Science.gov

Sample records for metal chemical addition

  1. Amorphouslike chemical vapor deposited tungsten diffusion barrier for copper metallization and effects of nitrogen addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kow-Ming; Yeh, Ta-Hsun; Deng, I.-Chung; Shih, Chieh-Wen

    1997-08-01

    In this article, we propose an amorphouslike chemical vapor deposited tungsten (CVD-W) thin film as a diffusion barrier for copper metallization. Experimental results gave no evidence of interdiffusion and structural change for Cu/amorphouslike CVD-W/Si samples annealed up to 675 °C for 30 min in N2. At higher temperatures (700 °C), Cu penetration results in the formation of η''-Cu3Si precipitates at the CVD-W/Si interface. This is due to the crystallization of the amorphouslike CVD-W film above 650 °C, rendering the grain-boundary structure and, hence, fast pathways for Cu diffusion. The Cu/amorphouslike CVD-W/p+n diodes, thus, sustain large increases in reverse leakage current. In addition, the effects of nitrogen addition by using an in situ nitridation on the amorphouslike CVD-W film are also discussed. The effectiveness of the nitrided barrier is attributed to the blocking of the grain boundaries in the tungsten film by nitrogen atoms. This slows down Cu diffusion significantly. Physical and chemical analyses indicate that interfaces in the Cu/WNx/W/Si multilayer maintain their integrity while the annealing is carried out at 750 °C. Moreover, the reverse leakage current densities of Cu/WNx/W/p+n diodes remain at 10-7 A/cm2 after 725 °C annealing.

  2. A quantum chemical study of the mechanisms of olefin addition to group 9 transition metal dioxo compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issahaku; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic aspects of ethylene addition to MO2(CH2)(CH3) (M=Co, Rh, Ir) have been investigated with a Hartree-Fock/DFT hybrid functional at the MO6/LACVP* and B3LYP/LACVP* levels of theory to elucidate the reaction pathways on the singlet, doublet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PES). In the reaction of the IrO2CH2CH3 complex with ethylene, [3 + 2]C,O addition is the most plausible pathway on the singlet PES, the [3 + 2]O,O addition is the most favoured pathway on the doublet surface whiles the stepwise [1 + 1] addition involving the oxygen atom of the complex in the first step and the carbon atom of the complex in the second step is the most plausible pathway on the triplet PES. For the reaction of the RhO2(CH2)(CH3) complex, the [2 + 2]Rh,O addition pathway is the most favoured on the singlet surface, the [2 + 2]Rh,C is the most plausible pathway on the triplet PES and [3 + 2]C,O is the most plausible on the doublet surface. For the reactions of the CoO2(CH2)(CH3) complex, the [1 + 2]O addition is the most plausible on the singlet PES, [3 + 2]C=Co=O cycloaddition to form the five-membered intermediate is the most preferred pathway on the doublet PES, whiles on the triplet PES the preferred pathway is the [3 + 2] addition across the O=Co=O bond of the metal complex. The reactions of olefins with the Co dioxo complex have lower activation barriers for the preferred [3 + 2] and [2 + 2] addition pathways as well as fewer side reactions than those of the rhodium and iridium systems. This could imply that the cobalt dioxo complexes can efficiently and selectively catalyze specific reactions in oxidation of olefins than Rh and Ir oxo complexes will do and therefore Co oxo complexes may be better catalysts for specific oxidation reactions of olefins than Rh and Ir complexes are. The activation barriers for the formation of the four-or five-membered metallacycle intermediates through [2 + 2] or [3 + 2] cyclo-addition are lower on the

  3. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford tank waste via addition of metal cations and chemical oxidant: FY 1995 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Zacher, A.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Elliott, K.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    Chelating organics and some of their degradation products in the Hanford tank waste, such as EDTA, HEDTA, and NTA act to solubilize strontium and transuranics (TRU) in the tank waste supernatant. Displacement of strontium and TRU will facilitate the removal of these radionuclides via precipitation/filtration, ion exchange, or solvent extraction so that low-level waste feed specifications can be met. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated two methods for releasing organic-complexed strontium and TRU components to allow for effective pretreatment of tank waste supernatant: metal cation addition (to promote displacement and flocculation) and chemical oxidant (pennanganate) addition (to promote chelator destruction/defunctionalization and possibly flocculation). These methods, which can be conducted at near-ambient. temperatures and pressures, could be deployed as intank processes.

  4. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  5. The Structural Evolution of (Gd, Y)Ba2Cu3Ox Tapes With Zr Addition Made by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, CH; Galstyan, E; Chen, YM; Shi, T; Liu, YH; Khatri, N; Liu, JF; Xiong, XM; Majkic, G; Selvamanickam, V

    2013-06-01

    Structural analysis of (Gd, Y) Ba2Cu3Ox tapes with Zr addition made by metal organic chemical vapor deposition has been conducted with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Zr content in the films was varied from 0 to 25% in the precursor. In all Zr-doped films, self-assembled nanocolumnar structures of BaZrO3 (BZO) were observed along the c-axis. The amount of BaZrO3 was found to increase steadily with Zr content. Additionally, planar BZO plates were found on the (001) plane of (Gd, Y) Ba2Cu3Ox film. The size and thickness of BZO plates were seen to increase with Zr doping level. Rare-earth copper oxide phases were observed to begin to emerge in the 20% Zr-doped film. Cross-sectional study of the interface between (Gd, Y)Ba2Cu3Ox and LaMnO3 cap layer revealed a thin discrete BZO layer on the LaMnO3 in the 20% Zr doped film.

  6. Large Scale Metal Additive Techniques Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nycz, Andrzej; Adediran, Adeola I; Noakes, Mark W; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years additive manufacturing made long strides toward becoming a main stream production technology. Particularly strong progress has been made in large-scale polymer deposition. However, large scale metal additive has not yet reached parity with large scale polymer. This paper is a review study of the metal additive techniques in the context of building large structures. Current commercial devices are capable of printing metal parts on the order of several cubic feet compared to hundreds of cubic feet for the polymer side. In order to follow the polymer progress path several factors are considered: potential to scale, economy, environment friendliness, material properties, feedstock availability, robustness of the process, quality and accuracy, potential for defects, and post processing as well as potential applications. This paper focuses on current state of art of large scale metal additive technology with a focus on expanding the geometric limits.

  7. Additively Manufactured Metals in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Metals produced by additive manufacturing methods, such as Powder Bed Fusion Technology, are now mature enough to be considered for qualification in human spaceflight oxygen systems. The mechanical properties of metals produced through AM processes are being systematically studied. However, it is unknown whether AM metals in oxygen applications may present an increased risk of flammability or ignition as compared to wrought metals of the same metallurgical composition due to increased porosity. Per NASA-STD-6001B materials to be used in oxygen system applications shall be based on flammability and combustion test data, followed by a flammability assessment. Without systematic flammability and ignition testing in oxygen there is no credible method for NASA to accurately evaluate the risk of using AM metals in oxygen systems.

  8. OPERATOR BURDEN IN METAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amy M; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emerging manufacturing process that creates usable machine parts via layer-by-layer joining of a stock material. With this layer-wise approach, high-performance geometries can be created which are impossible with traditional manufacturing methods. Metal AM technology has the potential to significantly reduce the manufacturing burden of developing custom hardware; however, a major consideration in choosing a metal AM system is the required amount of operator involvement (i.e., operator burden) in the manufacturing process. The operator burden not only determines the amount of operator training and specialization required but also the usability of the system in a facility. As operators of several metal AM processes, the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Labs is uniquely poised to provide insight into requirements for operator involvement in each of the three major metal AM processes. The paper covers an overview of each of the three metal AM technologies, focusing on the burden on the operator to complete the build cycle, process the part for final use, and reset the AM equipment for future builds.

  9. Additively manufactured metallic pentamode meta-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati, R.; Leeflang, A. M.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual mechanical properties that originate from their topological design. Pentamode metamaterials are particularly interesting because they could be designed to possess any thermodynamically admissible elasticity tensor. In this study, we additively manufacture the metallic pentamode metamaterials from a biocompatible and mechanically strong titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) using an energy distribution method developed for the powder bed fusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the developed materials were a few orders of magnitude higher than those of the similar topologies fabricated previously from polymers. Moreover, the elastic modulus and yield stress of the presented pentamode metamaterials were decoupled from their relative density, meaning that the metallic meta-biomaterials with independently tailored elastic and mass transport (permeability) properties could be designed for tissue regeneration purposes.

  10. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  11. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  12. Chemical Shuttle Additives in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Mary

    2013-03-31

    than NMC) and the DDB is useful for lithium ion cells with LFP cathodes (potential that is lower than NMC). A 4.5 V class redox shuttle provided by Argonne National Laboratory was evaluated which provides a few cycles of overcharge protection for lithium ion cells containing NMC cathodes but it is not stable enough for consideration. Thus, a redox shuttle with an appropriate redox potential and sufficient chemical and electrochemical stability for commercial use in larger format lithium ion cells with NMC cathodes was not found. Molecular imprinting of the redox shuttle molecule during solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation likely contributes to the successful reduction of oxidized redox shuttle species at carbon anodes. This helps to understand how a carbon anode covered with an SEI layer, that is supposed to be electrically insulating, can reduce the oxidized form of a redox shuttle.

  13. Chemical sensing and imaging with metallic nanorods.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Catherine J; Gole, Anand M; Hunyadi, Simona E; Stone, John W; Sisco, Patrick N; Alkilany, Alaaldin; Kinard, Brian E; Hankins, Patrick

    2008-02-07

    In this Feature Article, we examine recent advances in chemical analyte detection and optical imaging applications using gold and silver nanoparticles, with a primary focus on our own work. Noble metal nanoparticles have exciting physical and chemical properties that are entirely different from the bulk. For chemical sensing and imaging, the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles provide a wide range of opportunities, all of which ultimately arise from the collective oscillations of conduction band electrons ("plasmons") in response to external electromagnetic radiation. Nanorods have multiple plasmon bands compared to nanospheres. We identify four optical sensing and imaging modalities for metallic nanoparticles: (1) aggregation-dependent shifts in plasmon frequency; (2) local refractive index-dependent shifts in plasmon frequency; (3) inelastic (surface-enhanced Raman) light scattering; and (4) elastic (Rayleigh) light scattering. The surface chemistry of the nanoparticles must be tunable to create chemical specificity, and is a key requirement for successful sensing and imaging platforms.

  14. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1989-04-30

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativeities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation. Reaction of ethylene with syngas is used as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of metal catalysts. During the sixth quarter of the project, the mechanism of CO insertion on Ni/SiO{sub 2} was investigated by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. Ni/SiO{sub 2}, a methanation catalyst, has been shown to exhibit CO insertion activity. In situ infrared studies of CO/H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reactions show that the carbonylation of Ni/SiO{sub 2} to Ni(CO){sub 4} leads to an inhibition of methanation in CO hydrogenation but an enhancement of formation of propionaldehyde in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reaction. The results suggest that the sites for propionaldehyde formation is different from those for methanation.

  15. 33 CFR 157.31 - Discharges: Chemical additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Discharges: Chemical additives. 157.31 Section 157.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.31 Discharges: Chemical additives. No person may use a...

  16. 33 CFR 157.31 - Discharges: Chemical additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Discharges: Chemical additives. 157.31 Section 157.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.31 Discharges: Chemical additives. No person may use a...

  17. 33 CFR 157.31 - Discharges: Chemical additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discharges: Chemical additives. 157.31 Section 157.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.31 Discharges: Chemical additives. No person may use a...

  18. 33 CFR 157.31 - Discharges: Chemical additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discharges: Chemical additives. 157.31 Section 157.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.31 Discharges: Chemical additives. No person may use a...

  19. 33 CFR 157.31 - Discharges: Chemical additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Discharges: Chemical additives. 157.31 Section 157.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.31 Discharges: Chemical additives. No person may use a...

  20. Chemical resistance guide for metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This guide contains data for 29,000 combinations of corrodents vs. metals, metal alloys, and carbon. Features and specifications include: (1) 963 liquid or dry chemicals, gases, lubricants, household fluids, foods, atmospheres, and other environments are covered; (2) 70 chemical trade names are covered; (3) 500 synonyms of covered chemicals, gases, etc. are indexed to page numbers; (4) corrodents are listed in alphabetical order; (5) data are presented in symbolic format (A, B, C, NR); (6) where known chemical resistance varies with concentration and temperature, data are presented in descending order of concentration and temperature; (7) mechanical, physical, and electrical properties data for each metal are provided; (8) a flex thumb index is provided at the right-hand margin of the right-hand pages to facilitate quick access to the desired data; (9) an electromotive or galvanic series list covering 120 metals, alloys, and carbon is included; (10) machinability ratings for most metals, including some specific S.F.M. rates, is included; (11) creep or stress relaxation rates at various levels of stress, temperature, and time are included; and (12) printed on semigloss, 70 pound, plastic-coated bond paper that last through years of reference.

  1. Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces of Metal Nanomaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0168 Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces of Metal Nanomaterials Junrong Zheng WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIV HOUSTON TX Final Report 07/23...Junrong Zheng Department of Chemistry, Rice University 1. Proposed summary The project was designed to develop novel spectroscopic tools for

  2. View of building 11050, showing metal clad addition on east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11050, showing metal clad addition on east elevation, looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Machine Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  3. A novel high-efficiency methodology for metal additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wei, Zhengying; Wang, Xin; Fang, Xuewei; Zhao, Guangxi

    2016-11-01

    Metal additive manufacturing (AM) offers unrivalled design freedom with the ability to manufacture complex parts. However, the high capital costs and slow throughput printing have severely restricted its application. In this paper, a new metal AM process, referred to as the "metal fused-coating additive manufacturing (MFCAM)", was developed for highly efficient metal parts production. This new process is the combination of metal fused-coating process and laser surface melting process. A two-dimensional numerical model was established to provide an insight into the primary thermo-physical phenomena occurring in the MFCAM process. Experiments of single-track formation were conducted using MFCAM to validate the feasibility of the proposed process. The good agreement between experimental and simulated results demonstrated the reasonableness of the established models.

  4. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  5. Chemical segregation in metallic glass nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Mo; Li, Qi-Kai

    2014-11-21

    Nanowires made of metallic glass have been actively pursued recently due to the superb and unique properties over those of the crystalline materials. The amorphous nanowires are synthesized either at high temperature or via mechanical disruption using focused ion beam. These processes have potential to cause significant changes in structure and chemical concentration, as well as formation of defect or imperfection, but little is known to date about the possibilities and mechanisms. Here, we report chemical segregation to surfaces and its mechanisms in metallic glass nanowires made of binary Cu and Zr elements from molecular dynamics simulation. Strong concentration deviation are found in the nanowires under the conditions similar to these in experiment via focused ion beam processing, hot imprinting, and casting by rapid cooling from liquid state. Our analysis indicates that non-uniform internal stress distribution is a major cause for the chemical segregation, especially at low temperatures. Extension is discussed for this observation to multicomponent metallic glass nanowires as well as the potential applications and side effects of the composition modulation. The finding also points to the possibility of the mechanical-chemical process that may occur in different settings such as fracture, cavitation, and foams where strong internal stress is present in small length scales.

  6. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-04-09

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  7. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  8. Epitaxy and Microstructure Evolution in Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Amrita; Das, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Metal additive manufacturing (AM) works on the principle of incremental layer-by-layer material consolidation, facilitating the fabrication of objects of arbitrary complexity through the controlled melting and resolidification of feedstock materials by using high-power energy sources. The focus of metal AM is to produce complex-shaped components made of metals and alloys to meet demands from various industrial sectors such as defense, aerospace, automotive, and biomedicine. Metal AM involves a complex interplay between multiple modes of energy and mass transfer, fluid flow, phase change, and microstructural evolution. Understanding the fundamental physics of these phenomena is a key requirement for metal AM process development and optimization. The effects of material characteristics and processing conditions on the resulting epitaxy and microstructure are of critical interest in metal AM. This article reviews various metal AM processes in the context of fabricating metal and alloy parts through epitaxial solidification, with material systems ranging from pure-metal and prealloyed to multicomponent materials. The aim is to cover the relationships between various AM processes and the resulting microstructures in these material systems.

  9. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  10. Metal-Catalyzed Asymmetric Michael Addition in Natural Product Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chunngai; Pu, Fan; Xu, Jing

    2016-12-19

    Asymmetric catalysis for chiral compound synthesis is a rapidly growing field in modern organic chemistry. Asymmetric catalytic processes have been indispensable for the synthesis of enantioselective materials to meet demands from various fields. Michael addition has been used extensively for the construction of C-C bonds under mild conditions. With the discovery and development of organo- and metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions, the synthesis of enantioselective and/or diastereoselective Michael adducts has become possible and increasingly prevalent in the literature. In particular, metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael addition has been employed as a key reaction in natural product synthesis for the construction of contiguous quaternary stereogenic center(s), which is still a difficult task in organic synthesis. Previously reported applications of metal-catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions in natural product synthesis are presented here and discussed in depth.

  11. Modeling of additive manufacturing processes for metals: Challenges and opportunities

    DOE PAGES

    Francois, Marianne M.; Sun, Amy; King, Wayne E.; ...

    2017-01-09

    Here, with the technology being developed to manufacture metallic parts using increasingly advanced additive manufacturing processes, a new era has opened up for designing novel structural materials, from designing shapes and complex geometries to controlling the microstructure (alloy composition and morphology). The material properties used within specific structural components are also designable in order to meet specific performance requirements that are not imaginable with traditional metal forming and machining (subtractive) techniques.

  12. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  15. Partial Exemption of Certain Chemical Substances from Reporting Additional Chemical Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Federal Register notice amends the list of chemical substances that are partially exempt from reporting additional information by adding six chemicals in response to a petition the Agency received.

  16. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  17. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of additives on the ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow them to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. 49 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. THE USE OF CHEMICALS AS SOIL ADDITIVES. AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS TECHNOLOGY, NUMBER 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE IS TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN PREPARING POST-SECONDARY STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL OCCUPATIONS. IT IS ONE OF A SERIES OF MODULES DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF STATE STUDY DATA. SECTIONS ARE (1) PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ALTERATION OF SOIL WITH CHEMICAL ADDITIVES, (2) TERMINOLOGY AND COMPUTATIONS, (3)…

  19. Disclosure of hydraulic fracturing fluid chemical additives: analysis of regulations.

    PubMed

    Maule, Alexis L; Makey, Colleen M; Benson, Eugene B; Burrows, Isaac J; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to extract natural gas from shale formations. The process involves injecting into the ground fracturing fluids that contain thousands of gallons of chemical additives. Companies are not mandated by federal regulations to disclose the identities or quantities of chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing operations on private or public lands. States have begun to regulate hydraulic fracturing fluids by mandating chemical disclosure. These laws have shortcomings including nondisclosure of proprietary or "trade secret" mixtures, insufficient penalties for reporting inaccurate or incomplete information, and timelines that allow for after-the-fact reporting. These limitations leave lawmakers, regulators, public safety officers, and the public uninformed and ill-prepared to anticipate and respond to possible environmental and human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids. We explore hydraulic fracturing exemptions from federal regulations, as well as current and future efforts to mandate chemical disclosure at the federal and state level.

  20. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  1. Accelerating Industrial Adoption of Metal Additive Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanian, Kenneth; McDonald, Tom

    2016-03-01

    While metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology has clear benefits, there are still factors preventing its adoption by industry. These factors include the high cost of metal AM systems, the difficulty for machinists to learn and operate metal AM machines, the long approval process for part qualification/certification, and the need for better process controls; however, the high AM system cost is the main barrier deterring adoption. In this paper, we will discuss an America Makes-funded program to reduce AM system cost by combining metal AM technology with conventional computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools. Information will be provided on how an Optomec-led team retrofitted a legacy CNC vertical mill with laser engineered net shaping (LENS®—LENS is a registered trademark of Sandia National Labs) AM technology, dramatically lowering deployment cost. The upgraded system, dubbed LENS Hybrid Vertical Mill, enables metal additive and subtractive operations to be performed on the same machine tool and even on the same part. Information on the LENS Hybrid system architecture, learnings from initial system deployment and continuing development work will also be provided to help guide further development activities within the materials community.

  2. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  3. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, JA; Garboczi, EJ; Stutzman, PE; Ferraris, CF; Watson, SS; Peltz, MA

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques1 can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process. PMID:26601040

  4. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, J A; Garboczi, E J; Stutzman, P E; Ferraris, C F; Watson, S S; Peltz, M A

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  5. Decontamination of metals using chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Lerch, Ronald E.; Partridge, Jerry A.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

  6. In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1992-07-01

    In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir`s oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

  7. In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1992-07-01

    In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir's oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

  8. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  9. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  10. Developing Gradient Metal Alloys through Radial Deposition Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R. Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  11. Developing gradient metal alloys through radial deposition additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-06-19

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels.

  12. Additives initiate selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Wang, Lei; Qiu, Huizhe; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Jingmei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    To improve chemicals selectivity under low temperature, a new method that involves the injection of additives into biomass pyrolysis is introduced. This method allows biomass pyrolysis to achieve high selectivity to chemicals under low temperature (300°C), while nothing was obtained in typical pyrolysis under 300°C. However, by using the new method, the first liquid drop emerged at the interval between 140°C and 240°C. Adding methanol to mushroom scrap pyrolysis obtained high selectivity to acetic acid (98.33%), while adding ethyl acetate gained selectivity to methanol (65.77%) in bagasse pyrolysis and to acetone (72.51%) in corncob pyrolysis. Apart from basic chemicals, one high value-added chemical (2,3-dihydrobenzofuran) was also detected, which obtained the highest selectivity (10.33%) in corncob pyrolysis through the addition of ethyl acetate. Comparison of HZSM-5 and CaCO3 catalysis showed that benzene emerged in the liquid because of the larger degree of cracking and hydrodeoxygenation over HZSM-5.

  13. Applications for Gradient Metal Alloys Fabricated Using Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Borgonia, John Paul C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Suh, Eric J.; Mulder, jerry L.; Gardner, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, additive manufacturing (AM) techniques have been developed that may shift the paradigm of traditional metal production by allowing complex net-shaped hardware to be built up layer-by-layer, rather than being machined from a billet. The AM process is ubiquitous with polymers due to their low melting temperatures, fast curing, and controllable viscosity, and 3D printers are widely available as commercial or consumer products. 3D printing with metals is inherently more complicated than with polymers due to their higher melting temperatures and reactivity with air, particularly when heated or molten. The process generally requires a high-power laser or other focused heat source, like an electron beam, for precise melting and deposition. Several promising metal AM techniques have been developed, including laser deposition (also called laser engineered net shaping or LENS® and laser deposition technology (LDT)), direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and electron beam free-form (EBF). These machines typically use powders or wire feedstock that are melted and deposited using a laser or electron beam. Complex net-shape parts have been widely demonstrated using these (and other) AM techniques and the process appears to be a promising alternative to machining in some cases. Rather than simply competing with traditional machining for cost and time savings, the true advantage of AM involves the fabrication of hardware that cannot be produced using other techniques. This could include parts with "blind" features (like foams or trusses), parts that are difficult to machine conventionally, or parts made from materials that do not exist in bulk forms. In this work, the inventors identify that several AM techniques can be used to develop metal parts that change composition from one location in the part to another, allowing for complete control over the mechanical or physical properties. This changes the paradigm for conventional metal fabrication, which relies on an

  14. Calculation of laser absorption by metal powders in additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Boley, C D; Khairallah, S A; Rubenchik, A M

    2015-03-20

    We have calculated the absorption of laser light by a powder of metal spheres, typical of the powder employed in laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing. Using ray-trace simulations, we show that the absorption is significantly larger than its value for normal incidence on a flat surface, due to multiple scattering. We investigate the dependence of absorption on powder content (material, size distribution, and geometry) and on beam size.

  15. Structural, optical and charge generation properties of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite copper antimony sulfide thin films prepared from metal xanthates† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Chemical structures of the used metal xanthates, additional XRD, SEM-EDX and UV-vis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta05777a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Andrew J.; Brown, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a solution based approach for the preparation of thin films of copper antimony sulfide, an emerging absorber material for third generation solar cells. In this work, copper and antimony xanthates are used as precursor materials for the formation of two different copper antimony sulfide phases: chalcostibite (CuSbS2) and tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13). Both phases were thoroughly investigated regarding their structural and optical properties. Moreover, thin films of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite were prepared on mesoporous TiO2 layers and photoinduced charge transfer in these metal sulfide/TiO2 heterojunctions was studied via transient absorption spectroscopy. Photoinduced charge transfer was detected in both the chalcostibite as well as the tetrahedrite sample, which is an essential property in view of applying these materials as light-harvesting agents in semiconductor sensitized solar cells. PMID:27019713

  16. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  17. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Seifi, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the mechanical properties of additively manufactured metallic materials. The additive manufacturing techniques utilized to generate samples covered in this review include powder bed fusion (e.g., EBM, SLM, DMLS) and directed energy deposition (e.g., LENS, EBF3). Although only a limited number of metallic alloy systems are currently available for additive manufacturing (e.g., Ti-6Al-4V, TiAl, stainless steel, Inconel 625/718, and Al-Si-10Mg), the bulk of the published mechanical properties information has been generated on Ti-6Al-4V. However, summary tables for published mechanical properties and/or key figures are included for each of the alloys listed above, grouped by the additive technique used to generate the data. Published values for mechanical properties obtained from hardness, tension/compression, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth, and high cycle fatigue are included for as-built, heat-treated, and/or HIP conditions, when available. The effects of test orientation/build direction on properties, when available, are also provided, along with discussion of the potential source(s) (e.g., texture, microstructure changes, defects) of anisotropy in properties. Recommendations for additional work are also provided.

  18. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  19. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  20. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kenzari, Samuel; Bonina, David; Marie Dubois, Jean; Fournée, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal-matrix composites or of polymer-matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized.

  1. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenzari, Samuel; Bonina, David; Dubois, Jean Marie; Fournée, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal-matrix composites or of polymer-matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized.

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Structures at the Micrometer Scale.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Luca; Reiser, Alain; Spolenak, Ralph; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2017-01-04

    Currently, the focus of additive manufacturing (AM) is shifting from simple prototyping to actual production. One driving factor of this process is the ability of AM to build geometries that are not accessible by subtractive fabrication techniques. While these techniques often call for a geometry that is easiest to manufacture, AM enables the geometry required for best performance to be built by freeing the design process from restrictions imposed by traditional machining. At the micrometer scale, the design limitations of standard fabrication techniques are even more severe. Microscale AM thus holds great potential, as confirmed by the rapid success of commercial micro-stereolithography tools as an enabling technology for a broad range of scientific applications. For metals, however, there is still no established AM solution at small scales. To tackle the limited resolution of standard metal AM methods (a few tens of micrometers at best), various new techniques aimed at the micrometer scale and below are presently under development. Here, we review these recent efforts. Specifically, we feature the techniques of direct ink writing, electrohydrodynamic printing, laser-assisted electrophoretic deposition, laser-induced forward transfer, local electroplating methods, laser-induced photoreduction and focused electron or ion beam induced deposition. Although these methods have proven to facilitate the AM of metals with feature sizes in the range of 0.1-10 µm, they are still in a prototype stage and their potential is not fully explored yet. For instance, comprehensive studies of material availability and material properties are often lacking, yet compulsory for actual applications. We address these items while critically discussing and comparing the potential of current microscale metal AM techniques.

