where it is produced is influenced primarily by environmental conditions, and crop production and storage methods. The amount of toxin produced depends on physical (viz., moisture, relative humidity, temperature, and mechanical damage), chemical (viz., carbon dioxide,oxygen, composition of substrate, insecticides and fungicides), and biological factors (viz., plant variety, stress, insects, spore load, etc.). Moisture and temperature have a major influence on mold growth rate and mycotoxin production.Among the most toxic and prevalent fusaria) toxins are the following: zearalenone,fumonisins, moniliformin and trichothecenes (T-2/HT-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol,diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol). Zearalenone (ZEA; ZON, F-2 toxin) isaphy to estrogenic compound, primarily a field contaminant, which exhibits estrogenic activity and has been implicated in numerous mycotoxicoses of farm animals,especially pigs. Recently, evidence suggests that ZEA has potential to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells. Fumonisins are also cancer-promoting metabolites,of which Fumonisin 8 I (FBI) is the most important. Moniliformin (MON) isalso highly toxic to both animals and humans. Trichothecenes are classified as gastrointestinal toxins, dermatotoxins, immunotoxins, hematotoxins, and gene toxins.T-2 and HT-2 toxin, and diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, anguidine) are the most toxic mycotoxins among the trichothecene group. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and

  10. Volatile Metabolites of Pathogens: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Ideally, invading bacteria are detected as early as possible in critically ill patients: the strain of morbific pathogens is identified rapidly, and antimicrobial sensitivity is known well before the start of new antimicrobial therapy. Bacteria have a distinct metabolism, part of which results in the production of bacteria-specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which might be used for diagnostic purposes. Volatile metabolites can be investigated directly in exhaled air, allowing for noninvasive monitoring. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of VOCs produced by the six most abundant and pathogenic bacteria in sepsis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Such VOCs could be used as biological markers in the diagnostic approach of critically ill patients. A systematic review of existing literature revealed 31 articles. All six bacteria of interest produce isopentanol, formaldehyde, methyl mercaptan, and trimethylamine. Since humans do not produce these VOCs, they could serve as biological markers for presence of these pathogens. The following volatile biomarkers were found for identification of specific strains: isovaleric acid and 2-methyl-butanal for Staphylococcus aureus; 1-undecene, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-quinazoline, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl thiocyanide for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and methanol, pentanol, ethyl acetate, and indole for Escherichia coli. Notably, several factors that may effect VOC production were not controlled for, including used culture media, bacterial growth phase, and genomic variation within bacterial strains. In conclusion, VOCs produced by bacteria may serve as biological markers for their presence. Goal-targeted studies should be performed to identify potential sets of volatile biological markers and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers in critically ill patients. PMID

  11. Acrolein metabolites, diabetes and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Feroe, Aliya G; Attanasio, Roberta; Scinicariello, Franco

    2016-07-01

    Acrolein is a dietary and environmental pollutant that has been associated in vitro to dysregulate glucose transport. We investigated the association of urinary acrolein metabolites N-acetyl-S-(3-hydroxypropyl)-l-cysteine (3-HPMA) and N-acetyl-S-(carboxyethyl)-l-cysteine (CEMA) and their molar sum (∑acrolein) with diabetes using data from investigated 2027 adults who participated in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). After excluding participants taking insulin or other diabetes medication we, further, investigated the association of the compounds with insulin resistance (n=850), as a categorical outcome expressed by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR>2.6). As secondary analyses, we investigated the association of the compounds with HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, fasting insulin and fasting plasma glucose. The analyses were performed using urinary creatinine as independent variable in the models, and, as sensitivity analyses, the compounds were used as creatinine corrected variables. Diabetes as well as insulin resistance (defined as HOMA-IR>2.6) were positively associated with the 3-HPMA, CEMA and ∑Acrolein with evidence of a dose-response relationship (p<0.05). The highest 3rd and 4th quartiles of CEMA compared to the lowest quartile were significantly associated with higher HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and fasting insulin with a dose-response relationship. The highest 3rd quartile of 3-HPMA and ∑Acrolein were positively and significantly associated with HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and fasting insulin. These results suggest a need of further studies to fully understand the implications of acrolein with type 2 diabetes and insulin. PMID:26991531

  12. Bioactive metabolites from Spilanthes acmella Murr.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Suphapong, Saowapa; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Lawung, Ratana; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2009-01-01

    Spilanthes acmella Murr. (Compositae) has been used as a traditional medicine for toothache, rheumatism and fever. Its extracts had been shown to exhibit vasorelaxant and antioxidant activities. Herein, its antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities were evaluated. Agar dilution method assays against 27 strains of microorganisms were performed. Results showed that fractions from the chloroform and methanol extracts inhibited the growth of many tested organisms, e.g. Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC 10356 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64-256 mg/mL and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 with MIC of 128-256 mg/mL. The tested fractions all exhibited antioxidant properties in both DPPH and SOD assays. Potent radical scavenging activity was observed in the DPPH assay. No cytotoxic effects of the extracts against KB and HuCCA-1 cell lines were evident. Bioassay-guided isolation resulted in a diverse group of bioactive compounds such as phenolics [vanillic acid (2), trans-ferulic acid (5) and trans-isoferulic acid (6)], coumarin (scopoletin, 4) and triterpenoids like 3-acetylaleuritolic acid (1), b-sitostenone (3), stigmasterol and stigmasteryl-3-O-b-D-glucopyranosides, in addition to a mixture of stigmasteryl-and b-sitosteryl-3-O-b-D-glucopyranosides. The compounds 1-6 represent bioactive metabolites of S. acmella Murr. that were never previously reported. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the potential benefits of this medicinal plant as a rich source of high therapeutic value compounds for medicines, cosmetics, supplements and as a health food. PMID:19255544

  13. DNA adduct formation by alachlor metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Kimmel, E.C.; Casida, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of DNA adduct formation by alachlor (ArN(CH/sub 2/OCH/sub 3/)C(O)CH/sub 2/Cl wherein Ar is 2,6-diethylphenyl) and its metabolites is used as a guide to deduce the causal agent(s) in the carcinogenicity of this major herbicide. (/sup 14/C-phenyl)Alachlor is compared to its two metabolic cleavage products, (/sup 14/C-phenyl) 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)acetamide (CDEPA) (ArNHC(O)CH/sub 2/Cl) and (/sup 14/C-phenyl)2,6-diethylaniline (DEA) (ArNH/sub 2/), and to (/sup 14/C-methoxy)alachlor in various in vitro and in vivo systems. Horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide activate DEA, but not CEDPA or alachlor, for formation of adducts with calf thymus DNA, which probably involves 2,6-diethylnitrosobenzene (ArNO) as an intermediate. Mouse liver microsomes and NADPH are both required to enhance the binding from each labeled preparation to calf thymus DNA; 4-fold higher labeling is observed from (/sup 14/C-methoxy)- than from (/sup 14/C-phenyl)alachlor. This 4-fold preferential DNA labeling from the /sup 14/C-methoxy compound is likewise found in the liver of mice treated intraperitoneally. Mouse liver protein and hemoglobin are also labeled, in vivo, with (/sup 14/C-phenyl)alachlor, -CDEPA and -DEA, and, as with the DNA, the labeling of these proteins is 1.5- to 2-fold higher with (/sup 14/C-methoxy)alachlor.

  14. Profile of urinary arsenic metabolites during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Bin; Christian, Jay; Peralta, Cecilia; Ferreccio, Catterina; Atallah, Raja; Kalman, David

    2003-12-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (In-As) from drinking water is associated with different health effects, including skin, lung, bladder, and kidney cancer as well as vascular and possibly reproductive effects. In-As is metabolized through the process of methylation, resulting in the production and excretion of methylated species, mainly monomethylarsenate (MMA) and dimethylarsenate (DMA). Because a large percentage of the dose is excreted in urine, the distribution of urinary In-As, MMA, and DMA is considered a useful indicator of methylation patterns in human populations. Several factors affect these patterns, including sex and exposure level. In this study, we investigated the profile of urinary In-As, MMA, and DMA of pregnant women. Periodic urine samples were collected from early to late pregnancy among 29 pregnant women living in Antofagasta, Chile, who drank tap water containing 40 micro g/L In-As. The total urinary arsenic across four sampling periods increased with increasing weeks of gestation, from an initial mean value of 36.1 to a final value of 54.3 micro g/L. This increase was mainly due to an increase in DMA, resulting in lower percentages of In-As and MMA and a higher percentage of DMA. Our findings indicate that among women exposed to moderate arsenic from drinking water during pregnancy, changes occur in the pattern of urinary arsenic excretion and metabolite distribution. The toxicologic significance of this is not clear, given recent evidence suggesting that intermediate methylated species may be highly toxic. Nevertheless, this study suggests that arsenic metabolism changes throughout the course of pregnancy, which in turn may have toxicologic effects on the developing fetus. Key words: arsenic, arsenic metabolism, arsenic methylation, Chile, pregnancy, urinary arsenic.

  15. Synthesis and Cytotoxicity of Two Active Metabolites of Larotaxel.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei; Li, Anping; Li, Minghua; Qiao, Yufeng; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two epimeric metabolites of Larotaxel were synthesized in eight steps from 10-DAB III as a commercial material and their structures were characterized using NMR and MS spectral data. The cytotoxicity of two metabolites was performed on breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, MX-1 and MDA-MB-231. It is remarkable that both of these two desired taxanes showed great potent cytotoxic effect. PMID:26830032

  16. Metabolite profiling in plant biology: platforms and destinations

    PubMed Central

    Kopka, Joachim; Fernie, Alisdair; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Gibon, Yves; Stitt, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Optimal use of genome sequences and gene-expression resources requires powerful phenotyping platforms, including those for systematic analysis of metabolite composition. The most used technologies for metabolite profiling, including mass spectral, nuclear magnetic resonance and enzyme-based approaches, have various advantages and disadvantages, and problems can arise with reliability and the interpretation of the huge datasets produced. These techniques will be useful for answering important biological questions in the future. PMID:15186482

  17. Metabolite identification through multiple kernel learning on fragmentation trees

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolite identification from tandem mass spectrometric data is a key task in metabolomics. Various computational methods have been proposed for the identification of metabolites from tandem mass spectra. Fragmentation tree methods explore the space of possible ways in which the metabolite can fragment, and base the metabolite identification on scoring of these fragmentation trees. Machine learning methods have been used to map mass spectra to molecular fingerprints; predicted fingerprints, in turn, can be used to score candidate molecular structures. Results: Here, we combine fragmentation tree computations with kernel-based machine learning to predict molecular fingerprints and identify molecular structures. We introduce a family of kernels capturing the similarity of fragmentation trees, and combine these kernels using recently proposed multiple kernel learning approaches. Experiments on two large reference datasets show that the new methods significantly improve molecular fingerprint prediction accuracy. These improvements result in better metabolite identification, doubling the number of metabolites ranked at the top position of the candidates list. Contact: huibin.shen@aalto.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24931979

  18. Discovering Regulated Metabolite Families in Untargeted Metabolomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Treutler, Hendrik; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Porzel, Andrea; Gorzolka, Karin; Tissier, Alain; Neumann, Steffen; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich

    2016-08-16

    The identification of metabolites by mass spectrometry constitutes a major bottleneck which considerably limits the throughput of metabolomics studies in biomedical or plant research. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze metabolomics data from untargeted, data-independent LC-MS/MS measurements. By integrated analysis of MS(1) abundances and MS/MS spectra, the identification of regulated metabolite families is achieved. This approach offers a global view on metabolic regulation in comparative metabolomics. We implemented our approach in the web application "MetFamily", which is freely available at http://msbi.ipb-halle.de/MetFamily/ . MetFamily provides a dynamic link between the patterns based on MS(1)-signal intensity and the corresponding structural similarity at the MS/MS level. Structurally related metabolites are annotated as metabolite families based on a hierarchical cluster analysis of measured MS/MS spectra. Joint examination with principal component analysis of MS(1) patterns, where this annotation is preserved in the loadings, facilitates the interpretation of comparative metabolomics data at the level of metabolite families. As a proof of concept, we identified two trichome-specific metabolite families from wild-type tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777 in a fully unsupervised manner and validated our findings based on earlier publications and with NMR. PMID:27452369

  19. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, (trans, trans)-3,4-dihydroxycyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid, p-hydrocoumaric acid, vanillic acid, azelaic acid, hydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, hydrocaffeic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. Among these metabolites, the antifungal compounds 3-phenyllactic acid and 3-hydroxydecanoic acid were previously isolated in our laboratory from liquid cultures of the same LAB strains by bioassay-guided fractionation. It was concluded that other metabolites, e.g., p-hydrocoumaric acid, hydroferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid, were released from the grass by the added LAB strains. The antifungal activities of the identified metabolites in 100 mM lactic acid were investigated. The MICs against Pichia anomala, Penicillium roqueforti, and Aspergillus fumigatus were determined, and 3-hydroxydecanoic acid showed the lowest MIC (0.1 mg ml−1 for two of the three test organisms). PMID:17616609

  20. Discovering Regulated Metabolite Families in Untargeted Metabolomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Treutler, Hendrik; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Porzel, Andrea; Gorzolka, Karin; Tissier, Alain; Neumann, Steffen; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich

    2016-08-16

    The identification of metabolites by mass spectrometry constitutes a major bottleneck which considerably limits the throughput of metabolomics studies in biomedical or plant research. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze metabolomics data from untargeted, data-independent LC-MS/MS measurements. By integrated analysis of MS(1) abundances and MS/MS spectra, the identification of regulated metabolite families is achieved. This approach offers a global view on metabolic regulation in comparative metabolomics. We implemented our approach in the web application "MetFamily", which is freely available at http://msbi.ipb-halle.de/MetFamily/ . MetFamily provides a dynamic link between the patterns based on MS(1)-signal intensity and the corresponding structural similarity at the MS/MS level. Structurally related metabolites are annotated as metabolite families based on a hierarchical cluster analysis of measured MS/MS spectra. Joint examination with principal component analysis of MS(1) patterns, where this annotation is preserved in the loadings, facilitates the interpretation of comparative metabolomics data at the level of metabolite families. As a proof of concept, we identified two trichome-specific metabolite families from wild-type tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777 in a fully unsupervised manner and validated our findings based on earlier publications and with NMR.

  1. Trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Navarro, V; Leppänen, M T; Kukkonen, J V K; Godoy Olmos, S

    2013-02-01

    The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites was studied using Gammarus setosus as a predator and the invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius as prey. The results obtained by liquid scintillation counting confirmed that the pyrene metabolites produced by the aquatic invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius were transferred to G. setosus through the diet. More detailed analyses by liquid chromatography discovered that two of the metabolites produced by C. riparius appeared in the chromatograms of G. setosus tissue extracts, proving their trophic transfer. These metabolites were not present in chromatograms of G. setosus exclusively exposed to pyrene. The present study supports the trophic transfer of PAH metabolites between benthic macroinvertebrates and common species of an arctic amphipod. As some PAH metabolites are more toxic than the parent compounds, the present study raises concerns about the consequences of their trophic transfer and the fate and effects of PAHs in natural environments. PMID:23202283

  2. A toxic metabolite of Nigrospora oryzae (Berk and Br.) petch.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Davis, N D; Diener, U L

    1986-09-01

    Nigrospora oryzae was isolated from dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.) collected in Auburn and from hay shipped under refrigeration to Florida. Some of these samples were eaten by cattle and horses that subsequently developed lameness. Metabolites of N. oryzae were separated by thin layer chromatography and tested for toxicity. Only one metabolite was toxic. Metabolite A showed toxicity to brine shrimp with an LD50 = 500 micrograms/ml in 8 h. It also had an antibiotic effect on Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 with a minimum inhibitory level of 10.1 micrograms/disc. As little as 435 micrograms of a crude methanolic extract of N. oryzae showed mild toxicity to chick embryos. The metabolite was not toxic to mice nor rats at the levels tested. Quantitative procedures developed for the determination of metabolite A showed that the maximum production occurred in yeast extract-sucrose liquid medium with an initial pH of 5-6, when incubated as a stationary culture for 28 days at 25 degrees C. It was concluded that metabolite A is a weak antibiotic rather than a mycotoxin, and was probably not associated with the symptoms of lameness observed in cattle and horses. The antibiotic is not one previously reported for N. oryzae. PMID:3095644

  3. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Pohnert, Georg; Wei, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology. PMID:27775594

  4. The "first hit" toward alcohol reinforcement: role of ethanol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Israel, Yedy; Quintanilla, María Elena; Karahanian, Eduardo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario

    2015-05-01

    This review analyzes literature that describes the behavioral effects of 2 metabolites of ethanol (EtOH): acetaldehyde and salsolinol (a condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine) generated in the brain. These metabolites are self-administered into specific brain areas by animals, showing strong reinforcing effects. A wealth of evidence shows that EtOH, a drug consumed to attain millimolar concentrations, generates brain metabolites that are reinforcing at micromolar and nanomolar concentrations. Salsolinol administration leads to marked increases in voluntary EtOH intake, an effect inhibited by mu-opioid receptor blockers. In animals that have ingested EtOH chronically, the maintenance of alcohol intake is no longer influenced by EtOH metabolites, as intake is taken over by other brain systems. However, after EtOH withdrawal brain acetaldehyde has a major role in promoting binge-like drinking in the condition known as the "alcohol deprivation effect"; a condition seen in animals that have ingested alcohol chronically, are deprived of EtOH for extended periods, and are allowed EtOH re-access. The review also analyzes the behavioral effects of acetate, a metabolite that enters the brain and is responsible for motor incoordination at low doses of EtOH. Also discussed are the paradoxical effects of systemic acetaldehyde. Overall, evidence strongly suggests that brain-generated EtOH metabolites play a major role in the early ("first-hit") development of alcohol reinforcement and in the generation of relapse-like drinking.

  5. Metabolites of Siamenoside I and Their Distributions in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Rong; Xu, Feng; Li, Dian-Peng; Lu, Feng-Lai; Liu, Guang-Xue; Wang, Lei; Shang, Ming-Ying; Huang, Yong-Lin; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Siamenoside I is the sweetest mogroside that has several kinds of bioactivities, and it is also a constituent of Siraitiae Fructus, a fruit and herb in China. Hitherto the metabolism of siamenoside I in human or animals remains unclear. To reveal its metabolic pathways, a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap-time of flight-multistage mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n)) method was used to profile and identify its metabolites in rats. Altogether, 86 new metabolites were identified or tentatively identified, and 23 of them were also new metabolites of mogrosides. In rats, siamenoside I was found to undergo deglycosylation, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, deoxygenation, isomerization, and glycosylation reactions. Among them, deoxygenation, pentahydroxylation, and didehydrogenation were novel metabolic reactions of mogrosides. The distributions of siamenoside I and its 86 metabolites in rat organs were firstly reported, and they were mainly distributed to intestine, stomach, kidney, and brain. The most widely distributed metabolite was mogroside IIIE. In addition, eight metabolites were bioactive according to literature. These findings would help to understand the metabolism and effective forms of siamenoside I and other mogrosides in vivo. PMID:26840289

  6. Modulation of antimicrobial metabolites production by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Bracarense, Adriana A.P.; Takahashi, Jacqueline A.

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of active secondary metabolites by fungi occurs as a specific response to the different growing environments. Changes in this environment alter the chemical and biological profiles leading to metabolites diversification and consequently to novel pharmacological applications. In this work, it was studied the influence of three parameters (fermentation length, medium composition and aeration) in the biosyntheses of antimicrobial metabolites by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus in 10 distinct fermentation periods. Metabolism modulation in two culturing media, CYA and YES was evaluated by a 22 full factorial planning (ANOVA) and on a 23 factorial planning, role of aeration, medium composition and carbohydrate concentration were also evaluated. In overall, 120 different extracts were prepared, their HPLC profiles were obtained and the antimicrobial activity against A. flavus, C. albicans, E. coli and S. aureus of all extracts was evaluated by microdilution bioassay. Yield of kojic acid, a fine chemical produced by the fungus A. parasiticus was determined in all extracts. Statistical analyses pointed thirteen conditions able to modulate the production of bioactive metabolites by A. parasiticus. Effect of carbon source in metabolites diversification was significant as shown by the changes in the HPLC profiles of the extracts. Most of the extracts presented inhibition rates higher than that of kojic acid as for the extract obtained after 6 days of fermentation in YES medium under stirring. Kojic acid was not the only metabolite responsible for the activity since some highly active extracts showed to possess low amounts of this compound, as determined by HPLC. PMID:24948950

  7. Identification of intra- and inter-individual metabolite variation in plasma metabolite profiles of cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Colyer, Alison; Gilham, Matthew S; Kamlage, Beate; Rein, Dietrich; Allaway, David

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was first to identify drivers of variance in plasma metabolite profiles of cats and dogs that may affect the interpretation of nutritional metabolomic studies. A total of fourteen cats and fourteen dogs housed in environmentally enriched accommodation were fed a single batch of diet to maintain body weight. Fasting blood samples were taken on days 14, 16 and 18 of the study. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS and solid-phase extraction-LC-MS/MS analyses were used for metabolite profiling. Principal component (PC) analysis that indicated 31 and 27 % of the variance was explained in PC1 and PC2 for cats and dogs, respectively, with most individuals occupying a unique space. As the individual was a major driver of variance in the plasma metabolome, the second objective was to identify metabolites associated with the individual variation observed. The proportion of intra- and inter-individual variance was calculated for 109 cat and 101 dog metabolites with a low intra-individual variance (SD < 0.05). Of these, fifteen cat and six dog metabolites had inter-individual variance accounting for at least 90 % of the total variance. There were four metabolites common to both species (campesterol, DHA, a cholestenol and a sphingosine moiety). Many of the metabolites with >75 % inter-individual variance were common to both species and to similar areas of metabolism. In summary, the individual is an important driver of variance in the fasted plasma metabolome, and specific metabolites and areas of metabolism may be differentially regulated by individuals in two companion animal species. PMID:22005413

  8. Severe drought stress is affecting selected primary metabolites, polyphenols, and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves (Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir).

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michaela; Weingart, Georg; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Neumann, Nora; Becker, Manuel; Varmuza, Kurt; Liebner, Falk; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Extreme weather conditions with prolonged dry periods and high temperatures as well as heavy rain events can severely influence grapevine physiology and grape quality. The present study evaluates the effects of severe drought stress on selected primary metabolites, polyphenols and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves. Among the 11 primary metabolites, 13 polyphenols and 95 volatiles which were analyzed, a significant discrimination between control and stressed plants of 7 primary metabolites, 11 polyphenols and 46 volatile metabolites was observed. As single parameters are usually not specific enough for the discrimination of control and stressed plants, an unsupervised (PCA) and a supervised (PLS-DA) multivariate approach were applied to combine results from different metabolic groups. In a first step a selection of five metabolites, namely citric acid, glyceric acid, ribose, phenylacetaldehyde and 2-methylbutanal were used to establish a calibration model using PLS regression to predict the leaf water potential. The model was strong enough to assign a high number of plants correctly with a correlation of 0.83. The PLS-DA provides an interesting approach to combine data sets and to provide tools for the specific evaluation of physiological plant stresses.

  9. Severe drought stress is affecting selected primary metabolites, polyphenols, and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves (Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot noir).

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michaela; Weingart, Georg; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Neumann, Nora; Becker, Manuel; Varmuza, Kurt; Liebner, Falk; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Forneck, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Extreme weather conditions with prolonged dry periods and high temperatures as well as heavy rain events can severely influence grapevine physiology and grape quality. The present study evaluates the effects of severe drought stress on selected primary metabolites, polyphenols and volatile metabolites in grapevine leaves. Among the 11 primary metabolites, 13 polyphenols and 95 volatiles which were analyzed, a significant discrimination between control and stressed plants of 7 primary metabolites, 11 polyphenols and 46 volatile metabolites was observed. As single parameters are usually not specific enough for the discrimination of control and stressed plants, an unsupervised (PCA) and a supervised (PLS-DA) multivariate approach were applied to combine results from different metabolic groups. In a first step a selection of five metabolites, namely citric acid, glyceric acid, ribose, phenylacetaldehyde and 2-methylbutanal were used to establish a calibration model using PLS regression to predict the leaf water potential. The model was strong enough to assign a high number of plants correctly with a correlation of 0.83. The PLS-DA provides an interesting approach to combine data sets and to provide tools for the specific evaluation of physiological plant stresses. PMID:25602440

  10. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  11. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sara A; McGettrick, Julie R; Hansen, Warren K; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT.

  12. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  13. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sara A; McGettrick, Julie R; Hansen, Warren K; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  14. Identification of Metabolites of the Fungicide Penconazole in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, R; Polledri, E; Scurati, S; Moretto, A; Fustinoni, S

    2016-07-18

    Penconazole (PEN) is a fungicide used in agriculture that has been classified as hazardous to humans and the environment. The objective of this work was to identify PEN urinary metabolites in humans and propose a biomarker for PEN exposure. Five urine samples were collected from agricultural workers who worked with and were exposed to PEN. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry, with the source operating in the electrospray ionization mode. Metabolites previously identified in animal studies were searched as possible metabolites in humans. Candidate metabolites were first identified by multiple reaction monitoring following the protonated molecular ions that generated the protonated triazole moiety, which is expected to be present in all PEN metabolites; second, the isotopic patterns of the molecular ions were checked for consistency with the presence of two chlorine atoms; third, the full mass spectra were evaluated for consistency with the molecular structure. Seven different oxidized metabolites were found, both in the free and glucuronide conjugate forms. The major metabolite was the monohydroxyl-derivative PEN-OH (median molar fraction approximately 0.92 as a sum of free and glucuronide conjugated form). The product of further oxidation was the carboxyl-derivate PEN-COOH (median molar fraction approximately 0.03). After hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase, the free compounds were quantified in the presence of deuterated PEN as an internal standard; PEN-OH levels ranged from 230 to 460 μg/L, and PEN-COOH levels ranged from 5.2 to 16.7 μg/L. We propose a pathway for PEN metabolism in humans and suggest PEN-OH, after hydrolysis of glucuronide conjugates, as a biomarker for monitoring human exposure to PEN. PMID:27268969

  15. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  16. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction.

    PubMed

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J; Girard, Frederic C; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  17. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (˜60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  18. Current approaches toward production of secondary plant metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Md. Sarfaraj; Fareed, Sheeba; Ansari, Saba; Rahman, Md. Akhlaquer; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Saeed, Mohd.

    2012-01-01

    Plants are the tremendous source for the discovery of new products with medicinal importance in drug development. Today several distinct chemicals derived from plants are important drugs, which are currently used in one or more countries in the world. Secondary metabolites are economically important as drugs, flavor and fragrances, dye and pigments, pesticides, and food additives. Many of the drugs sold today are simple synthetic modifications or copies of the naturally obtained substances. The evolving commercial importance of secondary metabolites has in recent years resulted in a great interest in secondary metabolism, particularly in the possibility of altering the production of bioactive plant metabolites by means of tissue culture technology. Plant cell and tissue culture technologies can be established routinely under sterile conditions from explants, such as plant leaves, stems, roots, and meristems for both the ways for multiplication and extraction of secondary metabolites. In vitro production of secondary metabolite in plant cell suspension cultures has been reported from various medicinal plants, and bioreactors are the key step for their commercial production. Based on this lime light, the present review is aimed to cover phytotherapeutic application and recent advancement for the production of some important plant pharmaceuticals. PMID:22368394

  19. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-06-06

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences.

  20. Novel urinary metabolite of d-delta-tocopherol in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chiku, S.; Hamamura, K.; Nakamura, T.

    1984-01-01

    A novel metabolite of d-delta-tocopherol was isolated from the urine of rats given d-3,4-(/sup 3/H/sub 2/)-delta-tocopherol intravenously. The metabolite was collected from the urine of rats given d-delta-tocopherol in the same manner as that of the labeled compound. It was found that the metabolites consisted of sulfate conjugates. The portion of the major metabolite released with sulfatase was determined to be 2,8-dimethyl-2-(2'-carboxyethyl)-6-chromanol by infrared spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and mass spectra. The proposed structure was confirmed by comparing the analytical results with those of a synthetically derived compound. As a result of the structural elucidation of this novel metabolite, a pathway for the biological transformation of delta-tocopherol is proposed which is different from that of alpha-tocopherol. A characteristic feature of the pathway is the absence of any opening of the chroman ring throughout the sequence.

  1. Pyrazolones metabolites are relevant for identifying selective anaphylaxis to metamizole.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; García-Martín, Elena; Salas, María; Montañez, María I; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Andreu, Inmaculada; Perkins, James; Blanca, Miguel; Agúndez, José A G; Torres, María J

    2016-03-31

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common cause of hypersensitivity reactions, with pyrazolones the most frequent drugs inducing selective reactions. Immediate selective hypersensitivity to pyrazolones is thought to be mediated by specific-IgE. Sensitivity of in vitro diagnostic tests is low and this may be due to the incomplete characterization of the structures involved. Here we investigated whether main metabolites of metamizole (dipyrone) in human could be involved in the immune response using the basophil activation test (BAT). We studied subjects with confirmed selective immediate hypersensitivity to metamizole and performed BAT with metamizole and its metabolites: 4-methylamino-antipyrine (MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (AA), 4-acetylamino-antipyrine (AAA) and 4-formylamino-antipyrine (FAA). BAT results showed an increase of positive results from 37.5% to 62.5% using metamizole plus metabolites as compared with the BAT carried out only with the parent drug, demonstrating that metamizole metabolites have a role in the reaction and can induce specific basophil activation in patients with immediate hypersensitivity to this drug. Our findings indicate that pyrazolone metabolites are useful for improving the in vitro diagnosis of allergic reactions to metamizole.

  2. The Disposition of Oxycodone and Metabolite in Human Hair.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Jones, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The disposition of oxycodone (OC) and metabolites in hair remains poorly characterized. We present a case involving a pharmacist in an impaired professionals' monitoring program in whom hair testing yielded OC on two occasions. On both occasions, his hair was negative for the oxymorphone (OM) metabolite at the cutoff concentration of 100 pg/mg. He claimed that, absent the detection of metabolite, the OC necessarily represented external contamination. This prompted a review of the laboratory's OC-positive hair results for the quarter April-June 2014. Overall, 466 specimens contained OC, with a mean (median) concentration of 2,375 (1,060) pg/mg. Of these OC-positive specimens, only 47 (10%) contained detectable OM. When OC was present at or below the mean (median) concentration, only 2.2% (1.3%) of specimens were OM-positive. In the setting of OC administration, the detection of OM in hair is unlikely at a cutoff concentration of 100 pg/mg. More consistent demonstration of OC metabolite(s) in hair will require the validation of methods to detect OM at lower concentrations and/or methods to detect noroxycodone.

  3. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  4. Toxicity of fluoranthene and its biodegradation metabolites to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Sepic, Ester; Bricelj, Mihael; Leskovsek, Hermina

    2003-08-01

    The toxicity of nine stable products of the biodegradation of fluoranthene with the pure bacterial strain Pasteurella sp. IFA was studied. For their quantification, an improved analytical procedure with two-step liquid-liquid extraction, derivatisation and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection was used. Growth inhibition and immobility tests for fluoranthene and its metabolites were carried out using algae (Scenedesmus subspicatus), bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) and crustaceans (Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus). Tests using the alga S. subspicatus revealed that with the exception of 9-hydroxyfluorene, which was only four times less toxic than fluoranthene, all the other metabolites were 37 to approximately 3000 times less toxic than the parent material. P. putida cells were resistant to fluoranthene and its primary metabolites, but were inhibited by low molecular weight intermediates, especially benzoic acid. Fluoranthene was not toxic to T. Platyurus, but was toxic to D. magna. Its primary metabolites (including 9-fluorenone and 9-hydroxyfluorene) were toxic to D. magna, and a low molecular weight metabolite (2-carboxybenzaldehyde) was highly toxic to T. platyurus. PMID:12820993

  5. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Wojciech G; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2013-12-15

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV-Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  6. Growth promoting effects of some lichen metabolites on probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Subhash; Verma, Neeraj; Sharma, B O; Behera, B C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the extract of four natural lichen species Canoparmelia eruptens, Everniastrum cirrhatum, Parmotrema austrosinense and Rimelia cetrata were studied for the source of natural antioxidant and their purified secondary metabolites were evaluated for growth promoting effects on probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus casei. The methanolic fraction of lichen species showed moderate to high antioxidant activity in the order P. austrosinense > E. cirrhatum > C. eruptens > R. cetrata. The lichen metabolites showed antioxidant activity with an IC50 values (μg/ml); lecanoric acid 79-95, salazinic 88-108, atranorin 100-116 and consalazinic acid 119-125. As far as the growth promoting effects of lichen metabolites on L. casei is concerned, lecanoric acid at 100 μg/ml conc. showed high growth stimulating activity in terms of increased dry matter of biomass (56.08 mg) of L. casei. Other lichen metabolites; salazinic acid, atranorin and consalazinic acid produced relatively less dry biomass 43.98 mg, 41.1 mg, 40.68 mg, respectively. However, standard antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and Trolox after 36 h produced 39.04-47.81 mg dry biomass. At lower pH the growth promoting activity of lichen metabolites was found stable. PMID:25328204

  7. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  8. A modular modulation method for achieving increases in metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Acerenza, Luis; Monzon, Pablo; Ortega, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the production of overproducing strains represents a great challenge. Here, we develop a modular modulation method to determine the key steps for genetic manipulation to increase metabolite production. The method consists of three steps: (i) modularization of the metabolic network into two modules connected by linking metabolites, (ii) change in the activity of the modules using auxiliary rates producing or consuming the linking metabolites in appropriate proportions and (iii) determination of the key modules and steps to increase production. The mathematical formulation of the method in matrix form shows that it may be applied to metabolic networks of any structure and size, with reactions showing any kind of rate laws. The results are valid for any type of conservation relationships in the metabolite concentrations or interactions between modules. The activity of the module may, in principle, be changed by any large factor. The method may be applied recursively or combined with other methods devised to perform fine searches in smaller regions. In practice, it is implemented by integrating to the producer strain heterologous reactions or synthetic pathways producing or consuming the linking metabolites. The new procedure may contribute to develop metabolic engineering into a more systematic practice. PMID:25683235

  9. Reevaluating the hype: four bacterial metabolites under scrutiny

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, R.; Holzer, P.

    2015-01-01

    With microbiome research being a fiercely contested playground in science, new data are being published at tremendous pace. The review at hand serves to critically revise four microbial metabolites widely applied in research: butyric acid, flagellin, lipoteichoic acid, and propionic acid. All four metabolites are physiologically present in healthy humans. Nevertheless, all four are likewise involved in pathologies ranging from cancer to mental retardation. Their inflammatory potential is equally friend and foe. The authors systematically analyze positive and negative attributes of the aforementioned substances, indicating chances and dangers with the use of pre- and probiotic therapeutics. Furthermore, the widespread actions of microbial metabolites on distinct organs and diseases are reconciled. Moreover, the review serves as critical discourse on scientific methods commonly employed in microbiome research and comparability as well as reproducibility issues arising thereof. PMID:25883790

  10. Mutagenicity of stemphyltoxin III, a metabolite of Alternaria alternata

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.M.; Stack, M.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Some common decay organisms of vegetables and ripened fruits are Alternaria species. Even fruits and vegetables kept under refrigeration can be spoiled by Alternaria species because the mold grows at low temperatures. Alternaria alternata is commonly found in grain in areas with a high incidence of esophageal cancer. Three metabolites, altertoxins I, II, and III, have been isolated from A. alternata and have hydroxyperylenequinone structures. Although other perylenequinone metabolites, such as stemphyperylenol and stemphyltoxins I, II, III, and IV, have been isolated from Stemphylium botryosum var. lactucum, a plant pathogen and mold, we isolated and identified stemphyltoxin III from A. alternata. This metabolite was tested for mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay with and without Aroclor 1254-induced rat S-9 metabolic activation. A positive response was noted with and without metabolic activation in S. typhimurium TA98 and TA1537, and there was a marginal response in strain TA100.

  11. Use of Mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Jin; Perdian, David C.; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward S.; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  12. Use of mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Jin; Perdian, David; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  13. Plants and endophytes: equal partners in secondary metabolite production?

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Well known plant production systems should be re-evaluated due to findings that the interesting metabolite might actually be produced by microbes intimately associated with the plant, so-called endophytes. Endophytes can be bacteria or fungi and they are characterized usually by the feature that they do not cause any harm to the host. Indeed, in some cases, such as mycorrhizal fungi or other growth promoting endophytes, they can be beneficial for the plant. Here some examples are reviewed where the host plant and/or endophyte metabolism can be induced by the other partner. Also, partial or complete biosynthesis pathways for plant secondary metabolites can be attributed to such endophytes. In other cases the host plant is able to metabolize substances from fungal origin. The question of the natural role of such metabolic changes for the endophyte will be briefly touched. Finally, the consequences for the use of plant cultures for secondary metabolite production is discussed.

  14. Secondary metabolites and insecticidal activity of Anemone pavonina.

    PubMed

    Varitimidis, Christos; Petrakis, Panos V; Vagias, Constantinos; Roussis, Vassilios

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of the crude extracts of the leaves and flowers of Anemone pavonina were evaluated on Pheidole pallidula ants and showed significant levels of activity. Bioassay-guided fractionations led to the isolation of the butenolide ranunculin (1) as the active principle. Chemical investigations of the extracts showed them to contain as major components the sitosterol glycopyranoside lipids 2-5 and the glycerides 6-8. The structures of the metabolites were elucidated, following acetylation and hydrolysis of the natural products, by interpretation of their NMR and mass spectral data. The uncommon lipid metabolites 2-8 were isolated for the first time from the genus Anemone and this is the first report of insecticidal activity of the Anemone metabolite ranunculin against ants.

  15. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium corylophilum isolated from damp buildings.

    PubMed

    McMullin, David R; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Indoor exposure to the spores and mycelial fragments of fungi that grow on damp building materials can result in increased non-atopic asthma and upper respiratory disease. The mechanism appears to involve exposure to low doses of fungal metabolites. Penicillium corylophilum is surprisingly common in damp buildings in USA, Canada and western Europe. We examined isolates of P. corylophilum geographically distributed across Canada in the first comprehensive study of secondary metabolites of this fungus. The sesquiterpene phomenone, the meroterpenoids citreohybridonol and andrastin A, koninginin A, E and G, three new alpha pyrones and four new isochromans were identified from extracts of culture filtrates. This is the first report of koninginins, meroterpenoids and alpha pyrones from P. corylophilum. These secondary metabolite data support the removal of P. corylophilum from Penicillium section Citrina and suggest that further taxonomic studies are required on this species.

  16. Endocidal Regulation of Secondary Metabolites in the Producing Organisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiyou; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Wei; Su, Zushang; Bullard, Steven H

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are defined as organic compounds that are not directly involved in the normal growth, development, and reproduction of an organism. They are widely believed to be responsible for interactions between the producing organism and its environment, with the producer avoiding their toxicities. In our experiments, however, none of the randomly selected 44 species representing different groups of plants and insects can avoid autotoxicity by its endogenous metabolites once made available. We coined the term endocides (endogenous biocides) to describe such metabolites that can poison or inhibit the parent via induced biosynthesis or external applications. Dosage-dependent endocides can selectively induce morphological mutations in the parent organism (e.g., shrubbiness/dwarfism, pleiocotyly, abnormal leaf morphogenesis, disturbed phyllotaxis, fasciated stems, and variegation in plants), inhibit its growth, development, and reproduction and cause death than non-closely related species. The propagule, as well as the organism itself contains or produces adequate endocides to kill itself. PMID:27389069

  17. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  18. The role of nicotinic acid metabolites in flushing and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stern, Ralph H

    2007-07-01

    Flushing and hepatotoxicity are important adverse effects of nicotinic acid. This article reviews the role of metabolism of nicotinic acid in the production of these side effects. The suggestion that nicotinic acid (NUA) formation produces flushing is traced to a correlation of flushing with NUA C(max) (maximal concentration) and the observation that aspirin inhibits NUA formation and flushing. The former does not establish causation and the latter can be explained by inhibition of prostaglandin formation. Recent characterization of the GPR109A receptor that mediates prostaglandin release by Langerhans cells to produce flushing has shown nicotinic acid, not NUA, is responsible. The suggestion that nicotinamide metabolites produce hepatotoxicity is not supported by any data. The mechanism of hepatotoxicity is unknown and a toxic metabolite of nicotinic acid has not been identified. Different nicotinic acid formulations produce different metabolite patterns due to nonlinear pharmacokinetics, but there is no evidence that these differences have any clinical importance. PMID:21291680

  19. Endocidal Regulation of Secondary Metabolites in the Producing Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiyou; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Wei; Su, Zushang; Bullard, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are defined as organic compounds that are not directly involved in the normal growth, development, and reproduction of an organism. They are widely believed to be responsible for interactions between the producing organism and its environment, with the producer avoiding their toxicities. In our experiments, however, none of the randomly selected 44 species representing different groups of plants and insects can avoid autotoxicity by its endogenous metabolites once made available. We coined the term endocides (endogenous biocides) to describe such metabolites that can poison or inhibit the parent via induced biosynthesis or external applications. Dosage-dependent endocides can selectively induce morphological mutations in the parent organism (e.g., shrubbiness/dwarfism, pleiocotyly, abnormal leaf morphogenesis, disturbed phyllotaxis, fasciated stems, and variegation in plants), inhibit its growth, development, and reproduction and cause death than non-closely related species. The propagule, as well as the organism itself contains or produces adequate endocides to kill itself. PMID:27389069

  20. Plants and endophytes: equal partners in secondary metabolite production?

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Well known plant production systems should be re-evaluated due to findings that the interesting metabolite might actually be produced by microbes intimately associated with the plant, so-called endophytes. Endophytes can be bacteria or fungi and they are characterized usually by the feature that they do not cause any harm to the host. Indeed, in some cases, such as mycorrhizal fungi or other growth promoting endophytes, they can be beneficial for the plant. Here some examples are reviewed where the host plant and/or endophyte metabolism can be induced by the other partner. Also, partial or complete biosynthesis pathways for plant secondary metabolites can be attributed to such endophytes. In other cases the host plant is able to metabolize substances from fungal origin. The question of the natural role of such metabolic changes for the endophyte will be briefly touched. Finally, the consequences for the use of plant cultures for secondary metabolite production is discussed. PMID:25792513

  1. How astrocyte networks may contribute to cerebral metabolite clearance

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2015-01-01

    The brain possesses an intricate network of interconnected fluid pathways that are vital to the maintenance of its homeostasis. With diffusion being the main mode of solute transport in cerebral tissue, it is not clear how bulk flow through these pathways is involved in the removal of metabolites. In this computational study, we show that networks of astrocytes may contribute to the passage of solutes between tissue and paravascular spaces (PVS) by serving as low resistance pathways to bulk water flow. The astrocyte networks are connected through aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels with a parallel, extracellular route carrying metabolites. Inhibition of the intracellular route by deletion of AQP4 causes a reduction of bulk flow between tissue and PVS, leading to reduced metabolite clearance into the venous PVS or, as observed in animal studies, a reduction of tracer influx from arterial PVS into the brain tissue. PMID:26463008

  2. Pesticides in ground water: Do atrazine metabolites matter?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, S.; Yen, S.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Atrazine and atrazine-residue (atrazine + two metabolites - deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine) concentrations were examined to determine if consideration of these atrazine metabolites substantially adds to our understanding of the distribution of this pesticide in groundwater of the midcontinental United States. The mean of atrazine.residue concentrations was 53 percent greater than that of atrazine alone for those observations above the detection limit (> 0.05 μg/l). Furthermore, a censored regression analysis using atrazine-residue concentrations revealed significant factors not identified when only atrazine concentrations were used. Thus, knowledge of concentrations of these atrazine metabolites is required to obtain a true estimation of risk of using these aquifers as sources for drinking water, and such knowledge also provides information that ultimately may be important for future management policies designed to reduce atrazine concentrations in ground water.

