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Sample records for metabolome annotation quality

  1. Quality assurance of metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Beger, Richard; Flynn, Thomas; Guo, Lining; Harris, Georgina; Hogberg, Helena; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Kamp, Hennicke; Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Odwin-DaCosta, Shelly; Pamies, David; Robertson, Donald; Smirnova, Lena; Sun, Jinchun; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics promises a holistic phenotypic characterization of biological responses to toxicants. This technology is based on advanced chemical analytical tools with reasonable throughput, including mass-spectroscopy and NMR. Quality assurance, however - from experimental design, sample preparation, metabolite identification, to bioinformatics data-mining - is urgently needed to assure both quality of metabolomics data and reproducibility of biological models. In contrast to microarray-based transcriptomics, where consensus on quality assurance and reporting standards has been fostered over the last two decades, quality assurance of metabolomics is only now emerging. Regulatory use in safety sciences, and even proper scientific use of these technologies, demand quality assurance. In an effort to promote this discussion, an expert workshop discussed the quality assurance needs of metabolomics. The goals for this workshop were 1) to consider the challenges associated with metabolomics as an emerging science, with an emphasis on its application in toxicology and 2) to identify the key issues to be addressed in order to establish and implement quality assurance procedures in metabolomics-based toxicology. Consensus has still to be achieved regarding best practices to make sure sound, useful, and relevant information is derived from these new tools.

  2. BioSpider: a web server for automating metabolome annotations.

    PubMed

    Knox, Craig; Shrivastava, Savita; Stothard, Paul; Eisner, Roman; Wishart, David S

    2007-01-01

    One of the growing challenges in life science research lies in finding useful, descriptive or quantitative data about newly reported biomolecules (genes, proteins, metabolites and drugs). An even greater challenge is finding information that connects these genes, proteins, drugs or metabolites to each other. Much of this information is scattered through hundreds of different databases, abstracts or books and almost none of it is particularly well integrated. While some efforts are being undertaken at the NCBI and EBI to integrate many different databases together, this still falls short of the goal of having some kind of human-readable synopsis that summarizes the state of knowledge about a given biomolecule - especially small molecules. To address this shortfall, we have developed BioSpider. BioSpider is essentially an automated report generator designed specifically to tabulate and summarize data on biomolecules - both large and small. Specifically, BioSpider allows users to type in almost any kind of biological or chemical identifier (protein/gene name, sequence, accession number, chemical name, brand name, SMILES string, InCHI string, CAS number, etc.) and it returns an in-depth synoptic report (approximately 3-30 pages in length) about that biomolecule and any other biomolecule it may target. This summary includes physico-chemical parameters, images, models, data files, descriptions and predictions concerning the query molecule. BioSpider uses a web-crawler to scan through dozens of public databases and employs a variety of specially developed text mining tools and locally developed prediction tools to find, extract and assemble data for its reports. Because of its breadth, depth and comprehensiveness, we believe BioSpider will prove to be a particularly valuable tool for researchers in metabolomics. BioSpider is available at: www.biospider.ca PMID:17990488

  3. ProbMetab: an R package for Bayesian probabilistic annotation of LC-MS-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ricardo R; Jourdan, Fabien; Salvanha, Diego M; Letisse, Fabien; Jamin, Emilien L; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos A; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N

    2014-05-01

    We present ProbMetab, an R package that promotes substantial improvement in automatic probabilistic liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolome annotation. The inference engine core is based on a Bayesian model implemented to (i) allow diverse source of experimental data and metadata to be systematically incorporated into the model with alternative ways to calculate the likelihood function and (ii) allow sensitive selection of biologically meaningful biochemical reaction databases as Dirichlet-categorical prior distribution. Additionally, to ensure result interpretation by system biologists, we display the annotation in a network where observed mass peaks are connected if their candidate metabolites are substrate/product of known biochemical reactions. This graph can be overlaid with other graph-based analysis, such as partial correlation networks, in a visualization scheme exported to Cytoscape, with web and stand-alone versions. PMID:24443383

  4. Educational Quality Indicators: Annotated Bibliography. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This annotated bibliography of journal articles and documents on educational quality indicators contains approximately 230 entries arranged by the following topics: (1) indicator systems, including international, local/provincial/state, models, and national/federal systems; (2) interpretive framework (context, inputs, processes), including…

  5. Experimental Strategies for Functional Annotation and Metabolism Discovery: Targeted Screening of Solute Binding Proteins and Unbiased Panning of Metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rate at which genome sequencing data is accruing demands enhanced methods for functional annotation and metabolism discovery. Solute binding proteins (SBPs) facilitate the transport of the first reactant in a metabolic pathway, thereby constraining the regions of chemical space and the chemistries that must be considered for pathway reconstruction. We describe high-throughput protein production and differential scanning fluorimetry platforms, which enabled the screening of 158 SBPs against a 189 component library specifically tailored for this class of proteins. Like all screening efforts, this approach is limited by the practical constraints imposed by construction of the library, i.e., we can study only those metabolites that are known to exist and which can be made in sufficient quantities for experimentation. To move beyond these inherent limitations, we illustrate the promise of crystallographic- and mass spectrometric-based approaches for the unbiased use of entire metabolomes as screening libraries. Together, our approaches identified 40 new SBP ligands, generated experiment-based annotations for 2084 SBPs in 71 isofunctional clusters, and defined numerous metabolic pathways, including novel catabolic pathways for the utilization of ethanolamine as sole nitrogen source and the use of d-Ala-d-Ala as sole carbon source. These efforts begin to define an integrated strategy for realizing the full value of amassing genome sequence data. PMID:25540822

  6. Experimental strategies for functional annotation and metabolism discovery: targeted screening of solute binding proteins and unbiased panning of metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Vetting, Matthew W; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Zhao, Suwen; San Francisco, Brian; Kim, Jungwook; Wichelecki, Daniel J; Bouvier, Jason T; Solbiati, Jose O; Vu, Hoan; Zhang, Xinshuai; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Love, James D; Hillerich, Brandan S; Seidel, Ronald D; Quinn, Ronald J; Osterman, Andrei L; Cronan, John E; Jacobson, Matthew P; Gerlt, John A; Almo, Steven C

    2015-01-27

    The rate at which genome sequencing data is accruing demands enhanced methods for functional annotation and metabolism discovery. Solute binding proteins (SBPs) facilitate the transport of the first reactant in a metabolic pathway, thereby constraining the regions of chemical space and the chemistries that must be considered for pathway reconstruction. We describe high-throughput protein production and differential scanning fluorimetry platforms, which enabled the screening of 158 SBPs against a 189 component library specifically tailored for this class of proteins. Like all screening efforts, this approach is limited by the practical constraints imposed by construction of the library, i.e., we can study only those metabolites that are known to exist and which can be made in sufficient quantities for experimentation. To move beyond these inherent limitations, we illustrate the promise of crystallographic- and mass spectrometric-based approaches for the unbiased use of entire metabolomes as screening libraries. Together, our approaches identified 40 new SBP ligands, generated experiment-based annotations for 2084 SBPs in 71 isofunctional clusters, and defined numerous metabolic pathways, including novel catabolic pathways for the utilization of ethanolamine as sole nitrogen source and the use of d-Ala-d-Ala as sole carbon source. These efforts begin to define an integrated strategy for realizing the full value of amassing genome sequence data.

  7. Metabolomics and proteomics annotate therapeutic properties of geniposide: targeting and regulating multiple perturbed pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Wenjun; Han, Ying; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Geniposide is an important constituent of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, a famous Chinese medicinal plant, and has displayed bright prospects in prevention and therapy of hepatic injury (HI). Unfortunately, the working mechanisms of this compound are difficult to determine and thus remain unknown. To determine the mechanisms that underlie this compound, we conducted a systematic analysis of the therapeutic effects of geniposide using biochemistry, metabolomics and proteomics. Geniposide significantly intensified the therapeutic efficacy as indicated by our modern biochemical analysis. Metabolomics results indicate 9 ions in the positive mode as differentiating metabolites which were associated with perturbations in primary bile acid biosynthesis, butanoate metabolism, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism. Of note, geniposide has potential pharmacological effect through regulating multiple perturbed pathways to normal state. In an attempt to address the benefits of geniposide based on the proteomics approaches, the protein-interacting networks were constructed to aid identifying the drug targets of geniposide. Six identified differential proteins appear to be involved in antioxidation and signal transduction, energy production, immunity, metabolism, chaperoning. These proteins were closely related in the protein-protein interaction network and the modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways. These data will help to understand the molecular therapeutic mechanisms of geniposide on hepatic damage rats. We also conclude that metabolomics and proteomics are powerful and versatile tools for both biomarker discovery and exploring the complex relationships between biological pathways and drug response, highlighting insights into drug discovery. PMID:23967205

  8. Metabolomics: approaches to assessing oocyte and embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Sinclair, K D

    2007-09-01

    Morphological evaluation remains the primary method of embryo assessment during IVF cycles, but its modest predictive power and inherent inter- and intra-observer variability limits its value. Low-molecular weight metabolites represent the end products of cell regulatory processes and therefore reveal the response of biological systems to a variety of genetic, nutrient or environmental influences. It follows that the non-invasive quantification of oocyte and embryo metabolism, from the analyses of follicular fluid or culture media, may be a useful predictor of pregnancy outcome following embryo transfer, a potential supported by recent clinical studies working with specific classes of metabolites such as glycolytic intermediates and amino acids. Such selective approaches, however, whilst adhering closely to known cellular processes, may fail to harness the full potential of contemporary metabolomic methodologies, which can measure a wider spectrum of metabolites. However, an important technical drawback with many existing methodologies is the limited number of metabolites that can be determined by a single analytical platform. Vibrational spectroscopy methodologies such as Fourier transform infrared and near infrared spectroscopy may overcome these limitations by generating unique spectral signatures of functional groups and bonds, but their application in embryo quality assessment remains to be fully validated. Ultimately, a combination of evaluation criteria that include morphometry with metabolomics may provide the best predictive assessment of embryo viability.

  9. Different Statistical Approaches to Investigate Porcine Muscle Metabolome Profiles to Highlight New Biomarkers for Pork Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Welzenbach, Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying biochemical processes to identify potential key molecules of meat quality traits drip loss, pH of meat 1 h post-mortem (pH1), pH in meat 24 h post-mortem (pH24) and meat color. An untargeted metabolomics approach detected the profiles of 393 annotated and 1,600 unknown metabolites in 97 Duroc × Pietrain pigs. Despite obvious differences regarding the statistical approaches, the four applied methods, namely correlation analysis, principal component analysis, weighted network analysis (WNA) and random forest regression (RFR), revealed mainly concordant results. Our findings lead to the conclusion that meat quality traits pH1, pH24 and color are strongly influenced by processes of post-mortem energy metabolism like glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, whereas drip loss is significantly associated with metabolites of lipid metabolism. In case of drip loss, RFR was the most suitable method to identify reliable biomarkers and to predict the phenotype based on metabolites. On the other hand, WNA provides the best parameters to investigate the metabolite interactions and to clarify the complex molecular background of meat quality traits. In summary, it was possible to attain findings on the interaction of meat quality traits and their underlying biochemical processes. The detected key metabolites might be better indicators of meat quality especially of drip loss than the measured phenotype itself and potentially might be used as bio indicators. PMID:26919205

  10. Different Statistical Approaches to Investigate Porcine Muscle Metabolome Profiles to Highlight New Biomarkers for Pork Quality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Welzenbach, Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying biochemical processes to identify potential key molecules of meat quality traits drip loss, pH of meat 1 h post-mortem (pH1), pH in meat 24 h post-mortem (pH24) and meat color. An untargeted metabolomics approach detected the profiles of 393 annotated and 1,600 unknown metabolites in 97 Duroc × Pietrain pigs. Despite obvious differences regarding the statistical approaches, the four applied methods, namely correlation analysis, principal component analysis, weighted network analysis (WNA) and random forest regression (RFR), revealed mainly concordant results. Our findings lead to the conclusion that meat quality traits pH1, pH24 and color are strongly influenced by processes of post-mortem energy metabolism like glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, whereas drip loss is significantly associated with metabolites of lipid metabolism. In case of drip loss, RFR was the most suitable method to identify reliable biomarkers and to predict the phenotype based on metabolites. On the other hand, WNA provides the best parameters to investigate the metabolite interactions and to clarify the complex molecular background of meat quality traits. In summary, it was possible to attain findings on the interaction of meat quality traits and their underlying biochemical processes. The detected key metabolites might be better indicators of meat quality especially of drip loss than the measured phenotype itself and potentially might be used as bio indicators.

  11. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites.

    PubMed

    Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J; Francke, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any particular gene. We have formulated a reference-free method to score the TIS annotation quality. The method is based on a comparison of the observed and expected distribution of all TISs in a particular genome given prior gene-calling. We have assessed the TIS annotations for all available NCBI RefSeq microbial genomes and found that approximately 87% is of appropriate quality, whereas 13% needs substantial improvement. We have analyzed a number of factors that could affect TIS annotation quality such as GC-content, taxonomy, the fraction of genes with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the year of publication. The analysis showed that only the first factor has a clear effect. We have then formulated a straightforward Principle Component Analysis-based TIS identification strategy to self-organize and score potential TISs. The strategy is independent of reference data and a priori calculations. A representative set of 277 genomes was subjected to the analysis and we found a clear increase in TIS annotation quality for the genomes with a low quality score. The PCA-based annotation was also compared with annotation with the current tool of reference, Prodigal. The comparison for the model genome of Escherichia coli K12 showed that both methods supplement each other and that prediction agreement can be used as an indicator of a correct TIS annotation. Importantly, the data suggest that the addition of a PCA-based strategy to a Prodigal prediction can be used to 'flag' TIS annotations for re-evaluation and in addition can be used to evaluate a given annotation in case a Prodigal annotation is lacking.

  12. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J.; Francke, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any particular gene. We have formulated a reference-free method to score the TIS annotation quality. The method is based on a comparison of the observed and expected distribution of all TISs in a particular genome given prior gene-calling. We have assessed the TIS annotations for all available NCBI RefSeq microbial genomes and found that approximately 87% is of appropriate quality, whereas 13% needs substantial improvement. We have analyzed a number of factors that could affect TIS annotation quality such as GC-content, taxonomy, the fraction of genes with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the year of publication. The analysis showed that only the first factor has a clear effect. We have then formulated a straightforward Principle Component Analysis-based TIS identification strategy to self-organize and score potential TISs. The strategy is independent of reference data and a priori calculations. A representative set of 277 genomes was subjected to the analysis and we found a clear increase in TIS annotation quality for the genomes with a low quality score. The PCA-based annotation was also compared with annotation with the current tool of reference, Prodigal. The comparison for the model genome of Escherichia coli K12 showed that both methods supplement each other and that prediction agreement can be used as an indicator of a correct TIS annotation. Importantly, the data suggest that the addition of a PCA-based strategy to a Prodigal prediction can be used to ‘flag’ TIS annotations for re-evaluation and in addition can be used to evaluate a given annotation in case a Prodigal annotation is lacking. PMID:26204119

  13. Told through the wine: A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry interplatform comparison reveals the influence of the global approach on the final annotated metabolites in non-targeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ramon; Gallart-Ayala, Hector; Sancho, Juan V; Nuñez, Oscar; Zamora, Tatiana; Martins, Claudia P B; Hernández, Félix; Hernández-Cassou, Santiago; Saurina, Javier; Checa, Antonio

    2016-02-12

    This work focuses on the influence of the selected LC-HRMS platform on the final annotated compounds in non-targeted metabolomics. Two platforms that differed in columns, mobile phases, gradients, chromatographs, mass spectrometers (Orbitrap [Platform#1] and Q-TOF [Platform#2]), data processing and marker selection protocols were compared. A total of 42 wines samples from three different protected denomination of origin (PDO) were analyzed. At the feature level, good (O)PLS-DA models were obtained for both platforms (Q(2)[Platform#1]=0.89, 0.83 and 0.72; Q(2)[Platform#2]=0.86, 0.86 and 0.77 for Penedes, Ribera del Duero and Rioja wines respectively) with 100% correctly classified samples in all cases. At the annotated metabolite level, platforms proposed 9 and 8 annotated metabolites respectively which were identified by matching standards or the MS/MS spectra of the compounds. At this stage, there was no coincidence among platforms regarding the suggested metabolites. When screened on the raw data, 6 and 5 of these compounds were detected on the other platform with a similar trend. Some of the detected metabolites showed complimentary information when integrated on biological pathways. Through the use of some examples at the annotated metabolite level, possible explanations of this initial divergence on the results are presented. This work shows the complications that may arise on the comparison of non-targeted metabolomics platforms even when metabolite focused approaches are used in the identification.

  14. Diagnostic Metabolomic Blood Tests for Endoluminal Gastrointestinal Cancer--A Systematic Review and Assessment of Quality.

    PubMed

    Antonowicz, Stefan; Kumar, Sacheen; Wiggins, Tom; Markar, Sheraz R; Hanna, George B

    2016-01-01

    Advances in analytics have resulted in metabolomic blood tests being developed for the detection of cancer. This systematic review aims to assess the diagnostic accuracy of blood-based metabolomic biomarkers for endoluminal gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Using endoscopic diagnosis as a reference standard, methodologic and reporting quality was assessed using validated tools, in addition to pathway-based informatics to biologically contextualize discriminant features. Twenty-nine studies (15 colorectal, 9 esophageal, 3 gastric, and 2 mixed) with data from 10,835 participants were included. All reported significant differences in hematologic metabolites. In pooled analysis, 246 metabolites were found to be significantly different after multiplicity correction. Incremental metabolic flux with disease progression was frequently reported. Two promising candidates have been validated in independent populations (both colorectal biomarkers), and one has been approved for clinical use. Networks analysis suggested modulation of elements of up to half of Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network subdivisions, and that the poor clinical applicability of commonly modulated metabolites could be due to extensive molecular interconnectivity. Methodologic and reporting quality was assessed as moderate-to-poor. Serum metabolomics holds promise for GI cancer diagnostics; however, future efforts must adhere to consensus standardization initiatives, utilize high-resolution discovery analytics, and compare candidate biomarkers with peer nonendoscopic alternatives.

  15. Metabolomics in food science.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan Manuel; Reyes-De-Corcuera, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics, the newest member of the omics techniques, has become an important tool in agriculture, pharmacy, and environmental sciences. Advances in compound extraction, separation, detection, identification, and data analysis have allowed metabolomics applications in food sciences including food processing, quality, and safety. This chapter discusses recent advances and applications of metabolomics in food science.

  16. Integration of high-content screening and untargeted metabolomics for comprehensive functional annotation of natural product libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Kenji L.; Glassey, Emerson; Linington, Roger G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional natural products discovery using a combination of live/dead screening followed by iterative bioassay-guided fractionation affords no information about compound structure or mode of action until late in the discovery process. This leads to high rates of rediscovery and low probabilities of finding compounds with unique biological and/or chemical properties. By integrating image-based phenotypic screening in HeLa cells with high-resolution untargeted metabolomics analysis, we have developed a new platform, termed Compound Activity Mapping, that is capable of directly predicting the identities and modes of action of bioactive constituents for any complex natural product extract library. This new tool can be used to rapidly identify novel bioactive constituents and provide predictions of compound modes of action directly from primary screening data. This approach inverts the natural products discovery process from the existing ‟grind and find” model to a targeted, hypothesis-driven discovery model where the chemical features and biological function of bioactive metabolites are known early in the screening workflow, and lead compounds can be rationally selected based on biological and/or chemical novelty. We demonstrate the utility of the Compound Activity Mapping platform by combining 10,977 mass spectral features and 58,032 biological measurements from a library of 234 natural products extracts and integrating these two datasets to identify 13 clusters of fractions containing 11 known compound families and four new compounds. Using Compound Activity Mapping we discovered the quinocinnolinomycins, a new family of natural products with a unique carbon skeleton that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26371303

  17. Metabolomics as a Hypothesis-Generating Functional Genomics Tool for the Annotation of Arabidopsis thaliana Genes of “Unknown Function”

    PubMed Central

    Quanbeck, Stephanie M.; Brachova, Libuse; Campbell, Alexis A.; Guan, Xin; Perera, Ann; He, Kun; Rhee, Seung Y.; Bais, Preeti; Dickerson, Julie A.; Dixon, Philip; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Fiehn, Oliver; Barkan, Lenore; Lange, Iris; Lange, B. Markus; Lee, Insuk; Cortes, Diego; Salazar, Carolina; Shuman, Joel; Shulaev, Vladimir; Huhman, David V.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Roth, Mary R.; Welti, Ruth; Ilarslan, Hilal; Wurtele, Eve S.; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics is the methodology that identifies and measures global pools of small molecules (of less than about 1,000 Da) of a biological sample, which are collectively called the metabolome. Metabolomics can therefore reveal the metabolic outcome of a genetic or environmental perturbation of a metabolic regulatory network, and thus provide insights into the structure and regulation of that network. Because of the chemical complexity of the metabolome and limitations associated with individual analytical platforms for determining the metabolome, it is currently difficult to capture the complete metabolome of an organism or tissue, which is in contrast to genomics and transcriptomics. This paper describes the analysis of Arabidopsis metabolomics data sets acquired by a consortium that includes five analytical laboratories, bioinformaticists, and biostatisticians, which aims to develop and validate metabolomics as a hypothesis-generating functional genomics tool. The consortium is determining the metabolomes of Arabidopsis T-DNA mutant stocks, grown in standardized controlled environment optimized to minimize environmental impacts on the metabolomes. Metabolomics data were generated with seven analytical platforms, and the combined data is being provided to the research community to formulate initial hypotheses about genes of unknown function (GUFs). A public database (www.PlantMetabolomics.org) has been developed to provide the scientific community with access to the data along with tools to allow for its interactive analysis. Exemplary datasets are discussed to validate the approach, which illustrate how initial hypotheses can be generated from the consortium-produced metabolomics data, integrated with prior knowledge to provide a testable hypothesis concerning the functionality of GUFs. PMID:22645570

  18. Early Learning: Program Quality in Early Childhood Education. Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, research shows that program quality is a major determinant in the achievement gains for young children who participate in early education programs. Teacher quality, in particular, is closely related to positive educational outcomes for preschool participants. Research shows that children in programs whose lead and supporting…

  19. Framing Quality: Annotated Video-Based Portfolios of Classroom Practice by Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Gail E.; Brennan, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe the use of peer learning teams creating annotated video-based portfolios to improve the quality of teacher-child interactions of undergraduate majors in early childhood and family studies. We used the intentional teaching framework (Hamre et al. in "Handbook of Early Education." Guilford Publications, New York,…

  20. Quality assessment of digital annotated ECG data from clinical trials by the FDA ECG Warehouse.

    PubMed

    Sarapa, Nenad

    2007-09-01

    The FDA mandates that digital electrocardiograms (ECGs) from 'thorough' QTc trials be submitted into the ECG Warehouse in Health Level 7 extended markup language format with annotated onset and offset points of waveforms. The FDA did not disclose the exact Warehouse metrics and minimal acceptable quality standards. The author describes the Warehouse scoring algorithms and metrics used by FDA, points out ways to improve FDA review and suggests Warehouse benefits for pharmaceutical sponsors. The Warehouse ranks individual ECGs according to their score for each quality metric and produces histogram distributions with Warehouse-specific thresholds that identify ECGs of questionable quality. Automatic Warehouse algorithms assess the quality of QT annotation and duration of manual QT measurement by the central ECG laboratory.

  1. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste).

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Min; Suh, Dong Ho; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-07-15

    To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste), metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice) and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens) affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity.

  2. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste).

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Min; Suh, Dong Ho; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste), metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice) and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens) affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity. PMID:27428946

  3. SMART: Statistical Metabolomics Analysis-An R Tool.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Jen; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chia-Wei; Lin, Chien-Wei; Chao, Kun-Mao; Pan, Wen-Harn; Yang, Hsin-Chou

    2016-06-21

    Metabolomics data provide unprecedented opportunities to decipher metabolic mechanisms by analyzing hundreds to thousands of metabolites. Data quality concerns and complex batch effects in metabolomics must be appropriately addressed through statistical analysis. This study developed an integrated analysis tool for metabolomics studies to streamline the complete analysis flow from initial data preprocessing to downstream association analysis. We developed Statistical Metabolomics Analysis-An R Tool (SMART), which can analyze input files with different formats, visually represent various types of data features, implement peak alignment and annotation, conduct quality control for samples and peaks, explore batch effects, and perform association analysis. A pharmacometabolomics study of antihypertensive medication was conducted and data were analyzed using SMART. Neuromedin N was identified as a metabolite significantly associated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors in our metabolome-wide association analysis (p = 1.56 × 10(-4) in an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with an adjustment for unknown latent groups and p = 1.02 × 10(-4) in an ANCOVA with an adjustment for hidden substructures). This endogenous neuropeptide is highly related to neurotensin and neuromedin U, which are involved in blood pressure regulation and smooth muscle contraction. The SMART software, a user guide, and example data can be downloaded from http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/metabolomics/SMART.htm .

  4. Comparative mass spectrometry & nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic approaches for nutraceuticals quality control analysis: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    The number of botanical dietary supplements in the market has recently increased primarily due to increased health awareness. Standardization and quality control of the constituents of these plant extracts is an important topic, particularly when such ingredients are used long term as dietary supplements, or in cases where higher doses are marketed as drugs. The development of fast, comprehensive, and effective untargeted analytical methods for plant extracts is of high interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are the most informative tools, each of which enables high-throughput and global analysis of hundreds of metabolites in a single step. Although only one of the two techniques is utilized in the majority of plant metabolomics applications, there is a growing interest in combining the data from both platforms to effectively unravel the complexity of plant samples. The application of combined MS and NMR in the quality control of nutraceuticals forms the major part of this review. Finally I will look at the future developments and perspectives of these two technologies for the quality control of herbal materials. PMID:24354527

  5. Ranking biomedical annotations with annotator's semantic relevancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aihua

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  6. Ranking Biomedical Annotations with Annotator's Semantic Relevancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  7. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation.

  8. Quality evaluation and prediction of Citrullus lanatus by 1H NMR-based metabolomics and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarachiwin, Lucksanaporn; Masako, Osawa; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2008-07-23

    (1)H NMR spectrometry in combination with multivariate analysis was considered to provide greater information on quality assessment over an ordinary sensory testing method due to its high reliability and high accuracy. The sensory quality evaluation of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) was carried out by means of (1)H NMR-based metabolomics. Multivariate analyses by partial least-squares projections to latent structures-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA) and PLS-regression offered extensive information for quality differentiation and quality evaluation, respectively. The impact of watermelon and rootstock cultivars on the sensory qualities of watermelon was determined on the basis of (1)H NMR metabolic fingerprinting and profiling. The significant metabolites contributing to the discrimination were also identified. A multivariate calibration model was successfully constructed by PLS-regression with extremely high reliability and accuracy. Thus, (1)H NMR-based metabolomics with multivariate analysis was considered to be one of the most suitable complementary techniques that could be applied to assess and predict the sensory quality of watermelons and other horticultural plants.

  9. Metabolomic technologies for improving the quality of food: Practice and promise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is now well documented that the diet has a significant impact on human health and well-being. However, the complete set of small molecule metabolites present in foods that make up the human diet and the role of food production systems in altering this food metabolome are still largely unknown. Me...

  10. Water quality effects and nonpoint source control for forestry: An annotated bibliography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, J.; Parcher, M.A.; Wright, J.; Townsend, G.; Cannell, J.

    1993-08-01

    Many forestry-related practices have been identified as having an impact on water quality and aquatic habitat. These impacts range from increased water temperature and nutrient concentrations to disruptions in stream channel norphology and riparian characteristics that affect stream health. In 1993, the EPA released a guidance specifying management measures for sources of nonpoint source pollution in coastal waters as required under section 6217 of the Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA). The guidance provides the States and Territories with management measures for the following major sources of nonpoint source pollution: (1) agricultural runoff; (2) urban runoff; (3) silvicultural runoff; (4) marinas and recreational boatings; and (5) channelization and channel modification, dams, and streambank and shoreline erosion. The development of the CZARA guidance on management measures provided the impetus for developing this annotated bibliography, which provides a single source of background information on the water quality impacts and the costs and effectiveness of forestry best management practices (BMPs) used to mitigate the impacts.

  11. Metabolomic analysis of the effect of shade treatment on the nutritional and sensory qualities of green tea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lan-Sook; Choi, Ji Hea; Son, Nari; Kim, Sang-Hee; Park, Jong-Dae; Jang, Dae-Ja; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Kim, Hyun-Jin

    2013-01-16

    We analyzed metabolites from a 50% aqueous methanol extract of green teas treated with different shade periods (0, 15, 18, and 20 days) to investigate the effect of low light on their nutritional and sensory qualities. The shaded groups could be clearly distinguished from the control (0 day), and the 20 day group was separated from the 15 and 18 day groups. The shade treatment increased quercetin-galactosylrutinoside, kaempferol-glucosylrutinoside, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate, tryptophan, phenylalanine, theanine, glutamine, glutamate, and caffeine levels but decreased quercetin-glucosylrutinoside, kaempferol-glucoside, gallocatechin, and epigallocatechin levels. Further studies on the nutritional benefits of these metabolites are needed. However, this result, along with the sensory evaluation and color measurement data, suggests that shade treatment improves the nutritional and sensory quality of green tea. Thus, we proposed a metabolomic pathway related to the effect of low light, which could elucidate the relationship between low light and tea quality.

  12. Microbial Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Microbial metabolomics constitutes an integrated component of systems biology. By studying the complete set of metabolites within a microorganism and monitoring the global outcome of interactions between its development processes and the environment, metabolomics can potentially provide a more accurate snap shot of the actual physiological state of the cell. Recent advancement of technologies and post-genomic developments enable the study and analysis of metabolome. This unique contribution resulted in many scientific disciplines incorporating metabolomics as one of their “omics” platforms. This review focuses on metabolomics in microorganisms and utilizes selected topics to illustrate its impact on the understanding of systems microbiology. PMID:22379393

  13. Quantitative performance of E-Scribe warehouse in detecting quality issues with digital annotated ECG data from healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sarapa, Nenad; Mortara, Justin L; Brown, Barry D; Isola, Lamberto; Badilini, Fabio

    2008-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration recommends submission of digital electrocardiograms in the standard HL7 XML format into the electrocardiogram warehouse to support preapproval review of new drug applications. The Food and Drug Administration scrutinizes electrocardiogram quality by viewing the annotated waveforms and scoring electrocardiogram quality by the warehouse algorithms. Part of the Food and Drug Administration warehouse is commercially available to sponsors as the E-Scribe Warehouse. The authors tested the performance of E-Scribe Warehouse algorithms by quantifying electrocardiogram acquisition quality, adherence to QT annotation protocol, and T-wave signal strength in 2 data sets: "reference" (104 digital electrocardiograms from a phase I study with sotalol in 26 healthy subjects with QT annotations by computer-assisted manual adjustment) and "test" (the same electrocardiograms with an intentionally introduced predefined number of quality issues). The E-Scribe Warehouse correctly detected differences between the 2 sets expected from the number and pattern of errors in the "test" set (except for 1 subject with QT misannotated in different leads of serial electrocardiograms) and confirmed the absence of differences where none was expected. E-Scribe Warehouse scores below the threshold value identified individual electrocardiograms with questionable T-wave signal strength. The E-Scribe Warehouse showed satisfactory performance in detecting electrocardiogram quality issues that may impair reliability of QTc assessment in clinical trials in healthy subjects.

  14. Metabolomic profiling of urine samples from mice exposed to protons reveals radiation quality and dose specific differences.

    PubMed

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steven J; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-04-01

    As space travel is expanding to include private tourism and travel beyond low-Earth orbit, so is the risk of exposure to space radiation. Galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events have the potential to expose space travelers to significant doses of radiation that can lead to increased cancer risk and other adverse health consequences. Metabolomics has the potential to assess an individual's risk by exploring the metabolic perturbations in a biofluid or tissue. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.5 and 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon of protons and the levels of metabolites were evaluated in urine at 4 h after radiation exposure through liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Significant differences were identified in metabolites that map to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that energy metabolism is severely impacted after exposure to protons. Additionally, various pathways of amino acid metabolism (tryptophan, tyrosine, arginine and proline and phenylalanine) were affected with potential implications for DNA damage repair and cognitive impairment. Finally, presence of products of purine and pyrimidine metabolism points to direct DNA damage or increased apoptosis. Comparison of these metabolomic data to previously published data from our laboratory with gamma radiation strongly suggests a more pronounced effect on metabolism with protons. This is the first metabolomics study with space radiation in an easily accessible biofluid such as urine that further investigates and exemplifies the biological differences at early time points after exposure to different radiation qualities.

  15. Metabolomic profiling of urine samples from mice exposed to protons reveals radiation quality and dose specific differences.

    PubMed

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steven J; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-04-01

    As space travel is expanding to include private tourism and travel beyond low-Earth orbit, so is the risk of exposure to space radiation. Galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events have the potential to expose space travelers to significant doses of radiation that can lead to increased cancer risk and other adverse health consequences. Metabolomics has the potential to assess an individual's risk by exploring the metabolic perturbations in a biofluid or tissue. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.5 and 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon of protons and the levels of metabolites were evaluated in urine at 4 h after radiation exposure through liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Significant differences were identified in metabolites that map to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that energy metabolism is severely impacted after exposure to protons. Additionally, various pathways of amino acid metabolism (tryptophan, tyrosine, arginine and proline and phenylalanine) were affected with potential implications for DNA damage repair and cognitive impairment. Finally, presence of products of purine and pyrimidine metabolism points to direct DNA damage or increased apoptosis. Comparison of these metabolomic data to previously published data from our laboratory with gamma radiation strongly suggests a more pronounced effect on metabolism with protons. This is the first metabolomics study with space radiation in an easily accessible biofluid such as urine that further investigates and exemplifies the biological differences at early time points after exposure to different radiation qualities. PMID:25768838

  16. Metabolomic Profiling of Urine Samples from Mice Exposed to Protons Reveals Radiation Quality and Dose Specific Differences

    PubMed Central

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steven J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    As space travel is expanding to include private tourism and travel beyond low-Earth orbit, so is the risk of exposure to space radiation. Galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events have the potential to expose space travelers to significant doses of radiation that can lead to increased cancer risk and other adverse health consequences. Metabolomics has the potential to assess an individual’s risk by exploring the metabolic perturbations in a biofluid or tissue. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.5 and 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon of protons and the levels of metabolites were evaluated in urine at 4 h after radiation exposure through liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Significant differences were identified in metabolites that map to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that energy metabolism is severely impacted after exposure to protons. Additionally, various pathways of amino acid metabolism (tryptophan, tyrosine, arginine and proline and phenylalanine) were affected with potential implications for DNA damage repair and cognitive impairment. Finally, presence of products of purine and pyrimidine metabolism points to direct DNA damage or increased apoptosis. Comparison of these metabolomic data to previously published data from our laboratory with gamma radiation strongly suggests a more pronounced effect on metabolism with protons. This is the first metabolomics study with space radiation in an easily accessible biofluid such as urine that further investigates and exemplifies the biological differences at early time points after exposure to different radiation qualities. PMID:25768838

  17. Utility of Metabolomics toward Assessing the Metabolic Basis of Quality Traits in Apple Fruit with an Emphasis on Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Daniel; Andrews, Preston K.; Reganold, John P.; Davies, Neal M.; Lange, B. Markus

    2012-01-01

    A gas chromatography–mass spectrometry approach was employed to evaluate the use of metabolite patterns to differentiate fruit from six commercially grown apple cultivars harvested in 2008. Principal component analysis (PCA) of apple fruit peel and flesh data indicated that individual cultivar replicates clustered together and were separated from all other cultivar samples. An independent metabolomics investigation with fruit harvested in 2003 confirmed the separate clustering of fruit from different cultivars. Further evidence for cultivar separation was obtained using a hierarchical clustering analysis. An evaluation of PCA component loadings revealed specific metabolite classes that contributed the most to each principal component, whereas a correlation analysis demonstrated that specific metabolites correlate directly with quality traits such as antioxidant activity, total phenolics, and total anthocyanins, which are important parameters in the selection of breeding germplasm. These data sets lay the foundation for elucidating the metabolic basis of commercially important fruit quality traits. PMID:22881116

  18. Workflow4Metabolomics: a collaborative research infrastructure for computational metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Giacomoni, Franck; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Monsoor, Misharl; Landi, Marion; Pericard, Pierre; Pétéra, Mélanie; Duperier, Christophe; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Martin, Jean-François; Jacob, Daniel; Goulitquer, Sophie; Thévenot, Etienne A.; Caron, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The complex, rapidly evolving field of computational metabolomics calls for collaborative infrastructures where the large volume of new algorithms for data pre-processing, statistical analysis and annotation can be readily integrated whatever the language, evaluated on reference datasets and chained to build ad hoc workflows for users. We have developed Workflow4Metabolomics (W4M), the first fully open-source and collaborative online platform for computational metabolomics. W4M is a virtual research environment built upon the Galaxy web-based platform technology. It enables ergonomic integration, exchange and running of individual modules and workflows. Alternatively, the whole W4M framework and computational tools can be downloaded as a virtual machine for local installation. Availability and implementation: http://workflow4metabolomics.org homepage enables users to open a private account and access the infrastructure. W4M is developed and maintained by the French Bioinformatics Institute (IFB) and the French Metabolomics and Fluxomics Infrastructure (MetaboHUB). Contact: contact@workflow4metabolomics.org PMID:25527831

  19. Metabolomics as a powerful tool for molecular quality assessment of the fish Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Picone, Gianfranco; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Savorani, Francesco; Testi, Silvia; Badiani, Anna; Capozzi, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    The molecular profiles of perchloric acid solutions extracted from the flesh of Sparus aurata fish specimens, produced according to different aquaculture systems, have been investigated. The (1)H-NMR spectra of aqueous extracts are indicative of differences in the metabolite content of fish reared under different conditions that are already distinguishable at their capture, and substantially maintain the same differences in their molecular profiles after sixteen days of storage under ice. The fish metabolic profiles are studied by top-down chemometric analysis. The results of this exploratory investigation show that the fish metabolome accurately reflects the rearing conditions. The level of many metabolites co-vary with the rearing conditions and a few metabolites are quantified including glycogen (stress indicator), histidine, alanine and glycine which all display significant changes dependent on the aquaculture system and on the storage times.

  20. Tools and databases of the KOMICS web portal for preprocessing, mining, and dissemination of metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Nozomu; Ara, Takeshi; Enomoto, Mitsuo; Motegi, Takeshi; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Iijima, Yoko; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Nakajima, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    A metabolome--the collection of comprehensive quantitative data on metabolites in an organism--has been increasingly utilized for applications such as data-intensive systems biology, disease diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and assessment of food quality. A considerable number of tools and databases have been developed to date for the analysis of data generated by various combinations of chromatography and mass spectrometry. We report here a web portal named KOMICS (The Kazusa Metabolomics Portal), where the tools and databases that we developed are available for free to academic users. KOMICS includes the tools and databases for preprocessing, mining, visualization, and publication of metabolomics data. Improvements in the annotation of unknown metabolites and dissemination of comprehensive metabolomic data are the primary aims behind the development of this portal. For this purpose, PowerGet and FragmentAlign include a manual curation function for the results of metabolite feature alignments. A metadata-specific wiki-based database, Metabolonote, functions as a hub of web resources related to the submitters' work. This feature is expected to increase citation of the submitters' work, thereby promoting data publication. As an example of the practical use of KOMICS, a workflow for a study on Jatropha curcas is presented. The tools and databases available at KOMICS should contribute to enhanced production, interpretation, and utilization of metabolomic Big Data. PMID:24949426

  1. Tools and databases of the KOMICS web portal for preprocessing, mining, and dissemination of metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Nozomu; Ara, Takeshi; Enomoto, Mitsuo; Motegi, Takeshi; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Iijima, Yoko; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Nakajima, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    A metabolome--the collection of comprehensive quantitative data on metabolites in an organism--has been increasingly utilized for applications such as data-intensive systems biology, disease diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and assessment of food quality. A considerable number of tools and databases have been developed to date for the analysis of data generated by various combinations of chromatography and mass spectrometry. We report here a web portal named KOMICS (The Kazusa Metabolomics Portal), where the tools and databases that we developed are available for free to academic users. KOMICS includes the tools and databases for preprocessing, mining, visualization, and publication of metabolomics data. Improvements in the annotation of unknown metabolites and dissemination of comprehensive metabolomic data are the primary aims behind the development of this portal. For this purpose, PowerGet and FragmentAlign include a manual curation function for the results of metabolite feature alignments. A metadata-specific wiki-based database, Metabolonote, functions as a hub of web resources related to the submitters' work. This feature is expected to increase citation of the submitters' work, thereby promoting data publication. As an example of the practical use of KOMICS, a workflow for a study on Jatropha curcas is presented. The tools and databases available at KOMICS should contribute to enhanced production, interpretation, and utilization of metabolomic Big Data.

  2. Representation and high-quality annotation of the Physcomitrella patens transcriptome demonstrates a high proportion of proteins involved in metabolism in mosses.

    PubMed

    Lang, D; Eisinger, J; Reski, R; Rensing, S A

    2005-05-01

    To gain insight into the transcriptome of the well-used plant model system Physcomitrella patens, several EST sequencing projects have been undertaken. We have clustered, assembled, and annotated all publicly available EST and CDS sequences in order to represent the transcriptome of this non-seed plant. Here, we present our fully annotated knowledge resource for the Physcomitrella patens transcriptome, integrating annotation from the production process of the clustered sequences and from a high-quality annotation pipeline developed during this study. Each transcript is represented as an entity containing full annotations and GO term associations. The whole production, filtering, clustering, and annotation process is being modelled and results in seven datasets, representing the annotated Physcomitrella transcriptome from different perspectives. We were able to annotate 63.4 % of the 26 123 virtual transcripts. The transcript archetype, as covered by our clustered data, is compared to a compilation based on all available Physcomitrella full length CDS. The distribution of the gene ontology annotations (GOA) for the virtual transcriptome of Physcomitrella patens demonstrates consistency in the ratios of the core molecular functions among the plant GOA. However, the metabolism subcategory is over-represented in bryophytes as compared to seed plants. This observation can be taken as an indicator for the wealth of alternative metabolic pathways in moss in comparison to spermatophytes. All resources presented in this study have been made available to the scientific community through a suite of user-friendly web interfaces via www.cosmoss.org and form the basis for assembly and annotation of the moss genome, which will be sequenced in 2005.

  3. Metabolomic profiling and sensorial quality of 'Golden Delicious', 'Liberty', 'Santana', and 'Topaz' apples grown using organic and integrated production systems.

    PubMed

    Vanzo, Andreja; Jenko, Mojca; Vrhovsek, Urska; Stopar, Matej

    2013-07-01

    Apple quality was investigated in the scab-resistant 'Liberty', 'Santana', and 'Topaz' cultivars and the scab-susceptible 'Golden Delicious' cultivar. Trees subjected to the same crop load were cultivated using either an organic (ORG) or an integrated production (IP) system. Physicochemical properties, phenolic content, and sensorial quality of fruit from both systems were compared. There were no significant differences in fruit mass, starch, and total soluble solid content (the latter was higher in ORG 'Liberty') between ORG and IP fruit, whereas significantly higher flesh firmness was found in ORG fruit (except no difference in 'Golden Delicious'). Significantly higher total phenolic content in ORG fruit was found in 'Golden Delicious', whereas differences in other cultivars were not significant. Targeted metabolomic profiling of multiple classes of phenolics confirmed the impact of the production system on the 'Golden Delicious' phenolic profile as higher levels of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, neo- and chlorogenic acids, phloridzin, procyanidin B2+B4, -3-O-glucoside and -3-O-galactoside of quercetin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, and rutin being found in ORG fruit. The results obtained suggested that scab resistance influenced the phenolic biosynthesis in relation to the agricultural system. Sensorial evaluation indicated significantly better flavor (except for 'Topaz') and better appearance of IP fruit. PMID:23745580

  4. Metabolomic profiling and sensorial quality of 'Golden Delicious', 'Liberty', 'Santana', and 'Topaz' apples grown using organic and integrated production systems.

    PubMed

    Vanzo, Andreja; Jenko, Mojca; Vrhovsek, Urska; Stopar, Matej

    2013-07-01

    Apple quality was investigated in the scab-resistant 'Liberty', 'Santana', and 'Topaz' cultivars and the scab-susceptible 'Golden Delicious' cultivar. Trees subjected to the same crop load were cultivated using either an organic (ORG) or an integrated production (IP) system. Physicochemical properties, phenolic content, and sensorial quality of fruit from both systems were compared. There were no significant differences in fruit mass, starch, and total soluble solid content (the latter was higher in ORG 'Liberty') between ORG and IP fruit, whereas significantly higher flesh firmness was found in ORG fruit (except no difference in 'Golden Delicious'). Significantly higher total phenolic content in ORG fruit was found in 'Golden Delicious', whereas differences in other cultivars were not significant. Targeted metabolomic profiling of multiple classes of phenolics confirmed the impact of the production system on the 'Golden Delicious' phenolic profile as higher levels of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, neo- and chlorogenic acids, phloridzin, procyanidin B2+B4, -3-O-glucoside and -3-O-galactoside of quercetin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, and rutin being found in ORG fruit. The results obtained suggested that scab resistance influenced the phenolic biosynthesis in relation to the agricultural system. Sensorial evaluation indicated significantly better flavor (except for 'Topaz') and better appearance of IP fruit.

  5. The Human Urine Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Bouatra, Souhaila; Aziat, Farid; Mandal, Rupasri; Guo, An Chi; Wilson, Michael R.; Knox, Craig; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Saleem, Fozia; Liu, Philip; Dame, Zerihun T.; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Yallou, Faizath S.; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bogumil, Ralf; Roehring, Cornelia; Wishart, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Urine has long been a “favored” biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify) a total of: 209 (209) by NMR, 179 (85) by GC-MS, 127 (127) by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40) by ICP-MS and 10 (10) by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database containing

  6. Automated update, revision, and quality control of the maize genome annotations using MAKER-P improves the B73 RefGen_v3 gene models and identifies new genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large size and relative complexity of many plant genomes make creation, quality control, and dissemination of high-quality gene structure annotations challenging. In response, we have developed MAKER-P, a fast and easy-to-use genome annotation engine for plants. Here, we report the use of MAKER-...

  7. Adaptation and Recommendation Techniques to Improve the Quality of Annotations and the Relevance of Resources in Web 2.0 and Semantic Web-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, Ilaria

    The Web 2.0 and the Semantic Web represent different forms of evolution of the first-generation Web, and both of them enrich Web resources with semantic annotations. Recommendation and personalization of Web resources is another trend that becomes more and more important with the growth of information, and both the Web 2.0 and the Semantic Web are deeply connected to it. The objective of this paper is to analyze the contribution of recommendation and adaptation techniques to these paradigms and to investigate if these techniques can be used as a bridge for their integration. More specifically, the paper will focus on the contribution of adaptation and recommendation techniques to improve the quality of annotations in the Web 2.0, Semantic Web, and mixed approaches and the relevance of annotated resources that are retrieved or filtered to users.

  8. Quality Assurance for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Services: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towery, O. B.; And Others

    This is a comprehensive bibliography for all those in the alcohol, drug abuse and mental health fields who are developing and implementing programs for assuring quality in the services they provide. A major problem is the newness of the language and the unfamilarity with procedures required by the government and others seeking accountability from…

  9. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions.

  10. ECMDB: the E. coli Metabolome Database.

    PubMed

    Guo, An Chi; Jewison, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Liu, Yifeng; Knox, Craig; Djoumbou, Yannick; Lo, Patrick; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Wishart, David S

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Metabolome Database (ECMDB, http://www.ecmdb.ca) is a comprehensively annotated metabolomic database containing detailed information about the metabolome of E. coli (K-12). Modelled closely on the Human and Yeast Metabolome Databases, the ECMDB contains >2600 metabolites with links to ∼1500 different genes and proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in the ECMDB has been collected from dozens of textbooks, journal articles and electronic databases. Each metabolite entry in the ECMDB contains an average of 75 separate data fields, including comprehensive compound descriptions, names and synonyms, chemical taxonomy, compound structural and physicochemical data, bacterial growth conditions and substrates, reactions, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data and numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. The ECMDB also includes an extensive collection of intracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from our own work as well as other published metabolomic studies. This information is further supplemented with thousands of fully assigned reference nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry spectra obtained from pure E. coli metabolites that we (and others) have collected. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of E. coli's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers but also to molecular biologists, systems biologists and individuals in the biotechnology industry.

  11. Metabolomics-Inspired Insight into Developmental, Environmental and Genetic Aspects of Tomato Fruit Chemical Composition and Quality.

    PubMed

    Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-09-01

    Tomato was one of the first plant species to be evaluated using metabolomics and remains one of the best characterized, with tomato fruit being both an important source of nutrition in the human diet and a valuable model system for the development of fleshy fruits. Additionally, given the broad habitat range of members of the tomato clade and the extensive use of exotic germplasm in tomato genetic research, it represents an excellent genetic model system for understanding both metabolism per se and the importance of various metabolites in conferring stress tolerance. This review summarizes technical approaches used to characterize the tomato metabolome to date and details insights into metabolic pathway structure and regulation that have been obtained via analysis of tissue samples taken under different developmental or environmental circumstance as well as following genetic perturbation. Particular attention is paid to compounds of importance for nutrition or the shelf-life of tomatoes. We propose furthermore how metabolomics information can be coupled to the burgeoning wealth of genome sequence data from the tomato clade to enhance further our understanding of (i) the shifts in metabolic regulation occurring during development and (ii) specialization of metabolism within the tomato clade as a consequence of either adaptive evolution or domestication.