  3. Inhibition of hot salt corrosion by metallic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of several potential fuel additives in reducing the effects of sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion was evaluated in a cyclic Mach 0.3 burner rig. The potential inhibitors examined were salts of Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and Ba. The alloys tested were IN-100, U-700, IN-738, IN-792, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. Each alloy was exposed for 100 cycles of 1 hour each at 900 C in combustion gases doped with the corrodant and inhibitor salts and the extent of attack was determined by measuring maximum metal thickness loss. The most effective and consistent inhibitor additive was Ba (NO3)2 which reduced the hot corrosion attack to nearly that of simple oxidation.

  4. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  5. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Reporting Manufactured Chemical Substances from Metal Mining and Related Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides guidance on the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requirements related to the reporting of mined metals, intermediates, and byproducts manufactured during metal mining and related activities.

  6. Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhipeng; Geyer, Nadine; Werner, Peter; de Boor, Johannes; Gösele, Ulrich

    2011-01-11

    This article presents an overview of the essential aspects in the fabrication of silicon and some silicon/germanium nanostructures by metal-assisted chemical etching. First, the basic process and mechanism of metal-assisted chemical etching is introduced. Then, the various influences of the noble metal, the etchant, temperature, illumination, and intrinsic properties of the silicon substrate (e.g., orientation, doping type, doping level) are presented. The anisotropic and the isotropic etching behaviors of silicon under various conditions are presented. Template-based metal-assisted chemical etching methods are introduced, including templates based on nanosphere lithography, anodic aluminum oxide masks, interference lithography, and block-copolymer masks. The metal-assisted chemical etching of other semiconductors is also introduced. A brief introduction to the application of Si nanostructures obtained by metal-assisted chemical etching is given, demonstrating the promising potential applications of metal-assisted chemical etching. Finally, some open questions in the understanding of metal-assisted chemical etching are compiled.

  7. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Kenzari, Samuel; Bonina, David; Marie Dubois, Jean; Fournée, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal–matrix composites or of polymer–matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized. PMID:27877661

  8. NMR characterization of cellulose acetate: chemical shift assignments, substituent effects, and chemical shift additivity.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi

    2015-03-15

    A series of cellulose acetates (CA) with degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 2.92-0.92 dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-d6 and cellulose dissolved in tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF)/DMSO-d6 were investigated by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed the determination of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) that contain CA: 2,3,6-tri-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, and unacetylated AGUs. A comparative analysis of the chemical shift data revealed the substituent effect of acetyl groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions on the (1)H and (13)C nuclei in the same AGU. In addition, chemical shift additivity could be applied to the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of CA because the chemical shifts of the diacetylated and triacetylated AGUs could be almost completely explained by the acetyl substituent effects at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions.

  9. Non-essential metals in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions and compounds are essential to life and many people routinely take them as food supplements in the form of vitamin and mineral pills. Most non-essential metals are considered to be toxic, nevertheless, many are widely used in imaging, diagnostics and medicine. This short review provides an overview from selected examples of the on-going research within my laboratory that uses metal compounds to either understand biological processes or that exhibit therapeutic properties overcoming the limitations of existing chemotherapies.

  10. Chemically Modified Metal Oxide Nanostructure for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gongming

    Hydrogen gas is chemical fuel with high energy density, and represents a clean, renewable and carbon-free burning fuel, which has the potential to solve the more and more urgent energy crisis in today's society. Inspired by natural photosynthesis, artificial photosynthesis to generate hydrogen energy has attracted a lot of attentions in the field of chemistry, physics and material. Photoelectrochemical water splitting based on semiconductors represents a green and low cost method to generate hydrogen fuel. However, the current overall efficiency of solar to hydrogen is quite low, due to some intrinsic limitations such as bandgap, diffusion distance, carrier lifetime and photostability of semiconductors. Although nanostructured semiconductors can improve their photoelectrochemical water splitting performance to some extent, by increasing electrolyte accessible area and shortening minority carrier diffusion distance, nanostructure engineering cannot change their intrinsic electronic properties. Recent development in chemically modified nanostructures such as surface catalyst decoration, element doping, plasmonic modification and interfacial hetero-junction design have led to significant advancement in the photoelectrochemical water splitting, by improving surface reaction kinetics and charge separation, transportation and collection efficiency. In this thesis, I will give a detailed discussion on the chemically modified metal oxide nanostructures for photoelectrocemical hydrogen generation, with a focus on the element doping, hydrogen treatment and catalyst modification. I have demonstrated nitrogen doping on ZnO and Ti doping on hematite can improve their photoelectrochemical performance. In addition, we found hydrogen treatment is a general and effective method to improve the photocatalytic performance, by increasing their carrier desities. Hydrogen treatment has been demonstrated on TiO2, WO3 and BiVO4. In the end, we also used electrochemical catalyt to modify

  11. AFCATT (Anti-Fouling Chemical Additive Test Tower)

    SciTech Connect

    Philpot, E.F.; Newton, M.T.; Noble, R.T.

    1995-06-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) film-type cellular fill is the fill of choice in replacing cement asbestos board fill in existing cooling towers and in new cooling towers because of its high thermal performance, ease of installation, and low initial cost. However, PVC fill has been found to foul quickly with biological and sediment material, significantly reducing tower performance and the fill`s useful life. The Anti-Fouling Chemical Additives Test Tower (AFCATT) has been build to study accumulation rates of fouling deposits in corrugated PVC film fill and to study methods of cleaning and preventing the fouling deposits. This small mechanical draft cooling tower is located next to the Unit 4 natural draft cooling tower at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Bowen. The once-through mechanical draft tower receives hot water from the condenser and returns the cold water to the basin of the host tower. The pilot tower is divided into four chambers allowing for three different treatment programs and one control to be run simultaneously. PVC fill packs are suspended from load cells to allow the weight of the fill packs to be measured continuously. Six vendors participated in the summer 1993 test program. Each proposed different methods of cleaning the fouled fill and were given the opportunity to try their proposed method of fill cleaning. To determine the success of these different treatment programs, statistical analyses were performed on the collected data and the changes in the accumulation rates compared.

  12. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of chemistry and detonation performance.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L; Bukowski, Eric J

    2017-01-20

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser has been used to ablate, atomize, ionize, and excite milligram quantities of metal-doped energetic materials that undergo exothermic reactions in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion in the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The method enables the estimation of detonation velocities based on the measured laser-induced air-shock velocities and has previously been demonstrated for organic military explosives. Here, the LASEM technique has been extended to explosive formulations with metal additives. A comparison of the measured laser-induced air-shock velocities for TNT, RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by the thermochemical code CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time (<10  μs) participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that while Al is mostly inert at early times in the detonation event (confirmed from large-scale detonation testing), B is active-and reducing the amount of hydrogen present during the early chemical reactions increases the resulting estimated detonation velocities.

  13. Workshop Report on Additive Manufacturing for Large-Scale Metal Components - Development and Deployment of Metal Big-Area-Additive-Manufacturing (Large-Scale Metals AM) System

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is considered an emerging technology that is expected to transform the way industry can make low-volume, high value complex structures. This disruptive technology promises to replace legacy manufacturing methods for the fabrication of existing components in addition to bringing new innovation for new components with increased functional and mechanical properties. This report outlines the outcome of a workshop on large-scale metal additive manufacturing held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on March 11, 2016. The charter for the workshop was outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office program manager. The status and impact of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for polymer matrix composites was presented as the background motivation for the workshop. Following, the extension of underlying technology to low-cost metals was proposed with the following goals: (i) High deposition rates (approaching 100 lbs/h); (ii) Low cost (<$10/lbs) for steel, iron, aluminum, nickel, as well as, higher cost titanium, (iii) large components (major axis greater than 6 ft) and (iv) compliance of property requirements. The above concept was discussed in depth by representatives from different industrial sectors including welding, metal fabrication machinery, energy, construction, aerospace and heavy manufacturing. In addition, DOE’s newly launched High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4MFG) program was reviewed. This program will apply thermo-mechanical models to elucidate deeper understanding of the interactions between design, process, and materials during additive manufacturing. Following these presentations, all the attendees took part in a brainstorming session where everyone identified the top 10 challenges in large-scale metal AM from their own perspective. The feedback was analyzed and grouped in different categories including, (i) CAD to PART software, (ii) selection of energy source, (iii

  14. Hematite Surface Activation by Chemical Addition of Tin Oxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Waldemir M; Souza, Flavio L

    2016-09-05

    In this study, the effect of tin (Sn(4+) ) modification on the surface of hematite electrodes synthesized by an aqueous solution route at different times (2, 5, 10, 18, and 24 h) is investigated. As confirmed from X-ray diffraction results, the as-synthesized electrode exhibits an oxyhydroxide phase, which is converted into a pure hematite phase after being subjected to additional thermal treatment at 750 °C for 30 min. The tin-modified hematite electrode is prepared by depositing a solution of Sn(4+) precursor on the as-synthesized electrode, followed by thermal treatment under the same abovementioned conditions. This modification results in an enhancement of the photocurrent response for all hematite electrodes investigated and attains the highest values of around 1.62 and 2.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 and 1.4 V versus RHE, respectively, for electrodes obtained in short synthesis times (2 h). Contact angle measurements suggest that the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode provides a more hydrophilic surface, which favors a chemical reaction at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte. This result generates new perspectives for understanding the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode surface, which is in contrast with several studies previously reported; these studies state that the enhancement in photocurrent density is related to either the induction of an increased donor charge density or shift in the flat-band potential, which favors charge separation.

  15. Complexed metals in hazardous waste: Limitations of conventional chemical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Diel, B.N.; Kuchynka, D.J.; Borchert, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the management of hazardous waste, more is known regarding the treatment of metals than about the fixation, destruction and/or immobilization of any other hazardous constituent group. Metals are the only hazardous constituents which cannot be destroyed, and so must be converted to their least soluble and/or reactive form to prevent reentry into the environment. The occurrence of complexed metals, e.g., metallocyanides, and/or chelated metals, e.g., M{center_dot}EDTA in hazardous waste streams presents formidable challenges to conventional waste treatment practices. This paper presents the results of extensive research into the destruction (chemical oxidation) of metallocyanides and metal-chelates, defines the utility and limitations of conventional chemical oxidation approaches, illustrates some of the waste management difficulties presented by such species, and presents preliminary data on the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} photodecomposition of chelated metals.

  16. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Functional Elements on Sheet Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Adam; Ahuja, Bhrigu; Butzhammer, Lorenz; Osterziel, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael; Merklein, Marion

    Laser Beam Melting (LBM) process with its advantages of high design flexibility and free form manufacturing methodology is often applied limitedly due to its low productivity and unsuitability for mass production compared to conventional manufacturing processes. In order to overcome these limitations, a hybrid manufacturing methodology is developed combining the additive manufacturing process of laser beam melting with sheet forming processes. With an interest towards aerospace and medical industry, the material in focus is Ti-6Al-4V. Although Ti-6Al-4V is a commercially established material and its application for LBM process has been extensively investigated, the combination of LBM of Ti-6Al-4V with sheet metal still needs to be researched. Process dynamics such as high temperature gradients and thermally induced stresses lead to complex stress states at the interaction zone between the sheet and LBM structure. Within the presented paper mechanical characterization of hybrid parts will be performed by shear testing. The association of shear strength with process parameters is further investigated by analyzing the internal structure of the hybrid geometry at varying energy inputs during the LBM process. In order to compare the hybrid manufacturing methodology with conventional fabrication, the conventional methodologies subtractive machining and state of the art Laser Beam Melting is evaluated within this work. These processes will be analyzed for their mechanical characteristics and productivity by determining the build time and raw material consumption for each case. The paper is concluded by presenting the characteristics of the hybrid manufacturing methodology compared to alternative manufacturing technologies.

  18. Chemical characterization and metal abundance in Sri Lankan serpentine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vithanage, M. S.; Rajapaksha, A. U.; Ok, Y. S.; Oze, C.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical weathering of ultramafic rocks and their related soils provide localized sources of metal contamination. In Sri Lanka, rural communities live in close proximity to these rocks and soils and utilize associated groundwaters where human intake of these high metal sources may have adverse human health effects. This study investigates metal abundances and variations in Sri Lankan serpentine soils to begin evaluating potential human health hazards. Specifically, we examine serpentinite occurrences at Ussangoda, Wasgamuwa, Ginigalpelessa, and Indikolapelessa located at the geological boundary between the Highland and Vijayan Complexes. The pH of the soils are near neutral (6.26 to 7.69) with soil electrical conductivities (EC) ranging from 33.5 to 129.9 μS cm-1, a range indicative of relatively few dissolved salts and/or major dissolved inorganic solutes. The highest EC is from the Ussangoda soil which may be due to the atmospheric deposition of salt spray from the sea. Organic carbon contents of the soils range from 1.09% to 2.58%. The highest organic carbon percentage is from the Wasgamuwa soil which is located in a protected preserve. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and total metal digestion results show that all serpentine soils are Fe-, Cr-, and Ni-rich with abundant aluminosilicate minerals. Nickel is highest in the Ussangoda soil (6,459 mg kg-1), while Cr (>10,000 mg kg-1), Co (441 mg kg-1) and Mn (2,263 mg kg-1) are highest in the Wasgamuwa serpentine soil. Additionally, Mn (2,200 mg kg-1) and Co (400 mg kg-1) are present at high concentrations in the Wasgamuwa and Ginigalpelessa soils respectively. Electron microprobe mapping demonstrates that these heavy metals are not homogeneously distributed where Cr is specifically associated with Al and Fe phases. Metal speciation of these serpentine soils are currently being investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to provide better constraints with regards to their mobility and toxicity.

  19. 15 CFR 714.3 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals. 714.3 Section 714.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade... COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 3 CHEMICALS § 714.3 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals. (a)...

  20. Heavy metal pollutants and chemical ecology: exploring new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Heavy metals are an important class of pollutants with both lethal and sublethal effects on organisms. The latter are receiving increased attention, as these may have harmful ecological outcomes. For example, recent explorations of heavy metals in freshwater habitats reveal that they can modify chemical communication between individuals, resulting in "info-disruption" that can impact ecological relationships within and between species. Info-disruption can affect animal behavior and social structure, which in turn can modify both intraspecies and interspecies interactions. In terrestrial habitats, info-disruption by metals is not well studied, but recent demonstrations of chemical signaling between plants via both roots and volatile organic molecules provide potential opportunities for info-disruption. Metals in terrestrial habitats also can form elemental plant defenses, in which they can defend a plant against natural enemies. For example, hyperaccumulation of metals by terrestrial plants has been shown to provide defensive benefits, although in almost all known cases the metals are not anthropogenic pollutants but are naturally present in soils inhabited by these plants. Info-disruption among microbes is another arena in which metal pollutants may have ecological effects, as recent discoveries regarding quorum sensing in bacteria provide an avenue for metals to affect interactions among bacteria or between bacteria and other organisms. Metal pollutants also may influence immune responses of organisms, and thus affect pathogen/host relationships. Immunomodulation (modification of immune system function) has been tied to some metal pollutants, although specific metals may boost or reduce immune system function depending on dose. Finally, the study of metal pollutants is complicated by their frequent occurrence as mixtures, either with other metals or with organic pollutants. Most studies of metal pollutants focus on single metals and therefore oversimplify complex

  1. An effects addition model based on bioaccumulation of metals from exposure to mixtures of metals can predict chronic mortality in the aquatic invertebrate Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Warren P; Borgmann, Uwe; Dixon, D George

    2013-07-01

    Chronic toxicity tests of mixtures of 9 metals and 1 metalloid (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Tl, and Zn) at equitoxic concentrations over an increasing concentration range were conducted with the epibenthic, freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. The authors conducted 28-d, water-only tests. The bioaccumulation trends changed for 8 of the elements in exposures to mixtures of the metals compared with individual metal exposures. The bioaccumulation of Co and Tl were affected the most. These changes may be due to interactions between all the metals as well as interactions with waterborne ligands. A metal effects addition model (MEAM) is proposed as a more accurate method to assess the impact of mixtures of metals and to predict chronic mortality. The MEAM uses background-corrected body concentration to predict toxicity. This is important because the chemical characteristics of different waters can greatly alter the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of metals, and interactions among metals for binding at the site of action within the organism can affect body concentration. The MEAM accurately predicted toxicity in exposures to mixtures of metals, and predicted results were within a factor of 1.1 of the observed data, using 24-h depurated body concentrations. The traditional concentration addition model overestimated toxicity by a factor of 2.7.

  2. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Objects Including Amorphous Metal Using Techniques Akin to Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including amorphous metals using techniques akin to additive manufacturing. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes an amorphous metal includes: applying a first layer of molten metallic alloy to a surface; cooling the first layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a first layer including amorphous metal; subsequently applying at least one layer of molten metallic alloy onto a layer including amorphous metal; cooling each subsequently applied layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a layer including amorphous metal prior to the application of any adjacent layer of molten metallic alloy; where the aggregate of the solidified layers including amorphous metal forms a desired shape in the object to be fabricated; and removing at least the first layer including amorphous metal from the surface.

  3. Enhancement of Platinum Cathode Catalysis by Addition of Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duong, Hung Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) contributes significantly to the loss of cathode overpotential in fuel cells, thus requiring high loadings of platinum (Pt), which is an expensive metal with limited supply. However, Pt and Pt-based alloys are still the best available electrocatalysts for ORR thus far. The research presented…

  4. Chemical abundances in metal-poor stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim; Norris, John; Shetrone, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Stars in low-mass dwarf galaxies show a larger range in their chemical properties than those in the Milky Way halo. Not only are alpha-poor stars found at lower metallicities, but also r-process challenged stars, and a disparate fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars. A more pristine and chemically inhomogeneous interstellar medium, combined with stoichastic star formation in a metal-poor environment, is thought to cause these detectable differences in the early SN II contributions. We are also now finding stars in dwarf galaxies that appear to be iron-enhanced, i.e., stars that have formed in pockets of SN Ia enriched gas. A comparison of their chemical abundances with individual SN Ia models can provide unique constraints on the SN Ia progenitors.

  5. Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

    1985-08-05

    A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

  6. Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L.; Doctor, Richard D.; Wingender, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of simultaneously removing SO.sub.2 and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO.sub.2 and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled.

  7. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments.

  8. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  9. Metal accumulation by stream bryophytes, related to chemical speciation.

    PubMed

    Tipping, E; Vincent, C D; Lawlor, A J; Lofts, S

    2008-12-01

    Metal accumulation by aquatic bryophytes was investigated using data for headwater streams of differing chemistry. The Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) was applied to calculate chemical speciation, including competitive proton and metal interactions with external binding sites on the plants. The speciation modelling approach gives smaller deviations between observed and predicted bryophyte contents of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb than regressions based on total filtered metal concentrations. If all four metals, and Ni, are considered together, the WHAM predictions are superior at the 1% level. Optimised constants for bryophyte binding by the trace metals are similar to those for humic substances and simple carboxylate ligands. Bryophyte contents of Na, Mg and Ca are approximately explained by binding at external sites, while most of the K is intracellular. Oxide phases account for some of the Al, and most of the Mn, Fe and Co.

  10. Metal-air cell with performance enhancing additive

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A; Buttry, Daniel

    2015-11-10

    Systems and methods drawn to an electrochemical cell comprising a low temperature ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions and a performance enhancing additive added to the low temperature ionic liquid. The additive dissolves in the ionic liquid to form cations, which are coordinated with one or more negative ions forming ion complexes. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. The ion complexes improve oxygen reduction thermodynamics and/or kinetics relative to the ionic liquid without the additive.

  11. Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

    1992-12-31

    The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

  12. Automatic Submerged ARC Welding With Metal Power Additions to Increase Productivity and Maintain Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Manager of Welding Engineering PROPOSAL WELDING OF CARBON STEEL AND HY80 UTILIZING THE BULK WELDING PROCESS May 9, 1983 PREPARED BY: NEWPORT NEwS...12 joints with carbon steel and 12 with HY80 , utilizing three The joints will requirements of Benefits 1. Deposition times that different size double...of Joint Variations and Deposition Rates Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses; Carbon Steel /HIS Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses

  13. 75 FR 33824 - Pharmaceutical Products and Chemical Intermediates, Fourth Review: Advice Concerning the Addition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Pharmaceutical Products and Chemical Intermediates, Fourth Review: Advice Concerning the Addition of Certain Products to the Pharmaceutical Appendix to the HTS AGENCY: United States International... (Commission) instituted investigation No. 332-520, Pharmaceutical Products and Chemical Intermediates,...

  14. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Cellular Structures: Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Harrysson, Ola; Cormier, Denis; West, Harvey; Gong, Haijun; Stucker, Brent

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid development of additive manufacturing (AM), high-quality fabrication of lightweight design-efficient structures no longer poses an insurmountable challenge. On the other hand, much of the current research and development with AM technologies still focuses on material and process development. With the design for additive manufacturing in mind, this article explores the design issue for lightweight cellular structures that could be efficiently realized via AM processes. A unit-cell-based modeling approach that combines experimentation and limited-scale simulation was demonstrated, and it was suggested that this approach could potentially lead to computationally efficient design optimizations with the lightweight structures in future applications.

  15. The chemical form of metallic debris in tissues surrounding metal-on-metal hips with unexplained failure.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alister J; Quinn, Paul D; Sampson, Barry; Sandison, Ann; Atkinson, Kirk D; Skinner, John A; Powell, Jonathan J; Mosselmans, J Fred W

    2010-11-01

    Implant-derived material from metal-on-metal (MOM) hip arthroplasties may be responsible for an unexplained tissue inflammatory response. The chemical form of the metal species in the tissues is predominantly chromium (Cr), but the currently used techniques have not been able to determine whether this is Cr(III) phosphate or Cr(III) oxide. The analytical challenge must overcome the fact that the metal in the tissues is at a relatively low concentration and tissue preparation or the microscopy beam used can affect the results. Microfocus X-ray spectroscopy using a synchrotron beam is useful in addressing both these issues. Using this technique we compared tissue from failed MOM hips with: (1) tissue from metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) hips; (2) chemical standards; (3) metal discs cut from MOM hips. The most abundant implant-related species in all MOM hip tissues contained Cr. Comparison with standards revealed the chemical form was Cr(III) phosphate, which did not vary with manufacturer type (four types analysed) or level of blood metal ions. Cobalt (Co) and molybdenum (Mo) were occasionally present in areas of high Cr. Co was normally found in a metallic state in the tissue, while Mo was found in an oxidized state. The variety of metallic species may have arisen from corrosion, wear or a combination of both. No evidence of Cr(VI) was seen in the tissues examined.

  16. Oxidative addition of C--H bonds in organic molecules to transition metal centers

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, R.G.

    1989-04-01

    Alkanes are among the most chemically inert organic molecules. They are reactive toward a limited range of reagents, such as highly energetic free radicals and strongly electrophilic and oxidizing species. This low reactivity is a consequence of the C--H bond energies in most saturated hydrocarbons. These values range from 90 to 98 kcal/mole for primary and secondary C--H bonds; in methane, the main constituent of natural gas, the C--H bond energy is 104 kcal/mole. This makes methane one of the most common but least reactive organic molecules in nature. This report briefly discusses the search for metal complexes capable of undergoing the C--H oxidative addition process allowing alkane chemistry to be more selective than that available using free radical reagents. 14 refs.

  17. 76 FR 20992 - Sun Chemical Corp.; Filing of Color Additive Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Sun Chemical Corp.; Filing of Color Additive Petition AGENCY... announcing that Sun Chemical Corp. has filed a petition proposing that the color additive regulations for D&C... 721(d)(1) (21 U.S.C. 379e(d)(1))), notice is given that a color additive petition (CAP 1C0290)...

  18. Metal Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition fabrication of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.

    1980-08-01

    The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process was studied and implemented in detail. Single crystal GaAs, and Ga(x)Al(1-x)As films were grown on GaAs by depositing metal organic alkyl gallium compounds in the presence of an arsine mixture. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition process allowed formation of the semiconductor compound directly on the heated substrate in only one hot temperature zone. With MO-CVD, semiconductor films can be efficiently produced by a more economical, less complicated process which will lend itself more easily than past fabrication procedures, to high quantity, high quality reproduction techniques of semiconductor lasers. Clearly MO-CVD is of interest to the communication industry where semiconductor lasers are used extensively in fiber optic communication systems, and similarly to the solar energy business where GaAs substrates are used as photoelectric cells.

  19. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  20. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  1. Chemically and temperature-induced phase transformations of metal vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patridge, Christopher James

    different individual beta'-Cu xV2O5 nanowires vary widely. Using scanning transmission X-ray microspectroscopy of individual beta'-CuxV2O 5 nanowires, correlations appear to exist between MIT characteristics and the markedly different orbital hybridization of vanadium and oxygen at the O K and V L absorption edges. These comprehensive nanostructure studies hint at the possibility of approaching the incredibly important realm of single-domain measurements which are needed to understand and exploit the intrinsic physical properties of materials. In addition to the bronze MIT studies, the classical MIT material vanadium dioxide, VO2, also shows new properties when scaling down to nanoscale dimensions as well as incorporation of substitutional dopants such as tungsten. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the dopant local structure suggests an increased symmetry and depairing of V4+-V 4+, which is critical for transition to the lower temperature insulating phase thereby super-cooling the metallic phase to temperatures as low as 254 K. Mechanistic insight and structural changes associated with the intercalation of Li+ are key aspects in understanding and designing useful secondary Li ion batteries. In similarity to the MxV2O 5 studies, another metal vanadate, Ag2VO2PO 4, undergoes phase transformations due to introduction of Li and the vacancy of Ag ions. Employing a comprehensive study on Ag2VO 2PO4 using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, information about chemical state changes and rehybridization of frontier orbitals allows for a more precise understanding of how the material discharges, what, if any, intermediate phases exist during the process, and provides evidence for the posited structural stability at high depths of discharge.

  2. Overview of Materials Qualification Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Salem, Ayman; Beuth, Jack; Harrysson, Ola; Lewandowski, John J.