  3. Supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry in metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kaori; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) owes many of its advantages to the properties of supercritical CO2, which possesses benefits as mobile phase. SFC has recently gained attention as a separation technique because it can be utilized for not only non-polar but also polar compound analysis. In addition, MS is widely adopted for SFC, and the options for MS are equivalent to liquid chromatography. Sensitive and selective detection is crucial in metabolite analysis. The SFC/MS system can be an alternative approach to liquid chromatography, as can metabolite analysis using packed-column SFC in biosamples. In this review we cover the fundamentals of SFC in combination with MS, and discuss the results of metabolite analysis using SFC/MS.

  4. [Occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary metabolites of soil Aspergillus].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Khmel'nitskaia, I I; Baskunov, B P; Arinbasarov, M U

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary fungal metabolites was studied in species of the genus Aspergillus, isolated from soils that were sampled in various regions of Russia (a total of 102 isolates of the species A. niger, A. phoenicis, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. ustus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus). Clavine alkaloids were represented by fumigaclavine, which was formed by A. fumigatus. alpha-Cyclopiazonic acid was formed by isolates of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. phoenicis, and A. clavatus. The occurrence of indole-containing diketopiperazine alkaloids was documented for isolates of A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus. No indole-containing metabolites were found among the metabolites of A. ustus or A. niger. PMID:12722658

  5. Exploring antagonistic metabolites of established biocontrol agent of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rane, Makarand Ramesh; Sarode, Prashant Diwakar; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar; Chincholkar, Sudhir Bhaskarrao

    2008-12-01

    Biocontrol ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ID 4365, a biocontrol agent of groundnut phytopathogens from marine origin, was previously attributed to the production of pyoverdin type of siderophores. However, pyoverdin-rich supernatants of this organism showed better antifungal activity compared to equivalent amount of purified pyoverdin indicating presence of undetected metabolite(s) in pyoverdin rich supernatants. On the basis of observation that antagonistic activity was iron-dependent and iron-independent, an attempt was made to detect the presence of additional metabolites. In addition to pyoverdin, strain produced additional siderophores, viz. pyochelin and salicylic acid. Two broad spectrum antifungal compounds, viz. pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, were detected, characterized, and activity against phytopathogens was demonstrated. Iron- and phosphate-dependent co-production of siderophores and phenazines was confirmed. Strain showed additional features like production of hydrogen cyanide, indol-3-acetic acid, and phosphate solubilization. PMID:18626581

  6. Pregnane X receptor prevents hepatorenal toxicity from cholesterol metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Junichiro; Chong, Ling Wa; Downes, Michael; Barish, Grant D.; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher; Lee, Chih-Hao; Evans, Ronald M.

    2005-01-01

    Efficient detoxification and clearance of cholesterol metabolites such as oxysterols, bile alcohols, and bile acids are critical for survival because they can promote liver and cardiovascular disease. We report here that loss of the nuclear xenobiotic receptor PXR (pregnane X receptor), a regulator of enterohepatic drug metabolism and clearance, results in an unexpected acute lethality associated with signs of severe hepatorenal failure when mice are fed with a diet that elicits accumulation of cholesterol and its metabolites. Induction of a distinct drug clearance program by a high-affinity ligand for the related nuclear receptor, the constitutive androstane receptor, does not overcome the lethality, indicating the unique requirement of PXR for detoxification. We propose that the PXR signaling pathway protects the body from toxic dietary cholesterol metabolites, and, by extension, PXR ligands may ameliorate human diseases such as cholestatic liver diseases and the associating acute renal failure. PMID:15671183

  7. Functional antidopaminergic and anticholinergic effects of thioridazine and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiecki, D.

    1986-01-01

    The relative potency of thioridazine and two of its clinically active metabolites, mesoridazine and sulforidazine was studied. In each of three separate methods, mesoridazine and sulforidazine exhibited greater potency than did thioridazine. Both metabolites showed greater affinities for striatal DA receptors as estimated by their competition for (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding sites in crude striatal membrane preparations. On a more functional level, both metabolites more potently antagonized the inhibitory effects of either the direct acting DA agonist apomorphine, or of endogenous DA, on the electrically evoked release of radiolabeled DA and ACh from perfused striatal slices. While thioridazine effectively blocked the agonist-induced inhibition at those striatal DA receptors which control DA release, it showed significantly lower potency at the striatal DA receptors which modulate ACh release. Thioridazine exhibited moderate affinity for striatal muscarinic cholinergic receptors. It was only five times less potent than atropine in competing for (/sup 3/H) quinuclidinylbenzilate binding sites in striatal membrane preparations. Unlike dopamine receptors, thioridazine showed greater antimuscarinic potency than did its metabolites. Despite this significant affinity for muscarinic binding sites in striatal homogenates, neither thioridezine nor its metabolites could block the inhibitory effects of the full muscarinic agonist carbachol, on the evoked release of ACh from striatal slices. This lack of effect contrasted with the antagonism of the carbachol-induced inhibition by such classical muscarinic blockers as quinuclindinylbenzilate or atropine. In combination with available pharmacokinetic data, these studies have demonstrated that the metabolites of thioridazine probably contribute to the antidopaminergic effects of this drug within the CNS.

  8. Bar Coding MS(2) Spectra for Metabolite Identification.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Jonathan L; Cho, Kevin; Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Nikolskiy, Igor; Llufrio, Elizabeth M; Johnson, Stephen L; Patti, Gary J

    2016-03-01

    Metabolite identifications are most frequently achieved in untargeted metabolomics by matching precursor mass and full, high-resolution MS(2) spectra to metabolite databases and standards. Here we considered an alternative approach for establishing metabolite identifications that does not rely on full, high-resolution MS(2) spectra. First, we select mass-to-charge regions containing the most informative metabolite fragments and designate them as bins. We then translate each metabolite fragmentation pattern into a binary code by assigning 1's to bins containing fragments and 0's to bins without fragments. With 20 bins, this binary-code system is capable of distinguishing 96% of the compounds in the METLIN MS(2) library. A major advantage of the approach is that it extends untargeted metabolomics to low-resolution triple quadrupole (QqQ) instruments, which are typically less expensive and more robust than other types of mass spectrometers. We demonstrate a method of acquiring MS(2) data in which the third quadrupole of a QqQ instrument cycles over 20 wide isolation windows (coinciding with the location and width of our bins) for each precursor mass selected by the first quadrupole. Operating the QqQ instrument in this mode yields diagnostic bar codes for each precursor mass that can be matched to the bar codes of metabolite standards. Furthermore, our data suggest that using low-resolution bar codes enables QqQ instruments to make MS(2)-based identifications in untargeted metabolomics with a specificity and sensitivity that is competitive to high-resolution time-of-flight technologies.

  9. Characterization of human urinary metabolites of the antimalarial piperaquine.

    PubMed

    Tarning, J; Bergqvist, Y; Day, N P; Bergquist, J; Arvidsson, B; White, N J; Ashton, M; Lindegårdh, N

    2006-12-01

    Five metabolites of the antimalarial piperaquine (PQ) (1,3-bis-[4-(7-chloroquinolyl-4)-piperazinyl-1]-propane) have been identified and their molecular structures characterized. After a p.o. dose of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, urine collected over 16 h from two healthy subjects was analyzed using liquid chromatography (LC)/UV, LC/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)/MS, and H NMR. Five different peaks were recognized as possible metabolites [M1, 320 m/z; M2, M3, and M4, 551 m/z (PQ + 16 m/z); and M5, 567 m/z (PQ + 32 m/z)] using LC/MS/MS with gradient elution. The proposed carboxylic M1 has a theoretical monoisotopic molecular mass of 320.1166 m/z, which is in accordance with the FTICR/MS (320.1168 m/z) findings. The LC/MS/MS results also showed a 551 m/z metabolite (M2) with a distinct difference both in polarity and fragmentation pattern compared with PQ, 7-hydroxypiperaquine, and the other 551 m/z metabolites. We suggest that this is caused by N-oxidation of PQ. The results showed two metabolites (M3 and M4) with a molecular ion at 551 m/z and similar fragmentation pattern as both PQ and 7-hydroxypiperaquine; therefore, they are likely to be hydroxylated PQ metabolites. The molecular structures of M1 and M2 were also confirmed using H NMR. Urinary excretion rate in one subject suggested a terminal elimination half-life of about 53 days for M1. Assuming formation rate-limiting kinetics, this would support recent findings that the terminal elimination half-life of PQ has been underestimated previously. PMID:16956956

  10. Mechanistic Modeling to Predict Midazolam Metabolite Exposure from In Vitro Data.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Kimoto, Emi; Callegari, Ernesto; Obach, R Scott

    2016-05-01

    Methods to predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs in humans from in vitro data have been established, but corresponding methods to predict exposure to circulating metabolites are unproven. The objective of this study was to use in vitro methods combined with static and dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to predict metabolite exposures, using midazolam and its major metabolites as a test system. Intrinsic clearances (CLint) of formation of individual metabolites were determined using human liver microsomes. Metabolic CLintof hydroxymidazolam metabolites via oxidation and glucuronidation were also determined. Passive diffusion intrinsic clearances of hydroxymidazolam metabolites were determined using sandwich cultured human hepatocytes and the combination of this term along with the metabolic CLint, and liver blood flow was used to estimate the fraction of the metabolite that can enter the systemic circulation after formation in the liver. The metabolite/parent drug area under the plasma concentration-time curve ratio (AUCm/AUCp) was predicted using a static model relating the fraction of midazolam clearance to each metabolite, the clearance rates of midazolam and hydroxymidazolam metabolites, and the availability of the metabolites. Additionally, the human disposition of midazolam metabolites was simulated using a SimCYP PBPK model. Both approaches yielded AUCm/AUCpratios that were in agreement with the in vivo ratios. This study shows that in vivo midazolam metabolite exposure can be predicted from in vitro data and PBPK modeling. This study emphasized the importance of metabolite systemic availability from its tissue of formation, which remains a challenge to quantitative prediction.

  11. Cocaine and metabolites by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Snozek, Christine L H; Bjergum, Matthew W; Langman, Loralie J

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of the stimulant cocaine (COC) is a common problem in the United States and elsewhere. The drug can be used either as the powder or as the free base (crack COC), and causes feelings of alertness and euphoria; both forms of COC are powerfully addictive. The assay described here is designed to detect and quantitate parent COC, its major metabolite benzoylecgonine, and a selection of metabolites that can provide specific information about sample validity (m-hydroxybenzoylecgonine), potential toxicity (norcocaine), route of administration (anhydroecgonine methyl ester), and co-utilization with ethanol (cocaethylene). PMID:22767110

  12. Fermented functional foods based on probiotics and their biogenic metabolites.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-04-01

    The claimed health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interaction of ingested live microorganisms, bacteria or yeast with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as a result of ingestion of microbial metabolites produced during the fermentation process (biogenic effect). Although still far from fully understood, several probiotic mechanisms of action have been proposed, including competitive exclusion, competition for nutrients and/or stimulation of an immune response. The biogenic properties of fermented functional foods result from the microbial production of bioactive metabolites such as certain vitamins, bioactive peptides, organic acids or fatty acids during fermentation.

  13. Optical properties of drug metabolites in latent fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Drug metabolites usually have structures of split-ring resonators (SRRs), which might lead to negative permittivity and permeability in electromagnetic field. As a result, in the UV-vis region, the latent fingermarks images of drug addicts and non drug users are inverse. The optical properties of latent fingermarks are quite different between drug addicts and non-drug users. This is a technic superiority for crime scene investigation to distinguish them. In this paper, we calculate the permittivity and permeability of drug metabolites using tight-binding model. The latent fingermarks of smokers and non-smokers are given as an example.

  14. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    PubMed

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM).

  15. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    PubMed

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM). PMID:24269500

  16. Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Gil; Garg, Neha; Debelius, Justine; Knight, Rob; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2014-11-01

    The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with various conditions, specific mechanisms of host-microbiota signaling remain largely elusive. We discuss the synthesis of microbial metabolites, their absorption, and potential physiological effects on the host. We propose that the effects of specialized metabolites may explain present knowledge gaps in linking the gut microbiota to biological host mechanisms during initial colonization, and in health and disease.

  17. Optical properties of drug metabolites in latent fingermarks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Drug metabolites usually have structures of split-ring resonators (SRRs), which might lead to negative permittivity and permeability in electromagnetic field. As a result, in the UV-vis region, the latent fingermarks images of drug addicts and non drug users are inverse. The optical properties of latent fingermarks are quite different between drug addicts and non-drug users. This is a technic superiority for crime scene investigation to distinguish them. In this paper, we calculate the permittivity and permeability of drug metabolites using tight-binding model. The latent fingermarks of smokers and non-smokers are given as an example. PMID:26838730

  18. Identification of stable and reactive metabolite(s) of nelfinavir in human liver microsomes and rCYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Jhajra, Shalu; Singh, Saranjit

    2016-01-25

    The present study was performed to detect trace level stable and reactive metabolites of nelfinavir in human liver microsomes and rCYP3A4. Initially, chromatographic and MS parameters were optimized and fragmentation pattern of the drug was delineated. The structures of metabolites were then elucidated by comparison of their MS/MS fragmentation patterns with the drug. A total of thirty nine stable metabolites were formed, of which twelve were established to be monohydroxylated, eighteen dihydroxy, two dehydrogenated, and one each a diquinone, keto, carboxylic, N-deacylated, dealkylated, oxo and dehydro monohydroxyl metabolite. Previously, a biotransformation product with hydroxylation at tert-butyl group of nelfinavir is reported as an active metabolite of the drug. In our case, ortho-diquinone and N-oxide metabolites were detected, which are known to be reactive in nature. However, these metabolites did not show any interaction with nucleophiles, possibly due to steric hindrance at the site of interface.

  19. Covalent binding of chlorotrianisene (TACE) metabolite(s) to rat hepatic microsomal components

    SciTech Connect

    Bulger, W.H.; Juedes, M.J.; Kupfer, D.

    1986-03-01

    TACE, an estrogen, is a member of the triarylethylene series of compounds which includes the antiestrogens clomiphene and tamoxifen. TACE has been used as a therapeutic estrogen and has been identified as a contaminant in the pesticide methoxychlor (M) and is presumably one of the factors responsible for the estrogenic properties of technical M. The possibility that like M, TACE is activated to covalently bind to microsomal proteins, was examined. (/sup 3/H)TACE was incubated with liver microsomes from phenobarbital (Pb)-treated male rats and NADPH. Microsomes were precipitated with ethanol and trapped on glass-fiber filter. The filter was washed with ethanol, hexane, and methanol:ether mixtures. The residue was solubilized from the filter by incubating (1hr, 37/sup 0/) With 2% SDS and the radioactivity and protein contents were determined. The solubilized samples were also subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Binding of TACE metabolites to microsomal components in the presence of NADPH was 350 pmol/30 min/mg protein. PAGE analysis revealed radioactivity in a region of 50-55K daltons, suggesting covalent binding to protein(s). When compared to incubations with control microsomes, binding was markedly enhanced by microsomes Pb treated rats.

  20. The local anesthetic potency of norcocaine, a metabolite of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Just, W W; Hoyer, J

    1977-01-15

    The local anesthetic effects of cocaine and one of its main metabolites norcocaine, were investigated comparatively on isolated ganglion cells of the marine gastropod, Aplysia californica. During a 4-hour-period, different action potential parameters such as amplitude, duration, maximum rate of rise were observed, which demonstrated that norcocaine exhibits a higher local anesthetic potency than cocaine.

  1. Metabolites from fungal laccase-catalysed transformation of sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jette; Aust, Marc-Oliver; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören

    2010-12-01

    Soil metabolism of sulfonamides is largely unknown. Hence the sulfonamides sulfanilamide (SAA), sulfadimethoxine (SDT) and sulfapyridine (SPY) were reacted in model experiments with a fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor. Enzymatic transformation after a reaction time of 15 d ranged from 10.0% for SAA up to 95.6% for SPY and the difference was attributed to the different molecular substituents. Metabolites were first tentatively assigned after LC-ESI(+)-MS full-scan analysis. Secondly, the proposed metabolites were further confirmed employing either multiple reaction monitoring in comparison with standard substances or precursor ion scan LC-ESI(+)-MS/MS experiments striving for the precursor and two to three product ions. Aniline was confirmed as a breakdown product of SPY and further metabolites of SPY and of SDT were identified as rearranged SO(2) extrusion products. Thirdly, some of the metabolites matched those that were previously reported for sulfonamide photodegradation and degradation in soil. It was concluded that enzymatic metabolism as investigated here also occurs in soil. PMID:20864143

  2. Plant metabolite profiles and the buffering capacities of ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Fester, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    In spite of some inherent challenges, metabolite profiling is becoming increasingly popular under field conditions. It has been used successfully to address topics like species interactions, connections between growth and chemical stoichiometry or the plant's stress response. Stress exerts a particularly clear impact on plant metabolomes and has become a central topic in many metabolite profiling experiments in the fields. In contrast to phytochambers, however, external stress is often at least partially absorbed by the environment when measuring under field conditions. Such stress-buffering capacities of (agro)-ecosystems are of crucial interest given the ever-increasing anthropogenic impact on ecosystems and this review promotes the idea of using plant metabolite profiles for respective measurements. More specifically I propose to use parameters of the response of key plant species to a given stress treatment as proxies for measuring and comparing stress-buffering capacities of ecosystems. Stress response parameters accessible by metabolite profiling comprise for example the intensity or duration of the impact of stress or the ability of the plant organism to recover from this impact after a given time. Analyses of ecosystem stress-buffering capacities may improve our understanding of how ecosystems cope with stress and may improve our abilities to predict ecosystem changes.

  3. HPLC ANALYSIS OF VINCLOZOLIN AND ITS METABOLITES IN SERUM

    EPA Science Inventory


    HPLC ANALYSIS OF VINCLOZOLIN AND ITS METABOLITES IN SERUM. A Sierra-Santoyo1,2, H A Barton1 and M F Hughes1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, RTP, NC; 2Toxicology Section, CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City, Mexico.

    The fungicide vinclozolin (V) is used predominantly for treatment...

  4. A novel fungal metabolite with beneficial properties for agricultural applications.

    PubMed

    Vinale, Francesco; Manganiello, Gelsomina; Nigro, Marco; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Pascale, Alberto; Ruocco, Michelina; Marra, Roberta; Lombardi, Nadia; Lanzuise, Stefania; Varlese, Rosaria; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Lorito, Matteo; Woo, Sheridan L

    2014-07-08

    Trichoderma are ubiquitous soil fungi that include species widely used as biocontrol agents in agriculture. Many isolates are known to secrete several secondary metabolites with different biological activities towards plants and other microbes. Harzianic acid (HA) is a T. harzianum metabolite able to promote plant growth and strongly bind iron. In this work, we isolated from the culture filtrate of a T. harzianum strain a new metabolite, named isoharzianic acid (iso-HA), a stereoisomer of HA. The structure and absolute configuration of this compound has been determined by spectroscopic methods, including UV-Vis, MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses. In vitro applications of iso-HA inhibited the mycelium radial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Rhizoctonia solani. Moreover, iso HA improved the germination of tomato seeds and induced disease resistance. HPLC-DAD experiments showed that the production of HA and iso HA was affected by the presence of plant tissue in the liquid medium. In particular, tomato tissue elicited the production of HA but negatively modulated the biosynthesis of its analogue iso-HA, suggesting that different forms of the same Trichoderma secondary metabolite have specific roles in the molecular mechanism regulating the Trichoderma plant interaction.

  5. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status.

    PubMed

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1's (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3's (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile. PMID:27240400

  6. Coevolution can explain defensive secondary metabolite diversity in plants.

    PubMed

    Speed, Michael P; Fenton, Andy; Jones, Meriel G; Ruxton, Graeme D; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Many plant species produce defensive compounds that are often highly diverse within and between populations. The genetic and cellular mechanisms by which metabolite diversity is produced are increasingly understood, but the evolutionary explanations for persistent diversification in plant secondary metabolites have received less attention. Here we consider the role of plant-herbivore coevolution in the maintenance and characteristics of diversity in plant secondary metabolites. We present a simple model in which plants can evolve to invest in a range of defensive toxins, and herbivores can evolve resistance to these toxins. We allow either single-species evolution or reciprocal coevolution. Our model shows that coevolution maintains toxin diversity within populations. Furthermore, there is a fundamental coevolutionary asymmetry between plants and their herbivores, because herbivores must resist all plant toxins, whereas plants need to challenge and nullify only one resistance trait. As a consequence, average plant fitness increases and insect fitness decreases as number of toxins increases. When costs apply, the model showed both arms race escalation and strong coevolutionary fluctuation in toxin concentrations across time. We discuss the results in the context of other evolutionary explanations for secondary metabolite diversification.

  7. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status.

    PubMed

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1's (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3's (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile.

  8. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON URINARY ARSENIC METABOLITE EXCRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Dietary Arsenic on Urinary Arsenic Metabolite Excretion

    Cara L. Carty, M.S., Edward E. Hudgens, B.Sc., Rebecca L. Calderon, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch/HSD, NHEERL/US EPA; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics...

  9. Reactive Arrays of Colorimetric Sensors for Metabolite and Steroid Identification.

    PubMed

    Batres, Gary; Jones, Talia; Johnke, Hannah; Wilson, Mark; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin

    2014-12-31

    The work described herein examines a rapid mix-and-measure method called DETECHIP suitable for screening of steroids and metabolites. The addition of steroids and metabolites to reactive arrays of colorimetric sensors generated characteristic color "fingerprints" that were used to identify the analyte. A color analysis tool was used to identify the analyte pool that now includes biologically relevant analytes. The mix-and-measure arrays allowed the detection of disease metabolites, orotic acid and argininosuccinic acid; and the steroids androsterone, 1,4-androstadiene, testosterone, stanozolol, and estrone. The steroid 1,4-androstadiene was also detected by this method while dissolved in synthetic urine. Some of the steroids, such as androstadiene, stanozolol, and androsterone were co-dissolved with (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin in order to increase solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. The colorimetric arrays do not intend to eliminate ELISA or mass spectroscopy based screening, but to possibly provide an alternative analytical detection method for steroids and metabolites. PMID:25019034

  10. METABOLISM OF VINCLOZOLIN AND ITS METABOLITES IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-04-008

    METABOLISM OF VINCLOZOLIN AND ITS METABOLITES IN RAT. A Sierra-Santoyo1, R Harrison2, H A Barton2 and M F Hughes2. 1Toxicology Section, CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City, Mexico; 2USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide used in agricultural...

  11. Metabolites identification of bioactive licorice compounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Yi; Wang, Qing; Yang, Yan-Fang; Ji, Shuai; Song, Wei; Qiao, Xue; Guo, De-An; Liang, Hong; Ye, Min

    2015-11-10

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) is one of the most popular herbal medicines worldwide. This study aims to identify the metabolites of seven representative bioactive licorice compounds in rats. These compounds include 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin (1), licoflavonol (2), licoricidin (3), licoisoflavanone (4), isoglycycoumarin (5), semilicoisoflavone B (6), and 3-methoxy-9-hydroxy-pterocarpan (7). After oral administration of 250mg/kg of 1 or 40mg/kg of 2-7 to rats, a total of 16, 43 and 31 metabolites were detected in the plasma, urine and fecal samples, respectively. The metabolites were characterized by HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS(n) and LC/IT-TOF-MS analyses. Particularly, two metabolites of 1 were unambiguously identified by comparing with reference standards, and 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin-6″-methyl ester (1-M2) is a new compound. Compound 1 could be readily hydrolyzed to eliminate the glucuronic acid residue. The phenolic compounds (4-7) mainly undertook phase II metabolism (glucuronidation or sulfation). Most phenolic compounds with an isoprenyl group (chain or cyclized, 2-5) could also undertake hydroxylation reaction. This is the first study on in vivo metabolism of these licorice compounds.

  12. Thalidomide teratogenesis: evidence for a toxic arene oxide metabolite.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G B; Spielberg, S P; Blake, D A; Balasubramanian, V

    1981-04-01

    It was postulated that thalidomide causes birth defects by being metabolized to a toxic electrophilic intermediate. This hypothesis was tested by using an in vitro assay in which drug toxicity to human lymphocytes was assessed in the presence of a hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing system. Maternal hepatic microsomes from pregnant rabbits mediated the production of a metabolite that was toxic to lymphocytes. Toxicity was enhanced by inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase (EC 3.3.2.3) and abolished by adding the purified enzyme to the incubation medium. The metabolite thus appears to be in arene oxide, consistent with the previously reported isolation of phenolic metabolites of thalidomide from the urine of treated animals. Two teratogenic analogs of thalidomide (phthalimidophthalimide and phthalimidinoglutarimide) were also toxic in the system; two nonteratogenic analogs (phthalimide and hexahydrothalidomide) were not toxic, even in the presence of epoxide hydrolase inhibitors. The toxic metabolite of thalidomide was not produced by rat liver microsomes (the rat is not sensitive to thalidomide teratogenesis) but was produced by hepatic preparations from maternal rabbits, and rabbit, monkey, and human (all sensitive species) fetuses. A toxic arene oxide therefore may be involved in the teratogenicity of thalidomide.

  13. [Gas chromatographic analysis of benzodiazepines. 2. Diazepam and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, V V; Mallach, H J; Moosmayer, A

    1975-04-01

    A gas-chromatographic method is reported which completely resolves diazepam and its major metabolites and thus enables the specific quantitation of these compounds after extraction from serum and urine. The sensitivity limits are about 3 ng/ml if 4 ml serum or urine are extracted.

  14. Chemotyping the distribution of vitamin D metabolites in human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Miriam J.; Stokes, Caroline S.; Lammert, Frank; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2016-02-01

    Most studies examining the relationships between vitamin D and disease or health focus on the main 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) metabolite, thus potentially overlooking contributions and dynamic effects of other vitamin D metabolites, the crucial roles of several of which have been previously demonstrated. The ideal assay would determine all relevant high and low-abundant vitamin D species simultaneously. We describe a sensitive quantitative assay for determining the chemotypes of vitamin D metabolites from serum after derivatisation and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS). We performed a validation according to the ‘FDA Guidance for Industry Bioanalytical Method Validation’. The proof-of-concept of the method was then demonstrated by following the metabolite concentrations in patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) during the course of a vitamin D supplementation study. The new quantitative profiling assay provided highly sensitive, precise and accurate chemotypes of the vitamin D metabolic process rather than the usually determined 25(OH)D3 concentrations.

  15. Urinary concentrations of PAH and VOC metabolites in marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Binnian; Alwis, K. Udeni; Li, Zheng; Wang, Lanqing; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Sosnoff, Connie S.; Xia, Yang; Conway, Kevin P.; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Marijuana is seeing increased therapeutic use, and is the world’s third most-popular recreational drug following alcohol and tobacco. This widening use poses increased exposure to potentially toxic combustion by-products from marijuana smoke and the potential for public health concerns. Objectives To compare urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) among self-reported recent marijuana users and nonusers, while accounting for tobacco smoke exposure. Methods Measurements of PAH and VOC metabolites in urine samples were combined with questionnaire data collected from participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2005 to 2012 in order to categorize participants (≥18 years) into exclusive recent marijuana users and nonusers. Adjusted geometric means (GMs) of urinary concentrations were computed for these groups using multiple regression analyses to adjust for potential confounders. Results Adjusted GMs of many individual monohydroxy PAHs (OH-PAHs) were significantly higher in recent marijuana users than in nonusers (p < 0.05). Urinary thiocyanate (p < 0.001) and urinary concentrations of many VOC metabolites, including metabolites of acrylonitrile (p < 0.001) and acrylamide (p < 0.001), were significantly higher in recent marijuana users than in nonusers. Conclusions We found elevated levels of biomarkers for potentially harmful chemicals among self-identified, recent marijuana users compared with nonusers. These findings suggest that further studies are needed to evaluate the potential health risks to humans from the exposure to these agents when smoking marijuana. PMID:26690539

  16. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF ATRAZINE METABOLITES IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we have shown that atrazine, a commonly used herbicide, causes full-litter resorption (FLR) in Fischer 344 rats at 50 mg/kg. In this study, we tested four atrazine metabolites for their potential to cause FLR and developmental toxicity. Desethylatrazine (DEA), desis...

  17. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  18. Childhood Psychosis and Monoamine Metabolites in Spinal Fluid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid of 22 psychotic children, 22 normal controls, and Ss with mental retardation, progressive encephalopathy, or meningitis revealed that psychotic Ss had raised levels of homovanillic acid. Thirteen Ss diagnosed as autistic showed isolated inrease of this metabolite. Increased concentration of mongamines was not…

  19. Oxidative metabolites of lycopene and their biological functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the beneficial biological activities of lycopene on cancer prevention, a greater knowledge of the metabolism of lycopene is needed. In particular, the identification of lycopene metabolites and oxidation products in vivo; the importance of tissue specific lycopene c...

  20. Benzene toxicokinetics in humans: exposure of bone marrow to metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, K H; Bois, F Y; Daisey, J M; Auslander, D M; Spear, R C

    1994-01-01

    A three compartment physiologically based toxicokinetic model was fitted to human data on benzene disposition. Two separate groups of model parameter derivations were obtained, depending on which data sets were being fitted. The model was then used to simulate five environmental or occupational exposures. Predicted values of the total bone marrow exposure to benzene and cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow were generated for each scenario. The relation between cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow and continuous benzene exposure was also investigated in detail for simulated inhalation exposure concentrations ranging from 0.0039 ppm to 150 ppm. At the level of environmental exposures, no dose rate effect was found for either model. The occupational exposures led to only slight dose rate effects. A 32 ppm exposure for 15 minutes predicted consistently higher values than a 1 ppm exposure for eight hours for the total exposure of bone marrow to benzene and the cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow. The general relation between the cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow and the inhalation concentration of benzene is not linear. An inflection point exists in some cases leading to a slightly S shaped curve. At environmental levels (0.0039-10 ppm) the curve bends upward, and it saturates at high experimental exposures (greater than 100 ppm). PMID:8044234

  1. Two new chamigrane metabolites from fermentation broth of Steccherinum ochraceum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Ze; Luo, Ming-He

    2010-12-01

    Two new chamigrane-type metabolites named steperoxides C (1) and D (2) were isolated from the basidiomycetes Steccherinum ochraceum. The structures of 1 and 2 were established on the basis of spectral methods (MS, IR, ID and 2D NMR experiments). Compounds 2 showed significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus at 10 and 5 μg/disk.

  2. Genotoxicity and inactivation of catechol metabolites of the mycotoxin zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Hildebrand, Andreas A; Müller, Elisabeth; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred

    2012-11-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a highly estrogenic mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species. The adverse effects of ZEN and its reductive metabolite α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) are often compared to those of 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1). These endogenous steroidal estrogens are associated with an increased risk for cancer, which may be mediated by two mechanisms, i.e. (1) hormonal activity and (2) genotoxic effects after cytochrome P450-catalyzed metabolic activation to catechols. Like E1 and E2, ZEN and α-ZEL exhibit marked estrogenicity and also undergo aromatic hydroxylation to catechol metabolites. The subsequent methylation of catechols by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is generally considered as a detoxifying pathway. Imbalances between the activation and inactivation reactions can lead to the formation of reactive semiquinones and quinones, which can alkylate DNA or produce reactive oxygen species by redox cycling. In the present study, the genotoxicity of the catechol metabolites of ZEN, α-ZEL, E1 and E2 was determined in a cell-free system by measuring 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine using a LC-DAD-MS(2) method. Each of the individual catechols of ZEN, α-ZEL, E1 and E2 induced oxidative DNA damage in calf thymus DNA. The ranking order of the DNA damaging activity was 15-hydroxy-ZEN/α-ZEL ≈ 2/4-hydroxy-E1/E2 > 13-hydroxy-ZEN/α-ZEL. When hepatic microsomes from different species were incubated with ZEN, the rat had the highest activity for catechol formation, followed by human, mouse, pig and steer. The amount of catechol metabolites correlated directly with the amount of oxidative damage in calf thymus DNA. The ranking order for the rate of methylation by human hepatic COMT was 2-hydroxy-E1/E2 > 4-hydroxy-E1/E2 > 13/15-hydroxy-ZEN/α-ZEL. Thus, the catechol metabolites of the mycoestrogen ZEN and its reductive metabolite α-ZEL exhibit a DNA-damaging potential comparable to that of the catechol metabolites of E1 and E2, but are much poorer substrates for

  3. The Metabolite Transporters of the Plastid Envelope: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Facchinelli, Fabio; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2011-01-01

    The engulfment of a photoautotrophic cyanobacterium by a primitive mitochondria-bearing eukaryote traces back to more than 1.2 billion years ago. This single endosymbiotic event not only provided the early petroalgae with the metabolic capacity to perform oxygenic photosynthesis, but also introduced a plethora of other metabolic routes ranging from fatty acids and amino acids biosynthesis, nitrogen and sulfur assimilation to secondary compounds synthesis. This implicated the integration and coordination of the newly acquired metabolic entity with the host metabolism. The interface between the host cytosol and the plastidic stroma became of crucial importance in sorting precursors and products between the plastid and other cellular compartments. The plastid envelope membranes fulfill different tasks: they perform important metabolic functions, as they are involved in the synthesis of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and galactolipids. In addition, since most genes of cyanobacterial origin have been transferred to the nucleus, plastidial proteins encoded by nuclear genes are post-translationally transported across the envelopes through the TIC–TOC import machinery. Most importantly, chloroplasts supply the photoautotrophic cell with photosynthates in form of reduced carbon. The innermost bilayer of the plastidic envelope represents the permeability barrier for the metabolites involved in the carbon cycle and is literally stuffed with transporter proteins facilitating their transfer. The intracellular metabolite transporters consist of polytopic proteins containing membrane spans usually in the number of four or more α-helices. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that connecting the plastid with the host metabolism was mainly a process driven by the host cell. In Arabidopsis, 58% of the metabolite transporters are of host origin, whereas only 12% are attributable to the cyanobacterial endosymbiont. This review focuses on the metabolite transporters of the inner envelope

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  5. Transport of rimsulfuron and its metabolites in soil columns

    PubMed

    Martins; Mermoud

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents a study on degradation, sorption and transport of the sulfonylurea herbicide rimsulfuron and its major metabolites in alluvial soil columns. The formulation of rimsulfuron was found to strongly affect its degradability. Hydrolysis of pure rimsulfuron takes place rapidly in distilled water (t(1/2)=2.2 days) or indeed instantaneously in alkaline solution. The formulated rimsulfuron (Titus, 25% rimsulfuron, Du Pont De Nemours) is more persistent in alluvial soil suspensions (t(1/2)=7.5 days). The study of sorption of Titus and its two major metabolites (1 and 2) revealed that these three chemicals are potentially highly mobile in the studied soil: in suspension distribution coefficients of 0.0028, 0.125 and 0.149 cm3 g(-1) were obtained respectively. Given the instability of rimsulfuron in alkaline solutions, the pH effect was evaluated with metabolite 2 in water saturated Fontainebleau sand columns at pH 6, 8 and 10. Transport was found to be strongly dependent on pH; a linear relationship was obtained between pH and the retardation factor or the dispersion coefficient. In alluvial soil columns, rimsulfuron from Titus was found to be very mobile (R=1.2) and rapidly degraded into metabolites 1 and 2, which were transported at a similar velocity. Nevertheless, the risks of groundwater contamination by rimsulfuron seem very low, as it is rapidly degraded under dynamic conditions (t(1,2)=1.4 days). On the other hand the relatively stable metabolite 2 seems likely to persist in the soil and to be transported to the groundwater. Special attention should thus be given to this compound at least as long as its harmlessness is not demonstrated.

  6. MyCompoundID MS/MS Search: Metabolite Identification Using a Library of Predicted Fragment-Ion-Spectra of 383,830 Possible Human Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Tang, Chenqu; Li, Ronghong; Shi, Yi; Lin, Guohui; Li, Liang

    2015-10-20

    We report an analytical tool to facilitate metabolite identification based on an MS/MS spectral match of an unknown to a library of predicted MS/MS spectra of possible human metabolites. To construct the spectral library, the known endogenous human metabolites in the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) (8,021 metabolites) and their predicted metabolic products via one metabolic reaction in the Evidence-based Metabolome Library (EML) (375,809 predicted metabolites) were subjected to in silico fragmentation to produce the predicted MS/MS spectra. This spectral library is hosted at the public MCID Web site ( www.MyCompoundID.org ), and a spectral search program, MCID MS/MS, has been developed to allow a user to search one or a batch of experimental MS/MS spectra against the library spectra for possible match(s). Using MS/MS spectra generated from standard metabolites and a human urine sample, we demonstrate that this tool is very useful for putative metabolite identification. It allows a user to narrow down many possible structures initially found by using an accurate mass search of an unknown metabolite to only one or a few candidates, thereby saving time and effort in selecting or synthesizing metabolite standard(s) for eventual positive metabolite identification.

  7. Evaluation of aspirin metabolites as inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Benoit M; Conejo-García, Ana; Stolze, Ineke; Loenarz, Christoph; Oldham, Neil J; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2008-12-21

    Known and potential aspirin metabolites were evaluated as inhibitors of oxygen-sensing hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) hydroxylases; some of the metabolites were found to stabilise HIF-alpha in cells. PMID:19048166

  8. Assessing the accuracy of software predictions of mammalian and microbial metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    New chemical development and hazard assessments benefit from accurate predictions of mammalian and microbial metabolites. Fourteen biotransformation libraries encoded in eight software packages that predict metabolite structures were assessed for their sensitivity (proportion of ...

  9. Novel rapid liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry method for vemurafenib and metabolites in human plasma, including metabolite concentrations at steady state.

    PubMed

    Vikingsson, Svante; Strömqvist, Malin; Svedberg, Anna; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica; Gréen, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    A novel, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry method for quantification of vemurafenib in human plasma, that also for the first time allows for metabolite semi-quantification, was developed and validated to support clinical trials and therapeutic drug monitoring. Vemurafenib was analysed by precipitation with methanol followed by a 1.9 min isocratic liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry analysis using an Acquity BEH C18 column with methanol and formic acid using isotope labelled internal standards. Analytes were detected in multireaction monitoring mode on a Xevo TQ. Semi-quantification of vemurafenib metabolites was performed using the same analytical system and sample preparation with gradient elution. The vemurafenib method was successfully validated in the range 0.5-100 μg/mL according to international guidelines. The metabolite method was partially validated owing to the lack of commercially available reference materials. For the first time concentration levels at steady state for melanoma patients treated with vemurafenib is presented. The low abundance of vemurafenib metabolites suggests that they lack clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Metabolite diversity in the plant pathogen Alternaria brassicicola: factors affecting production of brassicicolin A, depudecin, phomapyrone A and other metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Park, Myung Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the metabolites of Alternaria brassicicola produced under various culture conditions is reported. The phytotoxin brassicicolin A is produced in significantly larger amounts in potato dextrose broth than in minimal medium cultures. In general an increase in the incubation temperature of cultures 23-30 C increases the production of brassicicolin A but decreases depudecin production. Reducing or eliminating nitrate from culture media or adding ammonium chloride increases the production of brassicicolin A at 30 C, depudecin at 23 C and α-acetylorcinol at either temperature, suggesting that nitrogen represses their biosynthesis. Siderophores are detected in cultures of A. brassicicola containing low and high ferric ion concentrations. The metabolites α-acetylorcinol and tyrosol are isolated for the first time from cultures of A. brassicicola, and α-acetylorcinol is synthesized in four steps and 36% overall yield. Only brassicicolin A and no other isolated metabolites, including depudecin and phomapyrone A, display phytotoxicity on leaves of Brassica species (up to 5.0 mM). Epigenetic modifiers, 5-azacitidin (5-AZA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and suberoyl bis-hydroxamic acid (SBHA) do not affect the metabolite profiles of liquid cultures of this fungal pathogen.