  12. Validation of a two-step quality control approach for a large-scale human urine metabolomic study conducted in seven experimental batches with LC/QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Demetrowitsch, Tobias J; Petersen, Beate; Keppler, Julia K; Koch, Andreas; Schreiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Schwarz, Karin

    2015-01-01

    After his study of food science at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Tobias J Demetrowitsch obtained his doctoral degree in the research field of metabolomics at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel. The present paper is part of his doctoral thesis and describes an extended strategy to evaluate and verify complex or large-scale experiments and data sets. Large-scale studies result in high sample numbers, requiring the analysis of samples in different batches. So far, the verification of such LC-MS-based metabolomics studies is difficult. Common approaches have not provided a reliable validation procedure to date. This article shows a novel verification process for a large-scale human urine study (analyzed by a LC/QToF-MS system) using a two-step validation procedure. The first step comprises a targeted approach that aims to examine and exclude statistical outliers. The second step consists of a principle component analysis, with the aim of a tight cluster of all quality controls and a second for all volunteer samples. The applied study design provides a reliable two-step validation procedure for large-scale studies and additionally contains an inhouse verification procedure. PMID:25558939

  13. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K.; Larsen, Lotte B.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits. PMID:24957988

  14. Integrated metabolomic and transcriptome analyses reveal finishing forage affects metabolic pathways related to beef quality and animal welfare

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, José A.; He, Yanghua; Li, Yaokun; Liu, Jianan; Erdman, Richard A.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Song, Jiuzhou

    2016-01-01

    Beef represents a major dietary component and source of protein in many countries. With an increasing demand for beef, the industry is currently undergoing changes towards naturally produced beef. However, the true differences between the feeding systems, especially the biochemical and nutritional aspects, are still unclear. Using transcriptome and metabolome profiles, we identified biological pathways related to the differences between grass- and grain-fed Angus steers. In the latissimus dorsi muscle, we have recognized 241 differentially expressed genes (FDR < 0.1). The metabolome examinations of muscle and blood revealed 163 and 179 altered compounds in each tissue (P < 0.05), respectively. Accordingly, alterations in glucose metabolism, divergences in free fatty acids and carnitine conjugated lipid levels, and altered β-oxidation have been observed. The anti-inflammatory n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are enriched in grass finished beef, while higher levels of n6 PUFAs in grain finished animals may promote inflammation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, grass-fed animals produce tender beef with lower total fat and a higher omega3/omega6 ratio than grain-fed ones, which could potentially benefit consumer health. Most importantly, blood cortisol levels strongly indicate that grass-fed animals may experience less stress than the grain-fed individuals. These results will provide deeper insights into the merits and mechanisms of muscle development. PMID:27185157

  15. Integrated metabolomic and transcriptome analyses reveal finishing forage affects metabolic pathways related to beef quality and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, José A; He, Yanghua; Li, Yaokun; Liu, Jianan; Erdman, Richard A; Sonstegard, Tad S; Song, Jiuzhou

    2016-01-01

    Beef represents a major dietary component and source of protein in many countries. With an increasing demand for beef, the industry is currently undergoing changes towards naturally produced beef. However, the true differences between the feeding systems, especially the biochemical and nutritional aspects, are still unclear. Using transcriptome and metabolome profiles, we identified biological pathways related to the differences between grass- and grain-fed Angus steers. In the latissimus dorsi muscle, we have recognized 241 differentially expressed genes (FDR < 0.1). The metabolome examinations of muscle and blood revealed 163 and 179 altered compounds in each tissue (P < 0.05), respectively. Accordingly, alterations in glucose metabolism, divergences in free fatty acids and carnitine conjugated lipid levels, and altered β-oxidation have been observed. The anti-inflammatory n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are enriched in grass finished beef, while higher levels of n6 PUFAs in grain finished animals may promote inflammation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, grass-fed animals produce tender beef with lower total fat and a higher omega3/omega6 ratio than grain-fed ones, which could potentially benefit consumer health. Most importantly, blood cortisol levels strongly indicate that grass-fed animals may experience less stress than the grain-fed individuals. These results will provide deeper insights into the merits and mechanisms of muscle development. PMID:27185157

  16. Gene Ontology annotations and resources.

    PubMed

    Blake, J A; Dolan, M; Drabkin, H; Hill, D P; Li, Ni; Sitnikov, D; Bridges, S; Burgess, S; Buza, T; McCarthy, F; Peddinti, D; Pillai, L; Carbon, S; Dietze, H; Ireland, A; Lewis, S E; Mungall, C J; Gaudet, P; Chrisholm, R L; Fey, P; Kibbe, W A; Basu, S; Siegele, D A; McIntosh, B K; Renfro, D P; Zweifel, A E; Hu, J C; Brown, N H; Tweedie, S; Alam-Faruque, Y; Apweiler, R; Auchinchloss, A; Axelsen, K; Bely, B; Blatter, M -C; Bonilla, C; Bouguerleret, L; Boutet, E; Breuza, L; Bridge, A; Chan, W M; Chavali, G; Coudert, E; Dimmer, E; Estreicher, A; Famiglietti, L; Feuermann, M; Gos, A; Gruaz-Gumowski, N; Hieta, R; Hinz, C; Hulo, C; Huntley, R; James, J; Jungo, F; Keller, G; Laiho, K; Legge, D; Lemercier, P; Lieberherr, D; Magrane, M; Martin, M J; Masson, P; Mutowo-Muellenet, P; O'Donovan, C; Pedruzzi, I; Pichler, K; Poggioli, D; Porras Millán, P; Poux, S; Rivoire, C; Roechert, B; Sawford, T; Schneider, M; Stutz, A; Sundaram, S; Tognolli, M; Xenarios, I; Foulgar, R; Lomax, J; Roncaglia, P; Khodiyar, V K; Lovering, R C; Talmud, P J; Chibucos, M; Giglio, M Gwinn; Chang, H -Y; Hunter, S; McAnulla, C; Mitchell, A; Sangrador, A; Stephan, R; Harris, M A; Oliver, S G; Rutherford, K; Wood, V; Bahler, J; Lock, A; Kersey, P J; McDowall, D M; Staines, D M; Dwinell, M; Shimoyama, M; Laulederkind, S; Hayman, T; Wang, S -J; Petri, V; Lowry, T; D'Eustachio, P; Matthews, L; Balakrishnan, R; Binkley, G; Cherry, J M; Costanzo, M C; Dwight, S S; Engel, S R; Fisk, D G; Hitz, B C; Hong, E L; Karra, K; Miyasato, S R; Nash, R S; Park, J; Skrzypek, M S; Weng, S; Wong, E D; Berardini, T Z; Huala, E; Mi, H; Thomas, P D; Chan, J; Kishore, R; Sternberg, P; Van Auken, K; Howe, D; Westerfield, M

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium (GOC, http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that classifies gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. Over the past year, the GOC has implemented several processes to increase the quantity, quality and specificity of GO annotations. First, the number of manual, literature-based annotations has grown at an increasing rate. Second, as a result of a new 'phylogenetic annotation' process, manually reviewed, homology-based annotations are becoming available for a broad range of species. Third, the quality of GO annotations has been improved through a streamlined process for, and automated quality checks of, GO annotations deposited by different annotation groups. Fourth, the consistency and correctness of the ontology itself has increased by using automated reasoning tools. Finally, the GO has been expanded not only to cover new areas of biology through focused interaction with experts, but also to capture greater specificity in all areas of the ontology using tools for adding new combinatorial terms. The GOC works closely with other ontology developers to support integrated use of terminologies. The GOC supports its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources.

  17. Gene Ontology annotations and resources.

    PubMed

    Blake, J A; Dolan, M; Drabkin, H; Hill, D P; Li, Ni; Sitnikov, D; Bridges, S; Burgess, S; Buza, T; McCarthy, F; Peddinti, D; Pillai, L; Carbon, S; Dietze, H; Ireland, A; Lewis, S E; Mungall, C J; Gaudet, P; Chrisholm, R L; Fey, P; Kibbe, W A; Basu, S; Siegele, D A; McIntosh, B K; Renfro, D P; Zweifel, A E; Hu, J C; Brown, N H; Tweedie, S; Alam-Faruque, Y; Apweiler, R; Auchinchloss, A; Axelsen, K; Bely, B; Blatter, M -C; Bonilla, C; Bouguerleret, L; Boutet, E; Breuza, L; Bridge, A; Chan, W M; Chavali, G; Coudert, E; Dimmer, E; Estreicher, A; Famiglietti, L; Feuermann, M; Gos, A; Gruaz-Gumowski, N; Hieta, R; Hinz, C; Hulo, C; Huntley, R; James, J; Jungo, F; Keller, G; Laiho, K; Legge, D; Lemercier, P; Lieberherr, D; Magrane, M; Martin, M J; Masson, P; Mutowo-Muellenet, P; O'Donovan, C; Pedruzzi, I; Pichler, K; Poggioli, D; Porras Millán, P; Poux, S; Rivoire, C; Roechert, B; Sawford, T; Schneider, M; Stutz, A; Sundaram, S; Tognolli, M; Xenarios, I; Foulgar, R; Lomax, J; Roncaglia, P; Khodiyar, V K; Lovering, R C; Talmud, P J; Chibucos, M; Giglio, M Gwinn; Chang, H -Y; Hunter, S; McAnulla, C; Mitchell, A; Sangrador, A; Stephan, R; Harris, M A; Oliver, S G; Rutherford, K; Wood, V; Bahler, J; Lock, A; Kersey, P J; McDowall, D M; Staines, D M; Dwinell, M; Shimoyama, M; Laulederkind, S; Hayman, T; Wang, S -J; Petri, V; Lowry, T; D'Eustachio, P; Matthews, L; Balakrishnan, R; Binkley, G; Cherry, J M; Costanzo, M C; Dwight, S S; Engel, S R; Fisk, D G; Hitz, B C; Hong, E L; Karra, K; Miyasato, S R; Nash, R S; Park, J; Skrzypek, M S; Weng, S; Wong, E D; Berardini, T Z; Huala, E; Mi, H; Thomas, P D; Chan, J; Kishore, R; Sternberg, P; Van Auken, K; Howe, D; Westerfield, M

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium (GOC, http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that classifies gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. Over the past year, the GOC has implemented several processes to increase the quantity, quality and specificity of GO annotations. First, the number of manual, literature-based annotations has grown at an increasing rate. Second, as a result of a new 'phylogenetic annotation' process, manually reviewed, homology-based annotations are becoming available for a broad range of species. Third, the quality of GO annotations has been improved through a streamlined process for, and automated quality checks of, GO annotations deposited by different annotation groups. Fourth, the consistency and correctness of the ontology itself has increased by using automated reasoning tools. Finally, the GO has been expanded not only to cover new areas of biology through focused interaction with experts, but also to capture greater specificity in all areas of the ontology using tools for adding new combinatorial terms. The GOC works closely with other ontology developers to support integrated use of terminologies. The GOC supports its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources. PMID:23161678

  18. Quality classification of Spanish olive oils by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and metabolomics-based statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Sales, C; Cervera, M I; Gil, R; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Beltran, J

    2017-02-01

    The novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source has been used in combination with gas chromatography (GC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for determination of volatile components of olive oil, enhancing its potential for classification of olive oil samples according to their quality using a metabolomics-based approach. The full-spectrum acquisition has allowed the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in olive oil samples, including Extra Virgin, Virgin and Lampante qualities. A dynamic headspace extraction with cartridge solvent elution was applied. The metabolomics strategy consisted of three different steps: a full mass spectral alignment of GC-MS data using MzMine 2.0, a multivariate analysis using Ez-Info and the creation of the statistical model with combinations of responses for molecular fragments. The model was finally validated using blind samples, obtaining an accuracy in oil classification of 70%, taking the official established method, "PANEL TEST", as reference.

  19. Assisted annotation of medical free text using RapTAT

    PubMed Central

    Gobbel, Glenn T; Garvin, Jennifer; Reeves, Ruth; Cronin, Robert M; Heavirland, Julia; Williams, Jenifer; Weaver, Allison; Jayaramaraja, Shrimalini; Giuse, Dario; Speroff, Theodore; Brown, Steven H; Xu, Hua; Matheny, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether assisted annotation using interactive training can reduce the time required to annotate a clinical document corpus without introducing bias. Materials and methods A tool, RapTAT, was designed to assist annotation by iteratively pre-annotating probable phrases of interest within a document, presenting the annotations to a reviewer for correction, and then using the corrected annotations for further machine learning-based training before pre-annotating subsequent documents. Annotators reviewed 404 clinical notes either manually or using RapTAT assistance for concepts related to quality of care during heart failure treatment. Notes were divided into 20 batches of 19–21 documents for iterative annotation and training. Results The number of correct RapTAT pre-annotations increased significantly and annotation time per batch decreased by ∼50% over the course of annotation. Annotation rate increased from batch to batch for assisted but not manual reviewers. Pre-annotation F-measure increased from 0.5 to 0.6 to >0.80 (relative to both assisted reviewer and reference annotations) over the first three batches and more slowly thereafter. Overall inter-annotator agreement was significantly higher between RapTAT-assisted reviewers (0.89) than between manual reviewers (0.85). Discussion The tool reduced workload by decreasing the number of annotations needing to be added and helping reviewers to annotate at an increased rate. Agreement between the pre-annotations and reference standard, and agreement between the pre-annotations and assisted annotations, were similar throughout the annotation process, which suggests that pre-annotation did not introduce bias. Conclusions Pre-annotations generated by a tool capable of interactive training can reduce the time required to create an annotated document corpus by up to 50%. PMID:24431336

  20. HMDB: a knowledgebase for the human metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.; Knox, Craig; Guo, An Chi; Eisner, Roman; Young, Nelson; Gautam, Bijaya; Hau, David D.; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bouatra, Souhaila; Mandal, Rupasri; Sinelnikov, Igor; Xia, Jianguo; Jia, Leslie; Cruz, Joseph A.; Lim, Emilia; Sobsey, Constance A.; Shrivastava, Savita; Huang, Paul; Liu, Philip; Fang, Lydia; Peng, Jun; Fradette, Ryan; Cheng, Dean; Tzur, Dan; Clements, Melisa; Lewis, Avalyn; De Souza, Andrea; Zuniga, Azaret; Dawe, Margot; Xiong, Yeping; Clive, Derrick; Greiner, Russ; Nazyrova, Alsu; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Li, Liang; Vogel, Hans J.; Forsythe, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB, http://www.hmdb.ca) is a richly annotated resource that is designed to address the broad needs of biochemists, clinical chemists, physicians, medical geneticists, nutritionists and members of the metabolomics community. Since its first release in 2007, the HMDB has been used to facilitate the research for nearly 100 published studies in metabolomics, clinical biochemistry and systems biology. The most recent release of HMDB (version 2.0) has been significantly expanded and enhanced over the previous release (version 1.0). In particular, the number of fully annotated metabolite entries has grown from 2180 to more than 6800 (a 300% increase), while the number of metabolites with biofluid or tissue concentration data has grown by a factor of five (from 883 to 4413). Similarly, the number of purified compounds with reference to NMR, LC-MS and GC-MS spectra has more than doubled (from 380 to more than 790 compounds). In addition to this significant expansion in database size, many new database searching tools and new data content has been added or enhanced. These include better algorithms for spectral searching and matching, more powerful chemical substructure searches, faster text searching software, as well as dedicated pathway searching tools and customized, clickable metabolic maps. Changes to the user-interface have also been implemented to accommodate future expansion and to make database navigation much easier. These improvements should make the HMDB much more useful to a much wider community of users. PMID:18953024

  1. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Cancer.gov

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  2. ALLocator: An Interactive Web Platform for the Analysis of Metabolomic LC-ESI-MS Datasets, Enabling Semi-Automated, User-Revised Compound Annotation and Mass Isotopomer Ratio Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Persicke, Marcus; Albaum, Stefan P.; Kalinowski, Jörn; Goesmann, Alexander; Niehaus, Karsten; Nattkemper, Tim W.

    2014-01-01

    Adduct formation, fragmentation events and matrix effects impose special challenges to the identification and quantitation of metabolites in LC-ESI-MS datasets. An important step in compound identification is the deconvolution of mass signals. During this processing step, peaks representing adducts, fragments, and isotopologues of the same analyte are allocated to a distinct group, in order to separate peaks from coeluting compounds. From these peak groups, neutral masses and pseudo spectra are derived and used for metabolite identification via mass decomposition and database matching. Quantitation of metabolites is hampered by matrix effects and nonlinear responses in LC-ESI-MS measurements. A common approach to correct for these effects is the addition of a U-13C-labeled internal standard and the calculation of mass isotopomer ratios for each metabolite. Here we present a new web-platform for the analysis of LC-ESI-MS experiments. ALLocator covers the workflow from raw data processing to metabolite identification and mass isotopomer ratio analysis. The integrated processing pipeline for spectra deconvolution “ALLocatorSD” generates pseudo spectra and automatically identifies peaks emerging from the U-13C-labeled internal standard. Information from the latter improves mass decomposition and annotation of neutral losses. ALLocator provides an interactive and dynamic interface to explore and enhance the results in depth. Pseudo spectra of identified metabolites can be stored in user- and method-specific reference lists that can be applied on succeeding datasets. The potential of the software is exemplified in an experiment, in which abundance fold-changes of metabolites of the l-arginine biosynthesis in C. glutamicum type strain ATCC 13032 and l-arginine producing strain ATCC 21831 are compared. Furthermore, the capability for detection and annotation of uncommon large neutral losses is shown by the identification of (γ-)glutamyl dipeptides in the same strains

  3. GC/MS based metabolomics: development of a data mining system for metabolite identification by using soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The goal of metabolomics analyses is a comprehensive and systematic understanding of all metabolites in biological samples. Many useful platforms have been developed to achieve this goal. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is a well-established analytical method in metabolomics study, and 200 to 500 peaks are routinely observed with one biological sample. However, only ~100 metabolites can be identified, and the remaining peaks are left as "unknowns". Result We present an algorithm that acquires more extensive metabolite information. Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient and the Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) method were combined to automatically identify and annotate unknown peaks, which tend to be missed in routine studies that employ manual processing. Conclusions Our data mining system can offer a wealth of metabolite information quickly and easily, and it provides new insights, particularly into food quality evaluation and prediction. PMID:21542920

  4. Likelihood-based gene annotations for gap filling and quality assessment in genome-scale metabolic models

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, Matthew N.; Mundy, Michael B.; Henry, Christopher S.; Chia, Nicholas; Price, Nathan D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-16

    Genome-scale metabolic models provide a powerful means to harness information from genomes to deepen biological insights. With exponentially increasing sequencing capacity, there is an enormous need for automated reconstruction techniques that can provide more accurate models in a short time frame. Current methods for automated metabolic network reconstruction rely on gene and reaction annotations to build draft metabolic networks and algorithms to fill gaps in these networks. However, automated reconstruction is hampered by database inconsistencies, incorrect annotations, and gap filling largely without considering genomic information. Here we develop an approach for applying genomic information to predict alternative functions for genes and estimate their likelihoods from sequence homology. We show that computed likelihood values were significantly higher for annotations found in manually curated metabolic networks than those that were not. We then apply these alternative functional predictions to estimate reaction likelihoods, which are used in a new gap filling approach called likelihood-based gap filling to predict more genomically consistent solutions. To validate the likelihood-based gap filling approach, we applied it to models where essential pathways were removed, finding that likelihood-based gap filling identified more biologically relevant solutions than parsimony-based gap filling approaches. We also demonstrate that models gap filled using likelihood-based gap filling provide greater coverage and genomic consistency with metabolic gene functions compared to parsimony-based approaches. Interestingly, despite these findings, we found that likelihoods did not significantly affect consistency of gap filled models with Biolog and knockout lethality data. This indicates that the phenotype data alone cannot necessarily be used to discriminate between alternative solutions for gap filling and therefore, that the use of other information is necessary to

  5. Likelihood-based gene annotations for gap filling and quality assessment in genome-scale metabolic models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benedict, Matthew N.; Mundy, Michael B.; Henry, Christopher S.; Chia, Nicholas; Price, Nathan D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-16

    Genome-scale metabolic models provide a powerful means to harness information from genomes to deepen biological insights. With exponentially increasing sequencing capacity, there is an enormous need for automated reconstruction techniques that can provide more accurate models in a short time frame. Current methods for automated metabolic network reconstruction rely on gene and reaction annotations to build draft metabolic networks and algorithms to fill gaps in these networks. However, automated reconstruction is hampered by database inconsistencies, incorrect annotations, and gap filling largely without considering genomic information. Here we develop an approach for applying genomic information to predict alternative functions for genesmore » and estimate their likelihoods from sequence homology. We show that computed likelihood values were significantly higher for annotations found in manually curated metabolic networks than those that were not. We then apply these alternative functional predictions to estimate reaction likelihoods, which are used in a new gap filling approach called likelihood-based gap filling to predict more genomically consistent solutions. To validate the likelihood-based gap filling approach, we applied it to models where essential pathways were removed, finding that likelihood-based gap filling identified more biologically relevant solutions than parsimony-based gap filling approaches. We also demonstrate that models gap filled using likelihood-based gap filling provide greater coverage and genomic consistency with metabolic gene functions compared to parsimony-based approaches. Interestingly, despite these findings, we found that likelihoods did not significantly affect consistency of gap filled models with Biolog and knockout lethality data. This indicates that the phenotype data alone cannot necessarily be used to discriminate between alternative solutions for gap filling and therefore, that the use of other information is necessary

  6. Likelihood-based gene annotations for gap filling and quality assessment in genome-scale metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Matthew N; Mundy, Michael B; Henry, Christopher S; Chia, Nicholas; Price, Nathan D

    2014-10-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models provide a powerful means to harness information from genomes to deepen biological insights. With exponentially increasing sequencing capacity, there is an enormous need for automated reconstruction techniques that can provide more accurate models in a short time frame. Current methods for automated metabolic network reconstruction rely on gene and reaction annotations to build draft metabolic networks and algorithms to fill gaps in these networks. However, automated reconstruction is hampered by database inconsistencies, incorrect annotations, and gap filling largely without considering genomic information. Here we develop an approach for applying genomic information to predict alternative functions for genes and estimate their likelihoods from sequence homology. We show that computed likelihood values were significantly higher for annotations found in manually curated metabolic networks than those that were not. We then apply these alternative functional predictions to estimate reaction likelihoods, which are used in a new gap filling approach called likelihood-based gap filling to predict more genomically consistent solutions. To validate the likelihood-based gap filling approach, we applied it to models where essential pathways were removed, finding that likelihood-based gap filling identified more biologically relevant solutions than parsimony-based gap filling approaches. We also demonstrate that models gap filled using likelihood-based gap filling provide greater coverage and genomic consistency with metabolic gene functions compared to parsimony-based approaches. Interestingly, despite these findings, we found that likelihoods did not significantly affect consistency of gap filled models with Biolog and knockout lethality data. This indicates that the phenotype data alone cannot necessarily be used to discriminate between alternative solutions for gap filling and therefore, that the use of other information is necessary to

  7. Training in metabolomics research. I. Designing the experiment, collecting and extracting samples and generating metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Stephen; Benton, H Paul; Casazza, Krista; Cooper, Sara J; Cui, Xiangqin; Du, Xiuxia; Engler, Jeffrey; Kabarowski, Janusz H; Li, Shuzhao; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Prasain, Jeevan K; Renfrow, Matthew B; Tiwari, Hemant K

    2016-07-01

    The study of metabolism has had a long history. Metabolomics, a systems biology discipline representing analysis of known and unknown pathways of metabolism, has grown tremendously over the past 20 years. Because of its comprehensive nature, metabolomics requires careful consideration of the question(s) being asked, the scale needed to answer the question(s), collection and storage of the sample specimens, methods for extraction of the metabolites from biological matrices, the analytical method(s) to be employed and the quality control of the analyses, how collected data are correlated, the statistical methods to determine metabolites undergoing significant change, putative identification of metabolites and the use of stable isotopes to aid in verifying metabolite identity and establishing pathway connections and fluxes. The National Institutes of Health Common Fund Metabolomics Program was established in 2012 to stimulate interest in the approaches and technologies of metabolomics. To deliver one of the program's goals, the University of Alabama at Birmingham has hosted an annual 4-day short course in metabolomics for faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students from national and international institutions. This paper is the first part of a summary of the training materials presented in the course to be used as a resource for all those embarking on metabolomics research. The complete set of training materials including slide sets and videos can be viewed at http://www.uab.edu/proteomics/metabolomics/workshop/workshop_june_2015.php. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434804

  8. Cancer Metabolomics and the Human Metabolome Database

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.; Mandal, Rupasri; Stanislaus, Avalyn; Ramirez-Gaona, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The application of metabolomics towards cancer research has led to a renewed appreciation of metabolism in cancer development and progression. It has also led to the discovery of metabolite cancer biomarkers and the identification of a number of novel cancer causing metabolites. The rapid growth of metabolomics in cancer research is also leading to challenges. In particular, with so many cancer-associate metabolites being identified, it is often difficult to keep track of which compounds are associated with which cancers. It is also challenging to track down information on the specific pathways that particular metabolites, drugs or drug metabolites may be affecting. Even more frustrating are the difficulties associated with identifying metabolites from NMR or MS spectra. Fortunately, a number of metabolomics databases are emerging that are designed to address these challenges. One such database is the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). The HMDB is currently the world’s largest and most comprehensive, organism-specific metabolomics database. It contains more than 40,000 metabolite entries, thousands of metabolite concentrations, >700 metabolic and disease-associated pathways, as well as information on dozens of cancer biomarkers. This review is intended to provide a brief summary of the HMDB and to offer some guidance on how it can be used in metabolomic studies of cancer. PMID:26950159

  9. TriAnnot: A Versatile and High Performance Pipeline for the Automated Annotation of Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Philippe; Guilhot, Nicolas; Sakai, Hiroaki; Bernard, Aurélien; Choulet, Frédéric; Theil, Sébastien; Reboux, Sébastien; Amano, Naoki; Flutre, Timothée; Pelegrin, Céline; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Seidel, Michael; Giacomoni, Franck; Reichstadt, Mathieu; Alaux, Michael; Gicquello, Emmanuelle; Legeai, Fabrice; Cerutti, Lorenzo; Numa, Hisataka; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Mayer, Klaus; Itoh, Takeshi; Quesneville, Hadi; Feuillet, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In support of the international effort to obtain a reference sequence of the bread wheat genome and to provide plant communities dealing with large and complex genomes with a versatile, easy-to-use online automated tool for annotation, we have developed the TriAnnot pipeline. Its modular architecture allows for the annotation and masking of transposable elements, the structural, and functional annotation of protein-coding genes with an evidence-based quality indexing, and the identification of conserved non-coding sequences and molecular markers. The TriAnnot pipeline is parallelized on a 712 CPU computing cluster that can run a 1-Gb sequence annotation in less than 5 days. It is accessible through a web interface for small scale analyses or through a server for large scale annotations. The performance of TriAnnot was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and general fitness using curated reference sequence sets from rice and wheat. In less than 8 h, TriAnnot was able to predict more than 83% of the 3,748 CDS from rice chromosome 1 with a fitness of 67.4%. On a set of 12 reference Mb-sized contigs from wheat chromosome 3B, TriAnnot predicted and annotated 93.3% of the genes among which 54% were perfectly identified in accordance with the reference annotation. It also allowed the curation of 12 genes based on new biological evidences, increasing the percentage of perfect gene prediction to 63%. TriAnnot systematically showed a higher fitness than other annotation pipelines that are not improved for wheat. As it is easily adaptable to the annotation of other plant genomes, TriAnnot should become a useful resource for the annotation of large and complex genomes in the future. PMID:22645565

  10. MetaDB a Data Processing Workflow in Untargeted MS-Based Metabolomics Experiments.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Pietro; Mylonas, Roman; Shahaf, Nir; Scholz, Matthias; Arapitsas, Panagiotis; Masuero, Domenico; Weingart, Georg; Carlin, Silvia; Vrhovsek, Urska; Mattivi, Fulvio; Wehrens, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sensitivity and speed, mass-spectrometry based analytical technologies are widely used to in metabolomics to characterize biological phenomena. To address issues like metadata organization, quality assessment, data processing, data storage, and, finally, submission to public repositories, bioinformatic pipelines of a non-interactive nature are often employed, complementing the interactive software used for initial inspection and visualization of the data. These pipelines often are created as open-source software allowing the complete and exhaustive documentation of each step, ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis of extensive and often expensive experiments. In this paper, we will review the major steps which constitute such a data processing pipeline, discussing them in the context of an open-source software for untargeted MS-based metabolomics experiments recently developed at our institute. The software has been developed by integrating our metaMS R package with a user-friendly web-based application written in Grails. MetaMS takes care of data pre-processing and annotation, while the interface deals with the creation of the sample lists, the organization of the data storage, and the generation of survey plots for quality assessment. Experimental and biological metadata are stored in the ISA-Tab format making the proposed pipeline fully integrated with the Metabolights framework.

  11. MetaDB a Data Processing Workflow in Untargeted MS-Based Metabolomics Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Pietro; Mylonas, Roman; Shahaf, Nir; Scholz, Matthias; Arapitsas, Panagiotis; Masuero, Domenico; Weingart, Georg; Carlin, Silvia; Vrhovsek, Urska; Mattivi, Fulvio; Wehrens, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sensitivity and speed, mass-spectrometry based analytical technologies are widely used to in metabolomics to characterize biological phenomena. To address issues like metadata organization, quality assessment, data processing, data storage, and, finally, submission to public repositories, bioinformatic pipelines of a non-interactive nature are often employed, complementing the interactive software used for initial inspection and visualization of the data. These pipelines often are created as open-source software allowing the complete and exhaustive documentation of each step, ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis of extensive and often expensive experiments. In this paper, we will review the major steps which constitute such a data processing pipeline, discussing them in the context of an open-source software for untargeted MS-based metabolomics experiments recently developed at our institute. The software has been developed by integrating our metaMS R package with a user-friendly web-based application written in Grails. MetaMS takes care of data pre-processing and annotation, while the interface deals with the creation of the sample lists, the organization of the data storage, and the generation of survey plots for quality assessment. Experimental and biological metadata are stored in the ISA-Tab format making the proposed pipeline fully integrated with the Metabolights framework. PMID:25566535

  12. Novel biological insights through metabolomics and 13C-flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Nicola; Sauer, Uwe

    2009-10-01

    Metabolomics and (13)C-flux analysis have become instrumental for analyzing cellular metabolism and its regulation. Driven primarily by technical advances in mass spectrometry-based analytics, they provide unmatched readouts on metabolic state and activity. Functional genomics leverages metabolomics for the discovery of novel enzymes and unexpected secondary activities of annotated enzymes. (13)C-flux analyses are frequently used for empirical elucidation of pathways in poorly characterized species and for network-wide analysis of mechanisms that realize energy and redox balancing. Integration of metabolomics, (13)C-flux analysis and other data enable the condition-dependent characterization of regulatory circuits that ultimately govern the metabolic phenotype.

  13. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  14. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  15. Enhanced Acylcarnitine Annotation in High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data: Fragmentation Analysis for the Classification and Annotation of Acylcarnitines

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Justin J. J.; Ridder, Lars; Barrett, Michael P.; Burgess, Karl E. V.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite annotation and identification are primary challenges in untargeted metabolomics experiments. Rigorous workflows for reliable annotation of mass features with chemical structures or compound classes are needed to enhance the power of untargeted mass spectrometry. High-resolution mass spectrometry considerably improves the confidence in assigning elemental formulas to mass features in comparison to nominal mass spectrometry, and embedding of fragmentation methods enables more reliable metabolite annotations and facilitates metabolite classification. However, the analysis of mass fragmentation spectra can be a time-consuming step and requires expert knowledge. This study demonstrates how characteristic fragmentations, specific to compound classes, can be used to systematically analyze their presence in complex biological extracts like urine that have undergone untargeted mass spectrometry combined with data dependent or targeted fragmentation. Human urine extracts were analyzed using normal phase liquid chromatography (hydrophilic interaction chromatography) coupled to an Ion Trap-Orbitrap hybrid instrument. Subsequently, mass chromatograms and collision-induced dissociation and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragments were annotated using the freely available MAGMa software1. Acylcarnitines play a central role in energy metabolism by transporting fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix. By filtering on a combination of a mass fragment and neutral loss designed based on the MAGMa fragment annotations, we were able to classify and annotate 50 acylcarnitines in human urine extracts, based on high-resolution mass spectrometry HCD fragmentation spectra at different energies for all of them. Of these annotated acylcarnitines, 31 are not described in HMDB yet and for only 4 annotated acylcarnitines the fragmentation spectra could be matched to reference spectra. Therefore, we conclude that the use of mass fragmentation filters within the context

  16. Training in metabolomics research. I. Designing the experiment, collecting and extracting samples and generating metabolomics data

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephen; Benton, H. Paul; Casazza, Krista; Cooper, Sara J.; Cui, Xiangqin; Du, Xiuxia; Engler, Jeffrey; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Li, Shuzhao; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Tiwari, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    The study of metabolism has had a long history. Metabolomics, a systems biology discipline representing analysis of known and unknown pathways of metabolism, has grown tremendously over the past 20 years. Because of its comprehensive nature, metabolomics requires careful consideration of the question(s) being asked, the scale needed to answer the question(s), collection and storage of the sample specimens, methods for extraction of the metabolites from biological matrices, the analytical method(s) to be employed and the quality control of the analyses, how collected data are correlated, the statistical methods to determine metabolites undergoing significant change, putative identification of metabolites and the use of stable isotopes to aid in verifying metabolite identity and establishing pathway connections and fluxes. The National Institutes of Health Common Fund Metabolomics Program was established in 2012 to stimulate interest in the approaches and technologies of metabolomics. To deliver one of the program’s goals, the University of Alabama at Birmingham has hosted an annual 4-day short course in metabolomics for faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students from national and international institutions. This paper is the first part of a summary of the training materials presented in the course to be used as a resource for all those embarking on metabolomics research. PMID:27434804

  17. Serum and Muscle Metabolomics for the Prediction of Ultimate pH, a Key Factor for Chicken-Meat Quality.

    PubMed

    Beauclercq, Stéphane; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Collin, Anne; Tesseraud, Sophie; Bourin, Marie; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Berri, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Variations in muscle glycogen storage are highly correlated with variations in meat ultimate pH (pHu), a key factor for poultry meat quality. A total of two chicken lines were divergently selected on breast pHu to understand the biological basis for variations in meat quality (i.e., the pHu- and the pHu+ lines that are characterized by a 17% difference in muscle glycogen content). The effects of this selection on bird metabolism were investigated by quantifying muscle metabolites by high-resolution NMR ((1)H and (31)P) and serum metabolites by (1)H NMR. A total of 20 and 26 discriminating metabolites between the two lines were identified by orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) in the serum and muscle, respectively. There was over-representation of carbohydrate metabolites in the serum and muscle of the pHu- line, consistent with its high level of muscle glycogen. However, the pHu+ line was characterized by markers of oxidative stress and muscle catabolism, probably because of its low level of energy substrates. After OPLS-DA multiblock analysis, a metabolic set of 15 high-confidence biomarkers was identified that could be used to predict the quality of poultry meat after validation on an independent population.

  18. Discovering Regulated Metabolite Families in Untargeted Metabolomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Treutler, Hendrik; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Porzel, Andrea; Gorzolka, Karin; Tissier, Alain; Neumann, Steffen; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich

    2016-08-16

    The identification of metabolites by mass spectrometry constitutes a major bottleneck which considerably limits the throughput of metabolomics studies in biomedical or plant research. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze metabolomics data from untargeted, data-independent LC-MS/MS measurements. By integrated analysis of MS(1) abundances and MS/MS spectra, the identification of regulated metabolite families is achieved. This approach offers a global view on metabolic regulation in comparative metabolomics. We implemented our approach in the web application "MetFamily", which is freely available at http://msbi.ipb-halle.de/MetFamily/ . MetFamily provides a dynamic link between the patterns based on MS(1)-signal intensity and the corresponding structural similarity at the MS/MS level. Structurally related metabolites are annotated as metabolite families based on a hierarchical cluster analysis of measured MS/MS spectra. Joint examination with principal component analysis of MS(1) patterns, where this annotation is preserved in the loadings, facilitates the interpretation of comparative metabolomics data at the level of metabolite families. As a proof of concept, we identified two trichome-specific metabolite families from wild-type tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777 in a fully unsupervised manner and validated our findings based on earlier publications and with NMR. PMID:27452369

  19. Discovering Regulated Metabolite Families in Untargeted Metabolomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Treutler, Hendrik; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Porzel, Andrea; Gorzolka, Karin; Tissier, Alain; Neumann, Steffen; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich

    2016-08-16

    The identification of metabolites by mass spectrometry constitutes a major bottleneck which considerably limits the throughput of metabolomics studies in biomedical or plant research. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze metabolomics data from untargeted, data-independent LC-MS/MS measurements. By integrated analysis of MS(1) abundances and MS/MS spectra, the identification of regulated metabolite families is achieved. This approach offers a global view on metabolic regulation in comparative metabolomics. We implemented our approach in the web application "MetFamily", which is freely available at http://msbi.ipb-halle.de/MetFamily/ . MetFamily provides a dynamic link between the patterns based on MS(1)-signal intensity and the corresponding structural similarity at the MS/MS level. Structurally related metabolites are annotated as metabolite families based on a hierarchical cluster analysis of measured MS/MS spectra. Joint examination with principal component analysis of MS(1) patterns, where this annotation is preserved in the loadings, facilitates the interpretation of comparative metabolomics data at the level of metabolite families. As a proof of concept, we identified two trichome-specific metabolite families from wild-type tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777 in a fully unsupervised manner and validated our findings based on earlier publications and with NMR.

  20. Current metabolomics: technological advances.

    PubMed

    Putri, Sastia P; Yamamoto, Shinya; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-07-01

    Metabolomics, the global quantitative assessment of metabolites in a biological system, has played a pivotal role in various fields of science in the post-genomic era. Metabolites are the result of the interaction of the system's genome with its environment and are not merely the end product of gene expression, but also form part of the regulatory system in an integrated manner. Therefore, metabolomics is often considered a powerful tool to provide an instantaneous snapshot of the physiology of a cell. The power of metabolomics lies on the acquisition of analytical data in which metabolites in a cellular system are quantified, and the extraction of the most meaningful elements of the data by using various data analysis tool. In this review, we discuss the latest development of analytical techniques and data analyses methods in metabolomics study.

  1. Multivariate Analysis in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics aims to provide a global snapshot of all small-molecule metabolites in cells and biological fluids, free of observational biases inherent to more focused studies of metabolism. However, the staggeringly high information content of such global analyses introduces a challenge of its own; efficiently forming biologically relevant conclusions from any given metabolomics dataset indeed requires specialized forms of data analysis. One approach to finding meaning in metabolomics datasets involves multivariate analysis (MVA) methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares projection to latent structures (PLS), where spectral features contributing most to variation or separation are identified for further analysis. However, as with any mathematical treatment, these methods are not a panacea; this review discusses the use of multivariate analysis for metabolomics, as well as common pitfalls and misconceptions. PMID:26078916

  2. Metabolomics and protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Paget, Timothy; Haroune, Nicolas; Bagchi, Sushmita; Jarroll, Edward

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we examine the state-of-the-art technologies (gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, etc.) in the well-established area of metabolomics especially as they relate to protozoan parasites.

  3. MetaMapR: pathway independent metabolomic network analysis incorporating unknowns

    PubMed Central

    Grapov, Dmitry; Wanichthanarak, Kwanjeera; Fiehn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Metabolic network mapping is a widely used approach for integration of metabolomic experimental results with biological domain knowledge. However, current approaches can be limited by biochemical domain or pathway knowledge which results in sparse disconnected graphs for real world metabolomic experiments. MetaMapR integrates enzymatic transformations with metabolite structural similarity, mass spectral similarity and empirical associations to generate richly connected metabolic networks. This open source, web-based or desktop software, written in the R programming language, leverages KEGG and PubChem databases to derive associations between metabolites even in cases where biochemical domain or molecular annotations are unknown. Network calculation is enhanced through an interface to the Chemical Translation System, which allows metabolite identifier translation between >200 common biochemical databases. Analysis results are presented as interactive visualizations or can be exported as high-quality graphics and numerical tables which can be imported into common network analysis and visualization tools. Availability and Implementation: Freely available at http://dgrapov.github.io/MetaMapR/. Requires R and a modern web browser. Installation instructions, tutorials and application examples are available at http://dgrapov.github.io/MetaMapR/. Contact: ofiehn@ucdavis.edu PMID:25847005

  4. Quality classification of Spanish olive oils by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and metabolomics-based statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Sales, C; Cervera, M I; Gil, R; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Beltran, J

    2017-02-01

    The novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source has been used in combination with gas chromatography (GC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for determination of volatile components of olive oil, enhancing its potential for classification of olive oil samples according to their quality using a metabolomics-based approach. The full-spectrum acquisition has allowed the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in olive oil samples, including Extra Virgin, Virgin and Lampante qualities. A dynamic headspace extraction with cartridge solvent elution was applied. The metabolomics strategy consisted of three different steps: a full mass spectral alignment of GC-MS data using MzMine 2.0, a multivariate analysis using Ez-Info and the creation of the statistical model with combinations of responses for molecular fragments. The model was finally validated using blind samples, obtaining an accuracy in oil classification of 70%, taking the official established method, "PANEL TEST", as reference. PMID:27596432

  5. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Cancer.gov

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  6. Xenobiotic metabolomics: major impact on the metabolome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Patterson, Andrew D; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotics are encountered by humans on a daily basis and include drugs, environmental pollutants, cosmetics, and even components of the diet. These chemicals undergo metabolism and detoxication to produce numerous metabolites, some of which have the potential to cause unintended effects such as toxicity. They can also block the action of enzymes or receptors used for endogenous metabolism or affect the efficacy and/or bioavailability of a coadministered drug. Therefore, it is essential to determine the full metabolic effects that these chemicals have on the body. Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of small molecules in a biofluid, can reveal biologically relevant perturbations that result from xenobiotic exposure. This review discusses the impact that genetic, environmental, and gut microflora variation has on the metabolome, and how these variables may interact, positively and negatively, with xenobiotic metabolism.

  7. Improving the quality of biomarker candidates in untargeted metabolomics via peak table-based alignment of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Bean, Heather D; Hill, Jane E; Dimandja, Jean-Marie D

    2015-05-15

    The potential of high-resolution analytical technologies like GC×GC/TOF MS in untargeted metabolomics and biomarker discovery has been limited by the development of fully automated software that can efficiently align and extract information from multiple chromatographic data sets. In this work we report the first investigation on a peak-by-peak basis of the chromatographic factors that impact GC×GC data alignment. A representative set of 16 compounds of different chromatographic characteristics were followed through the alignment of 63 GC×GC chromatograms. We found that varying the mass spectral match parameter had a significant influence on the alignment for poorly-resolved peaks, especially those at the extremes of the detector linear range, and no influence on well-chromatographed peaks. Therefore, optimized chromatography is required for proper GC×GC data alignment. Based on these observations, a workflow is presented for the conservative selection of biomarker candidates from untargeted metabolomics analyses.

  8. Capillary Electrophoresis in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tanja Verena; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical toolbox to describe (all) low-molecular-weight compounds in a biological system, as cells, tissues, urine, and feces, as well as in serum and plasma. To analyze such complex biological samples, high requirements on the analytical technique are needed due to the high variation in compound physico-chemistry (cholesterol derivatives, amino acids, fatty acids as SCFA, MCFA, or LCFA, or pathway-related metabolites belonging to each individual organism) and concentration dynamic range. All main separation techniques (LC-MS, GC-MS) are applied in routine to metabolomics hyphenated or not to mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis is a powerful high-resolving technique but still underused in this field of complex samples. Metabolomics can be performed in the non-targeted way to gain an overview on metabolite profiles in biological samples. Targeted metabolomics is applied to analyze quantitatively pre-selected metabolites. This chapter reviews the use of capillary electrophoresis in the field of metabolomics and exemplifies solutions in metabolite profiling and analysis in urine and plasma. PMID:27645748

  9. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-14

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women's bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the "interactive metabolome", which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI.

  10. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Metabolomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Michael H.; Ward, Jane L.; Baker, John M.

    Modern ‘metabolomic’ methods allow us to compare levels of many structurally diverse compounds in an automated fashion across a large number of samples. This technology is ideally suited to screening of populations of plants, including trials where the aim is the determination of unintended effects introduced by GM. A number of metabolomic methods have been devised for the determination of substantial equivalence. We have developed a methodology, using [1H]-NMR fingerprinting, for metabolomic screening of plants and have applied it to the study of substantial equivalence of field-grown GM wheat. We describe here the principles and detail of that protocol as applied to the analysis of flour generated from field plots of wheat. Particular emphasis is given to the downstream data processing and comparison of spectra by multivariate analysis, from which conclusions regarding metabolome changes due to the GM can be assessed against the background of natural variation due to environment.

  11. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources. PMID:24829223

  12. Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Gareth A; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S

    2014-06-01

    Recent technological advances in accurate mass spectrometry and data analysis have revolutionized metabolomics experimentation. Activity-based and global metabolomic profiling methods allow simultaneous and rapid screening of hundreds of metabolites from a variety of chemical classes, making them useful tools for the discovery of novel enzymatic activities and metabolic pathways. By using the metabolome of the relevant organism or close species, these methods capitalize on biological relevance, avoiding the assignment of artificial and non-physiological functions. This review discusses state-of-the-art metabolomic approaches and highlights recent examples of their use for enzyme annotation, discovery of new metabolic pathways, and gene assignment of orphan metabolic activities across diverse biological sources.

  13. LC-MS-based metabolomics in drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Gonzalez, Frank J; Idle, Jeffrey R

    2007-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolism, a ubiquitous natural response to foreign compounds, elicits initiating signals for many pathophysiological events. Currently, most widely used techniques for identifying xenobiotic metabolites and metabolic pathways are empirical and largely based on in vitro incubation assays and in vivo radiotracing experiments. Recent work in our lab has shown that LC-MS-based metabolomic techniques are useful tools for xenobiotic metabolism research since multivariate data analysis in metabolomics can significantly rationalize the processes of xenobiotic metabolite identification and metabolic pathway analysis. In this review, the technological elements of LC-MS-based metabolomics for constructing high-quality datasets and conducting comprehensive data analysis are examined. Four novel approaches of using LC-MS-based metabolomic techniques in xenobiotic metabolism research are proposed and illustrated by case studies and proof-of-concept experiments, and the perspective on their application is further discussed.

  14. Metabolomics: a state-of-the-art technology for better understanding of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, A; Jafarzadeh, N; Gilany, K

    2016-08-01

    Male factor infertility affects approximately half of the infertile couples, in spite of many years of research on male infertility treatment and diagnosis; several outstanding questions remain to be addressed. In this regard, metabolomics as a novel field of omics has been suggested to be applied for male infertility problems. A variety of terms associated with metabolite quantity and quality have been established to demonstrate mixtures of metabolites. Despite metabolomics and metabolite analyses have been around more than decades, a limited number of studies concerning male infertility have been carried out. In this review, we summarised the latest finding in metabolomics techniques and metabolomics biomarkers correlated with male infertility. The rapid progress of a variety of metabolomics platforms, such as nonoptical and optical spectroscopy, could ease separation, recognition, classification and quantification of several metabolites and their metabolic pathways. Here, we recommend that the novel biomarkers determined in the course of metabolomics analysis may stand for potential application of treatment and future clinical practice.

  15. Galileo Reader and Annotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besomi, O.

    2011-06-01

    In his readings, Galileo made frequent use of annotations. Here, I will offer a general glance at them by discussing the case of the annotations to the Libra astronomica published in 1619 by Orazio Grassi, a Jesuit mathematician of the Collegio Romano. The annotations directly reflect Galileo's reaction to Grassi's book in a heated debate between the two astronomers. Galileo and Grassi had opposite ideas about the nature of the comets, which resulted in different scientific and theological implications. The annotations represent the starting point for Galileo's reply to the Libra, namely Il Saggiatore, which was published four years later and dedicated to the new pope Urban VIII.