    2016-03-01

    This overview highlights some of the key aspects regarding materials qualification needs across the additive manufacturing (AM) spectrum. AM technology has experienced considerable publicity and growth in the past few years with many successful insertions for non-mission-critical applications. However, to meet the full potential that AM has to offer, especially for flight-critical components (e.g., rotating parts, fracture-critical parts, etc.), qualification and certification efforts are necessary. While development of qualification standards will address some of these needs, this overview outlines some of the other key areas that will need to be considered in the qualification path, including various process-, microstructure-, and fracture-modeling activities in addition to integrating these with lifing activities targeting specific components. Ongoing work in the Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center at Case Western Reserve University is focusing on fracture and fatigue testing to rapidly assess critical mechanical properties of some titanium alloys before and after post-processing, in addition to conducting nondestructive testing/evaluation using micro-computerized tomography at General Electric. Process mapping studies are being conducted at Carnegie Mellon University while large area microstructure characterization and informatics (EBSD and BSE) analyses are being conducted at Materials Resources LLC to enable future integration of these efforts via an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering approach to AM. Possible future pathways for materials qualification are provided.

  3. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondloch, Joseph E.; Katz, Michael J.; Isley, William C., III; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W.; Hall, Morgan G.; Decoste, Jared B.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic ZrIV ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  4. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mondloch, Joseph E; Katz, Michael J; Isley, William C; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W; Hall, Morgan G; DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W; Snurr, Randall Q; Cramer, Christopher J; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic Zr(IV) ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  5. Spontaneous grafting of diazonium salts: chemical mechanism on metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Alice; Lefèvre, Xavier; Jégou, Pascale; Deniau, Guy; Palacin, Serge

    2012-08-14

    The spontaneous reaction of diazonium salts on various substrates has been widely employed since it consists of a simple immersion of the substrate in the diazonium salt solution. As electrochemical processes involving the same diazonium salts, the spontaneous grafting is assumed to give covalently poly(phenylene)-like bonded films. Resistance to solvents and to ultrasonication is commonly accepted as indirect proof of the existence of a covalent bond. However, the most relevant attempts to demonstrate a metal-C interface bond have been obtained by an XPS investigation of spontaneously grafted films on copper. Similarly, our experiments give evidence of such a bond in spontaneously grafted films on nickel substrates in acetonitrile. In the case of gold substrates, the formation of a spontaneous film was unexpected but reported in the literature in parallel to our observations. Even if no interfacial bond was observed, formation of the films was explained by grafting of aryl cations or radicals on the surface arising from dediazoniation, the film growing later by azo coupling, radical addition, or cationic addition on the grafted phenyl layer. Nevertheless, none of these mechanisms fits our experimental results showing the presence of an Au-N bond. In this work, we present a fine spectroscopic analysis of the coatings obtained on gold and nickel substrates that allow us to propose a chemical structure of such films, in particular, their interface with the substrates. After testing the most probable mechanisms, we have concluded in favor of the involvement of two complementary mechanisms which are the direct reaction of diazonium salts with the gold surface that accounts for the observed Au-N interfacial bonds as well as the formation of aryl cations able to graft on the substrate through Au-C linkages.

  6. 15 CFR 714.3 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals. 714.3 Section 714.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 3 CHEMICALS § 714.3...

  7. 15 CFR 714.3 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals. 714.3 Section 714.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 3 CHEMICALS § 714.3...

  8. 15 CFR 714.3 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals. 714.3 Section 714.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 3 CHEMICALS § 714.3...

  9. 15 CFR 714.3 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... additionally planned production of Schedule 3 chemicals. 714.3 Section 714.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 3 CHEMICALS § 714.3...

  10. Metal-assisted chemical etch porous silicon formation method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiuling; Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2004-09-14

    A thin discontinuous layer of metal such as Au, Pt, or Au/Pd is deposited on a silicon surface. The surface is then etched in a solution including HF and an oxidant for a brief period, as little as a couple seconds to one hour. A preferred oxidant is H.sub.2 O.sub.2. Morphology and light emitting properties of porous silicon can be selectively controlled as a function of the type of metal deposited, Si doping type, silicon doping level, and/or etch time. Electrical assistance is unnecessary during the chemical etching of the invention, which may be conducted in the presence or absence of illumination.

  11. Strategy for Texture Management in Metals Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirka, M. M.; Lee, Y.; Greeley, D. A.; Okello, A.; Goin, M. J.; Pearce, M. T.; Dehoff, R. R.

    2017-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies have long been recognized for their ability to fabricate complex geometric components directly from models conceptualized through computers, allowing for complicated designs and assemblies to be fabricated at lower costs, with shorter time to market, and improved function. Lacking behind the design complexity aspect is the ability to fully exploit AM processes for control over texture within AM components. Currently, standard heat-fill strategies utilized in AM processes result in largely columnar grain structures. Proposed in this work is a point heat source fill for the electron beam melting (EBM) process through which the texture in AM materials can be controlled. Through this point heat source strategy, the ability to form either columnar or equiaxed grain structures upon solidification through changes in the process parameters associated with the point heat source fill is demonstrated for the nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 718. Mechanically, the material is demonstrated to exhibit either anisotropic properties for the columnar-grained material fabricated through using the standard raster scan of the EBM process or isotropic properties for the equiaxed material fabricated using the point heat source fill.

  12. Optimization of soil mixing technology through metallic iron addition.

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, L. P.

    1999-01-15

    Enhanced soil mixing is a process used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil. In this process, also known as soil mixing with thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, or SM/TESVE, a soil mixing apparatus breaks up and mixes a column of soil up to 9 m (30 ft) deep; simultaneously, hot air is blown through the soil. The hot air carries the VOCs to the surface where they are collected and safely disposed of. This technology is cost effective at high VOC concentrations, but it becomes cost prohibitive at low concentrations. Argonne National Laboratory-East conducted a project to evaluate ways of improving the effectiveness of this system. The project investigated the feasibility of integrating the SM/TESVE process with three soil treatment processes--soil vapor extraction, augmented indigenous biodegradation, and zero-valent iron addition. Each of these technologies was considered a polishing treatment designed to remove the contaminants left behind by enhanced soil mixing. The experiment was designed to determine if the overall VOC removal effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the SM/TESVE process could be improved by integrating this approach with one of the polishing treatment systems.

  13. Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Chemical Transformations.

    PubMed

    He, Hongming; Perman, Jason A; Zhu, Guangshan; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ), as the primary greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, triggers a series of environmental and energy related problems in the world. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop multiple methods to capture and convert CO2 into useful chemical products, which can significantly improve the environment and promote sustainable development. Over the past several decades, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown outstanding heterogeneous catalytic activity due in part to their high internal surface area and chemical functionalities. These properties and the ability to synthesize MOF platforms allow experiments to test structure-function relationships for transforming CO2 into useful chemicals. Herein, recent developments are highlighted for MOFs participating as catalysts for the chemical fixation and photochemical reduction of CO2 . Finally, opportunities and challenges facing MOF catalysts are discussed in this ongoing research area.

  14. Transition-Metal Additives For Long-Life Na/NiCI(2) Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Transition-metal additives in cathodes of Na/NiCI(2) high-temperature, rechargeable electrochemical cells found to slow premature fading of charge/discharge capacity. Decline in capacity of cell attributed to agglomeration of Ni particles at cathode: this agglomeration reduces electrochemical area of cathode. Depending on choice of transition-metal additive for particular cell, additive might even participate in desired electrochemical reactions in cell, contributing to specific energy of cell.

  15. The Coupled Photothermal Reaction and Transport in a Laser Additive Metal Nanolayer Simultaneous Synthesis and Pattering for Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Song-Ling; Liu, Yi-Kai; Pan, Heng; Liu, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2016-01-08

    The Laser Direct Synthesis and Patterning (LDSP) technology has advantages in terms of processing time and cost compared to nanomaterials-based laser additive microfabrication processes. In LDSP, a scanning laser on the substrate surface induces chemical reactions in the reactive liquid solution and selectively deposits target material in a preselected pattern on the substrate. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of the processing parameters and type and concentration of the additive solvent on the properties and growth rate of the resulting metal film fabricated by this LDSP technology. It was shown that reactive metal ion solutions with substantial viscosity yield metal films with superior physical properties. A numerical analysis was also carried out the first time to investigate the coupled opto-thermo-fluidic transport phenomena and the effects on the metal film growth rate. To complete the simulation, the optical properties of the LDSP deposited metal film with a variety of thicknesses were measured. The characteristics of the temperature field and the thermally induced flow associated with the moving heat source are discussed. It was shown that the processing temperature range of the LDSP is from 330 to 390 K. A semi-empirical model for estimating the metal film growth rate using this process was developed based on these results. From the experimental and numerical results, it is seen that, owing to the increased reflectivity of the silver film as its thickness increases, the growth rate decreases gradually from about 40 nm at initial to 10 nm per laser scan after ten scans. This self-controlling effect of LDSP process controls the thickness and improves the uniformity of the fabricated metal film. The growth rate and resulting thickness of the metal film can also be regulated by adjustment of the processing parameters, and thus can be utilized for controllable additive nano/microfabrication.

  16. The Coupled Photothermal Reaction and Transport in a Laser Additive Metal Nanolayer Simultaneous Synthesis and Pattering for Flexible Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Song-Ling; Liu, Yi-Kai; Pan, Heng; Liu, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2016-01-01

    The Laser Direct Synthesis and Patterning (LDSP) technology has advantages in terms of processing time and cost compared to nanomaterials-based laser additive microfabrication processes. In LDSP, a scanning laser on the substrate surface induces chemical reactions in the reactive liquid solution and selectively deposits target material in a preselected pattern on the substrate. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of the processing parameters and type and concentration of the additive solvent on the properties and growth rate of the resulting metal film fabricated by this LDSP technology. It was shown that reactive metal ion solutions with substantial viscosity yield metal films with superior physical properties. A numerical analysis was also carried out the first time to investigate the coupled opto-thermo-fluidic transport phenomena and the effects on the metal film growth rate. To complete the simulation, the optical properties of the LDSP deposited metal film with a variety of thicknesses were measured. The characteristics of the temperature field and the thermally induced flow associated with the moving heat source are discussed. It was shown that the processing temperature range of the LDSP is from 330 to 390 K. A semi-empirical model for estimating the metal film growth rate using this process was developed based on these results. From the experimental and numerical results, it is seen that, owing to the increased reflectivity of the silver film as its thickness increases, the growth rate decreases gradually from about 40 nm at initial to 10 nm per laser scan after ten scans. This self-controlling effect of LDSP process controls the thickness and improves the uniformity of the fabricated metal film. The growth rate and resulting thickness of the metal film can also be regulated by adjustment of the processing parameters, and thus can be utilized for controllable additive nano/microfabrication.

  17. Are delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase inhibition and metal concentrations additional factors for the age-related cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Baierle, Marília; Charão, Mariele F; Göethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Fracasso, Rafael; Bubols, Guilherme; Sauer, Elisa; Campanharo, Sarah C; Rocha, Rafael C C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M; Avila, Daiana S; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-10-17

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive impairments and influenced by oxidative status and chemical imbalances. Thus, this study was conducted to examine whether age-related cognitive deficit is associated with oxidative damage, especially with inhibition of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), as well as to verify the influence of some metals in the enzyme activity and cognitive performance. Blood ALA-D activity, essential (Fe, Zn, Cu, Se) and non-essential metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Ni, V) were measured in 50 elderly and 20 healthy young subjects. Cognitive function was assessed by tests from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery and other. The elderly group presented decreased ALA-D activity compared to the young group. The index of ALA-D reactivation was similar to both study groups, but negatively associated with metals. The mean levels of essential metals were within the reference values, while the most toxic metals were above them in both groups. Cognitive function impairments were observed in elderly group and were associated with decreased ALA-D activity, with lower levels of Se and higher levels of toxic metals (Hg and V). Results suggest that the reduced ALA-D activity in elderly can be an additional factor involved in cognitive decline, since its inhibition throughout life could lead to accumulation of the neurotoxic compound ALA. Toxic metals were found to contribute to cognitive decline and also to influence ALA-D reactivation.

  18. Are Delta-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Inhibition and Metal Concentrations Additional Factors for the Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed Central

    Baierle, Marília; Charão, Mariele F.; Göethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Fracasso, Rafael; Bubols, Guilherme; Sauer, Elisa; Campanharo, Sarah C.; Rocha, Rafael C. C.; Saint’Pierre, Tatiana D.; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M.; Ávila, Daiana S.; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive impairments and influenced by oxidative status and chemical imbalances. Thus, this study was conducted to examine whether age-related cognitive deficit is associated with oxidative damage, especially with inhibition of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), as well as to verify the influence of some metals in the enzyme activity and cognitive performance. Blood ALA-D activity, essential (Fe, Zn, Cu, Se) and non-essential metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Ni, V) were measured in 50 elderly and 20 healthy young subjects. Cognitive function was assessed by tests from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD) battery and other. The elderly group presented decreased ALA-D activity compared to the young group. The index of ALA-D reactivation was similar to both study groups, but negatively associated with metals. The mean levels of essential metals were within the reference values, while the most toxic metals were above them in both groups. Cognitive function impairments were observed in elderly group and were associated with decreased ALA-D activity, with lower levels of Se and higher levels of toxic metals (Hg and V). Results suggest that the reduced ALA-D activity in elderly can be an additional factor involved in cognitive decline, since its inhibition throughout life could lead to accumulation of the neurotoxic compound ALA. Toxic metals were found to contribute to cognitive decline and also to influence ALA-D reactivation. PMID:25329536

  19. Effects of Metal Powder Addition in Ni-Sheathed PIT MgB2 Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, K.; Yamada, Y.; Katagiri, K.; Kumakura, H.; Iwamoto, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of different metal powder additions on the transport current and stress/strain performance of ex-situ processed MgB2 tapes with Ni sheath has been studied. The metal powder added to the core exhibits elongated morphology after the fabrication. The addition of low melting point metal powder, e.g. In and Sn, produces an appreciable increase in the Jc of MgB2 core. An addition of 10 vol% In enhances Jc by a factor of 6 to 7 after the combination of rolling and annealing at 200 °C, up to the order of 105 A/cm2 at 0.5 T and 4.2 K. An addition of 10 vol% Sn enhances Jc by a factor of ˜ 3. The In and Sn additions also appreciably increase the n-value of the current-voltage transition. Both In and Sn metals infiltrate into gaps between MgB2 grains, improving the linkage of the grains. Current may transfer through the impregnated metal by the proximity effect. Furthermore, the metal powder addition appreciably improves the strain tolerance in MgB2 tapes. The low melting point metal powder addition is a relatively simple and easy approach to yield better transport current and stress/strain performance in ex-situ MgB2 tapes.

  20. Silicon nanowire photodetectors made by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Ni, Chuan; Sarangan, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanowires have unique optical effects, and have potential applications in photodetectors. They can exhibit simple optical effects such as anti-reflection, but can also produce quantum confined effects. In this work, we have fabricated silicon photodetectors, and then post-processed them by etching nanowires on the incident surface. These nanowires were produced by a wet-chemical etching process known as the metal-assisted-chemical etching, abbreviated as MACE. N-type silicon substrates were doped by thermal diffusion from a solid ceramic source, followed by etching, patterning and contact metallization. The detectors were first tested for functionality and optical performance. The nanowires were then made by depositing an ultra-thin film of gold below its percolation thickness to produce an interconnected porous film. This was then used as a template to etch high aspect ratio nanowires into the face of the detectors with a HF:H2O2 mixture.

  1. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of nanoscale metal and metal oxide additives in biofuel (ethanol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the combustion behavior of nano-aluminum (n-Al) and nano-aluminum oxide (n-Al2O3) particles stably suspended in biofuel (ethanol) as a secondary energy carrier was conducted. The heat of combustion (HoC) was studied using a modified static bomb calorimeter system. Combustion element composition and surface morphology were evaluated using a SEM/EDS system. N-Al and n-Al2O3 particles of 50- and 36-nm diameters, respectively, were utilized in this investigation. Combustion experiments were performed with volume fractions of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10% for n-Al, and 0.5, 1, 3, and 5% for n-Al2O3. The results indicate that the amount of heat released from ethanol combustion increases almost linearly with n-Al concentration. N-Al volume fractions of 1 and 3% did not show enhancement in the average volumetric HoC, but higher volume fractions of 5, 7, and 10% increased the volumetric HoC by 5.82, 8.65, and 15.31%, respectively. N-Al2O3 and heavily passivated n-Al additives did not participate in combustion reactively, and there was no contribution from Al2O3 to the HoC in the tests. A combustion model that utilized Chemical Equilibrium with Applications was conducted as well and was shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21711760

  2. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents.

    PubMed

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janoš, Pavel; Skoumal, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxides have very important applications in many areas of chemistry, physics and materials science; their properties are dependent on the method of preparation, the morphology and texture. Nanostructured metal oxides can exhibit unique characteristics unlike those of the bulk form depending on their morphology, with a high density of edges, corners and defect surfaces. In recent years, methods have been developed for the preparation of metal oxide powders with tunable control of the primary particle size as well as of a secondary particle size: the size of agglomerates of crystallites. One of the many ways to take advantage of unique properties of nanostructured oxide materials is stoichiometric degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) pollutants on their surfaces.

  4. Tattoo inks: legislation, pigments, metals and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Prior, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Legal limits for chemical substances require that they are linked to clearly defined analytical methods. Present limits for certain chemicals in tattoo and permanent make-up inks do not mention analytical methods for the detection of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or forbidden colourants. There is, therefore, no established method for the determination of the quantities of these chemicals in tattoo and permanent make-up inks. Failing to provide an appropriate method may lead to unqualified and questionable results which often cause legal disputes that are ultimately resolved by a judge with regard to the method that should have been applied. Analytical methods are tuned to exactly what is to be found and what causes the health problems. They are extremely specific. Irrespective of which is the correct method for detecting metals in tattoo inks, the focus should be on the actual amounts of ink in the skin. CTL® has conducted experiments to determine these amounts and these experiments are crucial for toxicological evaluations and for setting legal limits. When setting legal limits, it is essential to also incorporate factors such as daily consumption, total uptake and frequency of use. A tattoo lasts for several decades; therefore, the limits that have been established for heavy metals used in drinking water or soap are not relevant. Drinking water is consumed on a daily basis and soap is used several times per week, while tattooing only occurs once.

  5. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  6. Late Chondritic Additions and Planet and Planetesimal Growth: Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Studies of terrestrial peridotite and martian and achondritic meteorites have led to the conclusion that addition of chondritic material to growing planets or planetesimals, after core formation, occurred on Earth, Mars, asteroid 4 Vesta, and the parent body of the angritic meteorites [1-4]. One study even proposed that this was a common process in the final stages of growth [5]. These conclusions are based almost entirely on the highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os). The HSE are a group of eight elements that have been used to argue for late accretion of chondritic material to the Earth after core formation was complete (e.g., [6]). This idea was originally proposed because the D(metal/silicate) values for the HSE are so high, yet their concentration in the mantle is too high to be consistent with such high Ds. The HSE also are present in chondritic relative abundances and hence require similar Ds if this is the result of core-mantle equilibration. Since the work of [6] there has been a realization that core formation at high PT conditions can explain the abundances of many siderophile elements in the mantle (e.g., [7]), but such detailed high PT partitioning data are lacking for many of the HSE to evaluate whether such ideas are viable for all four bodies. Consideration of other chemical parameters reveals larger problems that are difficult to overcome, but must be addressed in any scenario which calls on the addition of chondritic material to a reduced mantle. Yet these problems are rarely discussed or emphasized, making the late chondritic (or late veneer) addition hypothesis suspect.

  7. Chemical mutagenesis--a promising technique to increase metal concentration and extraction in sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Nehnevajova, Erika; Herzig, Rolf; Federer, Guido; Erismann, Karl-Hans; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Since most of the metal-hyperaccumulating wild plants only produce very low biomass and many high-yielding crops accumulate only moderate amounts of metals, the current research is mainly focused on overcoming these limitations and the optimization of metal phytoextraction. The main goal of the present study was the improvement of metal concentration and extraction properties of Helianthus annuus L by chemical mutagenesis (the non-GMO approach). Sunflowers--hybrid cultivar Salut and inbred lines-were treated with the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). The effect of chemical mutagenesis on metal concentration in and extraction by new sunflower M1 and M2 mutants was directly assessed on a metal-contaminated field in Raft, Switzerland. Mutants of the M2 generation showed a 2-3 times higher metal shoot concentration than the control plants. The best M2 sunflower "giant mutant" 14/185/04 showed a significantly enhanced metal extraction ability: 7.5 times for Cd, 9.2 times for Zn, and 8.2 times for Pb in aboveground parts, as compared to the control plants. Theoretical calculations for the phytoextraction potential of new sunflower variants note that the best sunflower mutant can produce up to 26 t dry matter per hectare and remove 13.3 kg Zn per hectare and year at the sewage sludge contaminated site of Raft; that is a gain factor of 9 compared to Zn extraction by sunflower controls. Furthermore, the use of sunflower oil and biomass for technical purposes (lubricants, biodiesel, biogas) should produce an additional value and improve the economical balance of phytoextraction.

  8. Effect of metal spiking on different chemical pools and chemically extractable fractions of heavy metals in sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kandpal, Geeta; Ram, Bali; Srivastava, P C; Singh, S K

    2004-01-30

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the effect of metal spiking and incubation on some properties and sequentially extractable chemical pools of some heavy metals (F1, two extractions with 0.1 M Sr(NO3)2; F2, one extraction with 1 M NaOAc (pH 5.0); F3, three extractions with 5% NaOCl (pH 8.5) at 90-95 degrees C; F4, three extractions with 0.2 M oxalic acid + 0.2 M ammonium oxalate + 0.1 M ascorbic acid (pH 3.0); and F5, dissolution of sample residue in HF-HClO4 (residual fraction,) and also 1 M CaCl2 and 0.005 M DTPA extractable heavy metals in sewage sludge. Metal spiking and incubation decreased pH and easily oxidizable organic C content of sludge but increased electrical conductivity. Metal spiking and incubation increased F1 fraction of all heavy metals, F2 fraction of Ni, Pb, Cu, and Cd, F3 fraction of Pb, Cu, and Cd, F4 or reducible fraction of Ni, Cu, and Cd and residual fraction of Zn and Pb, but decreased F2 fraction of Zn, F3 of Zn and Ni, F4 fraction of Zn and F5 fraction of Ni, Cu, and Cd. Metal spiking and incubation increased 1 M CaCl2 and 0.005 M DTPA extractable amounts of all heavy metals in sludge except for 0.005 M DTPA extractable Zn, which registered only very marginal decrease.

  9. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs-including their surface composition-unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  10. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roo, Jonathan; van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C.; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs--including their surface composition--unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  11. Metal-enhanced chemiluminescence: Radiating plasmons generated from chemically induced electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Aslan, Kadir; Malyn, Stuart N.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2006-04-01

    In this letter, we report the observation of metal-enhanced chemiluminescence. Silver Island films, in close proximity to chemiluminescence species, can significantly enhance luminescence intensities; a 20-fold increase in chemiluminescence intensity was observed as compared to an identical control sample containing no silver. This suggests the use of silver nanostructures in the chemiluminescence-based immunoassays used in the biosciences today, to improve signal and therefore analyte detectability. In addition, this finding suggests that surface plasmons can be directly excited by chemically induced electronically excited luminophores, a significant finding toward our understanding of fluorophore-metal interactions and the generation of surface plasmons.

  12. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Poston, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  13. Seeded growth of metal-doped plasmonic oxide heterodimer nanocrystals and their chemical transformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingchen; Reifsnyder Hickey, Danielle; Fei, Jiayang; Diroll, Benjamin T; Paik, Taejong; Chen, Jun; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-04-02

    We have developed a generalized seeded-growth methodology for the synthesis of monodisperse metal-doped plasmonic oxide heterodimer nanocrystals (NCs) with a near-unity morphological yield. Using indium-doped cadmium oxide (ICO) as an example, we show that a wide variety of preformed metal NCs (Au, Pt, Pd, FePt, etc.) can serve as the seeds for the tailored synthesis of metal-ICO heterodimers with exquisite size, shape, and composition control, facilitated by the delayed nucleation mechanism of the CdO phase. The metal-ICO heterodimers exhibit broadly tunable near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonances, and dual plasmonic bands are observed for Au-ICO heterodimers. We further demonstrate that the oxide domain of the Au-ICO heterodimers can be selectively and controllably transformed into a series of partially and completely hollow cadmium chalcogenide nanoarchitectures with unprecedented structural complexity, leaving the metal domain intact. Our work not only represents an exciting addition to the rapidly expanding library of chemical reactions that produce colloidal hybrid NCs, but it also provides a general route for the bottom-up chemical design of multicomponent metal-oxide-semiconductor NCs in a rational and sequential manner.

  14. 9 CFR 381.120 - Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Antioxidants; chemical preservatives... Labeling and Containers § 381.120 Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives. When an antioxidant is added to a poultry product, there shall appear on the label in prominent letters and...

  15. 9 CFR 381.120 - Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Antioxidants; chemical preservatives... Labeling and Containers § 381.120 Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives. When an antioxidant is added to a poultry product, there shall appear on the label in prominent letters and...

  16. 9 CFR 381.120 - Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Antioxidants; chemical preservatives... Labeling and Containers § 381.120 Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives. When an antioxidant is added to a poultry product, there shall appear on the label in prominent letters and...

  17. 9 CFR 381.120 - Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Antioxidants; chemical preservatives... Labeling and Containers § 381.120 Antioxidants; chemical preservatives; and other additives. When an antioxidant is added to a poultry product, there shall appear on the label in prominent letters and...

  18. Effect of vermicomposting on concentration and speciation of heavy metals in sewage sludge with additive materials.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Zhang, Yaxin; Shen, Maocai; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Mucen; Li, Meirong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the total content and speciation of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) during vermicomposting of sewage sludge by Eisenia fetida earthworm with different additive materials (soil, straw, fly ash and sawdust). Results showed that the pH, total organic carbon were reduced, while the electric conductivity and germination index increased after a combined composting - vermicomposting process. The addition of bulking agents accelerated the stabilization of sludge and eliminated its toxicity. The total heavy metals after vermicomposting in 10 scenarios were lowered as compared with the initial values and the control without amendment. BCR sequential extraction indicated that vermicomposting significantly decreased the mobility of all heavy metals by increasing the residual fractions. The activity of earthworms and appropriate addition of amendment materials played a positive role in sequestering heavy metals during the treatment of sewage sludge.

  19. MIXTURES OF THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: TESTING ADDITIVITY OF HEPATIC INDUCERS AND THYROID PEROXIDASE INHIBITORS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to chemical mixtures via diet, occupation, and the environment. Previous data demonstrated that low doses of polycyclic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) acting through similar mechanisms result in an additive reduction of thyroxine (T4). If xenobioti...