  11. Synthesis of Biologically Active Piperidine Metabolites of Clopidogrel: Determination of Structure and Analyte Development.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Scott A; Balasubramanian, Balu; Bonacorsi, Samuel; Cortes, Janet Caceres; Cao, Kevin; Chen, Bang-Chi; Dai, Jun; Decicco, Carl; Goswami, Animesh; Guo, Zhiwei; Hanson, Ronald; Humphreys, W Griffith; Lam, Patrick Y S; Li, Wenying; Mathur, Arvind; Maxwell, Brad D; Michaudel, Quentin; Peng, Li; Pudzianowski, Andrew; Qiu, Feng; Su, Shun; Sun, Dawn; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Vokits, Benjamin P; Wang, Bei; Wexler, Ruth; Wu, Dauh-Rurng; Zhang, Yingru; Zhao, Rulin; Baran, Phil S

    2015-07-17

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug anticoagulant with active metabolites that irreversibly inhibit the platelet surface GPCR P2Y12 and thus inhibit platelet activation. However, gaining an understanding of patient response has been limited due to imprecise understanding of metabolite activity and stereochemistry, and a lack of acceptable analytes for quantifying in vivo metabolite formation. Methods for the production of all bioactive metabolites of clopidogrel, their stereochemical assignment, and the development of stable analytes via three conceptually orthogonal routes are disclosed.

  12. High-resolution mass spectrometry elucidates metabonate (false metabolite) formation from alkylamine drugs during in vitro metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Joanna E; Kazmi, Faraz; Muranjan, Seema; Toren, Paul C; Parkinson, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    In vitro metabolite profiling and characterization experiments are widely employed in early drug development to support safety studies. Samples from incubations of investigational drugs with liver microsomes or hepatocytes are commonly analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for detection and structural elucidation of metabolites. Advanced mass spectrometers with accurate mass capabilities are becoming increasingly popular for characterization of drugs and metabolites, spurring changes in the routine workflows applied. In the present study, using a generic full-scan high-resolution data acquisition approach with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with postacquisition data mining, we detected and characterized metabonates (false metabolites) in microsomal incubations of several alkylamine drugs. If a targeted approach to mass spectrometric detection (without full-scan acquisition and appropriate data mining) were employed, the metabonates may not have been detected, hence their formation underappreciated. In the absence of accurate mass data, the metabonate formation would have been incorrectly characterized because the detected metabonates manifested as direct cyanide-trapped conjugates or as cyanide-trapped metabolites formed from the parent drugs by the addition of 14 Da, the mass shift commonly associated with oxidation to yield a carbonyl. This study demonstrates that high-resolution mass spectrometry and the associated workflow is very useful for the detection and characterization of unpredicted sample components and that accurate mass data were critical to assignment of the correct metabonate structures. In addition, for drugs containing an alkylamine moiety, the results suggest that multiple negative controls and chemical trapping agents may be necessary to correctly interpret the results of in vitro experiments.

  13. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  18. Novel correlations between microbial taxa and amino acid metabolites in mouse cecal contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut microbes share a bi-directional relationship with thousands of metabolites in their environment. Many of these microbes and metabolites are associated with human diseases including obesity, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of how microbes affect metabolite concentration i...

  19. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  20. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  1. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  2. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  3. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  4. Characterizing Protein Modifications by Reactive Metabolites using Magnetic Bead Bioreactors and LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25693065

  5. Electrochemical generation of selegiline metabolites coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Smoluch, Marek; Kotlinska, Jolanta H; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gotszalk, Teodor; Babij, Michal; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy

    2015-04-10

    The metabolic pathways of selegiline (a drug used for the treatment of early-stage Parkinson's disease) were analyzed by electrochemical oxidation with application of the flow electrochemical cell consisting of three electrodes (ROXY™, Antec, the Netherlands). Two types of working electrodes were applied: glassy carbon (GC) and boron-doped diamond (BDD). The potential applied at working electrode and composition of the solvent were optimized for the best conditions for oxidation and identification processes. All products were directly analyzed on-line by mass spectrometry. For further characterization of electrochemical oxidation products, the novel approach involving reversed phase chromatography linked to mass spectrometry with dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI-MS) was used. In this manuscript, we report a novel technique for simulation of drug metabolism by electrochemical system (EC) connected to liquid chromatography (LC) and dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) mass spectrometry (MS) for direct on-line detection of electrochemical oxidation products. Here, we linked LC/DBDI-MS system with an electrochemical flow cell in order to study metabolic pathways via identification of drug metabolites generated electrochemically. The DBDI source has never been used before for identification of psychoactive metabolites generated in an electrochemical flow cell. Our knowledge on the biological background of xenobiotics metabolism and its influence on human body is constantly increasing, but still many mechanisms are not explained. Nowadays, metabolism of pharmaceuticals is mainly studied using liver cells prepared from animals or humans. Cytochrome P450, present in microsomes, is primarily responsible for oxidative metabolism of xenobiotics. It was also shown, that breakdown of popular medicines may be successfully simulated by electrochemistry under appropriate conditions. The presented experiments allow for comparison of these two entirely

  6. Rapid structural characterization of in vivo and in vitro metabolites of tinoridine using UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS and in silico toxicological screening of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Patel, Prinesh N; Kavya, P; Sharma, Mahesh; Garg, Prabha; Srinivas, R; Talluri, M V N Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Tinoridine is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and also has potent radical scavenger and antiperoxidative activity. However, metabolism of tinoridine has not been thoroughly investigated. To identify in vivo metabolites, the drug was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5) at a dose of 20 mg kg(-1), and blood, urine and feces were collected at different time points up to 24 h. In vitro metabolism was delved by incubating the drug with rat liver microsomes and human liver microsomes. The metabolites were enriched by optimized sample preparation involving protein precipitation using acetonitrile, followed by solid-phase extraction. Data processes were carried out using multiple mass defects filters to eliminate false-positive ions. A total of 11 metabolites have been identified in urine samples including hydroxyl, dealkylated, acetylated and glucuronide metabolites; among them, some were also observed in plasma and feces samples. Only two major metabolites were formed using liver microsomal incubations. These metabolites were also observed in vivo. All the 11 metabolites, which are hitherto unknown and novel, were characterized by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry in combination with accurate mass measurements. Finally, in silico toxicological screening of all metabolites was evaluated, and two metabolites were proposed to show a certain degree of lung or liver toxicity.

  7. Ecotoxicological effects of selected cyanobacterial secondary metabolites a short review

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, C. . E-mail: cwiegand@igb-berlin.de; Pflugmacher, S. . E-mail: pflugmacher@igb-berlin.de

    2005-03-15

    Cyanobacteria are one of the most diverse groups of gram-negative photosynthetic prokaryotes. Many of them are able to produce a wide range of toxic secondary metabolites. These cyanobacterial toxins can be classified in five different groups: hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins, dermatotoxins, and irritant toxins (lipopolysaccharides). Cyanobacterial blooms are hazardous due to this production of secondary metabolites and endotoxins, which could be toxic to animals and plants. Many of the freshwater cyanobacterial blooms include species of the toxigenic genera Microcystis, Anabaena, or Plankthotrix. These compounds differ in mechanisms of uptake, affected organs, and molecular mode of action. In this review, the main focus is the aquatic environment and the effects of these toxins to the organisms living there. Some basic toxic mechanisms will be discussed in comparison to the mammalian system.

  8. [Pharmacological effects of CM6912 and its main metabolites].

    PubMed

    Morishita, H; Kushiku, K; Furukawa, T; Yamaki, Y; Izawa, M; Shibazaki, Y; Shibata, U

    1985-07-01

    Pharmacodynamic effects of ethyl 7-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-(2-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1H-1,4- benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (CM6912), a new benzodiazepine derivative, and its main metabolites (CM6913 = M1, CM7116 = M2) on the peripheral systems were investigated in several species of animals. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits, CM6912 and M2 (1 or 5 mg/kg, i.v.) had little effect on blood pressure, heart rate and ECG, but it slightly reduced the respiration rate. M1 decreased the heart rate without affecting respiration, blood pressure and ECG. In conscious rabbits, CM6912 and M2 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) did not affect respiration, blood pressure, heart rate and ECG, but M1 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) increased the heart rate. CM6912 (5 or 30 mg/kg), when administered orally, also increased heart rate. In pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs, CM6912 and its metabolites (5 mg/kg, i.v.) decreased respiration and heart rate without affecting blood pressure and ECG. CM 6912 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) did not affect cardiovascular responses to the carotid occlusion, vagus stimulation, and pre- and post-ganglionic stimulation of cardiac ganglion in anesthetized dogs. CM6912 and its metabolites affected neither the spontaneous contraction nor the heart rate of isolated rabbit atria. These compounds also had no action on isolated aortic strips from rabbits. CM6912 and its metabolites did not affect the muscle tone of isolated guinea pig intestine, and it had no effects on the contractile responses to acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin and barium chloride. In isolated rabbit intestine, CM6912 and M2 slightly reduced the amplitude of contraction, while M1 had no effect. CM6912 and its metabolites did not affect the spontaneous motility of isolated non-pregnant and pregnant rat uteri as well as in situ non-pregnant rat uterus and isolated guinea pig vas deferens, including the contractile response to adrenaline. CM6912 and M2 relaxed isolated guinea pig trachea strips only at high concentrations. CM6912 and its

  9. Integrating mass spectrometry and genomics for cyanobacterial metabolite discovery.

    PubMed

    Moss, Nathan A; Bertin, Matthew J; Kleigrewe, Karin; Leão, Tiago F; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H

    2016-03-01

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria produce bioactive natural products with both potential therapeutic value and capacity to be harmful to human health. Genome sequencing has revealed that cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The biosynthetic pathways that encode cyanobacterial natural products are mostly uncharacterized, and lack of cyanobacterial genetic tools has largely prevented their heterologous expression. Hence, a combination of cutting edge and traditional techniques has been required to elucidate their secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways. Here, we review the discovery and refined biochemical understanding of the olefin synthase and fatty acid ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylating oxygenase pathways to hydrocarbons, and the curacin A, jamaicamide A, lyngbyabellin, columbamide, and a trans-acyltransferase macrolactone pathway encoding phormidolide. We integrate into this discussion the use of genomics, mass spectrometric networking, biochemical characterization, and isolation and structure elucidation techniques.

  10. Bioactive secondary metabolites from acid mine waste extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    The extremophilic microbes of the Berkeley Pit Lake are a valuable source of new and interesting secondary metabolites. It is of particular interest that these acidophilic microbes produce small molecule inhibitors of pathways associated with low pH and high Eh. These same small molecules also inhibit molecular pathways induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in mammalian cells. Low pH is a hallmark of inflammation and high Eh is one of ROS, so the suitability of this collection as a source of bioactive metabolites is actually quite biorational. Compound isolation was guided by inhibition of caspase-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-3, and active compounds were sent to the National Cancer Institute-Developmental Therapeutics Program and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer center for evaluation as either antiproliferative or cytotoxic agents.

  11. Integrating mass spectrometry and genomics for cyanobacterial metabolite discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Matthew J.; Kleigrewe, Karin; Leão, Tiago F.; Gerwick, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria produce bioactive natural products with both potential therapeutic value and capacity to be harmful to human health. Genome sequencing has revealed that cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The biosynthetic pathways that encode cyanobacterial natural products are mostly uncharacterized, and lack of cyanobacterial genetic tools has largely prevented their heterologous expression. Hence, a combination of cutting edge and traditional techniques has been required to elucidate their secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways. Here, we review the discovery and refined biochemical understanding of the olefin synthase and fatty acid ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylating oxygenase pathways to hydrocarbons, and the curacin A, jamaicamide A, lyngbyabellin, columbamide, and a trans-acyltransferase macrolactone pathway encoding phormidolide. We integrate into this discussion the use of genomics, mass spectrometric networking, biochemical characterization, and isolation and structure elucidation techniques. PMID:26578313

  12. Semiautomated Device for Batch Extraction of Metabolites from Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics has become a mainstream analytical strategy for investigating metabolism. The quality of data derived from these studies is proportional to the consistency of the sample preparation. Although considerable research has been devoted to finding optimal extraction protocols, most of the established methods require extensive sample handling. Manual sample preparation can be highly effective in the hands of skilled technicians, but an automated tool for purifying metabolites from complex biological tissues would be of obvious utility to the field. Here, we introduce the semiautomated metabolite batch extraction device (SAMBED), a new tool designed to simplify metabolomics sample preparation. We discuss SAMBED’s design and show that SAMBED-based extractions are of comparable quality to extracts produced through traditional methods (13% mean coefficient of variation from SAMBED versus 16% from manual extractions). Moreover, we show that aqueous SAMBED-based methods can be completed in less than a quarter of the time required for manual extractions. PMID:22292466

  13. Extension of the generic amyloid hypothesis to nonproteinaceous metabolite assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Shaham-Niv, Shira; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Schnaider, Lee; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several major human diseases. Although the formation of these supramolecular entities has previously been associated with proteins and peptides, it was later demonstrated that even phenylalanine, a single amino acid, can form fibrils that have amyloid-like biophysical, biochemical, and cytotoxic properties. Moreover, the generation of antibodies against these assemblies in phenylketonuria patients and the correlating mice model suggested a pathological role for the assemblies. We determine that several other metabolites that accumulate in metabolic disorders form ordered amyloid-like ultrastructures, which induce apoptotic cell death, as observed for amyloid structures. The formation of amyloid-like assemblies by metabolites implies a general phenomenon of amyloid formation, not limited to proteins and peptides, and offers a new paradigm for metabolic diseases. PMID:26601224

  14. Integrating mass spectrometry and genomics for cyanobacterial metabolite discovery.

    PubMed

    Moss, Nathan A; Bertin, Matthew J; Kleigrewe, Karin; Leão, Tiago F; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H

    2016-03-01

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria produce bioactive natural products with both potential therapeutic value and capacity to be harmful to human health. Genome sequencing has revealed that cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The biosynthetic pathways that encode cyanobacterial natural products are mostly uncharacterized, and lack of cyanobacterial genetic tools has largely prevented their heterologous expression. Hence, a combination of cutting edge and traditional techniques has been required to elucidate their secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways. Here, we review the discovery and refined biochemical understanding of the olefin synthase and fatty acid ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylating oxygenase pathways to hydrocarbons, and the curacin A, jamaicamide A, lyngbyabellin, columbamide, and a trans-acyltransferase macrolactone pathway encoding phormidolide. We integrate into this discussion the use of genomics, mass spectrometric networking, biochemical characterization, and isolation and structure elucidation techniques. PMID:26578313

  15. Discriminative stimulus properties of mescaline: mescaline or metabolite?

    PubMed

    Browne, R G; Ho, B T

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible similarities in the interoceptive stimuli produced by mescaline and its metabolites. Rats were trained in a 2 lever operant chamber to discriminate between the drugged state (mescaline 25 mg/kg) and the nondrugged state (saline). Following acquisition of discriminative response control the rats were pretreated with either saline, aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors or amine oxidase inhibitors and tested stimulus generalization produced by i.p. injections of 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenylethanol (TMPE), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenylacetaldehyde (TMPA), N-acetylmescaline, mescaline or saline. The results indicated that both aldehyde dehydrogenase and amine oxidase inhibitors enhanced the effects of mescaline, while TMPE, TMPA and N-acetylmescaline failed to exhibit generalization to the mescaline state, regardless of pretreatment. These findings do not indicate the role of a metabolite in the interoceptive cue produced by mescaline.

  16. Identification of Microbial Metabolites Elevating Vitamin Contents in Barley Seeds.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-08-19

    The current investigation analyzes metabolites of Acetobacter aceti to explore chemical compounds responsible for the induction of vitamins in barley seeds. A bioactivity guided assay of bacterial extracts and chromatographic analyses of barley produce revealed 13 chemical compounds, which were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA determined four chemical compounds (i.e., quinolinic acid, pyridoxic acid, p-aminobenzoate, and α-oxobutanoic acid) highly associated with increased quantities of vitamins. Further experimentations confirmed that quinolinic acid and p-aminobenzoate were the most efficient vitamin inducers. The results indicated chloroform/ethanol (4:1) as the best solvent system for the extraction of active compounds from crude metabolites of A. aceti. Significant quantities of mevalonic acid were detected in the extracted fraction, indicating the possible induction of the isoprenoid pathway. Altogether, the current investigation broadens the frontiers in plant-microbe interaction.

  17. Media and growth conditions for induction of secondary metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Frisvad, Jens C

    2012-01-01

    Growth media and incubation conditions have a very strong influence of secondary metabolite production. There is no consensus on which media are the optimal for metabolite production, but a series of useful and effective media and incubation conditions have been listed here. Chemically well-defined media are suited for biochemical studies, but in order to get chemical diversity expressed in filamentous fungi, sources rich in amino acids, vitamins, and trace metals have to be added, such as yeast extract and oatmeal. A battery of solid agar media is recommended for exploration of chemical diversity as agar plug samples are easily analyzed to get an optimal representation of the qualitative secondary metabolome. Standard incubation for a week at 25°C in darkness is recommended, but optimal conditions have to be modified depending on the ecology and physiology of different filamentous fungi. PMID:23065607

  18. On the Electronic Structure of Cocaine and its Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, David A.; Dias Soeiro Cordeiro, Maria Natália; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2009-11-01

    This work aims at describing the electronic features of cocaine and how they are modified by the different substituents present in its metabolites. The QTAIM analysis of B3LYP and MP2 electron densities obtained with the 6-311++G** 6d basis set for cocaine and its principal metabolites indicates: (i) its positive charge is shared among the amino hydrogen, those of the methylamino group, and all of the hydrogens attached to the bicycle structure; (ii) the zwitterionic structure of benzoylecgonine can be described as two partial charges of 0.63 au, the negative one shared by the oxygens of the carboxylate group, whereas the positive charge is distributed among all the hydrogens that bear the positive charge in cocaine; (iii) its hydrogen bond is strengthened in the derivatives without benzoyloxy group and is also slightly strengthened as the size of the alkyl ester group at position 2 increases.

  19. Mutagenicity study of butachlor and its metabolites using Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuei-Yao; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Jen-Kun; Kuo, Wein-Shung; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2005-12-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide in Taiwan and many other countries. It has been reported to be an indirect mutagen and carcinogen in various in vitro assay systems. Previous investigation has also demonstrated that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation, transforms normal embryonic cells, and induces stomach tumors in Spraque-Dawley rats. However, the mechanism of butachlor carcinogenicity is still not clear. In order to clarify the toxicologic and carcinogenic properties of butachlor, we proposed a metabolic pathway, and synthesized the authentic metabolites by chemical methods. In addition, we tested the mutagenicity of butachlor and these metabolites on Salmonella typhimurium. The results indicate that butachlor might manifest its carcinogenicity via the mutagenicity of its metabolic products. Although the molecular mechanism of butachlor-induced cellular toxicity is still not clear, it is likely that the cellular transformation ability of butachlor is partly associated with its mutagenicity.

  20. Metabolite Content Profiling of Bottlenose Dolphin Exhaled Breath

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Changing ocean health and the potential impact on marine mammal health are gaining global attention. Direct health assessments of wild marine mammals, however, is inherently difficult. Breath analysis metabolomics is a very attractive assessment tool due to its noninvasive nature, but it is analytically challenging. It has never been attempted in cetaceans for comprehensive metabolite profiling. We have developed a method to reproducibly sample breath from small cetaceans, specifically Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). We describe the analysis workflow to profile exhaled breath metabolites and provide here a first library of volatile and nonvolatile compounds in cetacean exhaled breath. The described analytical methodology enabled us to document baseline compounds in exhaled breath of healthy animals and to study changes in metabolic content of dolphin breath with regard to a variety of factors. The method of breath analysis may provide a very valuable tool in future wildlife conservation efforts as well as deepen our understanding of marine mammals biology and physiology. PMID:25254551

  1. Ursolic acid (UA): A metabolite with promising therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Plants are known to produce a variety of bioactive metabolites which are being used to cure various life threatening and chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism of action of such bioactive molecules, may open up new avenues for the scientific community to develop or improve novel therapeutic approaches to tackle dreadful diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Ursolic acid (UA) is one among the categories of such plant-based therapeutic metabolites having multiple intracellular and extracellular targets that play role in apoptosis, metastasis, angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. Moreover, the synthetic derivatives of UA have also been seen to be involved in a range of pharmacological applications, which are associated with prevention of diseases. Evidences suggest that UA could be used as a potential candidate to develop a comprehensive competent strategy towards the treatment and prevention of health disorders. The review article herein describes the possible therapeutic effects of UA along with putative mechanism of action. PMID:26775565

  2. Antioxidant properties of fungal metabolite nigerloxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suresha, B S; Srinivasan, K

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the beneficial influence of the fungal metabolite nigerloxin, a new aldose reductase inhibitor and a lipoxygenase inhibitor on oxidative stress in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. In the present study we have investigated the antioxidant potential of nigerloxin in vitro as compared to one of the well known natural antioxidant, curcumin. The fungal metabolite nigerloxin was found to be an effective antioxidant in different in vitro assays including the phosphomolybdenum, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.),2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS.+) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The antioxidant potency of nigerloxin may be attributed to its electron donating nature. The ferric reducing potency of nigerloxin as demonstrated by FRAP assay method was even found to be superior to that of the natural antioxidant curcumin. PMID:25507780

  3. Antioxidant properties of fungal metabolite nigerloxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suresha, B S; Srinivasan, K

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the beneficial influence of the fungal metabolite nigerloxin, a new aldose reductase inhibitor and a lipoxygenase inhibitor on oxidative stress in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. In the present study we have investigated the antioxidant potential of nigerloxin in vitro as compared to one of the well known natural antioxidant, curcumin. The fungal metabolite nigerloxin was found to be an effective antioxidant in different in vitro assays including the phosphomolybdenum, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.),2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS.+) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The antioxidant potency of nigerloxin may be attributed to its electron donating nature. The ferric reducing potency of nigerloxin as demonstrated by FRAP assay method was even found to be superior to that of the natural antioxidant curcumin. PMID:25434182

  4. Compartmentation of Metabolites in Regulating Epigenomes of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Li; Di, Li-jun

    2016-01-01

    Covalent modifications of DNA and histones are important epigenetic events and the genomewide reshaping of epigenetic markers is common in cancer. Epigenetic markers are produced by enzymatic reactions, and some of these reactions require the presence of metabolites, specifically Epigenetic Enzyme Required Metabolites (EERMs), as cofactors. Recent studies found that the abundance of these EERMs correlates with epigenetic enzyme activities. Also, the subcellular compartmentation, especially the nuclear localization of these EERMs, may play a role in regulating the activities of epigenetic enzymes. Moreover, gene-specific recruitment of enzymes that produce the EERMs in the proximity of the epigenetic modification events accompanying the regulation of gene expression, were proposed. Therefore, it is important to summarize findings of EERMs in regulating epigenetic modifications at both the DNA and histone levels, and to understand how EERMs contribute to cancer development by addressing their global versus local distribution. PMID:27258652

  5. Characterization of the major metabolite of sampangine in rats.

    PubMed

    Orabi, K Y; Walker, L A; Clark, A M; Hufford, C D

    2000-05-01

    Sampangine (1) is a plant-derived antifungal copyrine alkaloid extracted from the stem bark of Cananga odorata. Although it possesses potent in vitro antifungal activity, 1 is devoid of significant and reproducible in vivo activity in a mouse model of cryptococcosis. Speculating that the lack of in vivo activity could be due to metabolism, a study was undertaken to begin to develop an understanding of the pharmacokinetics, and particularly metabolism of 1. Following intraperitoneal administration of 1 to rats, urine was collected, extracted, and chromatographed over a reversed-phase C(18) silica column to yield the major metabolite, SAM MM1 (2), which was identified by NMR and MS to be an O-glucuronide conjugate of sampangine. In addition, two other unstable, structurally uncharacterized minor metabolites were produced, as evidenced by HPLC analysis. Evaluation of the antifungal and antibacterial activities of 2 showed it to have remarkable in vitro activity against Cryptococcus neoformans. PMID:10843589

  6. Anthracycline metabolites of tetracenomycin C-nonproducing Streptomyces glaucescens mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Yue, S; Motamedi, H; Wendt-Pienkowski, E; Hutchinson, C R

    1986-01-01

    Mutants of Streptomyces glaucescens GLA.0 which are blocked in the production of tetracenomycin C (compound 1), an anthracycline antibiotic having significant antitumor activity, accumulated several new anthracycline metabolites structurally related to compound 1 and to intermediates of its biosynthetic pathway. Through chemical and spectroscopic comparisons with the known anthracycline metabolites of the wild-type strain, we identified the two regioisomers of tetracenomycin B2 (compounds 7a and 7b), 8-demethyltetracenomycin C (compound 12), tetracenomycin D2 (compound 11), tetracenomycin E (compound 13), and the 12-naphthacenone forms of compounds 7a, 7b, and 2 (tetracenomycin D1). A hypothetical biosynthetic pathway to compound 1 is presented that is consistent with the occurrence of compounds 7b, 13, and 5 (tetracenomycin A2) and with the cosynthetic behavior of tetracenomycin C-nonproducing mutants (H. Motamedi, E. Wendt-Pienkowski, and C. R. Hutchinson, J. Bacteriol. 167:575-580, 1986). PMID:3460987

  7. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack.

    PubMed

    Huber, Meret; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, Christian; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Köllner, Tobias G; Vogel, Heiko; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A M; Verhoeven, Koen; Preite, Veronica; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha), and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G) were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground. PMID:26731567

  8. Multiresidue determination of pesticides and pesticide metabolites in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mogadati, P.S.; Rosen, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Methods for the multiresidue extraction, cleanup and GC/MS determination of 142 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in soil have been developed. The use of solid phase extraction cartridges makes it possible to clean up the soil sufficiently so that the equivalent of 40 mg. soil may be injected onto the GC capillary column without overloading or harming the column. Combining this clean-up method with chemical ionization ion trap detection allowed for very low limits of detection.

  9. Pleiotropic mechanisms facilitated by resveratrol and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Calamini, Barbara; Ratia, Kiira; Malkowski, Michael G.; Cuendet, Muriel; Pezzuto, John M.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-07-01

    Resveratrol has demonstrated cancer chemopreventive activity in animal models and some clinical trials are underway. In addition, resveratrol was shown to promote cell survival, increase lifespan and mimic caloric restriction, thereby improving health and survival of mice on high-calorie diet. All of these effects are potentially mediated by the pleiotropic interactions of resveratrol with different enzyme targets including COX-1 (cyclo-oxygenase-1) and COX-2, NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase SIRT1 (sirtuin 1) and QR2 (quinone reductase 2). Nonetheless, the health benefits elicited by resveratrol as a direct result of these interactions with molecular targets have been questioned, since it is rapidly and extensively metabolized to sulfate and glucuronide conjugates, resulting in low plasma concentrations. To help resolve these issues, we tested the ability of resveratrol and its metabolites to modulate the function of some known targets in vitro. In the present study, we have shown that COX-1, COX-2 and QR2 are potently inhibited by resveratrol, and that COX-1 and COX-2 are also inhibited by the resveratrol 4{prime}-O-sulfate metabolite. We determined the X-ray structure of resveratrol bound to COX-1 and demonstrate that it occupies the COX active site similar to other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Finally, we have observed that resveratrol 3- and 4?-O-sulfate metabolites activate SIRT1 equipotently to resveratrol, but that activation is probably a substrate-dependent phenomenon with little in vivo relevance. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in vivo an interplay between resveratrol and its metabolites with different molecular targets may be responsible for the overall beneficial health effects previously attributed only to resveratrol itself.

  10. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack.

    PubMed

    Huber, Meret; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, Christian; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Köllner, Tobias G; Vogel, Heiko; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A M; Verhoeven, Koen; Preite, Veronica; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha), and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G) were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground.

  11. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Meret; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, Christian; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Köllner, Tobias G.; Vogel, Heiko; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A. M.; Verhoeven, Koen; Preite, Veronica; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha), and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G) were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground. PMID:26731567

  12. Profiling of plasma metabolites in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Miho; Harada, Sei; Kurihara, Ayako; Fukai, Kota; Kuwabara, Kazuyo; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Ayano; Okamura, Tomonori; Akiyama, Miki; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Asako; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Banno, Kouji; Aoki, Daisuke; Takebayashi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the associations of amino acids and other polar metabolites with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in postmenopausal women in a lean Asian population. Methods: The participants were 1,422 female residents enrolled in a cohort study from April to August 2012. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III modified for Japanese women. Associations were examined between MetS and 78 metabolites assayed in fasting plasma samples using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Replication analysis was performed to confirm the robustness of the results in a separate population created by random allocation. Results: Analysis was performed for 877 naturally postmenopausal women, including 594 in the original population and 283 in the replication population. The average age, body mass index, and levels of high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of the entire population were 64.6 years, 23.0 kg/m2, 72.1 mg/dL, and 126.1 mg/dL, respectively. There was no significant difference in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between women with and without MetS. Thirteen metabolites were significantly related to MetS: multiple plasma amino acids were elevated in women with MetS, including branched-chain amino acids, alanine, glutamate, and proline; and alpha-aminoadipate, which is generated by lysine degradation, was also significantly increased. Conclusions: Our large-scale metabolomic profiling indicates that Japanese postmenopausal women with MetS have abnormal polar metabolites, suggesting altered catabolic pathways. These results may help to understand metabolic disturbance, including in persons with normal body mass index and relatively high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and may have clinical utility based on further studies. PMID:27070805

  13. Aquatic toxicity of the macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michaela; Weiss, Klaus; Maletzki, Dirk; Schüssler, Walter; Schudoma, Dieter; Kopf, Willi; Kühnen, Ute

    2015-02-01

    The human macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin is widespread in surface waters. Our study shows that its major metabolite 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin is found in surface waters in comparable amounts. This metabolite is known to be pharmacologically active. Additionally, clarithromycin is partly metabolised to N-desmethyl-clarithromycin, which has no antimicrobial activity. For clarithromycin, some ecotoxicological studies on aquatic organisms have been published. However, many of them are not conform with the scientific principles as given in the "Technical guidance for deriving environmental quality standards" (TGD-EQS), because numerous studies were poorly documented and the methods did not contain analytical measurements confirming that the exposure concentrations were in the range of ± 20% of the nominal concentrations. Ecotoxicological effects of clarithromycin and its two metabolites on the zebrafish Danio rerio (embryo test), the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, the aquatic monocotyledonous macrophyte Lemna minor, the freshwater green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus (Chlorophyta) and the cyanobacterium Anabaena flosaquae were investigated in compliance with the TGD-EQS. Environmental risk assessment was performed using ErC10 values of Anabaena, the species most sensitive to clarithromycin and 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin in our testing. Based oncomparable toxicity and similar concentrations of clarithromycin and its active metabolite 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin in surface waters, an additional multiplication factor of 2 to the assessment factor of 10 on the ErC10 of clarithromycin should be used. Consequently, a freshwater quality standard of 0.130 μg L(-1) is proposed for clarithromycin as the "lead substance". Taking this additional multiplication factor of 2 into account, single monitoring of clarithromycin may be sufficient, in order to reduce the number of substances listed for routine monitoring programs. PMID:25051235

  14. Monitoring of propofol and its metabolite during total intravenous anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Ershov, T. D.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Intravenous hypnotic propofol and its metabolite are detected in real time during total intravenous anesthesia by an electron ionization mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer is connected directly to the breathing circuit of an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia. Ratios between the propofol concentrations in expired air and blood serum are measured. It is concluded that real-time noninvasive monitoring of the propofol concentration in blood using electron ionization mass spectrometry is feasible.

  15. Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals and metabolites in marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies with several bottom fish species from urban waterways show that of the identified xenobiotic chemicals in bottom sediments, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most strongly associated with the prevalence of liver lesions, including neoplasms. Accordingly, there is concern about the transfer of contaminants, such as PAHs, from aquatic species to humans. Because PAHs exert their toxicity only after being biotransformed, increasing attention has been focused on the ability of aquatic organisms to metabolize these chemicals. Overall, the results of both laboratory and field studies show that generally low levels of a few low molecular weight PAHs may be present in edible tissue of fish from contaminated areas and that high molecular weight PAHs, such as the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, will rarely be detected because of extensive metabolism. Additionally, the results from a few studies suggest that even though interactions between xenobiotics can affect both biochemical and physiological systems to alter the disposition of PAHs in fish, these interactions do not markedly change the relative proportions of metabolites to parent PAH in tissues. Thus, these studies clearly demonstrate that to obtain some insight into the questions of whether there is any risk to human health from consuming fish and crustaceans from urban areas, techniques must be developed that measure metabolites of carcinogens, such as PAHs, in edible tissue. Initial attempts may focus on semiquantitative methods that permit rapid assessment of the level of metabolites in edible tissues of fish and crustaceans from many urban areas. Based on information from such screening studies, further refinement in methodology leading to identification of specific compounds may be needed because certain metabolites may not be as toxic or carcinogenic as others.

  16. Essential Metabolites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Their Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Gyanu; Freundlich, Joel S.; Ekins, Sean; Wickramaratne, Niluka; Nolan, Scott T.; Bishai, William R.

    2011-01-01

    An organism requires a range of biomolecules for its growth. By definition, these are essential molecules which constitute the basic metabolic requirements of an organism. A small organic molecule with chemical similarity to that of an essential metabolite may bind to the enzyme that catalyzes its production and inhibit it, likely resulting in the stasis or death of the organism. Here, we report a high-throughput approach for identifying essential metabolites of an organism using genetic and biochemical approaches and then implement computational approaches to identify metabolite mimics. We generated and genotyped 5,126 Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants and performed a statistical analysis to determine putative essential genes. The essential molecules of M. tuberculosis were classified as products of enzymes that are encoded by genes in this list. Although incomplete, as many enzymes of M. tuberculosis have yet to be identified and characterized, this is the first report of a large number of essential molecules of the organism. We identified essential metabolites of three distinct metabolic pathways in M. tuberculosis and selected molecules with chemical similarity using cheminformatics strategies that illustrate a variety of different pharmacophores. Our approach is aimed at systematic identification of essential molecules and their mimics as a blueprint for development of effective chemical probes of M. tuberculosis metabolism, with the ultimate goal of seeking drugs that can kill this pathogen. As an illustration of this approach, we report that compounds JFD01307SC and l-methionine-S-sulfoximine, which share chemical similarity with an essential molecule of M. tuberculosis, inhibited the growth of this organism at micromolar concentrations. PMID:21285434

  17. Sulfate Metabolites of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl in Whole Poplar Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2013-01-01

    4-Monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3) has been proven to be transformed into hydroxylated metabolites of PCB3 (OH-PCB3s) in whole poplar plants in our previous work. However, hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs, including OH-PCB3s, as the substrates of sulfotransferases have not been studied in many organisms including plants in vivo. Poplar (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) was used to investigate the further metabolism from OH-PCB3s to PCB3 sulfates because it is a model plant and one that is frequently utilized in phytoremediation. Results showed poplar plants could metabolize PCB3 into PCB3 sulfates during 25 day exposures. Three sulfate metabolites, including 2′-PCB3 sulfate, 3′-PCB3 sulfate and 4′-PCB3 sulfate, were identified in poplar roots and their concentrations increased in the roots from day 10 to day 25. The major products were 2′-PCB3 sulfate and 4′-PCB3 sulfate. However, the concentrations of PCB3 sulfates were much lower than those of OH-PCB3s in the roots, suggesting the sequential transformation of these hydroxylated PCB3 metabolites into PCB3 sulfates in whole poplars. In addition, 2′-PCB3 sulfate or 4′-PCB3 sulfate was also found in the bottom wood samples indicating some translocation or metabolism in woody tissue. Results suggested that OH-PCB3s were the substrates of sulfotransferases which catalyzed the formation of PCB3 sulfates in the metabolic pathway of PCB3. PMID:23215248

  18. EMT-induced metabolite signature identifies poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Arnold, James Michael; Putluri, Vasanta; Sphyris, Nathalie; Michailidis, George; Putluri, Nagireddy; Ambs, Stefan; Sreekumar, Arun; Mani, Sendurai A

    2015-12-15

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induces cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics and promotes tumor invasiveness; however relatively little is known about the metabolic reprogramming in EMT. Here we show that breast epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming following EMT. Relative to control, cell lines expressing EMT transcription factors show ≥1.5-fold accumulation of glutamine, glutamate, beta-alanine and glycylleucine as well as ≥1.5-fold reduction of phosphoenolpyruvate, urate, and deoxycarnitine. Moreover, these metabolic alterations were found to be predictive of overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.31-4.2), logrank p-value = 0.03) and define breast cancer molecular subtypes. EMT-associated metabolites are primarily composed of anapleurotic precursors, suggesting that cells undergoing EMT have a shift in energy production. In summary, we describe a unique panel of metabolites associated with EMT and demonstrate that these metabolites have the potential for predicting clinical and biological characteristics associated with patient survival. PMID:26315396

  19. Metabolite Recognition Principles and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Riboswitch Function

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA elements capable of modulating gene expression in response to specific binding by cellular metabolites. Riboswitches exert their function through the interplay of alternative ligand-free and ligand-bound conformations of the metabolite-sensing domain, which in turn modulate the formation of adjacent gene expression controlling elements. X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy have determined three-dimensional structures of virtually all the major riboswitch classes in the ligand-bound state and, for several riboswitches, in the ligand-free state. The resulting spatial topologies have demonstrated the wide diversity of riboswitch folds and revealed structural principles for specific recognition by cognate metabolites. The available three-dimensional information, supplemented by structure-guided biophysical and biochemical experimentation, has led to an improved understanding of how riboswitches fold, what RNA conformations are required for ligand recognition, and how ligand binding can be transduced into gene expression modulation. These studies have greatly facilitated the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying riboswitch action and should in turn guide the anticipated development of tools for manipulating gene regulatory circuits. PMID:22577823

  20. Comprehensive analyses of genomes, transcriptomes and metabolites of neem tree.

    PubMed

    Kuravadi, Nagesh A; Yenagi, Vijay; Rangiah, Kannan; Mahesh, H B; Rajamani, Anantharamanan; Shirke, Meghana D; Russiachand, Heikham; Loganathan, Ramya Malarini; Shankara Lingu, Chandana; Siddappa, Shilpa; Ramamurthy, Aishwarya; Sathyanarayana, B N; Gowda, Malali

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile tropical evergreen tree species known in India since the Vedic period (1500 BC-600 BC). Neem tree is a rich source of limonoids, having a wide spectrum of activity against insect pests and microbial pathogens. Complex tetranortriterpenoids such as azadirachtin, salanin and nimbin are the major active principles isolated from neem seed. Absolutely nothing is known about the biochemical pathways of these metabolites in neem tree. To identify genes and pathways in neem, we sequenced neem genomes and transcriptomes using next generation sequencing technologies. Assembly of Illumina and 454 sequencing reads resulted in 267 Mb, which accounts for 70% of estimated size of neem genome. We predicted 44,495 genes in the neem genome, of which 32,278 genes were expressed in neem tissues. Neem genome consists about 32.5% (87 Mb) of repetitive DNA elements. Neem tree is phylogenetically related to citrus, Citrus sinensis. Comparative analysis anchored 62% (161 Mb) of assembled neem genomic contigs onto citrus chromomes. Ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected reaction monitoring (UHPLC-MS/SRM) method was used to quantify azadirachtin, nimbin, and salanin from neem tissues. Weighted Correlation Network Analysis (WCGNA) of expressed genes and metabolites resulted in identification of possible candidate genes involved in azadirachtin biosynthesis pathway. This study provides genomic, transcriptomic and quantity of top three neem metabolites resource, which will accelerate basic research in neem to understand biochemical pathways.