  16. Concept annotation in the CRAFT corpus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Manually annotated corpora are critical for the training and evaluation of automated methods to identify concepts in biomedical text. Results This paper presents the concept annotations of the Colorado Richly Annotated Full-Text (CRAFT) Corpus, a collection of 97 full-length, open-access biomedical journal articles that have been annotated both semantically and syntactically to serve as a research resource for the biomedical natural-language-processing (NLP) community. CRAFT identifies all mentions of nearly all concepts from nine prominent biomedical ontologies and terminologies: the Cell Type Ontology, the Chemical Entities of Biological Interest ontology, the NCBI Taxonomy, the Protein Ontology, the Sequence Ontology, the entries of the Entrez Gene database, and the three subontologies of the Gene Ontology. The first public release includes the annotations for 67 of the 97 articles, reserving two sets of 15 articles for future text-mining competitions (after which these too will be released). Concept annotations were created based on a single set of guidelines, which has enabled us to achieve consistently high interannotator agreement. Conclusions As the initial 67-article release contains more than 560,000 tokens (and the full set more than 790,000 tokens), our corpus is among the largest gold-standard annotated biomedical corpora. Unlike most others, the journal articles that comprise the corpus are drawn from diverse biomedical disciplines and are marked up in their entirety. Additionally, with a concept-annotation count of nearly 100,000 in the 67-article subset (and more than 140,000 in the full collection), the scale of conceptual markup is also among the largest of comparable corpora. The concept annotations of the CRAFT Corpus have the potential to significantly advance biomedical text mining by providing a high-quality gold standard for NLP systems. The corpus, annotation guidelines, and other associated resources are freely available at http

  17. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM) tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and will be updated on regular

  18. Plant metabolomics: from holistic hope, to hype, to hot topic.

    PubMed

    Hall, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    In a short time, plant metabolomics has gone from being just an ambitious concept to being a rapidly growing, valuable technology applied in the stride to gain a more global picture of the molecular organization of multicellular organisms. The combination of improved analytical capabilities with newly designed, dedicated statistical, bioinformatics and data mining strategies, is beginning to broaden the horizons of our understanding of how plants are organized and how metabolism is both controlled but highly flexible. Metabolomics is predicted to play a significant, if not indispensable role in bridging the phenotype-genotype gap and thus in assisting us in our desire for full genome sequence annotation as part of the quest to link gene to function. Plants are a fabulously rich source of diverse functional biochemicals and metabolomics is also already proving valuable in an applied context. By creating unique opportunities for us to interrogate plant systems and characterize their biochemical composition, metabolomics will greatly assist in identifying and defining much of the still unexploited biodiversity available today. PMID:16411949

  19. Plant metabolomics: from holistic hope, to hype, to hot topic.

    PubMed

    Hall, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    In a short time, plant metabolomics has gone from being just an ambitious concept to being a rapidly growing, valuable technology applied in the stride to gain a more global picture of the molecular organization of multicellular organisms. The combination of improved analytical capabilities with newly designed, dedicated statistical, bioinformatics and data mining strategies, is beginning to broaden the horizons of our understanding of how plants are organized and how metabolism is both controlled but highly flexible. Metabolomics is predicted to play a significant, if not indispensable role in bridging the phenotype-genotype gap and thus in assisting us in our desire for full genome sequence annotation as part of the quest to link gene to function. Plants are a fabulously rich source of diverse functional biochemicals and metabolomics is also already proving valuable in an applied context. By creating unique opportunities for us to interrogate plant systems and characterize their biochemical composition, metabolomics will greatly assist in identifying and defining much of the still unexploited biodiversity available today.

  20. Maize - GO annotation methods, evaluation, and review (Maize-GAMER)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Making a genome sequence accessible and useful involves three basic steps: genome assembly, structural annotation, and functional annotation. The quality of data generated at each step influences the accuracy of inferences that can be made, with high-quality analyses produce better datasets resultin...

  1. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women’s bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the “interactive metabolome”, which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI. PMID:27076285

  2. Expansion of DSSTox: Leveraging public data to create a semantic cheminformatics resource with quality annotations for support of U.S. EPA applications. (American Chemical Society)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expansion of chemical-bioassay data in the public domain is a boon to science; however, the difficulty in establishing accurate linkages from CAS registry number (CASRN) to structure, or for properly annotating names and synonyms for a particular structure is well known. DSS...

  3. Annotation extension through protein family annotation coherence metrics

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Hugo P.; Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional annotation consists in associating proteins with textual descriptors elucidating their biological roles. The bulk of annotation is done via automated procedures that ultimately rely on annotation transfer. Despite a large number of existing protein annotation procedures the ever growing protein space is never completely annotated. One of the facets of annotation incompleteness derives from annotation uncertainty. Often when protein function cannot be predicted with enough specificity it is instead conservatively annotated with more generic terms. In a scenario of protein families or functionally related (or even dissimilar) sets this leads to a more difficult task of using annotations to compare the extent of functional relatedness among all family or set members. However, we postulate that identifying sub-sets of functionally coherent proteins annotated at a very specific level, can help the annotation extension of other incompletely annotated proteins within the same family or functionally related set. As an example we analyse the status of annotation of a set of CAZy families belonging to the Polysaccharide Lyase class. We show that through the use of visualization methods and semantic similarity based metrics it is possible to identify families and respective annotation terms within them that are suitable for possible annotation extension. Based on our analysis we then propose a semi-automatic methodology leading to the extension of single annotation terms within these partially annotated protein sets or families. PMID:24130572

  4. Metabolomics in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Nadella, K D; Marla, Soma S; Kumar, P Ananda

    2012-04-01

    Metabolome refers to the complete set of metabolites synthesized through a series of multiple enzymatic steps from various biochemical pathways processing the information encrypted in the plant genome. Knowledge about synthesis and regulation of various plant metabolic substances has improved substantially with availability of Omics data originating from sequencing of plant genomes. Metabolic profiling of crops is increasingly becoming popular in assessing plant phenotypes and genetic diversity. Metabolic compositional changes vividly reflect the changes occurring during plant growth, development, and in response to stress. Hence, study of plant metabolic pathways, the interconnections between them in context of systems biology is increasingly becoming popular in identification of candidate genes. The present article reviews recent developments in analysis of plant metabolomics, available bioinformatics techniques and databases employed for comparative pathway analysis, metabolic QTLs, and their application in plants.

  5. Metabolomics and human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Primrose, Sandy; Draper, John; Elsom, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Verity; Mathers, John C; Seal, Chris; Beckmann, Manfred; Haldar, Sumanto; Beattie, John H; Lodge, John K; Jenab, Mazda; Keun, Hector; Scalbert, Augustin

    2011-04-01

    The present report summarises a workshop convened by the UK Food Standards Agency (Agency) on 25 March 2010 to discuss the current Agency's funded research on the use of metabolomics technologies in human nutrition research. The objectives of this workshop were to review progress to date, to identify technical challenges and ways of overcoming them, and to discuss future research priorities and the application of metabolomics in public health nutrition research and surveys. Results from studies nearing completion showed that by using carefully designed dietary and sampling regimens, it is possible to identify novel biomarkers of food intake that could not have been predicted from current knowledge of food composition. These findings provide proof-of-principle that the metabolomics approach can be used to develop new putative biomarkers of dietary intake. The next steps will be to validate these putative biomarkers, to develop rapid and inexpensive assays for biomarkers of food intake of high public health relevance, and to test their utility in population cohort studies and dietary surveys. PMID:21255470

  6. MetaboLights: An Open-Access Database Repository for Metabolomics Data.

    PubMed

    Kale, Namrata S; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Jayseelan, Kalaivani; Moreno, Pablo; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Nainala, Venkata Chandrasekhar; Spicer, Rachel A; Williams, Mark; Li, Xuefei; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    MetaboLights is the first general purpose, open-access database repository for cross-platform and cross-species metabolomics research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Based upon the open-source ISA framework, MetaboLights provides Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) compliant metadata and raw experimental data associated with metabolomics experiments. Users can upload their study datasets into the MetaboLights Repository. These studies are then automatically assigned a stable and unique identifier (e.g., MTBLS1) that can be used for publication reference. The MetaboLights Reference Layer associates metabolites with metabolomics studies in the archive and is extensively annotated with data fields such as structural and chemical information, NMR and MS spectra, target species, metabolic pathways, and reactions. The database is manually curated with no specific release schedules. MetaboLights is also recommended by journals for metabolomics data deposition. This unit provides a guide to using MetaboLights, downloading experimental data, and depositing metabolomics datasets using user-friendly submission tools.

  7. MetaboLights: An Open-Access Database Repository for Metabolomics Data.

    PubMed

    Kale, Namrata S; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Jayseelan, Kalaivani; Moreno, Pablo; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Nainala, Venkata Chandrasekhar; Spicer, Rachel A; Williams, Mark; Li, Xuefei; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    MetaboLights is the first general purpose, open-access database repository for cross-platform and cross-species metabolomics research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Based upon the open-source ISA framework, MetaboLights provides Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) compliant metadata and raw experimental data associated with metabolomics experiments. Users can upload their study datasets into the MetaboLights Repository. These studies are then automatically assigned a stable and unique identifier (e.g., MTBLS1) that can be used for publication reference. The MetaboLights Reference Layer associates metabolites with metabolomics studies in the archive and is extensively annotated with data fields such as structural and chemical information, NMR and MS spectra, target species, metabolic pathways, and reactions. The database is manually curated with no specific release schedules. MetaboLights is also recommended by journals for metabolomics data deposition. This unit provides a guide to using MetaboLights, downloading experimental data, and depositing metabolomics datasets using user-friendly submission tools. PMID:27010336

  8. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality. PMID:27258266

  9. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jun; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality. PMID:27258266

  10. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality.

  11. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  12. Integration of metabolomics data into metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Töpfer, Nadine; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite levels together with their corresponding metabolic fluxes are integrative outcomes of biochemical transformations and regulatory processes and they can be used to characterize the response of biological systems to genetic and/or environmental changes. However, while changes in transcript or to some extent protein levels can usually be traced back to one or several responsible genes, changes in fluxes and particularly changes in metabolite levels do not follow such rationale and are often the outcome of complex interactions of several components. The increasing quality and coverage of metabolomics technologies have fostered the development of computational approaches for integrating metabolic read-outs with large-scale models to predict the physiological state of a system. Constraint-based approaches, relying on the stoichiometry of the considered reactions, provide a modeling framework amenable to analyses of large-scale systems and to the integration of high-throughput data. Here we review the existing approaches that integrate metabolomics data in variants of constrained-based approaches to refine model reconstructions, to constrain flux predictions in metabolic models, and to relate network structural properties to metabolite levels. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in the developments of constraint-based modeling approaches driven by metabolomics data. PMID:25741348

  13. An Introduction to Genome Annotation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-17

    Genome projects have evolved from large international undertakings to tractable endeavors for a single lab. Accurate genome annotation is critical for successful genomic, genetic, and molecular biology experiments. These annotations can be generated using a number of approaches and available software tools. This unit describes methods for genome annotation and a number of software tools commonly used in gene annotation.

  14. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David; Hayes, David; Mitros, Therese

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward this aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.

  15. Ion trace detection algorithm to extract pure ion chromatograms to improve untargeted peak detection quality for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Wang, San-Yuan; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-03-01

    Able to detect known and unknown metabolites, untargeted metabolomics has shown great potential in identifying novel biomarkers. However, elucidating all possible liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) ion signals in a complex biological sample remains challenging since many ions are not the products of metabolites. Methods of reducing ions not related to metabolites or simply directly detecting metabolite related (pure) ions are important. In this work, we describe PITracer, a novel algorithm that accurately detects the pure ions of a LC/TOF-MS profile to extract pure ion chromatograms and detect chromatographic peaks. PITracer estimates the relative mass difference tolerance of ions and calibrates the mass over charge (m/z) values for peak detection algorithms with an additional option to further mass correction with respect to a user-specified metabolite. PITracer was evaluated using two data sets containing 373 human metabolite standards, including 5 saturated standards considered to be split peaks resultant from huge m/z fluctuation, and 12 urine samples spiked with 50 forensic drugs of varying concentrations. Analysis of these data sets show that PITracer correctly outperformed existing state-of-art algorithm and extracted the pure ion chromatograms of the 5 saturated standards without generating split peaks and detected the forensic drugs with high recall, precision, and F-score and small mass error.

  16. A metabolomic approach to quality determination and authentication of raw plant material in the fragrance field. Iris rhizomes: a case study.

    PubMed

    Masson, Jerome; Liberto, Erica; Brevard, Hugues; Bicchi, Carlo; Rubiolo, Patrizia

    2014-11-14

    This study aimed to discriminate 22 samples of commercial Iris rhizomes (orris root) by species and origin (Iris germanica (Morocco), I. albicans (Morocco), I. pallida (Morocco), I. pallida (China), I. pallida (Italy)) by applying a strategy derived from those adopted in metabolomics. The specimens' fingerprints from conventional analysis methods (LC-UV and/or LC-MS) were unable to provide clear discrimination. A strategy combining UHPLC/TOF-HRMS, in positive and negative modes, with multivariate statistical methods was therefore applied. Exact mass/retention time (EMRT) pairs obtained by UHPLC-TOF/HRMS were successfully submitted to statistical processing by principal component analysis (PCA), partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and then orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), to extract the discriminating EMRT pairs through their trend views. 146 EMRT pairs were selected on the basis of their trend views, because they significantly varied, and 104 of them were included to discriminate between species and origins. 32 of them were tentatively identified as discriminating markers (flavonoids, isoflavonoids, triterpenoids, benzophenone derivatives and related glycosides …) from the reference database created on the basis of Iris genus components reported in the literature: eight of them specific for I. albicans, four for I. germanica, five for I. pallida (Italy), five for I. pallida (China), and ten for I. pallida (Morocco). The reliability of this strategy was confirmed by identifying species and origin of two unknown samples submitted to the same analytical procedure.

  17. Using fragmentation trees and mass spectral trees for identifying unknown compounds in metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Vaniya, Arpana

    2015-01-01

    Identification of unknown metabolites is the bottleneck in advancing metabolomics, leaving interpretation of metabolomics results ambiguous. The chemical diversity of metabolism is vast, making structure identification arduous and time consuming. Currently, comprehensive analysis of mass spectra in metabolomics is limited to library matching, but tandem mass spectral libraries are small compared to the large number of compounds found in the biosphere, including xenobiotics. Resolving this bottleneck requires richer data acquisition and better computational tools. Multi-stage mass spectrometry (MSn) trees show promise to aid in this regard. Fragmentation trees explore the fragmentation process, generate fragmentation rules and aid in sub-structure identification, while mass spectral trees delineate the dependencies in multi-stage MS of collision-induced dissociations. This review covers advancements over the past 10 years as a tool for metabolite identification, including algorithms, software and databases used to build and to implement fragmentation trees and mass spectral annotations. PMID:26213431

  18. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  19. Algal functional annotation tool

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on

  20. A Novel Approach to Semantic and Coreference Annotation at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Firpo, M

    2005-02-04

    A case is made for the importance of high quality semantic and coreference annotation. The challenges of providing such annotation are described. Asperger's Syndrome is introduced, and the connections are drawn between the needs of text annotation and the abilities of persons with Asperger's Syndrome to meet those needs. Finally, a pilot program is recommended wherein semantic annotation is performed by people with Asperger's Syndrome. The primary points embodied in this paper are as follows: (1) Document annotation is essential to the Natural Language Processing (NLP) projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); (2) LLNL does not currently have a system in place to meet its need for text annotation; (3) Text annotation is challenging for a variety of reasons, many related to its very rote nature; (4) Persons with Asperger's Syndrome are particularly skilled at rote verbal tasks, and behavioral experts agree that they would excel at text annotation; and (6) A pilot study is recommend in which two to three people with Asperger's Syndrome annotate documents and then the quality and throughput of their work is evaluated relative to that of their neuro-typical peers.

  1. Human Genome Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, Mark

    A central problem for 21st century science is annotating the human genome and making this annotation useful for the interpretation of personal genomes. My talk will focus on annotating the 99% of the genome that does not code for canonical genes, concentrating on intergenic features such as structural variants (SVs), pseudogenes (protein fossils), binding sites, and novel transcribed RNAs (ncRNAs). In particular, I will describe how we identify regulatory sites and variable blocks (SVs) based on processing next-generation sequencing experiments. I will further explain how we cluster together groups of sites to create larger annotations. Next, I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline, which has enabled us to identify >10K pseudogenes in the genome and analyze their distribution with respect to age, protein family, and chromosomal location. Throughout, I will try to introduce some of the computational algorithms and approaches that are required for genome annotation. Much of this work has been carried out in the framework of the ENCODE, modENCODE, and 1000 genomes projects.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics of iron deficiency in soybean leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is an important agricultural concern leading to lower yields and crop quality. A better understanding of the condition, at the metabolome level, could contribute to the design of strategies to ameliorate Fe deficiency problems. Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soybean leaf extract...

  3. The Progress of Metabolomics Study in Traditional Chinese Medicine Research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Qiuhong; Yang, Bingyou; Zhao, Shan; Kuang, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has played important roles in health protection and disease treatment for thousands of years in China and has gained the gradual acceptance of the international community. However, many intricate issues, which cannot be explained by traditional methods, still remain, thus, new ideas and technologies are needed. As an emerging system biology technology, the holistic view adopted by metabolomics is similar to that of TCM, which allows us to investigate TCM with complicated conditions and multiple factors in depth. In this paper, we tried to give a timely and comprehensive update about the methodology progression of metabolomics, as well as its applications, in different fields of TCM studies including quality control, processing, safety and efficacy evaluation. The herbs investigated by metabolomics were selected for detailed examination, including Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, Atractylodes macrocephala Kidd, Pinellia ternate, etc.; furthermore, some valuable results have been obtained and summarized. In conclusion, although the study of metabolomics is at the early phase and requires further scrutiny and validation, it still provides bright prospects to dissect the synergistic action of multiple components from TCM. Overall, with the further development of analytical techniques, especially multi-analysis techniques, we expect that metabolomics will greatly promote TCM research and the establishment of international standards, which is beneficial to TCM modernization. PMID:26477800

  4. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  5. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  6. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-10-20

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  7. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  8. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  9. Re-Annotator: Annotation Pipeline for Microarray Probe Sequences.

    PubMed

    Arloth, Janine; Bader, Daniel M; Röh, Simone; Altmann, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technologies are established approaches for high throughput gene expression, methylation and genotyping analysis. An accurate mapping of the array probes is essential to generate reliable biological findings. However, manufacturers of the microarray platforms typically provide incomplete and outdated annotation tables, which often rely on older genome and transcriptome versions that differ substantially from up-to-date sequence databases. Here, we present the Re-Annotator, a re-annotation pipeline for microarray probe sequences. It is primarily designed for gene expression microarrays but can also be adapted to other types of microarrays. The Re-Annotator uses a custom-built mRNA reference database to identify the positions of gene expression array probe sequences. We applied Re-Annotator to the Illumina Human-HT12 v4 microarray platform and found that about one quarter (25%) of the probes differed from the manufacturer's annotation. In further computational experiments on experimental gene expression data, we compared Re-Annotator to another probe re-annotation tool, ReMOAT, and found that Re-Annotator provided an improved re-annotation of microarray probes. A thorough re-annotation of probe information is crucial to any microarray analysis. The Re-Annotator pipeline is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/reannotator along with re-annotated files for Illumina microarrays HumanHT-12 v3/v4 and MouseRef-8 v2.

  10. Annotation for information extraction from mammography reports.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Selen; Gulkesen, Kemal Hakan; Rubin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Inter and intra-observer variability in mammographic interpretation is a challenging problem, and decision support systems (DSS) may be helpful to reduce variation in practice. Since radiology reports are created as unstructured text reports, Natural language processing (NLP) techniques are needed to extract structured information from reports in order to provide the inputs to DSS. Before creating NLP systems, producing high quality annotated data set is essential. The goal of this project is to develop an annotation schema to guide the information extraction tasks needed from free-text mammography reports. PMID:23823416

  11. Computational approaches for systems metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Krumsiek, Jan; Bartel, Jörg; Theis, Fabian J

    2016-06-01

    Systems genetics is defined as the simultaneous assessment and analysis of multi-omics datasets. In the past few years, metabolomics has been established as a robust tool describing an important functional layer in this approach. The metabolome of a biological system represents an integrated state of genetic and environmental factors and has been referred to as a 'link between genotype and phenotype'. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in statistical analysis methods for metabolomics data in combination with other omics layers. We put a special focus on complex, multivariate statistical approaches as well as pathway-based and network-based analysis methods. Moreover, we outline current challenges and pitfalls of metabolomics-focused multi-omics analyses and discuss future steps for the field.

  12. Pathway Analysis Software: Annotation Errors and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Henderson-MacLennan, Nicole K.; Papp, Jeanette C.; Talbot, C. Conover; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Presson, Angela P.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic databases contain a variety of annotation errors that often go unnoticed due to the large size of modern genetic data sets. Interpretation of these data sets requires bioinformatics tools that may contribute to this problem. While providing gene symbol annotations for identifiers (IDs) such as microarray probeset, RefSeq, GenBank and Entrez Gene is seemingly trivial, the accuracy is fundamental to any subsequent conclusions. We examine gene symbol annotations and results from three commercial pathway analysis software (PAS) packages: Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, GeneGO and Pathway Studio. We compare gene symbol annotations and canonical pathway results over time and among different input ID types. We find that PAS results can be affected by variation in gene symbol annotations across software releases and the input ID type analyzed. As a result, we offer suggestions for using commercial PAS and reporting microarray results to improve research quality. We propose a wiki type website to facilitate communication of bioinformatics software problems within the scientific community. PMID:20663702

  13. Annotation of Ehux ESTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-06-12

    22 percent ESTs do no align with scaffolds. EST Pipeleine assembles 17126 consensi from the noaligned ESTs. Annotation Pipeline predicts 8564 ORFS on the consensi. Domain analysis of ORFs reveals missing genes. Cluster analysis reveals missing genes. Expression analysis reveals potential strain specific genes.

  14. Annotation: The Savant Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Pamela; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Whilst interest has focused on the origin and nature of the savant syndrome for over a century, it is only within the past two decades that empirical group studies have been carried out. Methods: The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area.…

  15. Intellectuals in China: Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    This annotated bibliography of 72 books, journal articles, government reports, and newspaper feature stories focuses on the changing role of intellectuals in China, primarily since the 1949 Chinese Revolution. Particular attention is given to the Hundred Flowers Movement of 1957 and the Cultural Revolution. Most of the cited works are in English,…

  16. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  17. Annotated Bibliography. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Norris G.

    An annotated bibliography which presents approximately 300 references from 1951 to 1973 on the education of severely/profoundly handicapped persons. Citations are grouped alphabetically by author's name within the following categories: characteristics and treatment, gross motor development, sensory and motor development, physical therapy for the…

  18. Ghostwriting: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Donald B.

    Drawn from communication journals, historical and news magazines, business and industrial magazines, political science and world affairs journals, general interest periodicals, and literary and political review magazines, the approximately 90 entries in this annotated bibliography discuss ghostwriting as practiced through the ages and reveal the…

  19. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  20. Ultrafast Polyphenol Metabolomics of Red Wines Using MicroLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Tanaka, Nobuo; Vaniya, Arpana; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-20

    The taste and quality of red wine are determined by its highly complex mixture of polyphenols and many other metabolites. No single method can fully cover the full metabolome, but even for polyphenols and related compounds, current methods proved inadequate. We optimized liquid chromatography resolution and sensitivity using 1 mm i.d. columns with microLC pumps and compared data-dependent to data-independent (SWATH) MS/MS acquisitions. A high-throughput microLC-MS method was developed with a 4 min gradient at 0.05 mL/min flow rate on a Kinetex C18 column and Sciex TripleTOF mass spectrometry. Using the novel software MS-DIAL, we structurally annotated 264 compounds including 165 polyphenols in six commercial red wines by accurate mass MS/MS matching. As proof of concept, multivariate statistics revealed the difference in the metabolite profiles of the six red wines, and regression analysis linked the polyphenol contents to the taste of the red wines.

  1. Ultrafast Polyphenol Metabolomics of Red Wines Using MicroLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Tanaka, Nobuo; Vaniya, Arpana; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-20

    The taste and quality of red wine are determined by its highly complex mixture of polyphenols and many other metabolites. No single method can fully cover the full metabolome, but even for polyphenols and related compounds, current methods proved inadequate. We optimized liquid chromatography resolution and sensitivity using 1 mm i.d. columns with microLC pumps and compared data-dependent to data-independent (SWATH) MS/MS acquisitions. A high-throughput microLC-MS method was developed with a 4 min gradient at 0.05 mL/min flow rate on a Kinetex C18 column and Sciex TripleTOF mass spectrometry. Using the novel software MS-DIAL, we structurally annotated 264 compounds including 165 polyphenols in six commercial red wines by accurate mass MS/MS matching. As proof of concept, multivariate statistics revealed the difference in the metabolite profiles of the six red wines, and regression analysis linked the polyphenol contents to the taste of the red wines. PMID:26698107

  2. Atmospheric vs. anaerobic processing of metabolome samples for the metabolite profiling of a strict anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sooah; Kwon, Min-A; Jung, Young Hoon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-12-01

    Well-established metabolome sample preparation is a prerequisite for reliable metabolomic data. For metabolome sampling of a Gram-positive strict anaerobe, Clostridium acetobutylicum, fast filtration and metabolite extraction with acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v) at -20°C under anaerobic conditions has been commonly used. This anaerobic metabolite processing method is laborious and time-consuming since it is conducted in an anaerobic chamber. Also, there have not been any systematic method evaluation and development of metabolome sample preparation for strict anaerobes and Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, metabolome sampling and extraction methods were rigorously evaluated and optimized for C. acetobutylicum by using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, in which a total of 116 metabolites were identified. When comparing the atmospheric (i.e., in air) and anaerobic (i.e., in an anaerobic chamber) processing of metabolome sample preparation, there was no significant difference in the quality and quantity of the metabolomic data. For metabolite extraction, pure methanol at -20°C was a better solvent than acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v/v) at -20°C that is frequently used for C. acetobutylicum, and metabolite profiles were significantly different depending on extraction solvents. This is the first evaluation of metabolite sample preparation under aerobic processing conditions for an anaerobe. This method could be applied conveniently, efficiently, and reliably to metabolome analysis for strict anaerobes in air.

  3. Metabolomics combined with standard quality measures of ‘Honeycrisp’ apple fruit reveals aspects of metabolism related to flavor, crispness, maturity, and storability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Honeycrisp’ is popular dessert apple cultivar. As acreage of planted ‘Honeycrisp’ increases, reliably assessing optimum storage duration is becoming increasingly important. Apple fruit quality is typically assessed by measuring titratible acidity, internal ethylene concentration, firmness, solubl...

  4. Semantator: annotating clinical narratives with semantic web ontologies.

    PubMed

    Song, Dezhao; Chute, Christopher G; Tao, Cui

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate clinical research, clinical data needs to be stored in a machine processable and understandable way. Manual annotating clinical data is time consuming. Automatic approaches (e.g., Natural Language Processing systems) have been adopted to convert such data into structured formats; however, the quality of such automatically extracted data may not always be satisfying. In this paper, we propose Semantator, a semi-automatic tool for document annotation with Semantic Web ontologies. With a loaded free text document and an ontology, Semantator supports the creation/deletion of ontology instances for any document fragment, linking/disconnecting instances with the properties in the ontology, and also enables automatic annotation by connecting to the NCBO annotator and cTAKES. By representing annotations in Semantic Web standards, Semantator supports reasoning based upon the underlying semantics of the owl:disjointWith and owl:equivalentClass predicates. We present discussions based on user experiences of using Semantator.

  5. Food metabolomics: from farm to human.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics, one of the latest components in the suite of systems biology, has been used to understand the metabolism and physiology of living systems, including microorganisms, plants, animals and humans. Food metabolomics can be defined as the application of metabolomics in food systems, including food resources, food processing and diet for humans. The study of food metabolomics has increased gradually in the recent years, because food systems are directly related to nutrition and human health. This review describes the recent trends and applications of metabolomics to food systems, from farm to human, including food resource production, industrial food processing and food intake by humans.

  6. Preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Euceda, Leslie R; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2015-05-01

    Metabolomics involves the large scale analysis of metabolites and thus, provides information regarding cellular processes in a biological sample. Independently of the analytical technique used, a vast amount of data is always acquired when carrying out metabolomics studies; this results in complex datasets with large amounts of variables. This type of data requires multivariate statistical analysis for its proper biological interpretation. Prior to multivariate analysis, preprocessing of the data must be carried out to remove unwanted variation such as instrumental or experimental artifacts. This review aims to outline the steps in the preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data and describe some of the methods to perform these. Since using different preprocessing methods may produce different results, it is important that an appropriate pipeline exists for the selection of the optimal combination of methods in the preprocessing workflow.

  7. Metabolomics techniques in nanotoxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; Beger, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth in the development of nanoparticles for uses in a variety of applications including targeted drug delivery, cancer therapy, imaging, and as biological sensors has led to questions about potential toxicity of such particles to humans. High-throughput methods are necessary to evaluate the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The omics technologies are particularly well suited to evaluate toxicity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Metabolomics, specifically, can rapidly screen for biomarkers related to predefined pathways or processes in biofluids and tissues. Specifically, oxidative stress has been implicated as a potential mechanism of toxicity in nanoparticles and is generally difficult to measure by conventional methods. Furthermore, metabolomics can provide mechanistic insight into nanotoxicity. This chapter focuses on the application of both LC/MS and NMR-based metabolomics approaches to study the potential toxicity of nanoparticles.

  8. Considerations to improve functional annotations in biological databases.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Despite the great effort to design efficient systems allowing the electronic indexation of information concerning genes, proteins, structures, and interactions published daily in scientific journals, some problems are still observed in specific tasks such as functional annotation. The annotation of function is a critical issue for bioinformatic routines, such as for instance, in functional genomics and the further prediction of unknown protein function, which are highly dependent of the quality of existing annotations. Some information management systems evolve to efficiently incorporate information from large-scale projects, but often, annotation of single records from the literature is difficult and slow. In this short report, functional characterizations of a representative sample of the entire set of uncharacterized proteins from Escherichia coli K12 was compiled from Swiss-Prot, PubMed, and EcoCyc and demonstrate a functional annotation deficit in biological databases. Some issues are postulated as causes of the lack of annotation, and different solutions are evaluated and proposed to avoid them. The hope is that as a consequence of these observations, there will be new impetus to improve the speed and quality of functional annotation and ultimately provide updated, reliable information to the scientific community. PMID:20050264

  9. Effective function annotation through catalytic residue conservation.

    PubMed

    George, Richard A; Spriggs, Ruth V; Bartlett, Gail J; Gutteridge, Alex; MacArthur, Malcolm W; Porter, Craig T; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Thornton, Janet M; Swindells, Mark B

    2005-08-30

    Because of the extreme impact of genome sequencing projects, protein sequences without accompanying experimental data now dominate public databases. Homology searches, by providing an opportunity to transfer functional information between related proteins, have become the de facto way to address this. Although a single, well annotated, close relationship will often facilitate sufficient annotation, this situation is not always the case, particularly if mutations are present in important functional residues. When only distant relationships are available, the transfer of function information is more tenuous, and the likelihood of encountering several well annotated proteins with different functions is increased. The consequence for a researcher is a range of candidate functions with little way of knowing which, if any, are correct. Here, we address the problem directly by introducing a computational approach to accurately identify and segregate related proteins into those with a functional similarity and those where function differs. This approach should find a wide range of applications, including the interpretation of genomics/proteomics data and the prioritization of targets for high-throughput structure determination. The method is generic, but here we concentrate on enzymes and apply high-quality catalytic site data. In addition to providing a series of comprehensive benchmarks to show the overall performance of our approach, we illustrate its utility with specific examples that include the correct identification of haptoglobin as a nonenzymatic relative of trypsin, discrimination of acid-d-amino acid ligases from a much larger ligase pool, and the successful annotation of BioH, a structural genomics target.

  10. Statistical mechanics of ontology based annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, David C.; Brass, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical mechanical theory of the process of annotating an object with terms selected from an ontology. The term selection process is formulated as an ideal lattice gas model, but in a highly structured inhomogeneous field. The model enables us to explain patterns recently observed in real-world annotation data sets, in terms of the underlying graph structure of the ontology. By relating the external field strengths to the information content of each node in the ontology graph, the statistical mechanical model also allows us to propose a number of practical metrics for assessing the quality of both the ontology, and the annotations that arise from its use. Using the statistical mechanical formalism we also study an ensemble of ontologies of differing size and complexity; an analysis not readily performed using real data alone. Focusing on regular tree ontology graphs we uncover a rich set of scaling laws describing the growth in the optimal ontology size as the number of objects being annotated increases. In doing so we provide a further possible measure for assessment of ontologies.

  11. The MetaboLights repository: curation challenges in metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Salek, Reza M.; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Hastings, Janna; Williams, Mark; Mahendraker, Tejasvi; Maguire, Eamonn; González-Beltrán, Alejandra N.; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    MetaboLights is the first general-purpose open-access curated repository for metabolomic studies, their raw experimental data and associated metadata, maintained by one of the major open-access data providers in molecular biology. Increases in the number of depositions, number of samples per study and the file size of data submitted to MetaboLights present a challenge for the objective of ensuring high-quality and standardized data in the context of diverse metabolomic workflows and data representations. Here, we describe the MetaboLights curation pipeline, its challenges and its practical application in quality control of complex data depositions. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metabolights PMID:23630246

  12. The Ensembl gene annotation system.

    PubMed

    Aken, Bronwen L; Ayling, Sarah; Barrell, Daniel; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valery; Fairley, Susan; Fernandez Banet, Julio; Billis, Konstantinos; García Girón, Carlos; Hourlier, Thibaut; Howe, Kevin; Kähäri, Andreas; Kokocinski, Felix; Martin, Fergal J; Murphy, Daniel N; Nag, Rishi; Ruffier, Magali; Schuster, Michael; Tang, Y Amy; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Zadissa, Amonida; Flicek, Paul; Searle, Stephen M J

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl gene annotation system has been used to annotate over 70 different vertebrate species across a wide range of genome projects. Furthermore, it generates the automatic alignment-based annotation for the human and mouse GENCODE gene sets. The system is based on the alignment of biological sequences, including cDNAs, proteins and RNA-seq reads, to the target genome in order to construct candidate transcript models. Careful assessment and filtering of these candidate transcripts ultimately leads to the final gene set, which is made available on the Ensembl website. Here, we describe the annotation process in detail.Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org/index.html. PMID:27337980

  13. The Ensembl gene annotation system

    PubMed Central

    Aken, Bronwen L.; Ayling, Sarah; Barrell, Daniel; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valery; Fairley, Susan; Fernandez Banet, Julio; Billis, Konstantinos; García Girón, Carlos; Hourlier, Thibaut; Howe, Kevin; Kähäri, Andreas; Kokocinski, Felix; Martin, Fergal J.; Murphy, Daniel N.; Nag, Rishi; Ruffier, Magali; Schuster, Michael; Tang, Y. Amy; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Zadissa, Amonida; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl gene annotation system has been used to annotate over 70 different vertebrate species across a wide range of genome projects. Furthermore, it generates the automatic alignment-based annotation for the human and mouse GENCODE gene sets. The system is based on the alignment of biological sequences, including cDNAs, proteins and RNA-seq reads, to the target genome in order to construct candidate transcript models. Careful assessment and filtering of these candidate transcripts ultimately leads to the final gene set, which is made available on the Ensembl website. Here, we describe the annotation process in detail. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org/index.html PMID:27337980

  14. Solar Tutorial and Annotation Resource (STAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, C.; Rex, R.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Zita, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    We have written a software suite designed to facilitate solar data analysis by scientists, students, and the public, anticipating enormous datasets from future instruments. Our “STAR" suite includes an interactive learning section explaining 15 classes of solar events. Users learn software tools that exploit humans’ superior ability (over computers) to identify many events. Annotation tools include time slice generation to quantify loop oscillations, the interpolation of event shapes using natural cubic splines (for loops, sigmoids, and filaments) and closed cubic splines (for coronal holes). Learning these tools in an environment where examples are provided prepares new users to comfortably utilize annotation software with new data. Upon completion of our tutorial, users are presented with media of various solar events and asked to identify and annotate the images, to test their mastery of the system. Goals of the project include public input into the data analysis of very large datasets from future solar satellites, and increased public interest and knowledge about the Sun. In 2010, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) will be launched into orbit. SDO’s advancements in solar telescope technology will generate a terabyte per day of high-quality data, requiring innovation in data management. While major projects develop automated feature recognition software, so that computers can complete much of the initial event tagging and analysis, still, that software cannot annotate features such as sigmoids, coronal magnetic loops, coronal dimming, etc., due to large amounts of data concentrated in relatively small areas. Previously, solar physicists manually annotated these features, but with the imminent influx of data it is unrealistic to expect specialized researchers to examine every image that computers cannot fully process. A new approach is needed to efficiently process these data. Providing analysis tools and data access to students and the public have proven

  15. Brain Injury Alters Volatile Metabolome.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Cohen, Akiva S; Gordon, Amy R; Opiekun, Maryanne; Martin, Talia; Elkind, Jaclynn; Lundström, Johan N; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-06-01

    Chemical signals arising from body secretions and excretions communicate information about health status as have been reported in a range of animal models of disease. A potential common pathway for diseases to alter chemical signals is via activation of immune function-which is known to be intimately involved in modulation of chemical signals in several species. Based on our prior findings that both immunization and inflammation alter volatile body odors, we hypothesized that injury accompanied by inflammation might correspondingly modify the volatile metabolome to create a signature endophenotype. In particular, we investigated alteration of the volatile metabolome as a result of traumatic brain injury. Here, we demonstrate that mice could be trained in a behavioral assay to discriminate mouse models subjected to lateral fluid percussion injury from appropriate surgical sham controls on the basis of volatile urinary metabolites. Chemical analyses of the urine samples similarly demonstrated that brain injury altered urine volatile profiles. Behavioral and chemical analyses further indicated that alteration of the volatile metabolome induced by brain injury and alteration resulting from lipopolysaccharide-associated inflammation were not synonymous. Monitoring of alterations in the volatile metabolome may be a useful tool for rapid brain trauma diagnosis and for monitoring recovery. PMID:26926034

  16. Translating metabolomics to cardiovascular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Senn, Todd; Hazen, Stanley L; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics is the systematic study of the unique chemical fingerprints of small molecules or metabolite profiles that are related to a variety of cellular metabolic processes in a cell, organ, or organism. Although messenger RNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses do not tell the whole story of what might be happening in a cell, metabolic profiling provides direct and indirect physiologic insights that can potentially be detectable in a wide range of biospecimens. Although not specific to cardiac conditions, translating metabolomics to cardiovascular biomarkers has followed the traditional path of biomarker discovery from identification and confirmation to clinical validation and bedside testing. With technological advances in metabolomic tools (such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry) and more sophisticated bioinformatics and analytical techniques, the ability to measure low-molecular-weight metabolites in biospecimens provides a unique insight into established and novel metabolic pathways. Systemic metabolomics may provide physiologic understanding of cardiovascular disease states beyond traditional profiling and may involve descriptions of metabolic responses of an individual or population to therapeutic interventions or environmental exposures.

  17. MEETING: Chlamydomonas Annotation Jamboree - October 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-04-13

    Shotgun sequencing of the nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas throughout) was performed at an approximate 10X coverage by JGI. Roughly half of the genome is now contained on 26 scaffolds, all of which are at least 1.6 Mb, and the coverage of the genome is ~95%. There are now over 200,000 cDNA sequence reads that we have generated as part of the Chlamydomonas genome project (Grossman, 2003; Shrager et al., 2003; Grossman et al. 2007; Merchant et al., 2007); other sequences have also been generated by the Kasuza sequence group (Asamizu et al., 1999; Asamizu et al., 2000) or individual laboratories that have focused on specific genes. Shrager et al. (2003) placed the reads into distinct contigs (an assemblage of reads with overlapping nucleotide sequences), and contigs that group together as part of the same genes have been designated ACEs (assembly of contigs generated from EST information). All of the reads have also been mapped to the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome and the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences have been reassembled, and the resulting assemblage is called an ACEG (an Assembly of contiguous EST sequences supported by genomic sequence) (Jain et al., 2007). Most of the unique genes or ACEGs are also represented by gene models that have been generated by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Walnut Creek, CA). These gene models have been placed onto the DNA scaffolds and are presented as a track on the Chlamydomonas genome browser associated with the genome portal (http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Chlre3/Chlre3.home.html). Ultimately, the meeting grant awarded by DOE has helped enormously in the development of an annotation pipeline (a set of guidelines used in the annotation of genes) and resulted in high quality annotation of over 4,000 genes; the annotators were from both Europe and the USA. Some of the people who led the annotation initiative were Arthur Grossman, Olivier Vallon, and Sabeeha Merchant (with many individual

  18. Drug Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieson, Moira B.

    This bibliography consists of a total of 215 entries dealing with drug education, including curriculum guides, and drawn from documents in the ERIC system. There are two sections, the first containing 130 annotated citations of documents and journal articles, and the second containing 85 citations of journal articles without annotations, but with…

  19. Adult Basic Education Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Nancy B.

    This annotated bibliography contains sections divided according to area of study, and within each category materials are listed alphabetically by publisher. Publishers and mailing addresses are listed at the end of the bibliography. Throughout the annotations, whenever specific grade level divisions are not named, the regular Adult Basic Education…

  20. Morphosyntactic Annotation of CHILDES Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagae, Kenji; Davis, Eric; Lavie, Alon; MacWhinney, Brian; Wintner, Shuly

    2010-01-01

    Corpora of child language are essential for research in child language acquisition and psycholinguistics. Linguistic annotation of the corpora provides researchers with better means for exploring the development of grammatical constructions and their usage. We describe a project whose goal is to annotate the English section of the CHILDES database…

  1. Model and Interoperability using Meta Data Annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, O.

    2011-12-01

    modeling components are not directly bound to framework by the use of specific APIs and/or data types they can more easily be reused both within the framework as well as outside. While providing all those capabilities, a significant reduction in the size of the model source code was achieved. To support the benefit of annotations for a modeler, studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of an annotation based framework approach with other modeling frameworks and libraries, a framework-invasiveness study was conducted to evaluate the effects of framework design on model code quality. A typical hydrological model was implemented across several modeling frameworks and several software metrics were collected. The metrics selected were measures of non-invasive design methods for modeling frameworks from a software engineering perspective. It appears that the use of annotations positively impacts several software quality measures. Experience to date has demonstrated the multi-purpose value of using annotations. Annotations are also a feasible and practical method to enable interoperability among models and modeling frameworks.

  2. Metabolomics in toxicology and preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Bois, Frederic Y; Clench, Malcolm R; Coen, Muireann; Donley, Beth; Fischer, Steven M; Ekman, Drew R; Fabian, Eric; Guillou, Claude; Heuer, Joachim; Hogberg, Helena T; Jungnickel, Harald; Keun, Hector C; Krennrich, Gerhard; Krupp, Eckart; Luch, Andreas; Noor, Fozia; Peter, Erik; Riefke, Bjoern; Seymour, Mark; Skinner, Nigel; Smirnova, Lena; Verheij, Elwin; Wagner, Silvia; Hartung, Thomas; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological status of a biological system, and about the changes caused by chemicals. Metabolomics analysis is used in many fields, ranging from the analysis of the physiological status of genetically modified organisms in safety science to the evaluation of human health conditions. In toxicology, metabolomics is the -omics discipline that is most closely related to classical knowledge of disturbed biochemical pathways. It allows rapid identification of the potential targets of a hazardous compound. It can give information on target organs and often can help to improve our understanding regarding the mode-of-action of a given compound. Such insights aid the discovery of biomarkers that either indicate pathophysiological conditions or help the monitoring of the efficacy of drug therapies. The first toxicological applications of metabolomics were for mechanistic research, but different ways to use the technology in a regulatory context are being explored. Ideally, further progress in that direction will position the metabolomics approach to address the challenges of toxicology of the 21st century. To address these issues, scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory bodies came together in a workshop to discuss the current status of applied metabolomics and its potential in the safety assessment of compounds. We report here on the conclusions of three working groups addressing questions regarding 1) metabolomics for in vitro studies 2) the appropriate use of metabolomics in systems toxicology, and 3) use of metabolomics in a regulatory context. PMID:23665807

  3. Multi-Platform Metabolomic Analyses of Ergosterol-Induced Dynamic Changes in Nicotiana tabacum Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tugizimana, Fidele; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is providing new dimensions into understanding the intracellular adaptive responses in plants to external stimuli. In this study, a multi-technology-metabolomic approach was used to investigate the effect of the fungal sterol, ergosterol, on the metabolome of cultured tobacco cells. Cell suspensions were treated with different concentrations (0–1000 nM) of ergosterol and incubated for different time periods (0–24 h). Intracellular metabolites were extracted with two methods: a selective dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and a general methanol extraction. Chromatographic techniques (GC-FID, GC-MS, GC×GC-TOF-MS, UHPLC-MS) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Multivariate data analyses (PCA and OPLS-DA models) were used to extract interpretable information from the multidimensional data generated from the analytical techniques. The results showed that ergosterol triggered differential changes in the metabolome of the cells, leading to variation in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PCA scores plots revealed dose- and time-dependent metabolic variations, with optimal treatment conditions being found to be 300 nM ergosterol and an 18 h incubation period. The observed ergosterol-induced metabolic changes were correlated with changes in defence-related metabolites. The ‘defensome’ involved increases in terpenoid metabolites with five antimicrobial compounds (the bicyclic sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins: phytuberin, solavetivone, capsidiol, lubimin and rishitin) and other metabolites (abscisic acid and phytosterols) putatively identified. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors, cinnamic acid derivatives and - conjugates, coumarins and lignin monomers were annotated. These annotated metabolites revealed a dynamic reprogramming of metabolic networks that are functionally correlated, with a high complexity in their regulation. PMID:24498209

  4. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.; Sabir, Jamal S.; Alfassi, Fahad A.; Hajarah, Nahid H.; Kabli, Saleh A.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Ashworth, Matt P.; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K.; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  5. Metabolomics techniques for nanotoxicity investigations.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mengying; Huang, Wanqiu; Chen, Zhipeng; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Jiaqing; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zunjian; Xu, Fengguo

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are commonly defined as engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nm or less. Investigations of their potential toxicological impact on biological systems and the environment have yet to catch up with the rapid development of nanotechnology and extensive production of nanoparticles. High-throughput methods are necessary to assess the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The omics techniques are well suited to evaluate toxicity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Besides genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling, metabolomics holds great promises for globally evaluating and understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-organism interaction. This manuscript presents a general overview of metabolomics techniques, summarizes its early application in nanotoxicology and finally discusses opportunities and challenges faced in nanotoxicology. PMID:26168257

  6. HMDB: the Human Metabolome Database

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.; Tzur, Dan; Knox, Craig; Eisner, Roman; Guo, An Chi; Young, Nelson; Cheng, Dean; Jewell, Kevin; Arndt, David; Sawhney, Summit; Fung, Chris; Nikolai, Lisa; Lewis, Mike; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Forsythe, Ian; Tang, Peter; Shrivastava, Savita; Jeroncic, Kevin; Stothard, Paul; Amegbey, Godwin; Block, David; Hau, David. D.; Wagner, James; Miniaci, Jessica; Clements, Melisa; Gebremedhin, Mulu; Guo, Natalie; Zhang, Ying; Duggan, Gavin E.; MacInnis, Glen D.; Weljie, Alim M.; Dowlatabadi, Reza; Bamforth, Fiona; Clive, Derrick; Greiner, Russ; Li, Liang; Marrie, Tom; Sykes, Brian D.; Vogel, Hans J.; Querengesser, Lori

    2007-01-01

    The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) is currently the most complete and comprehensive curated collection of human metabolite and human metabolism data in the world. It contains records for more than 2180 endogenous metabolites with information gathered from thousands of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the HMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental metabolite concentration data compiled from hundreds of mass spectra (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed on urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on purified, reference metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the HMDB contains an average of 90 separate data fields including a comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, biofluid concentrations, disease associations, pathway information, enzyme data, gene sequence data, SNP and mutation data as well as extensive links to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided. The HMDB is designed to address the broad needs of biochemists, clinical chemists, physicians, medical geneticists, nutritionists and members of the metabolomics community. The HMDB is available at: PMID:17202168

  7. Metabolomic assessment of embryo viability.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Asli; Seli, Emre

    2014-03-01

    Preimplantation embryo metabolism demonstrates distinctive characteristics associated with the developmental potential of embryos. On this basis, metabolite content of culture media was hypothesized to reflect the implantation potential of individual embryos. This hypothesis was tested in consecutive studies reporting a significant association between culture media metabolites and embryo development or clinical pregnancy. The need for a noninvasive, reliable, and rapid embryo assessment strategy promoted metabolomics studies in vitro fertilization (IVF) in an effort to increase success rates of single embryo transfers. With the advance of analytical techniques and bioinformatics, commercial instruments were developed to predict embryo viability using spectroscopic analysis of surplus culture media. However, despite the initial promising results from proof-of-principal studies, recent randomized controlled trials using commercial instruments failed to show a consistent benefit in improving pregnancy rates when metabolomics is used as an adjunct to morphology. At present, the application of metabolomics technology in clinical IVF laboratory requires the elimination of factors underlying inconsistent findings, when possible, and development of reliable predictive models accounting for all possible sources of bias throughout the embryo selection process. PMID:24515909

  8. Sma3s: a three-step modular annotator for large sequence datasets.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Viguera, Enrique; Claros, M Gonzalo; Trelles, Oswaldo; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2014-08-01

    Automatic sequence annotation is an essential component of modern 'omics' studies, which aim to extract information from large collections of sequence data. Most existing tools use sequence homology to establish evolutionary relationships and assign putative functions to sequences. However, it can be difficult to define a similarity threshold that achieves sufficient coverage without sacrificing annotation quality. Defining the correct configuration is critical and can be challenging for non-specialist users. Thus, the development of robust automatic annotation techniques that generate high-quality annotations without needing expert knowledge would be very valuable for the research community. We present Sma3s, a tool for automatically annotating very large collections of biological sequences from any kind of gene library or genome. Sma3s is composed of three modules that progressively annotate query sequences using either: (i) very similar homologues, (ii) orthologous sequences or (iii) terms enriched in groups of homologous sequences. We trained the system using several random sets of known sequences, demonstrating average sensitivity and specificity values of ~85%. In conclusion, Sma3s is a versatile tool for high-throughput annotation of a wide variety of sequence datasets that outperforms the accuracy of other well-established annotation algorithms, and it can enrich existing database annotations and uncover previously hidden features. Importantly, Sma3s has already been used in the functional annotation of two published transcriptomes. PMID:24501397

  9. anNET: a tool for network-embedded thermodynamic analysis of quantitative metabolome data

    PubMed Central

    Zamboni, Nicola; Kümmel, Anne; Heinemann, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Background Compared to other omics techniques, quantitative metabolomics is still at its infancy. Complex sample preparation and analytical procedures render exact quantification extremely difficult. Furthermore, not only the actual measurement but also the subsequent interpretation of quantitative metabolome data to obtain mechanistic insights is still lacking behind the current expectations. Recently, the method of network-embedded thermodynamic (NET) analysis was introduced to address some of these open issues. Building upon principles of thermodynamics, this method allows for a quality check of measured metabolite concentrations and enables to spot metabolic reactions where active regulation potentially controls metabolic flux. So far, however, widespread application of NET analysis in metabolomics labs was hindered by the absence of suitable software. Results We have developed in Matlab a generalized software called 'anNET' that affords a user-friendly implementation of the NET analysis algorithm. anNET supports the analysis of any metabolic network for which a stoichiometric model can be compiled. The model size can span from a single reaction to a complete genome-wide network reconstruction including compartments. anNET can (i) test quantitative data sets for thermodynamic consistency, (ii) predict metabolite concentrations beyond the actually measured data, (iii) identify putative sites of active regulation in the metabolic reaction network, and (iv) help in localizing errors in data sets that were found to be thermodynamically infeasible. We demonstrate the application of anNET with three published Escherichia coli metabolome data sets. Conclusion Our user-friendly and generalized implementation of the NET analysis method in the software anNET allows users to rapidly integrate quantitative metabolome data obtained from virtually any organism. We envision that use of anNET in labs working on quantitative metabolomics will provide the systems biology and

  10. Combined evidence annotation of transposable elements in genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Quesneville, Hadi; Bergman, Casey M; Andrieu, Olivier; Autard, Delphine; Nouaud, Danielle; Ashburner, Michael; Anxolabehere, Dominique

    2005-07-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile, repetitive sequences that make up significant fractions of metazoan genomes. Despite their near ubiquity and importance in genome and chromosome biology, most efforts to annotate TEs in genome sequences rely on the results of a single computational program, RepeatMasker. In contrast, recent advances in gene annotation indicate that high-quality gene models can be produced from combining multiple independent sources of computational evidence. To elevate the quality of TE annotations to a level comparable to that of gene models, we have developed a combined evidence-model TE annotation pipeline, analogous to systems used for gene annotation, by integrating results from multiple homology-based and de novo TE identification methods. As proof of principle, we have annotated "TE models" in Drosophila melanogaster Release 4 genomic sequences using the combined computational evidence derived from RepeatMasker, BLASTER, TBLASTX, all-by-all BLASTN, RECON, TE-HMM and the previous Release 3.1 annotation. Our system is designed for use with the Apollo genome annotation tool, allowing automatic results to be curated manually to produce reliable annotations. The euchromatic TE fraction of D. melanogaster is now estimated at 5.3% (cf. 3.86% in Release 3.1), and we found a substantially higher number of TEs (n = 6,013) than previously identified (n = 1,572). Most of the new TEs derive from small fragments of a few hundred nucleotides long and highly abundant families not previously annotated (e.g., INE-1). We also estimated that 518 TE copies (8.6%) are inserted into at least one other TE, forming a nest of elements. The pipeline allows rapid and thorough annotation of even the most complex TE models, including highly deleted and/or nested elements such as those often found in heterochromatic sequences. Our pipeline can be easily adapted to other genome sequences, such as those of the D. melanogaster heterochromatin or other species in the

  11. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  12. PRIMe Update: innovative content for plant metabolomics and integration of gene expression and metabolite accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamada, Yutaka; Sawada, Yuji; Matsuda, Fumio; Akiyama, Kenji; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Saito, Kazuki

    2013-02-01

    PRIMe (http://prime.psc.riken.jp/), the Platform for RIKEN Metabolomics, is a website that was designed and implemented to support research and analyses ranging from metabolomics to transcriptomics. To achieve functional genomics and annotation of unknown metabolites, we established the following PRIMe contents: MS2T, a library comprising >1 million entries of untargeted tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data of plant metabolites; AtMetExpress LC-MS, a database of transcriptomics and metabolomics approaches in Arabidopsis developmental stages (AtMetExpress Development LC-MS) and a data set of the composition of secondary metabolites among 20 Arabidopsis ecotypes (AtMetExpress 20 ecotypes LC-MS); and ReSpect, hybrid reference MS/MS data resources (acquisitions and literature). PRIMeLink is a new web application that allows access to the innovative data resources of PRIMe. The MS2T library was generated from a set of MS/MS spectra acquired using the automatic data acquisition function of mass spectrometry. To increase the understanding of mechanisms driving variations in metabolic profiles among plant tissues, we further provided the AtMetExpress Development LC-MS database in PRIMe, facilitating the investigation of relationships between gene expression and metabolite accumulation. This information platform therefore provides an integrative analysis resource by linking Arabidopsis transcriptome and metabolome data. Moreover, we developed the ReSpect database, a plant-specific MS/MS data resource, which allows users to identify candidate structures from the suite of complex phytochemical structures. Finally, we integrated the three databases into PRIMeLink and established a walk-through link between transcriptome and metabolome information. PRIMeLink offers a bi-directional searchable function, from the gene and the metabolite perspective, to search for targets seamlessly and effectively.