  20. A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Yosif A; Khalil, Rabah A

    2006-10-01

    A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method has been introduced. Three general nitrogen-15 NMR chemical shift additivity parameters with physical significance for aliphatic amines in methanol and cyclohexane and their hydrochlorides in methanol have been derived. A characteristic feature of these additivity parameters is the individual equation can be applied to both open-chain and rigid systems. The factors that influence the (15)N chemical shift of these substances have been determined. A new method for evaluating conformational equilibria at nitrogen in these compounds using the derived additivity parameters has been developed. Conformational analyses of these substances have been worked out. In general, the results indicate that there are four factors affecting the (15)N chemical shift of aliphatic amines; paramagnetic term (p-character), lone pair-proton interactions, proton-proton interactions, symmetry of alkyl substituents and molecular association.

  1. Effect of water treatment additives on lime softening residual trace chemical composition--implications for disposal and reuse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weizhi; Roessler, Justin; Blaisi, Nawaf I; Townsend, Timothy G

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water treatment residues (WTR) offer potential benefits when recycled through land application. The current guidance in Florida, US allows for unrestricted land application of lime softening WTR; alum and ferric WTR require additional evaluation of total and leachable concentrations of select trace metals prior to land application. In some cases a mixed WTR is produced when lime softening is accompanied by the addition of a coagulant or other treatment chemical; applicability of the current guidance is unclear. The objective of this research was to characterize the total and leachable chemical content of WTR from Florida facilities that utilize multiple treatment chemicals. Lime and mixed lime WTR samples were collected from 18 water treatment facilities in Florida. Total and leachable concentrations of the WTR were measured. To assess the potential for disposal of mixed WTR as clean fill below the water table, leaching tests were conducted at multiple liquid to solid ratios and under reducing conditions. The results were compared to risk-based soil and groundwater contamination thresholds. Total metal concentrations of WTR were found to be below Florida soil contaminant thresholds with Fe found in the highest abundance at a concentration of 3600 mg/kg-dry. Aluminum was the only element that exceeded the Florida groundwater contaminant thresholds using SPLP (95% UCL = 0.23 mg/L; risk threshold = 0.2 mg/L). Tests under reducing conditions showed elevated concentrations of Fe and Mn, ranging from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than SPLP leachates. Mixed lime WTR concentrations (total and leachable) were lower than the ferric and alum WTR concentrations, supporting that mixed WTR are appropriately represented as lime WTR. Testing of WTR under reducing conditions demonstrated the potential for release of certain trace metals (Fe, Al, Mn) above applicable regulatory thresholds; additional evaluation is needed to assess management options where

  2. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  4. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  5. Chemical control of the sea lamprey: the addition of a chemical to the environment.

    PubMed

    Menzie, C M; Hunn, J B

    1976-01-01

    Construction of the Welland Canal enabled shipping to by-pass Niagara Falls and enter the upper Great Lakes and also eliminated the barrier to the entry to the lakes by the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus). Within forty years the commercial fisheries of the Great Lakes was almost eliminated by this parasitic cyclostome. A search for selective chemical control of the sea lamprey was undertaken in the 1950's and culminated with the discovery of TFM (3-Trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol). At the request of the International Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife undertook to assess the hazard of TFM to the aquatic ecosystem, to humans as well as to fish and wildlife. Studies were undertaken in Bureau laboratories as well as by contracts with university and private laboratories. Results of these studies to-date indicate that this material is not subject to biomagnification and does not pose a hazard to man or the the environment.

  6. Chemical and biological properties of toxic metals and use of chelating agents for the pharmacological treatment of metal poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Amantea, Diana; Caruso, Anna; Saturnino, Carmela

    2010-07-01

    Exposure to toxic metals is a well-known problem in industrialized countries. Metals interfere with a number of physiological processes, including central nervous system (CNS), haematopoietic, hepatic and renal functions. In the evaluation of the toxicity of a particular metal it is crucial to consider many parameters: chemical forms (elemental, organic or inorganic), binding capability, presence of specific proteins that selectively bind metals, etc. Medical treatment of acute and chronic metal toxicity is provided by chelating agents, namely organic compounds capable of interacting with metal ions to form structures called chelates. The present review attempts to provide updated information about the mechanisms, the cellular targets and the effects of toxic metals.

  7. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  8. Chemical methods and phytoremediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Chen, H M; Zheng, C R; Tu, C; Shen, Z G

    2000-07-01

    The effects of chemical amendments (calcium carbonate (CC), steel sludge (SS) and furnace slag (FS)) on the growth and uptake of cadmium (Cd) by wetland rice, Chinese cabbage and wheat grown in a red soil contaminated with Cd were investigated using a pot experiment. The phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil with vetiver grass was also studied in a field plot experiment. Results showed that treatments with CC, SS and FS decreased Cd uptake by wetland rice, Chinese cabbage and wheat by 23-95% compared with the unamended control. Among the three amendments, FS was the most efficient at suppressing Cd uptake by the plants, probably due to its higher content of available silicon (Si). The concentrations of zinc (Zn), lead (Pb) and Cd in the shoots of vetiver grass were 42-67%, 500-1200% and 120-260% higher in contaminated plots than in control, respectively. Cadmium accumulation by vetiver shoots was 218 g Cd/ha at a soil Cd concentration of 0.33 mg Cd/kg. It is suggested that heavy metal-contaminated soil could be remediated with a combination of chemical treatments and plants.

  9. Recycling of red muds with the extraction of metals and special additions to cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoveev, D. V.; Diubanov, V. G.; Shutova, A. V.; Ziniaeva, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The liquid-phase reduction of iron oxides from red mud is experimentally studied. It is shown that, in addition to a metal, a slag suitable for utilization in the construction industry can be produced as a result of pyrometallurgical processing of red mud. Portland cement is shown to be produced from this slag with mineral additions and a high-aluminate expansion addition to cement.

  10. Baade's window and APOGEE. Metallicities, ages, and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheis, M.; Rojas-Arriagada, A.; García Pérez, A. E.; Jönsson, H.; Hayden, M.; Nandakumar, G.; Cunha, K.; Allende Prieto, C.; Holtzman, J. A.; Beers, T. C.; Bizyaev, D.; Brinkmann, J.; Carrera, R.; Cohen, R. E.; Geisler, D.; Hearty, F. R.; Fernandez-Tricado, J. G.; Maraston, C.; Minnitti, D.; Nitschelm, C.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Schneider, D. P.; Tang, B.; Villanova, S.; Zasowski, G.; Majewski, S. R.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Baade's window (BW) is one of the most observed Galactic bulge fields in terms of chemical abundances. Owing to its low and homogeneous interstellar absorption it is considered the perfect calibration field for Galactic bulge studies. Aims: In the era of large spectroscopic surveys, calibration fields such as BW are necessary for cross calibrating the stellar parameters and individual abundances of the APOGEE survey. Methods: We use the APOGEE BW stars to derive the metallicity distribution function (MDF) and individual abundances for α- and iron-peak elements of the APOGEE ASPCAP pipeline (DR13), as well as the age distribution for stars in BW. Results: We determine the MDF of APOGEE stars in BW and find a remarkable agreement with that of the Gaia-ESO survey (GES). Both exhibit a clear bimodal distribution. We also find that the Mg-metallicity planes of the two surveys agree well, except for the metal-rich part ([Fe/H] > 0.1), where APOGEE finds systematically higher Mg abundances with respect to the GES. The ages based on the [C/N] ratio reveal a bimodal age distribution, with a major old population at 10 Gyr, with a decreasing tail towards younger stars. A comparison of stellar parameters determined by APOGEE and those determined by other sources reveals detectable systematic offsets, in particular for spectroscopic surface gravity estimates. In general, we find a good agreement between individual abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from APOGEE with that of literature values. Conclusions: We have shown that in general APOGEE data show a good agreement in terms of MDF and individual chemical abundances with respect to literature works. Using the [C/N] ratio we found a significant fraction of young stars in BW.

  11. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low.

  12. TANK 40 FINAL SB5 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS PRIOR TO NP ADDITION

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.

    2010-01-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). This sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. Prior to radionuclide inventory analyses, a final sample of the H-canyon Np stream will be added to bound the Np addition anticipated for Tank 40. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB5. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB5 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 239 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four in Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Due to the use of Zr crucibles and Na in the peroxide fusions, Na and Zr cannot be determined from this preparation. Additionally, other alkali metals, such as Li and K that may be contaminants in the Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} are not determined from this preparation. Three Analytical Reference Glass - 14 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. The ARG-1 glass allows for an assessment of the completeness of each digestion. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis of masses 81-209 and 230

  13. Using alternative chemicals in the flotation of heavy metals from lead mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Benn, F.W.

    1995-04-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) investigated alternative chemicals for the flotation of heavy metal values from southeast Missouri lead mill tailings. The objectives of the study were to lower the Pb remaining in the reprocessed tailings to <500 ppm, concentrate the metal values, and lower the overall toxicity of the flotation reagent scheme. Due to the high toxicity of classic flotation chemicals, collectorless flotation, as well as nontoxic or less-toxic chemicals, was studied for use in the flotation process. The investigation centered on the National tailings pile in Flat River, MO. Advantages to using alternative chemicals for the flotation process are presented. Novel reagent schemes are discussed for the treatment of the tailings. Various nontoxic or less-toxic oils were tested, and a substitute for sodium sulfide was investigated. Using a food additive oil, soda ash, and a frother as the reagent scheme, froth flotation recovered 89% of the Pb values. Further scavenging lowered the Pb remaining in the reprocessed tailings to <500 ppm. A less-toxic substitute for sodium cyanide was also studied for use in the cleaner flotation stages. Preliminary results indicate that the food additive oil, canola oil, to be as effective as classic sulfide flotation reagents.

  14. The effect of lactic acid bacterial starter culture and chemical additives on wilted rice straw silage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Su; Shi, Wei; Huang, Lin-Ting; Ding, Cheng-Long; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suitable for rice straw silage fermentation, but have been studied rarely, and rice straw as raw material for ensiling is difficult because of its disadvantages, such as low nutrition for microbial activities and low abundances of natural populations of LAB. So we investigated the effect of application of LAB and chemical additives on the fermentation quality and microbial community of wilted rice straw silage. Treatment with chemical additives increased the concentrations of crude protein (CP), water soluble carbohydrate (WSC), acetic acid and lactic acid, reduced the concentrations of acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF), but did not effectively inhibit the growth of spoilage organisms. Inoculation with LABs did not improve the nutritional value of the silage because of poor growth of LABs in wilted rice straw. Inoculation with LAB and addition of chemical materials improved the quality of silage similar to the effects of addition of chemical materials alone. Growth of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria was inhibited by this mixed treatment and the LAB gradually dominated the microbial community. In summary, the fermentation quality of wilted rice straw silage had improved by addition of LAB and chemical materials.

  15. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}X)Rh(CO){sub 2} complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C{sub 60} molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C{sub 60} reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs.

  16. Chemical TOPAZ: Modifications to the heat transfer code TOPAZ: The addition of chemical reaction kinetics and chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.L. III.

    1990-06-07

    This is a report describing the modifications which have been made to the heat flow code TOPAZ to allow the inclusion of thermally controlled chemical kinetics. This report is broken into parts. The first part is an introduction to the general assumptions and theoretical underpinning that were used to develop the model. The second section describes the changes that have been implemented into the code. The third section is the users manual for the input for the code. The fourth section is a compilation of hints, common errors, and things to be aware of while you are getting started. The fifth section gives a sample problem using the new code. This manual addenda is written with the presumption that most readers are not fluent with chemical concepts. Therefore, we shall in this section endeavor to describe the requirements that must be met before chemistry can occur and how we have modeled the chemistry in the code.

  17. Topological design and additive manufacturing of porous metals for bone scaffolds and orthopaedic implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Xu, Shanqing; Zhou, Shiwei; Xu, Wei; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Qian, M; Brandt, Milan; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-03-01

    One of the critical issues in orthopaedic regenerative medicine is the design of bone scaffolds and implants that replicate the biomechanical properties of the host bones. Porous metals have found themselves to be suitable candidates for repairing or replacing the damaged bones since their stiffness and porosity can be adjusted on demands. Another advantage of porous metals lies in their open space for the in-growth of bone tissue, hence accelerating the osseointegration process. The fabrication of porous metals has been extensively explored over decades, however only limited controls over the internal architecture can be achieved by the conventional processes. Recent advances in additive manufacturing have provided unprecedented opportunities for producing complex structures to meet the increasing demands for implants with customized mechanical performance. At the same time, topology optimization techniques have been developed to enable the internal architecture of porous metals to be designed to achieve specified mechanical properties at will. Thus implants designed via the topology optimization approach and produced by additive manufacturing are of great interest. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of topological design and manufacturing processes of various types of porous metals, in particular for titanium alloys, biodegradable metals and shape memory alloys. This review also identifies the limitations of current techniques and addresses the directions for future investigations.

  18. Textbook Errors: 137. Physical and Chemical Properties and Bonding of Metallic Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Focuses attention on the almost universal practice of discussing all metals as malleable. The author points out that some are brittle and then he presents the variation in chemical properties of metals. (SA)

  19. Cumulative effects of bamboo sawdust addition on pyrolysis of sewage sludge: Biochar properties and environmental risk from metals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junwei; Wang, Minyan; Cao, Yucheng; Wu, Shengchun; Liang, Peng; Li, Yanan; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Jin; Wong, Ming Hung; Shan, Shengdao; Christie, Peter

    2017-03-01

    A novel type of biochar was produced by mixing bamboo sawdust with sewage sludge (1:1, w/w) via a co-pyrolysis process at 400-600°C. Changes in physico-chemical properties and the intrinsic speciation of metals were investigated before and after pyrolysis. Co-pyrolysis resulted in a lower biochar yield but a higher C content in the end product compared with use of sludge alone as the raw material. FT-IR analysis indicates that phosphine derivatives containing PH bonds were formed in the co-pyrolyzed biochars. In addition, co-pyrolysis of sludge with bamboo sawdust transformed the potentially toxic metals in the sludge into more stable fractions, leading to a considerable decrease in their direct toxicity and bioavailability in the co-pyrolyzed biochar. In conclusion, the co-pyrolysis technology provides a feasible method for the safe disposal of metal-contaminated sewage sludge in an attempt to minimize the environmental risk from potentially toxic metals after land application.

  20. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhenium with metal oxide additives. 1: Feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, F. A.; Page, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating small rhenium parts with metal oxide additives by means of slip casting and extrusion techniques is described. The metal oxides, ZrO2 and HfO2 were stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3. Additions of metal oxide to the rhenium of up to 15 weight percent were used. Tubes of 17 mm diameter with 0.5 mm walls were slip cast by adapting current ceramic oxide techniques. A complete cast double conical nozzle demonstrated the ability to meet shapes and tolerances. Extrusion of meter long tubing lengths of 3.9 mm o.d. x 2.3 mm i.d. final dimension is documented. Sintering schedules are presented to produce better than 95% of theoretical density parts. Finished machining was found possible were requried by electric discharge machining and diamond grinding.

  1. Ligand field effect at oxide-metal interface on the chemical reactivity of ultrathin oxide film surface.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2012-06-27

    Ultrathin oxide film is currently one of the paramount candidates for a heterogeneous catalyst because it provides an additional dimension, i.e., film thickness, to control chemical reactivity. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical reactivity of ultrathin MgO film grown on Ag(100) substrate for the dissociation of individual water molecules can be systematically controlled by interface dopants over the film thickness. Density functional theory calculations revealed that adhesion at the oxide-metal interface can be addressed by the ligand field effect and is linearly correlated with the chemical reactivity of the oxide film. In addition, our results indicate that the concentration of dopant at the interface can be controlled by tuning the drawing effect of oxide film. Our study provides not only profound insight into chemical reactivity control of ultrathin oxide film supported by a metal substrate but also an impetus for investigating ultrathin oxide films for a wider range of applications.

  2. Precursors for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of copper metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alicia Marie

    The colorless square-planar cluster [CuN(SiMe3)2] 4, which contains four Cu(I) ions with four bridging amide groups, was studied as a precursor for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of Cu metal. The cluster phosphoresces in CH2Cl2 solution and in the solid state at room temperature. Its electronic spectrum in CH 2Cl2 consists of two intense bands which are assigned to symmetry-allowed 3d → 4p transitions; the phosphorescence is also likely to be metal-centered. Solid [CuN(SiMe3)2]4 luminesces with approximately the same spectrum as that of the CH2Cl2 solutions. At 77 K, the solid-state luminescence red-shifts slightly. The emission lifetime in glassy Et2O solution is 690 mus. [CuN(SiMe3) 2]4 deposits Cu metal via chemical vapor deposition under H2 carrier gas at substrate temperatures of 145--200°C. Deposition also occurs photochemically beginning at 136--138°C under near-UV irradiation. The preparation of monomeric derivatives of [CuN(SiMe3) 2]4 was attempted by using neutral donor ligands L (e.g. LnCuN(SiMe3)2; L = CO, PR3, CN-t-Bu; n = 1--3). The target compounds were expected to be more volatile than the copper cluster and still maintain photosensitivity. CuCl and [Cu(CH 3CN)4]PF6 were used as starting materials. Even in the presence of L, [CuN(SiMe3)2] 4 is a major product in reactions using CuCl and NaN(SiCH3) 2- [Cu(CH3CN)4]PF6 was a promising route for the monomeric Cu(I) complexes because of ready dissociation of its acetonitrile ligands. However, the characterization of these complexes was unsuccessful. Other Cu(I) amide clusters have been prepared; they may also be suitable for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of Cu. [CuNEt2] 4, [CuN(i-Pr)2]4, and [CuN(t-Bu)(SiMe 3)]4 are phosphorescent though they are very air sensitive. They should be more volatile and produce Cu metal films more readily than [CuN(SiMe3)2]4 Cu(hfac)2 is a versatile Lewis acid, forming adducts with a variety of bases. The bases that were used were ethylene

  3. The Development of Metal Oxide Chemical Sensing Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; VanderWal,R. L.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L. J.; Berger, G. M.; Kulis, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures and microsystems technology. While nanostructures such as nanowires show significant potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of significant technical challenges remain. This paper discusses development to address each of these technical barriers: 1) Improved contact and integration of the nanostructured materials with microsystems in a sensor structure; 2) Control of nanostructure crystallinity to allow control of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by fabricating multiple nanostructured materials. A sensor structure composed of three nanostructured oxides aligned on a single microsensor has been fabricated and tested. Results of this testing are discussed and future development approaches are suggested. It is concluded that while this work lays the foundation for further development, these are the beginning steps towards realization of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostructures.

  4. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a highmore » crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  5. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a high crystallinity and very low defect concentration.

  6. Effects of simulated acid rain, EDTA, or their combination, on migration and chemical fraction distribution of extraneous metals in Ferrosol.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fang; Hou, Hong; Yao, Na; Yan, Zengguang; Bai, Liping; Li, Fasheng

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory repacked soil-leaching column experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated acid rain or EDTA by themselves or in combination, on migration and chemical speciation distribution of Pb and its alternative rare metals including Ag, Bi, In, Sb, and Sn. Experimental results demonstrate that leaching with simulated acid rain promoted the migration of Bi, In and Pb, and their migration reached down to 8 cm in the soil profile, no enhancement of Sb, Ag or Sn migration was observed. Addition of EDTA significantly enhanced the migration of all six metals, especially Bi, In and Pb. The migration of metals was in the order Pb>Bi>In>Sb>Sn>Ag. The individual and combined effects of acid rain and EDTA increased the environmental risk of metals, by increasing the soluble content of metals in soil solutions and the relative distribution of the exchangeable fraction. Leaching risks of Bi, In and Pb were higher than other three metals.

  7. Metal-mediated aminocatalysis provides mild conditions: Enantioselective Michael addition mediated by primary amino catalysts and alkali-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Leven, Matthias; Neudörfl, Jörg M; Goldfuss, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Four catalysts based on new amides of chiral 1,2-diamines and 2-sulfobenzoic acid have been developed. The alkali-metal salts of these betaine-like amides are able to form imines with enones, which are activated by Lewis acid interaction for nucleophilic attack by 4-hydroxycoumarin. The addition of 4-hydroxycoumarin to enones gives ee's up to 83% and almost quantitative yields in many cases. This novel type of catalysis provides an effective alternative to conventional primary amino catalysis were strong acid additives are essential components.

  8. Metal-mediated aminocatalysis provides mild conditions: Enantioselective Michael addition mediated by primary amino catalysts and alkali-metal ions

    PubMed Central

    Leven, Matthias; Neudörfl, Jörg M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Four catalysts based on new amides of chiral 1,2-diamines and 2-sulfobenzoic acid have been developed. The alkali-metal salts of these betaine-like amides are able to form imines with enones, which are activated by Lewis acid interaction for nucleophilic attack by 4-hydroxycoumarin. The addition of 4-hydroxycoumarin to enones gives ee’s up to 83% and almost quantitative yields in many cases. This novel type of catalysis provides an effective alternative to conventional primary amino catalysis were strong acid additives are essential components. PMID:23400419

  9. Reducing the matrix effects in chemical analysis: fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris

    2016-04-01

    The combination of isotope dilution and mass spectrometry has become an ubiquitous tool of chemical analysis. Often perceived as one of the most accurate methods of chemical analysis, it is not without shortcomings. Current isotope dilution equations are not capable of fully addressing one of the key problems encountered in chemical analysis: the possible effect of sample matrix on measured isotope ratios. The method of standard addition does compensate for the effect of sample matrix by making sure that all measured solutions have identical composition. While it is impossible to attain such condition in traditional isotope dilution, we present equations which allow for matrix-matching between all measured solutions by fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods.

  10. 77 FR 76419 - Health and Safety Data Reporting; Addition of Certain Chemicals; Withdrawal of Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ...-2011-0363; FRL-9375-3] RIN 2070-AJ89 Health and Safety Data Reporting; Addition of Certain Chemicals.... SUMMARY: EPA is withdrawing the final Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) section 8(d) Health and Safety Data Reporting Rule that it issued on December 3, 2012. The health and safety data reporting rule...

  11. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  12. Water and a protic ionic liquid acted as refolding additives for chemically denatured enzymes.

    PubMed

    Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, P; Kumar, Anil

    2012-10-07

    In this communication, we present the ability of water and a protic ionic liquid, triethyl ammonium phosphate (TEAP) to act as refolding additives for the urea-induced chemical denaturated state of the two enzymes, α-chymotrypsin and succinylated Con A. We show that the enzymatic activity is regained and in certain circumstances enhanced.

  13. A chemical additive to limit transfer of salmonella and campylobacter during immersion chill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler carcasses with different types and numbers of bacteria are commonly chilled together in an ice water bath which may lead to transfer of bacteria from carcass to carcass. Historically, chill tanks have been chlorinated to help prevent cross contamination. Recently other chemical additive op...

  14. Fluid mechanics of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of droplets - a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-03-01

    Paper presents a survey of principles of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of molten metal droplets, focusing on fluid-mechanical problems that deserve being investigated. The main problem is slowness of manufacturing due to necessarily small size of added droplets. Increase of droplet repetition rate calls for basic research of the phenomena that take place inside and around the droplets: ballistics of their flight, internal flowfield with heat and mass transfer, oscillation of surfaces, and the ways to elimination of satellite droplets.

  15. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  16. Crystal phase competition by addition of a second metal cation in solid solution metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Blas, C; Snejko, N; de la Peña-O'Shea, V A; Gallardo, J; Gutiérrez-Puebla, E; Monge, M A; Gándara, F

    2016-03-14

    Herein we report a synthetic study focused on the preparation of solid-solution metal-organic frameworks, MOFs, with the use of two kinds of linkers. In particular, we have explored the system composed by zinc, cobalt, 1,2,4-triazole and 4,4′-hexafluoroisopropylidenebisbenzoic acid (H2hfipbb). During this study, four new MOFs have been isolated, denoted TMPF-88 [M3(hfipbb)2(triazole)2(H2O)], TMPF-90 [M2(triazole)3(OCH2CH3)], TMPF-91 [M2(hfipbb)(triazole)2(H2O)] and TMPF-95 [M5(hfipbb)4(triazole)2(H2O)] (TMPF = transition metal polymeric framework, M = Zn, Co, or mixture of them). The study demonstrates that the addition of a second metal element during the MOF synthesis has a major effect in the formation of new phases, even at very high Zn/Co metal ratios. Furthermore, we show that during the MOF formation reaction, there is a competition among different crystal phases, where kinetically favoured phases of various compositions crystallize in short reaction times, precluding the formation of the pure solid-solution phases of other energetically more stable MOFs.

  17. Recent Developments in Metal-Catalyzed Additions of Oxygen Nucleophiles to Alkenes and Alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermann, Lukas

    Progress in the field of metal-catalyzed redox-neutral additions of oxygen nucleophiles (water, alcohols, carboxylic acids, and others) to alkenes, alkynes, and allenes between 2001 and 2009 is critically reviewed. Major advances in reaction chemistry include development of chiral Lewis acid catalyzed asymmetric oxa-Michael additions and Lewis-acid catalyzed hydro-alkoxylations of nonactivated olefins, as well as further development of Markovnikov-selective cationic gold complex-catalyzed additions of alcohols or water to alkynes and allenes.

  18. Dioxygen activation by non-adiabatic oxidative addition to a single metal center [O2 activation by non-adiabatic oxidative addition to a single metal center

    DOE PAGES

    Akturk, Eser S.; Yap, Glenn P. A.; Theopold, Klaus H.

    2015-10-16

    A chromium(I) dinitrogen complex reacts rapidly with O2 to form the mononuclear dioxo complex [TptBu,MeCrV(O)2] (TptBu,Me=hydrotris(3-tert-butyl-5-methylpyrazolyl)borate), whereas the analogous reaction with sulfur stops at the persulfido complex [TptBu,MeCrIII(S2)]. The transformation of the putative peroxo intermediate [TptBu,MeCrIII(O2)] (S=3/2) into [TptBu,MeCrV(O)2] (S=1/2) is spin-forbidden. The minimum-energy crossing point for the two potential energy surfaces has been identified. Finally, although the dinuclear complex [(TptBu,MeCr)2(μ-O)2] exists, mechanistic experiments suggest that O2 activation occurs on a single metal center, by an oxidative addition on the quartet surface followed by crossover to the doublet surface.

  19. Effects of chemical additives on filtration and rheological characteristics of MBR sludge.

    PubMed

    Koseoglu, H; Yigit, N O; Civelekoglu, G; Harman, B I; Kitis, M

    2012-08-01

    The main goal of this study was to control the fouling phenomena in MBR using chemical additives. In the first phase of the study, SMP removal and bound EPS formation capacity of chemical additives were determined. Highest SMP removal (72%) was achieved by the Poly-2 additive. In the second phase of the study, short term filtration tests were conducted. Poly-1 exhibited highest performance based on membrane resistance, permeability and average TMP. According to the results obtained from constant shear rate tests in fourth phase, no significant change in viscosity with time was observed. Studies for the adaptation of rheograms to common flow models showed that chitosan and starch was not able to fit to Ostwald de Waele and Bingham models. At a shear rate of 73.4 s(-1) viscosities of all samples were close to each other. Chitosan and starch achieved highest viscosity values at the shear rate of 0.6 s(-1).