  1. Metabolomic profiling of anionic metabolites by capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soga, Tomoyoshi; Igarashi, Kaori; Ito, Chiharu; Mizobuchi, Katsuo; Zimmermann, Hans-Peter; Tomita, Masaru

    2009-08-01

    We describe a sheath flow capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS) method in the negative mode using a platinum electrospray ionization (ESI) spray needle, which allows the comprehensive analysis of anionic metabolites. The material of the spray needle had significant effect on the measurement of anions. A stainless steel spray needle was oxidized and corroded at the anodic electrode due to electrolysis. The precipitation of iron oxides (rust) plugged the capillary outlet, resulting in shortened capillary lifetime. Many anionic metabolites also formed complexes with the iron oxides or migrating nickel ion, which was also generated by electrolysis and moved toward the cathode (the capillary inlet). The metal-anion complex formation significantly reduced detection sensitivity of the anionic compounds. The use of a platinum ESI needle prevented both oxidation of the metals and needle corrosion. Sensitivity using the platinum needle increased from several- to 63-fold, with the largest improvements for anions exhibiting high metal chelating properties such as carboxylic acids, nucleotides, and coenzyme A compounds. The detection limits for most anions were between 0.03 and 0.87 micromol/L (0.8 and 24 fmol) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This method is quantitative, sensitive, and robust, and its utility was demonstrated by the analysis of the metabolites in the central metabolic pathways extracted from mouse liver. PMID:19522513

  2. Fast metabolite identification with Input Output Kernel Regression

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Céline; Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: An important problematic of metabolomics is to identify metabolites using tandem mass spectrometry data. Machine learning methods have been proposed recently to solve this problem by predicting molecular fingerprint vectors and matching these fingerprints against existing molecular structure databases. In this work we propose to address the metabolite identification problem using a structured output prediction approach. This type of approach is not limited to vector output space and can handle structured output space such as the molecule space. Results: We use the Input Output Kernel Regression method to learn the mapping between tandem mass spectra and molecular structures. The principle of this method is to encode the similarities in the input (spectra) space and the similarities in the output (molecule) space using two kernel functions. This method approximates the spectra-molecule mapping in two phases. The first phase corresponds to a regression problem from the input space to the feature space associated to the output kernel. The second phase is a preimage problem, consisting in mapping back the predicted output feature vectors to the molecule space. We show that our approach achieves state-of-the-art accuracy in metabolite identification. Moreover, our method has the advantage of decreasing the running times for the training step and the test step by several orders of magnitude over the preceding methods. Availability and implementation: Contact: celine.brouard@aalto.fi Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307628

  3. Olfaction in the kidney: ‘smelling’ gut microbial metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Niranjana

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review covers recent findings highlighting roles for renal and vascular sensory receptors that modify blood pressure control in response to changes in gut microbial metabolites. What advances does it highlight? This review highlights the novel roles that G‐protein‐coupled receptor 41 and olfactory receptor 78 play in blood pressure regulation. The gut microbiota have recently been recognized as an important component of host physiology and pathophysiology. Our recent studies have shown that a subset of gut microbial metabolites, known as short‐chain fatty acids, act as ligands for host G‐protein‐coupled receptors (G‐protein‐coupled receptor 41 and olfactory receptor 78). Short‐chain fatty acid‐mediated activation of G‐protein‐coupled receptor 41 and olfactory receptor 78 modulates blood pressure control, both by modulating renin secretion and by modulating vascular tone directly. Further studies are needed in order to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanism by which microbiota and microbial metabolites modulate host physiology and their potential implications in health and disease. PMID:26238273

  4. Phthalate metabolite levels and menopausal hot flashes in midlife women.

    PubMed

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Gallicchio, Lisa; Chiang, Catheryne; Ther, Sara N; Miller, Susan R; Zacur, Howard A; Dills, Russell L; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-04-01

    During the menopausal transition, a woman's reproductive capacity declines, her hormone milieu changes, and her risk of hot flashes increases. Exposure to phthalates, which can be found in personal care products, can also result in altered reproductive function. Here, we investigated the associations between phthalate metabolite levels and midlife hot flashes. Eligible women (45-54 years of age) provided detailed information on hot flashes history and donated urine samples (n=195). Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were measured by HPLC-MS/MS. A higher total sum of phthalate metabolites commonly found in personal care products was associated with an increased risk of ever experiencing hot flashes (odds ratio (OR)=1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.07-1.96), hot flashes in the past 30days (OR=1.43; 95%CI=1.04-1.96), and more frequent hot flashes (OR=1.47; 95%CI=1.06-2.05). These data suggest that some phthalate exposures from personal care products are associated with menopausal hot flashes in women.

  5. Comprehensive analyses of genomes, transcriptomes and metabolites of neem tree

    PubMed Central

    Rangiah, Kannan; Mahesh, HB; Rajamani, Anantharamanan; Shirke, Meghana D.; Russiachand, Heikham; Loganathan, Ramya Malarini; Shankara Lingu, Chandana; Siddappa, Shilpa; Ramamurthy, Aishwarya; Sathyanarayana, BN

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile tropical evergreen tree species known in India since the Vedic period (1500 BC–600 BC). Neem tree is a rich source of limonoids, having a wide spectrum of activity against insect pests and microbial pathogens. Complex tetranortriterpenoids such as azadirachtin, salanin and nimbin are the major active principles isolated from neem seed. Absolutely nothing is known about the biochemical pathways of these metabolites in neem tree. To identify genes and pathways in neem, we sequenced neem genomes and transcriptomes using next generation sequencing technologies. Assembly of Illumina and 454 sequencing reads resulted in 267 Mb, which accounts for 70% of estimated size of neem genome. We predicted 44,495 genes in the neem genome, of which 32,278 genes were expressed in neem tissues. Neem genome consists about 32.5% (87 Mb) of repetitive DNA elements. Neem tree is phylogenetically related to citrus, Citrus sinensis. Comparative analysis anchored 62% (161 Mb) of assembled neem genomic contigs onto citrus chromomes. Ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected reaction monitoring (UHPLC-MS/SRM) method was used to quantify azadirachtin, nimbin, and salanin from neem tissues. Weighted Correlation Network Analysis (WCGNA) of expressed genes and metabolites resulted in identification of possible candidate genes involved in azadirachtin biosynthesis pathway. This study provides genomic, transcriptomic and quantity of top three neem metabolites resource, which will accelerate basic research in neem to understand biochemical pathways. PMID:26290780

  6. EMT-induced metabolite signature identifies poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Vasanta; Sphyris, Nathalie; Michailidis, George; Putluri, Nagireddy; Ambs, Stefan; Sreekumar, Arun; Mani, Sendurai A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induces cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics and promotes tumor invasiveness; however relatively little is known about the metabolic reprogramming in EMT. Here we show that breast epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming following EMT. Relative to control, cell lines expressing EMT transcription factors show ≥1.5-fold accumulation of glutamine, glutamate, beta-alanine and glycylleucine as well as ≥1.5-fold reduction of phosphoenolpyruvate, urate, and deoxycarnitine. Moreover, these metabolic alterations were found to be predictive of overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.31–4.2), logrank p-value = 0.03) and define breast cancer molecular subtypes. EMT-associated metabolites are primarily composed of anapleurotic precursors, suggesting that cells undergoing EMT have a shift in energy production. In summary, we describe a unique panel of metabolites associated with EMT and demonstrate that these metabolites have the potential for predicting clinical and biological characteristics associated with patient survival. PMID:26315396

  7. Major bioactive metabolites from marine fungi: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Saba; Ansari, Mohammad Israil; Ahmad, Anis; Mishra, Maitreyi

    2015-01-01

    Biologists and chemists of the world have been attracted towards marine natural products for the last five decades. Approximately 16,000 marine natural products have been isolated from marine organisms which have been reported in approximately 6,800 publications, proving marine microorganisms to be a invaluable source for the production of novel antibiotic, anti tumor, and anti inflammatory agents. The marine fungi particularly those associated with marine alga, sponge, invertebrates, and sediments appear to be a rich source for secondary metabolites, possessing Antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal and antiyeast activities. Besides, a few growth stimulant properties which may be useful in studies on wound healing, carcinogenic properties, and in the study of cancers are reported. Recent investigations on marine filamentous fungi looking for biologically active secondary metabolites indicate the tremendous potential of them as a source of new medicines. The present study reviews about some important bioactive metabolites reported from marine fungal strains which are anti bacterial, anti tumour and anti inflammatory in action. It highlights the chemistry and biological activity of the major bioactive alkaloids, polyketides, terpenoids, isoprenoid and non-isoprenoid compounds, quinones, isolated from marine fungi. PMID:26124556

  8. Comprehensive analyses of genomes, transcriptomes and metabolites of neem tree.

    PubMed

    Kuravadi, Nagesh A; Yenagi, Vijay; Rangiah, Kannan; Mahesh, H B; Rajamani, Anantharamanan; Shirke, Meghana D; Russiachand, Heikham; Loganathan, Ramya Malarini; Shankara Lingu, Chandana; Siddappa, Shilpa; Ramamurthy, Aishwarya; Sathyanarayana, B N; Gowda, Malali

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile tropical evergreen tree species known in India since the Vedic period (1500 BC-600 BC). Neem tree is a rich source of limonoids, having a wide spectrum of activity against insect pests and microbial pathogens. Complex tetranortriterpenoids such as azadirachtin, salanin and nimbin are the major active principles isolated from neem seed. Absolutely nothing is known about the biochemical pathways of these metabolites in neem tree. To identify genes and pathways in neem, we sequenced neem genomes and transcriptomes using next generation sequencing technologies. Assembly of Illumina and 454 sequencing reads resulted in 267 Mb, which accounts for 70% of estimated size of neem genome. We predicted 44,495 genes in the neem genome, of which 32,278 genes were expressed in neem tissues. Neem genome consists about 32.5% (87 Mb) of repetitive DNA elements. Neem tree is phylogenetically related to citrus, Citrus sinensis. Comparative analysis anchored 62% (161 Mb) of assembled neem genomic contigs onto citrus chromomes. Ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected reaction monitoring (UHPLC-MS/SRM) method was used to quantify azadirachtin, nimbin, and salanin from neem tissues. Weighted Correlation Network Analysis (WCGNA) of expressed genes and metabolites resulted in identification of possible candidate genes involved in azadirachtin biosynthesis pathway. This study provides genomic, transcriptomic and quantity of top three neem metabolites resource, which will accelerate basic research in neem to understand biochemical pathways. PMID:26290780

  9. Circadian variations in the liver metabolites of medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Kimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms with a period of around 24 hours. In this study, we compared the metabolome of the liver of medaka during the day and night. To comprehensively analyze the circadian variations in the levels of metabolites in the liver, livers were isolated from Zeitgeber time (ZT)4 and ZT16, and the variations in metabolite levels were evaluated. Inosinemonophosphate (IMP) and uridinemonophosphate (UMP) were found to be increased at night, indicating that nucleotide synthesis is most active during the night. Furthermore, the levels of metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were also reduced at night. In addition, the levels of many amino acids were reduced during the night, suggesting that the amino acids had been degraded. Moreover, the citrulline/ornithine ratio, which is related to arginine consumption, was lower during the day than at night. This pattern suggests that the urea cycle is activated during the day, whereas large amounts of nitric oxide and citrulline may be produced from arginine via nitric oxide synthase during the night. The results of this metabolomic analysis may be useful in future fundamental research to provide insight into chronobiology as well as applied research on drug evaluations using medaka as a model species. PMID:26862003

  10. Crude oil metabolites in groundwater at two spill sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Steenson, Ross; Thorn, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Two groundwater plumes in north central Minnesota with residual crude oil sources have 20 to 50 mg/L of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC). These values are over 10 times higher than benzene and two to three times higher than Diesel Range Organics in the same wells. On the basis of previous work, most of the NVDOC consists of partial transformation products from the crude oil. Monitoring data from 1988 to 2015 at one of the sites located near Bemidji, MN show that the plume of metabolites is expanding toward a lakeshore located 335 m from the source zone. Other mass balance studies of the site have demonstrated that the plume expansion is driven by the combined effect of continued presence of the residual crude oil source and depletion of the electron accepting capacity of solid phase iron oxide and hydroxides on the aquifer sediments. These plumes of metabolites are not covered by regulatory monitoring and reporting requirements in Minnesota and other states. Yet, a review of toxicology studies indicates that polar metabolites of crude oil may pose a risk to aquatic and mammalian species. Together the results suggest that at sites where residual sources are present, monitoring of NVDOC may be warranted to evaluate the fates of plumes of hydrocarbon transformation products.

  11. Functional Genomics of Novel Secondary Metabolites from Diverse Cyanobacteria Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Richard; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Jose, Nick; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Gugger, Muriel; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become a powerful tool for the detection of metabolites in complex biological systems and for the identification of novel metabolites. We previously identified a number of unexpected metabolites in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, such as histidine betaine, its derivatives and several unusual oligosaccharides. To test for the presence of these compounds and to assess the diversity of small polar metabolites in other cyanobacteria, we profiled cell extracts of nine strains representing much of the morphological and evolutionary diversification of this phylum. Spectral features in raw metabolite profiles obtained by normal phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) were manually curated so that chemical formulae of metabolites could be assigned. For putative identification, retention times and MS/MS spectra were cross-referenced with those of standards or available sprectral library records. Overall, we detected 264 distinct metabolites. These included indeed different betaines, oligosaccharides as well as additional unidentified metabolites with chemical formulae not present in databases of metabolism. Some of these metabolites were detected only in a single strain, but some were present in more than one. Genomic interrogation of the strains revealed that generally, presence of a given metabolite corresponded well with the presence of its biosynthetic genes, if known. Our results show the potential of combining metabolite profiling and genomics for the identification of novel biosynthetic genes. PMID:24084783

  12. Hydrophobic metabolites of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in cultured coconut tissue.

    PubMed

    López-Villalobos, Arturo; Hornung, Roland; Dodds, Peter F

    2004-10-01

    Cultures of inflorescence and plumular tissues of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.) were maintained in the presence of the auxin, [14C]2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), so that its metabolic fate could be studied. Thin layer chromatography of methanol extracts of the plumular tissue showed that four classes of metabolites, as well as the unchanged acid, were recovered in the extract. In inflorescence tissue, only the unchanged acid and the most polar class of metabolites (metabolite I) were recovered. Metabolite I was shown to consist mostly of a mixture of sugar conjugates and metabolite II (the next most polar) was an unidentified basic metabolite. Metabolites III and IV were both novel triacylglycerol analogues in which one of the natural fatty acids was replaced with a chain-elongated form of 2,4-D. Reversed-phase thin layer chromatography was used to identify the 2,4-D-derived acids and it was found that metabolite III contained the 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-moiety attached to a chain-length of between 2 and 12 carbons, whereas metabolite IV contained 12, 14 and 16 carbon chain lengths. In inflorescence tissue, and in plumular tissue at low sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations and after short periods in culture, metabolite I predominated. The other metabolites increased as a percentage when plumular culture was prolonged or when sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations were raised. These changes correlated with better development of the explant.

  13. Hydrophobic metabolites of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in cultured coconut tissue.

    PubMed

    López-Villalobos, Arturo; Hornung, Roland; Dodds, Peter F

    2004-10-01

    Cultures of inflorescence and plumular tissues of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera L.) were maintained in the presence of the auxin, [14C]2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), so that its metabolic fate could be studied. Thin layer chromatography of methanol extracts of the plumular tissue showed that four classes of metabolites, as well as the unchanged acid, were recovered in the extract. In inflorescence tissue, only the unchanged acid and the most polar class of metabolites (metabolite I) were recovered. Metabolite I was shown to consist mostly of a mixture of sugar conjugates and metabolite II (the next most polar) was an unidentified basic metabolite. Metabolites III and IV were both novel triacylglycerol analogues in which one of the natural fatty acids was replaced with a chain-elongated form of 2,4-D. Reversed-phase thin layer chromatography was used to identify the 2,4-D-derived acids and it was found that metabolite III contained the 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-moiety attached to a chain-length of between 2 and 12 carbons, whereas metabolite IV contained 12, 14 and 16 carbon chain lengths. In inflorescence tissue, and in plumular tissue at low sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations and after short periods in culture, metabolite I predominated. The other metabolites increased as a percentage when plumular culture was prolonged or when sucrose or 2,4-D concentrations were raised. These changes correlated with better development of the explant. PMID:15474562

  14. Identification and Structural Characterization of Three New Metabolites of Bupropion in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jennifer E; Choiniere, John R; Chang, Justine; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Nelson, Wendel L; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-11

    Bupropion is a widely used antidepressant and the recommended CYP2B6 probe drug. However, current understanding of bupropion elimination pathways is limited. Bupropion has three active circulating metabolites, OH-bupropion, threohydrobupropion, and erythrohydrobupropion, but together with bupropion these metabolites and their conjugates in urine represent only 23% of the dose, and the majority of the elimination pathways of bupropion result in uncharacterized metabolites. The aim of this study was to determine the structures of the uncharacterized bupropion metabolites using human clinical samples and in vitro incubations. Three new metabolites, 4'-OH-bupropion, erythro-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, and threo-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, were detected in human liver microsome incubations and were isolated from human urine. The structures of the metabolites were confirmed via comparison of UV absorbance, NMR spectra, and mass spectral data to those of the synthesized standards. In total, these metabolites represented 24% of the drug related material excreted in urine. PMID:27660681

  15. Identification and Structural Characterization of Three New Metabolites of Bupropion in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jennifer E; Choiniere, John R; Chang, Justine; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Nelson, Wendel L; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-11

    Bupropion is a widely used antidepressant and the recommended CYP2B6 probe drug. However, current understanding of bupropion elimination pathways is limited. Bupropion has three active circulating metabolites, OH-bupropion, threohydrobupropion, and erythrohydrobupropion, but together with bupropion these metabolites and their conjugates in urine represent only 23% of the dose, and the majority of the elimination pathways of bupropion result in uncharacterized metabolites. The aim of this study was to determine the structures of the uncharacterized bupropion metabolites using human clinical samples and in vitro incubations. Three new metabolites, 4'-OH-bupropion, erythro-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, and threo-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, were detected in human liver microsome incubations and were isolated from human urine. The structures of the metabolites were confirmed via comparison of UV absorbance, NMR spectra, and mass spectral data to those of the synthesized standards. In total, these metabolites represented 24% of the drug related material excreted in urine.

  16. Characterization and tissue distribution of conjugated metabolites of pyrene in the rat

    PubMed Central

    SAENGTIENCHAI, Aksorn; IKENAKA, Yoshinori; DARWISH, Wageh Sobhy; NAKAYAMA, Shouta M.M.; MIZUKAWA, Hazuki; ISHIZUKA, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyrene (PY) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is often used as a biomarker for human and wildlife exposure to PAHs. As the metabolites of PAHs, similar to their parent compounds, pose public health risks, it is necessary to study their characteristics and tissue-specific distribution. The present study was performed to experimentally characterize PY metabolites and analyze the tissue-specific distribution of the conjugated metabolites after oral administration of PY to rats. PY metabolites, such as pyrenediol-disulfate (PYdiol-diS), pyrenediol-sulfate (PYdiol-S), pyrene-1-sufate (PYOS), pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG) and 1-hydroxypyrene (PYOH), were detected in rat urine. Although glucuronide conjugate was the predominant metabolite, the metabolite composition varied among tissues. Interestingly, the proportion of PYOH was high in the large intestine. Furthermore, PYOH was the only PY metabolite detected in feces. PMID:26028020

  17. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Stec, Donald F.; Wang, Suwan; Stothers, Cody; Avance, Josh; Denson, Deon; Harris, Raymond; Voziyan, Paul

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was employed to study urinary metabolite profile in diabetic mouse models. • Mouse urinary metabolome showed major changes that are also found in human diabetic nephropathy. • These models can be new tools to study urinary biomarkers that are relevant to human disease. - Abstract: Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be

  18. Efficient total synthesis of novel bioactive microbial metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Hirose, Tomoyasu; Omura, Satoshi

    2008-02-01

    Bioactive natural products produced by microbes have almost limitless potential in pharmaceutical applications, and the organic synthesis of such products as lead compounds will result in the creation of new and widely useful pharmaceutical products. A program of discovery of naturally occurring bioactive microbial metabolites has been ongoing at the Kitasato Institute. We have also developed efficient, rational, and highly flexible production methods for generation of target compounds, synthesis of related compounds, elucidation of their structure-activity relationships, and the possible creation of improved bioactive compounds. In this Account, the isolation and total synthesis of naturally occurring bioactive microbial metabolites in order to create novel medicines for specific illnesses is described. This covers diseases and conditions such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, inflammation, and osteoporosis, among others, and focuses on six specific compounds. Pyripyropenes were discovered from Aspergillus fumigatus FO-1289 through our screening of microbial metabolites that strongly inhibit acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) in order to develop a new class of cholesterol-lowering agents. These novel polyoxygenated mixed polyketide-terpenoid (meroterpenoid) metabolites contain a fused pyridyl alpha-pyrone moiety. We carried out the first total synthesis of (+)-pyripyropene A via a flexible, concise, and highly efficient route and also clarified the structure-activity relationships. Arisugacins were discovered from Penicillium sp. FO-4259 by our screening of microbial metabolites that strongly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in order to create novel medicines for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Arisugacins are also meroterpenoids. We have achieved the first convergent total synthesis of arisugacins A and B. Lactacystin was isolated from Streptomyces sp. OM-6519 via our screening of microbial metabolites that promote the differentiation of the

  19. Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Drupad K.; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Ward, Holli; Trivedi, Dakshat K.; Greenwood, Joseph; Ellis, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Adulteration of high quality food products with sub-standard and cheaper grades is a world-wide problem taxing the global economy. Currently, many traditional tests suffer from poor specificity, highly complex outputs and a lack of high-throughput processing. Metabolomics has been successfully used as an accurate discriminatory technique in a number of applications including microbiology, cancer research and environmental studies and certain types of food fraud. In this study, we have developed metabolomics as a technique to assess the adulteration of meat as an improvement on current methods. Different grades of beef mince and pork mince, purchased from a national retail outlet were combined in a number of percentage ratios and analysed using GC-MS and UHPLC-MS. These techniques were chosen because GC-MS enables investigations of metabolites involved in primary metabolism whilst UHPLC-MS using reversed phase chromatography provides information on lipophilic species. With the application of chemometrics and statistical analyses, a panel of differential metabolites were found for identification of each of the two meat types. Additionally, correlation was observed between metabolite content and percentage of fat declared on meat products’ labelling. PMID:26911805

  20. Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Drupad K; Hollywood, Katherine A; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Ward, Holli; Trivedi, Dakshat K; Greenwood, Joseph; Ellis, David I; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-04-01

    Adulteration of high quality food products with sub-standard and cheaper grades is a world-wide problem taxing the global economy. Currently, many traditional tests suffer from poor specificity, highly complex outputs and a lack of high-throughput processing. Metabolomics has been successfully used as an accurate discriminatory technique in a number of applications including microbiology, cancer research and environmental studies and certain types of food fraud. In this study, we have developed metabolomics as a technique to assess the adulteration of meat as an improvement on current methods. Different grades of beef mince and pork mince, purchased from a national retail outlet were combined in a number of percentage ratios and analysed using GC-MS and UHPLC-MS. These techniques were chosen because GC-MS enables investigations of metabolites involved in primary metabolism whilst UHPLC-MS using reversed phase chromatography provides information on lipophilic species. With the application of chemometrics and statistical analyses, a panel of differential metabolites were found for identification of each of the two meat types. Additionally, correlation was observed between metabolite content and percentage of fat declared on meat products' labelling. PMID:26911805

  1. Software aided approaches to structure-based metabolite identification in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Pähler, Axel; Brink, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in mass spectrometry (MS) such as accurate mass high resolution instrumentation have fundamentally changed the approach to systematic metabolite identification over the past decade. Despite technological break-through on the instrumental side, metabolite identification still requires tedious manual data inspection and interpretation of huge analytical datasets. The process of metabolite identification has become largely facilitated and partly automated by cheminformatics approaches such as knowledge base metabolite prediction using, for example, Meteor, MetaDrug, MetaSite and StarDrop that are typically applied pre-acquisition. Likewise, emerging new technologies in postacquisition data analysis like mass defect filtering (MDF) have moved the technology driven analytical methodology to metabolite identification toward generic, structure-based workflows. The biggest challenge for automation however remains the structural assignment of drug metabolites. Software-guided approaches for the unsupervised metabolite identification still cannot compete with expert user manual data interpretation yet. Recently MassMetaSite has been introduced for the automated ranked output of metabolite structures based on the combination of metabolite prediction and interrogation of analytical mass spectrometric data. This approach and others are promising milestones toward an unsupervised process to metabolite identification and structural characterization moving away from a sample focused per-compound approach to a structure-driven generic workflow.

  2. Global Prioritization of Disease Candidate Metabolites Based on a Multi-omics Composite Network

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qianlan; Xu, Yanjun; Yang, Haixiu; Shang, Desi; Zhang, Chunlong; Zhang, Yunpeng; Sun, Zeguo; Shi, Xinrui; Feng, Li; Han, Junwei; Su, Fei; Li, Chunquan; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    The identification of disease-related metabolites is important for a better understanding of metabolite pathological processes in order to improve human medicine. Metabolites, which are the terminal products of cellular regulatory process, can be affected by multi-omic processes. In this work, we propose a powerful method, MetPriCNet, to predict and prioritize disease candidate metabolites based on integrated multi-omics information. MetPriCNet prioritized candidate metabolites based on their global distance similarity with seed nodes in a composite network, which integrated multi-omics information from the genome, phenome, metabolome and interactome. After performing cross-validation on 87 phenotypes with a total of 602 metabolites, MetPriCNet achieved a high AUC value of up to 0.918. We also assessed the performance of MetPriCNet on 18 disease classes and found that 4 disease classes achieved an AUC value over 0.95. Notably, MetPriCNet can also predict disease metabolites without known disease metabolite knowledge. Some new high-risk metabolites of breast cancer were predicted, although there is a lack of known disease metabolite information. A predicted disease metabolic landscape was constructed and analyzed based on the results of MetPriCNet for 87 phenotypes to help us understand the genetic and metabolic mechanism of disease from a global view. PMID:26598063

  3. Polar metabolites of polycyclic aromatic compounds from fungi are potential soil and groundwater contaminants.

    PubMed

    Boll, Esther S; Johnsen, Anders R; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sorption to soil of water-soluble metabolites from polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). The soil fungus Cunninghamella elegans was used to produce PAC metabolites from two un-substituted PACs (phenanthrene, pyrene), three alkyl-substituted PACs (2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylphenanthrene, 1-methylpyrene), and one sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC (dibenzothiophene). Fifty-eight metabolites were tentatively identified; metabolites from the un-substituted PACs were hydroxylated and sulfate conjugated, whereas metabolites from alkyl-substituted PACs were sulfate conjugated and either hydroxylated or oxidized to carboxylic acids at the methyl group. The metabolism of the sulfur-containing heterocyclic PAC resulted in sulfate conjugates. The sorption of the PAC metabolites to three soils was determined using a batch equilibrium method, and partition coefficients (Kd's) were calculated for fourteen representative metabolites. Sulfate conjugated metabolites displayed Kd's below 70 whereas the metabolites with both a sulfate and a carboxylic acid group had Kd's below 2.8. The low Kd's of water-soluble PAC metabolites indicate high mobility in soil and a potential for leaching to surface- and groundwaters.

  4. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic.

  5. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic. PMID:25655830

  6. Identification of novel metoclopramide metabolites in humans: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Gomez, Javier; Ung, Din; Parkman, Henry P; Nagar, Swati

    2010-08-01

    Metoclopramide (MCP) is frequently used to treat gastroparesis. Previous studies have documented MCP metabolism, but systematic structural identification of metabolites has not been performed. The aim of this study was to better understand MCP metabolism in humans. For examination of in vivo metabolism, a single oral 20-mg MCP dose was administered to eight healthy male volunteers, followed by complete urine collection over 24 h. In vitro incubations were performed in human liver microsomes (HLM) to characterize metabolism via cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and in human liver cytosol for metabolism via sulfotransferases. Urine and subcellular incubations were analyzed for MCP metabolites on a mass spectrometer with accurate mass measurement capability. Five MCP metabolites were detected in vivo, and five additional metabolites were detected in vitro. The five metabolites of MCP identified both in vitro and in vivo were an N-O-glucuronide (M1), an N-sulfate (M2), a des-ethyl metabolite (M3), a hydroxylated metabolite (M4), and an oxidative deaminated metabolite (M5). To our knowledge, metabolites M1 and M4 have not been reported previously. M2 urinary levels varied 22-fold and M3 levels varied 16-fold among eight subjects. In vitro studies in HLM revealed the following additional metabolites: two ether glucuronides (M6 and M8), possibly on the phenyl ring after oxidation, an N-glucuronide (M7), a carbamic acid (M9), and a nitro metabolite (M10). Metabolites M6 to M10 have not been reported previously. In conclusion, this study describes the identification of MCP metabolites in vivo and in vitro in humans. PMID:20423954

  7. Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals and metabolites in marine organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Varanasi, U; Stein, J E

    1991-01-01

    Studies with several bottom fish species from urban waterways show that of the identified xenobiotic chemicals in bottom sediments, polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most strongly associated with the prevalence of liver lesions, including neoplasms. Accordingly, there is concern about the transfer of contaminants, such as PAHs, from aquatic species to humans. Because PAHs exert their toxicity only after being biotransformed, increasing attention has been focused on the ability of aquatic organisms to metabolize these chemicals. Overall, the results of both laboratory and field studies show that generally low levels (nanograms per gram wet weight) of a few low molecular weight PAHs may be present in edible tissue of fish from contaminated areas and that high molecular weight PAHs, such as the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, will rarely be detected because of extensive metabolism. Additionally, the results from a few studies suggest that even though interactions between xenobiotics can affect both biochemical and physiological systems to alter the disposition of PAHs in fish, these interactions do not markedly change the relative proportions of metabolites to parent PAH in tissues. Thus, these studies clearly demonstrate that to obtain some insight into the questions of whether there is any risk to human health from consuming fish and crustaceans from urban areas, techniques must be developed that measure metabolites of carcinogens, such as PAHs, in edible tissue. Initial attempts may focus on semiquantitative methods that permit rapid assessment of the level of metabolites in edible tissues of fish and crustaceans from many urban areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 4. PMID:2050086

  8. Metal ion-inducing metabolite accumulation in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, Muhammad; Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2008-09-29

    Plants face a number of biotic and abiotic environmental stress factors during growth. Among the abiotic factors, in particular, a great deal of attention has been paid to metals not only because of their increasing amounts in the environment due to rapid industrial development but also because of the variation of metal composition in soil. Cultivation of crops close to industrial areas or irrigation with contaminated water may result in both growth inhibition and tissue accumulation of metals. Brassica species are well known as metal accumulators and are being used for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. However, the metal tolerance mechanism in the plant still remains unclear. In order to investigate the metabolomic changes induced by metal ions in Brassica, plants were subjected to concentrations 50, 100, 250 and 500 mmol of copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in separate treatments. (1)H NMR and two-dimensional NMR spectra coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to investigate the metabolic change in Brassica rapa (var. Raapstelen). The (1)H-NMR analysis followed by the application of chemometric methods revealed a number of metabolic consequences. Among the metabolites that showed variation, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids conjugated with malates were found to be the discriminating metabolites as were primary metabolites like carbohydrates and amino acids. This study shows that the effects of Cu and Fe on plant metabolism were larger than those of Mn and that the metabolomic changes varied not only according to the type of metal but also according to its concentration.

  9. Unbiased Evaluation of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites in Complex Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Taichi; Wang, Yuehong; Pro, Samuel M.; Franzblau, Scott G.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of bioactive principles in a complex matrix such as natural products and botanical medicines are secondary rather than primary metabolites. In addition to being chemically diverse, the bioactivity of an ethnobotanical can comprise from one to several bioactive compounds, present in a complex mixture. Conventional discovery efforts utilize bioassay-guided fractionation (BGF) to isolate individual active compounds. When applied to complex natural products, BGF is often challenged by an apparent loss of activity during fractionation, resulting in weakly active isolated compounds. Metabolomic analysis can potentially complement existing the BGF paradigm by capturing the chemical complexity of the metabolites. The proposed biochemometric approach establishes a link between the chemistry of a secondary metabolome and a deserved health impact, using a high-throughput, high-resolution capable biological endpoint. The proof of principle is demonstrated for the anti-tuberculosis (TB) activity of the Alaskan ethnobotanical, Oplopanax horridus. Biochemometric analysis identified the 100 most active constituents from thousands of metabolites in the active extract by means of 2D orthogonal chromatography using countercurrent and GC-MS methods. Previously isolated O. horridus phytoconstituents were used as reference markers of known structure and bio(in)activity. Positive correlations allowed distinction of anti-TB actives from inactive compounds. A total of 29 bioactives from 3 main structural classes were assigned based on MS data. Biochemometric analysis is a new tool for the standardization of herbal medicines and ethnobotanicals, as well as for drug discovery from nature. The method can assign multiple active compounds in complex mixtures without their prior isolation or structure elucidation, while still providing an interface to structural information. PMID:22766306

  10. Measurement of Blood Thiamine Metabolites for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoli; Fei, Guoqiang; Lu, Jingwen; Jin, Lirong; Pan, Shumei; Chen, Zhichun; Wang, Changpeng; Sang, Shaoming; Liu, Huimin; Hu, Weihong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhiliang; Tan, Qiong; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Qunying; Xie, Xueping; Ji, Yong; Cui, Donghong; Gu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yuguo; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain glucose hypometabolism is an invariant feature and has significant diagnostic value for Alzheimer's disease. Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) is a critical coenzyme for glucose metabolism and significantly reduced in brain and blood samples of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aims To explore the diagnostic value of the measurement of blood thiamine metabolites for AD. Methods Blood TDP, thiamine monophosphate, and thiamine levels were detected using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The study included the exploration and validation phases. In the exploration phase, the samples of 338 control subjects and 43 AD patients were utilized to establish the models for AD diagnosis assayed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, including the variable γ that represents the best combination of thiamine metabolites and age to predict the possibility of AD. In the validation phase, the values of models were further tested for AD diagnosis using samples of 861 control subjects, 81 AD patients, 70 vascular dementia patients, and 13 frontotemporal dementia patients. Results TDP and the γ exhibited significant and consistent values for AD diagnosis in both exploration and validation phases. TDP had 0.843 and 0.837 of the areas under ROC curve (AUCs), 77.4% and 81.5% of sensitivities, and 78.1% and 77.2% of specificities respectively in the exploration and validation phases. The γ had 0.938 and 0.910 of AUCs, 81.4% and 80.2% of sensitivities, and 90.5% and 87.2% of specificities respectively in the exploration and validation phases. TDP and the γ can effectively distinguish AD from vascular dementia (64.3% for TDP, 67.1% for γ) and frontotemporal dementia (84.6% for TDP, 100.0% for γ). Interpretation. The measurement of blood thiamine metabolites by HPLC is an ideal diagnostic test for AD with inexpensive, easy to perform, noninvasive merits. PMID:26870826

  11. Effects of aspartame metabolites on astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Rycerz, Karol; Jaworska-Adamu, Jadwiga Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Aspartame, a widespread sweetener used in many food products, is considered as a highly hazardous compound. Aspartame was discovered in 1965 and raises a lot of controversy up to date. Astrocytes are glial cells, the presence and functions of which are closely connected with the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this article is to demonstrate the direct and indirect role of astrocytes participating in the harmful effects of aspartame metabolites on neurons. The artificial sweetener is broken down into phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%) during metabolism in the body. The excess of phenylalanine blocks the transport of important amino acids to the brain contributing to reduced levels of dopamine and serotonin. Astrocytes directly affect the transport of this amino acid and also indirectly by modulation of carriers in the endothelium. Aspartic acid at high concentrations is a toxin that causes hyperexcitability of neurons and is also a precursor of other excitatory amino acid - glutamates. Their excess in quantity and lack of astrocytic uptake induces excitotoxicity and leads to the degeneration of astrocytes and neurons. The methanol metabolites cause CNS depression, vision disorders and other symptoms leading ultimately to metabolic acidosis and coma. Astrocytes do not play a significant role in methanol poisoning due to a permanent consumption of large amounts of aspartame. Despite intense speculations about the carcinogenicity of aspartame, the latest studies show that its metabolite - diketopiperazine - is cancirogenic in the CNS. It contributes to the formation of tumors in the CNS such as gliomas, medulloblastomas and meningiomas. Glial cells are the main source of tumors, which can be caused inter alia by the sweetener in the brain. On the one hand the action of astrocytes during aspartame poisoning may be advantageous for neuro-protection while on the other it may intensify the destruction of neurons. The role of the glia in

  12. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  13. Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and blood glucose levels during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Candace A.; Peck, Jennifer D.; Stoner, Julie; Calafat, Antonia M.; Carabin, Hélène; Cowan, Linda; Goodman, Jean R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations between phthalate metabolite urinary concentrations during early pregnancy and blood glucose levels obtained at the time of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Upon initiation of prenatal care, women with a mean gestational age of 12.8 weeks were recruited for a study of environmental chemical exposures (n = 110) and provided a spot urinary specimen. Blood glucose concentrations (mg/dl) were obtained from the electronic medical record for those patients who did not experience a pregnancy loss and did not transfer care to another facility prior to glucose screening (n = 72). Urinary concentrations of nine phthalate metabolites and creatinine were measured at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associations between tertiles of phthalate metabolites concentrations and blood glucose levels were estimated using linear regression. Results Compared to pregnant women in the lowest concentration tertile, women with the highest urinary concentrations (≥3rd tertile) of mono-iso-butyl phthalate (tertile: ≥15.3 μg/l, β = −18.3, 95% CI: −35.4, −1.2) and monobenzyl phthalate (tertile: ≥30.3 μg/l, β = −17.3, 95% CI: −34.1, −0.4) had lower blood glucose levels at the time of GDM screening after adjustment for urinary creatinine and demographic covariates. Conclusion Because maternal glucose levels increase during pregnancy to provide adequate nutrition for fetal growth and development, these findings may have implications for fetal health. However, given the limitations of our study, findings should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:25726127

  14. Reassessing culture media and critical metabolites that affect adenovirus production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chun Fang; Voyer, Robert; Tom, Roseanne; Kamen, Amine

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus production is currently operated at low cell density because infection at high cell densities still results in reduced cell-specific productivity. To better understand nutrient limitation and inhibitory metabolites causing the reduction of specific yields at high cell densities, adenovirus production in HEK 293 cultures using NSFM 13 and CD 293 media were evaluated. For cultures using NSFM 13 medium, the cell-specific productivity decreased from 3,400 to 150 vp/cell (or 96% reduction) when the cell density at infection was increased from 1 to 3 x 10(6) cells/mL. In comparison, only 50% of reduction in the cell-specific productivity was observed under the same conditions for cultures using CD 293 medium. The effect of medium osmolality was found critical on viral production. Media were adjusted to an optimal osmolality of 290 mOsm/kg to facilitate comparison. Amino acids were not critical limiting factors. Potential limiting nutrients including vitamins, energy metabolites, bases and nucleotides, or inhibitory metabolites (lactate and ammonia) were supplemented to infected cultures to further investigate their effect on the adenovirus production. Accumulation of lactate and ammonia in a culture infected at 3 x 10(6) cells/mL contributed to about 20% reduction of the adenovirus production yield, whereas nutrient limitation appeared primarily responsible for the decline in the viral production when NSFM 13 medium was used. Overall, the results indicate that multiple factors contribute to limiting the specific production yield at cell densities beyond 1 x 10(6) cells/mL and underline the need to further investigate and develop media for better adenoviral vector productions.

  15. Resistance of leishmanial phosphatases to inactivation by oxygen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Saha, A K; Das, S; Glew, R H; Gottlieb, M

    1985-09-01

    Leishmania donovani promastigotes produce large quantities of two distinct acid phosphatases; a tartrate-resistant enzyme is localized to the external surface of the plasma membrane, and a tartrate-sensitive enzyme is secreted into the growth medium. It was shown previously that preincubation of human neutrophils and macrophages with the tartrate-resistant phosphatase markedly reduced the ability of these host cells to produce superoxide anions in response to stimulation with the activator formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. The possibility that the cell surface acid phosphatase or the phosphatase that is secreted into the extracellular fluid might compromise other host cell functions, especially intracellular ones, depends on the ability of the enzyme to resist exposure to toxic oxygen metabolites (e.g., superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorite) generated by phagocytic cells. In the present report, we show that both leishmanial acid phosphatases were relatively resistant to inactivation by oxygen metabolites. At pH 5.5, the activity of the tartrate-resistant phosphatase was reduced 50% by incubation for 1 h with each of the following: 30 mM O2-, 500 mM hydrogen peroxide, and 6 mM hypochlorite ion. These concentrations are many fold greater than the concentrations of these substances that are generated by stimulated polymorphonuclear phagocytes. The tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase differed markedly from the tartrate-resistant phosphatase in that the former was essentially insensitive to even very high concentrations of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, 50% inactivation of the tartrate-sensitive leishmanial phosphatase required exposure to 35 mM hypochlorite for 30 min. These results indicate that the catalytic potential of these two leishmanial acid phosphatases probably survives exposure to toxic oxygen metabolites generated by neutrophils and macrophages.

  16. Enantioselective renal excretion of albendazole metabolites in patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Lanchote, V L; Takayanagui, O M; Mateus, F H

    2004-10-01

    The present study investigates the urinary excretion of the enantiomers of (+)- and (-)-albendazole sulfoxide (ASOX) and albendazole sulfone (ASON) in 12 patients with neurocysticercosis treated with albendazole for 8 days (7.5 mg/kg/12 h). Serial blood samples (0-12 h) and urine (three periods of 8 h) were collected after administration of the last dose of albendazole. Plasma and urine (+)-ASOX, (-)-ASOX, and ASON metabolites were determined by HPLC using a chiral phase column (Chiralpak AD) with fluorescence detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters (P < 0.05) for (+)-ASOX, (-)-ASOX, and ASON metabolites are reported as means (95% CI); amount excreted (Ae) = 3.19 (1.53-4.85) vs. 0.72 (0.41-1.04) vs. 0.08 (0.03-0.13) mg; plasma concentration-time area under the curve, AUC(0-24) = 3.56 (0.93-6.18) vs. 0.60 (0.12-1.08) vs. 0.38 (0.20-0.55) microg x h/ml, and renal clearance Cl(R) = 1.20 (0.66-1.73) vs. 2.72 (0.39-5.05) vs. 0.25 (0.13-0.37) l/h. Sulfone formation capacity, expressed as the Ae ratio ASON/ASOX + ASON, was 2.21 (1.43-2.99). These data point to enantioselectivity in the renal excretion of ASOX as a complementary mechanism to the metabolism responsible for the plasma accumulation of (+)-ASOX. The results also suggest that the metabolite ASON is partially eliminated as a reaction product of the subsequent metabolism.

  17. [Study on secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii].