  13. Annotated Bibliography on Religious Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Anton A.; Reich, K. Helmut

    1991-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography on religious development that covers the areas of psychology and religion, measurement of religiousness, religious development during the life cycle, religious experiences, conversion, religion and morality, and images of God. (Author/BB)

  14. Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    Topics included in this annotated bibliography on patient education are (1) background on development of patient education programs, (2) patient education interventions, (3) references for health professionals, and (4) research and evaluation in patient education. (TA)

  15. Recent advances in plant metabolomics and greener pastures.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Lloyd W

    2010-01-27

    Metabolomics is an extension of the omics concept and experimental approaches. However, is metabolomics just another trendy omics fashion perturbation or is metabolomics actually delivering novel content and value? This article highlights some recent advances that definitely support the role of plant metabolomics in the movement toward greener pastures.

  16. Recent advances in plant metabolomics and greener pastures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomics is an extension of the omics concept and experimental approaches. However, is metabolomics just another trendy omics fashion perturbation or is metabolomics actually delivering novel content and value? This article highlights some recent advances that definitely support the role of plant metabolomics in the movement toward greener pastures. PMID:20948782

  17. Effects of pre-analytical processes on blood samples used in metabolomics studies.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peiyuan; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang

    2015-07-01

    Every day, analytical and bio-analytical chemists make sustained efforts to improve the sensitivity, specificity, robustness, and reproducibility of their methods. Especially in targeted and non-targeted profiling approaches, including metabolomics analysis, these objectives are not easy to achieve; however, robust and reproducible measurements and low coefficients of variation (CV) are crucial for successful metabolomics approaches. Nevertheless, all efforts from the analysts are in vain if the sample quality is poor, i.e. if preanalytical errors are made by the partner during sample collection. Preanalytical risks and errors are more common than expected, even when standard operating procedures (SOP) are used. This risk is particularly high in clinical studies, and poor sample quality may heavily bias the CV of the final analytical results, leading to disappointing outcomes of the study and consequently, although unjustified, to critical questions about the analytical performance of the approach from the partner who provided the samples. This review focuses on the preanalytical phase of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-driven metabolomics analysis of body fluids. Several important preanalytical factors that may seriously affect the profile of the investigated metabolome in body fluids, including factors before sample collection, blood drawing, subsequent handling of the whole blood (transportation), processing of plasma and serum, and inadequate conditions for sample storage, will be discussed. In addition, a detailed description of latent effects on the stability of the blood metabolome and a suggestion for a practical procedure to circumvent risks in the preanalytical phase will be given.

  18. NCBI prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline.

    PubMed

    Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Badretdin, Azat; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Nawrocki, Eric P; Zaslavsky, Leonid; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Pruitt, Kim D; Borodovsky, Mark; Ostell, James

    2016-08-19

    Recent technological advances have opened unprecedented opportunities for large-scale sequencing and analysis of populations of pathogenic species in disease outbreaks, as well as for large-scale diversity studies aimed at expanding our knowledge across the whole domain of prokaryotes. To meet the challenge of timely interpretation of structure, function and meaning of this vast genetic information, a comprehensive approach to automatic genome annotation is critically needed. In collaboration with Georgia Tech, NCBI has developed a new approach to genome annotation that combines alignment based methods with methods of predicting protein-coding and RNA genes and other functional elements directly from sequence. A new gene finding tool, GeneMarkS+, uses the combined evidence of protein and RNA placement by homology as an initial map of annotation to generate and modify ab initio gene predictions across the whole genome. Thus, the new NCBI's Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) relies more on sequence similarity when confident comparative data are available, while it relies more on statistical predictions in the absence of external evidence. The pipeline provides a framework for generation and analysis of annotation on the full breadth of prokaryotic taxonomy. For additional information on PGAP see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/annotation_prok/ and the NCBI Handbook, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK174280/. PMID:27342282

  19. NCBI prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline.

    PubMed

    Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Badretdin, Azat; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Nawrocki, Eric P; Zaslavsky, Leonid; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Pruitt, Kim D; Borodovsky, Mark; Ostell, James

    2016-08-19

    Recent technological advances have opened unprecedented opportunities for large-scale sequencing and analysis of populations of pathogenic species in disease outbreaks, as well as for large-scale diversity studies aimed at expanding our knowledge across the whole domain of prokaryotes. To meet the challenge of timely interpretation of structure, function and meaning of this vast genetic information, a comprehensive approach to automatic genome annotation is critically needed. In collaboration with Georgia Tech, NCBI has developed a new approach to genome annotation that combines alignment based methods with methods of predicting protein-coding and RNA genes and other functional elements directly from sequence. A new gene finding tool, GeneMarkS+, uses the combined evidence of protein and RNA placement by homology as an initial map of annotation to generate and modify ab initio gene predictions across the whole genome. Thus, the new NCBI's Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) relies more on sequence similarity when confident comparative data are available, while it relies more on statistical predictions in the absence of external evidence. The pipeline provides a framework for generation and analysis of annotation on the full breadth of prokaryotic taxonomy. For additional information on PGAP see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/annotation_prok/ and the NCBI Handbook, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK174280/.

  20. MITOS: improved de novo metazoan mitochondrial genome annotation.

    PubMed

    Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Jühling, Frank; Externbrink, Fabian; Florentz, Catherine; Fritzsch, Guido; Pütz, Joern; Middendorf, Martin; Stadler, Peter F

    2013-11-01

    About 2000 completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes are available from the NCBI RefSeq data base together with manually curated annotations of their protein-coding genes, rRNAs, and tRNAs. This annotation information, which has accumulated over two decades, has been obtained with a diverse set of computational tools and annotation strategies. Despite all efforts of manual curation it is still plagued by misassignments of reading directions, erroneous gene names, and missing as well as false positive annotations in particular for the RNA genes. Taken together, this causes substantial problems for fully automatic pipelines that aim to use these data comprehensively for studies of animal phylogenetics and the molecular evolution of mitogenomes. The MITOS pipeline is designed to compute a consistent de novo annotation of the mitogenomic sequences. We show that the results of MITOS match RefSeq and MitoZoa in terms of annotation coverage and quality. At the same time we avoid biases, inconsistencies of nomenclature, and typos originating from manual curation strategies. The MITOS pipeline is accessible online at http://mitos.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de.

  1. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  2. Current Advances in the Metabolomics Study on Lotus Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingzhi; Liu, Ting; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-01-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera), which is distributed widely throughout Asia, Australia and North America, is an aquatic perennial that has been cultivated for over 2,000 years. It is very stimulating that almost all parts of lotus have been consumed as vegetable as well as food, especially the seeds. Except for the nutritive values of lotus, there has been increasing interest in its potential as functional food due to its rich secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids and alkaloids. Not only have these metabolites greatly contributed to the biological process of lotus seeds, but also have been reported to possess multiple health-promoting effects, including antioxidant, anti-amnesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor activities. Thus, comprehensive metabolomic profiling of these metabolites is of key importance to help understand their biological activities, and other chemical biology features. In this context, this review will provide an update on the current technological platforms, and workflow associated with metabolomic studies on lotus seeds, as well as insights into the application of metabolomics for the improvement of food safety and quality, assisting breeding, and promotion of the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics of lotus seeds; meanwhile it will also help explore new perspectives and outline future challenges in this fast-growing research subject. PMID:27379154

  3. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Souza, Renan P.; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate < 0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent methamphetamine levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. PMID:24034544

  4. Current Advances in the Metabolomics Study on Lotus Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingzhi; Liu, Ting; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-01-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera), which is distributed widely throughout Asia, Australia and North America, is an aquatic perennial that has been cultivated for over 2,000 years. It is very stimulating that almost all parts of lotus have been consumed as vegetable as well as food, especially the seeds. Except for the nutritive values of lotus, there has been increasing interest in its potential as functional food due to its rich secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids and alkaloids. Not only have these metabolites greatly contributed to the biological process of lotus seeds, but also have been reported to possess multiple health-promoting effects, including antioxidant, anti-amnesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor activities. Thus, comprehensive metabolomic profiling of these metabolites is of key importance to help understand their biological activities, and other chemical biology features. In this context, this review will provide an update on the current technological platforms, and workflow associated with metabolomic studies on lotus seeds, as well as insights into the application of metabolomics for the improvement of food safety and quality, assisting breeding, and promotion of the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics of lotus seeds; meanwhile it will also help explore new perspectives and outline future challenges in this fast-growing research subject.

  5. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Adkins, D E; McClay, J L; Vunck, S A; Batman, A M; Vann, R E; Clark, S L; Souza, R P; Crowley, J J; Sullivan, P F; van den Oord, E J C G; Beardsley, P M

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In this study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine (MA)-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate, FDR <0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent MA levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization.

  6. Tissue-Based Metabolomics to Analyze the Breast Cancer Metabolome.

    PubMed

    Budczies, Jan; Denkert, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics have been developed into mature technologies that can be utilized to analyze hundreds of biological samples in a high-throughput manner. Over the past few years, both technologies were utilized to analyze large cohorts of fresh frozen breast cancer tissues. Metabolite biomarkers were shown to separate breast cancer tissues from normal breast tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the metabolome differed between hormone receptor positive (HR+) and hormone receptor negative (HR-) breast cancer, but was unchanged in HER2+ tumors compared to HER2- tumors. New metabolism-related biomarkers were discovered including the 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase ABAT, where low mRNA expression led to an accumulation of beta-alanine and shortened relapse-free survival. The glutamate-to-glutamine ratio (GGR) represents another new biomarker that was increased in 88 % of HR- tumors and 56 % of HR+ tumors compared to normal breast tissues. The GGR might help to stratify patients for the treatment with specific glutaminase inhibitors that were recently developed and are currently being tested in phase I clinical studies. Surprisingly, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), initially found to accumulate in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutated gliomas and leukemias and described as an oncometabolite, was detected to be drastically increased in several breast carcinomas in the absence of IDH mutations. In summary, metabolomics analysis of breast cancer tissues is a reliable method and has produced many new biological insights that may impact breast cancer diagnostics and treatment over the coming years. PMID:27557538

  7. Establishment of Protocols for Global Metabolomics by LC-MS for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Yasunobu; Motoike, Ikuko N.; Katoh, Yasutake; Kurosawa, Yasuhiro; Saijyo, Reina; Koshiba, Seizo; Yasuda, Jun; Motohashi, Hozumi; Sugawara, Junichi; Tanabe, Osamu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a promising avenue for biomarker discovery. Although the quality of metabolomic analyses, especially global metabolomics (G-Met) using mass spectrometry (MS), largely depends on the instrumentation, potential bottlenecks still exist at several basic levels in the metabolomics workflow. Therefore, we established a precise protocol initially for the G-Met analyses of human blood plasma to overcome some these difficulties. In our protocol, samples are deproteinized in a 96-well plate using an automated liquid-handling system, and conducted either using a UHPLC-QTOF/MS system equipped with a reverse phase column or a LC-FTMS system equipped with a normal phase column. A normalization protocol of G-Met data was also developed to compensate for intra- and inter-batch differences, and the variations were significantly reduced along with our normalization, especially for the UHPLC-QTOF/MS data with a C18 reverse-phase column for positive ions. Secondly, we examined the changes in metabolomic profiles caused by the storage of EDTA-blood specimens to identify quality markers for the evaluation of the specimens’ pre-analytical conditions. Forty quality markers, including lysophospholipids, dipeptides, fatty acids, succinic acid, amino acids, glucose, and uric acid were identified by G-Met for the evaluation of plasma sample quality and established the equation of calculating the quality score. We applied our quality markers to a small-scale study to evaluate the quality of clinical samples. The G-Met protocols and quality markers established here should prove useful for the discovery and development of biomarkers for a wider range of diseases. PMID:27579980

  8. Establishment of Protocols for Global Metabolomics by LC-MS for Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, Daisuke; Okamura, Yasunobu; Motoike, Ikuko N; Katoh, Yasutake; Kurosawa, Yasuhiro; Saijyo, Reina; Koshiba, Seizo; Yasuda, Jun; Motohashi, Hozumi; Sugawara, Junichi; Tanabe, Osamu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a promising avenue for biomarker discovery. Although the quality of metabolomic analyses, especially global metabolomics (G-Met) using mass spectrometry (MS), largely depends on the instrumentation, potential bottlenecks still exist at several basic levels in the metabolomics workflow. Therefore, we established a precise protocol initially for the G-Met analyses of human blood plasma to overcome some these difficulties. In our protocol, samples are deproteinized in a 96-well plate using an automated liquid-handling system, and conducted either using a UHPLC-QTOF/MS system equipped with a reverse phase column or a LC-FTMS system equipped with a normal phase column. A normalization protocol of G-Met data was also developed to compensate for intra- and inter-batch differences, and the variations were significantly reduced along with our normalization, especially for the UHPLC-QTOF/MS data with a C18 reverse-phase column for positive ions. Secondly, we examined the changes in metabolomic profiles caused by the storage of EDTA-blood specimens to identify quality markers for the evaluation of the specimens' pre-analytical conditions. Forty quality markers, including lysophospholipids, dipeptides, fatty acids, succinic acid, amino acids, glucose, and uric acid were identified by G-Met for the evaluation of plasma sample quality and established the equation of calculating the quality score. We applied our quality markers to a small-scale study to evaluate the quality of clinical samples. The G-Met protocols and quality markers established here should prove useful for the discovery and development of biomarkers for a wider range of diseases. PMID:27579980

  9. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. Results We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. Conclusions MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets. PMID:22192575

  10. Objective-guided image annotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qi; Tsang, Ivor Wai-Hung; Gao, Shenghua

    2013-04-01

    Automatic image annotation, which is usually formulated as a multi-label classification problem, is one of the major tools used to enhance the semantic understanding of web images. Many multimedia applications (e.g., tag-based image retrieval) can greatly benefit from image annotation. However, the insufficient performance of image annotation methods prevents these applications from being practical. On the other hand, specific measures are usually designed to evaluate how well one annotation method performs for a specific objective or application, but most image annotation methods do not consider optimization of these measures, so that they are inevitably trapped into suboptimal performance of these objective-specific measures. To address this issue, we first summarize a variety of objective-guided performance measures under a unified representation. Our analysis reveals that macro-averaging measures are very sensitive to infrequent keywords, and hamming measure is easily affected by skewed distributions. We then propose a unified multi-label learning framework, which directly optimizes a variety of objective-specific measures of multi-label learning tasks. Specifically, we first present a multilayer hierarchical structure of learning hypotheses for multi-label problems based on which a variety of loss functions with respect to objective-guided measures are defined. And then, we formulate these loss functions as relaxed surrogate functions and optimize them by structural SVMs. According to the analysis of various measures and the high time complexity of optimizing micro-averaging measures, in this paper, we focus on example-based measures that are tailor-made for image annotation tasks but are seldom explored in the literature. Experiments show consistency with the formal analysis on two widely used multi-label datasets, and demonstrate the superior performance of our proposed method over state-of-the-art baseline methods in terms of example-based measures on four

  11. Global LC/MS Metabolomics Profiling of Calcium Stressed and Immunosuppressant Drug Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stefan; Fischer, Steven M; Chen, Lily; Sana, Theodore R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that calcium stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, challenged with immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and Cyclosporin A, responds with comprehensive gene expression changes and attenuation of the generalized calcium stress response. Here, we describe a global metabolomics workflow for investigating the utility of tracking corresponding phenotypic changes. This was achieved by efficiently analyzing relative abundance differences between intracellular metabolite pools from wild-type and calcium stressed cultures, with and without prior immunosuppressant drugs exposure. We used pathway database content from WikiPathways and YeastCyc to facilitate the projection of our metabolomics profiling results onto biological pathways. A key challenge was to increase the coverage of the detected metabolites. This was achieved by applying both reverse phase (RP) and aqueous normal phase (ANP) chromatographic separations, as well as electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) sources for detection in both ion polarities. Unsupervised principle component analysis (PCA) and ANOVA results revealed differentiation between wild-type controls, calcium stressed and immunosuppressant/calcium challenged cells. Untargeted data mining resulted in 247 differentially expressed, annotated metabolites, across at least one pair of conditions. A separate, targeted data mining strategy identified 187 differential, annotated metabolites. All annotated metabolites were subsequently mapped onto curated pathways from YeastCyc and WikiPathways for interactive pathway analysis and visualization. Dozens of pathways showed differential responses to stress conditions based on one or more matches to the list of annotated metabolites or to metabolites that had been identified further by MS/MS. The purine salvage, pantothenate and sulfur amino acid pathways were flagged as being enriched, which is consistent with previously published literature for

  12. Global LC/MS Metabolomics Profiling of Calcium Stressed and Immunosuppressant Drug Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stefan; Fischer, Steven M; Chen, Lily; Sana, Theodore R

    2013-12-06

    Previous studies have shown that calcium stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, challenged with immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and Cyclosporin A, responds with comprehensive gene expression changes and attenuation of the generalized calcium stress response. Here, we describe a global metabolomics workflow for investigating the utility of tracking corresponding phenotypic changes. This was achieved by efficiently analyzing relative abundance differences between intracellular metabolite pools from wild-type and calcium stressed cultures, with and without prior immunosuppressant drugs exposure. We used pathway database content from WikiPathways and YeastCyc to facilitate the projection of our metabolomics profiling results onto biological pathways. A key challenge was to increase the coverage of the detected metabolites. This was achieved by applying both reverse phase (RP) and aqueous normal phase (ANP) chromatographic separations, as well as electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) sources for detection in both ion polarities. Unsupervised principle component analysis (PCA) and ANOVA results revealed differentiation between wild-type controls, calcium stressed and immunosuppressant/calcium challenged cells. Untargeted data mining resulted in 247 differentially expressed, annotated metabolites, across at least one pair of conditions. A separate, targeted data mining strategy identified 187 differential, annotated metabolites. All annotated metabolites were subsequently mapped onto curated pathways from YeastCyc and WikiPathways for interactive pathway analysis and visualization. Dozens of pathways showed differential responses to stress conditions based on one or more matches to the list of annotated metabolites or to metabolites that had been identified further by MS/MS. The purine salvage, pantothenate and sulfur amino acid pathways were flagged as being enriched, which is consistent with previously published literature for

  13. Global LC/MS Metabolomics Profiling of Calcium Stressed and Immunosuppressant Drug Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Stefan; Fischer, Steven M.; Chen, Lily; Sana, Theodore R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that calcium stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, challenged with immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and Cyclosporin A, responds with comprehensive gene expression changes and attenuation of the generalized calcium stress response. Here, we describe a global metabolomics workflow for investigating the utility of tracking corresponding phenotypic changes. This was achieved by efficiently analyzing relative abundance differences between intracellular metabolite pools from wild-type and calcium stressed cultures, with and without prior immunosuppressant drugs exposure. We used pathway database content from WikiPathways and YeastCyc to facilitate the projection of our metabolomics profiling results onto biological pathways. A key challenge was to increase the coverage of the detected metabolites. This was achieved by applying both reverse phase (RP) and aqueous normal phase (ANP) chromatographic separations, as well as electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) sources for detection in both ion polarities. Unsupervised principle component analysis (PCA) and ANOVA results revealed differentiation between wild-type controls, calcium stressed and immunosuppressant/calcium challenged cells. Untargeted data mining resulted in 247 differentially expressed, annotated metabolites, across at least one pair of conditions. A separate, targeted data mining strategy identified 187 differential, annotated metabolites. All annotated metabolites were subsequently mapped onto curated pathways from YeastCyc and WikiPathways for interactive pathway analysis and visualization. Dozens of pathways showed differential responses to stress conditions based on one or more matches to the list of annotated metabolites or to metabolites that had been identified further by MS/MS. The purine salvage, pantothenate and sulfur amino acid pathways were flagged as being enriched, which is consistent with previously published literature for

  14. Evolution of metabolomics profile of crab paste during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daian; Ye, Yangfang; Chen, Juanjuan; Yan, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Crab paste is regularly consumed by people in the coastal area of China. The fermentation time plays a key role on the quality of crab paste. Here, we investigated the dynamic evolution of metabolite profile of crab paste during fermentation by combined use of NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that crab paste quality was significantly affected by fermentation. The quality change was manifested in the decline of lactate, betaine, taurine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, trigonelline, inosine, adenosine diphosphate, and 2-pyridinemethanol, and in the fluctuation of a range of amino acids as well as in the accumulation of glutamate, sucrose, formate, acetate, trimethylamine, and hypoxanthine. Trimethylamine production and its increased level with fermentation could be considered as a freshness index of crab paste. These results contribute to quality assessment of crab paste and confirm the metabolomics technique as a useful tool to provide important information on the crab paste quality.

  15. Mouse genome annotation by the RefSeq project.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Kelly M; Goldfarb, Tamara; Cox, Eric; Farrell, Catherine M; Gupta, Tripti; Joardar, Vinita S; Kodali, Vamsi K; Murphy, Michael R; O'Leary, Nuala A; Pujar, Shashikant; Rajput, Bhanu; Rangwala, Sanjida H; Riddick, Lillian D; Webb, David; Wright, Mathew W; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-10-01

    Complete and accurate annotation of the mouse genome is critical to the advancement of research conducted on this important model organism. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) develops and maintains many useful resources to assist the mouse research community. In particular, the reference sequence (RefSeq) database provides high-quality annotation of multiple mouse genome assemblies using a combinatorial approach that leverages computation, manual curation, and collaboration. Implementation of this conservative and rigorous approach, which focuses on representation of only full-length and non-redundant data, produces high-quality annotation products. RefSeq records explicitly link sequences to current knowledge in a timely manner, updating public records regularly and rapidly in response to nomenclature updates, addition of new relevant publications, collaborator discussion, and user feedback. Whole genome re-annotation is also conducted at least every 12-18 months, and often more frequently in response to assembly updates or availability of informative data. This article highlights key features and advantages of RefSeq genome annotation products and presents an overview of NCBI processes to generate these data. Further discussion of NCBI's resources highlights useful features and the best methods for accessing our data.

  16. ORegAnno 3.0: a community-driven resource for curated regulatory annotation.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Cotto, Kelsy C; Wang, Grace; Griffith, Malachi; Kasaian, Katayoon; Jones, Steven J M; Montgomery, Stephen B; Griffith, Obi L

    2016-01-01

    The Open Regulatory Annotation database (ORegAnno) is a resource for curated regulatory annotation. It contains information about regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites, RNA binding sites, regulatory variants, haplotypes, and other regulatory elements. ORegAnno differentiates itself from other regulatory resources by facilitating crowd-sourced interpretation and annotation of regulatory observations from the literature and highly curated resources. It contains a comprehensive annotation scheme that aims to describe both the elements and outcomes of regulatory events. Moreover, ORegAnno assembles these disparate data sources and annotations into a single, high quality catalogue of curated regulatory information. The current release is an update of the database previously featured in the NAR Database Issue, and now contains 1 948 307 records, across 18 species, with a combined coverage of 334 215 080 bp. Complete records, annotation, and other associated data are available for browsing and download at http://www.oreganno.org/.

  17. MEGAnnotator: a user-friendly pipeline for microbial genomes assembly and annotation.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Genome annotation is one of the key actions that must be undertaken in order to decipher the genetic blueprint of organisms. Thus, a correct and reliable annotation is essential in rendering genomic data valuable. Here, we describe a bioinformatics pipeline based on freely available software programs coordinated by a multithreaded script named MEGAnnotator (Multithreaded Enhanced prokaryotic Genome Annotator). This pipeline allows the generation of multiple annotated formats fulfilling the NCBI guidelines for assembled microbial genome submission, based on DNA shotgun sequencing reads, and minimizes manual intervention, while also reducing waiting times between software program executions and improving final quality of both assembly and annotation outputs. MEGAnnotator provides an efficient way to pre-arrange the assembly and annotation work required to process NGS genome sequence data. The script improves the final quality of microbial genome annotation by reducing ambiguous annotations. Moreover, the MEGAnnotator platform allows the user to perform a partial annotation of pre-assembled genomes and includes an option to accomplish metagenomic data set assemblies. MEGAnnotator platform will be useful for microbiologists interested in genome analyses of bacteria as well as those investigating the complexity of microbial communities that do not possess the necessary skills to prepare their own bioinformatics pipeline.

  18. Collective dynamics of social annotation.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain; Baldassarri, Andrea; Schehr, Gregory; Loreto, Vittorio

    2009-06-30

    The enormous increase of popularity and use of the worldwide web has led in the recent years to important changes in the ways people communicate. An interesting example of this fact is provided by the now very popular social annotation systems, through which users annotate resources (such as web pages or digital photographs) with keywords known as "tags." Understanding the rich emergent structures resulting from the uncoordinated actions of users calls for an interdisciplinary effort. In particular concepts borrowed from statistical physics, such as random walks (RWs), and complex networks theory, can effectively contribute to the mathematical modeling of social annotation systems. Here, we show that the process of social annotation can be seen as a collective but uncoordinated exploration of an underlying semantic space, pictured as a graph, through a series of RWs. This modeling framework reproduces several aspects, thus far unexplained, of social annotation, among which are the peculiar growth of the size of the vocabulary used by the community and its complex network structure that represents an externalization of semantic structures grounded in cognition and that are typically hard to access. PMID:19506244

  19. Metabolomics in neonatology: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Fanos, V; Van den Anker, J; Noto, A; Mussap, M; Atzori, L

    2013-02-01

    The newest 'omics' science is metabolomics, the latest offspring of genomics, considered the most innovative of the 'omics' sciences. Metabolomics, also called the 'new clinical biochemistry', is an approach based on the systematic study of the complete set of metabolites in a biological sample. The metabolome is considered the most predictive phenotype and is capable of considering epigenetic differences. It is so close to the phenotype that it can be considered the phenotype itself. In the last three years about 5000 papers have been listed in PubMed on this topic, but few data are available in the newborn. The aim of this review, after a description of background and technical procedures, is to analyse the clinical applications of metabolomics in neonatology, covering the following points: gestational age, postnatal age, type of delivery, zygosity, perinatal asphyxia, intrauterine growth restriction, prenatal inflammation and brain injury, respiratory, cardiovascular renal, metabolic diseases; sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis and antibiotic treatment; nutritional studies on maternal milk and formula, pharma-metabolomics, long-term diseases. Pros and cons of metabolomics are also discussed. All this comes about with the non-invasive collection of a few drops of urine (exceptionally important for the neonate, especially those of low birth weight). Only time and large-scale studies to validate initial results will place metabolomics within neonatology. In any case, it is important for perinatologists to learn and understand this new technology to offer their patients the utmost in diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities.

  20. American Indians, An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Library Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    Participants in the Library Services Institute for Minnesota Indians compiled an annotated bibliography of materials about American Indians which had been evaluated from an Indian frame of reference. Materials were evaluated in terms of artistic quality, reader appeal, and potential contribution to the study of American Indians. Included in the…

  1. Chicano Perspectives in Literature--A Critical and Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomeli, Francisco A.; Urioste, Donaldo W.

    As an effort to define and explore the horizons of Chicano literature, this annotated and critical bibliography provides bibliographical data and critical evaluations and judgments regarding the quality, importance, and impact of 131 literary works by Chicanos. The commentaries are intended to be taken as opinions with the objective for promoting…

  2. [The use of metabolomics in medicine - some examples of oncological and metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zimny, Dominika; Szatkowska, Marta; Połubok, Joanna; Maciaszek, Julian; Machaj, Mikołaj; Barg, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is a new field of medicine focused on examining and analyzing metabolites produced in biological cells. Biological fluids primarily used in this method include: plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva and urine. The most common methods of evaluating the composition involve nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance (MR) with addition of gas chromatography (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography (LC-MS). Metabolomics is used in a wide variety of medicine disciplines. The variability of biochemical processes in tumor cells in comparison to normal cells is the starting point of such studies. The metabolomic changes are observed not only in solid tumors, like the mammary tumor, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer but also in tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. Nowadays, the aim of studies is to find biomarkers which would help to diagnose a disease quickly, assess its progression, and implement effective treatment. Metabolomics is also widely applied in metabolic diseases, mainly the diabetes. The list of examined metabolites gives promising chances for a successful prognosis, diagnosis and comprehensive monitoring of the progression of this civilization disease. The development of metabolomics will also contribute to the individualization of treatment, proper drugs adjustment, which will make a therapy more successful, cause less side effects and improve the quality of patient's life.

  3. [The use of metabolomics in medicine - some examples of oncological and metabolic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zimny, Dominika; Szatkowska, Marta; Połubok, Joanna; Maciaszek, Julian; Machaj, Mikołaj; Barg, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is a new field of medicine focused on examining and analyzing metabolites produced in biological cells. Biological fluids primarily used in this method include: plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva and urine. The most common methods of evaluating the composition involve nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance (MR) with addition of gas chromatography (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography (LC-MS). Metabolomics is used in a wide variety of medicine disciplines. The variability of biochemical processes in tumor cells in comparison to normal cells is the starting point of such studies. The metabolomic changes are observed not only in solid tumors, like the mammary tumor, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer but also in tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. Nowadays, the aim of studies is to find biomarkers which would help to diagnose a disease quickly, assess its progression, and implement effective treatment. Metabolomics is also widely applied in metabolic diseases, mainly the diabetes. The list of examined metabolites gives promising chances for a successful prognosis, diagnosis and comprehensive monitoring of the progression of this civilization disease. The development of metabolomics will also contribute to the individualization of treatment, proper drugs adjustment, which will make a therapy more successful, cause less side effects and improve the quality of patient's life. PMID:26615014

  4. Metabolomics applied to the pancreatic islet

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Jessica R.; Jensen, Mette V.; Newgard, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics, the characterization of the set of small molecules in a biological system, is advancing research in multiple areas of islet biology. Measuring a breadth of metabolites simultaneously provides a broad perspective on metabolic changes as the islets respond dynamically to metabolic fuels, hormones, or environmental stressors. As a result, metabolomics has the potential to provide new mechanistic insights into islet physiology and pathophysiology. Here we summarize advances in our understanding of islet physiology and the etiologies of type-1 and type-2 diabetes gained from metabolomics studies. PMID:26116790

  5. The guard cell metabolome: functions in stomatal movement and global food security.

    PubMed

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Acharya, Biswa R; Granot, David; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Guard cells represent a unique single cell-type system for the study of cellular responses to abiotic and biotic perturbations that affect stomatal movement. Decades of effort through both classical physiological and functional genomics approaches have generated an enormous amount of information on the roles of individual metabolites in stomatal guard cell function and physiology. Recent application of metabolomics methods has produced a substantial amount of new information on metabolome control of stomatal movement. In conjunction with other "omics" approaches, the knowledge-base is growing to reach a systems-level description of this single cell-type. Here we summarize current knowledge of the guard cell metabolome and highlight critical metabolites that bear significant impact on future engineering and breeding efforts to generate plants/crops that are resistant to environmental challenges and produce high yield and quality products for food and energy security.

  6. The guard cell metabolome: functions in stomatal movement and global food security

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Biswapriya B.; Acharya, Biswa R.; Granot, David; Assmann, Sarah M.; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Guard cells represent a unique single cell-type system for the study of cellular responses to abiotic and biotic perturbations that affect stomatal movement. Decades of effort through both classical physiological and functional genomics approaches have generated an enormous amount of information on the roles of individual metabolites in stomatal guard cell function and physiology. Recent application of metabolomics methods has produced a substantial amount of new information on metabolome control of stomatal movement. In conjunction with other “omics” approaches, the knowledge-base is growing to reach a systems-level description of this single cell-type. Here we summarize current knowledge of the guard cell metabolome and highlight critical metabolites that bear significant impact on future engineering and breeding efforts to generate plants/crops that are resistant to environmental challenges and produce high yield and quality products for food and energy security. PMID:26042131

  7. PhenoMeter: A Metabolome Database Search Tool Using Statistical Similarity Matching of Metabolic Phenotypes for High-Confidence Detection of Functional Links

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Adam J.; Zhang, Peng; Whitehead, Lynne; Kaines, Sarah; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Badger, Murray R.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes PhenoMeter (PM), a new type of metabolomics database search that accepts metabolite response patterns as queries and searches the MetaPhen database of reference patterns for responses that are statistically significantly similar or inverse for the purposes of detecting functional links. To identify a similarity measure that would detect functional links as reliably as possible, we compared the performance of four statistics in correctly top-matching metabolic phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana metabolism mutants affected in different steps of the photorespiration metabolic pathway to reference phenotypes of mutants affected in the same enzymes by independent mutations. The best performing statistic, the PM score, was a function of both Pearson correlation and Fisher’s Exact Test of directional overlap. This statistic outperformed Pearson correlation, biweight midcorrelation and Fisher’s Exact Test used alone. To demonstrate general applicability, we show that the PM reliably retrieved the most closely functionally linked response in the database when queried with responses to a wide variety of environmental and genetic perturbations. Attempts to match metabolic phenotypes between independent studies were met with varying success and possible reasons for this are discussed. Overall, our results suggest that integration of pattern-based search tools into metabolomics databases will aid functional annotation of newly recorded metabolic phenotypes analogously to the way sequence similarity search algorithms have aided the functional annotation of genes and proteins. PM is freely available at MetabolomeExpress (https://www.metabolome-express.org/phenometer.php). PMID:26284240

  8. Chemical annotation of small and peptide-like molecules at the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Jasmine Y; Feng, Zukang; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Sala, Raul; Westbrook, John; Zhuravleva, Marina; Shao, Chenghua; Quesada, Martha; Peisach, Ezra; Berman, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of polymers and their complexes with small molecules in the Protein Data Bank archive (PDB) has continued to increase significantly. To support scientific advancements and ensure the best quality and completeness of the data files over the next 10 years and beyond, the Worldwide PDB partnership that manages the PDB archive is developing a new deposition and annotation system. This system focuses on efficient data capture across all supported experimental methods. The new deposition and annotation system is composed of four major modules that together support all of the processing requirements for a PDB entry. In this article, we describe one such module called the Chemical Component Annotation Tool. This tool uses information from both the Chemical Component Dictionary and Biologically Interesting molecule Reference Dictionary to aid in annotation. Benchmark studies have shown that the Chemical Component Annotation Tool provides significant improvements in processing efficiency and data quality. Database URL: http://wwpdb.org. PMID:24291661

  9. Chemical annotation of small and peptide-like molecules at the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Jasmine Y; Feng, Zukang; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Sala, Raul; Westbrook, John; Zhuravleva, Marina; Shao, Chenghua; Quesada, Martha; Peisach, Ezra; Berman, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of polymers and their complexes with small molecules in the Protein Data Bank archive (PDB) has continued to increase significantly. To support scientific advancements and ensure the best quality and completeness of the data files over the next 10 years and beyond, the Worldwide PDB partnership that manages the PDB archive is developing a new deposition and annotation system. This system focuses on efficient data capture across all supported experimental methods. The new deposition and annotation system is composed of four major modules that together support all of the processing requirements for a PDB entry. In this article, we describe one such module called the Chemical Component Annotation Tool. This tool uses information from both the Chemical Component Dictionary and Biologically Interesting molecule Reference Dictionary to aid in annotation. Benchmark studies have shown that the Chemical Component Annotation Tool provides significant improvements in processing efficiency and data quality. Database URL: http://wwpdb.org.

  10. Preserving sequence annotations across reference sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Matching and comparing sequence annotations of different reference sequences is vital to genomics research, yet many annotation formats do not specify the reference sequence types or versions used. This makes the integration of annotations from different sources difficult and error prone. Results As part of our effort to create linked data for interoperable sequence annotations, we present an RDF data model for sequence annotation using the ontological framework established by the OBO Foundry ontologies and the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). We defined reference sequences as the common domain of integration for sequence annotations, and identified three semantic relationships between sequence annotations. In doing so, we created the Reference Sequence Annotation to compensate for gaps in the SO and in its mapping to BFO, particularly for annotations that refer to versions of consensus reference sequences. Moreover, we present three integration models for sequence annotations using different reference assemblies. Conclusions We demonstrated a working example of a sequence annotation instance, and how this instance can be linked to other annotations on different reference sequences. Sequence annotations in this format are semantically rich and can be integrated easily with different assemblies. We also identify other challenges of modeling reference sequences with the BFO. PMID:25093075

  11. Metabolomic profiling of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wettersten, Hiromi I; Ganti, Sheila; Weiss, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is one of the newcomers among the "omics" techniques, perhaps also constituting the most relevant for the study of pathophysiological conditions. Metabolomics may indeed yield not only disease-specific biomarkers but also profound insights into the etiology and progression of a variety of human disorders. Various metabolomic approaches are currently available to study oncogenesis and tumor progression in vivo, in murine tumor models. Many of these models rely on the xenograft of human cancer cells into immunocompromised mice. Understanding how the metabolism of these cells evolves in vivo is critical to evaluate the actual pertinence of xenograft models to human pathology. Here, we discuss various tumor xenograft models and methods for their metabolomic profiling to provide a short guide to investigators interested in this field of research. PMID:24924138

  12. Metabolomics in Population-Based Research

    Cancer.gov

    Metabolomics is the study of small molecules of both endogenous and exogenous origin, such as metabolic substrates and their products, lipids, small peptides, vitamins and other protein cofactors generated by metabolism, which are downstream from genes.

  13. Metabolomic profiling of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wettersten, Hiromi I; Ganti, Sheila; Weiss, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is one of the newcomers among the "omics" techniques, perhaps also constituting the most relevant for the study of pathophysiological conditions. Metabolomics may indeed yield not only disease-specific biomarkers but also profound insights into the etiology and progression of a variety of human disorders. Various metabolomic approaches are currently available to study oncogenesis and tumor progression in vivo, in murine tumor models. Many of these models rely on the xenograft of human cancer cells into immunocompromised mice. Understanding how the metabolism of these cells evolves in vivo is critical to evaluate the actual pertinence of xenograft models to human pathology. Here, we discuss various tumor xenograft models and methods for their metabolomic profiling to provide a short guide to investigators interested in this field of research.

  14. Mass-based metabolomic analysis of soybean sprouts during germination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Eun-Ji; Kim, Dong Wook; Jang, Gwang-Ju; Song, Seong Hwa; Lee, Jae-In; Lee, Sang Bong; Kim, Bo-Min; Cho, Yeongrae; Lee, Hyeon-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jin

    2017-02-15

    We investigated the metabolite profile of soybean sprouts at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4days after germination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS) to understand the relationship between germination and nutritional quality. Data were analyzed by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and sprout samples were separated successfully using their PLS-DA scores. Fifty-eight metabolites, including macromolecular derivatives related to energy production, amino acids, myo-inositol metabolites, phytosterols, antioxidants, isoflavones, and soyasaponins, contributed to the separation. Amino acids, myo-inositol metabolites, isoflavone aglycones, B soyasaponins, antioxidants, and phytosterols, associated with health benefits and/or taste quality, increased with germination time while isoflavone glycosides and DDMP soyasaponins decreased. Based on these metabolites, the metabolomic pathway associated with energy production in soybean sprouts is suggested. Our data suggest that sprouting is a useful processing step to improve soybean nutritional quality, and metabolomic analysis is useful in understanding nutritional change during sprouting. PMID:27664639

  15. Automated semantic annotation of rare disease cases: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Maria; Rodríguez, Hadriana; Martínez, Diego; Pardo, María; Sobrido, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: As the number of clinical reports in the peer-reviewed medical literature keeps growing, there is an increasing need for online search tools to find and analyze publications on patients with similar clinical characteristics. This problem is especially critical and challenging for rare diseases, where publications of large series are scarce. Through an applied example, we illustrate how to automatically identify new relevant cases and semantically annotate the relevant literature about patient case reports to capture the phenotype of a rare disease named cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. Results: Our results confirm that it is possible to automatically identify new relevant case reports with a high precision and to annotate them with a satisfactory quality (74% F-measure). Automated annotation with an emphasis to entirely describe all phenotypic abnormalities found in a disease may facilitate curation efforts by supplying phenotype retrieval and assessment of their frequency. Availability and Supplementary information: http://www.usc.es/keam/Phenotype Annotation/. Database URL: http://www.usc.es/keam/PhenotypeAnnotation/ PMID:24903515

  16. Statistical algorithms for ontology-based annotation of scientific literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ontologies encode relationships within a domain in robust data structures that can be used to annotate data objects, including scientific papers, in ways that ease tasks such as search and meta-analysis. However, the annotation process requires significant time and effort when performed by humans. Text mining algorithms can facilitate this process, but they render an analysis mainly based upon keyword, synonym and semantic matching. They do not leverage information embedded in an ontology's structure. Methods We present a probabilistic framework that facilitates the automatic annotation of literature by indirectly modeling the restrictions among the different classes in the ontology. Our research focuses on annotating human functional neuroimaging literature within the Cognitive Paradigm Ontology (CogPO). We use an approach that combines the stochastic simplicity of naïve Bayes with the formal transparency of decision trees. Our data structure is easily modifiable to reflect changing domain knowledge. Results We compare our results across naïve Bayes, Bayesian Decision Trees, and Constrained Decision Tree classifiers that keep a human expert in the loop, in terms of the quality measure of the F1-mirco score. Conclusions Unlike traditional text mining algorithms, our framework can model the knowledge encoded by the dependencies in an ontology, albeit indirectly. We successfully exploit the fact that CogPO has explicitly stated restrictions, and implicit dependencies in the form of patterns in the expert curated annotations. PMID:25093071

  17. Infant Feeding: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowhurst, Christine Marie, Comp.; Kumer, Bonnie Lee, Comp.