  20. Transition metal-catalyzed process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, John F.; Kawatsura, Motoi; Loeber, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds in a substrate, comprising: reacting an amine with a compound containing at least one carbon-carbon double bond in the presence a transition metal catalyst under reaction conditions effective to form a product having a covalent bond between the amine and a carbon atom of the former carbon-carbon double bond. The transition metal catalyst comprises a Group 8 metal and a ligand containing one or more 2-electron donor atoms. The present invention is also directed to enantioselective reactions of amine compounds with compounds containing carbon-carbon double bonds, and a calorimetric assay to evaluate potential catalysts in these reactions.

  1. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing", evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  2. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing," evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door, were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  3. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Johnson, F. C.

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  4. Presence of chemical additives and microbial inhibition capacity in grapefruit seed extracts used in apiculture.

    PubMed

    Spinosi, Valerio; Semprini, Primula; Langella, Vincenzo; Scortichini, Giampiero; Calvarese, Silvano

    2007-01-01

    American foulbrood, caused by Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae (White 1906) is one of the most serious diseases of honey bees, causing beekeepers and health workers to make difficult, complex decisions and leading to the development of 'organic' treatments, such as grapefruit seed extract, with minor residue problems in the end product. This study evaluates the chemical composition of grapefruit seed extracts using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the detection of benzethonium chloride, cetrimonium bromide and decyltrimethylammonium chloride. The results obtained suggest a close correlation between the microbial effect and the presence of chemical additives in the samples analysed.

  5. Chemical Control of Plasmons in Metal Chalcogenide and Metal Oxide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Tracy M; Ye, Xingchen; Manthiram, Karthish; Schuck, P James; Alivisatos, A Paul; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-14

    The field of plasmonics has grown to impact a diverse set of scientific disciplines ranging from quantum optics and photovoltaics to metamaterials and medicine. Plasmonics research has traditionally focused on noble metals; however, any material with a sufficiently high carrier density can support surface plasmon modes. Recently, researchers have made great gains in the synthetic (both intrinsic and extrinsic) control over the morphology and doping of nanoscale oxides, pnictides, sulfides, and selenides. These synthetic advances have, collectively, blossomed into a new, emerging class of plasmonic metal chalcogenides that complement traditional metallic materials. Chalcogenide and oxide nanostructures expand plasmonic properties into new spectral domains and also provide a rich suite of chemical controls available to manipulate plasmons, such as particle doping, shape, and composition. New opportunities in plasmonic chalcogenide nanomaterials are highlighted in this article, showing how they may be used to fundamentally tune the interaction and localization of electromagnetic fields on semiconductor surfaces in a way that enables new horizons in basic research and energy-relevant applications.

  6. Tracing the migration history of metal catalysts in metal-assisted chemically etched silicon.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Küçükbayrak, Umut M; Zacharias, Margit

    2013-02-26

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of complex embedded nanopore networks in silicon requires expensive machinery and tedious sample preparation procedures such as electron tomography, also known as 3D transmission electron microscopy. In this article, we report a new, fast, powerful, and low-cost three-dimensional imaging technique with sub-5 nm resolution. This new imaging method is applied to metal-assisted chemically etched monocrystalline Si to demonstrate its capabilities. The AFEI (atomic layer deposition-fill-etch-imaging) technique consists of three simple process steps that are available in most material research settings. First the porous substrate is conformally coated with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) metal oxide layer. ALD is able to penetrate deep into complex, high aspect ratio pores, as it is a sequential gas-phase deposition process. Next, the cross-section of the ALD-filled porous Si substrate is etched with high-density fluorine-based plasma processing, which yields very high selectivity toward Si (e.g., >400:1 for Si:ZnO). This step removes the bulk Si and exposes the metal oxide structures grown inside the pores. In the last step, the sample cross-section is examined using a standard scanning electron microscope at various angles, which allows precise imaging of hidden features and reconstruction of a 3D model of the embedded pore network.

  7. Remediation of metal polluted soils by phytorremediation combined with biochar addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Ana; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Gómez-Limón, Dulce; César Arranz, Julio; Saa, Antonio; Gascó, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this work is to optimize and quantify the treatment of metal polluted soils through phytoremediation techniques combined with the addition of biochar. Biochar is a carbon rich material obtained by thermal treatment of biomass in inert atmosphere. In recent years, it has been attracted considerable interest due to their positive effect after soil addition. The use of biochar also seems appropriate for the treatment of metal-contaminated soils decreasing their mobility. Biochar properties highly depend on the raw material composition and manufacturing conditions. This paper is based on the use of manure wastes, rich in nutrients and therefore interesting raw materials for biochar production, especially when combined with phytoremediation techniques since the biochar act as conditioner and slow release fertilizer. We are very grateful to Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad (Spain) for financial support under Project CGL2014-58322-R.

  8. Aerosol based direct-write micro-additive fabrication method for sub-mm 3D metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Taibur; Renaud, Luke; Heo, Deuk; Renn, Michael; Panat, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    The fabrication of 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale is highly important in order to realize low-loss passives and GHz wavelength antennas with applications in wearable and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices. The inherent 2D nature of lithographic processes severely limits the available manufacturing routes to fabricate 3D structures. Further, the lithographic processes are subtractive and require the use of environmentally harmful chemicals. In this letter, we demonstrate an additive manufacturing method to fabricate 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale. A UV curable dielectric is dispensed from an Aerosol Jet system at 10-100 µm length scale and instantaneously cured to build complex 3D shapes at a length scale  <1 mm. A metal nanoparticle ink is then dispensed over the 3D dielectric using a combination of jetting action and tilted dispense head, also using the Aerosol Jet technique and at a length scale 10-100 µm, followed by the nanoparticle sintering. Simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using such structures as mm-wave antennas. The manufacturing method described in this letter opens up the possibility of fabricating an entirely new class of custom-shaped 3D structures at a sub-mm length scale with potential applications in 3D antennas and passives.

  9. Computational Investigations of Potential Energy Function Development for Metal--Organic Framework Simulations, Metal Carbenes, and Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioce, Christian R.

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional porous nanomaterials with a variety of applications, including catalysis, gas storage and separation, and sustainable energy. Their potential as air filtration systems is of interest for designer carbon capture materials. The chemical constituents (i.e. organic ligands) can be functionalized to create rationally designed CO2 sequestration platforms, for example. Hardware and software alike at the bleeding edge of supercomputing are utilized for designing first principles-based molecular models for the simulation of gas sorption in these frameworks. The classical potentials developed herein are named PHAST --- Potentials with High Accuracy, Speed, and Transferability, and thus are designed via a "bottom-up" approach. Specifically, models for N2 and CH4 are constructed and presented. Extensive verification and validation leads to insights and range of applicability. Through this experience, the PHAST models are improved upon further to be more applicable in heterogeneous environments. Given this, the models are applied to reproducing high level ab initio energies for gas sorption trajectories of helium atoms in a variety of rare-gas clusters, the geometries of which being representative of sorption-like environments commonly encountered in a porous nanomaterial. This work seeks to push forward the state of classical and first principles materials modeling. Additionally, the characterization of a new type of tunable radical metal---carbene is presented. Here, a cobalt(II)---porphyrin complex, [Co(Por)], was investigated to understand its role as an effective catalyst in stereoselective cyclopropanation of a diazoacetate reagent. Density functional theory along with natural bond order analysis and charge decomposition analysis gave insight into the electronics of the catalytic intermediate. The bonding pattern unveiled a new class of radical metal---carbene complex, with a doublet cobalt into which a triplet carbene

  10. Recovery of valuable metals from electroplating sludge with reducing additives via vitrification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruth; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Zih-Yi; Wang, Jian-Wen; Lin, Chitsan; Kuo, Yi-Ming

    2013-11-15

    In this study, vitrification was applied to treat Ni-Cu electroplating sludge. The sludge was mixed with additives (limestone:cullet = 4:6) and then heated to 1450 °C. The cooled product could be separated into slag and ingot. An atomic absorption spectrometer was used to determine the metal levels of specimens and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests, whereas the crystalline and surface characteristics were examined using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. With a glassy structure, the slag was mainly composed of Ca, Si, and Mg. The TCLP results of slags met the Taiwan regulated standards, suggesting that slag can be used for recycling purposes. With the aid of additives, the crystalline phase of slag was transformed form CaMgSiO4 into CsSiO3. The ingots were mainly composed of Ni (563,000-693,800 mg/kg), Cu (79,900-87,400 mg/kg), and Fe (35,000-43,600 mg/kg) (target metals) due the gravity separation during vitrification. At appropriate additives/sludge ratios (>0.2), >95% of target metals gathered in the ingot as a recoverable form (Ni-Fe alloy). The high Ni level of slag suggests that the ingot can be used as the raw materials for smelters or the additives for steel making. Therefore, the vitrification approach of this study is a promising technology to recover valuable metals from Ni-Cu electroplating sludge.

  11. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments.

  12. 78 FR 74218 - Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare... chemical weapons in violation of international law or lethal chemical weapons against its own nationals... the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act of 1991, 22 U.S.C. 5604(a)...

  13. Comparison of InGaAs(100) Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Greene, A. L.; Daniels-Race, T.; Lum, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study the effects of substrate temperature on the composition and growth rate of InGaAs/InP(100) multilayers grown by chemical beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth kinetics of the material grown by the different techniques are analyzed and compared.

  14. Use of chemical additives with steam injection to increase oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, L.L.

    1984-09-01

    Surfactants and certain inorganic bases have been evaluated as possible chemical additives to improve performance of steamfloods. Special emphasis was given to chemicals which would reduce the residual oil saturation in regions flooded by hot water below the steam zone. Problems considered were the effect of prolonged exposure to steam temperature on the stability of petroleum sulfonates, the effect of temperature on surfactant adsorption and the effect of temperature on interfacial tensions. Methods were developed for measuring quantitatively the thermal stability of the aryl sulfonate class of surfactant. This class includes the petroleum sulfonates. The best of the surfactants evaluated in this study had marginal stability for use with steamfloods. The surfactants in combination with elevated temperatures do reduce residual oil saturations. Data are presented on the temperature effects on interfacial tensions and on adsorption. Certain inorganic chemicals which give high pH are effective and inexpensive but hydroxyl ions react with silica in the reservoir. This reaction is accentuated at higher temperatures. Data show that the pH of the injected hot water with caustic decreases with contact time. The experiments did not permit determining if an equilibrium pH would be obtained which would be high enough to be effective in recovering oil. Core floods showed that pH's in excess of 12 would be required to reduce residual oil saturations if sodium hydroxide was the injected chemical. The addition of surfactants with caustic or the use of sodium carbonate may permit recovery of oil at lower pH's. A reservoir simulator is being developed to predict performance of steamfloods with chemical additives. This has been completed for simple linear floods but is being extended to three dimensions and to more complicated flooding operations. 31 references, 43 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Chemical preparation of graphene materials results in extensive unintentional doping with heteroatoms and metals.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Ambrosi, Adriano; Sofer, Zdeněk; Macková, Anna; Havránek, Vladimír; Tomandl, Ivo; Pumera, Martin

    2014-11-24

    Chemical synthesis of graphene relies on the usage of various chemical reagents. The initial synthesis step, in which graphite is oxidized to graphite oxide, is achieved by a combination of chemical oxidants and acids. A subsequent chemical reduction step eliminates/reduces most oxygen functionalities to yield graphene. We demonstrate here that these chemical treatments significantly contaminate graphene with heteroatoms/metals, depending on the procedures followed. Contaminations with heteroatoms (N, B, Cl, S) or metals (Mn, Al) were present at relatively high concentrations (up to 3 at%), with their chemical states dependent on the procedures. Such unintentional contaminations (unwanted doping) during chemical synthesis are rarely anticipated and reported, although the heteroatoms/metals may alter the electronic and catalytic properties of graphene. In fact, the levels of unintentionally introduced contaminants on graphene are often higher than typical levels found on intentionally doped graphene. Our findings are important for scientists applying chemical methods to prepare graphene.

  16. Metal hydride/chemical heat pump development project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madariaga, H. A.; Rohy, D. A.

    1982-02-01

    A mental hydride heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two different hydrides and using hydrogen as a working fluid for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. This system can be used with a variety of heat sources including industrial waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. Temperature as low as 130 F can drive the MHHP when a suitable sink is provided. A project is currently underway to develop this unique heat pump for a specific application. The goals of the project include the development of cost effective hydride containers with high heat transfer and low mass; design and fabrication of a laboratory evaluation model; and design and fabrication of a demonstration unit. Extensive component and system test will provide the data for the design processes.

  17. Natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics, and radionuclides in the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, G.; Pintauro, P.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-05-02

    This project focuses on the chemical aspects of remediation, with the underlying theme that chemical remediation does occur naturally. Included are studies on the fate of heavy metal and organic contaminants discharged into aquatic environments; accurate assay metal contaminants partitioned into soils, water and tissue; development of novel polymeric membranes and microporous solids for the entrapment of heavy metals; and the development of hybrid chemo-enzymatic oxidative schemes for aromatics decontamination. 49 refs.

  18. New chemical additive to enhance reduction of oil carryover in gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khatib, Z.I.

    1998-12-31

    Foaming and fouling in glycol contactors and/or in amine treating systems are frequent problems in gas treatment processes due to the entrainment of liquid and solid aerosols in the gas stream. Entrainment of these aerosols leads also to mechanical damage of turbines and/or unscheduled shutdown of compressor units. A new chemical additive was developed and applied in the gas stream. The additive was successful in preventing the dissemination of the oil and/or condensate carryover into aerosol sizes, thereby enhancing the performance of coalescer filters and scrubbers.

  19. On the occurrence of metallic character in the periodic table of the chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Friedrich; Slocombe, Daniel R; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    The classification of a chemical element as either 'metal' or 'non-metal' continues to form the basis of an instantly recognizable, universal representation of the periodic table (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23; Poliakoff M. & Tang S. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 373: , 20140211). Here, we review major, pre-quantum-mechanical innovations (Goldhammer DA. 1913 Dispersion und Absorption des Lichtes; Herzfeld KF. 1927 Phys. Rev. 29: , 701-705) that allow an understanding of the metallic or non-metallic status of the chemical elements under both ambient and extreme conditions. A special emphasis will be placed on recent experimental advances that investigate how the electronic properties of chemical elements vary with temperature and density, and how this invariably relates to a changing status of the chemical elements. Thus, the prototypical non-metals, hydrogen and helium, becomes metallic at high densities; and the acknowledged metals, mercury, rubidium and caesium, transform into their non-metallic forms at low elemental densities. This reflects the fundamental fact that, at temperatures above the absolute zero of temperature, there is therefore no clear dividing line between metals and non-metals. Our conventional demarcation of chemical elements as metals or non-metals within the periodic table is of course governed by our experience of the nature of the elements under ambient conditions. Examination of these other situations helps us to examine the exact divisions of the chemical elements into metals and non-metals (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23).

  20. Effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, Philip; Seidel, Scott; Gupta, Malancha

    2015-05-15

    In this work, the effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The polymerizations of 4-vinyl pyridine and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate were studied using copper(II) chloride (CuCl{sub 2}) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) as the transition metal salts. It was found that the surface coverages of both poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (P4VP) and poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate) were decreased on CuCl{sub 2}, while the surface coverage of only P4VP was decreased on FeCl{sub 3}. The decreased polymer surface coverage was found to be due to quenching of the propagating radicals by the salt, which led to a reduction of the oxidation state of the metal. The identification of this reaction mechanism allowed for tuning of the effectiveness of the salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage through the adjustment of processing parameters such as the filament temperature. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the ability of transition metal salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage could be extended to the fabrication of patterned cross-linked coatings, which is important for many practical applications such as sensors and microelectronics.

  1. Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites Containing Metal Reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuentz, Lily; Salem, Anton; Singh, M.; Halbig, M. C.; Salem, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of polymeric systems using 3D printing has become quite popular recently due to rapid growth and availability of low cost and open source 3D printers. Two widely used 3D printing filaments are based on polylactic acid (PLA) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) systems. PLA is much more environmentally friendly in comparison to ABS since it is made from renewable resources such as corn, sugarcane, and other starches as precursors. Recently, polylactic acid-based metal powder containing composite filaments have emerged which could be utilized for multifunctional applications. The composite filaments have higher density than pure PLA, and the majority of the materials volume is made up of polylactic acid. In order to utilize functionalities of composite filaments, printing behavior and properties of 3-D printed composites need to be characterized and compared with the pure PLA materials. In this study, pure PLA and composite specimens with different metallic reinforcements (Copper, Bronze, Tungsten, Iron, etc) were 3D printed at various layer heights and resulting microstructures and properties were characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) behavior of filaments with different reinforcements were studied. The microscopy results show an increase in porosity between 3-D printed regular PLA and the metal composite PLA samples, which could produce weaker mechanical properties in the metal composite materials. Tensile strength and fracture toughness behavior of specimens as a function of print layer height will be presented.

  2. Electrolyte additive enabled fast charging and stable cycling lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Mei, Donghai; Jiao, Shuhong; Polzin, Bryant J.; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Xu, Wu

    2017-03-01

    Batteries using lithium (Li) metal as anodes are considered promising energy storage systems because of their high energy densities. However, safety concerns associated with dendrite growth along with limited cycle life, especially at high charge current densities, hinder their practical uses. Here we report that an optimal amount (0.05 M) of LiPF6 as an additive in LiTFSI-LiBOB dual-salt/carbonate-solvent-based electrolytes significantly enhances the charging capability and cycling stability of Li metal batteries. In a Li metal battery using a 4-V Li-ion cathode at a moderately high loading of 1.75 mAh cm‑2, a cyclability of 97.1% capacity retention after 500 cycles along with very limited increase in electrode overpotential is accomplished at a charge/discharge current density up to 1.75 mA cm‑2. The fast charging and stable cycling performances are ascribed to the generation of a robust and conductive solid electrolyte interphase at the Li metal surface and stabilization of the Al cathode current collector.

  3. Progress Towards Metal Additive Manufacturing Standardization to Support Qualification and Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Gorelik, Michael; Waller, Jess; Hrabe, Nik; Shamsaei, Nima; Daniewicz, Steve; Lewandowski, John J.

    2017-03-01

    As the metal additive manufacturing (AM) industry moves towards industrial production, the need for qualification standards covering all aspects of the technology becomes ever more prevalent. While some standards and specifications for documenting the various aspects of AM processes and materials exist and continue to evolve, many such standards still need to be matured or are under consideration/development within standards development organizations. An important subset of this evolving the standardization domain has to do with critical property measurements for AM materials. While such measurement procedures are well documented, with various legacy standards for conventional metallic material forms such as cast or wrought structural alloys, many fewer standards are currently available to enable systematic evaluation of those properties in AM-processed metallic materials. This is due in part to the current lack of AM-specific standards and specifications for AM materials and processes, which are a logical precursor to the material characterization standards for any material system. This paper summarizes some of the important standardization activities, as well as limitations associated with using currently available standards for metal AM with a focus on measuring mission-critical properties. Technical considerations in support of future standards development, as well as a pathway for qualification/certification of AM parts enabled by the appropriate standardization landscape, are discussed.

  4. Bhasmas: unique ayurvedic metallic-herbal preparations, chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Nair, A G C; Reddy, A V R; Garg, A N

    2006-03-01

    Bhasmas are unique Ayurvedic metallic preparations with herbal juices/fruits, known in the Indian subcontinent since the seventh century BC and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Twenty bhasmas based on calcium, iron, zinc, mercury, silver, potassium, arsenic, copper, tin, and gemstones were analyzed for up to 18 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis, including their C, H, N, and S contents. In addition to the major constituent element found at % level, several other essential elements such as Na, K, Ca, Mg, V, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn have also been found in microg/g amounts and ultratrace (ng/g) amounts of Au and Co. These seem to remain chelated with organic ligands derived from medicinal herbs. The bhasmas are biologically produced nanoparticles and are taken along with milk, butter, honey, or ghee (a preparation from milk); thus, this makes these elements easily assimilable, eliminating their harmful effects and enhancing their biocompatibility. Siddha Makaradhwaja, a mercury preparation is found to be stoichiometrically HgS without any traces of any other element. Similarly, Swet Parpati is stoichiometrically KNO3 but is found to have Mn, Cu, Zn, Na, P, and Cl as well. An attempt has been made to correlate the metallic contents with their medicinal importance. Na and K, the two electrolytic elements, seem to be well correlated, although K/Na varies in a wide range from 0.06 to 95, with specifically low values for Ca-, Fe-, and Zn-based bhasmas. K/P also varies in a wide range from 0.23 to 12, although for most bhasmas (n = 12), it is 2.3 +/- 1.2. Further, Fe/Mn is linearly correlated (r = 0.96) with Fe in nine noniron bhasmas.

  5. Nitrite addition to acidified sludge significantly improves digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangzhou; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo; Batstone, Damien J.; Freguia, Stefano; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-12-01

    Sludge management is a major issue for water utilities globally. Poor digestibility and dewaterability are the main factors determining the cost for sludge management, whereas pathogen and toxic metal concentrations limit beneficial reuse. In this study, the effects of low level nitrite addition to acidified sludge to simultaneously enhance digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction were investigated. Waste activated sludge (WAS) from a full-scale waste water treatment plant was treated at pH 2 with 10 mg NO2‑-N/L for 5 h. Biochemical methane potential tests showed an increase in the methane production of 28%, corresponding to an improvement from 247 ± 8 L CH4/kg VS to 317 ± 1 L CH4/kg VS. The enhanced removal of toxic metals further increased the methane production by another 18% to 360 ± 6 L CH4/kg VS (a total increase of 46%). The solids content of dewatered sludge increased from 14.6 ± 1.4% in the control to 18.2 ± 0.8%. A 4-log reduction for both total coliforms and E. coli was achieved. Overall, this study highlights the potential of acidification with low level nitrite addition as an effective and simple method achieving multiple improvements in terms of sludge management.

  6. Nitrite addition to acidified sludge significantly improves digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fangzhou; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo; Batstone, Damien J.; Freguia, Stefano; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-01-01

    Sludge management is a major issue for water utilities globally. Poor digestibility and dewaterability are the main factors determining the cost for sludge management, whereas pathogen and toxic metal concentrations limit beneficial reuse. In this study, the effects of low level nitrite addition to acidified sludge to simultaneously enhance digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction were investigated. Waste activated sludge (WAS) from a full-scale waste water treatment plant was treated at pH 2 with 10 mg NO2−-N/L for 5 h. Biochemical methane potential tests showed an increase in the methane production of 28%, corresponding to an improvement from 247 ± 8 L CH4/kg VS to 317 ± 1 L CH4/kg VS. The enhanced removal of toxic metals further increased the methane production by another 18% to 360 ± 6 L CH4/kg VS (a total increase of 46%). The solids content of dewatered sludge increased from 14.6 ± 1.4% in the control to 18.2 ± 0.8%. A 4-log reduction for both total coliforms and E. coli was achieved. Overall, this study highlights the potential of acidification with low level nitrite addition as an effective and simple method achieving multiple improvements in terms of sludge management. PMID:28004811

  7. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine project, funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute, represents the first comprehensive evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. This will be achieved by assessing the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate polymer matrix composite and ceramic matrix composite turbine engine components. The benefits include: 50 weight reduction compared to metallic parts, reduced manufacturing costs, reduced part count and rapid design iterations. Two high payoff metallic components have been identified for replacement with PMCs and will be fabricated using fused deposition modeling (FDM) with high temperature polymer filaments. The CMC effort uses a binder jet process to fabricate silicon carbide test coupons and demonstration articles. Microstructural analysis and mechanical testing will be conducted on the PMC and CMC materials. System studies will assess the benefits of fully nonmetallic gas turbine engine in terms of fuel burn, emissions, reduction of part count, and cost. The research project includes a multidisciplinary, multiorganization NASA - industry team that includes experts in ceramic materials and CMCs, polymers and PMCs, structural engineering, additive manufacturing, engine design and analysis, and system analysis.

  8. Solidification/stabilization of fly ash from city refuse incinerator facility and heavy metal sludge with cement additives.

    PubMed

    Cerbo, Atlas Adonis V; Ballesteros, Florencio; Chen, Teng Chien; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Solidification and stabilization are well-known technologies used for treating hazardous waste. These technologies that use cementitious binder have been applied for decades as a final treatment procedure prior to the hazardous waste disposal. In the present work, hazardous waste like fly ash containing high concentrations of heavy metals such Zn (4715.56 mg/kg), Pb (1300.56 mg/kg), and Cu (534.72 mg/kg) and amounts of Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, and Ni was sampled from a city refuse incinerator facility. This fly ash was utilized in the solidification/stabilization of heavy metal sludge since fly ash has cement-like characteristics. Cement additives such as sodium sulfate, sodium carbonate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was incorporated to the solidified matrix in order to determine its effect on the solidification/stabilization performance. The solidified matrix was cured for 7, 14, 21, and 28 days prior for its physical and chemical characterizations. The results show that the solidified matrix containing 40% fly ash and 60% cement with heavy metal sludge was the formulation that has the highest fly ash content with a satisfactory strength. The solidified matrix was also able to immobilize the heavy metals both found in the fly ash and sludge based on the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. It also shows that the incorporation of sodium carbonate into the solidified matrix not only further improved the compressive strength from 0.36 MPa (without Na2CO3) to 0.54 MPa (with Na2CO3) but also increased its leaching resistance.

  9. ELECTRONIC AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF PD IN BIMETALLIC SYSTEMS: HOW MUCH DO WE KNOW ABOUT HETERONUCLEAR METAL-METAL BONDING?

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.

    2001-09-27

    The experimental and theoretical studies described above illustrate the complex nature of the heteronuclear metal-metal bond. In many cases, bimetallic bonding induces a significant redistribution of charge around the bonded metals. This redistribution of charge is usually linked to the strength of the bimetallic bond, affects the position of the core and valence levels of the metals, and can determine the chemical reactivity of the system under study. New concepts are emerging [22,23,34,36] and eventually the coupling of experiment and theory can be useful for designing more efficient bimetallic catalysts [98,106,107].