    PubMed

    Lv, Hai-ning; Ding, Guang-zhi; Liu, Yun-bao; Qu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii, isolated from Lysidice rhodostegia Hance root, was fermented and the secondary metabolites were studied. By means of Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, ODS column chromatography and PHPLC over the fermented culture, 5 compounds were isolated. By using ESI-MS and NMR, the structures of the compounds were determined as N-[9-(β- D-ribofuranosyl)-9H-purin-6-yl]-L-aspartic acid (1), 3-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 4-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 5-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 3-hydroxy-benzoic acid-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5).

  18. Supercritical fluid extraction of explosives and metabolites from composted soil

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, G.; Ho, C.H.; Griest, W.H.

    1995-06-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) experiments with composted explosives lagoon soil suggest that recoveries of explosives and metabolites depend more on solvent diffusivity and viscosity than on the solubility of the analytes in the supercritical fluid. Preliminary evidence suggests that SFE recoveries for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX; a particularly difficult to extract explosive) can equal those for an 18 hr. ultrasonic extraction in acetonitrile. Much work is needed to confirm this observation, particularly to optimize the SFE conditions and improve the reproducibility of the extractions.

  19. Ethanol volatility in fermentation systems. Salt and metabolite effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malorella, B.L.; Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of dissolved species on the relative volatility of ethanol in fermentation systems is evaluated. New data are presented showing that the enhancement in volatility due to dissolved salts varies with ethanol concentration and is largest for the dilute ethanol concentrations typical in fermentation broths. Dissolved sugars and metabolites also affect relative volatility. The most commonly applied model of volatility enhancement does not incorporate the effect of ethanol concentration, and published enhancement factors measured at high salt and ethanol concentration are not applicable to the conditions of a fermentation broth. 41 references, 9 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Analysis of Vitamins D, Their Metabolites and Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makin, Hugh L. J.; Jones, Glenville; Kaufmann, Martin; Calverley, Martin J.

    The analysis of vitamins D and their metabolites and analogues has been reviewed by us on two occasions (Makin et al., 1995; Jones and Makin, 2000) over the last 10-15 years. In this chapter, we have drawn heavily on the 2000 review, up-dating it to take account of the developments in methodology that have occurred in the intervening years, but including elements of our 1995 review so that the reader can get a picture of the historical context as well as the modern developments.

  1. New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites by Microbial Transformation of Medrysone

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Saira; Wahab, Atia-tul-; Yousuf, Sammer; Jabeen, Almas; Mesaik, Mohammad Ahmed; Rahman, Atta-ur-; Choudhary, M. Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformation of the anti-inflammatory steroid medrysone (1) was carried out for the first time with the filamentous fungi Cunninghamella blakesleeana (ATCC 8688a), Neurospora crassa (ATCC 18419), and Rhizopus stolonifer (TSY 0471). The objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of the substrate (1) and its metabolites. This yielded seven new metabolites, 14α-hydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (2), 6β-hydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (3), 15β-hydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (4), 6β,17α-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione (5), 6β,20S-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11-dione (6), 11β,16β-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11-dione (7), and 15β,20R-dihydroxy-6α-methylpregn-4-ene-3,11-dione (8). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique unambiguously established the structures of the metabolites 2, 4, 6, and 8. Fungal transformation of 1 yielded oxidation at the C-6β, -11β, -14α, -15β, -16β positions. Various cellular anti-inflammatory assays, including inhibition of phagocyte oxidative burst, T-cell proliferation, and cytokine were performed. Among all the tested compounds, metabolite 6 (IC50 = 30.3 μg/mL) moderately inhibited the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced from zymosan-induced human whole blood cells. Compounds 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8 strongly inhibited the proliferation of T-cells with IC50 values between <0.2–10.4 μg/mL. Compound 7 was found to be the most potent inhibitor (IC50 < 0.2 μg/mL), whereas compounds 2, 3, and 6 showed moderate levels of inhibition (IC50 = 14.6–20.0 μg/mL). Compounds 1, and 7 also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. All these compounds were found to be non-toxic to 3T3 cells (mouse fibroblast), and also showed no activity when tested against HeLa (human epithelial carcinoma), or against PC3 (prostate cancer) cancer cell lines. PMID:27104348

  2. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Fungal Endophytes of Conifers.

    PubMed

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B

    2015-10-01

    This is a review of bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from conifer-associated endophytic fungi from 1990-2014. This includes compounds with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity towards human cancer cell lines, and activity against either plant pathogens or plant insect pests. Compounds that were originally reported without associated activity were included if other studies ascribed activity to these compounds. Compounds were not included if they were exclusively phytotoxic or if they were isolated from active extracts but were not determined to be the active component of that extract. PMID:26669101

  3. N-containing metabolites from the marine sponge Agelas clathrodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Ji, Rui-Hua; Li, Jiang; Gan, Jian-Hong; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2013-12-01

    A new bisuracil analogue, 3,3-bis(uracil-1-yl)-propan-1-aminium (1), together with four known N-containing metabolites (2-5), were isolated from the South China Sea sponge Agelas clathrodes. Their chemical structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic and spectrometric analysis and comparison with known compounds. Compound 1 is an unusual naturally occurring bisuracil analogue, and compound 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time. Compounds 2 and 4 exhibit moderate cytotoxicity against cancer cell line SGC7901.

  4. Best practices for metabolite quantification in drug development: updated recommendation from the European Bioanalysis Forum.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Philip; Blech, Stefan; White, Stephen; Green, Martha; Delatour, Claude; McDougall, Stuart; Mannens, Geert; Smeraglia, John; Williams, Stephen; Young, Graeme

    2016-06-01

    Metabolite quantification and profiling continues to grow in importance in today's drug development. The guidance provided by the 2008 FDA Metabolites in Safety Testing Guidance and the subsequent ICH M3(R2) Guidance (2009) has led to a more streamlined process to assess metabolite exposures in preclinical and clinical studies in industry. In addition, the European Bioanalysis Forum (EBF) identified an opportunity to refine the strategies on metabolite quantification considering the experience to date with their recommendation paper on the subject dating from 2010 and integrating the recent discussions on the tiered approach to bioanalytical method validation with focus on metabolite quantification. The current manuscript summarizes the discussion and recommendations from a recent EBF Focus Workshop into an updated recommendation for metabolite quantification in drug development.

  5. Tentative identification of new metabolites of epimedin C by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minyan; Zhao, Shaohua; Wang, Zongquan; Wang, Hongtao; Shi, Xiaowei; Lü, Ziming; Xu, Honghui; Wang, Hairong; Du, Yingfeng; Zhang, Lantong

    2011-11-01

    Epimedin C is one of the major bioactive constituents of Herba Epimedii. The aim of this study is to characterize and elucidate the structure of metabolites in the rat after administration of epimedin C. Metabolite identification was performed using a predictive multiple reaction monitoring-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (pMRM-IDA-EPI) scan in positive ion mode on a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer. A total of 18 metabolites were characterized by the changes in their protonated molecular masses, their MS/MS spectrum and their retention times compared with those of the parent drug. The results reveal possible metabolite profiles of epimedin C in rats; the metabolic pathways including hydrolysis, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, demethylation and conjugation with glucuronic acid and different sugars were observed. This study provides a practical approach for rapidly identifying complicated metabolites, a methodology that could be widely applied for the structural characterization of metabolites of other compounds. PMID:22012680

  6. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P; Northen, Trent R

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites.

  7. Mass spectrometry–based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Northen, Trent R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry–based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites. PMID:20701590

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  9. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions. PMID:27507473

  10. Spatio-temporal distribution and natural variation of metabolites in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouchuang; Tu, Hong; Wan, Jian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-05-15

    To study the natural variation and spatio-temporal accumulation of citrus metabolites, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolome analysis was performed on four fruit tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane and juice sacs) and different Citrus species (lemon, pummelo and grapefruit, sweet orange and mandarin). Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, more than 2000 metabolite signals were detected, from which more than 54 metabolites, including amino acids, flavonoids and limonoids, were identified/annotated. Differential accumulation patterns of both primary metabolites and secondary metabolites in various tissues and species were revealed by our study. Further investigation indicated that flavedo accumulates more flavonoids while juice sacs contain more amino acids. Besides this, cluster analysis based on the levels of metabolites detected in 47 individual Citrus accessions clearly grouped them into four distinct clusters: pummelos and grapefruits, lemons, sweet oranges and mandarins, while the cluster of pummelos and grapefruits lay distinctly apart from the other three species.

  11. Variability of Non-Polar Secondary Metabolites in the Red Alga Portieria

    PubMed Central

    Payo, Dioli Ann; Colo, Joannamel; Calumpong, Hilconida; de Clerck, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Possible sources of variation in non-polar secondary metabolites of Portieria hornemannii, sampled from two distinct regions in the Philippines (Batanes and Visayas), resulting from different life-history stages, presence of cryptic species, and/or spatiotemporal factors, were investigated. PCA analyses demonstrated secondary metabolite variation between, as well as within, five cryptic Batanes species. Intraspecific variation was even more pronounced in the three cryptic Visayas species, which included samples from six sites. Neither species groupings, nor spatial or temporal based patterns, were observed in the PCA analysis, however, intraspecific variation in secondary metabolites was detected between life-history stages. Male gametophytes (102 metabolites detected) were strongly discriminated from the two other stages, whilst female gametophyte (202 metabolites detected) and tetrasporophyte (106 metabolites detected) samples were partially discriminated. These results suggest that life-history driven variations, and possibly other microscale factors, may influence the variation within Portieria species. PMID:22163195

  12. Microbial secondary metabolites ameliorate growth, in planta contents and lignification in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Gupta, Rupali; Srivastava, Madhumita; Gupta, M M; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-04-01

    In the present investigation, metabolites of Streptomyces sp. MTN14 and Trichoderma harzianum ThU significantly enhanced biomass yield (3.58 and 3.48 fold respectively) in comparison to the control plants. The secondary metabolites treatments also showed significant augmentation (0.75-2.25 fold) in withanolide A, a plant secondary metabolite. Lignin deposition, total phenolic and flavonoid content in W. somnifera were maximally induced in treatment having T. harzianum metabolites. Also, Trichoderma and Streptomyces metabolites were found much better in invoking in planta contents and antioxidants compared with their live culture treatments. Therefore, identification of new molecular effectors from metabolites of efficient microbes may be used as biopesticide and biofertilizer for commercial production of W. somnifera globally. PMID:27436916

  13. The identification of lobeglitazone metabolites in rat liver microsomes and the kinetics of the in vivo formation of the major metabolite M1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hwa; Ahn, Sung Hoon; Maeng, Han-Joo; Lee, Wooin; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae

    2015-11-10

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the chemical structure of the metabolites derived from lobeglitazone (LB) during its incubation with rat liver microsomes and to characterize the kinetics of formation of the major metabolite M1 in vivo. Using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap, the metabolites were derived from LB during its incubation with rat liver microsomes. From various fragmentation patterns obtained from the metabolites, LB was biotransformed into 5 metabolites in the incubation, in which demethylation and hydroxylation appeared to be the principle metabolic pathways in vitro; Amongst the five primary metabolites, M1, a demethylated derivative of LB, appeared to be the major metabolite of LB, based on a comparison on the peak intensities in the ion chromatogram. In a study of the in vivo kinetics of formation of M1 in rats, the rate of formation of M1 from LB was determined to be 0.252 and 0.216mL/min/kg at doses of 0.5mg/kg and 2mg/kg of LB, respectively, suggesting that the kinetics of M1 formation were linear in the dose range tested. Considering the fact that LB is primarily eliminated by hepatic metabolism in rats, the formation of M1 accounts for approximately 7.50-9.76% of the overall elimination of LB in rats.

  14. Metabolite Profiling of Justicia gendarussa Burm. f. Leaves Using UPLC-UHR-QTOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Ningsih, Indah Yulia; Purwanti, Diah Intan; Wongso, Suwidji; Prajogo, Bambang E. W.; Indrayanto, Gunawan

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography ultra-high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-UHR-QTOF-MS) metabolite profiling ofxs Justicia gendarussa Burm. f. leaves was performed. PCA and HCA analyses were applied to observe the clustering patterns and inter-sample relationships. It seemed that the concentrations of Ca, P, and Cu in the soil could affect the metabolite profiles of Justicia gendarussa. Six significant metabolites were proposed. PMID:26839833

  15. Metabolite Profiling of Justicia gendarussa Burm. f. Leaves Using UPLC-UHR-QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ningsih, Indah Yulia; Purwanti, Diah Intan; Wongso, Suwidji; Prajogo, Bambang E W; Indrayanto, Gunawan

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography ultra-high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-UHR-QTOF-MS) metabolite profiling ofxs Justicia gendarussa Burm. f. leaves was performed. PCA and HCA analyses were applied to observe the clustering patterns and inter-sample relationships. It seemed that the concentrations of Ca, P, and Cu in the soil could affect the metabolite profiles of Justicia gendarussa. Six significant metabolites were proposed. PMID:26839833

  16. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Ellingsen, Trond E; Bruheim, Per

    2012-02-17

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  17. MIDAS: a database-searching algorithm for metabolite identification in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingfeng; Kora, Guruprasad; Bowen, Benjamin P; Pan, Chongle

    2014-10-01

    A database searching approach can be used for metabolite identification in metabolomics by matching measured tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) against the predicted fragments of metabolites in a database. Here, we present the open-source MIDAS algorithm (Metabolite Identification via Database Searching). To evaluate a metabolite-spectrum match (MSM), MIDAS first enumerates possible fragments from a metabolite by systematic bond dissociation, then calculates the plausibility of the fragments based on their fragmentation pathways, and finally scores the MSM to assess how well the experimental MS/MS spectrum from collision-induced dissociation (CID) is explained by the metabolite's predicted CID MS/MS spectrum. MIDAS was designed to search high-resolution tandem mass spectra acquired on time-of-flight or Orbitrap mass spectrometer against a metabolite database in an automated and high-throughput manner. The accuracy of metabolite identification by MIDAS was benchmarked using four sets of standard tandem mass spectra from MassBank. On average, for 77% of original spectra and 84% of composite spectra, MIDAS correctly ranked the true compounds as the first MSMs out of all MetaCyc metabolites as decoys. MIDAS correctly identified 46% more original spectra and 59% more composite spectra at the first MSMs than an existing database-searching algorithm, MetFrag. MIDAS was showcased by searching a published real-world measurement of a metabolome from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 against the MetaCyc metabolite database. MIDAS identified many metabolites missed in the previous study. MIDAS identifications should be considered only as candidate metabolites, which need to be confirmed using standard compounds. To facilitate manual validation, MIDAS provides annotated spectra for MSMs and labels observed mass spectral peaks with predicted fragments. The database searching and manual validation can be performed online at http://midas.omicsbio.org.

  18. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Consortium, Stream; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Bruheim, Per

    2012-01-01

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor. PMID:24957373

  19. Impacts of environmental stress on growth, secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and metabolite production of xerotolerant/xerophilic fungi.

    PubMed

    Medina, Angel; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Rodríguez, Alicia; Parra, Roberto; Geisen, Rolf; Magan, Naresh

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the impact that single and interacting environmental stress factors have on tolerance mechanisms, molecular ecology and the relationship with secondary metabolite production by a group of mycotoxigenic species of economic importance. Growth of these fungi (Aspergillus flavus, A.ochraceus, A.carbonarius, Penicillium nordicum and P. verrucosum) is influenced by water and temperature interactions and type of solute used to induce water stress. Such abiotic stresses are overcome by the synthesis of increased amounts of low molecular weight sugar alcohols, especially glycerol and erythritol, to enable them to remain active under abiotic stress. This is accompanied by increased expression of sugar transporter genes, e.g., in A. flavus, which provides the nutritional means of tolerating such stress. The optimum conditions of water activity (a w) × temperature stress for growth are often different from those for secondary metabolite production. The genes for toxin production are clustered together and their relative expression is influenced by abiotic interacting stress factors. For example., A. flavus synthesises aflatoxins under water stress in non-ionic solutes. In contrast, P. nordicum specifically occupies a high salt (0.87 a w = 22% NaCl) niche such as cured meats, and produces ochratoxin A (OTA). There is differential and temporal expression of the genes in the secondary metabolite clusters in response to a w × temperature stress. We have used a microarray and integrated data on growth, relative expression of key genes in the biosynthetic pathways for secondary metabolite production and toxin production using a mixed growth model. This was used to correlate these factors and predict the toxin levels produced under different abiotic stress conditions. This system approach to integrate these different data sets and model the relationships could be a powerful tool for predicting the relative toxin production under extreme stress conditions

  20. Regulation of Nlrp3 inflammasome by dietary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Camell, Christina; Goldberg, Emily; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2015-01-01

    The bidirectional communication between innate immune cells and energy metabolism is now widely appreciated to regulate homeostasis as well as chronic diseases that emerge from dysregulated inflammation. Macronutrients-derived from diet or endogenous pathways that generate and divert metabolites into energetic or biosynthetic pathways-regulate the initiation, duration and cessation of the inflammatory response. The NLRP3 inflammasome is an important innate sensor of structurally diverse metabolic damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that has been implicated in a wide range of inflammatory disorders associated with caloric excess, adiposity and aging. Understanding the regulators of immune-metabolic interactions and their contribution towards chronic disease mechanisms, therefore, has the potential to reduce disease pathology, improve quality of life in elderly and promote the extension of healthspan. Just as specialized subsets of immune cells dampen inflammation through the production of negative regulatory cytokines; specific immunoregulatory metabolites can deactivate inflammasome-mediated immune activation. Here, we highlight the role of energy substrates, alternative fuels and metabolic DAMPs in the regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and discuss potential dietary interventions that may impact sterile inflammatory disease. PMID:26776831

  1. Serum metabolite signatures of type 2 diabetes mellitus complications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Xie, Guoxiang; Ni, Yan; Liu, Tao; Yang, Ming; Wei, Huafeng; Jia, Wei; Ji, Guang

    2015-01-01

    A number of metabolic conditions, including hypoglycemia, high blood pressure (HBP), dyslipidemia, nerve damage and amputation, and vision problems, occur as a result of uncontrolled blood glucose levels over a prolonged period of time. The different components of diabetic complications are not independent but rather interdependent of each other, rendering the disease difficult to diagnose and control. The underlying pathogenesis of those components cannot be easily elucidated because of the heterogeneous, polygenic, and multifactorial nature of the disease. Metabonomics offers a snapshot of distinct biochemical variations that may reflect the unique metabolic phenotype under pathophysiological conditions. Here we report a mass-spectrometry-based metabonomic study designed to identify the distinct metabolic changes associated with several complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The 292 patients recruited in the study were divided into five groups, including T2DM with HBP, T2DM with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), T2DM with HBP and NAFLD, T2DM with HBP and coronary heart disease (CHD), and T2DM with HBP, NAFLD, and CHD. Serum differential metabolites were identified in each group of T2DM complication, mainly involving bile acid, fatty acid, amino acid, lipid, carbohydrate, steroids metabolism, and tricarboxylic acids cycle. These broad-spectrum metabolic changes emphasize the complex abnormalities present among these complications with elevated blood glucose levels, providing a novel strategy for stratifying patients with T2DM complications using blood-based metabolite markers.

  2. Human in vivo phosphate metabolite imaging with 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A; Charles, H C; Roemer, P B; Flamig, D; Engeseth, H; Edelstein, W A; Mueller, O M

    1988-07-01

    Phosphorus (31P) spectroscopic images showing the distribution of high-energy phosphate metabolites in the human brain have been obtained at 1.5 T in scan times of 8.5 to 34 min at 27 and 64 cm3 spatial resolution using pulsed phase-encoding gradient magnetic fields and three-dimensional Fourier transform (3DFT) techniques. Data were acquired as free induction decays with a quadrature volume NMR detection coil of a truncated geometry designed to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio on the coil axis on the assumption that the sample noise represents the dominant noise source, and self-shielded magnetic field gradient coils to minimize eddy-current effects. The images permit comparison of metabolic data acquired simultaneously from different locations in the brain, as well as metabolite quantification by inclusion of a vial containing a standard of known 31P concentration in the image array. Values for the NMR visible adenosine triphosphate in three individuals were about 3 mM of tissue. The ratio of NMR detectable phosphocreatine to ATP in brain was 1.15 +/- 0.17 SD in these experiments. Potential sources of random and systematic error in these and other 31P measurements are identified.

  3. Evaluating bionanoparticle infused fungal metabolites as a novel antimicrobial agent

    PubMed Central

    Rajpal, Kartikeya; Aziz, Nafe; Prasad, Ram; Varma, Ramendra G.; Varma, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic properties of fungal metabolites and silver nanoparticles have been well documented. While fungal metabolites have been used for centuries as medicinal drugs, potential of biogenic silver nanoparticles has recently received attention. We have evaluated the antimicrobial potential of Aspergillus terreus crude extract, silver nanoparticles and an amalgamation of both against four pathogenic bacterial strains. Antimicrobial activity of the following was evaluated – A. terreus extract, biogenic silver nanoparticles, and a mixture containing extract and nanoparticles. Four pathogenic bacteria - Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus were used as test organisms. Phenol, flavonoid, and alkaloid content of extract were determined to understand the chemical profile of the fungus. The extract contained significantly high amounts of phenols, flavonoids, and alkaloids. The extract and biogenic silver nanoparticle exhibited significant antibacterial activity at concentrations of 10 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively. When used in combination, the extract-nanoparticle mixture showed equally potent antibacterial activity at a much lower concentration of 2.5 μg/ml extract + 0.5 μg/ml nanoparticle. Given its high antibacterial potential, the fungal extract can be a promising source of novel drug lead compounds. The extract – silver nanoparticle mixture exhibited synergism in their antibacterial efficacy. This property can be further used to formulate new age drugs. PMID:27429931

  4. Genetic and Metabolite Diversity of Sardinian Populations of Helichrysum italicum

    PubMed Central

    Melito, Sara; Sias, Angela; Petretto, Giacomo L.; Chessa, Mario; Pintore, Giorgio; Porceddu, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae) is a small shrub endemic to the Mediterranean Basin, growing in fragmented and diverse habitats. The species has attracted attention due to its secondary metabolite content, but little effort has as yet been dedicated to assessing the genetic and metabolite diversity present in these populations. Here, we describe the diversity of 50 H. italicum populations collected from a range of habitats in Sardinia. Methods H. italicum plants were AFLP fingerprinted and the composition of their leaf essential oil characterized by GC-MS. The relationships between the genetic structure of the populations, soil, habitat and climatic variables and the essential oil chemotypes present were evaluated using Bayesian clustering, contingency analyses and AMOVA. Key results The Sardinian germplasm could be partitioned into two AFLP-based clades. Populations collected from the southwestern region constituted a homogeneous group which remained virtually intact even at high levels of K. The second, much larger clade was more diverse. A positive correlation between genetic diversity and elevation suggested the action of natural purifying selection. Four main classes of compounds were identified among the essential oils, namely monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Oxygenated monoterpene levels were significantly correlated with the AFLP-based clade structure, suggesting a correspondence between gene pool and chemical diversity. Conclusions The results suggest an association between chemotype, genetic diversity and collection location which is relevant for the planning of future collections aimed at identifying valuable sources of essential oil. PMID:24260149

  5. Metabolomic Tools for Secondary Metabolite Discovery from Marine Microbial Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Lynsey; Zhang, Tong; Viegelmann, Christina; Juarez Martinez, Ignacio; Cheng, Cheng; Dowdells, Catherine; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Gernert, Christine; Hentschel, Ute; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2014-01-01

    Marine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strain selection by investigating differences in the chemical profiles of 77 bacterial extracts isolated from cold water marine invertebrates from Orkney, Scotland using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Following mass spectrometric analysis and dereplication using an Excel macro developed in-house, principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to differentiate the bacterial strains based on their chemical profiles. NMR 1H and correlation spectroscopy (COSY) were also employed to obtain a chemical fingerprint of each bacterial strain and to confirm the presence of functional groups and spin systems. These results were then combined with taxonomic identification and bioassay screening data to identify three bacterial strains, namely Bacillus sp. 4117, Rhodococcus sp. ZS402 and Vibrio splendidus strain LGP32, to prioritize for scale-up based on their chemically interesting secondary metabolomes, established through dereplication and interesting bioactivities, determined from bioassay screening. PMID:24905482

  6. Antifungal, phytotoxic and toxic metabolites produced by Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Wei, Jing; Pan, Shi-Yin; Gao, Jin-Ming; Tian, Jun-Mian

    2014-01-01

    Nine known metabolites, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methyl averantin (1), 6,8-di-O-methyl averufnin (2), 6,8-di-O-methyl averufanin (3), aversin (4), 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethoxy-9,10-anthraquinone (5), 6,8-di-O-methylnidurufin (6), 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (7), 5-methyoxysterigmatocystin (8) and (S)-ornidazole (9), were isolated from the extracts of Penicillium purpurogenum, and their structures were elucidated by using spectroscopic methods. The brine shrimp toxicity, anti-phytopathogenic and phytotoxic effects of these compounds were evaluated. Among them, compounds 1 and 8 exhibited the strongest toxicity against brine shrimp (Artemia salina), with lethality rates of 100% at a low concentration of 10 μM, comparable to the positive control toosendanin. Compounds 1, 4 and 7 moderately inhibited the growth of Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, 4 displayed moderate antifungal effects on Gibberella saubinettii. In addition, compounds 6, 7 and 9 produced the phytotoxic effects on radish seedlings at 100 μM. This is the first report on the isolation of these metabolites from this organism. PMID:25103412

  7. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  8. The factors influencing direct spectral fluorimetry of some urine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lichardusová, L; Kušnír, J; Valko-Rokytovská, M; Mareková, M

    2010-01-01

    Urine contains a variety of organic and inorganic chemicals including a number of natural fluorophores. Most of them are formed by tryptophan metabolites. But there are also metabolites of riboflavin, catecholamines and porphyrins. The alternation in the autofluorescence of urine and the alternation in the concentration of these substances are developed by both physiological and pathological changes such as disorder of body metabolism, dietary intake, age and etc. In this work we present fluorescent properties of chosen urine fluorophores - i.e. 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA), indoxyl sulphate (urine indican), serotonin (5-HT), vanillylmandelic (VMA) and homovanillic (HVA) acids typical for various diseases. Differences of fluorescent parameters of individual fluorophores measured in vitro in the water solutions and in natural environment of urine are significant and can lead to false results and conclusions. Therefore, we present the most common influence that can occur in urine (e.g. pH, ionic strength, proteins, and other fluorophores). The aim is to elaborate the exact "know-how" for direct complex fluorescent measurement in urine related to particular diagnoses. PMID:21189166

  9. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  10. Exploring the transport of plant metabolites using positron emitting radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Matthew R.; Reid, Chantal D.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Phillips, Richard P.; Howell, Calvin R.

    2008-01-01

    Short-lived positron-emitting radiotracer techniques provide time-dependent data that are critical for developing models of metabolite transport and resource distribution in plants and their microenvironments. Until recently these techniques were applied to measure radiotracer accumulation in coarse regions along transport pathways. The recent application of positron emission tomography (PET) techniques to plant research allows for detailed quantification of real-time metabolite dynamics on previously unexplored spatial scales. PET provides dynamic information with millimeter-scale resolution on labeled carbon, nitrogen, and water transport over a small plant-size field of view. Because details at the millimeter scale may not be required for all regions of interest, hybrid detection systems that combine high-resolution imaging with other radiotracer counting technologies offer the versatility needed to pursue wide-ranging plant physiological and ecological research. In this perspective we describe a recently developed hybrid detection system at Duke University that provides researchers with the flexibility required to carry out measurements of the dynamic responses of whole plants to environmental change using short-lived radiotracers. Following a brief historical development of radiotracer applications to plant research, the role of radiotracers is presented in the context of various applications at the leaf to the whole-plant level that integrates cellular and subcellular signals and∕or controls. PMID:19404430

  11. Production of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites by Marine Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Maria; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Vibrionaceae family are widespread in the marine environment. Today, 128 species of vibrios are known. Several of them are infamous for their pathogenicity or symbiotic relationships. Despite their ability to interact with eukaryotes, the vibrios are greatly underexplored for their ability to produce bioactive secondary metabolites and studies have been limited to only a few species. Most of the compounds isolated from vibrios so far are non-ribosomal peptides or hybrids thereof, with examples of N-containing compounds produced independent of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). Though covering a limited chemical space, vibrios produce compounds with attractive biological activities, including antibacterial, anticancer, and antivirulence activities. This review highlights some of the most interesting structures from this group of bacteria. Many compounds found in vibrios have also been isolated from other distantly related bacteria. This cosmopolitan occurrence of metabolites indicates a high incidence of horizontal gene transfer, which raises interesting questions concerning the ecological function of some of these molecules. This account underlines the pending potential for exploring new bacterial sources of bioactive compounds and the challenges related to their investigation. PMID:22131950

  12. Metabolites are key to understanding health effects of wine polyphenolics.

    PubMed

    Forester, Sarah C; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2009-09-01

    Phenolic compounds in grapes and wine are grouped within the following major classes: stilbenes, phenolic acids, ellagitannins, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins, flavonols, and proanthocyanidins. Consumption of foods containing phenolic substances has been linked to beneficial effects toward chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease and colorectal cancer. However, such correlations need to be supported by in vivo testing and bioavailability studies are the first step in establishing cause and effect. Class members from all phenolic groups can be glucuronidated, sulfated, and/or methylated and detected at low concentrations in the bloodstream and in urine. But the majority of phenolic compounds from grapes and wine are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract, where they are broken down by gut microflora. This typically involves deglycosylation, followed by breakdown of ring structures to produce phenolic acids and aldehydes. These metabolites can be detected in bloodstream, urine, and fecal samples by using sophisticated instrumentation methods for quantitation and identification at low concentrations. The health effects related to grape and wine consumption may well be due to these poorly understood phenolic acid metabolites. This review discusses the known metabolism of each major class of wine and grape phenolics, the means to measure them, and ideas for future investigations. PMID:19640966

  13. Purification of Transcripts and Metabolites from Drosophila Heads

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kurt; Sanchez-Garcia, Jonatan; Williams, Caroline; Khare, Swati; Mathur, Krishanu; Graze, Rita M.; Hahn, Daniel A.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Rincon-Limas, Diego E.; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    For the last decade, we have tried to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neuronal degeneration using Drosophila as a model organism. Although fruit flies provide obvious experimental advantages, research on neurodegenerative diseases has mostly relied on traditional techniques, including genetic interaction, histology, immunofluorescence, and protein biochemistry. These techniques are effective for mechanistic, hypothesis-driven studies, which lead to a detailed understanding of the role of single genes in well-defined biological problems. However, neurodegenerative diseases are highly complex and affect multiple cellular organelles and processes over time. The advent of new technologies and the omics age provides a unique opportunity to understand the global cellular perturbations underlying complex diseases. Flexible model organisms such as Drosophila are ideal for adapting these new technologies because of their strong annotation and high tractability. One challenge with these small animals, though, is the purification of enough informational molecules (DNA, mRNA, protein, metabolites) from highly relevant tissues such as fly brains. Other challenges consist of collecting large numbers of flies for experimental replicates (critical for statistical robustness) and developing consistent procedures for the purification of high-quality biological material. Here, we describe the procedures for collecting thousands of fly heads and the extraction of transcripts and metabolites to understand how global changes in gene expression and metabolism contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. These procedures are easily scalable and can be applied to the study of proteomic and epigenomic contributions to disease. PMID:23524378

  14. Monitoring of aqueous humor metabolites using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicksted, James P.; Erckens, Roel J.; Motamedi, Massoud; March, Wayne F.

    1994-05-01

    Laser Raman scattering has been used to monitor glucose and lactate metabolites within aqueous humor specimens obtained from nine human eyes during cataract surgery. Nine postmortem rabbit eyes were also investigated. Raman measurements were obtained using a single grating Raman spectrometer with a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD. A 514.5 nm line from an argon laser was used to illuminate capillaries containing several microliters of aqueous humor. A water background was subtracted from each of the aqueous humor Raman spectra. This experimental system was calibrated so that each metabolite in water could be measured down to 0.1 weight percent. Raman peaks indicative of the stretching vibrations of methylene and methyl groups associated with glucose and lactate, respectively, were observed in the human specimens. A second stretching mode characteristic of lactate between the carbon atom and either the carboxylic acid group or carboxylate ion group was also observed providing a distinguishing feature between the glucose and lactate Raman peaks. Similar structure was observed from the rabbit specimens, but these samples have recently been found to have been contaminated during euthanasia.

  15. Metabolite Profiling and Classification of DNA-Authenticated Licorice Botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Simmler, Charlotte; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Gauthier, Laura; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    Raw licorice roots represent heterogeneous materials obtained from mainly three Glycyrrhiza species. G. glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata exhibit marked metabolite differences in terms of flavanones (Fs), chalcones (Cs), and other phenolic constituents. The principal objective of this work was to develop complementary chemometric models for the metabolite profiling, classification, and quality control of authenticated licorice. A total of 51 commercial and macroscopically verified samples were DNA authenticated. Principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis were performed on 1H NMR spectra and area under the curve values obtained from UHPLC-UV chromatograms, respectively. The developed chemometric models enable the identification and classification of Glycyrrhiza species according to their composition in major Fs, Cs, and species specific phenolic compounds. Further key outcomes demonstrated that DNA authentication combined with chemometric analyses enabled the characterization of mixtures, hybrids, and species outliers. This study provides a new foundation for the botanical and chemical authentication, classification, and metabolomic characterization of crude licorice botanicals and derived materials. Collectively, the proposed methods offer a comprehensive approach for the quality control of licorice as one of the most widely used botanical dietary supplements. PMID:26244884

  16. Fingerprinting of secondary metabolites of liverworts: chemosystematic approach.

    PubMed

    Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between various types of plants can be predicted based on the similarity in the chemical substances present in them. Compounds that belong to the category of secondary metabolites are of great value in identifying such relationships. Additionally, results from the chemical investigations, together with the other biological or genetic information, can help to understand real relationships among the taxa. Liverworts are small spore-forming plants with simple morphological organization. On the other hand, many liverwort species demonstrate wide geographical distribution and grow under diverse ecological conditions. Because of this, the identification of these plants is especially challenging. One of the outstanding features of the liverworts is their chemistry. They produce a wide array of secondary metabolites, mainly terpenoids and aromatic compounds. Many of these compounds are characterized by unique structures, and some have not been found in any other plants, fungi, or marine organisms. The potential use of chromatographic fingerprinting of the liverworts, as complementary to morphological and genetic information, to resolve the taxonomic problems at the species, genus, and family levels are discussed. PMID:25902971

  17. Metabolite Profiling and Classification of DNA-Authenticated Licorice Botanicals.

    PubMed

    Simmler, Charlotte; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Gauthier, Laura; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-28

    Raw licorice roots represent heterogeneous materials obtained from mainly three Glycyrrhiza species. G. glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata exhibit marked metabolite differences in terms of flavanones (Fs), chalcones (Cs), and other phenolic constituents. The principal objective of this work was to develop complementary chemometric models for the metabolite profiling, classification, and quality control of authenticated licorice. A total of 51 commercial and macroscopically verified samples were DNA authenticated. Principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis were performed on (1)H NMR spectra and area under the curve values obtained from UHPLC-UV chromatograms, respectively. The developed chemometric models enable the identification and classification of Glycyrrhiza species according to their composition in major Fs, Cs, and species specific phenolic compounds. Further key outcomes demonstrated that DNA authentication combined with chemometric analyses enabled the characterization of mixtures, hybrids, and species outliers. This study provides a new foundation for the botanical and chemical authentication, classification, and metabolomic characterization of crude licorice botanicals and derived materials. Collectively, the proposed methods offer a comprehensive approach for the quality control of licorice as one of the most widely used botanical dietary supplements.

  18. Hsp90 Activity Modulation by Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Terracciano, Stefania; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Braca, Alessandra

    2015-09-01

    Hsp90 is an evolutionarily conserved adenosine triphosphate-dependent molecular chaperone and is one of the most abundant proteins in the cells (1-3 %). Hsp90 is induced when a cell undergoes various types of environmental stresses such as heat, cold, or oxygen deprivation. It is involved in the turnover, trafficking, and activity of client proteins, including apoptotic factors, protein kinases, transcription factors, signaling proteins, and a number of oncoproteins. Most of the Hsp90 client proteins are involved in cell growth, differentiation, and survival, and include kinases, nuclear hormone receptors, transcription factors, and other proteins associated with almost all the hallmarks of cancer. Consistent with these diverse activities, genetic and biochemical studies have demonstrated the implication of Hsp90 in a range of diseases, including cancer, making this chaperone an interesting target for drug research.During the last few decades, plant secondary metabolites have been studied as a major source for lead compounds in drug discovery. Recently, several plant-derived small molecules have been discovered exhibiting inhibitory activity towards Hsp90, such as epigallocatechin gallate, gedunin, lentiginosine, celastrol, and deguelin. In this work, an overview of plant secondary metabolites interfering with Hsp90 activities is provided. PMID:26227505

  19. Preparation of human drug metabolites using fungal peroxygenases.

    PubMed

    Poraj-Kobielska, Marzena; Kinne, Matthias; Ullrich, René; Scheibner, Katrin; Kayser, Gernot; Hammel, Kenneth E; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    The synthesis of hydroxylated and O- or N-dealkylated human drug metabolites (HDMs) via selective monooxygenation remains a challenging task for synthetic organic chemists. Here we report that aromatic peroxygenases (APOs; EC 1.11.2.1) secreted by the agaric fungi Agrocybe aegerita and Coprinellus radians catalyzed the H₂O₂-dependent selective monooxygenation of diverse drugs, including acetanilide, dextrorphan, ibuprofen, naproxen, phenacetin, sildenafil and tolbutamide. Reactions included the hydroxylation of aromatic rings and aliphatic side chains, as well as O- and N-dealkylations and exhibited different regioselectivities depending on the particular APO used. At best, desired HDMs were obtained in yields greater than 80% and with isomeric purities up to 99%. Oxidations of tolbutamide, acetanilide and carbamazepine in the presence of H₂¹⁸O₂ resulted in almost complete incorporation of ¹⁸O into the corresponding products, thus establishing that these reactions are peroxygenations. The deethylation of phenacetin-d₁ showed an observed intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 3.1±0.2, which is consistent with the existence of a cytochrome P450-like intermediate in the reaction cycle of APOs. Our results indicate that fungal peroxygenases may be useful biocatalytic tools to prepare pharmacologically relevant drug metabolites. PMID:21723855

  20. Medicinal plants: a source of anti-parasitic secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wink, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes human infections caused by endoparasites, including protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes, which affect more than 30% of the human population, and medicinal plants of potential use in their treatment. Because vaccinations do not work in most instances and the parasites have sometimes become resistant to the available synthetic therapeutics, it is important to search for alternative sources of anti-parasitic drugs. Plants produce a high diversity of secondary metabolites with interesting biological activities, such as cytotoxic, anti-parasitic and anti-microbial properties. These drugs often interfere with central targets in parasites, such as DNA (intercalation, alkylation), membrane integrity, microtubules and neuronal signal transduction. Plant extracts and isolated secondary metabolites which can inhibit protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Trichomonas and intestinal worms are discussed. The identified plants and compounds offer a chance to develop new drugs against parasitic diseases. Most of them need to be tested in more detail, especially in animal models and if successful, in clinical trials. PMID:23114614

  1. Antimicrobial and Antiinsectan Phenolic Metabolites of Dalea searlsiae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Continued interest in the chemistry of Dalea spp. led to investigation of Dalea searlsiae, a plant native to areas of the western United States. Methanol extractions of D. searlsiae roots and subsequent chromatographic fractionation afforded the new prenylated and geranylated flavanones malheurans A–D (1–4) and known flavanones (5 and 6). Known rotenoids (7 and 8) and isoflavones (9 and 10) were isolated from aerial portions. Structure determination of pure compounds was accomplished primarily by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy. The absolute configurations of compounds 1–5, 7, and 8 were assigned using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. Antimicrobial bioassays revealed significant activity concentrated in the plant roots. Compounds 1–6 exhibited MICs of 2–8 μg/mL against Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus cereus, and oxacillin-sensitive and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Aerial metabolites 7–10 were inactive against these organisms, but the presence of 7 and 8 prompted investigation of the antiinsectan activity of D. searlsiae metabolites toward the major crop pest Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm). While compounds 1–10 all caused significant reductions in larval growth rates, associated mortality (33–66%) was highest with flavanone 4 and rotenoids 7 and 8. These findings suggest a differential allocation of antimicrobial and antiinsectan plant resources to root and aerial portions of the plant, respectively. PMID:24761805

  2. Salivary Metabolite Fingerprint of Type 1 Diabetes in Young Children.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Livia Roberta Piedade; Martins, Carla; Fidalgo, Tatiana Kelly Silva; Freitas-Fernandes, Liana Bastos; de Oliveira Torres, Rafaela; Soares, Aline Laignier; Almeida, Fabio C L; Valente, Ana Paula; de Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    Metabolomics is an important tool for the evaluation of the human condition, in both health or disease. This study analyzed the salivary components of type I diabetic children (DM1) under six years of age, to assess oral health related to diabetes control, as well as metabolite profiling using NMR. Partial least squared discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to compare healthy (HG) and uncontrolled DM1 subjects that demonstrated a separation between the groups with classificatory performance of ACC = 0.80, R(2) = 0.92, Q(2) = 0.02 and for DM1 children with glycemia >200 mg/dL of ACC = 0.74, R(2) = 0.91, Q(2) = 0.06. The metabolites that mostly contributed to the distinction between the groups in the loading factor were acetate, n-acetyl-sugar, lactate, and sugar. The univariate analysis showed a decreased salivary concentration of succinic acid and increased levels of lactate, acetate, and sucrose in uncontrolled and DM1 children with glycemia >200 mg/dL. The present study demonstrates that the salivary profile of DM1 differs from that of HG children. It appears that diabetes status control has an important effect on the salivary composition. PMID:27306956

  3. Persistence of DDT and its metabolites in a farm pond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, W.R.; Kallman, B.J.; Andrews, A.K.