    Intended for parents, health professionals and allied health workers, and others involved in caring for infants and young children, this annotated bibliography brings together in one selective listing a review of over 700 current publications related to infant feeding. Reflecting current knowledge in infant feeding, the bibliography has as its…

  18. English Language Learners: Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hector-Mason, Anestine; Bardack, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This annotated bibliography represents a first step toward compiling a comprehensive overview of current research on issues related to English language learners (ELLs). It is intended to be a resource for researchers, policymakers, administrators, and educators who are engaged in efforts to bridge the divide between research, policy, and practice…

  19. Appalachian Women. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary Margo

    This bibliography compiles annotations of 178 books, journal articles, ERIC documents, and dissertations on Appalachian women and their social, cultural, and economic environment. Entries were published 1966-93 and are listed in the following categories: (1) authors and literary criticism; (2) bibliographies and resource guides; (3) economics,…

  20. Radiocarbon Dating: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortine, Suellen

    This selective annotated bibliography covers various sources of information on the radiocarbon dating method, including journal articles, conference proceedings, and reports, reflecting the most important and useful sources of the last 25 years. The bibliography is divided into five parts--general background on radiocarbon, radiocarbon dating,…

  1. Hispanic Heritage. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Univ., CO. School of Education.

    This annotated bibliography of a wide range of materials for the social studies teacher is concerned with the Hispano heritage. The sections are introduced by a brief description. The sections are: 1) general materials, 2) the land and the people, 3) the European background, 4) Spain's colonial system, 5) the Spanish borderlands, 6) the Anglo…

  2. Rural Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Sara

    The 120-item annotated bibliography was compiled to facilitate the development of a recently approved course entitled "Topics in Rural Education" at the University of Maine at Machias. Although the dates range from 1964 to 1982, most of the materials were prepared in the 1970s and 1980s. The interrelatedness of the issues makes categorization…

  3. Workforce Reductions. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Thomas A.; Hickok, Thomas A.

    This report, which is based on a review of practitioner-oriented sources and scholarly journals, uses a three-part framework to organize annotated bibliographies that, together, list a total of 104 sources that provide the following three perspectives on work force reduction issues: organizational, organizational-individual relationship, and…

  4. Vietnamese Amerasians: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark C.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography on Vietnamese Amerasians includes primary and secondary sources as well as reviews of three documentary films. Sources were selected in order to provide an overview of the historical and political context of Amerasian resettlement and a review of the scant available research on coping and adaptation with this…

  5. Instructional Materials Centers; Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Rosario, Comp.

    An annotated bibliography lists 74 articles and reports on instructional materials centers (IMC) which appeared from 1967-70. The articles deal with such topics as the purposes of an IMC, guidelines for setting up an IMC, and the relationship of an IMC to technology. Most articles deal with use of an IMC on an elementary or secondary level, but…

  6. Nikos Kazantzakis: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Kui

    This research paper consists of an annotated bibliography about Nikos Kazantzakis, one of the major modern Greek writers and author of "The Last Temptation of Christ,""Zorba the Greek," and many other works. Because of Kazantzakis' position in world literature there are many critical works about him; however, bibliographical control of these works…

  7. An Annotated Bibliography for Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Instruction.

    The annotated bibliography presents approximately 450 references about art for elementary, secondary, and professional levels. It is presented in three sections. Section one identifies 19 resources about art from a professional or teaching perspective. Included are books explaining how to teach various techniques to students of beginning or…

  8. Annotated Bibliography on Humanistic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganung, Cynthia

    1975-01-01

    Part I of this annotated bibliography deals with books and articles on such topics as achievement motivation, process education, transactional analysis, discipline without punishment, role-playing, interpersonal skills, self-acceptance, moral education, self-awareness, values clarification, and non-verbal communication. Part II focuses on…

  9. MSDAC Resource Library Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cristel; And Others

    This annotated bibliography lists books, films, filmstrips, recordings, and booklets on sex equity. Entries are arranged according to the following topics: career resources, curriculum resources, management, sex equity, sex roles, women's studies, student activities, and sex-fair fiction. Included in each entry are name of author, editor or…

  10. Multicultural Education. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narang, H. L.

    This annotated bibliography contains references to books, journal articles, ERIC documents, doctoral dissertations, and audio-visual materials on the subject of multicultural education. Topics include integrating multiculturalism in school subjects, prejudice and discrimination, intercultural communication, ethnic identity and ethnic bias.…

  11. IMG ER: A System for Microbial Genome Annotation Expert Review and Curation

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-25

    A rapidly increasing number of microbial genomes are sequenced by organizations worldwide and are eventually included into various public genome data resources. The quality of the annotations depends largely on the original dataset providers, with erroneous or incomplete annotations often carried over into the public resources and difficult to correct. We have developed an Expert Review (ER) version of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, with the goal of supporting systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotations. IMG ER provides tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within IMG's rich integrated genome framework. New genome datasets are included into IMG ER prior to their public release either with their native annotations or with annotations generated by IMG ER's annotation pipeline. IMG ER tools allow addressing annotation problems detected with IMG's comparative analysis tools, such as genes missed by gene prediction pipelines or genes without an associated function. Over the past year, IMG ER was used for improving the annotations of about 150 microbial genomes.

  12. Systems Theory and Communication. Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, William G., Jr.

    This annotated bibliography presents annotations of 31 books and journal articles dealing with systems theory and its relation to organizational communication, marketing, information theory, and cybernetics. Materials were published between 1963 and 1992 and are listed alphabetically by author. (RS)

  13. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices.

  14. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts.

  15. High Metabolomic Microdiversity within Co-Occurring Isolates of the Extremely Halophilic Bacterium Salinibacter ruber

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Lucio, Marianna; Peña, Arantxa; Cifuentes, Ana; Brito-Echeverría, Jocelyn; Moritz, Franco; Tziotis, Dimitrios; López, Cristina; Urdiain, Mercedes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Salinibacter ruber is an extremely halophilic member of the Bacteroidetes that thrives in crystallizer ponds worldwide. Here, we have analyzed two sets of 22 and 35 co-occurring S. ruber strains, newly isolated respectively, from 100 microliters water samples from crystalizer ponds in Santa Pola and Mallorca, located in coastal and inland Mediterranean Spain and 350 km apart from each other. A set of old strains isolated from the same setting were included in the analysis. Genomic and taxonomy relatedness of the strains were analyzed by means of PFGE and MALDI-TOF, respectively, while their metabolomic potential was explored with high resolution ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS). Overall our results show a phylogenetically very homogeneous species expressing a very diverse metabolomic pool. The combination of MALDI-TOF and PFGE provides, for the newly isolated strains, the same scenario presented by the previous studies of intra-specific diversity of S. ruber using a more restricted number of strains: the species seems to be very homogeneous at the ribosomal level while the genomic diversity encountered was rather high since no identical genome patterns could be retrieved from each of the samples. The high analytical mass resolution of ICR-FT/MS enabled the description of thousands of putative metabolites from which to date only few can be annotated in databases. Some metabolomic differences, mainly related to lipid metabolism and antibiotic-related compounds, provided enough specificity to delineate different clusters within the co-occurring strains. In addition, metabolomic differences were found between old and new strains isolated from the same ponds that could be related to extended exposure to laboratory conditions. PMID:23741374

  16. Next Generation Models for Storage and Representation of Microbial Biological Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Quest, Daniel J; Land, Miriam L; Brettin, Thomas S; Cottingham, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to

  17. The Steroid Metabolome of Adrenarche

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Juilee; Rainey, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenarche is an endocrine developmental process whereby humans and select nonhuman primates increase adrenal output of a series of steroids, especially dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). The timing of adrenarche varies between primates, but in humans, serum levels of DHEAS are seen to increase around 6 years of age. This phenomenon corresponds with the development and expansion of the zona reticularis (ZR) of the adrenal gland. The physiological phenomena that trigger the onset of adrenarche are still unknown; however the biochemical pathways leading to this event have been elucidated in detail. There are numerous reviews examining the process of adrenarche, most of which, have focused on the changes within the adrenal as well as the phenotypic results of adrenarche. This article reviews the recent and past studies that show the breadth of changes in the circulating steroid metabolome that occurs during the process of adrenarche. PMID:22715193

  18. ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CREATIVITY AND GIFTEDNESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOWAN, JOHN CURTIS

    THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY REPRESENTS A SAMPLING OF PUBLISHED WRITING ON CREATIVITY AND GIFTED CHILDREN SINCE 1960. THE LIST WAS COMPILED FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCHERS. IN A FEW INSTANCES THE ANNOTATIONS HAVE BEEN MODIFIED OR ABRIDGED FROM THOSE FOUND IN "PSYCHOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS" OR OTHER JOURNAL ABSTRACTS. SOME OF THE ANNOTATIONS HAVE PREVIOUSLY…

  19. Alcohol Education Materials; An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Gail Gleason

    This 873-item annotated bibliography cites books, pamphlets, leaflets, and other materials produced for education about alcohol from 1950 to May 1973. The major part of each annotation is a brief summary of the contents. The annotation also contains a statement of orientation or type of presentation and evaluative comments. Each item is classified…

  20. Annotation and Classification of Argumentative Writing Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the annotation and classification of students' revision behaviors in argumentative writing. A sentence-level revision schema is proposed to capture why and how students make revisions. Based on the proposed schema, a small corpus of student essays and revisions was annotated. Studies show that manual annotation is reliable with…

  1. NMR-based Metabolomics Applications in Biological and Environmental Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a complimentary tool to other omics platforms, metabolomics is increasingly being used bybiologists to study the dynamic response of biological systems (cells, tissues, or wholeorganisms) under diverse physiological or pathological conditions. Metabolomics deals with the quali...

  2. METABOLOMICS IN SMALL FISH TOXICOLOGY AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although lagging behind applications targeted to human endpoints, metabolomics offers great potential in environmental applications, including ecotoxicology. Indeed, the advantages of metabolomics (relative to other 'omic techniques) may be more tangible in ecotoxicology because...

  3. Dictionary-driven protein annotation.

    PubMed

    Rigoutsos, Isidore; Huynh, Tien; Floratos, Aris; Parida, Laxmi; Platt, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    Computational methods seeking to automatically determine the properties (functional, structural, physicochemical, etc.) of a protein directly from the sequence have long been the focus of numerous research groups. With the advent of advanced sequencing methods and systems, the number of amino acid sequences that are being deposited in the public databases has been increasing steadily. This has in turn generated a renewed demand for automated approaches that can annotate individual sequences and complete genomes quickly, exhaustively and objectively. In this paper, we present one such approach that is centered around and exploits the Bio-Dictionary, a collection of amino acid patterns that completely covers the natural sequence space and can capture functional and structural signals that have been reused during evolution, within and across protein families. Our annotation approach also makes use of a weighted, position-specific scoring scheme that is unaffected by the over-representation of well-conserved proteins and protein fragments in the databases used. For a given query sequence, the method permits one to determine, in a single pass, the following: local and global similarities between the query and any protein already present in a public database; the likeness of the query to all available archaeal/ bacterial/eukaryotic/viral sequences in the database as a function of amino acid position within the query; the character of secondary structure of the query as a function of amino acid position within the query; the cytoplasmic, transmembrane or extracellular behavior of the query; the nature and position of binding domains, active sites, post-translationally modified sites, signal peptides, etc. In terms of performance, the proposed method is exhaustive, objective and allows for the rapid annotation of individual sequences and full genomes. Annotation examples are presented and discussed in Results, including individual queries and complete genomes that were

  4. Metabolomic unveiling of a diverse range of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites dependent on geography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Nam; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Sungheuk; Lee, Hyosang; Lee, Sang-Jun; Hong, Young-Shick

    2015-05-01

    Numerous factors such as geographical origin, cultivar, climate, cultural practices, and manufacturing processes influence the chemical compositions of tea, in the same way as growing conditions and grape variety affect wine quality. However, the relationships between these factors and tea chemical compositions are not well understood. In this study, a new approach for non-targeted or global analysis, i.e., metabolomics, which is highly reproducible and statistically effective in analysing a diverse range of compounds, was used to better understand the metabolome of Camellia sinensis and determine the influence of environmental factors, including geography, climate, and cultural practices, on tea-making. We found a strong correlation between environmental factors and the metabolome of green, white, and oolong teas from China, Japan, and South Korea. In particular, multivariate statistical analysis revealed strong inter-country and inter-city relationships in the levels of theanine and catechin derivatives found in green and white teas. This information might be useful for assessing tea quality or producing distinct tea products across different locations, and highlights simultaneous identification of diverse tea metabolites through an NMR-based metabolomics approach. PMID:25529705

  5. Metabolomic unveiling of a diverse range of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites dependent on geography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Nam; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Sungheuk; Lee, Hyosang; Lee, Sang-Jun; Hong, Young-Shick

    2015-05-01

    Numerous factors such as geographical origin, cultivar, climate, cultural practices, and manufacturing processes influence the chemical compositions of tea, in the same way as growing conditions and grape variety affect wine quality. However, the relationships between these factors and tea chemical compositions are not well understood. In this study, a new approach for non-targeted or global analysis, i.e., metabolomics, which is highly reproducible and statistically effective in analysing a diverse range of compounds, was used to better understand the metabolome of Camellia sinensis and determine the influence of environmental factors, including geography, climate, and cultural practices, on tea-making. We found a strong correlation between environmental factors and the metabolome of green, white, and oolong teas from China, Japan, and South Korea. In particular, multivariate statistical analysis revealed strong inter-country and inter-city relationships in the levels of theanine and catechin derivatives found in green and white teas. This information might be useful for assessing tea quality or producing distinct tea products across different locations, and highlights simultaneous identification of diverse tea metabolites through an NMR-based metabolomics approach.

  6. Role of Metabolomics in Traumatic Brain Injury Research.

    PubMed

    Wolahan, Stephanie M; Hirt, Daniel; Braas, Daniel; Glenn, Thomas C

    2016-10-01

    Metabolomics is an important member of the omics community in that it defines which small molecules may be responsible for disease states. This article reviews the essential principles of metabolomics from specimen preparation, chemical analysis, to advanced statistical methods. Metabolomics in traumatic brain injury has so far been underutilized. Future metabolomics-based studies focused on the diagnoses, prognoses, and treatment effects need to be conducted across all types of traumatic brain injury. PMID:27637396

  7. Automatic annotation of organellar genomes with DOGMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, Stacia; Jansen, Robert K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-06-01

    Dual Organellar GenoMe Annotator (DOGMA) automates the annotation of extra-nuclear organellar (chloroplast and animal mitochondrial) genomes. It is a web-based package that allows the use of comparative BLAST searches to identify and annotate genes in a genome. DOGMA presents a list of putative genes to the user in a graphical format for viewing and editing. Annotations are stored on our password-protected server. Complete annotations can be extracted for direct submission to GenBank. Furthermore, intergenic regions of specified length can be extracted, as well the nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences of the genes.

  8. Use of Annotations for Component and Framework Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, O.; Lloyd, W.; Carlson, J.; Leavesley, G. H.; Geter, F.

    2009-12-01

    The popular programming languages Java and C# provide annotations, a form of meta-data construct. Software frameworks for web integration, web services, database access, and unit testing now take advantage of annotations to reduce the complexity of APIs and the quantity of integration code between the application and framework infrastructure. Adopting annotation features in frameworks has been observed to lead to cleaner and leaner application code. The USDA Object Modeling System (OMS) version 3.0 fully embraces the annotation approach and additionally defines a meta-data standard for components and models. In version 3.0 framework/model integration previously accomplished using API calls is now achieved using descriptive annotations. This enables the framework to provide additional functionality non-invasively such as implicit multithreading, and auto-documenting capabilities while achieving a significant reduction in the size of the model source code. Using a non-invasive methodology leads to models and modeling components with only minimal dependencies on the modeling framework. Since models and modeling components are not directly bound to framework by the use of specific APIs and/or data types they can more easily be reused both within the framework as well as outside of it. To study the effectiveness of an annotation based framework approach with other modeling frameworks, a framework-invasiveness study was conducted to evaluate the effects of framework design on model code quality. A monthly water balance model was implemented across several modeling frameworks and several software metrics were collected. The metrics selected were measures of non-invasive design methods for modeling frameworks from a software engineering perspective. It appears that the use of annotations positively impacts several software quality measures. In a next step, the PRMS model was implemented in OMS 3.0 and is currently being implemented for water supply forecasting in the

  9. THE METABOLOMIC WINDOW INTO HEPATOBILIARY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The emergent discipline of metabolomics has attracted considerable research effort in hepatology. Here we review the metabolomic data for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), hepatitis B and C, cholecystitis, cholestasis, liver transplantation and acute hepatotoxicity in animal models. A metabolomic window has permitted a view into the changing biochemistry occurring in the transitional phases between a healthy liver and hepatocellular carcinoma or cholangiocarcinoma. Whether provoked by obesity and diabetes, alcohol use or oncogenic viruses, the liver develops a core metabolomic phenotype (CMP) that involves dysregulation of bile acid and phospholipid homeostasis. The CMP commences at the transition between the healthy liver (Phase 0) and NAFLD/NASH, ALD or viral hepatitis (Phase 1). This CMP is maintained in the presence or absence of cirrhosis (Phase 2) and whether or not either HCC or CCA (Phase 3) develop. Inflammatory signalling in the liver triggers the appearance of the CMP. Many other metabolomic markers distinguish between Phases 0, 1, 2 and 3. A metabolic remodelling in HCC has been described but metabolomic data from all four Phases demonstrate that the Warburg shift from mitochondrial respiration to cytosolic glycolysis foreshadows HCC and may occur as early as Phase 1. The metabolic remodelling also involves an upregulation of fatty acid β-oxidation, also beginning in Phase 1. The storage of triglycerides in fatty liver provides high energy-yielding substrates for Phases 2 and 3 of liver pathology. The metabolomic window into hepatobiliary disease sheds new light on the systems pathology of the liver. PMID:23714158

  10. Oncotator: cancer variant annotation tool.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alex H; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gupta, Manaswi; Lawrence, Michael S; Pugh, Trevor J; Saksena, Gordon; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad

    2015-04-01

    Oncotator is a tool for annotating genomic point mutations and short nucleotide insertions/deletions (indels) with variant- and gene-centric information relevant to cancer researchers. This information is drawn from 14 different publicly available resources that have been pooled and indexed, and we provide an extensible framework to add additional data sources. Annotations linked to variants range from basic information, such as gene names and functional classification (e.g. missense), to cancer-specific data from resources such as the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), the Cancer Gene Census, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). For local use, Oncotator is freely available as a python module hosted on Github (https://github.com/broadinstitute/oncotator). Furthermore, Oncotator is also available as a web service and web application at http://www.broadinstitute.org/oncotator/.

  11. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H; Metcalf, Ginger A; Muzny, Donna M; Morrison, Alanna C; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study. PMID:27602404

  12. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H.; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Morrison, Alanna C.; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study. PMID:27602404

  13. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H.; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Morrison, Alanna C.; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study.

  14. Metabolomics: Applications and Promise in Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Winston, Brent W.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the study of mycobacterial diseases was trapped in culture-based technology that is more than a century old. The use of nucleic acid amplification is changing this, and powerful new technologies are on the horizon. Metabolomics, which is the study of sets of metabolites of both the bacteria and host, is being used to clarify mechanisms of disease, and can identify changes leading to better diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication of mycobacterial diseases. Metabolomic profiles are arrays of biochemical products of genes in their environment. These complex patterns are biomarkers that can allow a more complete understanding of cell function, dysfunction, and perturbation than genomics or proteomics. Metabolomics could herald sweeping advances in personalized medicine and clinical trial design, but the challenges in metabolomics are also great. Measured metabolite concentrations vary with the timing within a condition, the intrinsic biology, the instruments, and the sample preparation. Metabolism profoundly changes with age, sex, variations in gut microbial flora, and lifestyle. Validation of biomarkers is complicated by measurement accuracy, selectivity, linearity, reproducibility, robustness, and limits of detection. The statistical challenges include analysis, interpretation, and description of the vast amount of data generated. Despite these drawbacks, metabolomics provides great opportunity and the potential to understand and manage mycobacterial diseases. PMID:26196272

  15. Systematic Applications of Metabolomics in Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dromms, Robert A.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    The goals of metabolic engineering are well-served by the biological information provided by metabolomics: information on how the cell is currently using its biochemical resources is perhaps one of the best ways to inform strategies to engineer a cell to produce a target compound. Using the analysis of extracellular or intracellular levels of the target compound (or a few closely related molecules) to drive metabolic engineering is quite common. However, there is surprisingly little systematic use of metabolomics datasets, which simultaneously measure hundreds of metabolites rather than just a few, for that same purpose. Here, we review the most common systematic approaches to integrating metabolite data with metabolic engineering, with emphasis on existing efforts to use whole-metabolome datasets. We then review some of the most common approaches for computational modeling of cell-wide metabolism, including constraint-based models, and discuss current computational approaches that explicitly use metabolomics data. We conclude with discussion of the broader potential of computational approaches that systematically use metabolomics data to drive metabolic engineering. PMID:24957776

  16. Basics of mass spectrometry based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    The emerging field of metabolomics, aiming to characterize small molecule metabolites present in biological systems, promises immense potential for different areas such as medicine, environmental sciences, agronomy, etc. The purpose of this article is to guide the reader through the history of the field, then through the main steps of the metabolomics workflow, from study design to structure elucidation, and help the reader to understand the key phases of a metabolomics investigation and the rationale underlying the protocols and techniques used. This article is not intended to give standard operating procedures as several papers related to this topic were already provided, but is designed as a tutorial aiming to help beginners understand the concept and challenges of MS-based metabolomics. A real case example is taken from the literature to illustrate the application of the metabolomics approach in the field of doping analysis. Challenges and limitations of the approach are then discussed along with future directions in research to cope with these limitations. This tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP18).

  17. Assessment of community-submitted ontology annotations from a novel database-journal partnership.

    PubMed

    Berardini, Tanya Z; Li, Donghui; Muller, Robert; Chetty, Raymond; Ploetz, Larry; Singh, Shanker; Wensel, April; Huala, Eva

    2012-01-01

    As the scientific literature grows, leading to an increasing volume of published experimental data, so does the need to access and analyze this data using computational tools. The most commonly used method to convert published experimental data on gene function into controlled vocabulary annotations relies on a professional curator, employed by a model organism database or a more general resource such as UniProt, to read published articles and compose annotation statements based on the articles' contents. A more cost-effective and scalable approach capable of capturing gene function data across the whole range of biological research organisms in computable form is urgently needed. We have analyzed a set of ontology annotations generated through collaborations between the Arabidopsis Information Resource and several plant science journals. Analysis of the submissions entered using the online submission tool shows that most community annotations were well supported and the ontology terms chosen were at an appropriate level of specificity. Of the 503 individual annotations that were submitted, 97% were approved and community submissions captured 72% of all possible annotations. This new method for capturing experimental results in a computable form provides a cost-effective way to greatly increase the available body of annotations without sacrificing annotation quality. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org.

  18. OMIGA: Optimized Maker-Based Insect Genome Annotation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinding; Xiao, Huamei; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2014-08-01

    Insects are one of the largest classes of animals on Earth and constitute more than half of all living species. The i5k initiative has begun sequencing of more than 5,000 insect genomes, which should greatly help in exploring insect resource and pest control. Insect genome annotation remains challenging because many insects have high levels of heterozygosity. To improve the quality of insect genome annotation, we developed a pipeline, named Optimized Maker-Based Insect Genome Annotation (OMIGA), to predict protein-coding genes from insect genomes. We first mapped RNA-Seq reads to genomic scaffolds to determine transcribed regions using Bowtie, and the putative transcripts were assembled using Cufflink. We then selected highly reliable transcripts with intact coding sequences to train de novo gene prediction software, including Augustus. The re-trained software was used to predict genes from insect genomes. Exonerate was used to refine gene structure and to determine near exact exon/intron boundary in the genome. Finally, we used the software Maker to integrate data from RNA-Seq, de novo gene prediction, and protein alignment to produce an official gene set. The OMIGA pipeline was used to annotate the draft genome of an important insect pest, Chilo suppressalis, yielding 12,548 genes. Different strategies were compared, which demonstrated that OMIGA had the best performance. In summary, we present a comprehensive pipeline for identifying genes in insect genomes that can be widely used to improve the annotation quality in insects. OMIGA is provided at http://ento.njau.edu.cn/omiga.html . PMID:24609470

  19. Computational algorithms to predict Gene Ontology annotations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene function annotations, which are associations between a gene and a term of a controlled vocabulary describing gene functional features, are of paramount importance in modern biology. Datasets of these annotations, such as the ones provided by the Gene Ontology Consortium, are used to design novel biological experiments and interpret their results. Despite their importance, these sources of information have some known issues. They are incomplete, since biological knowledge is far from being definitive and it rapidly evolves, and some erroneous annotations may be present. Since the curation process of novel annotations is a costly procedure, both in economical and time terms, computational tools that can reliably predict likely annotations, and thus quicken the discovery of new gene annotations, are very useful. Methods We used a set of computational algorithms and weighting schemes to infer novel gene annotations from a set of known ones. We used the latent semantic analysis approach, implementing two popular algorithms (Latent Semantic Indexing and Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) and propose a novel method, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis, which adds a clustering step on the set of considered genes. Furthermore, we propose the improvement of these algorithms by weighting the annotations in the input set. Results We tested our methods and their weighted variants on the Gene Ontology annotation sets of three model organism genes (Bos taurus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster ). The methods showed their ability in predicting novel gene annotations and the weighting procedures demonstrated to lead to a valuable improvement, although the obtained results vary according to the dimension of the input annotation set and the considered algorithm. Conclusions Out of the three considered methods, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis is the one that provides better results. In particular, when coupled with a proper

  20. The metabolomics of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Graham; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Mhamdi, Amna

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from increased availability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key component of many responses of plants to challenging environmental conditions. The consequences for plant metabolism are complex and manifold. We review data on small compounds involved in oxidative stress, including ROS themselves and antioxidants and redox buffers in the membrane and soluble phases, and we discuss the wider consequences for plant primary and secondary metabolism. While metabolomics has been exploited in many studies on stress, there have been relatively few non-targeted studies focused on how metabolite signatures respond specifically to oxidative stress. As part of the discussion, we present results and reanalyze published datasets on metabolite profiles in catalase-deficient plants, which can be considered to be model oxidative stress systems. We emphasize the roles of ROS-triggered changes in metabolites as potential oxidative signals, and discuss responses that might be useful as markers for oxidative stress. Particular attention is paid to lipid-derived compounds, the status of antioxidants and antioxidant breakdown products, altered metabolism of amino acids, and the roles of phytohormone pathways. PMID:25306398

  1. Metabolomics and diabetes: analytical and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Sas, Kelli M; Karnovsky, Alla; Michailidis, George; Pennathur, Subramaniam

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes is characterized by altered metabolism of key molecules and regulatory pathways. The phenotypic expression of diabetes and associated complications encompasses complex interactions between genetic, environmental, and tissue-specific factors that require an integrated understanding of perturbations in the network of genes, proteins, and metabolites. Metabolomics attempts to systematically identify and quantitate small molecule metabolites from biological systems. The recent rapid development of a variety of analytical platforms based on mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance have enabled identification of complex metabolic phenotypes. Continued development of bioinformatics and analytical strategies has facilitated the discovery of causal links in understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Here, we summarize the metabolomics workflow, including analytical, statistical, and computational tools, highlight recent applications of metabolomics in diabetes research, and discuss the challenges in the field. PMID:25713200

  2. Metabolomics in rheumatic diseases: desperately seeking biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Guma, Monica; Tiziani, Stefano; Firestein, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics enables the profiling of large numbers of small molecules in cells, tissues and biological fluids. These molecules, which include amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides and their metabolites, can be detected quantitatively. Metabolomic methods, often focused on the information-rich analytical techniques of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, have potential for early diagnosis, monitoring therapy and defining disease pathogenesis in many therapeutic areas, including rheumatic diseases. By performing global metabolite profiling, also known as untargeted metabolomics, new discoveries linking cellular pathways to biological mechanisms are being revealed and are shaping our understanding of cell biology, physiology and medicine. These pathways can potentially be targeted to diagnose and treat patients with immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26935283

  3. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R; Dalsgaard, Trine K; Bertram, Hanne C

    2015-06-17

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  4. [Metabolomics analysis of taxadiene producing yeasts].

    PubMed

    Yan, Huifang; Ding, Mingzhu; Yuan, Yingjin

    2014-02-01

    In order to study the inherent difference among terpenes producing yeasts from the point of metabolomics, we selected taxadiene producing yeasts as the model system. The changes of cellular metabolites during fermentation log phase of artificial functional yeasts were determined using metabolomics methods. The results represented that compared to W303-1A as a blank control, the metabolites in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle and several amino acids were influenced. And due to the changes of metabolites, the growth of cells was inhibited to a certain extent. Among the metabolites identified, citric acid content in taxadiene producing yeasts changed the most, the decreasing amplitude reached 90% or more. Therefore, citric acid can be a marker metabolite for the future study of artificial functional yeasts. The metabolomics analysis of taxadiene producing yeasts can provide more information in further studies on optimization of terpenes production in heterologous chassis.

  5. Metabolomics and Diabetes: Analytical and Computational Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sas, Kelli M.; Karnovsky, Alla; Michailidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by altered metabolism of key molecules and regulatory pathways. The phenotypic expression of diabetes and associated complications encompasses complex interactions between genetic, environmental, and tissue-specific factors that require an integrated understanding of perturbations in the network of genes, proteins, and metabolites. Metabolomics attempts to systematically identify and quantitate small molecule metabolites from biological systems. The recent rapid development of a variety of analytical platforms based on mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance have enabled identification of complex metabolic phenotypes. Continued development of bioinformatics and analytical strategies has facilitated the discovery of causal links in understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Here, we summarize the metabolomics workflow, including analytical, statistical, and computational tools, highlight recent applications of metabolomics in diabetes research, and discuss the challenges in the field. PMID:25713200

  6. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C; Khan, Salman A; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn's Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  7. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  8. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  9. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R.; Dalsgaard, Trine K.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health. PMID:26091233

  10. Proteomics and Metabolomics in Renal Transplantation-Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    Bohra, Rahul; Klepacki, Jacek; Klawitter, Jelena; Klawitter, Jost; Thurman, Joshua; Christians, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of long-term transplant organ and patient survival remains a critical challenge following kidney transplantation. Proteomics and biochemical profiling (metabolomics) may allow for the detection of early changes in cell signal transduction regulation and biochemistry with high sensitivity and specificity. Hence, these analytical strategies hold the promise to detect and monitor disease processes and drug effects before histopathological and pathophysiological changes occur. In addition they will identify enriched populations and enable individualize drug therapy. However, proteomics and metabolomics have not yet lived up to such high expectations. Renal transplant patients are highly complex, making it difficult to establish cause-effect relationships between surrogate markers and disease processes. Appropriate study design, adequate sample handling, storage and processing, quality and reproducibility of bioanalytical multi-analyte assays, data analysis and interpretation, mechanistic verification and clinical qualification (=establishment of sensitivity and specificity in adequately powered prospective clinical trials) are important factors for the success of molecular marker discovery and development in renal transplantation. However, a newly developed and appropriately qualified molecular marker can only be successful if it is realistic that it can be implemented in a clinical setting. The development of combinatorial markers with supporting software tools is an attractive goal. PMID:23350848

  11. MetaboAnalyst 3.0--making metabolomics more meaningful.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianguo; Sinelnikov, Igor V; Han, Beomsoo; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    MetaboAnalyst (www.metaboanalyst.ca) is a web server designed to permit comprehensive metabolomic data analysis, visualization and interpretation. It supports a wide range of complex statistical calculations and high quality graphical rendering functions that require significant computational resources. First introduced in 2009, MetaboAnalyst has experienced more than a 50X growth in user traffic (>50 000 jobs processed each month). In order to keep up with the rapidly increasing computational demands and a growing number of requests to support translational and systems biology applications, we performed a substantial rewrite and major feature upgrade of the server. The result is MetaboAnalyst 3.0. By completely re-implementing the MetaboAnalyst suite using the latest web framework technologies, we have been able substantially improve its performance, capacity and user interactivity. Three new modules have also been added including: (i) a module for biomarker analysis based on the calculation of receiver operating characteristic curves; (ii) a module for sample size estimation and power analysis for improved planning of metabolomics studies and (iii) a module to support integrative pathway analysis for both genes and metabolites. In addition, popular features found in existing modules have been significantly enhanced by upgrading the graphical output, expanding the compound libraries and by adding support for more diverse organisms.

  12. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopic approaches for exploring plant metabolome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mahrous, Engy A.; Farag, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Today, most investigations of the plant metabolome tend to be based on either nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or mass spectrometry (MS), with or without hyphenation with chromatography. Although less sensitive than MS, NMR provides a powerful complementary technique for the identification and quantification of metabolites in plant extracts. NMR spectroscopy, well appreciated by phytochemists as a particularly information-rich method, showed recent paradigm shift for the improving of metabolome(s) structural and functional characterization and for advancing the understanding of many biological processes. Furthermore, two dimensional NMR (2D NMR) experiments and the use of chemometric data analysis of NMR spectra have proven highly effective at identifying novel and known metabolites that correlate with changes in genotype or phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of the development of NMR in the field of metabolomics with special focus on 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and their applications in phytomedicines quality control analysis and drug discovery from natural sources, raising more attention at its potential to reduce the gap between the pace of natural products research and modern drug discovery demand. PMID:25685540

  13. Untargeted LC-MS Metabolomics of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Differentiates Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome from Health

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charles R.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kovach, Melissa A.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Burant, Charles F.; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a significant hazard to human health and is clinically challenging because there are no prognostic biomarkers and no effective pharmacotherapy. The lung compartment metabolome may detail the status of the local environment that could be useful in ARDS biomarker discovery and the identification of drug target opportunities. However, neither the utility of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as a biofluid for metabolomics nor the optimal analytical platform for metabolite identification are established. To address this, we undertook a study to compare metabolites in BALF samples from patients with ARDS and healthy controls using a newly developed liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectroscopy (MS) platform for untargeted metabolomics. Following initial testing of three different high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns, we determined that reversed phase (RP)-LC and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), were the most informative chromatographic methods because they yielded the most and highest quality data. Following confirmation of metabolite identification, statistical analysis resulted in 37 differentiating metabolites in the BALF of ARDS compared with health across both analytical platforms. Pathway analysis revealed networks associated with amino acid metabolism, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, phospholipids and purine metabolism in the ARDS BALF. The complementary analytical platforms of RPLC and HILIC-LC generated informative, insightful metabolomics data of the ARDS lung environment. PMID:24289193

  14. Multilingual Twitter Sentiment Classification: The Role of Human Annotators

    PubMed Central

    Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Smailović, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    What are the limits of automated Twitter sentiment classification? We analyze a large set of manually labeled tweets in different languages, use them as training data, and construct automated classification models. It turns out that the quality of classification models depends much more on the quality and size of training data than on the type of the model trained. Experimental results indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between the performance of the top classification models. We quantify the quality of training data by applying various annotator agreement measures, and identify the weakest points of different datasets. We show that the model performance approaches the inter-annotator agreement when the size of the training set is sufficiently large. However, it is crucial to regularly monitor the self- and inter-annotator agreements since this improves the training datasets and consequently the model performance. Finally, we show that there is strong evidence that humans perceive the sentiment classes (negative, neutral, and positive) as ordered. PMID:27149621

  15. Multilingual Twitter Sentiment Classification: The Role of Human Annotators.

    PubMed

    Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Smailović, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    What are the limits of automated Twitter sentiment classification? We analyze a large set of manually labeled tweets in different languages, use them as training data, and construct automated classification models. It turns out that the quality of classification models depends much more on the quality and size of training data than on the type of the model trained. Experimental results indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between the performance of the top classification models. We quantify the quality of training data by applying various annotator agreement measures, and identify the weakest points of different datasets. We show that the model performance approaches the inter-annotator agreement when the size of the training set is sufficiently large. However, it is crucial to regularly monitor the self- and inter-annotator agreements since this improves the training datasets and consequently the model performance. Finally, we show that there is strong evidence that humans perceive the sentiment classes (negative, neutral, and positive) as ordered. PMID:27149621

  16. Qualitative Alterations of Bacterial Metabolome after Exposure to Metal Nanoparticles with Bactericidal Properties: A Comprehensive Workflow Based on (1)H NMR, UHPLC-HRMS, and Metabolic Databases.

    PubMed

    Chatzimitakos, Theodoros G; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2016-09-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) have proven to be more toxic than bulk analogues of the same chemical composition due to their unique physical properties. The NPs, lately, have drawn the attention of researchers because of their antibacterial and biocidal properties. In an effort to shed light on the mechanism through which the bacteria elimination is achieved and the metabolic changes they undergo, an untargeted metabolomic fingerprint study was carried out on Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria species. The (1)H NMR spectroscopy, in conjunction with high resolution mass-spectrometry (HRMS) and an unsophisticated data processing workflow were implemented. The combined NMR/HRMS data, supported by an open-access metabolomic database, proved to be efficacious in the process of assigning a putative annotation to a wide range of metabolite signals and is a useful tool to appraise the metabolome alterations, as a consequence of bacterial response to NPs. Interestingly, not all the NPs diminished the intracellular metabolites; bacteria treated with iron NPs produced metabolites not present in the nonexposed bacteria sample, implying the activation of previously inactive metabolic pathways. In contrast, copper and iron-copper NPs reduced the annotated metabolites, alluding to the conclusion that the metabolic pathways (mainly alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism, beta-alanine metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism) were hindered by the interactions of NPs with the intracellular metabolites. PMID:27432757

  17. SAS- Semantic Annotation Service for Geoscience resources on the web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, M.; Kumar, P.; Marini, L.; Li, R.; Jiang, P.

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing need for increased integration across the data and model resources that are disseminated on the web to advance their reuse across different earth science applications. Meaningful reuse of resources requires semantic metadata to realize the semantic web vision for allowing pragmatic linkage and integration among resources. Semantic metadata associates standard metadata with resources to turn them into semantically-enabled resources on the web. However, the lack of a common standardized metadata framework as well as the uncoordinated use of metadata fields across different geo-information systems, has led to a situation in which standards and related Standard Names abound. To address this need, we have designed SAS to provide a bridge between the core ontologies required to annotate resources and information systems in order to enable queries and analysis over annotation from a single environment (web). SAS is one of the services that are provided by the Geosematnic framework, which is a decentralized semantic framework to support the integration between models and data and allow semantically heterogeneous to interact with minimum human intervention. Here we present the design of SAS and demonstrate its application for annotating data and models. First we describe how predicates and their attributes are extracted from standards and ingested in the knowledge-base of the Geosemantic framework. Then we illustrate the application of SAS in annotating data managed by SEAD and annotating simulation models that have web interface. SAS is a step in a broader approach to raise the quality of geoscience data and models that are published on the web and allow users to better search, access, and use of the existing resources based on standard vocabularies that are encoded and published using semantic technologies.

  18. The Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Metabolome Signature in Arabidopsis thaliana Reveals Dynamic Reprogramming of Phytoalexin and Phytoanticipin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Tarryn; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), as MAMP molecules, trigger the activation of signal transduction pathways involved in defence. Currently, plant metabolomics is providing new dimensions into understanding the intracellular adaptive responses to external stimuli. The effect of LPS on the metabolomes of Arabidopsis thaliana cells and leaf tissue was investigated over a 24 h period. Cellular metabolites and those secreted into the medium were extracted with methanol and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Multivariate statistical data analyses were used to extract interpretable information from the generated multidimensional LC-MS data. The results show that LPS perception triggered differential changes in the metabolomes of cells and leaves, leading to variation in the biosynthesis of specialised secondary metabolites. Time-dependent changes in metabolite profiles were observed and biomarkers associated with the LPS-induced response were tentatively identified. These include the phytohormones salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, and also the associated methyl esters and sugar conjugates. The induced defensive state resulted in increases in indole—and other glucosinolates, indole derivatives, camalexin as well as cinnamic acid derivatives and other phenylpropanoids. These annotated metabolites indicate dynamic reprogramming of metabolic pathways that are functionally related towards creating an enhanced defensive capacity. The results reveal new insights into the mode of action of LPS as an activator of plant innate immunity, broadens knowledge about the defence metabolite pathways involved in Arabidopsis responses to LPS, and identifies specialised metabolites of functional importance that can be employed to enhance immunity against pathogen infection. PMID:27656890

  19. Microbial metabolomics in open microscale platforms.

    PubMed

    Barkal, Layla J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Guo, Chun-Jun; Spraker, Joe; Rappert, Lucas; Berthier, Jean; Brakke, Kenneth A; Wang, Clay C C; Beebe, David J; Keller, Nancy P; Berthier, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The microbial secondary metabolome encompasses great synthetic diversity, empowering microbes to tune their chemical responses to changing microenvironments. Traditional metabolomics methods are ill-equipped to probe a wide variety of environments or environmental dynamics. Here we introduce a class of microscale culture platforms to analyse chemical diversity of fungal and bacterial secondary metabolomes. By leveraging stable biphasic interfaces to integrate microculture with small molecule isolation via liquid-liquid extraction, we enable metabolomics-scale analysis using mass spectrometry. This platform facilitates exploration of culture microenvironments (including rare media typically inaccessible using established methods), unusual organic solvents for metabolite isolation and microbial mutants. Utilizing Aspergillus, a fungal genus known for its rich secondary metabolism, we characterize the effects of culture geometry and growth matrix on secondary metabolism, highlighting the potential use of microscale systems to unlock unknown or cryptic secondary metabolites for natural products discovery. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for this class of microfluidic systems to study interkingdom communication between fungi and bacteria. PMID:26842393

  20. Metabolomic Change Precedes Apple Superficial Scald Symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic profiling of 621 metabolites was employed to characterize metabolomic changes associated with ‘Granny Smith’ apple superficial scald development following 1-MCP or DPA treatment. Partial least squares-discriminant analyses were used to link metabolites with scald, postharvest treatments, ...

  1. Metabolomic Approaches for Characterizing Aquatic Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is becoming a well-established tool for studying how organisms, such as fish, respond to various stressors. For example, the literature is rich with laboratory studies involving analysis of samples from organisms exposed to individual chemical toxicants. These studie...

  2. Metabolomics in the fight against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jorge L; Kissinger, Jessica C; Jones, Dean P; Galinski, Mary R

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics uses high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide a chemical fingerprint of thousands of metabolites present in cells, tissues or body fluids. Such metabolic phenotyping has been successfully used to study various biologic processes and disease states. High-resolution metabolomics can shed new light on the intricacies of host-parasite interactions in each stage of the Plasmodium life cycle and the downstream ramifications on the host’s metabolism, pathogenesis and disease. Such data can become integrated with other large datasets generated using top-down systems biology approaches and be utilised by computational biologists to develop and enhance models of malaria pathogenesis relevant for identifying new drug targets or intervention strategies. Here, we focus on the promise of metabolomics to complement systems biology approaches in the quest for novel interventions in the fight against malaria. We introduce the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC), a new systems biology research coalition. A primary goal of the MaHPIC is to generate systems biology datasets relating to human and non-human primate (NHP) malaria parasites and their hosts making these openly available from an online relational database. Metabolomic data from NHP infections and clinical malaria infections from around the world will comprise a unique global resource. PMID:25185001

  3. NMR-based Metabolomics for Cancer Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is considered as a complementary tool to other omics platforms to provide a snapshot of the cellular biochemistry and physiology taking place at any instant. Metabolmics approaches have been widely used to provide comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the metabo...

  4. Cellular Metabolomics for Exposure and Toxicity Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed NMR automation and cell quench methods for cell culture-based metabolomics to study chemical exposure and toxicity. Our flow automation method is robust and free of cross contamination. The direct cell quench method is rapid and effective. Cell culture-based met...

  5. Metabolome Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Phan Nguyen Thuy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster embryo has been widely utilized as a model for genetics and developmental biology due to its small size, short generation time, and large brood size. Information on embryonic metabolism during developmental progression is important for further understanding the mechanisms of Drosophila embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the changes in embryos’ metabolome that occur at different stages of the Drosophila embryonic development. Time course samples of Drosophila embryos were subjected to GC/MS-based metabolome analysis for profiling of low molecular weight hydrophilic metabolites, including sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. The results showed that the metabolic profiles of Drosophila embryo varied during the course of development and there was a strong correlation between the metabolome and different embryonic stages. Using the metabolome information, we were able to establish a prediction model for developmental stages of embryos starting from their high-resolution quantitative metabolite composition. Among the important metabolites revealed from our model, we suggest that different amino acids appear to play distinct roles in different developmental stages and an appropriate balance in trehalose-glucose ratio is crucial to supply the carbohydrate source for the development of Drosophila embryo. PMID:25121768

  6. Microbial metabolomics in open microscale platforms

    PubMed Central

    Barkal, Layla J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Guo, Chun-Jun; Spraker, Joe; Rappert, Lucas; Berthier, Jean; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Wang, Clay C. C.; Beebe, David J.; Keller, Nancy P.; Berthier, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The microbial secondary metabolome encompasses great synthetic diversity, empowering microbes to tune their chemical responses to changing microenvironments. Traditional metabolomics methods are ill-equipped to probe a wide variety of environments or environmental dynamics. Here we introduce a class of microscale culture platforms to analyse chemical diversity of fungal and bacterial secondary metabolomes. By leveraging stable biphasic interfaces to integrate microculture with small molecule isolation via liquid–liquid extraction, we enable metabolomics-scale analysis using mass spectrometry. This platform facilitates exploration of culture microenvironments (including rare media typically inaccessible using established methods), unusual organic solvents for metabolite isolation and microbial mutants. Utilizing Aspergillus, a fungal genus known for its rich secondary metabolism, we characterize the effects of culture geometry and growth matrix on secondary metabolism, highlighting the potential use of microscale systems to unlock unknown or cryptic secondary metabolites for natural products discovery. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for this class of microfluidic systems to study interkingdom communication between fungi and bacteria. PMID:26842393

  7. Molecular cartography in acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infections--a non-targeted metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Müller, Constanze; Dietz, Inga; Tziotis, Dimitrios; Moritz, Franco; Rupp, Jan; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Infections with Chlamydia pneumoniae cause several respiratory diseases, such as community-acquired pneumonia, bronchitis or sinusitis. Here, we present an integrated non-targeted metabolomics analysis applying ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to determine metabolite alterations in C. pneumoniae-infected HEp-2 cells. Most important permutations are elaborated using uni- and multivariate statistical analysis, logD retention time regression and mass defect-based network analysis. Classes of metabolites showing high variations upon infection are lipids, carbohydrates and amino acids. Moreover, we observed several non-annotated compounds as predominantly abundant after infection, which are promising biomarker candidates for drug-target and diagnostic research.

  8. Flexibility in energy metabolism supports hypoxia tolerance in Drosophila flight muscle: metabolomic and computational systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Feala, Jacob D; Coquin, Laurence; McCulloch, Andrew D; Paternostro, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster offers promise as a genetically tractable model for studying adaptation to hypoxia at the cellular level, but the metabolic basis for extreme hypoxia tolerance in flies is not well known. Using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, metabolomic profiles were collected under hypoxia. Accumulation of lactate, alanine, and acetate suggested that these are the major end products of anaerobic metabolism in the fly. A constraint-based model of ATP-producing pathways was built using the annotated genome, existing models, and the literature. Multiple redundant pathways for producing acetate and alanine were added and simulations were run in order to find a single optimal strategy for producing each end product. System-wide adaptation to hypoxia was then investigated in silico using the refined model. Simulations supported the hypothesis that the ability to flexibly convert pyruvate to these three by-products might convey hypoxia tolerance by improving the ATP/H(+) ratio and efficiency of glucose utilization.

  9. Bridging the gap between comprehensive extraction protocols in plant metabolomics studies and method validation.

    PubMed

    Bijttebier, Sebastiaan; Van der Auwera, Anastasia; Foubert, Kenn; Voorspoels, Stefan; Pieters, Luc; Apers, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    It is vital to pay much attention to the design of extraction methods developed for plant metabolomics, as any non-extracted or converted metabolites will greatly affect the overall quality of the metabolomics study. Method validation is however often omitted in plant metabolome studies, as the well-established methodologies for classical targeted analyses such as recovery optimization cannot be strictly applied. The aim of the present study is to thoroughly evaluate state-of-the-art comprehensive extraction protocols for plant metabolomics with liquid chromatography-photodiode array-accurate mass mass spectrometry (LC-PDA-amMS) by bridging the gap with method validation. Validation of an extraction protocol in untargeted plant metabolomics should ideally be accomplished by validating the protocol for all possible outcomes, i.e. for all secondary metabolites potentially present in the plant. In an effort to approach this ideal validation scenario, two plant matrices were selected based on their wide versatility of phytochemicals: meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) for its polyphenols content, and spicy paprika powder (from the genus Capsicum) for its apolar phytochemicals content (carotenoids, phytosterols, capsaicinoids). These matrices were extracted with comprehensive extraction protocols adapted from literature and analysed with a generic LC-PDA-amMS characterization platform that was previously validated for broad range phytochemical analysis. The performance of the comprehensive sample preparation protocols was assessed based on extraction efficiency, repeatability and intermediate precision and on ionization suppression/enhancement evaluation. The manuscript elaborates on the finding that none of the extraction methods allowed to exhaustively extract the metabolites. Furthermore, it is shown that depending on the extraction conditions enzymatic degradation mechanisms can occur. Investigation of the fractions obtained with the different extraction methods

  10. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-05-14

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/.

  11. AICAR stimulation metabolome widely mimics electrical contraction in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Licht; Egawa, Tatsuro; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Tomida, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2013-12-15

    Physical exercise has potent therapeutic and preventive effects against metabolic disorders. A number of studies have suggested that 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a pivotal role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in contracting skeletal muscles, while several genetically manipulated animal models revealed the significance of AMPK-independent pathways. To elucidate significance of AMPK and AMPK-independent signals in contracting skeletal muscles, we conducted a metabolomic analysis that compared the metabolic effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleoside (AICAR) stimulation with the electrical contraction ex vivo in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscles, in which both α1- and α2-isoforms of AMPK and glucose uptake were equally activated. The metabolomic analysis using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry detected 184 peaks and successfully annotated 132 small molecules. AICAR stimulation exhibited high similarity to the electrical contraction in overall metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that the major principal component characterized common effects whereas the minor principal component distinguished the difference. PCA and a factor analysis suggested a substantial change in redox status as a result of AMPK activation. We also found a decrease in reduced glutathione levels in both AICAR-stimulated and contracting muscles. The muscle contraction-evoked influences related to the metabolism of amino acids, in particular, aspartate, alanine, or lysine, are supposed to be independent of AMPK activation. Our results substantiate the significance of AMPK activation in contracting skeletal muscles and provide novel evidence that AICAR stimulation closely mimics the metabolomic changes in the contracting skeletal muscles.

  12. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  13. Analysis of Metabolomics Datasets with High-Performance Computing and Metabolite Atlases.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yushu; Sun, Terence; Wang, Tony; Ruebel, Oliver; Northen, Trent; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Even with the widespread use of liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) based metabolomics, there are still a number of challenges facing this promising technique. Many, diverse experimental workflows exist; yet there is a lack of infrastructure and systems for tracking and sharing of information. Here, we describe the Metabolite Atlas framework and interface that provides highly-efficient, web-based access to raw mass spectrometry data in concert with assertions about chemicals detected to help address some of these challenges. This integration, by design, enables experimentalists to explore their raw data, specify and refine features annotations such that they can be leveraged for future experiments. Fast queries of the data through the web using SciDB, a parallelized database for high performance computing, make this process operate quickly. By using scripting containers, such as IPython or Jupyter, to analyze the data, scientists can utilize a wide variety of freely available graphing, statistics, and information management resources. In addition, the interfaces facilitate integration with systems biology tools to ultimately link metabolomics data with biological models.