  10. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  11. Arsenic Remediation Enhancement Through Chemical Additions to Pump and Treat Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wovkulich, K.; Mailloux, B. J.; Stute, M.; Simpson, H. J.; Keimowitz, A. R.; Powell, A.; Lacko, A.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant found at more than 500 US Superfund sites. Since pump and treat technologies are widely used for remediation of contaminated groundwater, increasing the efficiency of contaminant removal at such sites should allow limited financial resources to clean up more sites. The Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site is extensively contaminated with arsenic after waste arsenic salts were stored and disposed of improperly for much of the company's 44 year manufacturing lifetime. Despite approximately eight years of pump and treat remediation, arsenic concentrations in the recovery wells can still be greater than 1000 ppb. The arsenic concentrations in the groundwater remain high because of slow desorption of arsenic from contaminated aquifer solids. Extrapolation of laboratory column experiments suggest that continuing the current groundwater remediation practice based on flushing ambient groundwater through the system may require on the order of hundreds of years to clean the site. However, chemical additions of phosphate or oxalic acid into the aquifer could decrease the remediation time scale substantially. Laboratory results from a soil column experiment using input of 10 mM oxalic acid suggest that site clean up of groundwater could be decreased to as little as four years. Pilot scale forced gradient field experiments will help establish whether chemical additions can be effective for increasing arsenic mobilization from aquifer solids and thus substantially decrease pump and treat clean up time.

  12. [Effects of nitrogen addition on soil physico-chemical properties and enzyme activities in desertified steppe].

    PubMed

    Su, Jie-Qiong; Li, Xin-Rong; Bao, Jing-Ting

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the impacts of nitrogen (N) enrichment on soil physico-chemical property and soil enzyme activities in desert ecosystems, a field experiment by adding N at 0, 1.75, 3.5, 7, or 14 g N x m(-2) a(-1) was conducted in a temperate desert steppe in the southeastern fringe of the Tengger Desert. The results showed that N addition led to accumulations of total N, NO(3-)-N, NH(4+)-N, and available N in the upper soil (0-10 cm) and subsoil (10-20 cm), however, reductions in soil pH were observed, causing soil acidification to some extent. N addition pronouncedly inhibited soil enzyme activities, which were different among N addition levels, soil depths, and years, respectively. Soil enzyme activities were significantly correlated with the soil N level, soil pH, and soil moisture content, respectively.

  13. Radiative properties of ceramic metal-halide high intensity discharge lamps containing additives in argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Zissis, Georges

    2016-07-01

    The lighting represents a consumption of about 19% of the world electricity production. We are thus searching new effective and environment-friendlier light sources. The ceramic metal-halide high intensity lamps (C-MHL) are one of the options for illuminating very high area. The new C-MHL lamps contain additives species that reduce mercury inside and lead to a richer spectrum in specific spectral intervals, a better colour temperature or colour rendering index. This work is particularly focused on the power radiated by these lamps, estimated using the net emission coefficient, and depending on several additives (calcium, sodium, tungsten, dysprosium, and thallium or strontium iodides). The results show the strong influence of the additives on the power radiated despite of their small quantity in the mixtures and the increase of visible radiation portion in presence of dysprosium.

  14. Analysis of additive metals in fuel and emission aerosols of diesel vehicles with and without particle traps.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea; Wichser, Adrian

    2003-09-01

    Fuel additives used in particle traps have to comply with environmental directives and should not support the formation of additional toxic substances. The emission of metal additives from diesel engines with downstream particle traps has been studied. Aspects of the optimisation of sampling procedure, sample preparation and analysis are described. Exemplary results in form of a mass balance calculation are presented. The results demonstrate the high retention rate of the studied filter system but also possible deposition of additive metals in the engine.

  15. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  16. Thermotropic Behavior of Membranes Containing DMPC and Chemically and Stereochemically Pure Sphingomyelin upon Cholesterol Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibakami, Motonari; Sonoyama, Masashi; Goto, Rie; Mori, Michiko; Suzuki, Hikokazu; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2004-12-01

    High sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry is applied to the problem of interaction between phospholipids and cholesterol in bilayers, i.e., whether or not cholesterol shows a preferential interaction with sphingomyelins over glycerophospholipids. The simplest system yet used for exploring this problem is designed—one composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), chemically and stereochemically pure N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (pure-C16:0-SM), and cholesterol, based on a belief that chemically and stereochemically purity excludes chain length mismatch and chiral interaction that may affect the interaction from this system. Incremental addition of cholesterol to mixtures of DMPC and pure-C16:0-SM with a ratio of 6:4 or 4:6 leads to a continuous shift in endotherm due to DMPC toward a lower temperature. Such results indicate that cholesterol favors pure-C16:0-SM.

  17. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  18. How the toughness in metallic glasses depends on topological and chemical heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Samwer, Konrad; Demetriou, Marios D; Floyd, Michael C; Duggins, Danielle O; Johnson, William L; Goddard, William A

    2016-06-28

    To gain insight into the large toughness variability observed between metallic glasses (MGs), we examine the origin of fracture toughness through bending experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for two binary MGs: Pd82Si18 and Cu46Zr54 The bending experiments show that Pd82Si18 is considerably tougher than Cu46Zr54, and the higher toughness of Pd82Si18 is attributed to an ability to deform plastically in the absence of crack nucleation through cavitation. The MD simulations study the initial stages of cavitation in both materials and extract the critical factors controlling cavitation. We find that for the tougher Pd82Si18, cavitation is governed by chemical inhomogeneity in addition to topological structures. In contrast, no such chemical correlations are observed in the more brittle Cu46Zr54, where topological low coordination number polyhedra are still observed around the critical cavity. As such, chemical inhomogeneity leads to more difficult cavitation initiation in Pd82Si18 than in Cu46Zr54, leading to a higher toughness. The absence of chemical separation during cavitation initiation in Cu46Zr54 decreases the energy barrier for a cavitation event, leading to lower toughness.

  19. How the toughness in metallic glasses depends on topological and chemical heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    An, Qi; Samwer, Konrad; Demetriou, Marios D.; Floyd, Michael C.; Duggins, Danielle O.; Johnson, William L.; Goddard, William A.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insight into the large toughness variability observed between metallic glasses (MGs), we examine the origin of fracture toughness through bending experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for two binary MGs: Pd82Si18 and Cu46Zr54. The bending experiments show that Pd82Si18 is considerably tougher than Cu46Zr54, and the higher toughness of Pd82Si18 is attributed to an ability to deform plastically in the absence of crack nucleation through cavitation. The MD simulations study the initial stages of cavitation in both materials and extract the critical factors controlling cavitation. We find that for the tougher Pd82Si18, cavitation is governed by chemical inhomogeneity in addition to topological structures. In contrast, no such chemical correlations are observed in the more brittle Cu46Zr54, where topological low coordination number polyhedra are still observed around the critical cavity. As such, chemical inhomogeneity leads to more difficult cavitation initiation in Pd82Si18 than in Cu46Zr54, leading to a higher toughness. The absence of chemical separation during cavitation initiation in Cu46Zr54 decreases the energy barrier for a cavitation event, leading to lower toughness. PMID:27307438

  20. Transition-metal-catalyzed additions of C-H bonds to C-X (X = N, O) multiple bonds via C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guobing; Wu, Xiangmei; Yang, Minghua

    2013-09-14

    Chemical transformations via catalytic C-H bond activation have been established as one of the most powerful tools in organic synthetic chemistry. Transition-metal-catalyzed addition reactions of C-H bonds to polar C-X (X = N, O) multiple bonds, such as aldehydes, ketones, imines, isocyanates, nitriles, isocyanides, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, have undergone a rapid development in recent years. In this review, recent advances in this active area have been highlighted and their mechanisms have been discussed.

  1. Short range chemical ordering in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sterne, P A; Asoka-Kumar, P; Hartley, J H; Howell, R H; Nieh, T G; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Dauskardt, R H

    2001-01-03

    We provide direct experimental evidence for a non-random distribution of atomic constituents in Zr-based multi-component bulk metallic glasses using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The Ti content around the open-volume regions is significantly enhanced at the expense of Cu and Ni, indicating that Cu and Ni occupy most of the volume bounded by their neighboring atoms while Ti and Zr are less closely packed and more likely to be associated with open-volume regions. Temperature-dependent measurements indicate the presence of at least two different characteristic sizes for the open volume regions. Measurements on hydrogen-charged samples show that the larger open-volume regions can be filled by hydrogen up to a critical density. Beyond this critical density, local atomic-scale open-volume damage is created in the sample to accommodate additional hydrogen. The onset of this local damage in positron annihilation data coincides with the onset of volume expansion in X-ray diffraction data.

  2. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report 6, December 16, 1988--March 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1989-04-30

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativeities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation. Reaction of ethylene with syngas is used as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of metal catalysts. During the sixth quarter of the project, the mechanism of CO insertion on Ni/SiO{sub 2} was investigated by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. Ni/SiO{sub 2}, a methanation catalyst, has been shown to exhibit CO insertion activity. In situ infrared studies of CO/H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reactions show that the carbonylation of Ni/SiO{sub 2} to Ni(CO){sub 4} leads to an inhibition of methanation in CO hydrogenation but an enhancement of formation of propionaldehyde in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reaction. The results suggest that the sites for propionaldehyde formation is different from those for methanation.

  3. A Fully Non-metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine project, funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI), represents the first comprehensive evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. This will be achieved by assessing the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies for fabricating polymer matrix composite (PMC) and ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. The benefits of the proposed effort include: 50 weight reduction compared to metallic parts, reduced manufacturing costs due to less machining and no tooling requirements, reduced part count due to net shape single component fabrication, and rapid design change and production iterations. Two high payoff metallic components have been identified for replacement with PMCs and will be fabricated using fused deposition modeling (FDM) with high temperature capable polymer filaments. The first component is an acoustic panel treatment with a honeycomb structure with an integrated back sheet and perforated front sheet. The second component is a compressor inlet guide vane. The CMC effort, which is starting at a lower technology readiness level, will use a binder jet process to fabricate silicon carbide test coupons and demonstration articles. The polymer and ceramic additive manufacturing efforts will advance from monolithic materials toward silicon carbide and carbon fiber reinforced composites for improved properties. Microstructural analysis and mechanical testing will be conducted on the PMC and CMC materials. System studies will assess the benefits of fully nonmetallic gas turbine engine in terms of fuel burn, emissions, reduction of part count, and cost. The proposed effort will be focused on a small 7000 lbf gas turbine engine. However, the concepts are equally applicable to large gas turbine engines. The proposed effort includes a multidisciplinary, multiorganization NASA - industry team that includes experts in

  4. A brief survey of sensing for metal-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Bryant K.; Reutzel, Edward W.; Nassar, Abdalla R.; Dickman, Corey J.; Hall, Benjamin T.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose - Powder bed fusion additive manufacturing (PBFAM) of metal components has attracted much attention, but the inability to quickly and easily ensure quality has limited its industrial use. Since the technology is currently being investigated for critical engineered components and is largely considered unsuitable for high volume production, traditional statistical quality control methods cannot be readily applied. An alternative strategy for quality control is to monitor the build in real time with a variety of sensing methods and, when possible, to correct any defects as they occur. This article reviews the cause of common defects in powder bed additive manufacturing, briefly surveys process monitoring strategies in the literature, and summarizes recently-developed strategies to monitor part quality during the build process. Design/methodology/approach - Factors that affect part quality in powder bed additive manufacturing are categorized as those influenced by machine variables and those affected by other build attributes. Within each category, multiple process monitoring methods are presented. Findings - A multitude of factors contribute to the overall quality of a part built using PBFAM. Rather than limiting processing to a pre-defined build recipe and assuming complete repeatability, part quality will be ensured by monitoring the process as it occurs and, when possible, altering the process conditions or build plan in real-time. Recent work shows promise in this area and brings us closer to the goal of wide-spread adoption of additive manufacturing technology. Originality/value - This work serves to introduce and define the possible sources of defects and errors in metal-based PBFAM, and surveys sensing and control methods which have recently been investigated to increase overall part quality. Emphasis has been placed on novel developments in the field and their contribution to the understanding of the additive manufacturing process.

  5. Effect of Polyaniline additions on structural and gas sensing behaviour of metal oxides thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hj. Jumali, Mohammad H.; Izzuddin, Izura; Ramli, Norhashimah; Mat Salleh, Muhamad; Yahaya, Muhammad

    2009-07-01

    The structural and gas sensing behaviour of metal oxides namely TiO2 and ZnO thin films were investigated. In this paper, commercial Polyaniline (PANi) powder were added into two different metal oxides sol gel solutions with PANi : metal oxides weight ratios of 1wt.%, 2wt.% and 3wt.%. The thin films were fabricated using spin coating technique. Structural investigation using XRD presented that all films exhibited amorphous structure. Typical films surface morphology consists of agglomerated round shaped particles with the particles size varies between 57nm to 200nm. Addition of PANi formed network chains between the particles. Ethanol vapor detection test conducted at room temperature showed that both TiO2 and ZnO based films were capable to sense the vapor. The optimum ratio in sensing ethanol vapour for both PANi-TiO2 and PANi-ZnO films was 3:1. However, other issues such as reliability, selectability and repeatability remain as the major problems.

  6. Chemicals, metals, and pesticide pits waste unit low induction number electromagnetic survey

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.; Mohon, D.

    1995-06-01

    An electromagnetic survey was conducted at the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticide Waste Unit to identify any buried metallic objects that may be present in the materials used to fill and cover the pits after removal of pit debris. The survey was conducted with a Geonics EM-31 Terrain Conductivity Meter along north - south oriented traverses with 5-ft station intervals to produce a 5-ft by 5-ft square grid node pattern. Both conductivity and in-phase components were measured at each station for vertical dipole orientation with the common axis of the dipoles in the north - south and east - west orientations. The conductivity data clearly show elevated conductivities (2.1 to 7.0 mS/m) associated with the material over the pits, as compared with the surrounding area that is characterized by lower conductivities (1 to 2 mS/m). This is probably the result of the higher clay content of the fill material relative to the surrounding area, which has a higher sand to clay ratio and the presence of a plastic cover beneath the fill that has probably trapped water. Many metal objects are present in the survey area including manhole covers, monitoring well heads, metal, signs, drain culverts, abandoned wells, and BP waste unit marker balls. AU of these exhibit associated conductivity and in-phase anomalies of various magnitude. In addition to these anomalies that can be definitely associated with surface sources, conductivity and in-phase anomalies are also present with no obvious surface source. These anomalies are probably indicative of subsurface buried metallic objects. A high concentration of these objects appears to be present in the southwest corner of the survey area.

  7. Chemical associations and mobilization of heavy metals in fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Gisela; Eggenberger, Urs; Schlumberger, Stefan; Mäder, Urs K

    2016-12-19

    This study focusses on chemical and mineralogical characterization of fly ash and leached filter cake and on the determination of parameters influencing metal mobilization by leaching. Three different leaching processes of fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plants in Switzerland comprise neutral, acidic and optimized acidic (+ oxidizing agent) fly ash leaching have been investigated. Fly ash is characterized by refractory particles (Al-foil, unburnt carbon, quartz, feldspar) and newly formed high-temperature phases (glass, gehlenite, wollastonite) surrounded by characteristic dust rims. Metals are carried along with the flue gas (Fe-oxides, brass) and are enriched in mineral aggregates (quartz, feldspar, wollastonite, glass) or vaporized and condensed as chlorides or sulphates. Parameters controlling the mobilization of neutral and acidic fly ash leaching are pH and redox conditions, liquid to solid ratio, extraction time and temperature. Almost no depletion for Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd is achieved by performing neutral leaching. Acidic fly ash leaching results in depletion factors of 40% for Zn, 53% for Cd, 8% for Pb and 6% for Cu. The extraction of Pb and Cu are mainly limited due to a cementation process and the formation of a PbCu(0)-alloy-phase and to a minor degree due to secondary precipitation (PbCl2). The addition of hydrogen peroxide during acidic fly ash leaching (optimized acidic leaching) prevents this reduction through oxidation of metallic components and thus significantly higher depletion factors for Pb (57%), Cu (30%) and Cd (92%) are achieved. The elevated metal depletion using acidic leaching in combination with hydrogen peroxide justifies the extra effort not only by reduced metal loads to the environment but also by reduced deposition costs.

  8. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-Metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR. The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected realtime, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in

  9. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR, The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected real-time, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in

  10. Quasi-chemical approach for adsorption of mixtures with non-additive lateral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, O. A.; Pasinetti, P. M.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    The statistical thermodynamics of binary mixtures with non-additive lateral interactions was developed on a generalization in the spirit of the lattice-gas model and the classical quasi-chemical approximation (QCA). The traditional assumption of a strictly pairwise additive nearest-neighbors interaction is replaced by a more general one, namely that the bond linking a certain atom with any of its neighbors depends considerably on how many of them are actually present (or absent) on the sites in the first coordination shell of the atom. The total and partial adsorption isotherms are given for both attractive and repulsive lateral interactions between the adsorbed species. Interesting behaviors are observed and discussed in terms of the low-temperature phases formed in the system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations are performed in order to test the validity of the theoretical model.

  11. Physical defect formation in few layer graphene-like carbon on metals: influence of temperature, acidity, and chemical functionalization.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Christoph M; Grass, Robert N; Rossier, Michael; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Stark, Wendelin J

    2012-03-06

    A systematical examination of the chemical stability of cobalt metal nanomagnets with a graphene-like carbon coating is used to study the otherwise rather elusive formation of nanometer-sized physical defects in few layer graphene as a result of acid treatments. We therefore first exposed the core-shell nanomaterial to well-controlled solutions of altering acidity and temperature. The release of cobalt into these solutions over time offered a simple tool to monitor the progress of particle degradation. The results suggested that the oxidative damage of the graphene-like coatings was the rate-limiting step during particle degradation since only fully intact or entirely emptied carbon shells were found after the experiments. If ionic noble metal species were additionally present in the acidic solutions, the noble metal was found to reduce on the surface of specific, defective particles. The altered electrochemical gradients across the carbon shells were however not found to lead to a faster release of cobalt from the particles. The suggested mechanistic insight was further confirmed by the covalent chemical functionalization of the particle surface with chemically inert aryl species, which leads to an additional thickening of the shells. This leads to reduced cobalt release rates as well as slower noble metal reduction rates depending on the augmentation of the shell thickness.

  12. ProPhenol-Catalyzed Asymmetric Additions by Spontaneously Assembled Dinuclear Main Group Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus The development of catalytic enantioselective transformations has been the focus of many research groups over the past half century and is of paramount importance to the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries. Since the award of the Nobel Prize in 2001, the field of enantioselective transition metal catalysis has soared to new heights, with the development of more efficient catalysts and new catalytic transformations at increasing frequency. Furthermore, catalytic reactions that allow higher levels of redox- and step-economy are being developed. Thus, alternatives to asymmetric alkene dihydroxylation and the enantioselective reduction of α,β-unsaturated ketones can invoke more strategic C–C bond forming reactions, such as asymmetric aldol reactions of an aldehyde with α-hydroxyketone donors or enantioselective alkynylation of an aldehyde, respectively. To facilitate catalytic enantioselective addition reactions, including the aforementioned aldol and alkynylation reactions, our lab has developed the ProPhenol ligand. In this Account, we describe the development and application of the ProPhenol ligand for asymmetric additions of both carbon- and heteroatom-based nucleophiles to various electrophiles. The ProPhenol ligand spontaneously forms chiral dinuclear metal complexes when treated with an alkyl metal reagent, such as Et2Zn or Bu2Mg. The resulting complex contains both a Lewis acidic site to activate an electrophile and a Brønsted basic site to deprotonate a pronucleophile. Initially, our research focused on the use of Zn-ProPhenol complexes to facilitate the direct aldol reaction. Fine tuning of the reaction through ligand modification and the use of additives enabled the direct aldol reaction to proceed in high yields and stereoselectivities with a broad range of donor substrates, including acetophenones, methyl ynones, methyl vinyl ketone, acetone, α-hydroxy carbonyl compounds, and glycine Schiff bases. Additionally, an analogous

  13. Receiving Wear-Resistance Coverings Additives of Nanoparticles of Refractory Metals at a Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzakov, M. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Andreev, A. O.; Birukov, V. P.; Markushov, Y. V.

    2016-02-01

    Laser cladding technology was used to conduct experiments on production of wear-resistant coatings with additive nanoparticles of refractory metals (WC, TaC). Mechanical testing of coating abrasion was made using Brinell-Howarth method. The obtained data was compared with wear- resistance of commercial powder containing WC. It was found that at a concentration 10-15% coating with nanopowder additives shows a dramatic increase in wear-resistance by 4-6 times as compared to carbon steel substrate. There were conducted metallurgical studies of coatings on inverse electron reflection. There was determined elemental composition of deposited coating and substrate, and microhardness measured. It was found that structure of deposited coating with nanoparticles is fine.

  14. Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Metals for Use in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan; Cooper, Ken; Peralta, Stephen; Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Space Launch System, Commercial Resupply, and Commercial Crew programs have published intent to use additively manufactured (AM) components in propulsion systems and are likely to include various life support systems in the future. Parts produced by these types of additive manufacturing techniques have not been fully evaluated for use in oxygen systems and the inherent risks have not been fully identified. Some areas of primary concern in the SLS process with respect to oxygen compatibility may be the porosity of the printed parts, fundamental differences in microstructure of an AM part as compared to traditional materials, or increased risk of shed metal particulate into an oxygen system. If an ignition were to occur the printed material could be more flammable than components manufactured from a traditional billet of raw material and/or present a significant hazards if not identified and rigorously studied in advance of implementation into an oxygen system.

  15. Manipulating thermal conductance at metal-graphene contacts via chemical functionalization.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Patrick E; Baraket, Mira; Barnat, Edward V; Beechem, Thomas E; Kearney, Sean P; Duda, John C; Robinson, Jeremy T; Walton, Scott G

    2012-02-08

    Graphene-based devices have garnered tremendous attention due to the unique physical properties arising from this purely two-dimensional carbon sheet leading to tremendous efficiency in the transport of thermal carriers (i.e., phonons). However, it is necessary for this two-dimensional material to be able to efficiently transport heat into the surrounding 3D device architecture in order to fully capitalize on its intrinsic transport capabilities. Therefore, the thermal boundary conductance at graphene interfaces is a critical parameter in the realization of graphene electronics and thermal solutions. In this work, we examine the role of chemical functionalization on the thermal boundary conductance across metal/graphene interfaces. Specifically, we metalize graphene that has been plasma functionalized and then measure the thermal boundary conductance at Al/graphene/SiO(2) contacts with time domain thermoreflectance. The addition of adsorbates to the graphene surfaces are shown to influence the cross plane thermal conductance; this behavior is attributed to changes in the bonding between the metal and the graphene, as both the phonon flux and the vibrational mismatch between the materials are each subject to the interfacial bond strength. These results demonstrate plasma-based functionalization of graphene surfaces is a viable approach to manipulate the thermal boundary conductance.

  16. Elucidating triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanisms of sulfadiazine and metal ions effects by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Se; Song, Xuedan; Hao, Ce; Gao, Zhanxian; Chen, Jingwen; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-03-01

    Sulfadiazine (SDZ) mainly proceeds triplet-sensitized photolysis with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the aquatic environment. However, the mechanisms underlying the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ with DOM have not been fully worked out. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0) (neutral form) and SDZ(-) (anionic form) with four DOM analogues, i.e., fluorenone (FL), thioxanthone (TX), 2-acetonaphthone (2-AN), and 4-benzoylbenzoic acid (CBBP), and three metal ions (i.e., Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Zn(2+)) effects using quantum chemical calculations. Results indicated that the triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanism of SDZ(0) with FL, TX, and 2-AN was hydrogen transfer, and with CBBP was electron transfer along with proton transfer (for complex SDZ(0)-CBBP2) and hydrogen transfer (for complex SDZ(0)-CBBP1). The triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanisms of SDZ(-) with FL, TX, and CBBP was electron transfer along with proton transfer, and with 2-AN was hydrogen transfer. The triplet-sensitized photolysis product of both SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) was a sulfur dioxide extrusion product (4-(2-iminopyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)aniline), but the formation routs of the products for SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) were different. In addition, effects of the metal ions on the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) were different. The metal ions promoted the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0), but inhibited the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(-).

  17. Nutrients removal and recovery from anaerobically digested swine wastewater by struvite crystallization without chemical additions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Hui; Qiu, Guang-Lei; Yuan, Peng; Cui, Xiao-Yu; Peng, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Ping; Duan, Liang; Xiang, Lian-Cheng; Qian, Feng

    2011-06-15

    Anaerobically digested swine wastewater contains high concentrations of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N). A pilot-scale experiment was carried out for nutrients removal and recovery from anaerobically digested swine wastewater by struvite crystallization. In the pilot plant, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a continuous-flow reactor with struvite accumulation devices were designed and employed. The wastewater pH value was increased by CO(2) stripping, and the struvite crystallization process was performed without alkali and Mg(2+) additions. Results of the long-term operation of the system showed that, both reactors provided up to 85% P removal and recovery over wide ranges of aeration times (1.0-4.0 h), hydraulic retention times (HRT) (6.0-15.0 h) and temperatures (0-29.5°C) for an extended period of 247 d, in which approximate 30% of P was recovered by the struvite accumulation devices. However, 40-90% of NH(4)(+)-N removed was through air stripping instead of being immobilized in the recovered solids. The recovered products were detected and analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, which were proved to be struvite with purity of more than 90%. This work demonstrated the feasibility and effects of nutrients removal and recovery from anaerobically digested swine wastewater by struvite crystallization without chemical additions.

  18. 78 FR 68461 - Guidance for Industry: Studies To Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Anti- Salmonella Chemical Food Additives in Feeds; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug... revising the guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Studies to Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella... Guidance for Industry: Studies to Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives in...

  19. Preliminary assessment of metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrW alloy after 3wt.% Cu addition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjin; Zhao, Chaoqian; Ren, Ling; Guo, Sai; Gan, Yiliang; Yang, Chunguang; Wu, Songquan; Lin, Junjie; Huang, Tingting; Yang, Ke; Lin, Jinxin

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by selective laser melting for dental application has been studied. For its successful application, the bonding strength of metal-porcelain is essential to be systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrWCu alloy by three-point bending test, meanwhile the Ni-free CoCrW alloy was used as control. The oxygen content was investigated by an elemental analyzer; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface chemical composition of CoCrW based alloy after preoxidation treatment; the fracture mode was investigated by X-ray energy spectrum analysis (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Result from the oxygen content analysis showed that the content of oxygen dramatically increased after the Cu addition. And the XPS suggested that Co-oxidation, Cr2O3, CrO2, WO3, Cu2O and CuO existed on the preoxidated surface of the CoCrWCu alloy; the three-point bending test showed that the bonding strength of the CoCrWCu alloy was 43.32 MPa, which was lower than that of the CoCrW group of 47.65 MPa. However, the average metal-porcelain bonding strength is significantly higher than the minimum value in the ISO 9693 standard. Results from the SEM images and EDS indicated that the fracture mode of CoCrWCu-porcelain was mixed between cohesive and adhesive. Based on the results obtained in this study, it can be indicated that the Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by the selective laser melting is a promising candidate for use in dental application.