    1963-01-01

    A farm pond near Morrison, Colorado, was treated with 0.02 p.p.m. of DDT in June 1961. The persistence and distribution of the insecticide in materials sampled from the aquatic environment were studied until November 1962. Detectable amounts of DDT were not found in the water after 3 weeks. Residues in the mud had declined within 8 weeks after the treatment to levels not significantly higher than pre-treatment levels, but a sample of vegetation still contained relatively high levels of residues. From this time until the second summer, sufficient vegetation was not present to provide a sample for chemical analysis. A new crop of vegetation sampled 1 year after the treatment contained residues approximating pre-treatment levels. Fish accumulated 3 to 4 p.p.m. of DDT and its metabolites within 1 month after the treatment. The residue levels slowly declined after this, but when the study was terminated, 2 to 3 p.p.m. of the metabolites DDD and DDE still remained in the fish. The highest residue levels measured in crayfish were about one-half of those found in fish. Some mortality of the more susceptible fish and invertebrates occurred as a result of the DDT treatment; however, severe adverse effects were not demonstrated.

  4. Fingerprinting of secondary metabolites of liverworts: chemosystematic approach.

    PubMed

    Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between various types of plants can be predicted based on the similarity in the chemical substances present in them. Compounds that belong to the category of secondary metabolites are of great value in identifying such relationships. Additionally, results from the chemical investigations, together with the other biological or genetic information, can help to understand real relationships among the taxa. Liverworts are small spore-forming plants with simple morphological organization. On the other hand, many liverwort species demonstrate wide geographical distribution and grow under diverse ecological conditions. Because of this, the identification of these plants is especially challenging. One of the outstanding features of the liverworts is their chemistry. They produce a wide array of secondary metabolites, mainly terpenoids and aromatic compounds. Many of these compounds are characterized by unique structures, and some have not been found in any other plants, fungi, or marine organisms. The potential use of chromatographic fingerprinting of the liverworts, as complementary to morphological and genetic information, to resolve the taxonomic problems at the species, genus, and family levels are discussed.

  5. Targeted lipidomics strategies for oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Kendall, Alexandra C.; Dennis, Edward A.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) through enzymatic or non-enzymatic free radical-mediated reactions can yield an array of lipid metabolites including eicosanoids, octadecanoids, docosanoids and related species. In mammals, these oxygenated PUFA mediators play prominent roles in the physiological and pathological regulation of many key biological processes in the cardiovascular, renal, reproductive and other systems including their pivotal contribution to inflammation. Mass spectrometry-based technology platforms have revolutionized our ability to analyze the complex mixture of lipid mediators found in biological samples, with increased numbers of metabolites that can be simultaneously quantified from a single sample in few analytical steps. The recent development of high-sensitivity and high-throughput analytical tools for lipid mediators affords a broader view of these oxygenated PUFA species, and facilitates research into their role in health and disease. In this review, we illustrate current analytical approaches for a high-throughput lipidomic analysis of eicosanoids and related mediators in biological samples. PMID:25486530

  6. Metabolite profiling of CHO cells: Molecular reflections of bioprocessing effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Christopher A; Croxford, Alexandra S; Maqsood, Arfa R; Stephens, Gill M; Westerhoff, Hans V; Goodacre, Royston; Dickson, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Whilst development of medium and feeds has provided major advances in recombinant protein production in CHO cells, the fundamental understanding is limited. We have applied metabolite profiling with established robust (GC-MS) analytics to define the molecular loci by which two yield-enhancing feeds improve recombinant antibody yields from a model GS-CHO cell line. With data across core metabolic pathways, that report on metabolism within several cellular compartments, these data identify key metabolites and events associated with increased cell survival and specific productivity of cells. Of particular importance, increased process efficiency was linked to the functional activity of the mitochondria, with the amount and time course of use/production of intermediates of the citric acid cycle, for uses such as lipid biosynthesis, precursor generation and energy production, providing direct indicators of cellular status with respect to productivity. The data provide clear association between specific cellular metabolic indicators and cell process efficiency, extending from prior indications of the relevance of lactate metabolic balance to other redox sinks (glycerol, sorbitol and threitol). The information, and its interpretation, identifies targets for engineering cell culture efficiency, either from genetic or environmental perspectives, and greater understanding of the significance of specific medium components towards overall CHO cell bioprocessing.

  7. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3’-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  8. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Heterologous Expression of Fungal Secondary Metabolite Pathways in the Aspergillus nidulans Host System.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J W A; Wang, C C C

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous expression of fungal secondary metabolite genes allows for the product formation of otherwise silent secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways. It also allows facile expression of mutants or combinations of genes not found in nature. This capability makes model fungi an ideal platform for synthetic biology. In this chapter a detailed description is provided of how to heterologously express any fungal secondary metabolite gene(s) in a well-developed host strain of Aspergillus nidulans. It covers all the necessary steps from identifying a gene(s) of interest to culturing mutant strains to produce secondary metabolites.

  10. Construction of a metagenomic DNA library of sponge symbionts and screening of antibacterial metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juan; Zhu, Tianjiao; Li, Dehai; Cui, Chengbin; Fang, Yuchun; Liu, Hongbing; Liu, Peipei; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Weiming

    2006-04-01

    To study the bioactive metabolites produced by sponge-derived uncultured symbionts, a metagenomic DNA library of the symbionts of sponge Gelliodes gracilis was constructed. The average size of DNA inserts in the library was 20 kb. This library was screened for antibiotic activity using paper dise assaying. Two clones displayed the antibacterial activity against Micrococcus tetragenus. The metabolites of these two clones were analyzed through HPLC. The result showed that their metabolites were quite different from those of the host E. coli DH5α and the host containing vector pHZ132. This study may present a new approach to exploring bioactive metabolites of sponge symbionts.

  11. A correlation between antioxidant activity and metabolite release during the blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Jung Nam; Ku, Kang Mo; Kang, Daejung; Kim, Jong Sang; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS)-based metabolite profiling was applied to elucidate the correlation between metabolite release and antioxidant activity during water blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (CC). Some major metabolites showing differences between fresh CC and blanched CC (BCC) were selected by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) loading plots, and were identified as dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQA), succinoyl-DCQA, and acetylmycosinol. By PLS regression analysis of the correlation between antioxidant components and effects, candidate antioxidative metabolites were predicted due to strong positive correlations with DCQA and succinoyl-DCQA, and by a relatively weak positive correlation with acetylmycosinol.

  12. Heterologous Expression of Fungal Secondary Metabolite Pathways in the Aspergillus nidulans Host System.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J W A; Wang, C C C

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous expression of fungal secondary metabolite genes allows for the product formation of otherwise silent secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways. It also allows facile expression of mutants or combinations of genes not found in nature. This capability makes model fungi an ideal platform for synthetic biology. In this chapter a detailed description is provided of how to heterologously express any fungal secondary metabolite gene(s) in a well-developed host strain of Aspergillus nidulans. It covers all the necessary steps from identifying a gene(s) of interest to culturing mutant strains to produce secondary metabolites. PMID:27417927

  13. Cytotoxic Cytochalasins and Other Metabolites from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a Fungal Endophyte of Spanish Moss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Bashyal, Bharat P; Liu, Mangping X; Espinosa-Artiles, Patricia; U'Ren, Jana M; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-10-01

    Two new metabolites, 6-oxo-12-norcytochalasin D (1) and 4,5-di-isobutyl-2(1H)-pyrimidinone (2), together with seven known metabolites, cytochalasins D (3), Q (4), and N (5), 12-hydroxyzygosporin G (6), heptelidic acid chlorohydrin (7), (+)-heptelidic acid (8), and trichoderonic acid A (9), were isolated from Xylariaceae sp. FL0390, a fungal endophyte inhabiting Spanish moss, Tillandsia usneoides. Metabolite 1 is the first example of a 12-norcytochalasin. All metabolites, except 2 and 9, showed cytotoxic activity in a panel of five human tumor cell lines with IC50S of 0.2-5.0 μM. PMID:26669096

  14. Bile metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in European eels Anguilla anguilla from United Kingdom estuaries.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, P J; Bird, D J; McEvoy, J; Peters, L D

    2003-01-01

    A total of 94 European eels (Anguilla anguilla) were collected from five estuaries in the UK. The deconjugated metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the bile of the eels were separated using HPLC. Six PAH metabolites were identified: 1-hydroxy (1-OH) metabolites of phenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene; and the 1-OH, 3-OH and 7,8 dihydrodiol metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The mean concentration of the six metabolites was greatest in eels from the Tyne (49 microM) followed by the Wear (33 microM), Tees (19 microM), Thames (4 microM) and Severn (2 microM) estuaries. Although 1-OH pyrene was always the dominant compound, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between sites and between estuaries for some metabolites. Normalising the molar concentration of the bile metabolites to the bile biliverdin absorbance reduced sample variation. When the metabolites identified were each expressed as a percentage of the total detected, the metabolite profile was characteristic for each estuary.

  15. Isolation and identification of two hydroxylated metabolites of phenazopyridine in rat urine.

    PubMed

    Pitrè, D; Maffei-Facino, R

    1977-06-01

    Together with the metabolites arised from the reductive cleavage of the azo linkage, two hydroxylated metabolites of phenazopyridine (2,6-diamino-3-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]pyridine and and 2,6-diamino-3-[(2-hydroxyphenyl)azo]pyridine) were identified in rat urine, after the administration of 50 mg/kg of the drug. The structures of these metabolites were elucidated, after TLC separation, by means of I.R., N.M.R. and mass spectrometry. The presence of two hydroxylated metabolites of the intact drug support evidence that phenazopyridine is also subjected in vivo to oxidative metabolism.

  16. Monitoring of urinary metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 in legal cases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moonhee; Yang, Wonkyung; Choi, Hyeyoung; Chang, Hyejin; Lee, Sooyeun; Kim, Eunmi; Chung, Heesun

    2013-09-10

    Due to their cannabis-like effects, synthetic cannabinoids have attracted much public attention since 2008. Thus, elucidation of the metabolic pattern and the detection of the intake of these drugs have been of major concern. In order to suggest appropriate urinary biomarkers to prove JWH-018 or JWH-073 intake, we selected the major metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073, namely (ω)-, (ω-1)-hydroxy, carboxy and 6-hydroxyindole metabolites, and validated a method for the quantification of these metabolites using solid-phase extraction based on LC-MS/MS analysis. Authentic urine specimens obtained from drug offenders were screened via a synthetic cannabinoid ELISA kit and were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for confirmation. Twenty-one out of a total of 52 samples (40%) were found positive for at least one metabolite of JWH-018 or JWH-073. N-pentyl hydroxy metabolites of JWH-018 and carboxy metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 were detected in all positive samples. However, the rest of the metabolites were either not detected or only a small amount of them were found. A considerable variation was observed in the concentration ratio of (ω) and (ω-1)-hydroxy metabolites of JWH-018. Based on the results, it may have some pitfalls to determine the ingestion of specific synthetic cannabinoids by detecting a few metabolites, considering the continuous emergence of structurally related synthetic cannabinoids. Thus, use of synthetic cannabinoids should be proven carefully through comprehensive investigation of analytical results of biological specimens.

  17. Determination of AM-2201 metabolites in urine and comparison with JWH-018 abuse.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moonhee; Yang, Wonkyung; Shin, Ilchung; Choi, Hyeyoung; Chang, Hyejin; Kim, Eunmi

    2014-03-01

    With respect to the continuous emergence of new synthetic cannabinoids on the market since 2008, evaluation of the metabolism of these compounds and the development of analytical methods for the detection of these drugs including their respective metabolites in biological fluids have become essential. Other than JWH-018 or JWH-073, AM-2201 is one of the frequently identified synthetic cannabinoids in Korea. Recently, in our laboratory, several JWH-018 metabolites have been detected in some urine samples obtained from subjects who were arrested for the possession of herbal mixtures containing only AM-2201 or from those who confessed AM-2201 abuse. In the present study, we identified major urinary metabolites of AM-2201 and several metabolites of JWH-018, i.e., N-5-hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites from rats administered AM-2201 and found that the metabolic profile in rats was similar to those in human subjects in this study. Analytical results of the urine samples from suspects who had a considerable possibility of AM-2201 or JWH-018 intake were also compared to distinguish between AM-2201 and JWH-018 abuse. The presence of 6-indole hydroxylated metabolites of each drug and N-4-hydroxy metabolite of AM-2201 was found to contribute to the decisive differences in the metabolic patterns of the two drugs. In addition, the concentration ratio of the N-(5-hydroxypentyl) metabolite to the N-(4-hydroxypentyl) metabolite of JWH-018 may be used as a criterion to differentiate between AM-2201 and JWH-018 abuse.

  18. Analysis of cocaine and metabolites in hair: validation and application of measurement of hydroxycocaine metabolites as evidence of cocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Michael; Cheng, Chen-Chih; Chao, Oscar; Hill, Virginia; Matsui, Paul

    2016-03-01

    An LC/MS/MS method to identify and quantitate in hair the minor metabolites of cocaine-meta-, para-, and ortho-hydroxy cocaine-was developed and validated. Analysis was performed on a triple quadrupole ABSciex API 3000 MS equipped with an atmospheric pressure ionization source via an IonSpray (ESI). For LC, a series 200 micro binary pump with a Perkin Elmer Model 200 autosampler was used. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 ng/10 mg hair, with linearity from 0.02 to 10 ng/10 mg hair. Concentrations of the para isomer in extensively washed hair samples were in the range of 1-2 % of the cocaine in the sample, while the concentrations of the ortho form were considerably less. The method was used to analyze large numbers of samples from two populations: workplace and criminal justice. In vitro experiments to determine if deodorants or peroxide-containing cosmetic treatments could result in the presence of these metabolites in hair showed that this does not occur with extensively washed hair. Presence of hydroxycocaines, when detected after aggressive washing of the hair samples, provides a valuable additional indicator of ingestion of cocaine rather than mere environmental exposure.

  19. Analysis of cocaine and metabolites in hair: validation and application of measurement of hydroxycocaine metabolites as evidence of cocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Michael; Cheng, Chen-Chih; Chao, Oscar; Hill, Virginia; Matsui, Paul

    2016-03-01

    An LC/MS/MS method to identify and quantitate in hair the minor metabolites of cocaine-meta-, para-, and ortho-hydroxy cocaine-was developed and validated. Analysis was performed on a triple quadrupole ABSciex API 3000 MS equipped with an atmospheric pressure ionization source via an IonSpray (ESI). For LC, a series 200 micro binary pump with a Perkin Elmer Model 200 autosampler was used. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 ng/10 mg hair, with linearity from 0.02 to 10 ng/10 mg hair. Concentrations of the para isomer in extensively washed hair samples were in the range of 1-2 % of the cocaine in the sample, while the concentrations of the ortho form were considerably less. The method was used to analyze large numbers of samples from two populations: workplace and criminal justice. In vitro experiments to determine if deodorants or peroxide-containing cosmetic treatments could result in the presence of these metabolites in hair showed that this does not occur with extensively washed hair. Presence of hydroxycocaines, when detected after aggressive washing of the hair samples, provides a valuable additional indicator of ingestion of cocaine rather than mere environmental exposure. PMID:26873203

  20. Determination of XLR-11 and its metabolites in hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Yeon, Seonghoon; Lee, Jaesin; In, Sangwhan

    2015-10-10

    Analysis of drugs in hair is often used as a routine method to obtain detailed information about drug ingestion. However, few studies have been conducted on disposition of synthetic cannabinoids including cyclopropylindoles (UR-144 and XLR-11) and their metabolites in hair. XLR-11 has been widely abused in South Korea recently. Identification of metabolites in hair can be an important proof of synthetic cannabinoids use because it can exclude the possibility of passive smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative analytical method of XLR-11 and its metabolites (UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite and XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite) in hair by liquid chromatography with ESI-MS/MS. The target analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were evaporated, filtered and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in positive-ionization mode. JWH-018-d9 and JWH-018 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite-d5 were used as internal standards. Chromatographic separation was completed within 15 min. No interferences were detected in 10 blank hair samples. In intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy study, CV (%) and bias (%) were below 12. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1∼2 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.2-2 pg/mg, respectively. The validation results proved that the method was selective, accurate and precise with acceptable linearity within calibration range. No significant variation was observed by different sources of matrices. This method was applied to hair samples from 14 individual suspects of XLR-11 use. In this result, XLR-11, UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite, XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite were detected. The concentration of XLR-11 as a parent drug was much higher than other metabolites. UR-144 N-5-hydroxy metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid

  1. New hydroxylated metabolites of 4-monochlorobiphenyl in whole poplar plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two new monohydroxy metabolites of 4-monochlorobiphenyl (CB3) were positively identified using three newly synthesized monohydroxy compounds of CB3: 2-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (2OH-CB3), 3-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (3OH-CB3) and 4-hydroxy-3-chlorobiphenyl (4OH-CB2). New metabolites of CB3, including 2OH-CB3 and 3OH-CB3, were confirmed in whole poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34), a model plant in the application of phytoremediation. Furthermore, the concentrations and masses of 2OH-CB3 and 3OH-CB3 formed in various tissues of whole poplar plants and controls were measured. Results showed that 2OH-CB3 was the major product in these two OH-CB3s with chlorine and hydroxyl moieties in the same phenyl ring of CB3. Masses of 2OH-CB3 and 3OH-CB3 in tissues of whole poplar plants were much higher than those in the hydroponic solution, strongly indicating that the poplar plant itself metabolizes CB3 to both 2OH-CB3 and 3OH-CB3. The total yield of 2OH-CB3 and 3OH-CB3, with chlorine and hydroxyl in the same phenyl ring of CB3, was less than that of three previously found OH-CB3s with chlorine and hydroxyl in the opposite phenyl rings of CB3 (2'OH-CB3, 3'OH-CB3, and 4'OH-CB3). Finally, these two newly detected OH-CB3s from CB3 in this work also suggests that the metabolic pathway was via epoxide intermediates. These five OH-CB3s clearly showed the complete metabolism profile from CB3 to monohydroxylated CB3. More importantly, it's the first report and confirmation of 2OH-CB3 and 3OH-CB3 (new metabolites of CB3) in a living organism. PMID:22185578

  2. Metabolic Profiling and Antioxidant Assay of Metabolites from Three Radish Cultivars (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Ha; Baskar, Thanislas Bastin; Park, Soo-Yun; Kim, Sun-Ju; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Kim, Jae Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-28

    A total of 13 anthocyanins and 33 metabolites; including organic acids, phenolic acids, amino acids, organic compounds, sugar acids, sugar alcohols, and sugars, were profiled in three radish cultivars by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS)-based metabolite profiling. Total phenolics and flavonoids and their in vitro antioxidant activities were assessed. Pelargonidins were found to be the major anthocyanin in the cultivars studied. The cultivar Man Tang Hong showed the highest level of anthocyanins (1.89 ± 0.07 mg/g), phenolics (0.0664 ± 0.0033 mg/g) and flavonoids (0.0096 ± 0.0004 mg/g). Here; the variation of secondary metabolites in the radishes is described, as well as their association with primary metabolites. The low-molecular-weight hydrophilic metabolite profiles were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), Pearson's correlation analysis. PCA fully distinguished the three radish cultivars tested. The polar metabolites were strongly correlated between metabolites that participate in the TCA cycle. The chemometrics results revealed that TCA cycle intermediates and free phenolic acids as well as anthocyanins were higher in the cultivar Man Tang Hong than in the others. Furthermore; superoxide radical scavenging activities and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging were investigated to elucidate the antioxidant activity of secondary metabolites in the cultivars. Man Tang Hong showed the highest superoxide radical scavenging activity (68.87%) at 1000 μg/mL, and DPPH activity (20.78%), followed by Seo Ho and then Hong Feng No. 1. The results demonstrate that GC-TOFMS-based metabolite profiling, integrated with chemometrics, is an applicable method for distinguishing phenotypic variation and determining biochemical reactions connecting primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore; this study might provide

  3. Assessment of a micropatterned hepatocyte coculture system to generate major human excretory and circulating drug metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendy WeiWei; Khetani, Salman R; Krzyzewski, Stacy; Duignan, David B; Obach, R Scott

    2010-10-01

    Metabolism is one of the important determinants of the overall disposition of drugs, and the profile of metabolites can have an impact on efficacy and safety. Predicting which drug metabolites will be quantitatively predominant in humans has become increasingly important in the research and development of new drugs. In this study, a novel micropatterned hepatocyte coculture system was evaluated for its ability to generate human in vivo metabolites. Twenty-seven compounds of diverse chemical structure and subject to a range of drug biotransformation reactions were assessed for metabolite profiles in the micropatterned coculture system using pooled cryopreserved human hepatocytes. The ability of this system to generate metabolites that are >10% of dose in excreta or >10% of total drug-related material in circulation was assessed and compared to previously reported data obtained in human hepatocyte suspensions, liver S-9 fraction, and liver microsomes. The micropatterned coculture system was incubated for up to 7 days without a change in medium, which offered an ability to generate metabolites for slowly metabolized compounds. The micropatterned coculture system generated 82% of the excretory metabolites that exceed 10% of dose and 75% of the circulating metabolites that exceed 10% of total circulating drug-related material, exceeds the performance of hepatocyte suspension incubations and other in vitro systems. Phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites were generated, as well as metabolites that arise via two or more sequential reactions. These results suggest that this in vitro system offers the highest performance among in vitro metabolism systems to predict major human in vivo metabolites.

  4. Systems Genetic Validation of the SNP-Metabolite Association in Rice Via Metabolite-Pathway-Based Phenome-Wide Association Scans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaping; Liu, Yemao; Niu, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingyong; Hu, Xuehai; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xia, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    In the post-GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Scan) era, the interpretation of GWAS results is crucial to screen for highly relevant phenotype-genotype association pairs. Based on the single genotype-phenotype association test and a pathway enrichment analysis, we propose a Metabolite-pathway-based Phenome-Wide Association Scan (M-PheWAS) to analyze the key metabolite-SNP pairs in rice and determine the regulatory relationship by assessing similarities in the changes of enzymes and downstream products in a pathway. Two SNPs, sf0315305925 and sf0315308337, were selected using this approach, and their molecular function and regulatory relationship with Enzyme EC:5.5.1.6 and with flavonoids, a significant downstream regulatory metabolite product, were demonstrated. Moreover, a total of 105 crucial SNPs were screened using M-PheWAS, which may be important for metabolite associations. PMID:26640468

  5. Systems Genetic Validation of the SNP-Metabolite Association in Rice Via Metabolite-Pathway-Based Phenome-Wide Association Scans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Liu, Yemao; Niu, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingyong; Hu, Xuehai; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xia, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    In the post-GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Scan) era, the interpretation of GWAS results is crucial to screen for highly relevant phenotype-genotype association pairs. Based on the single genotype-phenotype association test and a pathway enrichment analysis, we propose a Metabolite-pathway-based Phenome-Wide Association Scan (M-PheWAS) to analyze the key metabolite-SNP pairs in rice and determine the regulatory relationship by assessing similarities in the changes of enzymes and downstream products in a pathway. Two SNPs, sf0315305925 and sf0315308337, were selected using this approach, and their molecular function and regulatory relationship with Enzyme EC:5.5.1.6 and with flavonoids, a significant downstream regulatory metabolite product, were demonstrated. Moreover, a total of 105 crucial SNPs were screened using M-PheWAS, which may be important for metabolite associations.

  6. Pentylindole/Pentylindazole Synthetic Cannabinoids and Their 5-Fluoro Analogs Produce Different Primary Metabolites: Metabolite Profiling for AB-PINACA and 5F-AB-PINACA.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Castaneto, Marisol S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Whereas non-fluoropentylindole/indazole synthetic cannabinoids appear to be metabolized preferably at the pentyl chain though without clear preference for one specific position, their 5-fluoro analogs' major metabolites usually are 5-hydroxypentyl and pentanoic acid metabolites. We determined metabolic stability and metabolites of N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-PINACA) and 5-fluoro-AB-PINACA (5F-AB-PINACA), two new synthetic cannabinoids, and investigated if results were similar. In silico prediction was performed with MetaSite (Molecular Discovery). For metabolic stability, 1 μmol/L of each compound was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h, and for metabolite profiling, 10 μmol/L was incubated with pooled human hepatocytes for up to 3 h. Also, authentic urine specimens from AB-PINACA cases were hydrolyzed and extracted. All samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry on a TripleTOF 5600+ (AB SCIEX) with gradient elution (0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile). High-resolution full-scan mass spectrometry (MS) and information-dependent acquisition MS/MS data were analyzed with MetabolitePilot (AB SCIEX) using different data processing algorithms. Both drugs had intermediate clearance. We identified 23 AB-PINACA metabolites, generated by carboxamide hydrolysis, hydroxylation, ketone formation, carboxylation, epoxide formation with subsequent hydrolysis, or reaction combinations. We identified 18 5F-AB-PINACA metabolites, generated by the same biotransformations and oxidative defluorination producing 5-hydroxypentyl and pentanoic acid metabolites shared with AB-PINACA. Authentic urine specimens documented presence of these metabolites. AB-PINACA and 5F-AB-PINACA produced suggested metabolite patterns. AB-PINACA was predominantly hydrolyzed to AB-PINACA carboxylic acid, carbonyl-AB-PINACA, and hydroxypentyl AB-PINACA, likely in 4-position. The most intense 5F

  7. Alternate energy dissipation? Phenolic metabolites and the xanthophyll cycle.

    PubMed

    Close, Dugald C; Beadle, Chris L

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of phenolic galloylglucoses (di-, tri-, tetra- and penta-galloylglucose), flavonoids (quercitin and quercitin glycosides) and sideroxylonal were compared with that of xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation during rapid induction of chilling-dependent photo-inhibition. Pre-dawn xanthophyll cycle engagement of seedlings of Eucalyptus nitens transferred from mild nursery conditions to a low temperature controlled environment increased logarithmically during eight days of treatment. Photochemical efficiency and flavonoids decreased after four days of treatment and non-photochemical quenching after two days of treatment. Galloylglucoses and sideroxylonal decreased linearly during treatment. These results demonstrate that rapid changes in foliar phenolic levels are associated with abrupt changes in the plant environment. It is argued that under these growth-chamber conditions, the xanthophyll cycle facilitated dissipation of excess light energy, lessening the requirement for the dissipation of energy or antioxidant activity through phenolic metabolites.

  8. Molluscicidal metabolites from an assemblage of Palmyra Atoll cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alban R; Etzbach, Lena; Engene, Niclas; Müller, Rolf; Gerwick, William H

    2011-05-27

    Molluscicides can play an important role in the control of schistosomiasis because snails of the genus Biomphalaria act as intermediate hosts for the parasite. Schistosomiasis is one of 13 neglected tropical diseases with high morbidity and mortality that collectively affect one billion of the world's poorest population, mainly in developing countries. Thiopalmyrone (1) and palmyrrolinone (2), metabolites isolated from extracts of a Palmyra Atoll environmental assemblage of two cyanobacteria, cf. Oscillatoria and Hormoscilla spp., represent new and potent molluscicidal chemotypes against Biomphalaria glabrata (LC50=8.3 and 6.0 μM, respectively). A slight enhancement in molluscicidal effect (LC50=5.0 μM) was observed when these two natural products were utilized as an equimolar binary mixture.

  9. Serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine metabolites in transcendental meditation-technique.

    PubMed

    Bujatti, M; Riederer, P

    1976-01-01

    The highly significant increase of 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid) in Transcendental Meditation technique suggests systemic serotonin as "rest and fulfillment hormone" of deactivation-relaxation. Furthermore 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) is considered to be the EC-cell (enterochromaffine-cell) hormone requested by Fujita and Kobayashi and its role for EEG synchronisation via area postrema chemoreceptor as anti arousal agent is being discussed. The significant decrease of the catecholamine metabolite VMA (vanillic-mandelic acid) in meditators, that is associated with a reciprocal increase of 5-HIAA supports as a feedback necessity the "rest and fulfillment response" versus "fight and flight". As the adreno medullary tissue serves for hormonal reinforcement of orthosympathetic activity, the Enterochromaffine Cell System (having taken the form of distinct organs in some species as octopus and discoglossus) is suggested to serve via serotonin for humoral reinforcement of parasympathetic activity in deep relaxation.

  10. New Benzoxazine Secondary Metabolites from an Arctic Actinomycete

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyuho; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Shin, Yoonho; Won, Tae Hyung; Ko, Keebeom; Lee, Sang Kook; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Nam, Seung-Il; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Two new secondary metabolites, arcticoside (1) and C-1027 chromophore-V (2), were isolated along with C-1027 chromophore-III and fijiolides A and B (3–5) from a culture of an Arctic marine actinomycete Streptomyces strain. The chemical structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated through NMR, mass, UV, and IR spectroscopy. The hexose moieties in 1 were determined to be d-glucose from a combination of acid hydrolysis, derivatization, and gas chromatographic analyses. Arcticoside (1) and C-1027 chromophore-V (2), which have a benzoxazine ring, inhibited Candida albicans isocitrate lyase. Chromophore-V (2) exhibited significant cytotoxicity against breast carcinoma MDA-MB231 cells and colorectal carcinoma cells (line HCT-116), with IC50 values of 0.9 and 2.7 μM, respectively. PMID:24796308

  11. Fungal naphtho-γ-pyrones--secondary metabolites of industrial interest.

    PubMed

    Choque, Elodie; El Rayess, Youssef; Raynal, José; Mathieu, Florence

    2015-02-01

    Naphtho-γ-pyrones (NGPs) are secondary metabolites mainly produced by filamentous fungi (Fusarium sp., Aspergillus sp.) that should be considered by industrials. Indeed, these natural biomolecules show various biological activities: anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, anti-HIV, anti-hyperuricuric, anti-tubercular, or mammalian triacylglycerol synthesis inhibition which could be useful for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and/or food industries. In this review, we draw an overview on the interest in studying fungal NGPs by presenting their biological activities and their potential values for industrials, their biochemical properties, and what is currently known on their biosynthetic pathway. Finally, we will present what remains to be discovered about NGPs.

  12. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality.

  13. [Secondary fungal metabolites (mycotoxins) in lichens of different taxonomic groups].

    PubMed

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P

    2014-01-01

    Secondary fungal metabolites (mycotoxins) in 22 lichen species of the families Parmeliaceae, Nephromataceae, Umbilicariaceae, Ramalinaceae, Cladoniaceae, Peltigeraceae, and Teloschistaceae were identified determined by enzyme immunoassay enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The following mycotoxins were identified found in these lichens in a broad concentration range with a frequency of 70-100%: sterigmatocystin (7-2090 ng/g), alternariol (20-6460 ng/g), and emodin (45-94500 ng/g). Mycophenolic acid frequently occurred in 19 lichen species; citrinin, in 17 species; diacetoxyscirpenol, in 11 species; cyclopiazonic acid, in 10 species; and zearalenone, in 9 species. PR toxin was regularly detected in three lichen species; deoxynivalenol, fumonisins, and ochratoxin A, in two species; and T-2 toxin and ergot alkaloids, in one species. Aflatoxin B1 was detected in only six species with a frequency of 2-42%, whereas roridin A was identified present in 10% of Hypogymnia physodes samples.

  14. An atlas of genetic influences on human blood metabolites.

    PubMed

    Shin, So-Youn; Fauman, Eric B; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Krumsiek, Jan; Santos, Rita; Huang, Jie; Arnold, Matthias; Erte, Idil; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Yang, Tsun-Po; Walter, Klaudia; Menni, Cristina; Chen, Lu; Vasquez, Louella; Valdes, Ana M; Hyde, Craig L; Wang, Vicky; Ziemek, Daniel; Roberts, Phoebe; Xi, Li; Grundberg, Elin; Waldenberger, Melanie; Richards, J Brent; Mohney, Robert P; Milburn, Michael V; John, Sally L; Trimmer, Jeff; Theis, Fabian J; Overington, John P; Suhre, Karsten; Brosnan, M Julia; Gieger, Christian; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Spector, Tim D; Soranzo, Nicole

    2014-06-01

    Genome-wide association scans with high-throughput metabolic profiling provide unprecedented insights into how genetic variation influences metabolism and complex disease. Here we report the most comprehensive exploration of genetic loci influencing human metabolism thus far, comprising 7,824 adult individuals from 2 European population studies. We report genome-wide significant associations at 145 metabolic loci and their biochemical connectivity with more than 400 metabolites in human blood. We extensively characterize the resulting in vivo blueprint of metabolism in human blood by integrating it with information on gene expression, heritability and overlap with known loci for complex disorders, inborn errors of metabolism and pharmacological targets. We further developed a database and web-based resources for data mining and results visualization. Our findings provide new insights into the role of inherited variation in blood metabolic diversity and identify potential new opportunities for drug development and for understanding disease.

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy may hold promise in studying metabolites, tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-24

    Almost 15 years ago, in a basement at Chicago's University of Illinois Medical Center, Michael Barany, MD, PhD, measured phosphorus metabolites in an intact frog muscle using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Prior to that, chemists used spectroscopy solely to analyze the contents of test tubes. Only a British group preceded Barany in proving that it would work in tissue as well. Today, he does spectroscopy clinically, one day a week, at the Greenberg Radiology Institute in Highland Park, IL, north of Chicago. Barany says that he can distinguish malignant from benign tumors in the living brain. The tool he uses is a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. While MRI capabilities have forged ahead, human MRS has been awaiting improvements in magnet and computer technology. Barany is one of a number of researchers who, since the early 1980s, have been developing MRS technology and techniques so that it can be done in the human body.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative mass spectrometry imaging of drugs and metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Lietz, Christopher B.; Gemperline, Erin; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has rapidly increased its presence in the pharmaceutical sciences. While quantitative whole-body autoradiography and microautoradiography are the traditional techniques for molecular imaging of drug delivery and metabolism, MSI provides advantageous specificity that can distinguish the parent drug from metabolites and modified endogenous molecules. This review begins with the fundamentals of MSI sample preparation/ionization, and then moves on to both qualitative and quantitative applications with special emphasis on drug discovery and delivery. Cutting-edge investigations on sub-cellular imaging and endogenous signaling peptides are also highlighted, followed by perspectives on emerging technology and the path for MSI to become a routine analysis technique. PMID:23603211

  17. Depsides: Lichen Metabolites Active against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thi Huyen; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Lalli, Claudia; Boustie, Joël; Samson, Michel

    2015-01-01

    A thorough phytochemical study of Stereocaulon evolutum was conducted, for the isolation of structurally related atranorin derivatives. Indeed, pilot experiments suggested that atranorin (1), the main metabolite of this lichen, would interfere with the lifecycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Eight compounds, including one reported for the first time (2), were isolated and characterized. Two analogs (5, 6) were also synthesized, to enlarge the panel of atranorin-related structures. Most of these compounds were active against HCV, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of about 10 to 70 µM, with depsides more potent than monoaromatic phenols. The most effective inhibitors (1, 5 and 6) were then added at different steps of the HCV lifecycle. Interestingly, atranorin (1), bearing an aldehyde function at C-3, inhibited only viral entry, whereas the synthetic compounds 5 and 6, bearing a hydroxymethyl and a methyl function, respectively, at C-3 interfered with viral replication. PMID:25793970

  18. Monitoring microbial metabolites using an inductively coupled resonance circuit

    PubMed Central

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Baraban, Larysa; Ye, Dan; Uguz, Ilke; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Makarov, Denys

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to monitor microbial population dynamics in emulsion droplets via changes in metabolite composition, using an inductively coupled LC resonance circuit. The signal measured by such resonance detector provides information on the magnetic field interaction with the bacterial culture, which is complementary to the information accessible by other detection means, based on electric field interaction, i.e. capacitive or resistive, as well as optical techniques. Several charge-related factors, including pH and ammonia concentrations, were identified as possible contributors to the characteristic of resonance detector profile. The setup enables probing the ionic byproducts of microbial metabolic activity at later stages of cell growth, where conventional optical detection methods have no discriminating power. PMID:26264183

  19. β-hydroxybutyrate: Much more than a metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) is a convenient carrier of energy from adipocytes to peripheral tissues during fasting or exercise. However, βOHB is more than just a metabolite, having important cellular signaling roles as well. βOHB is an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a ligand for at least two cell surface receptors. In addition, the downstream products of βOHB metabolism including acetyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) themselves have signaling activities. These regulatory functions of βOHB serve to link the outside environment to cellular function and gene expression, and have important implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. PMID:25193333

  20. SMURF: genomic mapping of fungal secondary metabolite clusters

    PubMed Central

    Khaldi, Nora; Seifuddin, Fayaz T.; Turner, Geoff; Haft, Daniel; Nierman, William C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Fedorova, Natalie D.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi produce an impressive array of secondary metabolites (SMs) including mycotoxins, antibiotics and pharmaceuticals. The genes responsible for their biosynthesis, export, and transcriptional regulation are often found in contiguous gene clusters. To facilitate annotation of these clusters in sequenced fungal genomes, we developed the web-based software SMURF (www.jcvi.org/smurf/) to systematically predict clustered SM genes based on their genomic context and domain content. We applied SMURF to catalog putative clusters in 27 publicly available fungal genomes. Comparison with genetically characterized clusters from six fungal species showed that SMURF accurately recovered all clusters and detected additional potential clusters. Subsequent comparative analysis revealed the striking biosynthetic capacity and variability of the fungal SM pathways and the correlation between unicellularity and the absence of SMs. Further genetics studies are needed to experimentally confirm these clusters. PMID:20554054

  1. Depsides: lichen metabolites active against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thi Huyen; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Lalli, Claudia; Boustie, Joël; Samson, Michel; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Le Seyec, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    A thorough phytochemical study of Stereocaulon evolutum was conducted, for the isolation of structurally related atranorin derivatives. Indeed, pilot experiments suggested that atranorin (1), the main metabolite of this lichen, would interfere with the lifecycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Eight compounds, including one reported for the first time (2), were isolated and characterized. Two analogs (5, 6) were also synthesized, to enlarge the panel of atranorin-related structures. Most of these compounds were active against HCV, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of about 10 to 70 µM, with depsides more potent than monoaromatic phenols. The most effective inhibitors (1, 5 and 6) were then added at different steps of the HCV lifecycle. Interestingly, atranorin (1), bearing an aldehyde function at C-3, inhibited only viral entry, whereas the synthetic compounds 5 and 6, bearing a hydroxymethyl and a methyl function, respectively, at C-3 interfered with viral replication. PMID:25793970

  2. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality. PMID:8685288

  3. Cocaine and metabolites in waste and surface water across Belgium.

    PubMed

    van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Pecceu, Bert; Theunis, Laetitia; Dubois, Nathalie; Charlier, Corinne; Jorens, Philippe G; Bervoets, Lieven; Blust, Ronny; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine abuse, a growing social problem, is currently estimated from population surveys, consumer interviews and crime statistics. A new approach based on the analysis of cocaine (COC) and metabolites, benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester (EME), in water samples was applied to 28 rivers and 37 waste water treatment plants in Belgium using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. While EME was undetectable, COC and BE were detectable with concentrations ranging from <1 to 753 ng/L and <1 to 2258 ng/L, respectively. BE concentrations were employed to calculate the local amount of abused cocaine. The highest values (up to 1.8 g/day cocaine per 1000 inhabitants) were found in large cities and during weekends. The estimation of cocaine abuse through water analysis can be executed on regular basis without cooperation of patients. It also gives clear geographical information, while prevention campaigns can easily be implemented and evaluated.

  4. Monitoring microbial metabolites using an inductively coupled resonance circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Baraban, Larysa; Ye, Dan; Uguz, Ilke; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Makarov, Denys

    2015-08-01

    We present a new approach to monitor microbial population dynamics in emulsion droplets via changes in metabolite composition, using an inductively coupled LC resonance circuit. The signal measured by such resonance detector provides information on the magnetic field interaction with the bacterial culture, which is complementary to the information accessible by other detection means, based on electric field interaction, i.e. capacitive or resistive, as well as optical techniques. Several charge-related factors, including pH and ammonia concentrations, were identified as possible contributors to the characteristic of resonance detector profile. The setup enables probing the ionic byproducts of microbial metabolic activity at later stages of cell growth, where conventional optical detection methods have no discriminating power.