  14. Metabolomics as a Potential Chemotaxonomical Tool: Application in the Genus Vernonia Schreb

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Maria Elvira Poleti; De Vos, Ric C. H.; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The taxonomic classification of the genus Vernonia Schreb is complex and, as yet, unclear. We here report the use of untargeted metabolomics approaches, followed by multivariate analyses methods and a phytochemical characterization of ten Vernonia species. Metabolic fingerprints were obtained by accurate mass measurements and used to determine the phytochemical similarities and differences between species through multivariate analyses approaches. Principal component analysis based on the relative levels of 528 metabolites, indicated that the ten species could be clustered into four groups. Thereby, V. polyanthes was the only species with presence of flavones chrysoeriol-7-O-glycuronyl, acacetin-7-O-glycuronyl and sesquiterpenes lactones piptocarphin A and piptocarphin B, while glaucolide A was detected in both V. brasiliana and V. polyanthes, separating these species from the two other species of the Vernonanthura group. Species from the Lessingianthus group were unique in showing a positive response in the foam test, suggesting the presence of saponins, which could be confirmed by metabolite annotation. V. rufogrisea showed a great variety of sesquiterpene lactones, placing this species into a separate group. Species within the Chrysolaena group were unique in accumulating clovamide. Our results of LC-MS-based profiling combined with multivariate analyses suggest that metabolomics approaches, such as untargeted LC-MS, may be potentially used as a large-scale chemotaxonomical tool, in addition to classical morphological and cytotaxonomical approaches, in order to facilitate taxonomical classifications. PMID:24736747

  15. Analysis of Metabolomics Datasets with High-Performance Computing and Metabolite Atlases

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yushu; Sun, Terence; Wang, Tony; Ruebel, Oliver; Northen, Trent; Bowen, Benjamin P.

    2015-01-01

    Even with the widespread use of liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) based metabolomics, there are still a number of challenges facing this promising technique. Many, diverse experimental workflows exist; yet there is a lack of infrastructure and systems for tracking and sharing of information. Here, we describe the Metabolite Atlas framework and interface that provides highly-efficient, web-based access to raw mass spectrometry data in concert with assertions about chemicals detected to help address some of these challenges. This integration, by design, enables experimentalists to explore their raw data, specify and refine features annotations such that they can be leveraged for future experiments. Fast queries of the data through the web using SciDB, a parallelized database for high performance computing, make this process operate quickly. By using scripting containers, such as IPython or Jupyter, to analyze the data, scientists can utilize a wide variety of freely available graphing, statistics, and information management resources. In addition, the interfaces facilitate integration with systems biology tools to ultimately link metabolomics data with biological models. PMID:26287255

  16. Annotated Catalog of Bilingual Vocational Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda (L.) and Associates, Bethesda, MD.

    This catalog contains annotations for 170 bilingual vocational training materials. Most of the materials are written in English, but materials written in 13 source languages and directed toward speakers of 17 target languages are provided. Annotations are provided for the following different types of documents: administrative, assessment and…

  17. Re-Entry Women: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porterfield, Patricia Lamb

    This is an annotated bibliography on topics related to reentry women. Topic categories include general and administrative issues, programs and services, needs assessment and evaluation, counseling and personal development, career planning and job placement, curriculum and instruction, admissions and recruiting, and financial aid. Annotations cite…

  18. Citizen Participation in Education: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Don

    The emphasis in this annotated bibliography is citizen participation in education in the areas of decision making, policy development, and school governance. The focus is on the public school and school system rather than on private and parochial schools. One hundred fifty books, parts of books, and published reports are annotated, together with…

  19. Public School Choice: A Selected Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crohn, Leslie; Hansen, Kenneth H.

    This annotated bibliography offers a sampling of a wide variety of viewpoints on the topic of school choice. Fourteen references selected for annotation, ranging from a 3-page journal article to a 266-page book, are listed at the beginning of the bibliography. Among the viewpoints that different authors represent are the following: (1) unlimited…

  20. Metabolomics of Clostridial Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Aristilde, Ludmilla; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-08

    Members of the genus Clostridium collectively have the ideal set of the metabolic capabilities for fermentative biofuel production: cellulose degradation, hydrogen production, and solvent excretion. No single organism, however, can effectively convert cellulose into biofuels. Here we developed, using metabolomics and isotope tracers, basic science knowledge of Clostridial metabolism of utility for future efforts to engineer such an organism. In glucose fermentation carried out by the biofuel producer Clostridium acetobutylicum, we observed a remarkably ordered series of metabolite concentration changes as the fermentation progressed from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In general, high-energy compounds decreased while low-energy species increased during solventogenesis. These changes in metabolite concentrations were accompanied by large changes in intracellular metabolic fluxes, with pyruvate directed towards acetyl-CoA and solvents instead of oxaloacetate and amino acids. Thus, the solventogenic transition involves global remodeling of metabolism to redirect resources from biomass production into solvent production. In contrast to C. acetobutylicum, which is an avid fermenter, C. cellulolyticum metabolizes glucose only slowly. We find that glycolytic intermediate concentrations are radically different from fast fermenting organisms. Associated thermodynamic and isotope tracer analysis revealed that the full glycolytic pathway in C. cellulolyticum is reversible. This arises from changes in cofactor utilization for phosphofructokinase and an alternative pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. The net effect is to increase the high-energy phosphate bond yield of glycolysis by 150% (from 2 to 5) at the expense of lower net flux. Thus, C. cellulolyticum prioritizes glycolytic energy efficiency over speed. Degradation of cellulose results in other sugars in addition to glucose. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled pentose sugars

  1. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and

  2. Automatic extraction of gene ontology annotation and its correlation with clusters in protein networks

    PubMed Central

    Daraselia, Nikolai; Yuryev, Anton; Egorov, Sergei; Mazo, Ilya; Ispolatov, Iaroslav

    2007-01-01

    and size of GO groups without any noticeable decrease of the link density within the groups indicated that this expansion significantly broadens the public GO annotation without diluting its quality. We revealed that functional GO annotation correlates mostly with clustering in a physical interaction protein network, while its overlap with indirect regulatory network communities is two to three times smaller. Conclusion Protein functional annotations extracted by the NLP technology expand and enrich the existing GO annotation system. The GO functional modularity correlates mostly with the clustering in the physical interaction network, suggesting that the essential role of structural organization maintained by these interactions. Reciprocally, clustering of proteins in physical interaction networks can serve as an evidence for their functional similarity. PMID:17620146

  3. Present and foreseeable future of metabolomics in forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Peinado, L S; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-06-21

    The revulsive publications during the last years on the precariousness of forensic sciences worldwide have promoted the move of major steps towards improvement of this science. One of the steps (viz. a higher involvement of metabolomics in the new era of forensic analysis) deserves to be discussed under different angles. Thus, the characteristics of metabolomics that make it a useful tool in forensic analysis, the aspects in which this omics is so far implicit, but not mentioned in forensic analyses, and how typical forensic parameters such as the post-mortem interval or fingerprints take benefits from metabolomics are critically discussed in this review. The way in which the metabolomics-forensic binomial succeeds when either conventional or less frequent samples are used is highlighted here. Finally, the pillars that should support future developments involving metabolomics and forensic analysis, and the research required for a fruitful in-depth involvement of metabolomics in forensic analysis are critically discussed.

  4. Metabolomics and its application to studying metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Booth, Sean C; Workentine, Matthew L; Weljie, Aalim M; Turner, Raymond J

    2011-11-01

    Here we explain the omics approach of metabolomics and how it can be applied to study a physiological response to toxic metal exposure. This review aims to educate the metallomics field to the tool of metabolomics. Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly used tool to compare natural and challenged states of various organisms, from disease states in humans to toxin exposure to environmental systems. This approach is key to understanding and identifying the cellular or biochemical targets of metals and the underlying physiological response. Metabolomics steps are described and overviews of its application to metal toxicity to organisms are given. As this approach is very new there are yet only a small number of total studies and therefore only a brief overview of some metal metabolomics studies is described. A frank critical evaluation of the approach is given to provide newcomers to the method a clear idea of the challenges and the rewards of applying metabolomics to their research.

  5. SelenoDB 2.0: annotation of selenoprotein genes in animals and their genetic diversity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Romagné, Frédéric; Santesmasses, Didac; White, Louise; Sarangi, Gaurab K.; Mariotti, Marco; Hübler, Ron; Weihmann, Antje; Parra, Genís; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Guigó, Roderic; Castellano, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    SelenoDB (http://www.selenodb.org) aims to provide high-quality annotations of selenoprotein genes, proteins and SECIS elements. Selenoproteins are proteins that contain the amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) and the first release of the database included annotations for eight species. Since the release of SelenoDB 1.0 many new animal genomes have been sequenced. The annotations of selenoproteins in new genomes usually contain many errors in major databases. For this reason, we have now fully annotated selenoprotein genes in 58 animal genomes. We provide manually curated annotations for human selenoproteins, whereas we use an automatic annotation pipeline to annotate selenoprotein genes in other animal genomes. In addition, we annotate the homologous genes containing cysteine (Cys) instead of Sec. Finally, we have surveyed genetic variation in the annotated genes in humans. We use exon capture and resequencing approaches to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in more than 50 human populations around the world. We thus present a detailed view of the genetic divergence of Sec- and Cys-containing genes in animals and their diversity in humans. The addition of these datasets into the second release of the database provides a valuable resource for addressing medical and evolutionary questions in selenium biology. PMID:24194593

  6. SelenoDB 2.0: annotation of selenoprotein genes in animals and their genetic diversity in humans.

    PubMed

    Romagné, Frédéric; Santesmasses, Didac; White, Louise; Sarangi, Gaurab K; Mariotti, Marco; Hübler, Ron; Weihmann, Antje; Parra, Genís; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Guigó, Roderic; Castellano, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    SelenoDB (http://www.selenodb.org) aims to provide high-quality annotations of selenoprotein genes, proteins and SECIS elements. Selenoproteins are proteins that contain the amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) and the first release of the database included annotations for eight species. Since the release of SelenoDB 1.0 many new animal genomes have been sequenced. The annotations of selenoproteins in new genomes usually contain many errors in major databases. For this reason, we have now fully annotated selenoprotein genes in 58 animal genomes. We provide manually curated annotations for human selenoproteins, whereas we use an automatic annotation pipeline to annotate selenoprotein genes in other animal genomes. In addition, we annotate the homologous genes containing cysteine (Cys) instead of Sec. Finally, we have surveyed genetic variation in the annotated genes in humans. We use exon capture and resequencing approaches to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in more than 50 human populations around the world. We thus present a detailed view of the genetic divergence of Sec- and Cys-containing genes in animals and their diversity in humans. The addition of these datasets into the second release of the database provides a valuable resource for addressing medical and evolutionary questions in selenium biology.

  7. An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach for exploring urinary metabolome modifications after cocoa consumption.

    PubMed

    Llorach, Rafael; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Jauregui, Olga; Monagas, Maria; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2009-11-01

    Cocoa-phytochemicals have been related to the health-benefits of cocoa consumption. Metabolomics has been proposed as a powerful tool to characterize both the intake and the effects on the metabolism of dietary components. Human urine metabolome modifications after single cocoa intake were explored in a randomized, crossed, and controlled trial. After overnight fasting, 10 subjects consumed randomly either a single dose of cocoa powder with milk or water, or milk without cocoa. Urine samples were collected before the ingestion and at 0-6, 6-12, and 12-24-h after test-meals consumption. Samples were analyzed by HPLC-q-ToF, followed by multivariate data analysis. Results revealed an important effect on urinary metabolome during the 24 h after cocoa powder intake. These changes were not influenced by matrix as no global differences were found between cocoa powder consumption with milk or with water. Overall, 27 metabolites related to cocoa-phytochemicals, including alkaloid derivatives, polyphenol metabolites (both host and microbial metabolites) and processing-derived products such as diketopiperazines, were identified as the main contributors to the urinary modifications after cocoa powder intake. These results confirm that metabolomics will contribute to better characterization of the urinary metabolome in order to further explore the metabolism of phytochemicals and its relation with human health.

  8. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants.

  9. MVAPACK: A Complete Data Handling Package for NMR Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Data handling in the field of NMR metabolomics has historically been reliant on either in-house mathematical routines or long chains of expensive commercial software. Thus, while the relatively simple biochemical protocols of metabolomics maintain a low barrier to entry, new practitioners of metabolomics experiments are forced to either purchase expensive software packages or craft their own data handling solutions from scratch. This inevitably complicates the standardization and communication of data handling protocols in the field. We report a newly developed open-source platform for complete NMR metabolomics data handling, MVAPACK, and describe its application on an example metabolic fingerprinting data set. PMID:24576144

  10. Metabolomics and metabolite profiling: past heroes and future developments.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, W J; Karu, K; Hornshaw, M; Woffendin, G; Wang, Y

    2007-01-01

    Following the sequencing of the human and other genomes, much research effort is now invested in post- genomic science, particularly in the related disciplines of proteomics and metabolomics. In this paper, we will attempt to provide an overview of mass spectrometry-based metabolomic strategies, discuss the evolution of metabolomics from its predecessor, Hmetabolite profiling", and provide some pointers to future methodological and technological direction. Current data from the authors' laboratory will also be presented, highlighting our efforts in the field of "targeted metabolomics", namely, "steroidomics in the brain".

  11. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Matthew Y.; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science. PMID:26114091

  12. Making web annotations persistent over time

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Robert; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    As Digital Libraries (DL) become more aligned with the web architecture, their functional components need to be fundamentally rethought in terms of URIs and HTTP. Annotation, a core scholarly activity enabled by many DL solutions, exhibits a clearly unacceptable characteristic when existing models are applied to the web: due to the representations of web resources changing over time, an annotation made about a web resource today may no longer be relevant to the representation that is served from that same resource tomorrow. We assume the existence of archived versions of resources, and combine the temporal features of the emerging Open Annotation data model with the capability offered by the Memento framework that allows seamless navigation from the URI of a resource to archived versions of that resource, and arrive at a solution that provides guarantees regarding the persistence of web annotations over time. More specifically, we provide theoretical solutions and proof-of-concept experimental evaluations for two problems: reconstructing an existing annotation so that the correct archived version is displayed for all resources involved in the annotation, and retrieving all annotations that involve a given archived version of a web resource.

  13. Microtask crowdsourcing for disease mention annotation in PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Good, Benjamin M; Nanis, Max; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Andrew I

    2015-01-01

    Identifying concepts and relationships in biomedical text enables knowledge to be applied in computational analyses. Many biological natural language processing (BioNLP) projects attempt to address this challenge, but the state of the art still leaves much room for improvement. Progress in BioNLP research depends on large, annotated corpora for evaluating information extraction systems and training machine learning models. Traditionally, such corpora are created by small numbers of expert annotators often working over extended periods of time. Recent studies have shown that workers on microtask crowdsourcing platforms such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) can, in aggregate, generate high-quality annotations of biomedical text. Here, we investigated the use of the AMT in capturing disease mentions in PubMed abstracts. We used the NCBI Disease corpus as a gold standard for refining and benchmarking our crowdsourcing protocol. After several iterations, we arrived at a protocol that reproduced the annotations of the 593 documents in the 'training set' of this gold standard with an overall F measure of 0.872 (precision 0.862, recall 0.883). The output can also be tuned to optimize for precision (max = 0.984 when recall = 0.269) or recall (max = 0.980 when precision = 0.436). Each document was completed by 15 workers, and their annotations were merged based on a simple voting method. In total 145 workers combined to complete all 593 documents in the span of 9 days at a cost of $.066 per abstract per worker. The quality of the annotations, as judged with the F measure, increases with the number of workers assigned to each task; however minimal performance gains were observed beyond 8 workers per task. These results add further evidence that microtask crowdsourcing can be a valuable tool for generating well-annotated corpora in BioNLP. Data produced for this analysis are available at http://figshare.com/articles/Disease_Mention_Annotation_with_Mechanical_Turk/1126402.

  14. Application of metabolomics to understanding biofilms in water distribution systems: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Barratt, R; Marlow, D R; Dunn, M S; Palombo, E A; Morrison, P D; Key, C

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed in pipes are known to contribute to waterborne diseases, accelerate corrosion and cause aesthetic taste and odour issues within the potable water supply network. This paper describes a pilot study, undertaken to assess the potential of using metabolomics to monitor bacterial activity in biofilms of an urban water network. Using samples from a water mains flushing programme, it was found that a profile of intracellular and extracellular metabolites associated with microbial activity could be obtained by analysing samples using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Chemometric analysis of the chromatograms in conjunction with data from the mass spectrometer showed that it is possible to differentiate between biofilms from different pipe materials and planktonic bacteria. This research demonstrates that metabolomics has the potential for investigating biofilms and other microbial activity within water networks, and could provide a means for enhancing monitoring programmes, understanding the source of water quality complaints, and optimising water network management strategies.

  15. NMR metabolomics of ripened and developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and turnip rape (Brassica rapa).

    PubMed

    Kortesniemi, Maaria; Vuorinen, Anssi L; Sinkkonen, Jari; Yang, Baoru; Rajala, Ari; Kallio, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    The oilseeds of the commercially important oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and turnip rape (Brassica rapa) were investigated with (1)H NMR metabolomics. The compositions of ripened (cultivated in field trials) and developing seeds (cultivated in controlled conditions) were compared in multivariate models using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Differences in the major lipids and the minor metabolites between the two species were found. A higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sucrose were observed in turnip rape, while the overall oil content and sinapine levels were higher in oilseed rape. The genotype traits were negligible compared to the effect of the growing site and concomitant conditions on the oilseed metabolome. This study demonstrates the applicability of NMR-based analysis in determining the species, geographical origin, developmental stage, and quality of oilseed Brassicas.

  16. Annotating user-defined abstractions for optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Schordan, M; Vuduc, R; Yi, Q

    2005-12-05

    This paper discusses the features of an annotation language that we believe to be essential for optimizing user-defined abstractions. These features should capture semantics of function, data, and object-oriented abstractions, express abstraction equivalence (e.g., a class represents an array abstraction), and permit extension of traditional compiler optimizations to user-defined abstractions. Our future work will include developing a comprehensive annotation language for describing the semantics of general object-oriented abstractions, as well as automatically verifying and inferring the annotated semantics.

  17. Automated Knowledge Annotation for Dynamic Collaborative Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Marshall, Eric J.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-05-19

    This paper describes the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF), a suite of tools to enable automated knowledge annotation for modeling and simulation projects. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., facts extracted from journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (from similar peer-reviewed material as well as social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks.

  18. Metabolomics Workbench: An international repository for metabolomics data and metadata, metabolite standards, protocols, tutorials and training, and analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Azam, Kenan; Vadivelu, Ilango; Burant, Charles; Edison, Arthur; Fiehn, Oliver; Higashi, Richard; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Sumner, Susan; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-01-01

    The Metabolomics Workbench, available at www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, is a public repository for metabolomics metadata and experimental data spanning various species and experimental platforms, metabolite standards, metabolite structures, protocols, tutorials, and training material and other educational resources. It provides a computational platform to integrate, analyze, track, deposit and disseminate large volumes of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of metabolomics studies including mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) data spanning over 20 different species covering all the major taxonomic categories including humans and other mammals, plants, insects, invertebrates and microorganisms. Additionally, a number of protocols are provided for a range of metabolite classes, sample types, and both MS and NMR-based studies, along with a metabolite structure database. The metabolites characterized in the studies available on the Metabolomics Workbench are linked to chemical structures in the metabolite structure database to facilitate comparative analysis across studies. The Metabolomics Workbench, part of the data coordinating effort of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Metabolomics Program, provides data from the Common Fund's Metabolomics Resource Cores, metabolite standards, and analysis tools to the wider metabolomics community and seeks data depositions from metabolomics researchers across the world.

  19. Metabolomics Workbench: An international repository for metabolomics data and metadata, metabolite standards, protocols, tutorials and training, and analysis tools

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Azam, Kenan; Vadivelu, Ilango; Burant, Charles; Edison, Arthur; Fiehn, Oliver; Higashi, Richard; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Sumner, Susan; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-01-01

    The Metabolomics Workbench, available at www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, is a public repository for metabolomics metadata and experimental data spanning various species and experimental platforms, metabolite standards, metabolite structures, protocols, tutorials, and training material and other educational resources. It provides a computational platform to integrate, analyze, track, deposit and disseminate large volumes of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of metabolomics studies including mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) data spanning over 20 different species covering all the major taxonomic categories including humans and other mammals, plants, insects, invertebrates and microorganisms. Additionally, a number of protocols are provided for a range of metabolite classes, sample types, and both MS and NMR-based studies, along with a metabolite structure database. The metabolites characterized in the studies available on the Metabolomics Workbench are linked to chemical structures in the metabolite structure database to facilitate comparative analysis across studies. The Metabolomics Workbench, part of the data coordinating effort of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Metabolomics Program, provides data from the Common Fund's Metabolomics Resource Cores, metabolite standards, and analysis tools to the wider metabolomics community and seeks data depositions from metabolomics researchers across the world. PMID:26467476

  20. Metabolomics Workbench: An international repository for metabolomics data and metadata, metabolite standards, protocols, tutorials and training, and analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Azam, Kenan; Vadivelu, Ilango; Burant, Charles; Edison, Arthur; Fiehn, Oliver; Higashi, Richard; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Sumner, Susan; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-01-01

    The Metabolomics Workbench, available at www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, is a public repository for metabolomics metadata and experimental data spanning various species and experimental platforms, metabolite standards, metabolite structures, protocols, tutorials, and training material and other educational resources. It provides a computational platform to integrate, analyze, track, deposit and disseminate large volumes of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of metabolomics studies including mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) data spanning over 20 different species covering all the major taxonomic categories including humans and other mammals, plants, insects, invertebrates and microorganisms. Additionally, a number of protocols are provided for a range of metabolite classes, sample types, and both MS and NMR-based studies, along with a metabolite structure database. The metabolites characterized in the studies available on the Metabolomics Workbench are linked to chemical structures in the metabolite structure database to facilitate comparative analysis across studies. The Metabolomics Workbench, part of the data coordinating effort of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Metabolomics Program, provides data from the Common Fund's Metabolomics Resource Cores, metabolite standards, and analysis tools to the wider metabolomics community and seeks data depositions from metabolomics researchers across the world. PMID:26467476

  1. Metabolomics analysis of shucked mussels' freshness.

    PubMed

    Aru, Violetta; Pisano, Maria Barbara; Savorani, Francesco; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Cosentino, Sofia; Cesare Marincola, Flaminia

    2016-08-15

    In this work a NMR metabolomics approach was applied to analyze changes in the metabolic profile of the bivalve mollusk Mytilus galloprovincialis upon storage at 0°C and 4°C for 10 and 6 days, respectively. The most significant microbial groups involved in spoilage of mussels were also investigated. The time-related metabolic signature of mussels was analysed by Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) which revealed a clear discrimination between the fresh samples and those stored at 0°C and 4°C. The results evidenced a noticeable increase in acetate, lactate, succinate, alanine, branched chain amino acids, trimethylamine and a progressive decline of osmolytes like betaine, homarine and taurine during storage. Exploration of the correlations of these metabolites with microbial counts suggested their use as potential biomarkers of spoilage. The results support the use of NMR metabolomics as a valuable tool to provide information on seafood freshness.

  2. Metabolomic Imaging for Human Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Lee; Jordan, Kate W.; Ratai, Eva M.; Sheng, Jinhua; Adkins, Christen B.; DeFeo, Elita M; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Ying, Leslie; McDougal, W. Scott; Cheng, Leo L.

    2010-01-01

    As current radiological approaches cannot accurately localize prostate cancer in vivo, biopsies are conducted at random within prostates for at-risk patients, leading to high false-negative rates. Metabolomic imaging can map cancer-specific biomolecular profile values onto anatomical structures to direct biopsy. In this preliminary study, we evaluated five prostatectomy-removed whole prostates from biopsy-proven cancer patients on a 7 Tesla human, whole-body magnetic resonance scanner. Localized, multi-cross-sectional, multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectra were used to construct a malignancy index based on prostate cancer metabolomic profiles obtained from previous, intact tissue analyses by a 14 Tesla spectrometer. This calculated Malignancy Index shows linear correlation with lesion size (p<0.013) and demonstrates a 93–97% overall accuracy for detecting the presence of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:20371475

  3. Metabolomics analysis of shucked mussels' freshness.

    PubMed

    Aru, Violetta; Pisano, Maria Barbara; Savorani, Francesco; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Cosentino, Sofia; Cesare Marincola, Flaminia

    2016-08-15

    In this work a NMR metabolomics approach was applied to analyze changes in the metabolic profile of the bivalve mollusk Mytilus galloprovincialis upon storage at 0°C and 4°C for 10 and 6 days, respectively. The most significant microbial groups involved in spoilage of mussels were also investigated. The time-related metabolic signature of mussels was analysed by Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) which revealed a clear discrimination between the fresh samples and those stored at 0°C and 4°C. The results evidenced a noticeable increase in acetate, lactate, succinate, alanine, branched chain amino acids, trimethylamine and a progressive decline of osmolytes like betaine, homarine and taurine during storage. Exploration of the correlations of these metabolites with microbial counts suggested their use as potential biomarkers of spoilage. The results support the use of NMR metabolomics as a valuable tool to provide information on seafood freshness. PMID:27006214

  4. Linking Disparate Datasets of the Earth Sciences with the SemantEco Annotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed, P.; Chastain, K.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Use of Semantic Web technologies for data management in the Earth sciences (and beyond) has great potential but is still in its early stages, since the challenges of translating data into a more explicit or semantic form for immediate use within applications has not been fully addressed. In this abstract we help address this challenge by introducing the SemantEco Annotator, which enables anyone, regardless of expertise, to semantically annotate tabular Earth Science data and translate it into linked data format, while applying the logic inherent in community-standard vocabularies to guide the process. The Annotator was conceived under a desire to unify dataset content from a variety of sources under common vocabularies, for use in semantically-enabled web applications. Our current use case employs linked data generated by the Annotator for use in the SemantEco environment, which utilizes semantics to help users explore, search, and visualize water or air quality measurement and species occurrence data through a map-based interface. The generated data can also be used immediately to facilitate discovery and search capabilities within 'big data' environments. The Annotator provides a method for taking information about a dataset, that may only be known to its maintainers, and making it explicit, in a uniform and machine-readable fashion, such that a person or information system can more easily interpret the underlying structure and meaning. Its primary mechanism is to enable a user to formally describe how columns of a tabular dataset relate and/or describe entities. For example, if a user identifies columns for latitude and longitude coordinates, we can infer the data refers to a point that can be plotted on a map. Further, it can be made explicit that measurements of 'nitrate' and 'NO3-' are of the same entity through vocabulary assignments, thus more easily utilizing data sets that use different nomenclatures. The Annotator provides an extensive and searchable

  5. Semantic annotation of Web data applied to risk in food.

    PubMed

    Hignette, Gaëlle; Buche, Patrice; Couvert, Olivier; Dibie-Barthélemy, Juliette; Doussot, David; Haemmerlé, Ollivier; Mettler, Eric; Soler, Lydie

    2008-11-30

    A preliminary step to risk in food assessment is the gathering of experimental data. In the framework of the Sym'Previus project (http://www.symprevius.org), a complete data integration system has been designed, grouping data provided by industrial partners and data extracted from papers published in the main scientific journals of the domain. Those data have been classified by means of a predefined vocabulary, called ontology. Our aim is to complement the database with data extracted from the Web. In the framework of the WebContent project (www.webcontent.fr), we have designed a semi-automatic acquisition tool, called @WEB, which retrieves scientific documents from the Web. During the @WEB process, data tables are extracted from the documents and then annotated with the ontology. We focus on the data tables as they contain, in general, a synthesis of data published in the documents. In this paper, we explain how the columns of the data tables are automatically annotated with data types of the ontology and how the relations represented by the table are recognised. We also give the results of our experimentation to assess the quality of such an annotation.

  6. Innovation in metabolomics to improve personalized healthcare.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Loda, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Metabolomics is the systemic study of all small molecules (metabolites) and their concentration as affected by pathological and physiological alterations or environmental or other factors. Metabolic alterations represent a "window" on the complex interactions between genetic expression, enzyme activity, and metabolic reactions. Techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopy, have led to significant advances in metabolomics. The field is shifting from feasibility studies to biological and clinical applications. Fields of application range from cancer biology to stem cell research and assessment of xenobiotics and drugs in tissues and single cells. Cross-validation across high-throughput platforms has allowed findings from expression profiling to be confirmed with metabolomics. Specific genetic alterations appear to drive unique metabolic programs. These, in turn, can be used as biomarkers of genetic subtypes of prostate cancer or as discovery tools for therapeutic targeting of metabolic enzymes. Thus, metabolites in blood may serve as biomarkers of tumor state, including inferring driving oncogenes. Novel applications such as these suggest that metabolic profiling may be utilized in refining personalized medicine.

  7. Innovation in Metabolomics to Improve Personalized Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Loda, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the systemic study of all small molecules (metabolites) and their concentration as affected by pathological and physiological alterations or environmental or other factors. Metabolic alterations represent a “window” on the complex interactions between genetic expression, enzyme activity, and metabolic reactions. Techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopy, have led to significant advances in metabolomics. The field is shifting from feasibility studies to biological and clinical applications. Fields of application range from cancer biology to stem cell research and assessment of xenobiotics and drugs in tissues and single cells. Cross-validation across high-throughput platforms has allowed findings from expression profiling to be confirmed with metabolomics. Specific genetic alterations appear to drive unique metabolic programs. These, in turn, can be used as biomarkers of genetic subtypes of prostate cancer or as discovery tools for therapeutic targeting of metabolic enzymes. Thus, metabolites in blood may serve as biomarkers of tumor state, including inferring driving oncogenes. Novel applications such as these suggest that metabolic profiling may be utilized in refining personalized medicine. PMID:26014591

  8. Metabolomic changes in autopsy confirmed Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Rozen, Steve; Matson, Wayne; Han, Xianlin; Hulette, Christine M.; Burke, James R.; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomics, the global science of biochemistry, provides powerful tools to map perturbations in the metabolic network and enables simultaneous quantification of a large number of metabolites to identify metabolic perturbances that might provide insights into disease. In this pilot study we take a targeted electrochemistry based metabolomics approach where liquid chromatography followed by coulometric array detection enables quantification of over thirty metabolites within key neurotransmitter pathways (dopamine and serotonin) and pathways involved in oxidative stress. Using samples from post-mortem ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (15 AD and 15 non-demented subjects with autopsy confirmed diagnoses) and using regression models, correlations, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and t-tests we identified alterations in tyrosine, tryptophan, purine, and tocopherol pathways in patients with AD. Reductions in norepinephrine and its related metabolites were also seen, consistent with prior literature. These data support further investigation of metabolomics in larger samples of clinical AD as well as in those with preclinical disease for utility as biomarkers. PMID:21075060

  9. The Vigna Genome Server, 'VigGS': A Genomic Knowledge Base of the Genus Vigna Based on High-Quality, Annotated Genome Sequence of the Azuki Bean, Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Naito, Ken; Takahashi, Yu; Sato, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Muto, Isamu; Itoh, Takeshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vigna includes legume crops such as cowpea, mungbean and azuki bean, as well as >100 wild species. A number of the wild species are highly tolerant to severe environmental conditions including high-salinity, acid or alkaline soil; drought; flooding; and pests and diseases. These features of the genus Vigna make it a good target for investigation of genetic diversity in adaptation to stressful environments; however, a lack of genomic information has hindered such research in this genus. Here, we present a genome database of the genus Vigna, Vigna Genome Server ('VigGS', http://viggs.dna.affrc.go.jp), based on the recently sequenced azuki bean genome, which incorporates annotated exon-intron structures, along with evidence for transcripts and proteins, visualized in GBrowse. VigGS also facilitates user construction of multiple alignments between azuki bean genes and those of six related dicot species. In addition, the database displays sequence polymorphisms between azuki bean and its wild relatives and enables users to design primer sequences targeting any variant site. VigGS offers a simple keyword search in addition to sequence similarity searches using BLAST and BLAT. To incorporate up to date genomic information, VigGS automatically receives newly deposited mRNA sequences of pre-set species from the public database once a week. Users can refer to not only gene structures mapped on the azuki bean genome on GBrowse but also relevant literature of the genes. VigGS will contribute to genomic research into plant biotic and abiotic stresses and to the future development of new stress-tolerant crops. PMID:26644460

  10. Improving Genome Assemblies and Annotations for Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Norgren, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The study of nonhuman primates (NHP) is key to understanding human evolution, in addition to being an important model for biomedical research. NHPs are especially important for translational medicine. There are now exciting opportunities to greatly increase the utility of these models by incorporating Next Generation (NextGen) sequencing into study design. Unfortunately, the draft status of nonhuman genomes greatly constrains what can currently be accomplished with available technology. Although all genomes contain errors, draft assemblies and annotations contain so many mistakes that they make currently available nonhuman primate genomes misleading to investigators conducting evolutionary studies; and these genomes are of insufficient quality to serve as references for NextGen studies. Fortunately, NextGen sequencing can be used in the production of greatly improved genomes. Existing Sanger sequences can be supplemented with NextGen whole genome, and exomic genomic sequences to create new, more complete and correct assemblies. Additional physical mapping, and an incorporation of information about gene structure, can be used to improve assignment of scaffolds to chromosomes. In addition, mRNA-sequence data can be used to economically acquire transcriptome information, which can be used for annotation. Some highly polymorphic and complex regions, for example MHC class I and immunoglobulin loci, will require extra effort to properly assemble and annotate. However, for the vast majority of genes, a modest investment in money, and a somewhat greater investment in time, can greatly improve assemblies and annotations sufficient to produce true, reference grade nonhuman primate genomes. Such resources can reasonably be expected to transform nonhuman primate research. PMID:24174438

  11. An automated protein annotation filter for integrating web-based annotation tools

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Shanmughavel, Primanayagam

    2007-01-01

    A wide range of web based prediction and annotation tools are frequently used for determining protein function from sequence. However, parallel processing of sequences for annotation through web tools is not possible due to several constraints in functional programming for multiple queries. Here, we propose the development of APAF as an automated protein annotation filter to overcome some of these difficulties through an integrated approach. PMID:18188426

  12. An automated protein annotation filter for integrating web-based annotation tools.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Shanmughavel, Primanayagam

    2007-12-15

    A wide range of web based prediction and annotation tools are frequently used for determining protein function from sequence. However, parallel processing of sequences for annotation through web tools is not possible due to several constraints in functional programming for multiple queries. Here, we propose the development of APAF as an automated protein annotation filter to overcome some of these difficulties through an integrated approach.

  13. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database.

    PubMed

    Winsor, Geoffrey L; Griffiths, Emma J; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Shay, Julie A; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  14. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Griffiths, Emma J.; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K.; Shay, Julie A.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  15. Generation of silver standard concept annotations from biomedical texts with special relevance to phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Oellrich, Anika; Collier, Nigel; Smedley, Damian; Groza, Tudor

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records and scientific articles possess differing linguistic characteristics that may impact the performance of natural language processing tools developed for one or the other. In this paper, we investigate the performance of four extant concept recognition tools: the clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES), the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) Annotator, the Biomedical Concept Annotation System (BeCAS) and MetaMap. Each of the four concept recognition systems is applied to four different corpora: the i2b2 corpus of clinical documents, a PubMed corpus of Medline abstracts, a clinical trails corpus and the ShARe/CLEF corpus. In addition, we assess the individual system performances with respect to one gold standard annotation set, available for the ShARe/CLEF corpus. Furthermore, we built a silver standard annotation set from the individual systems' output and assess the quality as well as the contribution of individual systems to the quality of the silver standard. Our results demonstrate that mainly the NCBO annotator and cTAKES contribute to the silver standard corpora (F1-measures in the range of 21% to 74%) and their quality (best F1-measure of 33%), independent from the type of text investigated. While BeCAS and MetaMap can contribute to the precision of silver standard annotations (precision of up to 42%), the F1-measure drops when combined with NCBO Annotator and cTAKES due to a low recall. In conclusion, the performances of individual systems need to be improved independently from the text types, and the leveraging strategies to best take advantage of individual systems' annotations need to be revised. The textual content of the PubMed corpus, accession numbers for the clinical trials corpus, and assigned annotations of the four concept recognition systems as well as the generated silver standard annotation sets are available from http://purl.org/phenotype/resources. The textual content of the Sh

  16. Virtual annotation: Verbal communication in virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Jouke C.; Bolter, Jay David; Vandermast, Charles

    A system that was developed to explore communication in virtual reality and which offers a simple and powerful method to embed verbal communication in simulations and visualizers by means of voice annotation is described. The prototype demonstrates that the addition of verbal communication opens up a range of new uses for virtual environments. A similar voice annotation facility is easily added to existing visualizers and simulations, and it enables reading, writing and communicating.

  17. Genepi: a blackboard framework for genome annotation

    PubMed Central

    Descorps-Declère, Stéphane; Ziébelin, Danielle; Rechenmann, François; Viari, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Background Genome annotation can be viewed as an incremental, cooperative, data-driven, knowledge-based process that involves multiple methods to predict gene locations and structures. This process might have to be executed more than once and might be subjected to several revisions as the biological (new data) or methodological (new methods) knowledge evolves. In this context, although a lot of annotation platforms already exist, there is still a strong need for computer systems which take in charge, not only the primary annotation, but also the update and advance of the associated knowledge. In this paper, we propose to adopt a blackboard architecture for designing such a system Results We have implemented a blackboard framework (called Genepi) for developing automatic annotation systems. The system is not bound to any specific annotation strategy. Instead, the user will specify a blackboard structure in a configuration file and the system will instantiate and run this particular annotation strategy. The characteristics of this framework are presented and discussed. Specific adaptations to the classical blackboard architecture have been required, such as the description of the activation patterns of the knowledge sources by using an extended set of Allen's temporal relations. Although the system is robust enough to be used on real-size applications, it is of primary use to bioinformatics researchers who want to experiment with blackboard architectures. Conclusion In the context of genome annotation, blackboards have several interesting features related to the way methodological and biological knowledge can be updated. They can readily handle the cooperative (several methods are implied) and opportunistic (the flow of execution depends on the state of our knowledge) aspects of the annotation process. PMID:17038181

  18. DAS Writeback: A Collaborative Annotation System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Centralised resources such as GenBank and UniProt are perfect examples of the major international efforts that have been made to integrate and share biological information. However, additional data that adds value to these resources needs a simple and rapid route to public access. The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) provides an adequate environment to integrate genomic and proteomic information from multiple sources, making this information accessible to the community. DAS offers a way to distribute and access information but it does not provide domain experts with the mechanisms to participate in the curation process of the available biological entities and their annotations. Results We designed and developed a Collaborative Annotation System for proteins called DAS Writeback. DAS writeback is a protocol extension of DAS to provide the functionalities of adding, editing and deleting annotations. We implemented this new specification as extensions of both a DAS server and a DAS client. The architecture was designed with the involvement of the DAS community and it was improved after performing usability experiments emulating a real annotation task. Conclusions We demonstrate that DAS Writeback is effective, usable and will provide the appropriate environment for the creation and evolution of community protein annotation. PMID:21569281

  19. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  20. Untargeted Metabolomics Strategies—Challenges and Emerging Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Sherrod, Stacy D.; McLean, John A.

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites are building blocks of cellular function. These species are involved in enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions and are essential for cellular function. Upstream biological disruptions result in a series of metabolomic changes and, as such, the metabolome holds a wealth of information that is thought to be most predictive of phenotype. Uncovering this knowledge is a work in progress. The field of metabolomics is still maturing; the community has leveraged proteomics experience when applicable and developed a range of sample preparation and instrument methodology along with myriad data processing and analysis approaches. Research focuses have now shifted toward a fundamental understanding of the biology responsible for metabolomic changes. There are several types of metabolomics experiments including both targeted and untargeted analyses. While untargeted, hypothesis generating workflows exhibit many valuable attributes, challenges inherent to the approach remain. This Critical Insight comments on these challenges, focusing on the identification process of LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics studies—specifically in mammalian systems. Biological interpretation of metabolomics data hinges on the ability to accurately identify metabolites. The range of confidence associated with identifications that is often overlooked is reviewed, and opportunities for advancing the metabolomics field are described.

  1. Environmental metabolomics: a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).

    PubMed

    Miller, Marion G

    2007-02-01

    Metabolomic approaches have the potential to make an exceptional contribution to understanding how chemicals and other environmental stressors can affect both human and environmental health. However, the application of metabolomics to environmental exposures, although getting underway, has not yet been extensively explored. This review will use a SWOT analysis model to discuss some of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that are apparent to an investigator venturing into this relatively new field. SWOT has been used extensively in business settings to uncover new outlooks and identify problems that would impede progress. The field of environmental metabolomics provides great opportunities for discovery, and this is recognized by a high level of interest in potential applications. However, understanding the biological consequence of environmental exposures can be confounded by inter- and intra-individual differences. Metabolomic profiles can yield a plethora of data, the interpretation of which is complex and still being evaluated and researched. The development of the field will depend on the availability of technologies for data handling and that permit ready access metabolomic databases. Understanding the relevance of metabolomic endpoints to organism health vs adaptation vs variation is an important step in understanding what constitutes a substantive environmental threat. Metabolomic applications in reproductive research are discussed. Overall, the development of a comprehensive mechanistic-based interpretation of metabolomic changes offers the possibility of providing information that will significantly contribute to the protection of human health and the environment. PMID:17269710

  2. Metabolomics for Undergraduates: Identification and Pathway Assignment of Mitochondrial Metabolites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Ana Patrícia; Serralheiro, Maria Luisa; Ferreira, António E. N.; Freire, Ana Ponces; Cordeiro, Carlos; Silva, Marta Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a key discipline in systems biology, together with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. In this omics cascade, the metabolome represents the biochemical products that arise from cellular processes and is often regarded as the final response of a biological system to environmental or genetic changes. The overall screening…

  3. Application of Metabolomics for High Resolution Phenotype Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Metabolome, a total profile of whole metabolites, is placed on downstream of proteome. Metabolome is thought to be results of implementation of genomic information. In other words, metabolome can be called as high resolution phenotype. The easiest operation of metabolomics is the integration to the upstream ome information including transcriptome and/or proteome. Those trials have been reported at a certain scientific level. In addition, metabolomics can be operated in stand-alone mode without any other ome information. Among metabolomics tactics, the author’s group is particularly focusing on metabolic fingerprinting, in which metabolome information is employed as explanatory variant to evaluate response variant. Metabolic fingerprinting technique is expected not only for analyzing slight difference depending on genotype difference but also for expressing dynamic variation of living organisms. The author introduces several good examples which he performed. Those are useful for easy understanding of the power of metabolomics. In addition, the author mentions the latest technology for analysis of metabolic dynamism. The author’s group developed a facile analytical method for semi-quantitative metabolic dynamism. The author introduces the novel method that uses time dependent variation of isotope distribution based on stable isotope dilution. PMID:26819889

  4. Environmental metabolomics: a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).

    PubMed

    Miller, Marion G

    2007-02-01

    Metabolomic approaches have the potential to make an exceptional contribution to understanding how chemicals and other environmental stressors can affect both human and environmental health. However, the application of metabolomics to environmental exposures, although getting underway, has not yet been extensively explored. This review will use a SWOT analysis model to discuss some of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that are apparent to an investigator venturing into this relatively new field. SWOT has been used extensively in business settings to uncover new outlooks and identify problems that would impede progress. The field of environmental metabolomics provides great opportunities for discovery, and this is recognized by a high level of interest in potential applications. However, understanding the biological consequence of environmental exposures can be confounded by inter- and intra-individual differences. Metabolomic profiles can yield a plethora of data, the interpretation of which is complex and still being evaluated and researched. The development of the field will depend on the availability of technologies for data handling and that permit ready access metabolomic databases. Understanding the relevance of metabolomic endpoints to organism health vs adaptation vs variation is an important step in understanding what constitutes a substantive environmental threat. Metabolomic applications in reproductive research are discussed. Overall, the development of a comprehensive mechanistic-based interpretation of metabolomic changes offers the possibility of providing information that will significantly contribute to the protection of human health and the environment.

  5. Potential of mass spectrometry metabolomics for chemical food safety.

    PubMed

    Gallart-Ayala, Hector; Chéreau, Sylvain; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This review aims to describe the most significant applications of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in the field of chemical food safety. A particular discussion of all the different analytical steps involved in the metabolomics workflow (sample preparation, mass spectrometry analytical platform and data processing) will be addressed.

  6. Metabolic pathfinding using RPAIR annotation.

    PubMed

    Faust, Karoline; Croes, Didier; van Helden, Jacques

    2009-05-01

    Metabolic databases contain information about thousands of small molecules and reactions, which can be represented as networks. In the context of metabolic reconstruction, pathways can be inferred by searching optimal paths in such networks. A recurrent problem is the presence of pool metabolites (e.g., water, energy carriers, and cofactors), which are connected to hundreds of reactions, thus establishing irrelevant shortcuts between nodes of the network. One solution to this problem relies on weighted networks to penalize highly connected compounds. A more refined solution takes the chemical structure of reactants into account in order to differentiate between side and main compounds of a reaction. Thanks to an intensive annotation effort at KEGG, decompositions of reactions into reactant pairs (RPAIR) categorized by their role (main, trans, cofac, ligase, and leave) are now available. The goal of this article is to evaluate the impact of RPAIR data on pathfinding in metabolic networks. To this end, we measure the impact of different parameters concerning the construction of the metabolic network: mapping of reactions and reactant pairs onto a graph, use of selected categories of reactant pairs, weighting schemes for compounds and reactions, removal of highly connected metabolites, and reaction directionality. In total, we tested 104 combinations of parameters and identified their optimal values for pathfinding on the basis of 55 reference pathways from three organisms. The best-performing metabolic network combines the biochemical knowledge encoded by KEGG RPAIR with a weighting scheme penalizing highly connected compounds. With this network, we could recover reference pathways from Escherichia coli with an average accuracy of 93% (32 pathways), from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with an average accuracy of 66% (11 pathways), and from humans with an average accuracy of 70% (12 pathways). Our pathfinding approach is available as part of the Network Analysis Tools.

  7. Annotated checklist of Georgia birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaton, G.; Sykes, P.W.; Parrish, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    This edition of the checklist includes 446 species, of which 407 are on the Regular Species List, 8 on the Provisional, and 31 on the Hypothetical. This new publication has been greatly expanded and much revised over the previous checklist (GOS Occasional Publ. No. 10, 1986, 48 pp., 6x9 inches) to a 7x10-inch format with an extensive Literature Cited section added, 22 species added to the Regular List, 2 to the Provisional List, and 9 to the Hypothetical List. Each species account is much more comprehensive over all previous editions of the checklist. Among some of the new features are citations for sources of most information used, high counts of individuals for each species on the Regular List, extreme dates of occurrence within physiographic regions, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and for each species the highest form of verifiable documentation given with its repository institution with a catalog number. This checklist is helpful for anyone working with birds in the Southeastern United States or birding in that region. Sykes' contribution to this fifth edition of the Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds includes: suggestion of the large format and spiral binding, use of Richard A. Parks' painting of the Barn Owl on the front cover, use of literature citations throughout, and inclusion of high counts for each species. Sykes helped plan all phases of the publication, wrote about 90% of the Introduction and 84 species accounts (Osprey through Red Phalarope), designed the four maps in the introduction section and format for the Literature Cited, and with Giff Beaton designed the layout of the title page.