  20. Webinar Presentation: Metals, Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Biomarkers of Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Adolescence

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Metals, Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Biomarkers of Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Adolescence, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series held on Feb. 11, 2015.

  1. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology.

    PubMed

    Pant, Deepak; Joshi, Deepika; Upreti, Manoj K; Kotnala, Ravindra K

    2012-05-01

    Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  2. Metal hydride and pyrophoric fuel additives for dicyclopentadiene based hybrid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shark, Steven C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of reactive energetic fuel additives that have the potential to increase the combustion performance of hybrid rocket propellants in terms of solid fuel regression rate and combustion efficiency. Additives that can augment the combustion flame zone in a hybrid rocket motor by means of increased energy feedback to the fuel grain surface are of great interest. Metal hydrides have large volumetric hydrogen densities, which gives these materials high performance potential as fuel additives in terms of specifc impulse. The excess hydrogen and corresponding base metal may also cause an increase in the hybrid rocket solid fuel regression rate. Pyrophoric additives also have potential to increase the solid fuel regression rate by reacting more readily near the burning fuel surface providing rapid energy feedback. An experimental performance evaluation of metal hydride fuel additives for hybrid rocket motor propulsion systems is examined in this study. Hypergolic ignition droplet tests and an accelerated aging study revealed the protection capabilities of Dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) as a fuel binder, and the ability for unaided ignition. Static hybrid rocket motor experiments were conducted using DCPD as the fuel. Sodium borohydride (NabH4) and aluminum hydride (AlH3) were examined as fuel additives. Ninety percent rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) was used as the oxidizer. In this study, the sensitivity of solid fuel regression rate and characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency to total fuel grain port mass flux and particle loading is examined. These results were compared to HTPB combustion performance as a baseline. Chamber pressure histories revealed steady motor operation in most tests, with reduced ignition delays when using NabH4 as a fuel additive. The addition of NabH4 and AlH3 produced up to a 47% and 85% increase in regression rate over neat DCPD, respectively. For all test conditions examined C* efficiency ranges

  3. Biosensor and chemical sensor probes for calcium and other metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Viallet, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to chemical sensor and biosensor probes for measuring low concentration of metals and metal ions in complex samples such as biological fluids, living cells, and environmental samples. More particularly the present invention relates to a gel-based Indo-1 and Fura-2 chemical sensor probes for the measurement of low concentrations of calcium, cadmium, magnesium and the like. Also disclosed is a detector device using the sensors of the present invention.

  4. America Makes: National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) Project 1: Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of Complex Metallic Additive Manufactured (AM) Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    titanium and nickel-base alloys after AM fabrication. 4.1 Additive Manufacturing Methods and Applications Three-dimensional printing ( 3D ...AM is defining the process of 3D printing , while additive manufacturing considers the broad application of 3D printing , and necessary manufacturing... printing could generate an economic impact of $230 billion to $550 billion per year by 2025.[4] According to the 2014 Wohlers Report, the 3D printing

  5. Influencing the arc and the mechanical properties of the weld metal in GMA-welding processes by additive elements on the wire electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesling, V.; Schram, A.; Müller, T.; Treutler, K.

    2016-03-01

    Under the premise of an increasing scarcity of raw materials and increasing demands on construction materials, the mechanical properties of steels and its joints are gaining highly important. In particular high- and highest-strength steels are getting in the focus of the research and the manufacturing industry. To the same extent, the requirements for filler metals are increasing as well. At present, these low-alloy materials are protected by a copper coating (<1μm) against corrosion. In addition, the coating realizes a good ohmic contact and good sliding properties between the welding machine and the wire during the welding process. By exchanging the copper with other elements it should be possible to change the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the arc stability during gas metal arc welding processes and keep the basic functions of the coating nearly untouched. On a laboratory scale solid wire electrodes with coatings of various elements and compounds such as titanium oxide were made and processed with a Gas Metal Arc Welding process. During the processing a different process behavior between the wire electrodes, coated and original, could be observed. The influences ranges from greater/shorter arc-length over increasing/decreasing droplets to larger/smaller arc foot point. Furthermore, the weld metal of the coated electrodes has significantly different mechanical and technological characteristics as the weld metal from the copper coated ground wire. The yield strength and tensile strength can be increased by up to 50%. In addition, the chemical composition of the weld metal was influenced by the application of coatings with layer thicknesses to 15 microns in the lower percentage range (up to about 3%). Another effect of the coating is a modified penetration. The normally occurring “argon finger” can be suppressed or enhanced by the choice of the coating. With the help of the presented studies it will be shown that Gas Metal Arc Welding processes

  6. Effect of indium addition in U-Zr metallic fuel on lanthanide migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, T.; O'Hare, E.; Fortner, J.; Wright, A.; Cheon, J. S.; Lee, B. O.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced fast reactor concepts to achieve ultra-high burnup (∼50%) require prevention of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). Fission product lanthanide accumulation at high burnup is substantial and significantly contributes to FCCI upon migration to the cladding interface. Diffusion barriers are typically used to prevent interaction of the lanthanides with the cladding. A more active method has been proposed which immobilizes the lanthanides through formation of stable compounds with an additive. Theoretical analysis showed that indium, thallium, and antimony are good candidates. Indium was the strongest candidate because of its low reactivity with iron-based cladding alloys. Characterization of the as-fabricated alloys was performed to determine the effectiveness of the indium addition in forming compounds with lanthanides, represented by cerium. Tests to examine how effectively the dopant prevents lanthanide migration under a thermal gradient were also performed. The results showed that indium effectively prevented cerium migration.

  7. A Preferable Method for the Formation of Vesicles from Lamellar Liquid Crystals Using Chemical Additives.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yasutaka; Imai, Yoko; Tajima, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for vesicle formation from lamellar liquid crystals (LCs) using a cationic amphiphilic substance, namely 2-hydroxyethyl di(alkanol)oxyethyl methylammonium methylsulfate (DEAE). Vesicle formation from the DEAE lamellar dispersion occurred via a two-step chemical addition. This method required neither additional mechanical energy nor the use of special solvents. The transition was solubilized using an organic substance (e.g., limonene) in the lamellar DEAE LC, after which, a small amount of inorganic salt was added to the solubilized lamellar LC dispersion with gentle stirring. The viscosity of the DEAE dispersion following salt addition decreased sharply from 10(5) mPa·s to 10(2) mPa·s, and the DEAE dispersion was converted into a high fluidity liquid. Several organic substances were examined as potential solubilizates to initiate the lamellar-vesicle transition. Inorganic salts were also examined as transition triggers using various types of electrolytes; only neutral salts were effective as trigger additives. Dissociation of inorganic salts yielded anions, which inserted between the DEAE bilayer membranes and induced OH(-) ion exchange. In addition, a number of cations simultaneously formed ion pairs with the DEAE counter ions (CH3SO4(-) ions). However, as the amount of solubilized organic substances in the DEAE bilayer membrane decreased over time, the vesicles were transformed into lamellar LCs once again. The DEAE states in each step were measured by monitoring the zeta potential, pH, viscosity, and by examination of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. A possible molecular mechanism for the lamellar-vesicle transition of DEAE was proposed.

  8. Effect of GdL Addition on Physico-chemical Properties of Fermented Sausages during Ripening.

    PubMed

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Jang, Kyoung-Hwan; Chung, Ku-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of glucono-δ-lactone (GdL) addition on physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of fermented sausages during ripening and drying. Five batches of sausages were produced under ripening conditions: without GdL and with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75% of GdL addition. Samples from each treatment were taken for physicochemical and microbiological analyses on the 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 and 25th day of ripening. Chemical analysis showed a significant decrease in moisture content of sausages with increasing amounts of GdL added (p<0.05). The moisture contents decreased, whereas the fat, protein and ash contents increased throughout ripening (p<0.05). Increasing levels of GdL caused a decrease in the pH values (p<0.05), which can have an inhibitory effect against microflora. Water holding capacity content of samples decreased with increasing GdL concentration (p<0.05). The shear force values of fermented sausages showed the highest in T4 (p<0.05). During ripening, the shear force values of sausages were increased on the 25th day compared to day 0 (p<0.05). The higher GdL level produced lighter and more yellow sausages. The addition of 0.75% GdL was effective in controlling bacteria counts. Addition of GdL in sausages resulted in the physicochemical and microbiological attributes equal to or better than no addition of GdL without any harmful effect.

  9. Metal ion-mobilizing additives for comprehensive detection of femtomole amounts of phosphopeptides by reversed phase LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Joerg; Zinn, Nico; Haaf, Erik; Boehm, Martin E; Winter, Dominic; Schlosser, Andreas; Lehmann, Wolf D

    2011-07-01

    It is hypothesized that metal ion-mediated adsorption of phosphorylated peptides on stationary phases of LC-columns is the major cause for their frequently observed poor detection efficiency in LC-MS. To study this phenomenon in more detail, sample solutions spiked with metal ion-mobilizing additives were analyzed by reversed phase μLC-ICP-MS or nanoLC-ESI-MS. Using μLC-ICP-MS, metal ions were analyzed directly as atomic ions. Using electrospray ionization, either metal ion chelates or phosphopeptide standard mixtures injected in subpicomole amounts were analyzed. Deferoxamine, imidazole, ascorbate, citrate, EDTA, and the tetrapeptide pSpSpSpS were tested as sample additives for the interlinked purposes of metal ion-mobilization and improvement of phosphopeptide recovery. Iron probably represents the major metal ion contamination of reversed phase columns. Based on the certified iron level in LC-grade solvents, a daily metal ion load of >10 pmol was estimated for typical nanoLC flow rates. In addition, phosphopeptide fractions from IMAC columns were identified as source for metal ion contamination of the LC column, as demonstrated for Ga(3+)-IMAC. The three metal ion-chelating additives, EDTA, citrate and pSpSpSpS, were found to perform best for improving the LC recovery of multiply phosphorylated peptides injected at subpicomole amounts. The benefits of metal ion-mobilizing LC (mimLC) characterized by metal ion complexing sample additives is demonstrated for three different instrumental setups comprising (a) a nanoUPLC-system with direct injection on the analytical column, (b) a nanoLC system with inclusion of a trapping column, and (c) the use of a HPLC-Chip system with integrated trapping and analytical column.

  10. Effect of additives on the properties of polyaniline nanofibers prepared by high gravity chemical oxidative polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yibo; Arowo, Moses; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianfeng

    2015-05-12

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers with improved properties were prepared by high gravity chemical oxidative polymerization in a rotating packed bed with the assistance of p-aminodiphenylamine (AD) and p-phenylenediamine (AP). The effects of reactor type, additive dosage, reaction temperature, and high-gravity level on the properties of products were investigated in detail. Three conclusions were made: (1) a small amount of additive can significantly improve some properties of the nanofibers such as uniformity, specific surface area, and specific capacitance; (2) in order to obtain high-quality nanofibers, the high-gravity level should coordinate with the reaction rate; (3) the molecular weight and conductivity of PANI decrease with the increase of additive dosage. The products have larger specific surface areas of up to 73.9 and 68.4 m(2)/g and consequently improved specific capacitance of up to 527.5 and 552 F/g for the PANI nanofibers prepared with AD and AP, respectively. However, the specific surface area and specific capacitance of pure PANI are only 49.1 m(2)/g and 333.3 F/g, respectively. This research provides a simple, reliable, and scalable method to produce PANI nanofibers of high performances.

  11. Study of metal whiskers growth and mitigation technique using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullapalli, Vikranth

    For years, the alloy of choice for electroplating electronic components has been tin-lead (Sn-Pb) alloy. However, the legislation established in Europe on July 1, 2006, required significant lead (Pb) content reductions from electronic hardware due to its toxic nature. A popular alternative for coating electronic components is pure tin (Sn). However, pure tin has the tendency to spontaneously grow electrically conductive Sn whisker during storage. Sn whisker is usually a pure single crystal tin with filament or hair-like structures grown directly from the electroplated surfaces. Sn whisker is highly conductive, and can cause short circuits in electronic components, which is a very significant reliability problem. The damages caused by Sn whisker growth are reported in very critical applications such as aircraft, spacecraft, satellites, and military weapons systems. They are also naturally very strong and are believed to grow from compressive stresses developed in the Sn coating during deposition or over time. The new directive, even though environmentally friendly, has placed all lead-free electronic devices at risk because of whisker growth in pure tin. Additionally, interest has occurred about studying the nature of other metal whiskers such as zinc (Zn) whiskers and comparing their behavior to that of Sn whiskers. Zn whiskers can be found in flooring of data centers which can get inside electronic systems during equipment reorganization and movement and can also cause systems failure. Even though the topic of metal whiskers as reliability failure has been around for several decades to date, there is no successful method that can eliminate their growth. This thesis will give further insights towards the nature and behavior of Sn and Zn whiskers growth, and recommend a novel manufacturing technique that has potential to mitigate metal whiskers growth and extend life of many electronic devices.

  12. Controlling nucleation of monolayer WSe2 during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Oliveros Colon, Víctor; Nie, Yifan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) is a semiconducting, two-dimensional (2D) material that has gained interest in the device community recently due to its electronic properties. The synthesis of atomically thin WSe2, however, is still in its infancy. In this work we elucidate the requirements for large selenium/tungsten precursor ratios and explain the effect of nucleation temperature on the synthesis of WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The introduction of a nucleation-step prior to growth demonstrates that increasing nucleation temperature leads to a transition from a Volmer-Weber to Frank-van der Merwe growth mode. Additionally, the nucleation step prior to growth leads to an improvement of WSe2 layer coverage on the substrate. Finally, we note that the development of this two-step technique may allow for improved control and quality of 2D layers grown via CVD and MOCVD processes.

  13. Chemical-looping combustion of coal with metal oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjani Siriwardane; Hanjing Tian; George Richards; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston

    2009-08-15

    The combustion and reoxidation properties of direct coal chemical-looping combustion (CLC) over CuO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CO{sub 3}O{sub 4}, NiO, and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor studies. When coal is heated in either nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), 50% of weight loss was observed because of partial pyrolysis, consistent with the proximate analysis. Among various metal oxides evaluated, CuO showed the best reaction properties: CuO can initiate the reduction reaction as low as 500{sup o}C and complete the full combustion at 700{sup o}C. In addition, the reduced copper can be fully reoxidized by air at 700{sup o}C. The combustion products formed during the CLC reaction of the coal/metal oxide mixture are CO{sub 2} and water, while no carbon monoxide was observed. Multicycle TGA tests and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor tests strongly supported the feasibility of CLC of coal by using CuO as an oxygen carrier. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of solid reaction products indicated some changes in the surface morphology of a CuO-coal sample after reduction/oxidation reactions at 800 {sup o}C. However, significant surface sintering was not observed. The interactions of fly ash with metal oxides were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic analysis. Overall, the results indicated that it is feasible to develop CLC with coal by metal oxides as oxygen carriers. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Active metal-matrix composites with embedded smart materials by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the development of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. Composites created through this process experience temperatures as low as 25 °C during fabrication, in contrast to current metal-matrix fabrication processes which require temperatures of 500 °C and above. UAM thus provides unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make these materials and components attractive. This research focuses on developing UAM composites with aluminum matrices and embedded shape memory NiTi, magnetostrictive Galfenol, and electroactive PVDF phases. The research on these composites will focus on: (i) electrical insulation between NiTi and Al phases for strain sensors, investigation and modeling of NiTi-Al composites as tunable stiffness materials and thermally invariant structures based on the shape memory effect; (ii) process development and composite testing for Galfenol-Al composites; and (iii) development of PVDF-Al composites for embedded sensing applications. We demonstrate a method to electrically insulate embedded materials from the UAM matrix, the ability create composites containing up to 22.3% NiTi, and their resulting dimensional stability and thermal actuation characteristics. Also demonstrated is Galfenol-Al composite magnetic actuation of up to 54 μ(see manuscript), and creation of a PVDF-Al composite sensor.

  15. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of detonation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer; Bukowski, Eric

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser with sufficient energy to exceed the breakdown threshold of a material generates a laser-induced plasma with high peak temperatures, pressures, and shock velocities. Depending on the laser parameters and material properties, nanograms to micrograms of material is ablated, atomized, ionized and excited in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion into the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The estimated detonation velocities using LASEM agree well with published experimental values. A comparison of the measured shock velocities for various energetic materials including RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that reducing the amount of hydrogen present in B formulations increases the resulting detonation velocities

  16. Performance and modeling of active metal-matrix composites manufactured by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. The primary benefit of UAM over other metal-matrix fabrication processes is the low process temperatures, as low as 25 °C. UAM thus provides unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make these materials and components attractive. The objective of this research is to develop UAM composites with aluminum matrices and embedded shape memory NiTi, magnetostrictive Galfenol (FeGa), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) phases. The paper is focused on the thermally induced strain response and stiffness behavior of NiTi-Al composites, the actuation properties of FeGa-Al composites, and the embedded sensing capabilities of PVDF-Al composites. We observe up to a 10% increase over room temperature stiffness for NiTi-Al composites and a magnetomechanical response in the FeGa-Al composite up to 52.4 μɛ. The response of the PVDF-Al composite to harmonic loads is observed over a frequency range of 10 to 1000 Hz.

  17. A mild, chemical conversion of cellulose to hexene and other liquid hydrocarbon fuels and additives

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A unique biomass fractionation is used to feed a novel chemical reduction process that converts carbohydrates with 100% carbon conversion into hydrocarbon fuels. Six strategic goals have been accomplished: (1) Lignin is cleanly removed in a single step, (2) The carbon chain of the sugar monomers remains intact, (3) Each reaction occurs at mild conditions and gives essentially quantitative yield, (4) Each reaction is catalytic, (5) Initial reactions occur in an aqueous medium, which (6) allows the use of wet feedstocks. Catalytic recycling of the chemical reducing agents thus provides the equivalent of an efficient biomass reduction. Conversion of cellulose (1) to hexenes (8) sequentially via sorbitol (4) and 2-iodohexane (6) typifies the process. Step 2 of the process is highly tunable and can directly produce about 80% hydrocarbon oligomers, C{sub 12}H{sub 22} (12) and C{sub 18}H{sub 32} (13). Oxygenate fuel additives such as 2-hexanol (14) are also available by further reactions of hexene.

  18. Influence of Alumina Additions on the Physical and Chemical Properties of Lithium-iron-phosphate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huali; Yang, Ruijuan; Wang, Yinghui; Liu, Shiquan

    Alumina improves the properties and depresses the devitrification of soda-lime-silicate glasses. Herein, the influence of alumina on the glass transition temperature, density, chemical durability, crystallization of lithium-iron-phosphate (LIP) glass has been investigated. As alumina was added to replace the iron oxide in a base LIP glass with the molar composition of Li2O:Fe2O3:P2O5=30:20:50, the alumina-containing glasses have increased Tg, densities and chemical stabilities than the base glass. When the amount of alumina is increased from 2 to 6 mol, the Tg value slightly increases, whereas the density decreases. However, the smallest weight loss is shown for the glass containing 3.2 mol of alumina. The variations of the properties with alumina are explained based on the infrared structure analysis results. In addition, it is found the either the base or the alumina-containing glasses have surface crystallization upon heat-treatments. Under the same treatment conditions, the base glass exhibits a thin layer of crystallization with LiFeP2O7 as the main phase. In contrast, alumina-containing glasses show much higher degree of crystallization, which is further increased with the amount of alumina. This trend is opposite to that of silicate glass. Besides the LiFeP2O7 main phase, Fe7(PO4) phase is also identified in the crystallized alumina-containing glasses.

  19. Modified lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1982-08-17

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of modified lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the modified lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well. The lignosulfonates may be modified by any combination of any two or more of: reaction with chloroacetic acid, reaction with carbon dioxide, addition of the methylene sulfonate radical to the lignosulfonate molecule and oxidation with oxygen.

  20. Leachability of Cr(VI) and other metals from asphalt composites with addition of filter dust.

    PubMed

    Vahcic, Mitja; Milacic, Radmila; Mladenovic, Ana; Murko, Simona; Zuliani, Tea; Zupancic, Marija; Scancar, Janez

    2008-12-01

    The potential use of filter dust in asphalt composites for road construction was investigated. Filter dust contains high concentrations of metals, of which Cr(VI) and Pb are leached with water. Compact and ground asphalt composites with addition of 2% of filter dust by mass were studied. In order to evaluate their environmental impact, leachability tests were performed using water and salt water as leaching agents. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and Pb were determined in leachates over a time period of 182 days. The results indicated that Pb was not leached with leaching agents from asphalt composites. Cr(VI) was also not leached with leaching agents from compact asphalt composites. However, in ground asphalt composites, Cr(VI) was leached with water in concentrations up to 220 microg L(-1) and in salt water up to 150 microg L(-1). From the physico-mechanical and environmental aspects, filter dust can be used as a component in asphalt mixtures.

  1. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  2. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubencik, A. M.

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  3. Defect Characterization for Material Assurance in Metal Additive Manufacturing (FY15-0664)

    SciTech Connect

    Salzbrenner, Bradley; Boyce, Brad; Jared, Bradley Howell; Rodelas, Jeffrey; Laing, John Robert

    2016-02-01

    No industry-wide standards yet exist for minimum properties in additively manufactured (AM) metals. While AM alloys such as 17-4 precipitation hardened stainless steel have been shown to have average properties that can be comparable to wrought or cast product, they suffer from inconsistent performance. Variability in the feedstock powder, feature sizes, thermal history, and laser performance can lead to unpredictable surface finish, chemistry, phase content, and defects. To address this issue, rapid, efficient, high-throughput mechanical testing and data analysis was developed, providing profound statistical insight into the stochastic variability in properties. With this new approach, 1000’s of comprehensive tensile tests can be performed for the cost of 10’s of conventional tests. This new high-throughput approach provides a material qualification pathway that is commensurate with the quick turn-around benefit of AM.

  4. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Khairallah, S. A.; Kamath, C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  5. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    DOE PAGES

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; ...

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In thismore » study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.« less

  6. New water-soluble metal working fluids additives from phosphonic acid derivatives for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Ichitaro; Tomoda, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    Water-soluble metal working fluids are used for processing of aluminum alloy materials. This short paper describes properties of new additives for water-soluble cutting fluids for aluminum alloy materials. Some alkyldiphosphonic acids were prepared with known method. Amine salts of these phosphonic acids showed anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials. However, they have no hard water tolerance. Monoesters of octylphosphonic acid were prepared by the reaction of octylphosphonic acid dichloride with various alcohols in the presence of triethylamine. Amine salts of monoester of octylphosphonic acid with diethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether and triethyleneglycol monomethyl ether showed both of a good anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials and hard water tolerance.

  7. Highly diastereo- and regioselective transition metal-catalyzed additions of metal hydrides and bimetallic species to cyclopropenes: easy access to multisubstituted cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Alexander; Rubina, Marina; Rubin, Michael; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    The first highly efficient, diastereo- and regioselective transition metal-catalyzed addition of metal hydrides (stannanes, silanes, and germanes) and bimetallic species (ditins and silyltins) to cyclopropenes has been developed. It was shown that the addition across the double bond of cyclopropenes is generally controlled by steric factors and proceeds from the least hindered face. This methodology represents a powerful and atom-economic approach toward a wide variety of highly substituted stereodefined cyclopropylmetals, useful building blocks unavailable by other methods.

  8. The dynamics of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces: testing the foundations of theory.

    PubMed

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  9. The Dynamics of Molecular Interactions and Chemical Reactions at Metal Surfaces: Testing the Foundations of Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  10. Heavy metals and its chemical speciation in sewage sludge at different stages of processing.

    PubMed

    Tytła, Malwina; Widziewicz, Kamila; Zielewicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of heavy metal concentrations and forms in sewage sludge constitutes an important issue in terms of both health and environmental hazards the metals pose. The total heavy metals concentration enables only the assessment of its contamination. Hence the knowledge of chemical forms is required to determine their environmental mobility and sludge final disposal. Heavy metals speciation was studied by using four-stage sequential extraction BCR (Community Bureau of Reference). This study was aimed at determining the total concentration of selected heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd, Cr and Hg) and their chemical forms (except for Hg) in sludge collected at different stages of its processing at two municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in southern Poland. Metals contents in sludge samples were determined by using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). This study shows that Zn and Cu appeared to be the most abundant in sludge, while Cd and Hg were in the lowest concentrations. The sewage sludge revealed the domination of immobile fractions over the mobile ones. The oxidizable and residual forms were dominant for all the heavy metals. There was also a significant difference in metals speciation between sludges of different origin which was probably due to differences in wastewater composition and processes occurring in biological stage of wastewater treatment. The results indicate a negligible capability of metals to migrate from sludge into the environment. Our research revealed a significant impact of thickening, stabilization and hygienization on the distribution of heavy metals in sludge and their mobility.

  11. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd. Zamri; Ismail, Siti Salwa

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature.

  12. Modifications of chemical functional groups of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb and its effect towards biosorption of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Mohd Zamri Ismail, Siti Salwa

    2015-07-22

    The utilization of non-living biomass as an alternative biosorbent for heavy metal removal has gain a tremendous consideration through the years. Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb or pandan leaves, which is widely used as food additives in the South East Asia region, has been selected for its viability in the said effort due to the presence of chemical functional groups on its cellular network that enables the sorption to occur. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms participated during the heavy metal removal process, the biosorbent undergone a series of modification techniques to alter the chemical functional groups present on its constituent. From the outcome of the chemically-modified biosorbent being subjected to the contact with metal cations, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing groups present on the biosorbent are believed to be responsible for the metal uptake to occur through complexation mechanism. Modifying amine groups causes 14% reduction of Cu(II) uptake, whereas removing protein element increases the uptake to 26% as compared to the unmodified biosorbent. Also, scanning electron micrographs further suggested that the adsorption mechanism could perform in parallel, as attributed to the evidence of porous structure throughout the biosorbent fibrous nature.

  13. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory.

  14. Influence of catalytic gold and silver metal nanoparticles on structural, optical, and vibrational properties of silicon nanowires synthesized by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, M. K.; Tripathy, S.; Dolmanan, S. B.; Ng, T. H.; Tan, H.; Lam, J.

    2012-10-01

    We report on the structural and vibrational characterization of silicon (Si) nanowire arrays synthesized by metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si deposited with metal nanoparticles. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) metal nanoparticles were synthesized by glancing angle deposition, and MACE was performed in a mixture of H2O2 and HF solution. We studied the structural differences between Au and Ag-etched Si nanowires. The morphology of the synthesized nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The optical and vibrational properties of the Si nanostructures were studied by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy using three different excitation sources (UV, visible, and near-infrared) and are correlated to their microstructures. The structural differences between Au-etched and Ag-etched nanowires are due to the higher degree of hole injection by the Au nanoparticle and diffusion into the Si nanowires, causing enhanced Si etching by HF on the nanowire surface. Au-etched nanowires were observed to be mesoporous throughout the nanowire while Ag-etched nanowires consisted of a thin porous layer around the crystalline core. In addition, the surface-enhanced resonant Raman scattering observed is attributed to the presence of the sunken metal nanoparticles. Such Si nanostructures may be useful for a wide range of applications such as photovoltaic and biological and chemical sensing.