  5. Metabolite Profiling of Italian Tomato Landraces with Different Fruit Types.

    PubMed

    Baldina, Svetlana; Picarella, Maurizio E; Troise, Antonio D; Pucci, Anna; Ruggieri, Valentino; Ferracane, Rosalia; Barone, Amalia; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Mazzucato, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Increased interest toward traditional tomato varieties is fueled by the need to rescue desirable organoleptic traits and to improve the quality of fresh and processed tomatoes in the market. In addition, the phenotypic and genetic variation preserved in tomato landraces represents a means to understand the genetic basis of traits related to health and organoleptic aspects and improve them in modern varieties. To establish a framework for this approach, we studied the content of several metabolites in a panel of Italian tomato landraces categorized into three broad fruit type classes (flattened/ribbed, pear/oxheart, round/elongate). Three modern hybrids, corresponding to the three fruit shape typologies, were included as reference. Red ripe fruits were morphologically characterized and biochemically analyzed for their content in glycoalkaloids, phenols, amino acids, and Amadori products. The round/elongate types showed a higher content in glycoalkaloids, whereas flattened types had higher levels of phenolic compounds. Flattened tomatoes were also rich in total amino acids and in particular in glutamic acid. Multivariate analysis of amino acid content clearly separated the three classes of fruit types. Making allowance of the very low number of genotypes, phenotype-marker relationships were analyzed after retrieving single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the landraces available in the literature. Sixty-six markers were significantly associated with the studied traits. The positions of several of these SNPs showed correspondence with already described genomic regions and QTLs supporting the reliability of the association. Overall the data indicated that significant changes in quality-related metabolites occur depending on the genetic background in traditional tomato germplasm, frequently according to specific fruit shape categories. Such a variability is suitable to harness association mapping for metabolic quality traits using this germplasm as an experimental

  6. Brain metabolite concentrations across cortical regions in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Jensen, J. Eric; Prescot, Andrew P.; Cohen, Bruce M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Öngür, Dost

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can provide in vivo information about metabolite levels across multiple brain regions. This study used MRS to examine concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity and function, and choline (Cho) which is related to the amount of cell membrane per unit volume, in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parieto-occipital cortex (POC) in healthy individuals. Data were drawn from two experiments which examined glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After controlling for gray matter percentages, NAA/Creatine (Cr) was 18% higher in POC than in ACC (p<0.001); Cho/Cr was 46% lower in POC than in ACC (p<0.001). There was an effect of study (p<0.001 for both metabolites), but no region by study interaction (NAA p=0.101, Cho p=0.850). Since NAA is localized to the intracellular space, these data suggest that ACC neuronal compartment is reduced as compared with POC, or that there is a lower concentration of NAA per cell in the ACC than POC, or both. Since elevated Cho suggests more cell membrane per unit volume, reduced NAA in ACC appears to be coupled with increases in overall cell membrane compartment. These findings are consistent with a number of previous studies using proton MRS which found increasing NAA and decreasing Cho moving caudally, and with post mortem anatomical studies which found neurons in more widely spaced bundles in ACC when compared to parietal and occipital cortices. MRS may be a useful tool for studying physical properties of the living human brain. PMID:21081116

  7. Stereoselective pharmacokinetics of moguisteine metabolites in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bernareggi, A; Crema, A; Carlesi, R M; Castoldi, D; Ratti, E; Renoldi, M I; Ratti, D; Ceserani, R; Tognella, S

    1995-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics of moguisteine, a racemic non-narcotic peripheral antitussive drug, in 12 healthy male subjects after a single oral administration of 200 mg. The unchanged drug was absent in plasma and urine of all subjects. Moguisteine was immediately and completely hydrolyzed to its main active metabolite, the free carboxylic acid M1. Therefore, we evaluated the kinetic profiles of M1, of its enantiomers R(+)-M1 and S(-)-M1, and of M1 sulfoxide optical isomers M2/I and M2/II by conventional and stereospecific HPLC. Maximum plasma concentrations for M1 (2.83 mg/l), M2/I (0.26 mg/l) and M2/II (0.40 mg/l), were respectively reached at 1.3, 1.6 and 1.5 h after moguisteine administration. Plasma concentrations declined after the peak with mean apparent terminal half-lives of 0.65 h (M1), 0.88 h (M2/I) and 0.84 h (M2/II). Most of the administered dose was recovered in urine within 6 h from moguisteine treatment. The systemic and renal clearance values indicated high renal extraction ratio for all moguisteine metabolites, and particularly for M1 sulfoxide optical isomers. Plasma concentration-time profiles and urinary excretion patterns for M1 enantiomers R(+)-M1 and S(-)-M1 were quite similar. Thus, for later moguisteine pharmacokinetic evaluations the investigation of the plasma concentration-time curve and the urinary excretion of the sole racemic M1 through non-stereospecific analytical methods may suffice in most cases. PMID:8983930

  8. Serum Metabolite Biomarkers Discriminate Healthy Smokers from COPD Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuying; Deeb, Ruba S.; Ma, Yuliang; Staudt, Michelle R.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gross, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is defined by a fixed expiratory airflow obstruction associated with disordered airways and alveolar destruction. COPD is caused by cigarette smoking and is the third greatest cause of mortality in the US. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) is the only validated clinical marker of COPD, but it correlates poorly with clinical features and is not sensitive enough to predict the early onset of disease. Using LC/MS global untargeted metabolite profiling of serum samples from a well-defined cohort of healthy smokers (n = 37), COPD smokers (n = 41) and non-smokers (n = 37), we sought to discover serum metabolic markers with known and/or unknown molecular identities that are associated with early-onset COPD. A total of 1,181 distinct molecular ions were detected in 95% of sera from all study subjects and 23 were found to be differentially-expressed in COPD-smokers vs. healthy-smokers. These 23 putative biomarkers were differentially-correlated with lung function parameters and used to generate a COPD prediction model possessing 87.8% sensitivity and 86.5% specificity. In an independent validation set, this model correctly predicted COPD in 8/10 individuals. These serum biomarkers included myoinositol, glycerophopshoinositol, fumarate, cysteinesulfonic acid, a modified version of fibrinogen peptide B (mFBP), and three doubly-charged peptides with undefined sequence that significantly and positively correlate with mFBP levels. Together, elevated levels of serum mFBP and additional disease-associated biomarkers point to a role for chronic inflammation, thrombosis, and oxidative stress in remodeling of the COPD airways. Serum metabolite biomarkers offer a promising and accessible window for recognition of early-stage COPD. PMID:26674646

  9. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy.

  10. CSF concentration gradients of monoamine metabolites in patients with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Wester, P

    1994-01-01

    Concentration gradients of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), were assessed in 762 successive CSF fractions (2 ml lumbar CSF) from 15 patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (AHS) and 11 patients with hydrocephalus of other causes (mixed group). A mean volume of 49.6 (SD 11.8) ml CSF was removed in the AHS group and 56.4 (10.2) ml in the mixed group. The CSF was collected with a specially designed carousel fraction collector and the corresponding CSF dynamics were continuously registered by a constant pressure CSF infusion method. Pronounced gradients in CSF HVA and CSF 5-HIAA were seen in both patient groups in the first 25 ml of CSF removed. The concentration curves levelled off, despite the removal of larger amounts of CSF and stabilised at about twice the initial concentrations. This phenomenon has not been described before. Concentrations of HVA and 5-HIAA in the first CSF fraction correlated strongly with concentrations in fractions up to about 40 ml. A positive correlation between the first fraction of CSF HVA and CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and CSF outflow conductance was found in the AHS group. There was no gradient in MHPG. It is suggested that the rostrocaudal gradients in CSF HVA and 5-HIAA may be explained by a downward flow of CSF along the spinal cord with absorption of metabolites occurring during passage. Mixing of CSF from different CSF compartments, extraventricular production sites of CSF, clearance of metabolites to venous blood or extracellular fluid, and CSF outflow conductance are probably important determinants of the plateau phase in patients with hydrocephalus. It is concluded that lumbar CSF does not exclusively reflect the concentrations of HVA, 5-HIAA, or MHPG in the ventricles. It should be noted that these results obtained in patients with hydrocephalus may not be applicable to other groups of patients or normal subjects. PMID:7522267

  11. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy. PMID:24648381

  12. Enhancement of Plant Metabolite Fingerprinting by Machine Learning1[W

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ian M.; Vermeer, Cornelia P.; Liakata, Maria; Corol, Delia I.; Ward, Jane L.; Lin, Wanchang; Johnson, Helen E.; Whitehead, Lynne; Kular, Baldeep; Baker, John M.; Walsh, Sean; Dave, Anuja; Larson, Tony R.; Graham, Ian A.; Wang, Trevor L.; King, Ross D.; Draper, John; Beale, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolite fingerprinting of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with known or predicted metabolic lesions was performed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, and flow injection electrospray-mass spectrometry. Fingerprinting enabled processing of five times more plants than conventional chromatographic profiling and was competitive for discriminating mutants, other than those affected in only low-abundance metabolites. Despite their rapidity and complexity, fingerprints yielded metabolomic insights (e.g. that effects of single lesions were usually not confined to individual pathways). Among fingerprint techniques, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance discriminated the most mutant phenotypes from the wild type and Fourier transform infrared discriminated the fewest. To maximize information from fingerprints, data analysis was crucial. One-third of distinctive phenotypes might have been overlooked had data models been confined to principal component analysis score plots. Among several methods tested, machine learning (ML) algorithms, namely support vector machine or random forest (RF) classifiers, were unsurpassed for phenotype discrimination. Support vector machines were often the best performing classifiers, but RFs yielded some particularly informative measures. First, RFs estimated margins between mutant phenotypes, whose relations could then be visualized by Sammon mapping or hierarchical clustering. Second, RFs provided importance scores for the features within fingerprints that discriminated mutants. These scores correlated with analysis of variance F values (as did Kruskal-Wallis tests, true- and false-positive measures, mutual information, and the Relief feature selection algorithm). ML classifiers, as models trained on one data set to predict another, were ideal for focused metabolomic queries, such as the distinctiveness and consistency of mutant phenotypes. Accessible software for use of ML in plant physiology is highlighted. PMID

  13. Enteric Microbiome Metabolites Correlate with Response to Simvastatin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Baillie, Rebecca A.; Zhu, Hongjie; Zeng, Zhao-Bang; Wiest, Michelle M.; Nguyen, Uyen Thao; Wojnoonski, Katie; Watkins, Steven M.; Trupp, Miles; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Although statins are widely prescribed medications, there remains considerable variability in therapeutic response. Genetics can explain only part of this variability. Metabolomics is a global biochemical approach that provides powerful tools for mapping pathways implicated in disease and in response to treatment. Metabolomics captures net interactions between genome, microbiome and the environment. In this study, we used a targeted GC-MS metabolomics platform to measure a panel of metabolites within cholesterol synthesis, dietary sterol absorption, and bile acid formation to determine metabolite signatures that may predict variation in statin LDL-C lowering efficacy. Measurements were performed in two subsets of the total study population in the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics (CAP) study: Full Range of Response (FR), and Good and Poor Responders (GPR) were 100 individuals randomly selected from across the entire range of LDL-C responses in CAP. GPR were 48 individuals, 24 each from the top and bottom 10% of the LDL-C response distribution matched for body mass index, race, and gender. We identified three secondary, bacterial-derived bile acids that contribute to predicting the magnitude of statin-induced LDL-C lowering in good responders. Bile acids and statins share transporters in the liver and intestine; we observed that increased plasma concentration of simvastatin positively correlates with higher levels of several secondary bile acids. Genetic analysis of these subjects identified associations between levels of seven bile acids and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs4149056, in the gene encoding the organic anion transporter SLCO1B1. These findings, along with recently published results that the gut microbiome plays an important role in cardiovascular disease, indicate that interactions between genome, gut microbiome and environmental influences should be considered in the study and management of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic profiles could

  14. Haemoglobin binding of a musk xylene metabolite in man.

    PubMed

    Riedel, J; Birner, G; van Dorp, C; Neumann, H G; Dekant, W

    1999-06-01

    1. Musk xylene (1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) is used as a fragrance component in toiletries, detergents and skin care products. Musk xylene is widely distributed in the environment and has been identified as a persistent contaminant in fish and in mothers' milk. Experimental data in man indicate a slow elimination of musk xylene and a potential for accumulation. Nitroarenes may be biotransformed to the respective amines. Some aromatic amines are known to be tumorigenic in animals and in man. Quantitation of the binding of those aromatic amines to haemoglobin has been proposed as a biomarker of internal exposure. 2. To determine bioavailability, metabolic reduction and haemoglobin binding of musk xylene in man, we investigated the presence of musk xylene metabolites bound to haemoglobin in blood samples from rat and from 10 human volunteers not knowingly exposed to musk xylene. 3. Haemoglobin from the blood samples was isolated, and bound metabolites were liberated as amines by alkaline hydrolysis. In haemoglobin samples from all individuals, 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-amino-2,6-dinitrobenzene and, after chemical derivatization, the corresponding N-perfluoropropyl amide were identified by GC/MS using electron-impact and electron-capture mass spectrometry. 4. The amounts of 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-amino-2,6-dinitrobenzene bound to haemoglobin in the human blood samples ranged from 13 to 46 fmol/mg haemoglobin. 5. These data demonstrate that musk xylene is bioavailable in man. The use of haemoglobin binding as a biomarker for nitromusk exposure in the general population warrants further studies.

  15. Metabolite Profiling of Italian Tomato Landraces with Different Fruit Types

    PubMed Central

    Baldina, Svetlana; Picarella, Maurizio E.; Troise, Antonio D.; Pucci, Anna; Ruggieri, Valentino; Ferracane, Rosalia; Barone, Amalia; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Mazzucato, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Increased interest toward traditional tomato varieties is fueled by the need to rescue desirable organoleptic traits and to improve the quality of fresh and processed tomatoes in the market. In addition, the phenotypic and genetic variation preserved in tomato landraces represents a means to understand the genetic basis of traits related to health and organoleptic aspects and improve them in modern varieties. To establish a framework for this approach, we studied the content of several metabolites in a panel of Italian tomato landraces categorized into three broad fruit type classes (flattened/ribbed, pear/oxheart, round/elongate). Three modern hybrids, corresponding to the three fruit shape typologies, were included as reference. Red ripe fruits were morphologically characterized and biochemically analyzed for their content in glycoalkaloids, phenols, amino acids, and Amadori products. The round/elongate types showed a higher content in glycoalkaloids, whereas flattened types had higher levels of phenolic compounds. Flattened tomatoes were also rich in total amino acids and in particular in glutamic acid. Multivariate analysis of amino acid content clearly separated the three classes of fruit types. Making allowance of the very low number of genotypes, phenotype-marker relationships were analyzed after retrieving single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the landraces available in the literature. Sixty-six markers were significantly associated with the studied traits. The positions of several of these SNPs showed correspondence with already described genomic regions and QTLs supporting the reliability of the association. Overall the data indicated that significant changes in quality-related metabolites occur depending on the genetic background in traditional tomato germplasm, frequently according to specific fruit shape categories. Such a variability is suitable to harness association mapping for metabolic quality traits using this germplasm as an experimental

  16. Gut Microbial Fatty Acid Metabolites Reduce Triacylglycerol Levels in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nanthirudjanar, Tharnath; Furumoto, Hidehiro; Zheng, Jiawen; Kim, Young-Il; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo; Park, Si-Bum; Hirata, Akiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxy and oxo fatty acids were recently found to be produced as intermediates during gut microbial fatty acid metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum produces these fatty acids from unsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of these gut microbial fatty acid metabolites on the lipogenesis in liver cells. We screened their effect on sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) expression in HepG2 cells treated with a synthetic liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist (T0901317). The results showed that 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (18:1) (HYA), 10-hydroxy-6(Z),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) (γHYA), 10-oxo-12(Z)-18:1 (KetoA), and 10-oxo-6(Z),12(Z)-18:2 (γKetoA) significantly decreased SREBP-1c mRNA expression induced by T0901317. These fatty acids also downregulated the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes by suppressing LXRα activity and inhibiting SREBP-1 maturation. Oral administration of KetoA, which effectively reduced triacylglycerol accumulation and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) expression in HepG2 cells, for 2 weeks significantly decreased Srebp-1c, Scd-1, and Acc2 expression in the liver of mice fed a high-sucrose diet. Our findings suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of the fatty acid metabolites produced by L. plantarum can be exploited in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or dyslipidemia. PMID:26399511

  17. Differential effects of linoleic Acid metabolites on cardiac sodium current.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Maddison D; Stimers, Joseph R

    2002-10-01

    9,10-Epoxy-12-octadecenoic acid (EOA), a metabolite of linoleic acid, causes cardiac arrest in dogs. Other metabolites of linoleic acid also have toxic effects. This study investigates the mechanism of action of four of these compounds on cardiac Na(+) current (I(Na)). The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the effects of EOA, 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (DHOA), and their corresponding methyl esters (9,10-epoxy-12-octadecenoic methyl ester, EOM; and 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic methyl ester, DHOM) on I(Na) in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. Extracellular application of each compound elicited a concentration-dependent inhibition of I(Na). The dose-response curve yielded 50% inhibition concentrations of 301 +/- 117 microM for DHOA, 41 +/- 6 microM for DHOM, 34 +/- 5 microM for EOA, and 160 +/- 41 microM for EOM. Although there was no effect on activation, 50 microM DHOM, EOA, and EOM significantly hyperpolarized the steady-state inactivation curve by approximately -6 mV. Furthermore, EOM significantly increased the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. These compounds also seemed to stabilize the inactivated state because the time for recovery from inactivation was significantly slowed from a control value of 12.9 +/- 0.5 ms to 30.5 +/- 3.3, 31.4 +/- 1.4, and 20.5 +/- 1.0 ms by 50 microM DHOM, EOA, and EOM, respectively. These compounds have multiple actions on Na(+) channels and that despite their structural similarities their actions differ from each other. The steady-state block of I(Na) suggests that either the pore is being blocked or the channels are prevented from gating to the open state. In addition, these compounds stabilize the inactivated state and promote increased population of a slower inactivated state. PMID:12235270

  18. Update on hydrocodone metabolites in rats and dogs aided with a semi-automatic software for metabolite identification Mass-MetaSite.

    PubMed

    Li, Austin C; Chovan, James P; Yu, Erya; Zamora, Ismael

    2013-04-01

    1. There has been a lack of in vivo metabolite profiling update of hydrocodone since the original report on species differences was published in 1978. As such, the mechanism for its analgesic activity in different species has been ambiguous. To address safety concern from regulatory agencies, hydrocodone metabolite profiles in rats and dogs are updated herein aided by a newly developed software, Mass-MetaSite. 2. Samples collected from rats and dogs dosed orally with hydrocodone were analyzed with reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with LTQ-Orbitrap. The exact mass measurement data collected with data-dependent acquisition methodology were analyzed both traditionally, using Xcalibur Qual Browser and MetWorks, and by Mass-MetaSite. 3. Profiling of hydrocodone metabolites in rat and dog plasma reflected previously reported species differences in circulating metabolites. While hydrocodone mainly underwent O-demethylation and ketone reduction in rats forming hydromorphone and reduced hydromorphone, which were then subsequently cleared via glucuronide conjugation, hydrocodone in dogs was cleared predominantly by N-demethylation and N-oxidation. 4. Given the success ratio of metabolite detection offered by Mass-MetaSite, the software will be able to aid chemists in early identification of drug metabolites from complex biomatrices.

  19. Food Fight: Role of Itaconate and Other Metabolites in Antimicrobial Defense.

    PubMed

    Luan, Harding H; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-09-13

    Itaconate is a newly discovered mammalian metabolite bearing significant implications for our understanding of cellular immunometabolism and antimicrobial defense. Here, we explore recent findings regarding the role of itaconate in the innate immune response and highlight the emerging principle that metabolites can have distinct immunological functions independent of bioenergetics. PMID:27626199

  20. Nobiletin metabolites: synthesis and inhibitory activity against matrix metalloproteinase-9 production.

    PubMed

    Oshitari, Tetsuta; Okuyama, Yuji; Miyata, Yoshiki; Kosano, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideyo; Natsugari, Hideaki

    2011-08-01

    A divergent synthesis of nobiletin metabolites was developed through highly oxygenated acetophenone derivative. We used commercially available methyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate as a starting material for concise preparation of the key intermediate, 2'-hydroxy-3',4',5',6'-tetramethoxyacetophenone (I). These metabolites showed strong inhibitory activity against matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in human lens epithelial cells.

  1. Selective of informative metabolites using random forests based on model population analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Hua; Yan, Jun; Wu, Qing-Hua; Duarte Ferro, Miguel; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Lu, Hong-Mei; Xu, Qing-Song; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2013-12-15

    One of the main goals of metabolomics studies is to discover informative metabolites or biomarkers, which may be used to diagnose diseases and to find out pathology. Sophisticated feature selection approaches are required to extract the information hidden in such complex 'omics' data. In this study, it is proposed a new and robust selective method by combining random forests (RF) with model population analysis (MPA), for selecting informative metabolites from three metabolomic datasets. According to the contribution to the classification accuracy, the metabolites were classified into three kinds: informative, no-informative, and interfering metabolites. Based on the proposed method, some informative metabolites were selected for three datasets; further analyses of these metabolites between healthy and diseased groups were then performed, showing by T-test that the P values for all these selected metabolites were lower than 0.05. Moreover, the informative metabolites identified by the current method were demonstrated to be correlated with the clinical outcome under investigation. The source codes of MPA-RF in Matlab can be freely downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/my-research-list/downloads/list. PMID:24209380

  2. The nuclear receptor PPARγ individually responds to serotonin- and fatty acid-metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Waku, Tsuyoshi; Shiraki, Takuma; Oyama, Takuji; Maebara, Kanako; Nakamori, Rinna; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), recognizes various synthetic and endogenous ligands by the ligand-binding domain. Fatty-acid metabolites reportedly activate PPARγ through conformational changes of the Ω loop. Here, we report that serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for PPARγ to regulate macrophage function and adipogenesis by directly binding to helix H12. A cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, is a mimetic agonist of these metabolites. Crystallographic analyses revealed that an indole acetate functions as a common moiety for the recognition by the sub-pocket near helix H12. Intriguingly, a serotonin metabolite and a fatty-acid metabolite each bind to distinct sub-pockets, and the PPARγ antagonist, T0070907, blocked the fatty-acid agonism, but not that of the serotonin metabolites. Mutational analyses on receptor-mediated transcription and coactivator binding revealed that each metabolite individually uses coregulator and/or heterodimer interfaces in a ligand-type-specific manner. Furthermore, the inhibition of the serotonin metabolism reduced the expression of the endogenous PPARγ-target gene. Collectively, these results suggest a novel agonism, in which PPARγ functions as a multiple sensor in response to distinct metabolites. PMID:20717101

  3. Secondary Metabolites and Toxins of Fusarium - What is Causing Disease Symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium species produce a plethora of phytotoxic secondary metabolites. In the case of various races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (F.o.v.) that attacks cotton, alfalfa, okra and other crops, many of these metabolites are derived from the polyketide biosynthetic pathway. The recent dis...

  4. Can we predict the intracellular metabolic state of a cell based on extracellular metabolite data?

    PubMed

    Granucci, Ninna; Pinu, Farhana R; Han, Ting-Li; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of extracellular metabolites presents many technical advantages over the analysis of intracellular compounds, which made this approach very popular in recent years as a high-throughput tool to assess the metabolic state of microbial cells. However, very little effort has been made to determine the actual relationship between intracellular and extracellular metabolite levels. The secretion of intracellular metabolites has been traditionally interpreted as a consequence of an intracellular metabolic overflow, which is based on the premise that for a metabolite to be secreted, it must be over-produced inside the cell. Therefore, we expect to find a secreted metabolite at increased levels inside the cells. Here we present a time-series metabolomics study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-limited chemostat with parallel measurements of intra- and extracellular metabolites. Although most of the extracellular metabolites were also detected in the intracellular samples and showed a typical metabolic overflow behaviour, we demonstrate that the secretion of many metabolites could not be explained by the metabolic overflow theory. PMID:26400772

  5. Combined computational metabolite prediction and automated structure-based analysis of mass spectrometric data.

    PubMed

    Stranz, David D; Miao, Shichang; Campbell, Scott; Maydwell, George; Ekins, Sean

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT As high-throughput technologies have developed in the pharmaceutical industry, the demand for identification of possible metabolites using predominantly liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS/MS) for a large number of molecules in drug discovery has also increased. In parallel, computational technologies have also been developed to generate predictions for metabolites alongside methods to predict MS spectra and score the quality of the match with experimental spectra. The goal of the current study was to generate metabolite predictions from molecular structure with a software product, MetaDrug. In vitro microsomal incubations were used to ultimately produce MS data that could be used to verify the predictions with Apex, which is a new software tool that can predict the molecular ion spectrum and a fragmentation spectrum, automating the detailed examination of both MS and MS/MS spectra. For the test molecule imipramine used to illustrate the combined in vitro/in silico process proposed, MetaDrug predicts 16 metabolites. Following rat microsomal incubations with imipramine and analysis of the MS(n) data using the Apex software, strong evidence was found for imipramine and five metabolites and weaker evidence for five additional metabolites. This study suggests a new approach to streamline MS data analysis using a combination of predictive computational approaches with software capable of comparing the predicted metabolite output with empirical data when looking at drug metabolites.

  6. RNA-seq analysis for secondary metabolite pathway gene discovery in Polygonum minus.

    PubMed

    Loke, Kok-Keong; Rahnamaie-Tajadod, Reyhaneh; Yeoh, Chean-Chean; Goh, Hoe-Han; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2016-03-01

    Polygonum minus plant is rich in secondary metabolites, especially terpenoids and flavonoids. Present study generates transcriptome resource for P. minus to decipher its secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways. Raw reads and the transcriptome assembly project have been deposited at GenBank under the accessions SRX313492 (root) and SRX669305 (leaf) respectively. PMID:26981350

  7. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  8. Effect of viroid infection on the dynamics of phenolic metabolites in the apoplast of tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are capable of producing a wide array of secondary metabolites which serve many functions, due to their bioactive, redox or structural properties. Subtle changes in the external or internal environment can cause significant changes in the array of secondary metabolites presented in the tissu...

  9. Integrating multiple analytical datasets to compare metabolite profiles of mouse colonic-cecal contents and feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of fec...

  10. Food Fight: Role of Itaconate and Other Metabolites in Antimicrobial Defense.

    PubMed

    Luan, Harding H; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-09-13

    Itaconate is a newly discovered mammalian metabolite bearing significant implications for our understanding of cellular immunometabolism and antimicrobial defense. Here, we explore recent findings regarding the role of itaconate in the innate immune response and highlight the emerging principle that metabolites can have distinct immunological functions independent of bioenergetics.

  11. Effect of Competition on the Production and Activity of Secondary Metabolites in Aspergillus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secondary metabolites are of intense interest to humans due to their pharmaceutical and/or toxic properties. Aspergillus species secrete these metabolites by themselves and in the presence of other fungal species. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among different Aspergillu...

  12. Antimicrobial secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsules and egg masses

    PubMed Central

    Kaviarasan, T; Siva, Sankar R; Yogamoorthi, A

    2012-01-01

    Marine organisms have attracted special attention in the last three decades for their ability to produce interesting pharmacological active compounds. Even though all marine organisms have the potential to produce antimicrobial secondary metabolites, the gastropod has the vital sources of secondary metabolites particularly their egg capsule which has the promising antimicrobial secondary metabolites. In the present review, we intend to focus on marine secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsule. The following compounds i.e. Kabiramid C, Aplysianin E, Aplysianin A, Thisaplysianin E and Tyrian purple have been documented in egg capsule of various gastropod and most of the antimicrobial secondary metabolites have not been isolated from the egg capsule because of the odious, and complex chemical structure. Stability of the compounds is unknown. PMID:23569871

  13. Different profiles of quercetin metabolites in rat plasma: comparison of two administration methods.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshichika; Saito, Satomi; Nishikawa, Tomomi; Ishisaka, Akari; Murota, Kaeko; Terao, Junji

    2009-03-23

    The bioavailability of polyphenols in human and rodents has been discussed regarding their biological activity. We found different metabolite profiles of quercetin in rat plasma between two administration procedures. A single intragastric administration (50 mg/kg) resulted in the appearance of a variety of metabolites in the plasma, whereas only a major fraction was detected by free access (1% quercetin). The methylated/non-methylated metabolites ratio was much higher in the free access group. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that the fraction from free access contained highly conjugated quercetin metabolites such as sulfo-glucuronides of quercetin and methylquercetin. The metabolite profile of human plasma after an intake of onion was similar to that with intragastric administration in rats. In vitro oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein showed that methylation of the catechol moiety of quercetin significantly attenuated the antioxidative activity. These results might provide information about the bioavailability of quercetin when conducting animal experiments. PMID:19270373

  14. Different profiles of quercetin metabolites in rat plasma: comparison of two administration methods.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshichika; Saito, Satomi; Nishikawa, Tomomi; Ishisaka, Akari; Murota, Kaeko; Terao, Junji

    2009-03-23

    The bioavailability of polyphenols in human and rodents has been discussed regarding their biological activity. We found different metabolite profiles of quercetin in rat plasma between two administration procedures. A single intragastric administration (50 mg/kg) resulted in the appearance of a variety of metabolites in the plasma, whereas only a major fraction was detected by free access (1% quercetin). The methylated/non-methylated metabolites ratio was much higher in the free access group. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that the fraction from free access contained highly conjugated quercetin metabolites such as sulfo-glucuronides of quercetin and methylquercetin. The metabolite profile of human plasma after an intake of onion was similar to that with intragastric administration in rats. In vitro oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein showed that methylation of the catechol moiety of quercetin significantly attenuated the antioxidative activity. These results might provide information about the bioavailability of quercetin when conducting animal experiments.

  15. A Yeast Metabolite Extraction Protocol Optimised for Time-Series Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Kalesh; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing call for the absolute quantification of time-resolved metabolite data. However, a number of technical issues exist, such as metabolites being modified/degraded either chemically or enzymatically during the extraction process. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is incompatible with high salt concentrations often used in extraction protocols. In microbial systems, metabolite yield is influenced by the extraction protocol used and the cell disruption rate. Here we present a method that rapidly quenches metabolism using dry-ice ethanol bath and methanol N-ethylmaleimide solution (thus stabilising thiols), disrupts cells efficiently using bead-beating and avoids artefacts created by live-cell pelleting. Rapid sample processing minimised metabolite leaching. Cell weight, number and size distribution was used to calculate metabolites to an attomol/cell level. We apply this method to samples obtained from the respiratory oscillation that occurs when yeast are grown continuously. PMID:22952947

  16. The effects of GA and ABA treatments on metabolite profile of germinating barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Cai, Shengguan; Ye, Lingzhen; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2016-02-01

    Sugar degradation during grain germination is important for malt quality. In malting industry, gibberellin (GA) is frequently used for improvement of malting quality. In this study, the changes of metabolite profiles and starch-degrading enzymes during grain germination, and as affected by GA and abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated using two wild barley accessions XZ72 and XZ95. Totally fifty-two metabolites with known structures were detected and the change of metabolite during germination was time- and genotype dependent. Sugars and amino acids were the most dramatically changed compounds. Addition of GA enhanced the activities of starch-degrading enzymes, and increased most metabolites, especially sugars and amino acids, whereas ABA had the opposite effect. The effect varied with the barley accessions. The current study is the first attempt in investigating the effect of hormones on metabolite profiles in germinating barley grain, being helpful for identifying the factors affecting barley germination or malt quality. PMID:26304431

  17. Drug metabolite profiling and identification by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshe; Zhang, Haiying; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2011-07-22

    Mass spectrometry plays a key role in drug metabolite identification, an integral part of drug discovery and development. The development of high-resolution (HR) MS instrumentation with improved accuracy and stability, along with new data processing techniques, has improved the quality and productivity of metabolite identification processes. In this minireview, HR-MS-based targeted and non-targeted acquisition methods and data mining techniques (e.g. mass defect, product ion, and isotope pattern filters and background subtraction) that facilitate metabolite identification are examined. Methods are presented that enable multiple metabolite identification tasks with a single LC/HR-MS platform and/or analysis. Also, application of HR-MS-based strategies to key metabolite identification activities and future developments in the field are discussed.

  18. Characterization of retinoyl beta-glucuronide as a minor metabolite of retinoic acid in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Zile, M H; Schnoes, H K; DeLuca, H F

    1980-01-01

    Several metabolites detected in the bile of rats given radioactive retinoic acid were separated by liquid/gel partition chromatography and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. One of these metabolites was found to be sensitive to beta-D-glucuronidase, yielding both 13-cis- and all-trans-retinoic acid. It had the characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of retinoic acid esters. Trimethylsilyl ether and acetyl derivatives of the methylated metabolite were prepared and examined by mass spectrometry. The resulting mass spectra established the structure to be retinoyl beta-glucuronide. Retinoyl glucuronide was rapidly excreted into the bile: the excretion was complete by 12 hr after the administration of retinoic acid. At this time the metabolite represented 12% of bile radioactivity (10% of dose). These observations confirm the existence of retinoyl glucuronide but demonstrate that it represents only one of several retinoic acid metabolites in bile. PMID:6932017

  19. On the metabolism of prostaglandin F 2 in female subjects. II. Structures of six metabolites.

    PubMed

    Granström, E; Samuelsson, B

    1971-12-25

    In vitro studies of PG (prostaglandin) metabolism have shown that they can be transformed by oxidation of the allylic alcohol group at C-15 catalyzed by a PG-specific dehydrogenase. This report describes isolation and chemical studies of several metabolites of PGF2alpha in female subjects. Chromatography, assay of radioactivity, infrared spectrometry, oxidative ozonolysis, reduction with lithium aluminum hydride and sodium borohydride, and solvents were used to analyze the metabolites. Chromatography graphs, chemical diagrams of the metabolite structures, and mass spectrum graphs present the study data. PGF2alpha is transformed into a variety of compounds in man. The stereochemical features of the metabolites have not been rigorously determined. In fact, the metabolic pathways discussed must be considered tentative. The work does provide a chemical background for more detailed studies of the sequences of the transformations and the properties of the enzymes involved. The study elucidated the structures of 5 previously unrecognized metabolites.

  20. In vitro cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y

    1998-04-01

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied extensively. In this study, Hela cells, propagated at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2-95% air, served as a target for evaluation of cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of the metabolites, which subsequently showed inhibition of cell growth and produced dose-related decreases in cell viability and cell protein content. The BTEX metabolites affected the levels of the polyamines spermidine, spermine, and putrescine, which are known to be important in cell proliferation. The cytotoxic effects for these BTEX metabolites to Hela cells were 3-methylcatechol > 4-methylcatechol > 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid > 4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  1. MET-XAlign: a metabolite cross-alignment tool for LC/MS-based comparative metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenchao; Lei, Zhentian; Huhman, David; Sumner, Lloyd W; Zhao, Patrick X

    2015-09-15

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) metabolite profiling has been widely used in comparative metabolomics studies; however, LC/MS-based comparative metabolomics currently faces several critical challenges. One of the greatest challenges is how to effectively align metabolites across different LC/MS profiles; a single metabolite can give rise to multiple peak features, and the grouped peak features that can be used to construct a spectrum pattern of single metabolite can vary greatly between biochemical experiments and even between instrument runs. Another major challenge is that the observed retention time for a single metabolite can also be significantly affected by experimental conditions. To overcome these two key challenges, we present a novel metabolite-based alignment approach entitled MET-XAlign to align metabolites across LC/MS metabolomics profiles. MET-XAlign takes the deduced molecular mass and estimated compound retention time information that can be extracted by our previously published tool, MET-COFEA, and aligns metabolites based on this information. We demonstrate that MET-XAlign is able to cross-align metabolite compounds, either known or unknown, in LC/MS profiles not only across different samples but also across different biological experiments and different electrospray ionization modes. Therefore, our proposed metabolite-based cross-alignment approach is a great step forward and its implementation, MET-XAlign, is a very useful tool in LC/MS-based comparative metabolomics. MET-XAlign has been successfully implemented with core algorithm coding in C++, making it very efficient, and visualization interface coding in the Microsoft.NET Framework. The MET-XAlign software along with demonstrative data is freely available at http://bioinfo.noble.org/manuscript-support/met-xalign/ .

  2. Frontal Metabolite Concentration Deficits in Opiate Dependence Relate to Substance Use, Cognition, and Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E; Durazzo, Timothy C; Schmidt, Thomas P; Abé, Christoph; Guydish, Joseph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in opiate dependence showed abnormalities in neuronal viability and glutamate concentration in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Metabolite levels in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and their neuropsychological correlates have not been investigated in opiate dependence. Methods Single-volume proton MRS at 4 Tesla and neuropsychological testing were conducted in 21 opiate-dependent individuals (OD) on buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Results were compared to 28 controls (CON) and 35 alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC), commonly investigated treatment-seekers providing context for OD evaluation. Metabolite concentrations were measured from ACC, DLPFC, OFC and parieto-occipital cortical (POC) regions. Results Compared to CON, OD had lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), creatine +phosphocreatine (Cr) and myo-Inositol (mI) in the DLPFC and lower NAA, Cr, and mI in the ACC. OD, ALC, and CON were equivalent on metabolite levels in the POC and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration did not differ between groups in any region. In OD, prefrontal metabolite deficits in ACC Glu as well as DLPFC NAA and choline containing metabolites (Cho) correlated with poorer working memory, executive and visuospatial functioning; metabolite deficits in DLPFC Glu and ACC GABA and Cr correlated with substance use measures. In the OFC of OD, Glu and choline-containing metabolites were elevated and lower Cr concentration related to higher nonplanning impulsivity. Compared to 3 week abstinent ALC, OD had significant DLPFC metabolite deficits. Conclusion The anterior frontal metabolite profile of OD differed significantly from that of CON and ALC. The frontal lobe metabolite abnormalities in OD and their neuropsychological correlates may play a role in treatment outcome and could be explored as specific targets for improved OD treatment. PMID:27695638

  3. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, including the organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, isazaphos, malathion, pirimiphos, and parathion and its methyl counterpart; a common metabolite of at least 18 pyrethroid insecticides; the repellent DEET; and the herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Predictors included measures of paraoccupational, residential, and environmental exposure, child characteristics, and mother characteristics. Results Thirteen metabolites were present in the urine samples. Organophosphate pesticide metabolites were detected in a substantial proportion of children, particularly metabolites of parathion/methyl parathion (90.0%; geometric mean 1.00 μg/L), chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos methyl (83.3%; geometric mean 1.92 μg/L), and diazinon (55.0%; geometric mean 10.56 μg/L). The number of metabolites detected ranged from 0 to 7, with a mode of 4 detected (28.3%). Boys, children living in rented housing, and children with mothers working part-time had more metabolites detected. Conclusions Children in farmworker homes experience multiple sources of pesticide exposure. Pesticides may remain in their environments for long periods. Environmental and occupational health changes are needed to address these exposures. Research is needed with more precise measures of exposure and on the health effects of concurrent exposure to multiple pesticides. PMID:17687456

  4. Frontal Metabolite Concentration Deficits in Opiate Dependence Relate to Substance Use, Cognition, and Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E; Durazzo, Timothy C; Schmidt, Thomas P; Abé, Christoph; Guydish, Joseph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in opiate dependence showed abnormalities in neuronal viability and glutamate concentration in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Metabolite levels in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and their neuropsychological correlates have not been investigated in opiate dependence. Methods Single-volume proton MRS at 4 Tesla and neuropsychological testing were conducted in 21 opiate-dependent individuals (OD) on buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Results were compared to 28 controls (CON) and 35 alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC), commonly investigated treatment-seekers providing context for OD evaluation. Metabolite concentrations were measured from ACC, DLPFC, OFC and parieto-occipital cortical (POC) regions. Results Compared to CON, OD had lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), creatine +phosphocreatine (Cr) and myo-Inositol (mI) in the DLPFC and lower NAA, Cr, and mI in the ACC. OD, ALC, and CON were equivalent on metabolite levels in the POC and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration did not differ between groups in any region. In OD, prefrontal metabolite deficits in ACC Glu as well as DLPFC NAA and choline containing metabolites (Cho) correlated with poorer working memory, executive and visuospatial functioning; metabolite deficits in DLPFC Glu and ACC GABA and Cr correlated with substance use measures. In the OFC of OD, Glu and choline-containing metabolites were elevated and lower Cr concentration related to higher nonplanning impulsivity. Compared to 3 week abstinent ALC, OD had significant DLPFC metabolite deficits. Conclusion The anterior frontal metabolite profile of OD differed significantly from that of CON and ALC. The frontal lobe metabolite abnormalities in OD and their neuropsychological correlates may play a role in treatment outcome and could be explored as specific targets for improved OD treatment.