  8. Inductive creation of an annotation schema for manually indexing clinical conditions from emergency department reports

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Wendy W.; Dowling, John N.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluating automated indexing applications requires comparing automatically indexed terms against manual reference standard annotations. However, there are no standard guidelines for determining which words from a textual document to include in manual annotations, and the vague task can result in substantial variation among manual indexers. We applied grounded theory to emergency department reports to create an annotation schema representing syntactic and semantic variables that could be annotated when indexing clinical conditions. We describe the annotation schema, which includes variables representing medical concepts (e.g., symptom, demographics), linguistic form (e.g., noun, adjective), and modifier types (e.g., anatomic location, severity). We measured the schema’s quality and found: (1) the schema was comprehensive enough to be applied to 20 unseen reports without changes to the schema; (2) agreement between author annotators applying the schema was high, with an F measure of 93%; and (3) an error analysis showed that the authors made complementary errors when applying the schema, demonstrating that the schema incorporates both linguistic and medical expertise. PMID:16230050

  9. Review: Microfluidic Applications in Metabolomics and Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kraly, James R.; Holcomb, Ryan E.; Guan, Qian; Henry, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics is an emerging area of research focused on measuring small molecules in biological samples. There are a number of different types of metabolomics, ranging from global profiling of all metabolites in a single sample to measurement of a selected group of analytes. Microfluidics and related technologies have been used in this research area with good success. The aim of this review article is to summarize the use of microfluidics in metabolomics. Direct application of microfluidics to the determination of small molecules is covered first. Next, important sample preparation methods developed for microfluidics and applicable to metabolomics are covered. Finally, a summary of metabolomic work as it relates to analysis of cellular events using microfluidics is covered. PMID:19800473

  10. MicroScope: a platform for microbial genome annotation and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Vallenet, D; Engelen, S; Mornico, D; Cruveiller, S; Fleury, L; Lajus, A; Rouy, Z; Roche, D; Salvignol, G; Scarpelli, C; Médigue, C

    2009-01-01

    The initial outcome of genome sequencing is the creation of long text strings written in a four letter alphabet. The role of in silico sequence analysis is to assist biologists in the act of associating biological knowledge with these sequences, allowing investigators to make inferences and predictions that can be tested experimentally. A wide variety of software is available to the scientific community, and can be used to identify genomic objects, before predicting their biological functions. However, only a limited number of biologically interesting features can be revealed from an isolated sequence. Comparative genomics tools, on the other hand, by bringing together the information contained in numerous genomes simultaneously, allow annotators to make inferences based on the idea that evolution and natural selection are central to the definition of all biological processes. We have developed the MicroScope platform in order to offer a web-based framework for the systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotation and comparative analysis (http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/microscope). Starting with the description of the flow chart of the annotation processes implemented in the MicroScope pipeline, and the development of traditional and novel microbial annotation and comparative analysis tools, this article emphasizes the essential role of expert annotation as a complement of automatic annotation. Several examples illustrate the use of implemented tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within MicroScope's rich integrated genome framework. The platform is used as a viewer in order to browse updated annotation information of available microbial genomes (more than 440 organisms to date), and in the context of new annotation projects (117 bacterial genomes). The human expertise gathered in the MicroScope database (about 280,000 independent annotations) contributes to improve the quality of

  11. Review of sample preparation strategies for MS-based metabolomic studies in industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2016-09-28

    Fermentation and cell culture biotechnology in the form of so-called "cell factories" now play an increasingly significant role in production of both large (e.g. proteins, biopharmaceuticals) and small organic molecules for a wide variety of applications. However, associated metabolic engineering optimisation processes relying on genetic modification of organisms used in cell factories, or alteration of production conditions remain a challenging undertaking for improving the final yield and quality of cell factory products. In addition to genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic workflows, analytical metabolomics continues to play a critical role in studying detailed aspects of critical pathways (e.g. via targeted quantification of metabolites), identification of biosynthetic intermediates, and also for phenotype differentiation and the elucidation of previously unknown pathways (e.g. via non-targeted strategies). However, the diversity of primary and secondary metabolites and the broad concentration ranges encompassed during typical biotechnological processes means that simultaneous extraction and robust analytical determination of all parts of interest of the metabolome is effectively impossible. As the integration of metabolome data with transcriptome and proteome data is an essential goal of both targeted and non-targeted methods addressing production optimisation goals, additional sample preparation steps beyond necessary sampling, quenching and extraction protocols including clean-up, analyte enrichment, and derivatisation are important considerations for some classes of metabolites, especially those present in low concentrations or exhibiting poor stability. This contribution critically assesses the potential of current sample preparation strategies applied in metabolomic studies of industrially-relevant cell factory organisms using mass spectrometry-based platforms primarily coupled to liquid-phase sample introduction (i.e. flow injection, liquid

  12. Long-Term Differential Changes in Mouse Intestinal Metabolomics after γ and Heavy Ion Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Prabhjit; Singh, Rajbir; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Tissue consequences of radiation exposure are dependent on radiation quality and high linear energy transfer (high-LET) radiation, such as heavy ions in space is known to deposit higher energy in tissues and cause greater damage than low-LET γ radiation. While radiation exposure has been linked to intestinal pathologies, there are very few studies on long-term effects of radiation, fewer involved a therapeutically relevant γ radiation dose, and none explored persistent tissue metabolomic alterations after heavy ion space radiation exposure. Using a metabolomics approach, we report long-term metabolomic markers of radiation injury and perturbation of signaling pathways linked to metabolic alterations in mice after heavy ion or γ radiation exposure. Intestinal tissues (C57BL/6J, female, 6 to 8 wks) were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QToF-MS) two months after 2 Gy γ radiation and results were compared to an equitoxic 56Fe (1.6 Gy) radiation dose. The biological relevance of the metabolites was determined using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Metabolic profile analysis showed radiation-type-dependent spatial separation of the groups. Decreased adenine and guanosine and increased inosine and uridine suggested perturbed nucleotide metabolism. While both the radiation types affected amino acid metabolism, the 56Fe radiation preferentially altered dipeptide metabolism. Furthermore, 56Fe radiation caused upregulation of ‘prostanoid biosynthesis’ and ‘eicosanoid signaling’, which are interlinked events related to cellular inflammation and have implications for nutrient absorption and inflammatory bowel disease during space missions and after radiotherapy. In conclusion, our data showed for the first time that metabolomics can not only be used to distinguish between heavy ion and γ radiation exposures, but also as a radiation

  13. Deep Question Answering for protein annotation.

    PubMed

    Gobeill, Julien; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Pasche, Emilie; Vishnyakova, Dina; Gaudet, Pascale; Bairoch, Amos; Ruch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical professionals have access to a huge amount of literature, but when they use a search engine, they often have to deal with too many documents to efficiently find the appropriate information in a reasonable time. In this perspective, question-answering (QA) engines are designed to display answers, which were automatically extracted from the retrieved documents. Standard QA engines in literature process a user question, then retrieve relevant documents and finally extract some possible answers out of these documents using various named-entity recognition processes. In our study, we try to answer complex genomics questions, which can be adequately answered only using Gene Ontology (GO) concepts. Such complex answers cannot be found using state-of-the-art dictionary- and redundancy-based QA engines. We compare the effectiveness of two dictionary-based classifiers for extracting correct GO answers from a large set of 100 retrieved abstracts per question. In the same way, we also investigate the power of GOCat, a GO supervised classifier. GOCat exploits the GOA database to propose GO concepts that were annotated by curators for similar abstracts. This approach is called deep QA, as it adds an original classification step, and exploits curated biological data to infer answers, which are not explicitly mentioned in the retrieved documents. We show that for complex answers such as protein functional descriptions, the redundancy phenomenon has a limited effect. Similarly usual dictionary-based approaches are relatively ineffective. In contrast, we demonstrate how existing curated data, beyond information extraction, can be exploited by a supervised classifier, such as GOCat, to massively improve both the quantity and the quality of the answers with a +100% improvement for both recall and precision. Database URL: http://eagl.unige.ch/DeepQA4PA/. PMID:26384372

  14. Deep Question Answering for protein annotation.

    PubMed

    Gobeill, Julien; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Pasche, Emilie; Vishnyakova, Dina; Gaudet, Pascale; Bairoch, Amos; Ruch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical professionals have access to a huge amount of literature, but when they use a search engine, they often have to deal with too many documents to efficiently find the appropriate information in a reasonable time. In this perspective, question-answering (QA) engines are designed to display answers, which were automatically extracted from the retrieved documents. Standard QA engines in literature process a user question, then retrieve relevant documents and finally extract some possible answers out of these documents using various named-entity recognition processes. In our study, we try to answer complex genomics questions, which can be adequately answered only using Gene Ontology (GO) concepts. Such complex answers cannot be found using state-of-the-art dictionary- and redundancy-based QA engines. We compare the effectiveness of two dictionary-based classifiers for extracting correct GO answers from a large set of 100 retrieved abstracts per question. In the same way, we also investigate the power of GOCat, a GO supervised classifier. GOCat exploits the GOA database to propose GO concepts that were annotated by curators for similar abstracts. This approach is called deep QA, as it adds an original classification step, and exploits curated biological data to infer answers, which are not explicitly mentioned in the retrieved documents. We show that for complex answers such as protein functional descriptions, the redundancy phenomenon has a limited effect. Similarly usual dictionary-based approaches are relatively ineffective. In contrast, we demonstrate how existing curated data, beyond information extraction, can be exploited by a supervised classifier, such as GOCat, to massively improve both the quantity and the quality of the answers with a +100% improvement for both recall and precision. Database URL: http://eagl.unige.ch/DeepQA4PA/.

  15. GO annotation in InterPro: why stability does not indicate accuracy in a sea of changing annotations.

    PubMed

    Sangrador-Vegas, Amaia; Mitchell, Alex L; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Yong, Siew-Yit; Finn, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The removal of annotation from biological databases is often perceived as an indicator of erroneous annotation. As a corollary, annotation stability is considered to be a measure of reliability. However, diverse data-driven events can affect the stability of annotations in both primary protein sequence databases and the protein family databases that are built upon the sequence databases and used to help annotate them. Here, we describe some of these events and their consequences for the InterPro database, and demonstrate that annotation removal or reassignment is not always linked to incorrect annotation by the curator. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro.

  16. Annotated Chemical Patent Corpus: A Gold Standard for Text Mining

    PubMed Central

    Akhondi, Saber A.; Klenner, Alexander G.; Tyrchan, Christian; Manchala, Anil K.; Boppana, Kiran; Lowe, Daniel; Zimmermann, Marc; Jagarlapudi, Sarma A. R. P.; Sayle, Roger; Kors, Jan A.; Muresan, Sorel

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the chemical and biological space covered by patent applications is crucial in early-stage medicinal chemistry activities. Patent analysis can provide understanding of compound prior art, novelty checking, validation of biological assays, and identification of new starting points for chemical exploration. Extracting chemical and biological entities from patents through manual extraction by expert curators can take substantial amount of time and resources. Text mining methods can help to ease this process. To validate the performance of such methods, a manually annotated patent corpus is essential. In this study we have produced a large gold standard chemical patent corpus. We developed annotation guidelines and selected 200 full patents from the World Intellectual Property Organization, United States Patent and Trademark Office, and European Patent Office. The patents were pre-annotated automatically and made available to four independent annotator groups each consisting of two to ten annotators. The annotators marked chemicals in different subclasses, diseases, targets, and modes of action. Spelling mistakes and spurious line break due to optical character recognition errors were also annotated. A subset of 47 patents was annotated by at least three annotator groups, from which harmonized annotations and inter-annotator agreement scores were derived. One group annotated the full set. The patent corpus includes 400,125 annotations for the full set and 36,537 annotations for the harmonized set. All patents and annotated entities are publicly available at www.biosemantics.org. PMID:25268232

  17. Annotated chemical patent corpus: a gold standard for text mining.

    PubMed

    Akhondi, Saber A; Klenner, Alexander G; Tyrchan, Christian; Manchala, Anil K; Boppana, Kiran; Lowe, Daniel; Zimmermann, Marc; Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Sayle, Roger; Kors, Jan A; Muresan, Sorel

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the chemical and biological space covered by patent applications is crucial in early-stage medicinal chemistry activities. Patent analysis can provide understanding of compound prior art, novelty checking, validation of biological assays, and identification of new starting points for chemical exploration. Extracting chemical and biological entities from patents through manual extraction by expert curators can take substantial amount of time and resources. Text mining methods can help to ease this process. To validate the performance of such methods, a manually annotated patent corpus is essential. In this study we have produced a large gold standard chemical patent corpus. We developed annotation guidelines and selected 200 full patents from the World Intellectual Property Organization, United States Patent and Trademark Office, and European Patent Office. The patents were pre-annotated automatically and made available to four independent annotator groups each consisting of two to ten annotators. The annotators marked chemicals in different subclasses, diseases, targets, and modes of action. Spelling mistakes and spurious line break due to optical character recognition errors were also annotated. A subset of 47 patents was annotated by at least three annotator groups, from which harmonized annotations and inter-annotator agreement scores were derived. One group annotated the full set. The patent corpus includes 400,125 annotations for the full set and 36,537 annotations for the harmonized set. All patents and annotated entities are publicly available at www.biosemantics.org.

  18. Annotated chemical patent corpus: a gold standard for text mining.

    PubMed

    Akhondi, Saber A; Klenner, Alexander G; Tyrchan, Christian; Manchala, Anil K; Boppana, Kiran; Lowe, Daniel; Zimmermann, Marc; Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Sayle, Roger; Kors, Jan A; Muresan, Sorel

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the chemical and biological space covered by patent applications is crucial in early-stage medicinal chemistry activities. Patent analysis can provide understanding of compound prior art, novelty checking, validation of biological assays, and identification of new starting points for chemical exploration. Extracting chemical and biological entities from patents through manual extraction by expert curators can take substantial amount of time and resources. Text mining methods can help to ease this process. To validate the performance of such methods, a manually annotated patent corpus is essential. In this study we have produced a large gold standard chemical patent corpus. We developed annotation guidelines and selected 200 full patents from the World Intellectual Property Organization, United States Patent and Trademark Office, and European Patent Office. The patents were pre-annotated automatically and made available to four independent annotator groups each consisting of two to ten annotators. The annotators marked chemicals in different subclasses, diseases, targets, and modes of action. Spelling mistakes and spurious line break due to optical character recognition errors were also annotated. A subset of 47 patents was annotated by at least three annotator groups, from which harmonized annotations and inter-annotator agreement scores were derived. One group annotated the full set. The patent corpus includes 400,125 annotations for the full set and 36,537 annotations for the harmonized set. All patents and annotated entities are publicly available at www.biosemantics.org. PMID:25268232

  19. ISsaga is an ensemble of web-based methods for high throughput identification and semi-automatic annotation of insertion sequences in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Varani, Alessandro M; Siguier, Patricia; Gourbeyre, Edith; Charneau, Vincent; Chandler, Mick

    2011-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) play a key role in prokaryotic genome evolution but are seldom well annotated. We describe a web application pipeline, ISsaga (http://issaga.biotoul.fr/ISsaga/issaga_index.php), that provides computational tools and methods for high-quality IS annotation. It uses established ISfinder annotation standards and permits rapid processing of single or multiple prokaryote genomes. ISsaga provides general prediction and annotation tools, information on genome context of individual ISs and a graphical overview of IS distribution around the genome of interest.

  20. Non-Formal Education and Radio: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography. Annotated Bibliography #14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergeldt, Vicki; And Others

    Materials concerning the use of radio and mass communications for non-formal education and development are listed in a selected annotated bibliography, intended for those actively involved in non-formal education and development. Three sections contain annotated entries (which range from 1972-1983), each of which includes source information and…

  1. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Ogata, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process. PMID:25826378

  2. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Ogata, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process.

  3. Crowdsourcing image annotation for nucleus detection and segmentation in computational pathology: evaluating experts, automated methods, and the crowd.

    PubMed

    Irshad, H; Montaser-Kouhsari, L; Waltz, G; Bucur, O; Nowak, J A; Dong, F; Knoblauch, N W; Beck, A H

    2015-01-01

    The development of tools in computational pathology to assist physicians and biomedical scientists in the diagnosis of disease requires access to high-quality annotated images for algorithm learning and evaluation. Generating high-quality expert-derived annotations is time-consuming and expensive. We explore the use of crowdsourcing for rapidly obtaining annotations for two core tasks in com- putational pathology: nucleus detection and nucleus segmentation. We designed and implemented crowdsourcing experiments using the CrowdFlower platform, which provides access to a large set of labor channel partners that accesses and manages millions of contributors worldwide. We obtained annotations from four types of annotators and compared concordance across these groups. We obtained: crowdsourced annotations for nucleus detection and segmentation on a total of 810 images; annotations using automated methods on 810 images; annotations from research fellows for detection and segmentation on 477 and 455 images, respectively; and expert pathologist-derived annotations for detection and segmentation on 80 and 63 images, respectively. For the crowdsourced annotations, we evaluated performance across a range of contributor skill levels (1, 2, or 3). The crowdsourced annotations (4,860 images in total) were completed in only a fraction of the time and cost required for obtaining annotations using traditional methods. For the nucleus detection task, the research fellow-derived annotations showed the strongest concordance with the expert pathologist- derived annotations (F-M =93.68%), followed by the crowd-sourced contributor levels 1,2, and 3 and the automated method, which showed relatively similar performance (F-M = 87.84%, 88.49%, 87.26%, and 86.99%, respectively). For the nucleus segmentation task, the crowdsourced contributor level 3-derived annotations, research fellow-derived annotations, and automated method showed the strongest concordance with the expert pathologist

  4. Metabolomic profiling of cultured cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Scoazec, Marie; Durand, Sylvere; Chery, Alexis; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics approaches have been developed-and now begin to be implemented on a high-throughput basis-to fill-in the large gap between the genomic/transcriptomic setup of (cancer) cells and their phenotypic/behavioral traits, reflecting a significant degree of posttranscriptional regulation in gene expression as well as a robust posttranslational regulation of protein function. However, proteomic profiling assays not only fail to detect labile posttranslational modifications as well as unstable protein-to-protein interactions but also are intrinsically incapable of assessing the enzymatic activity, as opposed to the mere abundance, of a given protein. Thus, determining the abundance of theoretically all the metabolites contained in a cell/tissue/organ/organism may significantly improve the informational value of proteomic approaches. Several techniques have been developed to this aim, including high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). This approach is particularly advantageous for metabolomic profiling as it offers elevated accuracy and improved sensitivity. Here, we describe a simple procedure to determine the complete complement of intracellular metabolites in cultured malignant cells by HPLC coupled to Q-TOF HRMS. According to this method, (1) cells are collected and processed to minimize contaminations as well as fluctuations in their metabolic profile; (2) samples are separated by HPLC and analyzed on a Q-TOF spectrometer; and (3) data are extracted, normalized, and deconvoluted according to refined mathematical methods. This protocol constitutes a simple approach to determine the intracellular metabolomic profile of cultured cancer cells. With minimal variations (mostly related to sample collection and processing), this method is expected to provide reliable metabolomic data on a variety of cellular samples.

  5. Development of quantitative metabolomics for Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Marc; Canelas, André B; Ten Pierick, Angela; Zeng, Zhen; van Dam, Jan; Albiol, Joan; Ferrer, Pau; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Accurate, reliable and reproducible measurement of intracellular metabolite levels has become important for metabolic studies of microbial cell factories. A first critical step for metabolomic studies is the establishment of an adequate quenching and washing protocol, which ensures effective arrest of all metabolic activity and removal of extracellular metabolites, without causing leakage of metabolites from the cells. Five different procedures based on cold methanol quenching and cell separation by filtration were tested for metabolomics of Pichia pastoris regarding methanol content and temperature of the quenching solution as key parameters. Quantitative evaluation of these protocols was carried out through mass balance analysis, based on metabolite measurements in all sample fractions, those are whole broth, quenched and washed cells, culture filtrate and quenching and washing solution. Finally, the optimal method was used to study the time profiles of free amino acid and central carbon metabolism intermediates in glucose-limited chemostat cultures. Acceptable recoveries (>90%) were obtained for all quenching procedures tested. However, quenching at -27°C in 60% v/v methanol performed slightly better in terms of leakage minimization. We could demonstrate that five residence times under glucose limitation are enough to reach stable intracellular metabolite pools. Moreover, when comparing P. pastoris and S. cerevisiae metabolomes, under the same cultivation conditions, similar metabolite fingerprints were found in both yeasts, except for the lower glycolysis, where the levels of these metabolites in P. pastoris suggested an enzymatic capacity limitation in that part of the metabolism. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-011-0308-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  6. Biological variation of Vanilla planifolia leaf metabolome.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Fock, Isabelle; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2010-04-01

    The metabolomic analysis of Vanilla planifolia leaves collected at different developmental stages was carried out using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis in order to evaluate their variation. Ontogenic changes of the metabolome were considered since leaves of different ages were collected at two different times of the day and in two different seasons. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square modeling discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) of (1)H NMR data provided a clear separation according to leaf age, time of the day and season of collection. Young leaves were found to have higher levels of glucose, bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-isopropyltartrate (glucoside A) and bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-(2-butyl)-tartrate (glucoside B), whereas older leaves had more sucrose, acetic acid, homocitric acid and malic acid. Results obtained from PLS-DA analysis showed that leaves collected in March 2008 had higher levels of glucosides A and B as compared to those collected in August 2007. However, the relative standard deviation (RSD) exhibited by the individual values of glucosides A and B showed that those compounds vary more according to their developmental stage (50%) than to the time of day or the season in which they were collected (19%). Although morphological variations of the V. planifolia accessions were observed, no clear separation of the accessions was determined from the analysis of the NMR spectra. The results obtained in this study, show that this method based on the use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis has a great potential for further applications in the study of vanilla leaf metabolome.

  7. Metabolome in progression to Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Orešič, M; Hyötyläinen, T; Herukka, S-K; Sysi-Aho, M; Mattila, I; Seppänan-Laakso, T; Julkunen, V; Gopalacharyulu, P V; Hallikainen, M; Koikkalainen, J; Kivipelto, M; Helisalmi, S; Lötjönen, J; Soininen, H

    2011-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered as a transition phase between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). MCI confers an increased risk of developing AD, although the state is heterogeneous with several possible outcomes, including even improvement back to normal cognition. We sought to determine the serum metabolomic profiles associated with progression to and diagnosis of AD in a prospective study. At the baseline assessment, the subjects enrolled in the study were classified into three diagnostic groups: healthy controls (n=46), MCI (n=143) and AD (n=47). Among the MCI subjects, 52 progressed to AD in the follow-up. Comprehensive metabolomics approach was applied to analyze baseline serum samples and to associate the metabolite profiles with the diagnosis at baseline and in the follow-up. At baseline, AD patients were characterized by diminished ether phospholipids, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and sterols. A molecular signature comprising three metabolites was identified, which was predictive of progression to AD in the follow-up. The major contributor to the predictive model was 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, which was upregulated in AD progressors (P=0.0048), indicating potential involvement of hypoxia in the early AD pathogenesis. This was supported by the pathway analysis of metabolomics data, which identified upregulation of pentose phosphate pathway in patients who later progressed to AD. Together, our findings primarily implicate hypoxia, oxidative stress, as well as membrane lipid remodeling in progression to AD. Establishment of pathogenic relevance of predictive biomarkers such as ours may not only facilitate early diagnosis, but may also help identify new therapeutic avenues. PMID:22832349

  8. ACID: annotation of cassette and integron data

    PubMed Central

    Joss, Michael J; Koenig, Jeremy E; Labbate, Maurizio; Polz, Martin F; Gillings, Michael R; Stokes, Harold W; Doolittle, W Ford; Boucher, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Although integrons and their associated gene cassettes are present in ~10% of bacteria and can represent up to 3% of the genome in which they are found, very few have been properly identified and annotated in public databases. These genetic elements have been overlooked in comparison to other vectors that facilitate lateral gene transfer between microorganisms. Description By automating the identification of integron integrase genes and of the non-coding cassette-associated attC recombination sites, we were able to assemble a database containing all publicly available sequence information regarding these genetic elements. Specialists manually curated the database and this information was used to improve the automated detection and annotation of integrons and their encoded gene cassettes. ACID (annotation of cassette and integron data) can be searched using a range of queries and the data can be downloaded in a number of formats. Users can readily annotate their own data and integrate it into ACID using the tools provided. Conclusion ACID is a community resource providing easy access to annotations of integrons and making tools available to detect them in novel sequence data. ACID also hosts a forum to prompt integron-related discussion, which can hopefully lead to a more universal definition of this genetic element. PMID:19383137

  9. Automated analysis and annotation of basketball video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, Drew D.; Tan, Yap-Peng; Kulkarni, Sanjeev R.; Ramadge, Peter J.

    1997-01-01

    Automated analysis and annotation of video sequences are important for digital video libraries, content-based video browsing and data mining projects. A successful video annotation system should provide users with useful video content summary in a reasonable processing time. Given the wide variety of video genres available today, automatically extracting meaningful video content for annotation still remains hard by using current available techniques. However, a wide range video has inherent structure such that some prior knowledge about the video content can be exploited to improve our understanding of the high-level video semantic content. In this paper, we develop tools and techniques for analyzing structured video by using the low-level information available directly from MPEG compressed video. Being able to work directly in the video compressed domain can greatly reduce the processing time and enhance storage efficiency. As a testbed, we have developed a basketball annotation system which combines the low-level information extracted from MPEG stream with the prior knowledge of basketball video structure to provide high level content analysis, annotation and browsing for events such as wide- angle and close-up views, fast breaks, steals, potential shots, number of possessions and possession times. We expect our approach can also be extended to structured video in other domains.

  10. Metabolomics of cocaine: implications in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the most commonly used illicit drug among those seeking care in Emergency Departments or drug detoxification centers. Cocaine, chemically known as benzoylmethylecgonine, is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves of the Erythroxylum coca plant. The pharmacokinetics of cocaine is dependent on multiple factors, such as physical/chemical form, route of administration, genetics and concurrent consumption of alcohol. This review aims to discuss metabolomics of cocaine, namely by presenting all known metabolites of cocaine and their roles in the cocaine-mediated toxic effects.

  11. Metabolomics of cocaine: implications in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the most commonly used illicit drug among those seeking care in Emergency Departments or drug detoxification centers. Cocaine, chemically known as benzoylmethylecgonine, is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves of the Erythroxylum coca plant. The pharmacokinetics of cocaine is dependent on multiple factors, such as physical/chemical form, route of administration, genetics and concurrent consumption of alcohol. This review aims to discuss metabolomics of cocaine, namely by presenting all known metabolites of cocaine and their roles in the cocaine-mediated toxic effects. PMID:26249365

  12. Declining Enrolments--Issues and Responses. An Annotated Bibliography. Current Bibliography No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Linda, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography reflects an attempt to indicate the range and quality of published responses to the complex phenomenon of declining enrollments in elementary and secondary schools. It is intended to suggest sources of practical information and advice and to provide a larger context for administrators coping with the effects of decline…

  13. The Relationship Between Individual Attributes and Job Design: Review and Annotated Bibliography. Technical Report 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Gerald V.; And Others

    The annotated bibliography, review of literature, and glossary of terms contained in this document relate to current and past trends in job design. Topics covered are Quality of Work Life; Conceptual and Theoretical Framework for Job Design; Measurement of Tasks and Job Structural Attributes and Tasks; Survey Research on Job Design; Case, Field,…

  14. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases. PMID:27271597

  15. The Utility of Metabolomics in Natural Product and Biomarker Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Daniel G.; Oh, Joonseok; Keasling, Adam; Colson, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolomics is a well-established rapidly developing research field involving quantitative and qualitative metabolite assessment within biological systems. Recent improvements in metabolomics technologies reveal the unequivocal value of metabolomics tools in natural products discovery, gene-function analysis, systems biology and diagnostic platforms. Scope of review We review of some of the prominent metabolomics methodologies employed in data acquisition and analysis of natural products and disease-related biomarkers. Major conclusions This review demonstrates that metabolomics represents a highly adaptable technology with diverse applications ranging from environmental toxicology to disease diagnosis. Metabolomic analysis is shown to provide a unique snapshot of the functional genetic status of an organism by examining its biochemical profile, with relevance toward resolving phylogenetic associations involving horizontal gene transfer and distinguishing subgroups of genera possessing high genetic homology, as well as an increasing role in both elucidating biosynthetic transformations of natural products and detecting preclinical biomarkers of numerous disease states. General significance This review expands the interest in multiplatform combinatorial metabolomic analysis. The applications reviewed range from phylogenetic assignment, biosynthetic transformations of natural products, and the detection of preclinical biomarkers. PMID:25151044

  16. Metabolomics analysis for biomarker discovery: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, M S; Carvalho, M; Bastos, M L; Guedes de Pinho, P

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades there has been a change in biomedical research with the search for single genes, transcripts, proteins, or metabolites being substituted by the coverage of the entire genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome with the "omics" approaches. The emergence of metabolomics, defined as the comprehensive analysis of all metabolites in a system, is still recent compared to other "omics" fields, but its particular features and the improvement of both analytical techniques and pattern recognition methods has contributed greatly to its increasingly use. The feasibility of metabolomics for biomarker discovery is supported by the assumption that metabolites are important players in biological systems and that diseases cause disruption of biochemical pathways, which are not new concepts. In fact, metabolomics, meaning the parallel assessment of multiple metabolites, has been shown to have benefits in various clinical areas. Compared to classical diagnostic approaches and conventional clinical biomarkers, metabolomics offers potential advantages in sensitivity and specificity. Despite its potential, metabolomics still retains several intrinsic limitations which have a great impact on its widespread implementation - these limitations in biological and experimental measurements. This review will provide an insight to the characteristics, strengths, limitations, and recent advances in metabolomics, always keeping in mind its potential application in clinical/ health areas as a biomarker discovery tool. PMID:23210853

  17. Quantifying Variability of Manual Annotation in Cryo-Electron Tomograms.

    PubMed

    Hecksel, Corey W; Darrow, Michele C; Dai, Wei; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Chin, Jessica A; Mitchell, Patrick G; Chen, Shurui; Jakana, Jemba; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2016-06-01

    Although acknowledged to be variable and subjective, manual annotation of cryo-electron tomography data is commonly used to answer structural questions and to create a "ground truth" for evaluation of automated segmentation algorithms. Validation of such annotation is lacking, but is critical for understanding the reproducibility of manual annotations. Here, we used voxel-based similarity scores for a variety of specimens, ranging in complexity and segmented by several annotators, to quantify the variation among their annotations. In addition, we have identified procedures for merging annotations to reduce variability, thereby increasing the reliability of manual annotation. Based on our analyses, we find that it is necessary to combine multiple manual annotations to increase the confidence level for answering structural questions. We also make recommendations to guide algorithm development for automated annotation of features of interest. PMID:27225525

  18. Genetic introgression of ethylene-suppressed, long shelf-life transgenic tomatoes with higher-polyamines trait overcomes many unintended effects due to reduced ethylene on metabolome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene regulates a myriad physiological and biochemical processes in ripening fruits and is accepted as the ripening hormone for the climacteric fruits. However, its effects on metabolome and resulting fruit quality are not yet fully understood, particularly when some of the ripening-associated bi...

  19. Functional annotation of hypothetical proteins - A review.

    PubMed

    Sivashankari, Selvarajan; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam

    2006-12-29

    The complete human genome sequences in the public database provide ways to understand the blue print of life. As of June 29, 2006, 27 archaeal, 326 bacterial and 21 eukaryotes is complete genomes are available and the sequencing for 316 bacterial, 24 archaeal, 126 eukaryotic genomes are in progress. The traditional biochemical/molecular experiments can assign accurate functions for genes in these genomes. However, the process is time-consuming and costly. Despite several efforts, only 50-60 % of genes have been annotated in most completely sequenced genomes. Automated genome sequence analysis and annotation may provide ways to understand genomes. Thus, determination of protein function is one of the challenging problems of the post-genome era. This demands bioinformatics to predict functions of un-annotated protein sequences by developing efficient tools. Here, we discuss some of the recent and popular approaches developed in Bioinformatics to predict functions for hypothetical proteins.

  20. I2Cnet medical image annotation service.

    PubMed

    Chronaki, C E; Zabulis, X; Orphanoudakis, S C

    1997-01-01

    I2Cnet (Image Indexing by Content network) aims to provide services related to the content-based management of images in healthcare over the World-Wide Web. Each I2Cnet server maintains an autonomous repository of medical images and related information. The annotation service of I2Cnet allows specialists to interact with the contents of the repository, adding comments or illustrations to medical images of interest. I2Cnet annotations may be communicated to other users via e-mail or posted to I2Cnet for inclusion in its local repositories. This paper discusses the annotation service of I2Cnet and argues that such services pave the way towards the evolution of active digital medical image libraries.

  1. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this.

  2. Growth and preparation of Staphylococcus epidermidis for NMR metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Greg A; Powers, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The "omics" era began with transcriptomics and this progressed into proteomics. While useful, these approaches provide only circumstantial information about carbon flow, metabolic status, redox poise, etc. To more directly address these metabolic concerns, researchers have turned to the emerging field of metabolomics. In our laboratories, we frequently use NMR metabolomics to acquire a snapshot of bacterial metabolomes during stressful or transition events. Irrespective of the "omics" method of choice, the experimental outcome depends on the proper cultivation and preparation of bacterial samples. In addition, the integration of these large datasets requires that these cultivation conditions be clearly defined.

  3. [Metabolomics analysis revealing multiple compounds changed in rhubarb after processing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Xiao-Zhe; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Jia, Tian-Zhu; Xiao, Hong-Bin

    2014-05-01

    Untargeted metabolomics analysis of rhubarb and stewed rhubarb samples shows that the determined samples clearly clustered in to two groups, indicating that the processing procedures caused changes in the composition and/or content of components in rhubarb. Ten components were identified by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS and references, which intensity declined in rhubarb after processing. Targeted metabolomics analysis of rhubarb and stewed rhubarb samples indicated that aloe-emodin, rhein, emodin and physcion were detected with lower intensity in stewed rhubarb samples than in rhubarb samples. Metabolomics analysis of rhubarb and stewed rhubarb indicated the various components of rhubarb changed after processing.

  4. An annotated bibliography of psychiatric medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Anzia, D J; La Puma, J

    1991-03-01

    We offer an annotated bibliography of psychiatric medical ethics that we hope will be useful for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals who are interested in the moral dimensions of psychiatric care. We present the educational and clinical rationale for the bibliography, ways to use the bibliography, and the bibliography itself. Using the American Psychiatric Association's Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry as a principled framework, we selected references based primarily on educational and clinical relevance for physicians. We include both empirical and conceptual analyses of the ethical issues seen daily in the office, clinic, hospital, nursing home, and in society at large.

  5. MIDAS: a database-searching algorithm for metabolite identification in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingfeng; Kora, Guruprasad; Bowen, Benjamin P; Pan, Chongle

    2014-10-01

    A database searching approach can be used for metabolite identification in metabolomics by matching measured tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) against the predicted fragments of metabolites in a database. Here, we present the open-source MIDAS algorithm (Metabolite Identification via Database Searching). To evaluate a metabolite-spectrum match (MSM), MIDAS first enumerates possible fragments from a metabolite by systematic bond dissociation, then calculates the plausibility of the fragments based on their fragmentation pathways, and finally scores the MSM to assess how well the experimental MS/MS spectrum from collision-induced dissociation (CID) is explained by the metabolite's predicted CID MS/MS spectrum. MIDAS was designed to search high-resolution tandem mass spectra acquired on time-of-flight or Orbitrap mass spectrometer against a metabolite database in an automated and high-throughput manner. The accuracy of metabolite identification by MIDAS was benchmarked using four sets of standard tandem mass spectra from MassBank. On average, for 77% of original spectra and 84% of composite spectra, MIDAS correctly ranked the true compounds as the first MSMs out of all MetaCyc metabolites as decoys. MIDAS correctly identified 46% more original spectra and 59% more composite spectra at the first MSMs than an existing database-searching algorithm, MetFrag. MIDAS was showcased by searching a published real-world measurement of a metabolome from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 against the MetaCyc metabolite database. MIDAS identified many metabolites missed in the previous study. MIDAS identifications should be considered only as candidate metabolites, which need to be confirmed using standard compounds. To facilitate manual validation, MIDAS provides annotated spectra for MSMs and labels observed mass spectral peaks with predicted fragments. The database searching and manual validation can be performed online at http://midas.omicsbio.org.

  6. MeRy-B, a metabolomic database and knowledge base for exploring plant primary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Plant primary metabolites are organic compounds that are common to all or most plant species and are essential for plant growth, development, and reproduction. They are intermediates and products of metabolism involved in photosynthesis and other biosynthetic processes. Primary metabolites belong to different compound families, mainly carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, steroids, or lipids. Until recently, unlike the Human Metabolome Database ( http://www.hmdb.ca ) dedicated to human metabolism, there was no centralized database or repository dedicated exclusively to the plant kingdom that contained information on metabolites and their concentrations in a detailed experimental context. MeRy-B is the first platform for plant (1)H-NMR metabolomic profiles (MeRy-B, http://bit.ly/meryb ), designed to provide a knowledge base of curated plant profiles and metabolites obtained by NMR, together with the corresponding experimental and analytical metadata. MeRy-B contains lists of plant metabolites, mostly primary metabolites and unknown compounds, with information about experimental conditions, the factors studied, and metabolite concentrations for 19 different plant species (Arabidopsis, broccoli, daphne, grape, maize, barrel clover, melon, Ostreococcus tauri, palm date, palm tree, peach, pine tree, eucalyptus, plantain rice, strawberry, sugar beet, tomato, vanilla), compiled from more than 2,300 annotated NMR profiles for various organs or tissues deposited by 30 different private or public contributors in September 2013. Currently, about half of the data deposited in MeRy-B is publicly available. In this chapter, readers will be shown how to (1) navigate through and retrieve data of publicly available projects on MeRy-B website; (2) visualize lists of experimentally identified metabolites and their concentrations in all plant species present in MeRy-B; (3) get primary metabolite list for a particular plant species in MeRy-B; and for a

  7. Metabolomics: a tool for the diagnosis of GH deficiency and for monitoring GH replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Höybye, Charlotte; Wahlström, Erik; Tollet-Egnell, Petra; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic value of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) for GH deficiency (GHD) in adults is not optimal. Molecular profiling could be used for biomarker discovery. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the serum metabolome between GHD patients and healthy controls, and identification of potential markers for diagnosis and/or for individual GH dosing. A total of ten patients with GHD, median age of 55 years and BMI of 27 kg/m2, were compared with ten healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The serum metabolic profiles were generated using gas chromatography-coupled mass spectroscopy on fasting samples taken in the morning from the controls and at baseline and during 6 months of GH replacement in the patients with GHD. The difference in low-molecular weight compounds (LMC) distinguished the healthy controls from GHD patients. Among 285 measured metabolites, 13 were identified as being most important in differentiating GHD patients from controls. Of these, 11 could not be structurally annotated but many were classified as lipids. The difference in the LMC pattern persisted despite normalisation of IGF1 following GH replacement. GH replacement increased the levels of specific fatty acid compounds and decreased the levels of certain amino acids. No metabolite changed in response to GH treatment, to the same extent as IGF1. The measurement of 285 metabolites resulted in a unique pattern in GHD, but changes in the metabolite patterns during GH treatment were limited. The utility of metabolomics to find new markers in GHD and GH replacement remains to be further elucidated. PMID:25312907

  8. Error Propagation Analysis for Quantitative Intracellular Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tillack, Jana; Paczia, Nicole; Nöh, Katharina; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Model-based analyses have become an integral part of modern metabolic engineering and systems biology in order to gain knowledge about complex and not directly observable cellular processes. For quantitative analyses, not only experimental data, but also measurement errors, play a crucial role. The total measurement error of any analytical protocol is the result of an accumulation of single errors introduced by several processing steps. Here, we present a framework for the quantification of intracellular metabolites, including error propagation during metabolome sample processing. Focusing on one specific protocol, we comprehensively investigate all currently known and accessible factors that ultimately impact the accuracy of intracellular metabolite concentration data. All intermediate steps are modeled, and their uncertainty with respect to the final concentration data is rigorously quantified. Finally, on the basis of a comprehensive metabolome dataset of Corynebacterium glutamicum, an integrated error propagation analysis for all parts of the model is conducted, and the most critical steps for intracellular metabolite quantification are detected. PMID:24957773

  9. Systems biology of host-microbe metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Heinken, Almut; Thiele, Ines

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota performs essential functions for host and well-being, but has also been linked to a variety of disease states, e.g., obesity and type 2 diabetes. The mammalian body fluid and tissue metabolomes are greatly influenced by the microbiota, with many health-relevant metabolites being considered 'mammalian-microbial co-metabolites'. To systematically investigate this complex host-microbial co-metabolism, a systems biology approach integrating high-throughput data and computational network models is required. Here, we review established top-down and bottom-up systems biology approaches that have successfully elucidated relationships between gut microbiota-derived metabolites and host health and disease. We focus particularly on the constraint-based modeling and analysis approach, which enables the prediction of mechanisms behind metabolic host-microbe interactions on the molecular level. We illustrate that constraint-based models are a useful tool for the contextualization of metabolomic measurements and can further our insight into host-microbe interactions, yielding, e.g., in potential novel drugs and biomarkers.

  10. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Jörg; Krumsiek, Jan; Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Carstensen, Maren; Peters, Annette; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Strauch, Konstantin; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Prokisch, Holger; Theis, Fabian J

    2015-06-01

    Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the 'human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface' (BMTI). Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease. PMID:26086077

  11. Radiation Metabolomics: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Smrithi S.; Uppal, Medha; Randhawa, Subeena; Cheema, Mehar S.; Aghdam, Nima; Usala, Rachel L.; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Dritschilo, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) disrupts normal metabolic processes in cells and organs by inducing complex biological responses that interfere with gene and protein expression. Conventional dosimetry, monitoring of prodromal symptoms, and peripheral lymphocyte counts are of limited value as organ- and tissue-specific biomarkers for personnel exposed to radiation, particularly, weeks or months after exposure. Analysis of metabolites generated in known stress-responsive pathways by molecular profiling helps to predict the physiological status of an individual in response to environmental or genetic perturbations. Thus, a multi-metabolite profile obtained from a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolomics platform offers potential for identification of robust biomarkers to predict radiation toxicity of organs and tissues resulting from exposures to therapeutic or non-therapeutic IR. Here, we review the status of radiation metabolomics and explore applications as a standalone technology, as well as its integration in systems biology, to facilitate a better understanding of the molecular basis of radiation response. Finally, we draw attention to the identification of specific pathways that can be targeted for the development of therapeutics to alleviate or mitigate harmful effects of radiation exposure. PMID:26870697

  12. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Carstensen, Maren; Peters, Annette; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Strauch, Konstantin; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Prokisch, Holger; Theis, Fabian J.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the ‘human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface’ (BMTI). Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease. PMID:26086077

  13. Practical application of ontologies to annotate and analyse large scale raw mouse phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Tim; Morgan, Hugh; Blake, Andrew; Wells, Sara; Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Large-scale international projects are underway to generate collections of knockout mouse mutants and subsequently to perform high throughput phenotype assessments, raising new challenges for computational researchers due to the complexity and scale of the phenotype data. Phenotypes can be described using ontologies in two differing methodologies. Traditionally an individual phenotypic character has either been defined using a single compound term, originating from a species-specific dedicated phenotype ontology, or alternatively by a combinatorial annotation, using concepts from a range of disparate ontologies, to define a phenotypic character as an entity with an associated quality (EQ). Both methods have their merits, which include the dedicated approach allowing use of community standard terminology, and the combinatorial approach facilitating cross-species phenotypic statement comparisons. Previously databases have favoured one approach over another. The EUMODIC project will generate large amounts of mouse phenotype data, generated as a result of the execution of a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and will implement both ontological approaches to capture the phenotype data generated. Results For all SOPs a four-tier annotation is made: a high-level description of the SOP, to broadly define the type of data generated by the SOP; individual parameter annotation using the EQ model; annotation of the qualitative data generated for each mouse; and the annotation of mutant lines after statistical analysis. The qualitative assessments of phenodeviance are made at the point of data entry, using child PATO qualities to the parameter quality. To facilitate data querying by scientists more familiar with single compound terms to describe phenotypes, the mappings between the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) ontology and the EQ PATO model are exploited to allow querying via MP terms. Conclusion Well-annotated and comparable phenotype databases can be achieved

  14. The emergence of proton nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics in the cardiovascular arena as viewed from a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Naomi J.; Preiss, David; Welsh, Paul; Burgess, Karl E.V.; Nelson, Scott M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    The ability to phenotype metabolic profiles in serum has increased substantially in recent years with the advent of metabolomics. Metabolomics is the study of the metabolome, defined as those molecules with an atomic mass less than 1.5 kDa. There are two main metabolomics methods: mass spectrometry (MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy, each with its respective benefits and limitations. MS has greater sensitivity and so can detect many more metabolites. However, its cost (especially when heavy labelled internal standards are required for absolute quantitation) and quality control is sub-optimal for large cohorts. 1H NMR is less sensitive but sample preparation is generally faster and analysis times shorter, resulting in markedly lower analysis costs. 1H NMR is robust, reproducible and can provide absolute quantitation of many metabolites. Of particular relevance to cardio-metabolic disease is the ability of 1H NMR to provide detailed quantitative data on amino acids, fatty acids and other metabolites as well as lipoprotein subparticle concentrations and size. Early epidemiological studies suggest promise, however, this is an emerging field and more data is required before we can determine the clinical utility of these measures to improve disease prediction and treatment. This review describes the theoretical basis of 1H NMR; compares MS and 1H NMR and provides a tabular overview of recent 1H NMR-based research findings in the atherosclerosis field, describing the design and scope of studies conducted to date. 1H NMR metabolomics-CVD related research is emerging, however further large, robustly conducted prospective, genetic and intervention studies are needed to advance research on CVD risk prediction and to identify causal pathways amenable to intervention. PMID:25299963

  15. The emergence of proton nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics in the cardiovascular arena as viewed from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Naomi J; Preiss, David; Welsh, Paul; Burgess, Karl E V; Nelson, Scott M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-11-01

    The ability to phenotype metabolic profiles in serum has increased substantially in recent years with the advent of metabolomics. Metabolomics is the study of the metabolome, defined as those molecules with an atomic mass less than 1.5 kDa. There are two main metabolomics methods: mass spectrometry (MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, each with its respective benefits and limitations. MS has greater sensitivity and so can detect many more metabolites. However, its cost (especially when heavy labelled internal standards are required for absolute quantitation) and quality control is sub-optimal for large cohorts. (1)H NMR is less sensitive but sample preparation is generally faster and analysis times shorter, resulting in markedly lower analysis costs. (1)H NMR is robust, reproducible and can provide absolute quantitation of many metabolites. Of particular relevance to cardio-metabolic disease is the ability of (1)H NMR to provide detailed quantitative data on amino acids, fatty acids and other metabolites as well as lipoprotein subparticle concentrations and size. Early epidemiological studies suggest promise, however, this is an emerging field and more data is required before we can determine the clinical utility of these measures to improve disease prediction and treatment. This review describes the theoretical basis of (1)H NMR; compares MS and (1)H NMR and provides a tabular overview of recent (1)H NMR-based research findings in the atherosclerosis field, describing the design and scope of studies conducted to date. (1)H NMR metabolomics-CVD related research is emerging, however further large, robustly conducted prospective, genetic and intervention studies are needed to advance research on CVD risk prediction and to identify causal pathways amenable to intervention.

  16. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Porwollik, Steffen; Jones, Marcus B.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Martin, Jessica L.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Venepally, Pratap; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Heffron, Fred; Mcclelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-08-25

    Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. For example systems biology-oriented genome scale modeling efforts greatly benefit from accurate annotation of protein-coding genes to develop proper functioning models. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference, using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches can be used to augment and verify coding regions of a genomic sequence and importantly detect post-translational processing events. In this study we utilized “shotgun” proteomics to guide accurate primary genome annotation of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028 to facilitate a systems-level understanding of Salmonella biology. The data provides protein-level experimental confirmation for 44% of predicted protein-coding genes, suggests revisions to 48 genes assigned incorrect translational start sites, and uncovers 13 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs. We also present a comprehensive analysis of post-translational processing events in Salmonella, revealing a wide range of complex chemical modifications (70 distinct modifications) and confirming more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events in Salmonella. This study highlights several ways in which proteomics data applied during the primary stages of annotation can improve the quality of genome annotations, especially with regards to the annotation of mature protein products.

  17. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/. PMID:24828308

  18. Using community metabolomics as a new approach to discriminate marine microbial particulate organic matter in the western English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Carole A.; Sommer, Ulf; Dupont, Chris L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Viant, Mark R.

    2015-09-01

    Metabolomics provides an unbiased assessment of a wide range of metabolites and is an emerging 'omics technique in the marine sciences. We use 'non-targeted' community metabolomics to determine patterns in metabolite profiles associated with particulate organic matter (POM) at four locations from two long-term monitoring stations (L4 and E1) in the western English Channel. The polar metabolite fractions were measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (UHPLC-FT-ICR-MS), and the lipid fractions by direct infusion Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (DI-FT-ICR-MS); these were then analysed to statistically compare the metabolite distributions. Results show significantly different profiles of metabolites across the four locations with the largest differences for both the polar and lipid fractions found between the two stations relative to the smaller differences associated with depth. We putatively annotate the most discriminant metabolites revealing a range of amino-acid derivatives, diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS) lipids, oxidised fatty acids (oxylipins), glycosylated compounds, oligohexoses, phospholipids, triacylglycerides (TAGs) and oxidised TAGs. The majority of the polar metabolites were most abundant in the surface waters at L4 and least abundant in the deep waters at E1 (E1-70m). In contrast, the oxidised TAGs were more abundant at E1 and most abundant at E1-70m. The differentiated metabolites are discussed in relation to the health of the phytoplankton as indicated by nutrients, carbon and chlorophyll, and to the dominance (determined from metatranscript data) of the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus. Our results show proof of concept for community metabolomics in discriminating and characterising polar and lipid metabolite patterns associated with marine POM.

  19. New frontiers in pharmaceutical analysis: A metabolomic approach to check batch compliance of complex products based on natural substances.

    PubMed

    Mattoli, L; Burico, M; Fodaroni, G; Tamimi, S; Bedont, S; Traldi, P; Stocchero, M

    2016-07-15

    Natural substances, particularly medicinal plants and their extracts, are still today intended as source for new Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs). Alternatively they can be validly employed to prepare medicines, food supplements or medical devices. The most adopted analytical approach used to verify quality of natural substances like medicinal plants is based still today on the traditional quantitative determination of marker compounds and/or active ingredients, besides the acquisition of a fingerprint by TLC, NIR, HPLC, GC. Here a new analytical approach based on untargeted metabolomic fingerprinting by means of Mass Spectrometry (MS) to verify the quality of grinTuss adulti syrup, a complex products based on medicinal plants, is proposed. Recently, untargeted metabolomic has been successfully applied to assess quality of natural substances, plant extracts, as well as corresponding formulated products, being the complexity a resource but not necessarily a limit. The untargeted metabolomic fingerprinting includes the monitoring of the main constituents, giving weighted relevance to the most abundant ones, but also considering minor components, that might be notable in view of an integrated - often synergistic - effect on the biological system. Two different years of production were investigated. The collected samples were analyzed by Flow Injection ElectroSpray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis (FIA-ESI-MS) and a suitable data processing procedure was developed to transform the MS spectra into robust fingerprints. Multivariate Statistical Process Control (MSPC) was applied in order to obtain multivariate control charts that were validated to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27155737

  20. Spatially Resolved Plant Metabolomics: Some Potentials and Limitations of Laser-Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Metabolite Imaging1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Etalo, Desalegn W.; De Vos, Ric C.H.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.; Hall, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI)-mass spectrometry imaging has been applied to contrasting plant organs to assess its potential as a procedure for performing in vivo metabolomics in plants. In a proof-of-concept experiment, purple/white segmented Phalaenopsis spp. petals were first analyzed using standard liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of separate extracts made specifically from the purple and white regions. Discriminatory compounds were defined and putatively annotated. LAESI analyses were then performed on living tissues, and these metabolites were then relocalized within the LAESI-generated data sets of similar tissues. Maps were made to illustrate their locations across the petals. Results revealed that, as expected, anthocyanins always mapped to the purple regions. Certain other (nonvisible) polyphenols were observed to colocalize with the anthocyanins, whereas others were found specifically within the white tissues. In a contrasting example, control and Cladosporium fulvum-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves were subjected to the same procedures, and it could be observed that the alkaloid tomatine has clear heterogeneous distribution across the tomato leaf lamina. Furthermore, LAESI analyses revealed perturbations in alkaloid content following pathogen infection. These results show the clear potential of LAESI-based imaging approaches as a convenient and rapid way to perform metabolomics analyses on living tissues. However, a range of limitations and factors have also been identified that must be taken into consideration when interpreting LAESI-derived data. Such aspects deserve further evaluation before this approach can be applied in a routine manner. PMID:26392264

  1. Training in metabolomics research. I. Designing the experiment, collecting and extracting samples and generating metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Benton, H P; Casazza, K; Cooper, S J; Cui, X; Du, X; Engler, J A; Kabarowski, J H; Li, S; Pathmasiri, W; Prasain, J K; Renfrow, M B; Tiwari, H K

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics is perhaps the most challenging of the -omics fields, given the complexity of an organism's metabolome and the rapid rate at which it changes. When one sets out to study metabolism there are numerous dynamic variables that can influence metabolism that must be considered. Recognizing the experimental challenges confronting researchers who undertake metabolism studies, workshops like the one at University of Alabama at Birmingham have been established to offer instructional guidance. A summary of the UAB course training materials is being published as a two-part Special Feature Tutorial. In this month's Part I the authors discuss details of good experimental design and sample collection and handling. In an upcoming Part II, the authors discuss in detail the various aspects of data analysis.

  2. Construction of coffee transcriptome networks based on gene annotation semantics.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luis F; Galeano, Narmer; Isaza, Gustavo A; Gaitán, Alvaro

    2012-07-24

    Gene annotation is a process that encompasses multiple approaches on the analysis of nucleic acids or protein sequences in order to assign structural and functional characteristics to gene models. When thousands of gene models are being described in an organism genome, construction and visualization of gene networks impose novel challenges in the understanding of complex expression patterns and the generation of new knowledge in genomics research. In order to take advantage of accumulated text data after conventional gene sequence analysis, this work applied semantics in combination with visualization tools to build transcriptome networks from a set of coffee gene annotations. A set of selected coffee transcriptome sequences, chosen by the quality of the sequence comparison reported by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) and Interproscan, were filtered out by coverage, identity, length of the query, and e-values. Meanwhile, term descriptors for molecular biology and biochemistry were obtained along the Wordnet dictionary in order to construct a Resource Description Framework (RDF) using Ruby scripts and Methontology to find associations between concepts. Relationships between sequence annotations and semantic concepts were graphically represented through a total of 6845 oriented vectors, which were reduced to 745 non-redundant associations. A large gene network connecting transcripts by way of relational concepts was created where detailed connections remain to be validated for biological significance based on current biochemical and genetics frameworks. Besides reusing text information in the generation of gene connections and for data mining purposes, this tool development opens the possibility to visualize complex and abundant transcriptome data, and triggers the formulation of new hypotheses in metabolic pathways analysis.

  3. A Method for Producing Reminiscence Videos by Using Photo Annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Noriaki; Kuwabara, Kazuhiro; Abe, Shinji; Susami, Kenji; Yasuda, Kiyoshi

    Providing good home-based care to people with dementia is becoming an important issue as the size of the elderly population increases. One of the main problems in providing such care is that it must be constantly provided without interruption, and this puts a great burden on caregivers, who are often family members. Networked Interaction Therapy is the name we call our methods designed to relieve the stress of people suffering from dementia as well as that of their family members. This therapy aims to provide a system that interacts with people with dementia by utilizing various engaging stimuli. One such stimulus is a reminiscence video created from old photo albums, which is a promising way to hold a dementia sufferer's attention for a long time. In this paper, we present an authoring tool to assist in the production of a reminiscence video by using photo annotations. We conducted interviews with several video creators on how they used photo annotations such as date, title and subject of photos when they produced the reminiscence videos. According to the creators' comments, we have defined an ontology for representing the creators' knowledge of how to add visual effects to a reminiscence video. Subsequently, we developed an authoring tool that automatically produces a reminiscence video from the annotated photos. Subjective evaluation of the quality of reminiscence videos produced with our tool indicates that they give impressions similar to those produced by creators using conventional video editing software. The effectiveness of presenting such a video to people with dementia is also discussed.

  4. Characterisation of the metabolome of ocular tissues and post-mortem changes in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shi Z; Mullard, Graham; Hollywood, Katherine A; Dunn, Warwick B; Bishop, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    Time-dependent post-mortem biochemical changes have been demonstrated in donor cornea and vitreous, but there have been no published studies to date that objectively measure post-mortem changes in the retinal metabolome over time. The aim of the study was firstly, to investigate post-mortem, time-dependent changes in the rat retinal metabolome and secondly, to compare the metabolite composition of healthy rat ocular tissues. To study post-mortem changes in the rat retinal metabolome, globes were enucleated and stored at 4 °C and sampled at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h post-mortem. To study the metabolite composition of rat ocular tissues, eyes were dissected immediately after culling to isolate the cornea, lens, vitreous and retina, prior to storing at -80 °C. Tissue extracts were subjected to Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). Generally, the metabolic composition of the retina was stable for 8 h post-mortem when eyes were stored at 4 °C, but showed increasing changes thereafter. However, some more rapid changes were observed such as increases in TCA cycle metabolites after 2 h post-mortem, whereas some metabolites such as fatty acids only showed decreases in concentration from 24 h. A total of 42 metabolites were identified across the ocular tissues by GC-MS (MSI level 1) and 2782 metabolites were annotated by UHPLC-MS (MSI level 2) according to MSI reporting standards. Many of the metabolites detected were common to all of the tissues but some metabolites showed partitioning between different ocular structures with 655, 297, 93 and 13 metabolites being uniquely detected in the retina, lens, cornea and vitreous respectively. Only a small percentage (1.6%) of metabolites found in the vitreous were only detected in the retina and not other tissues. In conclusion, mass spectrometry-based techniques have been used for the first time to compare the metabolic composition of

  5. Application of comparative biology in GO functional annotation: the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Drabkin, Harold J; Christie, Karen R; Dolan, Mary E; Hill, David P; Ni, Li; Sitnikov, Dmitry; Blake, Judith A

    2015-10-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is an important component of modern biological knowledge representation with great utility for computational analysis of genomic and genetic data. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) consists of a large team of contributors including curation teams from most model organism database groups as well as curation teams focused on representation of data relevant to specific human diseases. Key to the generation of consistent and comprehensive annotations is the development and use of shared standards and measures of curation quality. The GOC engages all contributors to work to a defined standard of curation that is presented here in the context of annotation of genes in the laboratory mouse. Comprehensive understanding of the origin, epistemology, and coverage of GO annotations is essential for most effective use of GO resources. Here the application of comparative approaches to capturing functional data in the mouse system is described. PMID:26141960

  6. Genome-wide functional annotation of Phomopsis longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Omar; Li, Shuxian; Matthews, Benjamin; Alkharouf, Nadim

    2016-06-01

    Phomopsis seed decay of soybean is caused primarily by the seed-borne fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla). This disease severely decreases soybean seed quality, reduces seedling vigor and stand establishment, and suppresses yield. It is one of the most economically important soybean diseases. In this study we annotated the entire genome of P. longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6, which was isolated from field-grown soybean seed in Mississippi, USA. This study represents the first reported genome-wide functional annotation of a seed borne fungal pathogen in the Diaporthe-Phomopsis complex. The P. longicolla genome annotation will enable research into the genetic basis of fungal infection of soybean seed and provide information for the study of soybean-fungal interactions. The genome annotation will also be a valuable resource for the research and agricultural communities. It will aid in the development of new control strategies for this pathogen. The annotations can be found from: http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/phomopsis_longicolla/download.html. NCBI accession number is: AYRD00000000. PMID:27222801

  7. Proteogenomics: the needs and roles to be filled by proteomics in genome annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Purvine, Samuel O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    While genome sequencing efforts reveal the basic building blocks of life, a genome sequence alone is insufficient for elucidating biological function. Genome annotation – the process of identifying genes and assigning function to each gene in a genome sequence – provides the means to elucidate biological function from sequence. Current state-of-the-art high throughput genome annotation uses a combination of comparative (sequence similarity data) and non-comparative (ab initio gene prediction algorithms) methods to identify open reading frames in genome sequences. Because approaches used to validate the presence of these open reading frames are typically based on the information derived from the annotated genomes, they cannot independently and unequivocally determine whether a predicted open reading frame is translated into a protein. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, high throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics, approaches can be used to verify coding regions of a genomic sequence. Here, we highlight several ways in which high throughput tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics can improve the quality of genome annotations and suggest that it could be efficiently applied during the initial gene calling process so that the improvements are propagated through the subsequent functional annotation process.

  8. Exo-Metabolome of Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1 Analyzed by Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and the Effect of Phosphate Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Stefano; Dittmar, Thorsten; Bondarev, Vladimir; Weber, Ralf J. M.; Viant, Mark R.; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an assemblage of reduced carbon compounds, which results from biotic and abiotic processes. The biotic processes consist in either release or uptake of specific molecules by marine organisms. Heterotrophic bacteria have been mostly considered to influence the DOM composition by preferential uptake of certain compounds. However, they also secrete a variety of molecules depending on physiological state, environmental and growth conditions, but so far the full set of compounds secreted by these bacteria has never been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the exo-metabolome, metabolites secreted into the environment, of the heterotrophic marine bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1 via ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, comparing phosphate limited with phosphate surplus growth conditions. Bacteria belonging to the Pseudovibrio genus have been isolated worldwide, mainly from marine invertebrates and were described as metabolically versatile Alphaproteobacteria. We show that the exo-metabolome is unexpectedly large and diverse, consisting of hundreds of compounds that differ by their molecular formulae. It is characterized by a dynamic recycling of molecules, and it is drastically affected by the physiological state of the strain. Moreover, we show that phosphate limitation greatly influences both the amount and the composition of the secreted molecules. By assigning the detected masses to general chemical categories, we observed that under phosphate surplus conditions the secreted molecules were mainly peptides and highly unsaturated compounds. In contrast, under phosphate limitation the composition of the exo-metabolome changed during bacterial growth, showing an increase in highly unsaturated, phenolic, and polyphenolic compounds. Finally, we annotated the detected masses using multiple metabolite databases. These analyses suggested the presence of several masses analogue to masses of known bioactive compounds. However

  9. Online Annotation--Research and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Ian; Xu, Zhijie; Hardaker, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Annotation can be a valuable exercise when trying to understand new information. The technique can be used to create a "condensed" version of the original information for later review and to add additional information into the existing document. The growth in web-based learning materials and information sources has created requirement for systems…

  10. Studies of Scientific Disciplines. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Diane; Kruytbosch, Carlos

    Provided in this bibliography are annotated lists of social studies of science literature, arranged alphabetically by author in 13 disciplinary areas. These areas include astronomy; general biology; biochemistry and molecular biology; biomedicine; chemistry; earth and space sciences; economics; engineering; mathematics; physics; political science;…

  11. Counseling American Indians: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdale, Elizabeth; Thomason, Timothy C.

    This bibliography presents 75 annotated entries on counseling and psychotherapy with American Indians. Entries include journal articles, books, book chapters, newspaper and newsletter articles, and conference papers, published 1964-96. Topics covered include counseling approaches and techniques, mental health services for Native Americans,…

  12. Core French: A Selected Annotated Resource List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, J. A.; Mollica, Anthony

    1985-01-01

    This is an annotated bibliography of: readers, workbooks, conversation books, cultural sources and readings, flash cards, duplicating or line masters, and media kits submitted by publishers as applicable to French second language instruction from kindergarten through senior high school levels. (MSE)

  13. Learning To Lead: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehno, Joe

    This annotated bibliography reviews some of the leadership development training programs currently being offered to business, industry, and educational personnel. Section 1 focuses on programs for corporate personnel. Section 2 reviews both preparatory and continuing professional education programs for top college and university administrators.…

  14. Reflective Annotations: On Becoming a Scholar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Mark; Taylor, Caroline; Greenberger, Scott; Watts, Margie; Balch, Riann

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the authors' reflective annotations on becoming a scholar. This paper begins with a discussion on socialization for teaching, followed by a discussion on socialization for service and sense of belonging. Then, it describes how the doctoral process evolves. Finally, it talks about adult learners who pursue doctoral education.

  15. Skin Cancer Education Materials: Selected Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Cancer Inst. (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 85 entries on a variety of approaches to cancer education. The entries are grouped under three broad headings, two of which contain smaller sub-divisions. The first heading, Public Education, contains prevention and general information, and non-print materials. The second heading, Professional Education,…

  16. Annotated bibliography of psychomotor testing. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, C.

    1987-03-01

    An annotated bibliography of 67 publications in the field of psychomotor testing has been prepared. The collection includes technical reports, journal articles, presented at scientific meetings, books and conference proceedings. The publications were assembled as preliminary work in the development of a dexterity test battery designed to measure the effects of chemical-defense-treatment drugs.

  17. Intellectual Freedom and Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Frank

    Intended to act as a general introduction for high school and college students, this book presents an annotated bibliography of books, periodical articles, legal materials, and other documents dealing with the subject of intellectual freedom and censorship. The book is divided into five parts: (1) "The Theoretical Foundations of Censorship and…

  18. An Annotated Bibliography on Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Architectural Research Lab.

    This annotated bibliography of more than 150 books and articles covers a wide range of topical areas concerned with the relationship of the young child to his environment. Among the 18 topics included are: child development; health, educational, staff, and community programs; infants and toddlers, handicapped children; Project Head Start; day…

  19. Environment and the Community: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    Three hundred and nine citations of books, reports, and articles dating from 1964 to 1971 are included in this annotated bibliography, intended as a selection tool for concerned citizens, architects, builders, and city planners emphasizing the environment of American cities and communities. It is topically arranged into sixteen broad sections with…

  20. Nutrition & Adolescent Pregnancy: A Selected Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Agricultural Library (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This annotated bibliography on nutrition and adolescent pregnancy is intended to be a source of technical assistance for nurses, nutritionists, physicians, educators, social workers, and other personnel concerned with improving the health of teenage mothers and their babies. It is divided into two major sections. The first section lists selected…

  1. Adolescent Reproductive Behaviour: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations, New York, NY. Population Div.

    A general overview of the literature on adolescent fertility and closely related issues is provided in this annotated bibliography. Material on the following topics is included: (1) programs related to adolescent pregnancy, contraception, abortion, and births; (2) studies relating socioeconomic characteristics of pregnant adolescents to their…

  2. College Students in Transition: An Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Stephanie M., Ed.; Hinkle, Sara M., Ed.; Kranzow, Jeannine, Ed.; Pistilli, Matthew D., Ed.; Miles, LaTonya Rease, Ed.; Simmons, Jannell G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The transition from high school to college is an important milestone, but it is only one of many steps in the journey through higher education. This volume is an annotated bibliography of the emerging literature examining the many other transitions students make beyond the first year, including the sophomore year, the transfer experience, and the…

  3. Suggested Books for Children: An Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NHSA Dialog, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an annotated bibliography of various children's books. It includes listings of books that illustrate the dynamic relationships within the natural environment, economic context, racial and cultural identities, cross-group similarities and differences, gender, different abilities and stories of injustice and resistance.

  4. Participative Decision Making: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Ramon; Camp, Richaurd

    An annotated bibliography of 40 articles on participative decision making (PDM) published from 1968 through 1975 is presented. The following categories were used in summarizing each article: description, sample, type of study, variables, PDM variables, results and discussion. An introduction to the bibliography discusses some issues related to…

  5. Sex and Proxemics: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Audrey A.

    This annotated bibliography focuses on the sex differences and similarities in two proxemic variables, physical distance and orientation of the body. The majority of the more than 90 titles, dating from 1965 to the present, are selected from the following sources: dissertation abstracts, social-psychology journals, communication journals, and…

  6. Small Group Communication: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouran, Dennis S.; Guadagnino, Christopher S.

    This annotated bibliography includes sources of information that are primarily concerned with problem solving, decision making, and processes of social influence in small groups, and secondarily deal with other aspects of communication and interaction in groups, such as conflict management and negotiation. The 57 entries, all dating from 1980…

  7. A Partially Annotated Political Communication Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barbara C.

    This 63-page annotated bibliography contains available materials in the area of political communication, a relatively new field of political science. Political communication includes facets of the election process and interaction between political parties and the voter. A variety of materials dating from 1960 to 1972 include books, pamphlets,…

  8. Rates of Comprehension: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Allen, Comp.; Peebles, James D., Comp.

    This booklet is a revision of an earlier annotated bibliography, "Speed Reading," compiled by Allen Berger in 1967 and revised in 1970. The 82 entries are arranged alphabetically by author in the following ten categories: tachistoscope and controlled pacing, paperback scanning, flexible rates of comprehension, retention of gains, perception,…

  9. Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-06-06

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  10. Automating Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob L.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-22

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  11. Document Delivery: An Annotated Selective Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mounir A.; Katz, Suzanne R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a selective annotated bibliography of 61 items that deal with topics related to document delivery, including networks; hypertext; interlibrary loan; computer security; electronic publishing; copyright; online catalogs; resource sharing; electronic mail; electronic libraries; optical character recognition; microcomputers; liability issues;…

  12. An Annotated Journalism Bibliography; 1958-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Warren C.; Pickett, Calder M.

    Annotated entries of 2172 books in journalism which have appeared between 1958 and 1968 comprise this volume. Materials are listed alphabetically, by author, and an index of names and subject headings is provided. General categories of entries are biographies, narratives of journalists at work, anthologies of journalistic writing, ethical and…

  13. Health Communication and Literacy: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Jennifer

    This annotated bibliography lists publications and World Wide Web sites dealing with health communication and literacy. The 51 publications, which were all published between 1982 and 1998, contain information about and/or for use in the following areas: assessment, assessment tools, elderly adults, empowerment, maternal and child health, patient…

  14. Revenue Producing Athletes: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Leroy; And Others

    An annotated bibliography on revenue producing sports is presented, with attention to: Proposition 48, exploitation of athletes, legal proceedings, research related to athletes and academic performance, psychological characteristics of athletes, and counseling programs for athletes. Introductions to each of the six topics are included. The section…

  15. Annotated Psychodynamic Bibliography for Residents in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    CALIGOR, EVE

    1996-01-01

    The author provides an annotated bibliography to introduce psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis to residents in psychiatry. The emphasis of the selection is on relevance to practice. The entries are grouped by topic, levels of difficulty are noted, and readings are identified as being of either current or historic relevance. PMID:22700303

  16. The Mentally Retarded Offender: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilit, Jeffrey; And Others

    An annotated bibliography of approximately 150 books and articles on the mentally retarded offender as well as 30 nonannotated entries are provided. Topics covered include such areas as characteristics of mentally retarded delinquents, rehabilitation of the retarded offender, community services for retarded persons, rights of the mentally…

  17. The Community; A Classified, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Raymond, Comp.; Bailey, Wilfrid C., Comp.

    This is a classified retrospective bibliography of 839 items on the community (about 140 are annotated) from rural sociology and agricultural economics departments and sections, agricultural experiment stations, extension services, and related agencies. Items are categorized as follows: bibliography and reference lists; location and delineation of…

  18. Chemical Principles Revisited: Annotating Reaction Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Urges chemistry teachers to have students annotate the chemical reactions in aqueous-solutions that they see in their textbooks and witness in the laboratory. Suggests this will help students recognize the reaction type more readily. Examples are given for gas formation, precipitate formation, redox interaction, acid-base interaction, and…

  19. Teleconferencing, an annotated bibliography, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervis, K.

    1971-01-01

    In this annotated and indexed listing of works on teleconferencing, emphasis has been placed upon teleconferencing as real-time, two way audio communication with or without visual aids. However, works on the use of television in two-way or multiway nets, data transmission, regional communications networks and on telecommunications in general are also included.

  20. The Alaska Eskimos. A Selected, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hippler, Arthur E.; Wood, John R.

    This annotated bibliography, containing approximately 732 entries, provides a general overview of English literature concerning Alaska Eskimos and cities. Although the earliest date of publication is 1843, the majority of the works have been done since 1900; there are no entries published later than 1975. Section I lists the works alphabetically…

  1. An Annotated Bibliography of Migrant Related Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton.

    Over 1,000 annotated entries in this bibliography present a wide variety of materials related to the teaching and understanding of the migrant and culturally deprived student. Materials are divided into 6 major content areas: (1) health, (2) information on migrants and culturally disadvantaged, (3) curriculum materials, (4) guidance, (5)…

  2. Communication and Sexuality: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buley, Jerry, Comp.; And Others

    The entries in this annotated bibliography represent books, educational journals, dissertations, popular magazines, and research studies that deal with the topic of communication and sexuality. Arranged alphabetically by author and also indexed according to subject matter, the titles span a variety of topics, including the following: sex and…

  3. Research: Annotated Bibliography of New Canadian Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toronto Board of Education (Ontario). Research Dept.

    This annotated bibliography of twenty-one research reports that provide knowledge about various cultures and educational experiences of the major ethnic groups in the Toronto schools is designed to present information for not only special English teachers, but other school personnel as well. The bibliography consists of reports that aim to: 1)…

  4. Annotated Bibliography of Literature on Narcotic Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, R. Renee

    Nearly 150 abstracts have been included in this annotated bibliography; its purpose has been to scan the voluminous number of documents on the problem of drug addiction in order to summarize the present state of knowledge on narcotic addiction and on methods for its treatment and control. The literature reviewed has been divided into the following…

  5. Ludwig von Mises: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David

    A 117-item annotated bibliography of books, articles, essays, lectures, and reviews by economist Ludwig von Mises is presented. The bibliography is arranged chronologicaly, and is followed by an alphabetical listing of the citations, excluding books. An index and information on the Ludwig von Mises Institute at Auburn University (Alabama) are…

  6. Greeks in Canada (an Annotated Bibliography).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombas, Leonidas C.

    This bibliography on Greeks in Canada includes annotated references to both published and (mostly) unpublished works. Among the 70 entries (arranged in alphabetical order by author) are articles, reports, papers, and theses that deal either exclusively with or include a separate section on Greeks in the various Canadian provinces. (GC)

  7. Visitor Reports about Chinese Schools: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    An annotated bibliography of 77 books, journal articles, congressional reports, and conference papers all based on visits to Chinese schools by U.S. and British visitors including professional educators, teachers, government officials, historians, and lay citizens is presented. A wide range of entries includes specialized, scholarly journals and…

  8. Health Economics Research: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillard, Carole D.; And Others

    This annotated bibliography lists books and journal articles published since 1976 which deal with health economics and which are based on health services research supported by the National Center for Health Services Research (NCHSR). Articles prepared by NCHSR staff are listed as intramural. All other articles cite the NCHSR grant or contract…

  9. Human object annotation for surveillance video forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraz, Muhammad; Zafar, Iffat; Tzanidou, Giounona; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Sarfraz, Muhammad Saquib

    2013-10-01

    A system that can automatically annotate surveillance video in a manner useful for locating a person with a given description of clothing is presented. Each human is annotated based on two appearance features: primary colors of clothes and the presence of text/logos on clothes. The annotation occurs after a robust foreground extraction stage employing a modified Gaussian mixture model-based approach. The proposed pipeline consists of a preprocessing stage where color appearance of an image is improved using a color constancy algorithm. In order to annotate color information for human clothes, we use the color histogram feature in HSV space and find local maxima to extract dominant colors for different parts of a segmented human object. To detect text/logos on clothes, we begin with the extraction of connected components of enhanced horizontal, vertical, and diagonal edges in the frames. These candidate regions are classified as text or nontext on the basis of their local energy-based shape histogram features. Further, to detect humans, a novel technique has been proposed that uses contourlet transform-based local binary pattern (CLBP) features. In the proposed method, we extract the uniform direction invariant LBP feature descriptor for contourlet transformed high-pass subimages from vertical and diagonal directional bands. In the final stage, extracted CLBP descriptors are classified by a trained support vector machine. Experimental results illustrate the superiority of our method on large-scale surveillance video data.

  10. Women and World Development: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buvinic, Mayra; And Others

    This annotated bibliography focuses on the effects of socioeconomic development and cultural change on women and on women's reactions to these changes. It is an expanded version of one which was prepared for the American Association of Science Seminar on Women in Development held in Mexico City in June 1975. The objectives were to disseminate this…

  11. Food for Thought: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susan G., Ed.

    Most of the 24 books reviewed in this annotated bibliography concern writing and are recent publications (1980-1985). Titles and authors are as follows: "Teacher" (Sylvia Ashton-Warner); "What Did I Write? Beginning Writing Behavior" (Marie M. Clay); "Composing: Writing as a Self-Creating Process" (William E. Coles); "Right Brain...Write On!…

  12. People: Annotated Multiethnic Bibliography K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Dolores D., Comp.; Petrie, Kenneth, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography has been compiled to assist personnel in the selection of multiethnic media for schools. The bibliography includes sections entitled "Asian Americans,""Jewish Americans,""Mexican Americans,""Native Americans,""Puerto Rican Americans,""Other Hyphenated Americans," and "All Americans (Multiethnic)." The entries for the…

  13. Annotated Bibliography of Products/Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Carolyn S., Comp.; Jennings, Mark B., Comp.; Mayo, Linda P., Comp.; Young, Debra A., Comp.

    This document, which is intended for teachers, program directors, researchers, businesspeople, and students, is an annotated bibliography of more than 600 programs and resources that were developed with funds from the Office of Vocational and Adult Education in fiscal years 1987-1998. The document is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a summary of…

  14. Anthropology and Education: An Annotated Bibliographic Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Jaquetta H.; And Others

    References in this annotated bibliography concentrate on anthropological research concerning formal and informal education. The bibliography is selective, and the criteria are guided primarily by four questions: What basic concepts oriented the writer? What was done? How was it done? What was the disciplinary, or cultural, identity of the person…

  15. La Mujer Chicana: An Annotated Bibliography, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapa, Evey, Ed.; And Others

    Intended to provide interested persons, researchers, and educators with information about "la mujer Chicana", this annotated bibliography cites 320 materials published between 1916 and 1975, with the majority being between 1960 and 1975. The 12 sections cover the following subject areas: Chicana publications; Chicana feminism and "el movimiento";…

  16. An Annotated Bibliography of Small Town Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Suzanne M.

    The purpose of this annotated bibliography is to list books, articles, and bulletins (written from 1900 to 1968) related to small towns in the United States. The work contributes to the project "Population Changes in Small Towns," sponsored by the Division of Social Sciences of the National Science Foundation and by the University of Wisconsin…

  17. Annotated Bibliography of Special Education Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Iva Dean, Comp.

    The annotated bibliography lists approximately 900 commercially prepared materials available for statewide distribution from the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies Special Education Instructional Materials Center (WEIMC) for use in teaching educable (EMR) and trainable mentally retarded (TMR) students. Materials are grouped under subject…

  18. Project for Global Education: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for World Order, New York, NY.

    Over 260 books, textbooks, articles, pamphlets, periodicals, films, and multi-media packages appropriate for the analysis of global issues at the college level are briefly annotated. Entries include classic books and articles as well as a number of recent (1976-1981) publications. The purpose is to assist students and educators in developing a…

  19. Children and Poetry: A Selective, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Virginia; Smith, William Jay

    This annotated bibliography of over 120 books was compiled to call attention to poetry for children that is both pleasing and rewarding. Omitted are traditional materials such as Mother Goose rhymes, textbooks, and collections designed especially for the classroom. Sample illustrations from the books noted and lines from poems are reproduced…

  20. Bibliografia de Aztlan: An Annotated Chicano Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Ernie, Ed.

    More than 300 books and articles published from 1920 to 1971 are reviewed in this annotated bibliography of literature on the Chicano. The citations and reviews are categorized by subject area and deal with contemporary Chicano history, education, health, history of Mexico, literature, native Americans, philosophy, political science, pre-Columbian…

  1. Sexually Transmitted Diseases: A Selective, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., New York, NY. Education Dept.

    This document contains a reference sheet and an annotated bibliography concerned with sexually transmitted diseases (STD). The reference sheet provides a brief, accurate overview of STDs which includes both statistical and background information. The bibliography contains 83 entries, listed alphabetically, that deal with STDs. Books and articles…

  2. Postsecondary Peer Cooperative Learning Programs: Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendale, David R., Comp.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This annotated bibliography is focused intentionally on postsecondary peer cooperative learning programs that increasing student achievement. Peer learning has been popular in education for decades. As both a pedagogy and learning strategy, it has been frequently adapted for a wide range of academic content areas at the elementary,…

  3. An Annotated Bibliography of Latino Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Paul; Cabrera, Alberto; Swail, Watson Scott

    2007-01-01

    This bibliography lists and provides annotations for 59 recent research studies on a variety of Latino educational issues. Descriptions of the focus of each item, as well as implications for policy and practice are provided. Items range in publication date from 1993 to 2007. [This document was compiled by the Educational Policy Institute in…

  4. Dissemination of metabolomics results: role of MetaboLights and COSMOS.

    PubMed

    Salek, Reza M; Haug, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-05-17

    With ever-increasing amounts of metabolomics data produced each year, there is an even greater need to disseminate data and knowledge produced in a standard and reproducible way. To assist with this a general purpose, open source metabolomics repository, MetaboLights, was launched in 2012. To promote a community standard, initially culminated as metabolomics standards initiative (MSI), COordination of Standards in MetabOlomicS (COSMOS) was introduced. COSMOS aims to link life science e-infrastructures within the worldwide metabolomics community as well as develop and maintain open source exchange formats for raw and processed data, ensuring better flow of metabolomics information.

  5. Metabolomic determinants of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in premature infants and animals show that carbohydrate malabsorption and gut microbiota colonisation are key elements for triggering necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Our aim was to determine how dietary carbohydrate composition affects the metabolomic profile and whether unique metabolite s...

  6. Applying Metabolomics to differentiate amphibian responses to multiple stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction/Objectives/Methods One of the biggest challenges in ecological risk assessment is determining the impact of multiple stressors on individual organisms and populations in ‘real world’ scenarios. Emerging ‘omic technologies, notably, metabolomics, pr...

  7. Interpreting Metabolomics Data to Mode of Action of Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics approach utilizes high-throughput identification, quantification, and characterization of low molecular weight endogenous metabolites from numerous metabolic pathways. Exposure to environmental chemicals, which act through multiple mechanisms, cause perturbation of...

  8. Global metabolomic profiling targeting childhood obesity in the Hispanic population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolomics may unravel important biological pathways involved in the pathophysiology of childhood obesity. We aimed to 1) identify metabolites that differ significantly between nonobese and obese Hispanic children; 2) collapse metabolites into principal components (PCs) associated with obesity and...

  9. Is there a role for stool metabolomics in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Pickford, Russell; Jaffe, Adam; Ooi, Chee Y

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies utilizing metabolomics have focused on the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Here, we performed fecal metabolomics on pancreatic insufficient (PI) and sufficient (PS) children with CF and compared them with healthy controls (HC). Fecal metabolomics can differentiate between PS-CF and PI-CF. We identified a potential biomarker of disease severity or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function (m/z, 463.247; retention time, 0.570717 min) that discriminates between HC versus PS-CF versus PI-CF. We also identified lipoyl-GMP as a potential novel inflammatory biomarker, and elevation in fecal glycerol 1,2-didodecanoate 3-tetradecanoate may provide clues to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. For the first time, we demonstrate the potential applications of fecal metabolomics in CF. PMID:27553892

  10. Analysis of bacterial biofilms using NMR-based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Powers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases can be difficult to cure, especially if the pathogen forms a biofilm. After decades of extensive research into the morphology, physiology and genomics of biofilm formation, attention has recently been directed toward the analysis of the cellular metabolome in order to understand the transformation of a planktonic cell to a biofilm. Metabolomics can play an invaluable role in enhancing our understanding of the underlying biological processes related to the structure, formation and antibiotic resistance of biofilms. A systematic view of metabolic pathways or processes responsible for regulating this ‘social structure’ of microorganisms may provide critical insights into biofilm-related drug resistance and lead to novel treatments. This review will discuss the development of NMR-based metabolomics as a technology to study medically relevant biofilms. Recent advancements from case studies reviewed in this manuscript have shown the potential of metabolomics to shed light on numerous biological problems related to biofilms. PMID:22800371

  11. (Video 6 of 8) Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Human Research Program releases “Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat” video to highlight its Twins Study which uses omics to study Mark and Scott Kelly’s metabolites. Omics is an evolving fie...

  12. Field-based Metabolomics for Assessing Contaminated Surface Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is becoming well-established for studying chemical contaminant-induced alterations to normal biological function. For example, the literature contains a wealth of laboratory-based studies involving analysis of samples from organisms exposed to individual chemical tox...

  13. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  14. METABOLOMICS IN SMALL FISH TOXICOLOGY AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is tasked with protecting not only humans, but also ecosystems from potentially harmful effects of chemical pollutants. Although lagging behind applications targeted to human endpoints, metabolomics offers great potential in ecotoxicology. Indeed, the advantages of met...

  15. Spectral Relative Standard Deviation: A Practical Benchmark in Metabolomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics datasets, by definition, comprise of measurements of large numbers of metabolites. Both technical (analytical) and biological factors will induce variation within these measurements that is not consistent across all metabolites. Consequently, criteria are required to...

  16. METABOLOMICS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR SMALL FISH TOXICOLOGY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics involves the application of advanced analytical and statistical tools to profile changes in levels of endogenous metabolites in tissues and biofluids resulting from disease onset or stress. While certain metabolites are being specifically targeted in these studies, w...

  17. The De Novo Transcriptome and Its Functional Annotation in the Seed Beetle Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Sayadi, Ahmed; Immonen, Elina; Bayram, Helen; Arnqvist, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Despite their unparalleled biodiversity, the genomic resources available for beetles (Coleoptera) remain relatively scarce. We present an integrative and high quality annotated transcriptome of the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, an important and cosmopolitan agricultural pest as well as an emerging model species in ecology and evolutionary biology. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we sequenced 492 million read pairs generated from 51 samples of different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of C. maculatus. Reads were de novo assembled using the Trinity software, into a single combined assembly as well as into three separate assemblies based on data from the different developmental stages. The combined assembly generated 218,192 transcripts and 145,883 putative genes. Putative genes were annotated with the Blast2GO software and the Trinotate pipeline. In total, 33,216 putative genes were successfully annotated using Blastx against the Nr (non-redundant) database and 13,382 were assigned to 34,100 Gene Ontology (GO) terms. We classified 5,475 putative genes into Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) and 116 metabolic pathways maps were predicted based on the annotation. Our analyses suggested that the transcriptional specificity increases with ontogeny. For example, out of 33,216 annotated putative genes, 51 were only expressed in larvae, 63 only in pupae and 171 only in adults. Our study illustrates the importance of including samples from several developmental stages when the aim is to provide an integrative and high quality annotated transcriptome. Our results will represent an invaluable resource for those working with the ecology, evolution and pest control of C. maculatus, as well for comparative studies of the transcriptomics and genomics of beetles more generally. PMID:27442123

  18. The De Novo Transcriptome and Its Functional Annotation in the Seed Beetle Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Sayadi, Ahmed; Immonen, Elina; Bayram, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Despite their unparalleled biodiversity, the genomic resources available for beetles (Coleoptera) remain relatively scarce. We present an integrative and high quality annotated transcriptome of the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, an important and cosmopolitan agricultural pest as well as an emerging model species in ecology and evolutionary biology. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we sequenced 492 million read pairs generated from 51 samples of different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of C. maculatus. Reads were de novo assembled using the Trinity software, into a single combined assembly as well as into three separate assemblies based on data from the different developmental stages. The combined assembly generated 218,192 transcripts and 145,883 putative genes. Putative genes were annotated with the Blast2GO software and the Trinotate pipeline. In total, 33,216 putative genes were successfully annotated using Blastx against the Nr (non-redundant) database and 13,382 were assigned to 34,100 Gene Ontology (GO) terms. We classified 5,475 putative genes into Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) and 116 metabolic pathways maps were predicted based on the annotation. Our analyses suggested that the transcriptional specificity increases with ontogeny. For example, out of 33,216 annotated putative genes, 51 were only expressed in larvae, 63 only in pupae and 171 only in adults. Our study illustrates the importance of including samples from several developmental stages when the aim is to provide an integrative and high quality annotated transcriptome. Our results will represent an invaluable resource for those working with the ecology, evolution and pest control of C. maculatus, as well for comparative studies of the transcriptomics and genomics of beetles more generally. PMID:27442123

  19. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, David Charles; Severin, Jessica

    2016-07-19

    There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

  20. Data annotation of aerial reconnaissance imagery and exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareberg, P. Gunnar; Prunes, V.; Scholes, Richard W.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reviews the use of LED recording head assemblies (RHAs) for film annotation in aerial reconnaissance cameras and discusses code matrix block readers (CMBRs). Annotation of video imagery is also covered.

  1. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  2. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  3. The food metabolome: a window over dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Dragsted, Lars O; Draper, John; Rappaport, Stephen M; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Wishart, David S

    2014-06-01

    The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food compositions by using hypothesis-driven approaches. However, the rapid development of metabolomics resulting from the development of highly sensitive modern analytic instruments, the availability of metabolite databases, and progress in (bio)informatics has made agnostic approaches more attractive as shown by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still face hurdles, which slow progress and need to be resolved to bring this emerging field of research to maturity. These limits were discussed during the First International Workshop on the Food Metabolome held in Glasgow. Key recommendations made during the workshop included more coordination of efforts; development of new databases, software tools, and chemical libraries for the food metabolome; and shared repositories of metabolomic data. Once achieved, major progress can be expected toward a better understanding of the complex interactions between diet and human health.

  4. Functional Annotation Analytics of Rhodopseudomonas palustris Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Shaneka S.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Brown, Shyretha D.; McAllister, Donee L.; Hall, Charnia C.; McDuffy, Wanaki M.; Medley, Tamara L.; Udensi, Udensi K.; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V.; Ayensu, Wellington K.; Cohly, Hari H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris, a nonsulphur purple photosynthetic bacteria, has been extensively investigated for its metabolic versatility including ability to produce hydrogen gas from sunlight and biomass. The availability of the finished genome sequences of six R. palustris strains (BisA53, BisB18, BisB5, CGA009, HaA2 and TIE-1) combined with online bioinformatics software for integrated analysis presents new opportunities to determine the genomic basis of metabolic versatility and ecological lifestyles of the bacteria species. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the functional annotations available for multiple R. palustris genomes to identify annotations that can be further investigated for strain-specific or uniquely shared phenotypic characteristics. A total of 2,355 protein family Pfam domain annotations were clustered based on presence or absence in the six genomes. The clustering process identified groups of functional annotations including those that could be verified as strain-specific or uniquely shared phenotypes. For example, genes encoding water/glycerol transport were present in the genome sequences of strains CGA009 and BisB5, but absent in strains BisA53, BisB18, HaA2 and TIE-1. Protein structural homology modeling predicted that the two orthologous 240 aa R. palustris aquaporins have water-specific transport function. Based on observations in other microbes, the presence of aquaporin in R. palustris strains may improve freeze tolerance in natural conditions of rapid freezing such as nitrogen fixation at low temperatures where access to liquid water is a limiting factor for nitrogenase activation. In the case of adaptive loss of aquaporin genes, strains may be better adapted to survive in conditions of high-sugar content such as fermentation of biomass for biohydrogen production. Finally, web-based resources were developed to allow for interactive, user-defined selection of the relationship between protein family annotations and the R

  5. Representing annotation compositionality and provenance for the Semantic Web

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though the annotation of digital artifacts with metadata has a long history, the bulk of that work focuses on the association of single terms or concepts to single targets. As annotation efforts expand to capture more complex information, annotations will need to be able to refer to knowledge structures formally defined in terms of more atomic knowledge structures. Existing provenance efforts in the Semantic Web domain primarily focus on tracking provenance at the level of whole triples and do not provide enough detail to track how individual triple elements of annotations were derived from triple elements of other annotations. Results We present a task- and domain-independent ontological model for capturing annotations and their linkage to their denoted knowledge representations, which can be singular concepts or more complex sets of assertions. We have implemented this model as an extension of the Information Artifact Ontology in OWL and made it freely available, and we show how it can be integrated with several prominent annotation and provenance models. We present several application areas for the model, ranging from linguistic annotation of text to the annotation of disease-associations in genome sequences. Conclusions With this model, progressively more complex annotations can be composed from other annotations, and the provenance of compositional annotations can be represented at the annotation level or at the level of individual elements of the RDF triples composing the annotations. This in turn allows for progressively richer annotations to be constructed from previous annotation efforts, the precise provenance recording of which facilitates evidence-based inference and error tracking. PMID:24268021

  6. Ultrasound: a subexploited tool for sample preparation in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Luque de Castro, M D; Delgado-Povedano, M M

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics, one of the most recently emerged "omics", has taken advantage of ultrasound (US) to improve sample preparation (SP) steps. The metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial has experienced a dissimilar development that has depended on the area (vegetal or animal) and the SP step. Thus, vegetal metabolomics and US assisted leaching has received the greater attention (encompassing subdisciplines such as metallomics, xenometabolomics and, mainly, lipidomics), but also liquid-liquid extraction and (bio)chemical reactions in metabolomics have taken advantage of US energy. Also clinical and animal samples have benefited from US assisted SP in metabolomics studies but in a lesser extension. The main effects of US have been shortening of the time required for the given step, and/or increase of its efficiency or availability for automation; nevertheless, attention paid to potential degradation caused by US has been scant or nil. Achievements and weak points of the metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial are discussed and possible solutions to the present shortcomings are exposed. PMID:24331041

  7. Clinical Applications of Metabolomics in Oncology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Spratlin, Jennifer L.; Serkova, Natalie J.; Gail Eckhardt, S.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics, an omic science in systems biology, is the global quantitative assessment of endogenous metabolites within a biological system. Either individually or grouped as a metabolomic profile, detection of metabolites is carried out in cells, tissues, or biofluids by either nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry. There is potential for the metabolome to have a multitude of uses in oncology, including the early detection and diagnosis of cancer and as both a predictive and pharmacodynamic marker of drug effect. Despite this, there is lack of knowledge in the oncology community regarding metabolomics and confusion about its methodologic processes, technical challenges, and clinical applications. Metabolomics, when used as a translational research tool, can provide a link between the laboratory and clinic, particularly because metabolic and molecular imaging technologies, such as positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, enable the discrimination of metabolic markers noninvasively in vivo. Here, we review the current and potential applications of metabolomics, focusing on its use as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic evaluation. PMID:19147747

  8. Impact of dietary polydextrose fiber on the human gut metabolome.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Santosh; Yde, Christian C; Forssten, Sofia; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Saarinen, Markku; Jensen, Henrik Max; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert; Fava, Francesca; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the impact of polydextrose PDX an soluble fiber, on the human fecal metabolome by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomics in a dietary intervention study (n = 12). Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a strong effect of PDX consumption on the fecal metabolome, which could be mainly ascribed to the presence of undigested fiber and oligosaccharides formed from partial degradation of PDX. Our results demonstrate that NMR-based metabolomics is a useful technique for metabolite profiling of feces and for testing compliance to dietary fiber intake in such trials. In addition, novel associations between PDX and the levels of the fecal metabolites acetate and propionate could be identified. The establishment of a correlation between the fecal metabolome and levels of Bifidobacterium (R(2) = 0.66) and Bacteroides (R(2) = 0.46) demonstrates the potential of NMR-based metabolomics to elucidate metabolic activity of bacteria in the gut. PMID:25231382

  9. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward. PMID:27063670

  10. Considering Transposable Element Diversification in De Novo Annotation Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Flutre, Timothée; Duprat, Elodie; Feuillet, Catherine; Quesneville, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile, repetitive DNA sequences that are almost ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. They have a large impact on genome structure, function and evolution. With the recent development of high-throughput sequencing methods, many genome sequences have become available, making possible comparative studies of TE dynamics at an unprecedented scale. Several methods have been proposed for the de novo identification of TEs in sequenced genomes. Most begin with the detection of genomic repeats, but the subsequent steps for defining TE families differ. High-quality TE annotations are available for the Drosophila melanogaster and Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequences, providing a solid basis for the benchmarking of such methods. We compared the performance of specific algorithms for the clustering of interspersed repeats and found that only a particular combination of algorithms detected TE families with good recovery of the reference sequences. We then applied a new procedure for reconciling the different clustering results and classifying TE sequences. The whole approach was implemented in a pipeline using the REPET package. Finally, we show that our combined approach highlights the dynamics of well defined TE families by making it possible to identify structural variations among their copies. This approach makes it possible to annotate TE families and to study their diversification in a single analysis, improving our understanding of TE dynamics at the whole-genome scale and for diverse species. PMID:21304975

  11. Integration of RNA-seq and proteomics data with genomics for improved genome annotation in Apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Silmon de Monerri, Natalie C; Weiss, Louis M

    2015-08-01

    While high quality genomic sequence data is available for many pathogenic organisms, the corresponding gene annotations are often plagued with inaccuracies that can hinder research that utilizes such genomic data. Experimental validation of gene models is clearly crucial in improving such gene annotations; the field of proteogenomics is an emerging area of research wherein proteomic data is applied to testing and improving genetic models. Krishna et al. [Proteomics 2015, 15, 2618-2628] investigated whether incorporation of RNA-seq data into proteogenomics analyses can contribute significantly to validation studies of genome annotation, in two important parasitic organisms Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. They applied a systematic approach to combine new and previously published proteomics data from T. gondii and N. caninum with transcriptomics data, leading to substantially improved gene models for these organisms. This study illustrates the importance of incorporating experimental data from both proteomics and RNA-seq studies into routine genome annotation protocols.

  12. VideoANT: Extending Online Video Annotation beyond Content Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosack, Bradford

    2010-01-01

    This paper expands the boundaries of video annotation in education by outlining the need for extended interaction in online video use, identifying the challenges faced by existing video annotation tools, and introducing Video-ANT, a tool designed to create text-based annotations integrated within the time line of a video hosted online. Several…

  13. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    PubMed Central

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, James A.; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-01-01

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception. PMID:25666585

  14. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, III, James A.; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.

  15. Metabolomic evaluation of ginsenosides distribution in Panax genus (Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius) using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pace, Roberto; Martinelli, Ernesto Marco; Sardone, Nicola; D E Combarieu, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Ginseng is any one of the eleven species belonging to the genus Panax of the family Araliaceae and is found in North America and in eastern Asia. Ginseng is characterized by the presence of ginsenosides. Principally Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius are the adaptogenic herbs and are commonly distributed as health food markets. In the present study high performance liquid chromatography has been used to identify and quantify ginsenosides in the two subject species and the different parts of the plant (roots, neck, leaves, flowers, fruits). The power of this chromatographic technique to evaluate the identity of botanical material and to distinguishing different part of the plants has been investigated with metabolomic technique such as principal component analysis. Metabolomics provide a good opportunity for mining useful chemical information from the chromatographic data set resulting an important tool for quality evaluation of medicinal plants in the authenticity, consistency and efficacy.

  16. Annotations and the Collaborative Digital Library: Effects of an Aligned Annotation Interface on Student Argumentation and Reading Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Recent research on annotation interfaces provides provocative evidence that anchored, annotation-based discussion environments may lead to better conversations about a text. However, annotation interfaces raise complicated tradeoffs regarding screen real estate and positioning. It is argued that solving this screen real estate problem requires…

  17. Applications of NMR-based metabolomics in biological and environmental research

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a complimentary tool to other omics platforms, metabolomics is increasingly being used by biologists to study the dynamic response of biological systems (cells, tissues, or whole organisms) under diverse physiological or pathological conditions. Metabolomics deals with the qu...

  18. Metabolomics in Small Fish Toxicology: Assessing the Impacts of Model EDCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although lagging behind applications targeted to human endpoints, metabolomics offers great potential in environmental applications, including ecotoxicology. Indeed, the advantages of metabolomics (relative to other ‘omic techniques) may be more tangible in ecotoxicology because...

  19. Standard Reporting Requirements for Biological Samples in Metabolomics Experiments: Environmental Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomic technologies are increasingly being applied to study biological questions in a range of different settings from clinical through to environmental. As with other high-throughput technologies, such as those used in transcriptomics and proteomics, metabolomics continues...

  20. Metabolomics in Toxicology and Preclinical Research, a t4 Workshop Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological condition of the test system, and of changes affected by anthropogenic chemicals. Metabolomic analysis is used in many fields, ranging...