  5. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  6. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  7. Intestinal Microbial Metabolites Are Linked to Severity of Myocardial Infarction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Vy; Su, Jidong; Hsu, Anna; Gross, Garrett J; Salzman, Nita H; Baker, John E

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats. We determined whether low molecular weight metabolites derived from intestinal microbiota and transported to the systemic circulation are linked to severity of myocardial infarction. Plasma from rats treated for seven days with the non-absorbed antibiotic vancomycin or a mixture of streptomycin, neomycin, polymyxin B and bacitracin was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling platforms. Antibiotic-induced changes in the abundance of individual groups of intestinal microbiota dramatically altered the host's metabolism. Hierarchical clustering of dissimilarities separated the levels of 284 identified metabolites from treated vs. untreated rats; 193 were altered by the antibiotic treatments with a tendency towards decreased metabolite levels. Catabolism of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine was the most affected pathway comprising 33 affected metabolites. Both antibiotic treatments decreased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction in vivo by 27% and 29%, respectively. We then determined whether microbial metabolites of the amino acids phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine were linked to decreased severity of myocardial infarction. Vancomycin-treated rats were administered amino acid metabolites prior to ischemia/reperfusion studies. Oral or intravenous pretreatment of rats with these amino acid metabolites abolished the decrease in infarct size conferred by vancomycin. Inhibition of JAK-2 (AG-490, 10 μM), Src kinase (PP1, 20 μM), Akt/PI3 kinase (Wortmannin, 100 nM), p44/42 MAPK (PD98059, 10 μM), p38 MAPK (SB203580, 10 μM), or KATP channels (glibenclamide, 3 μM) abolished cardioprotection by vancomycin, indicating microbial metabolites are interacting with cell surface receptors to transduce their signals through Src kinase, cell survival pathways and KATP channels. These inhibitors have no effect on myocardial infarct size in

  8. Curcumin Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evidences in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats Support the Antidiabetic Activity to Be via Metabolite(s)

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Vânia Ortega; Campos, Michel Leandro; Arcaro, Carlos Alberto; Assis, Renata Pires; Baldan-Cimatti, Helen Mariana; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Kettelhut, Isis Carmo; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Brunetti, Iguatemy Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the curcumin concentration in rat plasma by liquid chromatography and investigates the changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity of streptozotocin-diabetic rats treated with curcumin-enriched yoghurt. The analytical method for curcumin detection was linear from 10 to 500 ng/mL. The Cmax⁡ and the time to reach Cmax⁡ (tmax⁡) of curcumin in plasma were 3.14 ± 0.9 μg/mL and 5 minutes (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and 0.06 ± 0.01 μg/mL and 14 minutes (500 mg/kg, p.o.). The elimination half-time was 8.64 ± 2.31 (i.v.) and 32.70 ± 12.92 (p.o.) minutes. The oral bioavailability was about 0.47%. Changes in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were investigated in four groups: normal and diabetic rats treated with yoghurt (NYOG and DYOG, resp.) and treated with 90 mg/kg/day curcumin incorporated in yoghurt (NC90 and DC90, resp.). After 15 days of treatment, the glucose tolerance and the insulin sensitivity were significantly improved in DC90 rats in comparison with DYOG, which can be associated with an increase in the AKT phosphorylation levels and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscles. These findings can explain, at least in part, the benefits of curcumin-enriched yoghurt to diabetes and substantiate evidences for the curcumin metabolite(s) as being responsible for the antidiabetic activity. PMID:26064170

  9. Quantitation of drug metabolites in the absence of pure metabolite standards by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector and mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuzhong; Wu, Jing-Tao; Zhang, Hongwei; Olah, Timothy V

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative information on drug metabolites with pharmacological or toxicological activities is of great interest during the drug discovery and development process. Because the analyte response with mass spectrometry can change significantly due to small variations in chemical structure, pure standards are required to construct standard curves for quantitation. However, for most programs at the discovery stage, pure metabolite standards are not available. In this work, an evaluation was conducted using a chemiluminescent nitrogen detector (CLND) as a calibrator to obtain the response factor ratio on a mass spectrometer generated from a metabolite and its parent compound in biological fluids. Using the response factor ratio obtained from the CLND, the metabolite could be quantified with the liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) response obtained from the parent drug's standard curve. For this evaluation, oxazepam and temazepam were chosen as a 'drug/metabolite' pair. Temazepam was treated as the methylated metabolite of oxazepam. A spiked dog urine sample with a known concentration of oxazepam and unknown concentration of temazepam was injected onto the HPLC system and detected by both the CLND and MS/MS. Taking advantage of the equimolar response feature of the CLND, a response factor ratio between temazepam and oxazepam on the mass spectrometer was obtained by comparing the peak areas generated on the CLND and the mass spectrometer. From this ratio, temazepam was quantified using the oxazepam standard curve. The difference between the concentration of temazepam obtained from the reconstructed standard curve and the concentration obtained directly from a real temazepam standard curve was within 13% except the least concentrated standard (31%). This methodology has been successfully applied to measure quantities of the metabolite of a proprietary compound in a dog pharmacokinetic (PK) study.

  10. Treatments against hair loss may hinder cocaine and metabolites detection.

    PubMed

    Zucchella, Alessandra; Stramesi, Cristiana; Politi, Lucia; Morini, Luca; Polettini, Aldo

    2007-06-01

    Recently, some of the hair samples that we routinely analyse for drugs of abuse did not produce valid results for cocaine and metabolites. A series of very intense interfering peaks with ion fragments common to cocaine (CO), and benzoylecgonine (BE) were found to cover up the "cocaine" region of the chromatogram. In one of these cases the subject declared he had used a lotion containing Minoxidil in order to prevent hair loss. Starting from this observation we found that the interfering peaks belonged to four different TMS derivatives of Minoxidil. Minoxidil interference was further investigated by applying Tricoxidil(®), a Minoxidil solution, to the hair of CO-free volunteers and to a CO-positive hair strand dipped into Tricoxidil. Hair were analysed before and after treatment. In both cases interfering peaks were absent in the chromatograms of untreated hair and appeared in treated hair. In the CO-positive hair detection of CO, BE and internal standard was completely hindered after treatment with Minoxidil. Attempts to separate interfering peaks from CO and metabolites by modifying the temperature programme failed. None of the hair washing methods tested (methanol; dichloromethane; sodium dodecyl sulphate water solution, 1% w/v followed by methanol; phosphate buffer 0.1 M, pH 6 followed by methanol) succeeded in removing Minoxidil interference. However, a simple solution to partially overcome the problem was to dry up the derivatised extract, reconstitute it in methanol (in order to switch back Minoxidil derivatives to the native molecule), and re-inject it: owing to the higher polarity, underivatised Minoxidil does not interfere any more with the chromatography of CO, at the expense of the disappearance of BE and ecgonine methyl ester both producing TMS derivatives. This strategy was applied to four real cases where Minoxidil interference was recognised: in two of these cases CO was detected. The problem of Minoxidil interference on CO detection may be limited

  11. Production of metabolites as bacterial responses to the marine environment.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    -contaminated sites. Siderophores are necessary e.g., in the treatment of diseases with metal ion imbalance, while antifouling compounds could be used to treat man-made surfaces that are used in marine environments. New classes of antibiotics could efficiently combat bacteria resistant to the existing antibiotics. The present work aims to provide a comprehensive review of the metabolites produced by marine bacteria in order to cope with intrusive environments, and to illustrate how such metabolites can be advantageously used in several relevant areas, from bioremediation to health and pharmaceutical sectors. PMID:20411122

  12. Production of Metabolites as Bacterial Responses to the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.; Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    -contaminated sites. Siderophores are necessary e.g., in the treatment of diseases with metal ion imbalance, while antifouling compounds could be used to treat man-made surfaces that are used in marine environments. New classes of antibiotics could efficiently combat bacteria resistant to the existing antibiotics. The present work aims to provide a comprehensive review of the metabolites produced by marine bacteria in order to cope with intrusive environments, and to illustrate how such metabolites can be advantageously used in several relevant areas, from bioremediation to health and pharmaceutical sectors. PMID:20411122

  13. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Oak Pathogen Diplodia corticola.

    PubMed

    Masi, Marco; Maddau, Lucia; Linaldeddu, Benedetto Teodoro; Cimmino, Alessio; D'Amico, Wanda; Scanu, Bruno; Evidente, Marco; Tuzi, Angela; Evidente, Antonio

    2016-01-13

    Three new lactones and a new fatty acid ester, named sapinofuranones C and D, diplopyrone B, and diplobifuranylone C, respectively, were isolated from Diplodia corticola, together with sphaeropsidins A and C, diplopyrone, diplobifuranylones A and B, diplofuranone A, and the (S,S)-enantiomer of sapinofuranone B. Sapinofuranones C and D, diplopyrone B, and diplobifuranylone C were characterized as (5S)-5-((1,S-1,6-dihydroxyhexa-2,4-dienyl)-dihydrofuran-2-one, 4,5-dihydroxy-deca-6,8-dienoic acid methyl ester, (5S)-5-hydroxy-6-(penta-1,3-dienyl)-5,6-dihydro-pyran-2-one, and 5'-((1R)-1-hydroxyethyl)-2',5'-dihydro-2H-[2,2']bifuranyl-5-one by spectroscopic and chemical methods, respectively. The relative configuration of sapinofuranone C was assigned by X-ray diffraction analysis, whereas its absolute configuration was determined by applying the advanced Mosher's method to its 11-O-p-bromobenzoyl derivative. The same method was used to assign the absolute configuration to C-5 of diplopyrone B and to that of the hydroxyethyl of the side chain of diplobifuranylone C, respectively. The metabolites isolated were tested at 1 mg/mL on leaves of cork oak, grapevine cv. 'Cannonau', and tomato using the leaf puncture assay. They were also tested on tomato cuttings at 0.2, 0.1, and 0.05 mg/mL. Each compound was tested for zootoxic activity on Artemia salina L. larvae. The efficacy of sapinofuranone C and diplopyrone B on three plant pathogens, namely, Athelia rolfsii, Fusarium avenaceum, and Phytophthora nicotianae was also evaluated. In all phytotoxic assays only diplopyrone B was found to be active. It also showed strong inhibition on the vegetative growth of A. rolfsii and P. nicotianae. All metabolites were inactive in the assay performed for the zootoxic activity (A. salina) even at the highest concentration used (200 μg/mL). Diplopyrone B showed a promising antioomycete activity for the control of Phytophthora spp. also taking into account the absence of zootoxic activity

  14. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Oak Pathogen Diplodia corticola.

    PubMed

    Masi, Marco; Maddau, Lucia; Linaldeddu, Benedetto Teodoro; Cimmino, Alessio; D'Amico, Wanda; Scanu, Bruno; Evidente, Marco; Tuzi, Angela; Evidente, Antonio

    2016-01-13

    Three new lactones and a new fatty acid ester, named sapinofuranones C and D, diplopyrone B, and diplobifuranylone C, respectively, were isolated from Diplodia corticola, together with sphaeropsidins A and C, diplopyrone, diplobifuranylones A and B, diplofuranone A, and the (S,S)-enantiomer of sapinofuranone B. Sapinofuranones C and D, diplopyrone B, and diplobifuranylone C were characterized as (5S)-5-((1,S-1,6-dihydroxyhexa-2,4-dienyl)-dihydrofuran-2-one, 4,5-dihydroxy-deca-6,8-dienoic acid methyl ester, (5S)-5-hydroxy-6-(penta-1,3-dienyl)-5,6-dihydro-pyran-2-one, and 5'-((1R)-1-hydroxyethyl)-2',5'-dihydro-2H-[2,2']bifuranyl-5-one by spectroscopic and chemical methods, respectively. The relative configuration of sapinofuranone C was assigned by X-ray diffraction analysis, whereas its absolute configuration was determined by applying the advanced Mosher's method to its 11-O-p-bromobenzoyl derivative. The same method was used to assign the absolute configuration to C-5 of diplopyrone B and to that of the hydroxyethyl of the side chain of diplobifuranylone C, respectively. The metabolites isolated were tested at 1 mg/mL on leaves of cork oak, grapevine cv. 'Cannonau', and tomato using the leaf puncture assay. They were also tested on tomato cuttings at 0.2, 0.1, and 0.05 mg/mL. Each compound was tested for zootoxic activity on Artemia salina L. larvae. The efficacy of sapinofuranone C and diplopyrone B on three plant pathogens, namely, Athelia rolfsii, Fusarium avenaceum, and Phytophthora nicotianae was also evaluated. In all phytotoxic assays only diplopyrone B was found to be active. It also showed strong inhibition on the vegetative growth of A. rolfsii and P. nicotianae. All metabolites were inactive in the assay performed for the zootoxic activity (A. salina) even at the highest concentration used (200 μg/mL). Diplopyrone B showed a promising antioomycete activity for the control of Phytophthora spp. also taking into account the absence of zootoxic activity.

  15. Detection of Nitrobenzodiazepines and Their 7-Amino Metabolites in Oral Fluid.

    PubMed

    Vindenes, Vigdis; Strand, Dag Helge; Koksæter, Paul; Gjerde, Hallvard

    2016-05-01

    Clonazepam, nitrazepam and flunitrazepam are frequently used benzodiazepines, both as prescribed medication and as drugs of abuse. Little is, however, known about how these drugs are excreted in oral fluid. It has been claimed that the parent drugs are more likely to be detected in oral fluid than the 7-amino metabolites. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parent drugs or the 7-amino metabolites of the nitrobenzodiazepines were most frequently detected in authentic oral fluid samples. Oral fluid samples were collected from patients undergoing opioid maintenance treatment. Cases where clonazepam, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam and/or their metabolites were detected were included. The samples were collected using the Intercept Oral Specimen Collection Device. A cutoff concentration of 1 nM (∼0.3 ng/mL) in oral fluid-buffer mixture was applied for all the substances. A total of 1,001 oral fluid samples were positive for clonazepam and/or 7-aminoclonazepam; both substances were detected in 707 samples, only the parent drug in 64 cases and only the metabolite in 230 cases. For nitrazepam, both substances were detected in 139 samples; only the parent drug in 16 cases and only the metabolite in 56 cases. Flunitrazepam only was not detected in any sample; both substances were detected in one of these cases, and only the metabolite in three cases. This study revealed that 7-amino metabolites were more likely to be detected in oral fluid than the parent drugs. PMID:27013620

  16. Prioritization of putative metabolite identifications in LC-MS/MS experiments using a computational pipeline.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Xiao, Jun Feng; Ressom, Habtom W

    2013-01-01

    One of the major bottle-necks in current LC-MS-based metabolomic investigations is metabolite identification. An often-used approach is to first look up metabolites from databases through peak mass, followed by verification of the obtained putative identifications using MS/MS data. However, the mass-based search may provide inappropriate putative identifications when the observed peak is from isotopes, fragments, or adducts. In addition, a large fraction of peaks is often left with multiple putative identifications. To differentiate these putative identifications, manual verification of metabolites through comparison between biological samples and authentic compounds is necessary. However, such experiments are laborious, especially when multiple putative identifications are encountered. It is desirable to use computational approaches to obtain more reliable putative identifications and prioritize them before performing experimental verification of the metabolites. In this article, a computational pipeline is proposed to assist metabolite identification with improved metabolome coverage and prioritization capability. Multiple publicly available software tools and databases, along with in-house developed algorithms, are utilized to fully exploit the information acquired from LC-MS/MS experiments. The pipeline is successfully applied to identify metabolites on the basis of LC-MS as well as MS/MS data. Using accurate masses, retention time values, MS/MS spectra, and metabolic pathways/networks, more appropriate putative identifications are retrieved and prioritized to guide subsequent metabolite verification experiments. PMID:23307777

  17. Phthalate metabolites in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Fourgous, C; Chevreuil, M; Alliot, F; Amilhat, E; Faliex, E; Paris-Palacios, S; Teil, M J; Goutte, A

    2016-11-01

    The levels and fate of phthalate metabolites have been poorly evaluated in fish, despite their potential ecotoxicological impacts. The present study aims to characterize the levels of phthalate metabolites in muscle tissue of yellow eels (Anguilla anguilla) from two coastal Mediterranean lagoons, during three sampling periods. Nine phthalate metabolites were detected in >70% of the samples. Slightly higher levels of phthalate metabolites were detected in March and June compared to October, suggesting possible seasonal variations in environmental release and/or phthalate metabolization process by eels. The large sample size (N=117) made it possible to explore correlations between phthalate metabolites' levels and individual parameters, such as body length, age, body condition and hepatic histo-pathologies. Body length and estimated age poorly correlated with phthalate metabolites, suggesting that eels did not accumulate phthalates during growth, contrary to persistent compounds. Eels presented different grades of hepatic fibrosis and lipidosis. A negative correlation was found between the severity of these pathologies in the liver and the sum of phthalate metabolites levels, supporting the hypothesis that eels with damaged liver are less able to metabolize xenobiotics. PMID:27412480

  18. Identification of alcohol-dependent clopidogrel metabolites using conventional liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yi; Laizure, S. Casey; Herring, Vanessa L.; Parker, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Clopidogrel (CLO) is a prodrug used to prevent ischemic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention or with myocardial infarction. A previous study found ethyl clopidogrel (ECLO) is formed by transesterification of CLO when incubated with alcohol in human liver microsomes. We hypothesize that ECLO will be subject to further metabolism and developed an assay to identify its metabolites. METHODS A liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed to identify metabolites of ECLO. According to the predicted metabolic pathway of ECLO, precursor–product ion pairs were used to screen the possible metabolites of ECLO in human liver S9 fractions. Subsequently, the detected metabolites were characterized by the results of product ion scan. RESULTS In the presence of alcohol, CLO was tranesterified to ECLO, which was further oxidized to form ethylated 2-oxo-clopidogrel and several ethylated thiol metabolites including the ethylated form of the H4 active metabolite. CONCLUSIONS The ECLO formed by transesterification with alcohol is subject to metabolism by CYP450 enzymes producing ethylated forms of 2-oxo-clopidogrel and the active H4 thiol metabolite. PMID:24760569

  19. Seed metabolomic study reveals significant metabolite variations and correlations among different soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Rao, Jun; Shi, Jianxin; Hu, Chaoyang; Cheng, Fang; Wilson, Zoe A; Zhang, Dabing; Quan, Sheng

    2014-09-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the world's major crops, and soybean seeds are a rich and important resource for proteins and oils. While "omics" studies, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, have been widely applied in soybean molecular research, fewer metabolomic studies have been conducted for large-scale detection of low molecular weight metabolites, especially in soybean seeds. In this study, we investigated the seed metabolomes of 29 common soybean cultivars through combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred sixty-nine named metabolites were identified and subsequently used to construct a metabolic network of mature soybean seed. Among the 169 detected metabolites, 104 were found to be significantly variable in their levels across tested cultivars. Metabolite markers that could be used to distinguish genetically related soybean cultivars were also identified, and metabolite-metabolite correlation analysis revealed some significant associations within the same or among different metabolite groups. Findings from this work may potentially provide the basis for further studies on both soybean seed metabolism and metabolic engineering to improve soybean seed quality and yield.

  20. Correction and comparability of phthalate metabolite measurements of Canadian biomonitoring studies (2007-2012).

    PubMed

    Langlois, Éric; Saravanabhavan, Gurusankar; Arbuckle, Tye E; Giroux, Suzelle

    2014-03-01

    Phthalate metabolites are often measured in biomonitoring studies to evaluate a population's exposure to ubiquitous phthalates. During the course of national biomonitoring studies in Canada, we identified an issue with the accuracy of several commercial phthalate metabolite standards that are commonly used in such studies. The validity of the results from these studies was then questioned. Altogether, three (3) large studies were affected, involving a total of 9302 samples and 105000 individual phthalate metabolite measurements. Data from our previous investigation suggested that the inaccuracies in the commercially-available phthalate metabolite standards were compound- and lot-specific. Therefore, an approach was developed to derive correction factors for each lot of phthalate metabolite standard and was applied to the previously-acquired measurements with the goal of obtaining accurate and comparable data. A statistical analysis was performed to support the approach. It is expected that the corrected phthalate metabolite data from all three Canadian biomonitoring studies are comparable to one another. However, caution is still advised when comparing data obtained from biomonitoring studies for which the calibration standards have not been investigated for their accuracy. Suggestions are made based on quality assurance aspects to improve the validity of phthalate metabolite measurements.

  1. Detection, synthesis and characterization of metabolites of steroid hormones conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Marcos, Josep; Joglar, Jesús; Alfonso, Ignacio; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of several polyunsaturated testosterone related compounds (including 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione and 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one) in urine after alkaline treatment of the sample has been recently reported. Although several experiments seem to indicate that they are testosterone metabolites, their origin is still unknown. In this study, it is demonstrated that these metabolites are produced from the degradation of cysteine conjugates. Several testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine have been synthesized and characterized by NMR techniques. Their detection in human urine has been performed by LC-MS/MS. The acquisition of several transitions in the SRM mode and the comparison between ion ratios and retention times allowed for the unequivocal confirmation of the presence of cysteine conjugates in urine. The analysis of urine samples collected after testosterone administration confirmed that synthesized cysteine conjugates are testosterone metabolites. The fact that these conjugates result in polyunsaturated compounds in urine after alkaline treatment was demonstrated by fraction collection and alkaline treatment of each fraction. Besides, the presence of these metabolites was also confirmed in human plasma. The formation of these metabolites implies an unreported metabolic biotransformation: 6,7-dehydrogenation as phase I metabolism followed by conjugation with glutathione and subsequent transformation to cysteine conjugates. Finally, the existence of similar metabolites for cortisol and progesterone was also confirmed by LC-MS/MS indicating that the presented metabolic pathway is not exclusively active in androgens, but common to progestagens and glucocorticoids. PMID:23261958

  2. Dereplicating and spatial mapping of secondary metabolites from fungal cultures in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Sica, Vincent P.; Raja, Huzefa A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Pearce, Cedric J.

    2015-07-30

    Ambient ionization techniques coupled to mass spectrometry have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. Identifying, mapping, and monitoring secondary metabolites directly on an organism provides invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. Most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/VIS spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (droplet LMJ SSP) was coupled with UPLC PDA HRMS MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, and UV/VIS data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites could be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet LMJ SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures directly without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. As a result, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture.

  3. Dereplicating and spatial mapping of secondary metabolites from fungal cultures in situ

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Sica, Vincent P.; Raja, Huzefa A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Pearce, Cedric J.

    2015-07-30

    Ambient ionization techniques coupled to mass spectrometry have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. Identifying, mapping, and monitoring secondary metabolites directly on an organism provides invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. Most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/VIS spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (droplet LMJ SSP) was coupled with UPLC PDA HRMS MS/MS,more » thus providing separation, retention times, and UV/VIS data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites could be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet LMJ SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures directly without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. As a result, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture.« less

  4. Determinants of Organophosphorus Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels in Young Children Living in an Agricultural Community

    PubMed Central

    Bradman, Asa; Castorina, Rosemary; Barr, Dana Boyd; Chevrier, Jonathan; Harnly, Martha E.; Eisen, Ellen A.; McKone, Thomas E.; Harley, Kim; Holland, Nina; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are used in agriculture and several are registered for home use. As young children age they may experience different pesticide exposures due to varying diet, behavior, and other factors. We measured six OP dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites (three dimethyl alkylphosphates (DMAP) and three diethyl alkylphosphates (DEAP)) in urine samples collected from ∼400 children living in an agricultural community when they were 6, 12, and 24 months old. We examined bivariate associations between DAP metabolite levels and determinants such as age, diet, season, and parent occupation. To evaluate independent impacts, we then used generalized linear mixed multivariable models including interaction terms with age. The final models indicated that DMAP metabolite levels increased with age. DMAP levels were also positively associated with daily servings of produce at 6- and 24-months. Among the 6-month olds, DMAP metabolite levels were higher when samples were collected during the summer/spring versus the winter/fall months. Among the 12-month olds, DMAP and DEAP metabolites were higher when children lived ≤60 meters from an agricultural field. Among the 24-month-olds, DEAP metabolite levels were higher during the summer/spring months. Our findings suggest that there are multiple determinants of OP pesticide exposures, notably dietary intake and temporal and spatial proximity to agricultural use. The impact of these determinants varied by age and class of DAP metabolite. PMID:21695029

  5. Phthalate metabolites in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Fourgous, C; Chevreuil, M; Alliot, F; Amilhat, E; Faliex, E; Paris-Palacios, S; Teil, M J; Goutte, A

    2016-11-01

    The levels and fate of phthalate metabolites have been poorly evaluated in fish, despite their potential ecotoxicological impacts. The present study aims to characterize the levels of phthalate metabolites in muscle tissue of yellow eels (Anguilla anguilla) from two coastal Mediterranean lagoons, during three sampling periods. Nine phthalate metabolites were detected in >70% of the samples. Slightly higher levels of phthalate metabolites were detected in March and June compared to October, suggesting possible seasonal variations in environmental release and/or phthalate metabolization process by eels. The large sample size (N=117) made it possible to explore correlations between phthalate metabolites' levels and individual parameters, such as body length, age, body condition and hepatic histo-pathologies. Body length and estimated age poorly correlated with phthalate metabolites, suggesting that eels did not accumulate phthalates during growth, contrary to persistent compounds. Eels presented different grades of hepatic fibrosis and lipidosis. A negative correlation was found between the severity of these pathologies in the liver and the sum of phthalate metabolites levels, supporting the hypothesis that eels with damaged liver are less able to metabolize xenobiotics.

  6. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms. PMID:27649603

  7. Sources of secondary metabolite variation in Dysidea avara (Porifera: Demospongiae): the importance of having good neighbors.

    PubMed

    De Caralt, Sonia; Bry, Delphine; Bontemps, Nataly; Turon, Xavier; Uriz, Maria-Jesus; Banaigs, Bernard

    2013-02-18

    Several studies report temporal, geographical, and intra-individual variation in sponge metabolite yields. However, the internal and/or external factors that regulate the metabolite production remain poorly understood. Dysidea avara is a demosponge that produces sesquiterpenoids (avarol and derivatives) with interesting medical properties, which has prompted addressed studies to obtain enough amounts of these metabolites for research on drug discovery. Within this framework, specimens of Dysidea avara from a population of the Northwest Mediterranean were sampled and their secondary metabolites quantified to assess their variability and the possible relationship with external (seasonality, interactions with neighbors) and internal (reproductive stages) factors. The results show a variation of the amount of both avarol and its monoacetate derivative with time, with no clear relationship with seawater temperature. A trade-off with sponge reproduction was not found either. However, our results showed for the first time that sponges are able to increase production or accumulation of secondary metabolites in their peripheral zone depending on the nature of their neighbors. This finding could explain part of the high variability in the amount of secondary metabolites usually found in chemical ecology studies on sponges and opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite yield in sponge cultures.

  8. Correction and comparability of phthalate metabolite measurements of Canadian biomonitoring studies (2007-2012).

    PubMed

    Langlois, Éric; Saravanabhavan, Gurusankar; Arbuckle, Tye E; Giroux, Suzelle

    2014-03-01

    Phthalate metabolites are often measured in biomonitoring studies to evaluate a population's exposure to ubiquitous phthalates. During the course of national biomonitoring studies in Canada, we identified an issue with the accuracy of several commercial phthalate metabolite standards that are commonly used in such studies. The validity of the results from these studies was then questioned. Altogether, three (3) large studies were affected, involving a total of 9302 samples and 105000 individual phthalate metabolite measurements. Data from our previous investigation suggested that the inaccuracies in the commercially-available phthalate metabolite standards were compound- and lot-specific. Therefore, an approach was developed to derive correction factors for each lot of phthalate metabolite standard and was applied to the previously-acquired measurements with the goal of obtaining accurate and comparable data. A statistical analysis was performed to support the approach. It is expected that the corrected phthalate metabolite data from all three Canadian biomonitoring studies are comparable to one another. However, caution is still advised when comparing data obtained from biomonitoring studies for which the calibration standards have not been investigated for their accuracy. Suggestions are made based on quality assurance aspects to improve the validity of phthalate metabolite measurements. PMID:24513526

  9. Sources of Secondary Metabolite Variation in Dysidea avara (Porifera: Demospongiae): The Importance of Having Good Neighbors

    PubMed Central

    De Caralt, Sonia; Bry, Delphine; Bontemps, Nataly; Turon, Xavier; Uriz, Maria-Jesus; Banaigs, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Several studies report temporal, geographical, and intra-individual variation in sponge metabolite yields. However, the internal and/or external factors that regulate the metabolite production remain poorly understood. Dysidea avara is a demosponge that produces sesquiterpenoids (avarol and derivatives) with interesting medical properties, which has prompted addressed studies to obtain enough amounts of these metabolites for research on drug discovery. Within this framework, specimens of Dysidea avara from apopulation of the Northwest Mediterranean were sampled and their secondary metabolites quantified to assess their variability and the possible relationship with external (seasonality, interactions with neighbors) and internal (reproductive stages) factors. The results show a variation of the amount of both avarol and its monoacetate derivative with time, with no clear relationship with seawater temperature. A trade-off with sponge reproduction was not found either. However, our results showed for the first time that sponges are able to increase production or accumulation of secondary metabolites in their peripheral zone depending on the nature of their neighbors. This finding could explain part of the high variability in the amount of secondary metabolites usually found in chemical ecology studies on sponges and opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite yield in sponge cultures. PMID:23429282

  10. Identifying individual differences of fluoxetine response in juvenile rhesus monkeys by metabolite profiling

    PubMed Central

    He, Y; Hogrefe, C E; Grapov, D; Palazoglu, M; Fiehn, O; Turck, C W; Golub, M S

    2014-01-01

    Fluoxetine is the only psychopharmacological agent approved for depression by the US Food and Drug Administration for children and is commonly used therapeutically in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Therapeutic response shows high individual variability, and severe side effects have been observed. In the current study we set out to identify biomarkers of response to fluoxetine as well as biomarkers that correlate with impulsivity, a measure of reward delay behavior and potential side effect of the drug, in juvenile male rhesus monkeys. The study group was also genotyped for polymorphisms of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a gene that has been associated with psychiatric disorders. We used peripheral metabolite profiling of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from animals treated daily with fluoxetine or vehicle for one year. Fluoxetine response metabolite profiles and metabolite/reward delay behavior associations were evaluated using multivariate analysis. Our analyses identified a set of plasma and CSF metabolites that distinguish fluoxetine- from vehicle-treated animals and metabolites that correlate with impulsivity. Some metabolites displayed an interaction between fluoxetine and MAOA genotype. The identified metabolite biomarkers belong to pathways that have important functions in central nervous system physiology. Biomarkers of response to fluoxetine in the normally functioning brain of juvenile nonhuman primates may aid in finding predictors of response to treatment in young psychiatric populations and in progress toward the realization of a precision medicine approach in the area of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25369145

  11. Antiproliferative and hepatoprotective activity of metabolites from Corynebacterium xerosis against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farhadul; Ghosh, Soby; Khanam, Jahan Ara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out the effective anticancer drugs from bacterial products, petroleum ether extract of Corynebacterium xerosis. Methods Antiproliferative activity of the metabolite has been measured by monitoring the parameters like tumor weight measurement, tumor cell growth inhibition in mice and survival time of tumor bearing mice, etc. Hepatoprotective effect of the metabolites was determined by observing biochemical, hematological parameters. Results It has been found that the petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite significantly decrease cell growth (78.58%; P<0.01), tumor weight (36.04 %; P<0.01) and increase the life span of tumor bearing mice (69.23%; P<0.01) at dose 100 mg/kg (i.p.) in comparison to those of untreated Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing mice. The metabolite also alters the depleted hematological parameters like red blood cell, white blood cell, hemoglobin (Hb%), etc. towards normal in tumor bearing mice. Metabolite show no adverse effect on liver functions regarding blood glucose, serum alkaline phosphatases, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity and serum billirubin, etc. in normal mice. Histopathological observation of these mice organ does not show any toxic effect on cellular structure. But in the case of EAC bearing untreated mice these hematological and biochemical parameters deteriorate extremely with time whereas petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite receiving EAC bearing mice nullified the toxicity induced by EAC cells. Conclusion Study results reveal that metabolite possesses significant antiproliferative and hepatoprotective effect against EAC cells. PMID:25183099

  12. Prioritization of putative metabolite identifications in LC-MS/MS experiments using a computational pipeline.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Xiao, Jun Feng; Ressom, Habtom W

    2013-01-01

    One of the major bottle-necks in current LC-MS-based metabolomic investigations is metabolite identification. An often-used approach is to first look up metabolites from databases through peak mass, followed by verification of the obtained putative identifications using MS/MS data. However, the mass-based search may provide inappropriate putative identifications when the observed peak is from isotopes, fragments, or adducts. In addition, a large fraction of peaks is often left with multiple putative identifications. To differentiate these putative identifications, manual verification of metabolites through comparison between biological samples and authentic compounds is necessary. However, such experiments are laborious, especially when multiple putative identifications are encountered. It is desirable to use computational approaches to obtain more reliable putative identifications and prioritize them before performing experimental verification of the metabolites. In this article, a computational pipeline is proposed to assist metabolite identification with improved metabolome coverage and prioritization capability. Multiple publicly available software tools and databases, along with in-house developed algorithms, are utilized to fully exploit the information acquired from LC-MS/MS experiments. The pipeline is successfully applied to identify metabolites on the basis of LC-MS as well as MS/MS data. Using accurate masses, retention time values, MS/MS spectra, and metabolic pathways/networks, more appropriate putative identifications are retrieved and prioritized to guide subsequent metabolite verification experiments.

  13. Human hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 are glucuronidated and sulfated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio; Zheng, Xiaobo; Ryden, Andreas; Marsh, Goran; Maho, Walid; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-16

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were used worldwide as additive flame retardants and are classified as persistent, bioaccumulable and toxic environmental pollutants. In humans, the hydroxylated metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99) formed in vitro have also been detected in vivo. To further characterize the metabolism of BDE-47 and BDE-99 and to identify candidate markers for monitoring the human exposure to PBDEs using non-invasive approaches, glucuronidation and sulfation of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were investigated using human liver microsomes and cytoplasm, respectively. The formed Phase II metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a novel approach to develop analytical methods in absence of authentic standards. All available standards for hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were glucuronidated and sulfated, showing that glucuronidation and sulfation are part of the metabolism pathway of BDE-47 and BDE-99 in vitro. The major glucuronidated and sulfated analogs of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 were (a) 2,4-DBP-Gluc and 5-Gluc-BDE-47, and (b) 2'-Sulf-BDE-28, 4-Sulf-BDE-42 and 3-Sulf-BDE-47, respectively. The major glucuronidated and sulfated analogs of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 were (a) 2,4,5-TBP-Gluc and 6'-Gluc-BDE-99, and (b) 3'-Sulf-BDE-99 and 5'-Sulf-BDE-99, respectively. Apparent Km values associated with the formation of sulfated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were ten times lower than those of the corresponding glucuronidated metabolites, suggesting that sulfated rather than glucuronidated metabolites of OH-PBDEs might be used as markers of human exposure to PBDEs using a non-invasive approach based on urine sample collection. PMID:25956475

  14. Stable isotope coded derivatizing reagents as internal standards in metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Bruheim, Per; Kvitvang, Hans Fredrik Nyvold; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2013-06-28

    Gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometric (MS) detection have become the two main techniques for the analysis of metabolite pools (i.e. Metabolomics). These technologies are especially suited for Metabolite Profiling analysis of various metabolite groups due to high separation capabilities of the chromatographs and high sensitivity of the mass analysers. The trend in quantitative Metabolite Profiling is to add more metabolites and metabolite groups in a single method. This should not be done by compromising the analytical precision. Mass spectrometric detection comes with certain limitations, especially in the quantitative aspects as standards are needed for conversion of ion abundance to concentration and ionization efficiencies are directly dependent on eluent conditions. This calls for novel strategies to counteract all variables that can influence the quantitative precision. Usually, internal standards are used to correct any technical variation. For quantitation of single or just a few analytes this can be executed with spiking isotopically labeled standards. However, for more comprehensive analytical tasks, e.g. profiling tens or hundreds of analytes simultaneously, this strategy becomes expensive and in many cases isotopically labeled standards are not available. An alternative is to introduce a derivatizing step where the sample is derivatized with naturally labeled reagent, while a standard solution is separately derivatized with isotopically labeled reagent and spiked into the sample solution prior to analysis. This strategy, named isotope coded derivatization - ICD, is attractive in the emerging field of quantitative Metabolite Profiling where current protocols can easily comprise over hundred metabolites. This review provides an overview of isotopically labeled derivatizing reagents that have been developed for important metabolite groups with the aim to improve analytical performance and precision.

  15. Contribution of network connectivity in determining the relationship between gene expression and metabolite concentration changes.

    PubMed

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Sheridan, Steven; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-04-01

    One of the primary mechanisms through which a cell exerts control over its metabolic state is by modulating expression levels of its enzyme-coding genes. However, the changes at the level of enzyme expression allow only indirect control over metabolite levels, for two main reasons. First, at the level of individual reactions, metabolite levels are non-linearly dependent on enzyme abundances as per the reaction kinetics mechanisms. Secondly, specific metabolite pools are tightly interlinked with the rest of the metabolic network through their production and consumption reactions. While the role of reaction kinetics in metabolite concentration control is well studied at the level of individual reactions, the contribution of network connectivity has remained relatively unclear. Here we report a modeling framework that integrates both reaction kinetics and network connectivity constraints for describing the interplay between metabolite concentrations and mRNA levels. We used this framework to investigate correlations between the gene expression and the metabolite concentration changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during its metabolic cycle, as well as in response to three fundamentally different biological perturbations, namely gene knockout, nutrient shock and nutrient change. While the kinetic constraints applied at the level of individual reactions were found to be poor descriptors of the mRNA-metabolite relationship, their use in the context of the network enabled us to correlate changes in the expression of enzyme-coding genes to the alterations in metabolite levels. Our results highlight the key contribution of metabolic network connectivity in mediating cellular control over metabolite levels, and have implications towards bridging the gap between genotype and metabolic phenotype.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for lipid-soluble metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiyang; Hong, Bikai; Xu, Zhifeng; Ma, Lian; Chen, Yaowen; Xiao, Yeyu; Wu, Renhua

    2013-08-01

    Although the water-soluble metabolite profile of human mesenchymal stem cells is known, the lipid profile still needs further investigation. In this study, methanol-chloroform was used to extract pid-soluble metabolites and perchloric acid was used to extract water-soluble metabolites. Furthermore, a dual phase extraction method using methanol-chloroform and water was used to obtain both water and lipid fractions simultaneously. All metabolite extractions were analyzed on a 9.4T high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. Metabolite resonance peaks were assigned in the acquired spectra according to the chemical shift, and the extraction efficiency of ferent methods was compared. Results showed that in the spectra of water-soluble extracts, major metabolites comprised low molecular weight metabolites, including lactate, acetic acid, fatty acids, threonine, glutamic acid, creatine, choline and its derivatives, while in the spectra of lipid-soluble extracts, most metabolites were assigned to fatty acids. Among the different extraction procedures, perchloric acid was more efficient in extracting water-soluble metabolites and methanol-chloroform was efficient in extracting organic components compared with the dual phase extraction method. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that as low as 0.7 mg organic yield was enough to obtain clear resonance peaks, while about 6.0 mg water-soluble yield was needed to obtain relatively favorable spectral lines. These results show that the efficiency of extracting water and lipid fractions is higher using perchloric acid and methanol-chloroform compared with dual phase extraction and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for analyzing lipid-soluble extracts.

  17. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations±standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700±1000 ng L(-1), 2100±1700 ng L(-1), carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480±380 ng L(-1), 360±400 ng L(-1), venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400±1300 ng L(-1), 1800±2300 ng L(-1). Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that this is likely a global environmental issue

  18. Highly sensitive simultaneous quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Johänning, Janina; Heinkele, Georg; Precht, Jana C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Tamoxifen is a mainstay in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and is metabolized to more than 30 different compounds. Little is known about in vivo concentrations of estrogenic metabolites E-metabolite E, Z-metabolite E, and bisphenol and their relevance for tamoxifen efficacy. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method for tamoxifen metabolites bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E as well as for the sex steroid hormones estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone. Plasma samples were subjected to protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction. Upon derivatization with 3-[(N-succinimide-1-yl)oxycarbonyl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide, all analytes were separated on a sub-2-μm column with a gradient of acetonitrile in water with 0.1 % of formic acid. Analytes were detected on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Our method demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. The lower limits of quantification were 12, 8, and 25 pM for bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E, respectively, and 4 pM for estradiol and estrogen, 50 pM for testosterone and androstenedione, and 25 pM for progesterone. The method was applied to plasma samples of postmenopausal patients taken at baseline and under tamoxifen therapy. Graphical Abstract Sample preparation and derivatization for highly sensitive quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by HPLC-MS/MS.

  19. Fecal cortisol metabolite analysis for noninvasive monitoring of adrenocortical function in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Terio, K A; Citino, S B; Brown, J L

    1999-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay was validated for quantifying excreted cortisol metabolites in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feces. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that immunoreactivity was associated with a water-soluble metabolite in fecal extracts from males and females. None of the immunoreactivity corresponded with free cortisol or corticosterone but rather was associated with a more polar, unidentified metabolite. To determine the biologic relevance of excreted immunoreactive cortisol metabolites, cheetahs were exposed to a variety of situations anticipated to increase cortisol secretion. First, to assess acute changes in adrenal activity, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 400 IU i.m.) was administered to two adult males and two adult females. Pre-ACTH baseline serum cortisol and fecal cortisol metabolite concentrations varied among individuals. Serum cortisol concentrations were elevated above baseline within 10 min of ACTH injection, followed by corresponding increases in fecal cortisol metabolite concentrations (690-4,194% above baseline) 48 hr later in three of four cheetahs. In the fourth cheetah, a smaller increase (334% above baseline) in fecal cortisol metabolite excretion was observed 96 hr after ACTH injection. Seven cheetah females also were subjected to a variety of potentially stressful manipulations, including immobilization, translocation, and introduction to a male to assess the ability of this technique to detect physiologic changes in adrenal activity. Increased fecal corticoid metabolite excretion was observed 24-72 hr after exposure to these exogenous stressors. Results indicate that adrenocortical activity can be monitored noninvasively in the cheetah through analysis of these metabolites. This technique could be valuable for evaluating, and thus optimizing, environmental and management conditions and for investigating the role of stress in disease pathogenesis and the usually poor reproductive performance of this species in

  20. Synchronous fluorometric measurement of metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the bile of brown bullhead

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E.L.C.; Cormier, S.M. . Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.); Racine, R.N.

    1994-05-01

    A synchronous fluorescent spectroscopy (SFS) method was developed to measure pyrene-type metabolites in the bile of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and to estimate the exposure of fish to PAHs in four Lake Erie tributaries collected in the spring and fall of 1990 and 1991. For comparison, fish biliary benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolites were also measured by HPLC/fluorescent detection (HPLC/F). Both methods showed that concentrations of biliary PAH metabolites of fish collected in polluted rivers were significantly higher than those collected from reference rivers. Concentrations biliary metabolites of fish caught in the Black River were five to 20 times greater than those collected in Old Woman Creek by SFS and three to five times greater by HPLC/F. Fish from the Cuyahoga River had four to 24 times more biliary PAH metabolites than fish from Old Woman Creek, measured by SFS, and five to 10 times more, measured by HPLC/F. Brown bullhead from the Toussaint River had fewer PAH metabolites than fish from Old Woman Creek. Correlation analyses of the two sets of data obtained by SFS and HPLC/F showed significance by both Pearson's sample correlation and Spearman's rank correlation. This study indicates that pyrene-type metabolites determined by SFS can be used to estimate B[a]P-type metabolites in fish bile. SFS appears to be a highly sensitive method for detecting PAH metabolites and, because of its simplicity, a cost-efficient method for screening large numbers of samples for exposure to PAHs in fish.