  15. Enhanced Metal Contacts to Carbon Nanotube Networks through Chemical and Physical Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Nathanael David

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an emerging class of nano-structured carbon materials which are currently being studied for applications which would benefit from their desirable electrical and mechanical properties. Potential benefits such as improved current density, flexure tolerance, weight savings, and even radiation tolerance have led to their implementation into numerous devices and structures, many of which are slated for use in space environments. The role of CNTs can be quite diverse, with varied CNT electronic-types and morphologies dictated by the specific application. Despite numerous CNT types and morphologies employed by these technologies, a common link between nearly all of these devices and structures is metal contact to CNTs, where the metal components often provide the link between the carbon nanotubes and the external system. In this work, a variety of CNT-metal systems were characterized in terms of metal morphology analysis and CNT-metal electrical and mechanical interactions, in response to chemical and structural modifications. A large portion of the work additionally focuses on ion irradiation environments. A diverse number of experiments related to CNT-metal interactions will be discussed. For instance, electrochemical interactions between ion-irradiated single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs) and metal salt solutions were utilized to selectively deposit Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) onto the SWCNTs. A direct correlation was established between defect density and Au-NP areal density, resulting in a method for rapid spatial profiling of ion-irradiation induced defects in SWCNTs. The effect of ion irradiation on the CNT-metal interface was also investigated and it was found that the contact resistance of Ag-SWCNT structures increases, while the specific contact resistance decreases. The increase in overall contact resistance was attributed to increased series resistance in the system due to damage of the bulk SWCNT films, while the decrease in specific contact

  16. Chemical etching and EDAX analysis of beryllium-free nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy.

    PubMed

    Atta, O M; Mosleh, I E; Shehata, M T

    1995-10-01

    A chemical etching technique is described for producing etch patterns in beryllium-free nickel chromium ceramo-metal alloy. Disc-shaped samples were chemically etched, evaluated with SEM and analysed by the EDAX technique. Scanning electron micrographs revealed, profound retentive cavities. The EDAX analysis provided a comprehensive interpretation of the etch mechanism. The obtained results show that the developed chemical etching has the potential to produce a highly retentive etched surface with less problematic and less technique sensitive than electrolytic etching.

  17. Toxicogenomics concepts and applications to study hepatic effects of food additives and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stierum, Rob . E-mail: stierum@voeding.tno.nl; Heijne, Wilbert; Kienhuis, Anne; Ommen, Ben van; Groten, John

    2005-09-01

    Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are genomics technologies with great potential in toxicological sciences. Toxicogenomics involves the integration of conventional toxicological examinations with gene, protein or metabolite expression profiles. An overview together with selected examples of the possibilities of genomics in toxicology is given. The expectations raised by toxicogenomics are earlier and more sensitive detection of toxicity. Furthermore, toxicogenomics will provide a better understanding of the mechanism of toxicity and may facilitate the prediction of toxicity of unknown compounds. Mechanism-based markers of toxicity can be discovered and improved interspecies and in vitro-in vivo extrapolations will drive model developments in toxicology. Toxicological assessment of chemical mixtures will benefit from the new molecular biological tools. In our laboratory, toxicogenomics is predominantly applied for elucidation of mechanisms of action and discovery of novel pathway-supported mechanism-based markers of liver toxicity. In addition, we aim to integrate transcriptome, proteome and metabolome data, supported by bioinformatics to develop a systems biology approach for toxicology. Transcriptomics and proteomics studies on bromobenzene-mediated hepatotoxicity in the rat are discussed. Finally, an example is shown in which gene expression profiling together with conventional biochemistry led to the discovery of novel markers for the hepatic effects of the food additives butylated hydroxytoluene, curcumin, propyl gallate and thiabendazole.

  18. Thin films of metal oxides grown by chemical vapor deposition from volatile transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Kimberly Dona

    1998-08-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of novel volatile metal-organic complexes for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal oxides. Monomeric tantalum complexes, lbrack Ta(OEt)sb4(beta-diketonate)) are prepared by the acid-base reaction of lbrack Tasb2(OEt)sb{10}rbrack with a beta-diketone, (RC(O)CHsb2C(O)Rsp' for R = CHsb3, Rsp' = CFsb3; R = Rsp'=C(CHsb3)sb3; R = Csb3Fsb7,\\ Rsp'=C(CHsb3)sb3;\\ R=Rsp'=CFsb3; and R = Rsp' = CHsb3). The products are characterized spectroscopically. Thermal CVD using these complexes as precursors gave good quality Tasb2Osb5 thin films which are characterized by XPS, SEM, electrical measurements, and XRD. Factors affecting the film deposition such as the type of carrier gas and the temperature of the substrate were considered. Catalyst-enhanced CVD reactions with each of the precursors and a palladium catalyst, ((2-methylallyl)Pd(acac)), were studied as a lower temperature route to good quality Tasb2Osb5 films. The decomposition mechanism at the hot substrate surface was studied. Precursors for the formation of yttria by CVD were examined. New complexes of the form (Y(hfac)sb3(glyme)), (hfac = \\{CFsb3C(O)CHC(O)CFsb3\\}sp-,\\ glyme=CHsb3O(CHsb2CHsb2O)sb{n}CHsb3 for n = 1-4) were synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. X-ray structural determinations of three new complexes were obtained. CVD reaction conditions were determined which give YOF films and, with catalyst-enhanced CVD, reaction conditions which give selective formation of Ysb2Osb3, YOF, or YFsb3. The films were studied by XPS, SEM, and XRD. Decomposition mechanisms which lead to film formation, together with a possible route for fluorine atom transfer from the ligand to the metal resulting in fluorine incorporation, were studied by analysis of exhaust products using GC-MS. Novel precursors of the form lbrack Ce(hfac)sb3(glyme)rbrack,\\ (hfac=\\{CFsb3C(O)CHC(O)CFsb3\\}sp-,\\ glyme=CHsb3O(CHsb2CHsb2O)sb{n}CHsb3, n = 1-4) for CVD of ceria were

  19. Y-Ba-Cu-O film deposition by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on buffered metal substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamanickam, V.; Galinski, G.; DeFrank, J.; Trautwein, C.; Haldar, P.; Balachandran, U.; Lanagan, M.; Chudzik, M.

    1999-10-12

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 2} (YBCO) films have been deposited on buffered metal substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). Cube-textured nickel substrates were fabricated by a thermomechanical process. Epitaxial CeO{sub 2}films were deposited on these substrates by thermal evaporation. Nickel alloy substrates with biaxially-textured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers deposited by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition were also prepared. Highly biaxially-textured YBCO films were deposited by MOCVD on both types of metal substrates. A critical current density greater than 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K has been achieved in YBCO films on metal substrates.

  20. Octahedral Chiral-at-Metal Iridium Catalysts: Versatile Chiral Lewis Acids for Asymmetric Conjugate Additions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaodong; Huo, Haohua; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Bo; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2015-06-26

    Octahedral iridium(III) complexes containing two bidentate cyclometalating 5-tert-butyl-2-phenylbenzoxazole (IrO) or 5-tert-butyl-2-phenylbenzothiazole (IrS) ligands in addition to two labile acetonitrile ligands are demonstrated to constitute a highly versatile class of asymmetric Lewis acid catalysts. These complexes feature the metal center as the exclusive source of chirality and serve as effective asymmetric catalysts (0.5-5.0 mol % catalyst loading) for a variety of reactions with α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, namely Friedel-Crafts alkylations (94-99% ee), Michael additions with CH-acidic compounds (81-97% ee), and a variety of cycloadditions (92-99% ee with high d.r.). Mechanistic investigations and crystal structures of an iridium-coordinated substrates and iridium-coordinated products are consistent with a mechanistic picture in which the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds are activated by two-point binding (bidentate coordination) to the chiral Lewis acid.

  1. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  2. Characterization of embedded fiber optic strain sensors into metallic structures via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, John J.; Hehr, Adam J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors measure deviation in a reflected wavelength of light to detect in-situ strain. These sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference, and the inclusion of multiple FBGs on the same fiber allows for a seamlessly integrated sensing network. FBGs are attractive for embedded sensing in aerospace applications due to their small noninvasive size and prospect of constant, real-time nondestructive evaluation. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded in aluminum 6061 via ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM), a rapid prototyping process that uses high power ultrasonic vibrations to weld similar and dissimilar metal foils together. UAM was chosen due to the desire to embed FBG sensors at low temperatures, a requirement that excludes other additive processes such as selective laser sintering or fusion deposition modeling. In this paper, the embedded FBGs are characterized in terms of birefringence losses, post embedding strain shifts, consolidation quality, and strain sensing performance. Sensors embedded into an ASTM test piece are compared against an exterior surface mounted foil strain gage at both room and elevated temperatures using cyclic tensile tests.

  3. Effect of yttrium additions on void swelling in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor candidate cladding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hopson, R.D.

    1981-10-01

    Candidate Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor cladding alloys AL1 (Fe-26% Ni-9% Cr) and AL2 (Fe-35% Ni-12% Cr) without and with the addition of 0.1% yttrium were bombarded by 4 MeV/sup 56/Fe/sup 2 +/ ions without and with simultaneous bombardment by 0.4 MeV /sup 4/He/sup +/ ions. These bombardments were conducted at various irradiation temperatures to determine the effect of yttrium on void swelling. The addition of yttrium decreased peak swelling for 4 MeV /sup 56/Fe/sup 2 +/ ion bombarded AL1 and AL2 by 28% and 20%, respectively. In all cases where similar sample comparisons were made (i.e., undoped with undoped and doped with doped) and where bombardment conditions were similar (i.e., single with single beam and dual with dual beam), AL1 showed less peak swelling than did AL2. Simultaneously implanting helium during heavy-ion bombardment increased peak swelling in undoped and doped AL1 by factors of 2.3 and 2.6, respectively.

  4. Comparative evaluation of microbial and chemical leaching processes for heavy metal removal from dewatered metal plating sludge.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Belgin; Sari, Bulent

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of the study described in this paper was to evaluate the application of bioleaching technique involving Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans to recover heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) in dewatered metal plating sludge (with no sulfide or sulfate compounds). The effect of some conditional parameters (i.e. pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), sulfate production) and operational parameters (i.e. pulp density of the sludge and agitation time) were investigated in a 3l completely mixed batch (CMB) reactor. The metal recovery yields in bioleaching were also compared with chemical leaching of the sludge waste using commercial inorganic acids (sulfuric acids and ferric chloride). The leaching of heavy metals increased with decreasing of pH and increasing of ORP and sulfate production during the bioleaching experiment. Optimum pulp density for bioleaching was observed at 2% (w/v), and leaching efficiency decreased with increasing pulp density in bioleaching experiments. Maximum metal solubilization (97% of Zn, 96% of Cu, 93% of Ni, 84% of Pb, 67% of Cd and 34% of Cr) was achieved at pH 2, solids contents of 2% (w/v), and a reaction temperature of 25+/-2 degrees C during the bioleaching process. The maximum removal efficiencies of 72% and 79% Zn, 70% and 75% Cu, 69% and 73% Ni, 57% and 70% Pb, 55% and 65% Cd, and 11% and 22% Cr were also attained with the chemical leaching using sulfuric acids and ferric chloride, respectively, at pH 2, solids contents of 2% (w/v), and a reaction temperature of 25+/-2 degrees C during the acid leaching processes. The rates of metal leaching for bioleaching and chemical leaching are well described by a kinetic equation related to time. Although bioleaching generally requires a longer period of operation compared to chemical leaching, it achieves higher removal efficiency for heavy metals. The efficiency of leaching processes can be arranged in descending order as follows: bioleaching>ferric chloride leaching>sulfuric acid

  5. LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

    2009-09-03

    In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

  6. Tunable Surface Structuration of Silicon by Metal Assisted Chemical Etching with Pt Nanoparticles under Electrochemical Bias.

    PubMed

    Torralba, Encarnación; Le Gall, Sylvain; Lachaume, Raphaël; Magnin, Vincent; Harari, Joseph; Halbwax, Mathieu; Vilcot, Jean-Pierre; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Bastide, Stéphane

    2016-11-16

    An in-depth study of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of p-type c-Si in HF/H2O2 aqueous solutions using Pt nanoparticles as catalysts is presented. Combination of cyclic voltammetry, open circuit measurements, chronoamperometry, impedance spectroscopy, and 2D band bending modeling of the metal/semiconductor/electrolyte interfaces at the nanoscale and under different etching conditions allows gaining physical insights into this system. Additionally, in an attempt to mimic the etching conditions, the modeling has been performed with a positively biased nanoparticle buried in the Si substrate. Following these findings, the application of an external polarization during etching is introduced as a novel efficient approach for achieving straightforward control of the pore morphology by acting upon the band bending at the Si/electrolyte junction. In this way, nanostructures ranging from straight mesopores to cone-shaped macropores are obtained as the Si sample is biased from negative to positive potentials. Remarkably, macroscopic cone-shaped pores in the 1-5 μm size range with a high aspect ratio (L/W ∼ 1.6) are obtained by this method. This morphology leads to a reduction of the surface reflectance below 5% over the entire VIS-NIR domain, which outperforms macrostructures made by state of the art texturization techniques for Si solar cells.

  7. EFFECT OF NITROGEN AND METAL ADDITIONS ON NITROGEN FIXATION ACTIVITY IN BIOLOGICAL SOIL CRUSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Lui, D.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse consortia of microorganisms that live in intimate association with soils in arid environments. Also called cryptogamic or microbiotic crusts, these communities can include cyanobacteria, algae, heterotrophic bacteria, fungi, lichens, and mosses. Together, these organisms provide many services to their surrounding ecosystems, including reduction of water runoff, promotion of water infiltration, and prevention of soil erosion. The cyanobacteria and algae also provide fixed carbon (C) to the soil through photosynthesis, and because atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in arid environments is low, the major input of biologically available N comes from cyanobacteria capable of converting nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4+). Biological soil crusts are easily destroyed by livestock grazing, motor vehicle travel, and many forms of recreational and agricultural land use. Loss of BSC cover can leave the soil vulnerable to intense erosion that can remove the nutrients necessary to sustain plant and animal life, thus accelerating the process of desertification. In order to preserve existing crusts and encourage the development of new crusts, it is crucial to understand the nutrient requirements of metabolism and growth in these microbial communities. This study investigated the affect of nitrogen and metal additions on N2-fixation activity in cyanobacterially-dominated crusts from the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah. Although N2-fixation has been studied in this system before, the affect of nutrient additions on N2-fixation activity has not been documented. The goal of this work was to understand how N and metal supplementation affects crust N metabolism. Three experiments were conducted to observe how N2-fixation activity changed with the addition of N, molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V). Molybdenum and vanadium were chosen because they are most commonly found at the active site of the enzyme nitrogenase, the molecule responsible

  8. One component metal sintering additive for {beta}-SiC based on thermodynamic calculation and experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Noviyanto, Alfian; Yoon, Dang-Hyok

    2011-08-15

    Graphical abstract: . Standard Gibbs formation free energies vs. temperature for various metal carbides. The heavy line represents the standard Gibbs free energy for {beta}-SiC. The hatched area denotes the typical liquid phase hot pressing temperature of {beta}-SiC (1973-2123 K). Highlights: {yields} Various metal elements were examined as a sintering additive for {beta}-SiC. {yields} Al and Mg enhanced the density significantly without decomposing {beta}-SiC, as predicted by thermodynamic simulation. {yields} Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W additives formed metal carbide and/or silicide compounds by decomposing {beta}-SiC. {yields} This approach would be useful for selecting effective sintering additive for high temperature ceramics. -- Abstract: Various types of metals were examined as sintering additives for {beta}-SiC by considering the standard Gibbs formation free energy and vapor pressure under hot pressing conditions (1973-2123 K), particularly for applications in nuclear reactors. Metallic elements having the low long-term activation under neutron irradiation condition, such as Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W, as well as widely used elements, Al, Mg and B, were considered. The conclusions drawn from thermodynamic considerations were compared with the experimental observations. Al and Mg were found to be effective sintering additives, whereas the others were not due to the formation of metal carbides or silicides from the decomposition of SiC under hot pressing conditions.

  9. Testing for Additivity in Chemical Mixtures Using a Fixed-Ratio Ray Design and Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed-ratio ray designs have been used for detecting and characterizing interactions of large numbers of chemicals in combination. Single chemical dose-response data are used to predict an “additivity curve” along an environmentally relevant ray. A “mixture curve” is estimated fr...

  10. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  11. Composite of liposome and metal complexes: Toward creating a new chemical reaction space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshiyama, Tomomi; Ohba, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of our research is to construct a novel functional space by fixation of various metal complexes into the liposome space. For the functionalization of liposome surface, we designed lipophilic metal complexes and succeeded in the fixation of various metal complexes such as oxidation catalysts. In addition, reactivities of metal complexes on the liposome surface were optimized by controlling their surrounding environment using various types of phospholipids. Furthermore, we succeeded in the incorporation of coordination polymers in inner water phase of liposomes using antibiotic ion channel, and the composites showed absorption of metal ions through antibiotic ion channels.

  12. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  13. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  14. Toxic Industrial Chemical Removal by Isostructural Metal-Organic Frameworks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    ISOSTRUCTURAL METAL-ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS Gregory W. Peterson RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE T. Grant Glover Bryan J. Schindler SCIENCE...APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION Gunpowder, MD 21010-0068 David Britt Omar Yaghi UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 January 2011...Frameworks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Peterson, Gregory W. (ECBC); Glover, T. Grant; Schindler

  15. 77 FR 71561 - Health and Safety Data Reporting; Addition of Certain Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ...) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to recommend chemicals and chemical mixtures to EPA for..., any chemical substance or mixture'' to submit lists of health and safety studies conducted or initiated by or for such person with respect to such substance or mixture at any time, known to such...

  16. Bonding in diborane-metal complexes: a quantum-chemical and experimental study of complexes featuring early and late transition metals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-06-03

    The coordination chemistry of the doubly base-stabilised diborane(4), [HB(hpp)]2 (hpp = 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido-[1,2-a]pyrimidinate), was extended by the synthesis of new late transition-metal complexes containing Cu(I) and Rh(I) fragments. A detailed experimental study was conducted and quantum-chemical calculations on the metal-ligand bonding interactions for [HB(hpp)]2 complexes of Group 6, 9, 11 and 12 metals revealed the dominant B-H-M interactions in the case of early transition-metal fragments, whereas the B-B-M bonding prevails in the case of the late d-block compounds. These findings support the experimental results as reflected by the IR and NMR spectroscopic parameters of the investigated compounds. DFT calculations on [MeB(hpp)]2 and model reactions between [B2H4⋅2NMe3] and [Rh(μ-Cl)(C2H4)2] showed that the bicyclic guanidinate allows in principle for an oxidative addition of the B-B bond. However, the formation of σ-complexes is thermodynamically favoured. The results point to the selective B-H or B-B bond-activation of diborane compounds by complexation, depending on the chosen transition-metal fragment.

  17. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Deepak; Joshi, Deepika; Upreti, Manoj K.; Kotnala, Ravindra K.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid methodology for E waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient extraction of metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace metal extraction is possible. - Abstract: Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  18. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  19. Room-Temperature Chemical Welding and Sintering of Metallic Nanostructures by Capillary Condensation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-06-08

    Room-temperature welding and sintering of metal nanostructures, nanoparticles and nanowires, by capillary condensation of chemical vapors have successfully been demonstrated. Nanoscale gaps or capillaries that are abundant in layers of metal nanostructures have been found to be the preferred sites for the condensation of chemically oxidizing vapor, H2O2 in this work. The partial dissolution and resolidification at such nanogaps completes the welding/sintering of metal nanostructures within ∼10 min at room-temperature, while other parts of nanostructures remain almost intact due to negligible amount of condensation on there. The welded networks of Ag nanowires have shown much improved performances, such as high electrical conductivity, mechanical flexibility, optical transparency, and chemical stability. Chemically sintered layers of metal nanoparticles, such as Ag, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Co, have also shown orders of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity and improved environmental stability, compared to nontreated ones. Pertinent mechanisms involved in the chemical welding/sintering process have been discussed. Room-temperature welding and sintering of metal nanostructures demonstrated here may find widespread application in diverse fields, such as displays, deformable electronics, wearable heaters, and so forth.

  20. Reversible Semiconducting-to-Metallic Phase Transition in Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Monolayer WSe2 and Applications for Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuqiang; Liu, Bilu; Zhang, Anyi; Chen, Liang; Fathi, Mohammad; Shen, Chenfei; Abbas, Ahmad; Ge, Mingyuan; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Zhou, Chongwu; Usc Nanolab Team

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have stimulated lots of interest because they are direct bandgap materials that have reasonably good mobility values. However, contact between most metals and semiconducting TMDCs like 2H phase WSe2 is highly resistive, thus degrading the performance of field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated with WSe2 as active channel materials. We applied a phase engineering method to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer 2H-WSe2 and demonstrated semiconducting-to-metallic phase transition in atomically thin WSe2. We have also shown that metallic phase WSe2 can be converted back to semiconducting phase, demonstrating the reversibility of this phase transition. In addition, we fabricated FETs based on these CVD-grown WSe2 flakes with phase-engineered metallic 1T-WSe2 as contact regions and intact semiconducting 2H-WSe2 as active channel materials. The device performance is substantially improved with metallic phase source/drain electrodes, showing on/off current ratios of 107 and mobilities up to 66 cm2/Vs for monolayer WSe2. PI name: Chongwu Zhou.

  1. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Separation of Pb and Zn from Fe and Cu in ash-melting of municipal solid waste. ► Molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in fly ash affected the metal-separation efficiency. ► The low molar ratio and a non-oxidative atmosphere were better for the separation. - Abstract: In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of the ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu.

  2. Evaluation of four chemical extractants for metal determinations in wetland soils

    SciTech Connect

    Sistani, K.R.; Mays, D.A.; Taylor, R.W.; Buford, C.

    1995-12-01

    Wetland soils (hydric soils) are unique in their chemical characteristics compared to upland soils. It is known that they are capable of removing a variety of wastes from polluted water entering the wetland including metals and potentially toxic heavy metals. When these metals are determined in wetland soils, it is necessary to use the proper chemical extractant(s). Four commonly used chemical extractants (Mehlich 1, Mehlich 3, 0.1 M HC1, and DTPA) for soil fertility evaluation were selected to measure metal concentrations of three different wetland soils/spoils. Soil samples were collected from the constructed wetland cells which were lined with Abernathy silt loam topsoil and two different mine spoil materials [collected from active coal strip-mined sites in Alabama (pH 5.9) and Tennessee (pH 3.2)]. Mehlich 3 extracted the most zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), sodiumm (Na), and aluminum (Al), while 0.1 M HCl extracted more cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb). Extractants followed the same trend in removing quantities of the metals from the three soil/spoil materials, with DTPA generally extracting the least amount of the metal (the trend was Mehlich 3 > 0.1N HCl > Mehlich 1 > DTPA). However, DTPA removed large quantities of metals from Tennessee spoil compared to Alabama spoil and topsoil, suggesting the higher effectiveness of DTPA under acidic conditions. Metal concentrations in plant tissue did not show a definite trend in correlation with metals extracted by four chemical extractants. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Chemical and Sensory Quality Preservation in Coated Almonds with the Addition of Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Larrauri, Mariana; Demaría, María Gimena; Ryan, Liliana C; Asensio, Claudia M; Grosso, Nelson R; Nepote, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Almonds provide many benefits such as preventing heart disease due to their high content of oleic fatty acid-rich oil and other important nutrients. However, they are susceptible to oxidation reactions causing rancidity during storage. The objective of this work was to evaluate the chemical and sensory quality preservation of almonds coated with carboxymethyl cellulose and with the addition of natural and synthetic antioxidants during storage. Four samples were prepared: almonds without coating (C), almonds coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), almonds coated with CMC supplemented with peanut skins extract (E), and almonds coated with CMC and supplemented with butylhydroxytoluene (BHT). Proximate composition and fatty acid profile were determined on raw almonds. Almond samples (C, CMC, E and BHT) were stored at 40 °C for 126 d. Lipid oxidation indicators: peroxide value (PV), conjugated dienes (CD), volatile compounds (hexanal and nonanal), and sensory attributes were determined for the stored samples. Samples showed small but significant increases in PV, CD, hexanal and nonanal contents, and intensity ratings of negative sensory attributes (oxidized and cardboard). C had the highest tendency to deterioration during storage. At the end of storage (126 d), C had the highest PV (3.90 meqO2 /kg), and BHT had the lowest PV (2.00 meqO2 /kg). CMC and E samples had similar intermediate PV values (2.69 and 2.57 meqO2 /kg, respectively). CMC coating and the addition of natural (peanut skin extract) and synthetic (BHT) antioxidants provide protection to the roasted almond product.

  4. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer.

    PubMed

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-04-04

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM.

  5. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer

    PubMed Central

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM. PMID:28374805

  6. Using additive modelling to quantify the effect of chemicals on phytoplankton diversity and biomass.

    PubMed

    Viaene, K P J; De Laender, F; Van den Brink, P J; Janssen, C R

    2013-04-01

    Environmental authorities require the protection of biodiversity and other ecosystem properties such as biomass production. However, the endpoints listed in available ecotoxicological datasets generally do not contain these two ecosystem descriptors. Inferring the effects of chemicals on such descriptors from micro- or mesocosm experiments is often hampered by inherent differences in the initial biodiversity levels between experimental units or by delayed community responses. Here we introduce additive modelling to establish the effects of a chronic application of the herbicide linuron on 10 biodiversity indices and phytoplankton biomass in microcosms. We found that communities with a low (high) initial biodiversity subsequently became more (less) diverse, indicating an equilibrium biodiversity status in the communities considered here. Linuron adversely affected richness and evenness while dominance increased but no biodiversity indices were different from the control treatment at linuron concentrations below 2.4 μg/L. Richness-related indices changed at lower linuron concentrations (effects noticeable from 2.4 μg/L) than other biodiversity indices (effects noticeable from 14.4 μg/L) and, in contrast to the other indices, showed no signs of recovery following chronic exposure. Phytoplankton biomass was unaffected by linuron due to functional redundancy within the phytoplankton community. Comparing thresholds for biodiversity with conventional toxicity test results showed that standard ecological risk assessments also protect biodiversity in the case of linuron.

  7. Pilot scale cooling tower fouled fill treatment: AFCATT (Anti-Fouling Chemical Additive Test Tower)

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.T.; Noble, R.T.; Philpot, E.F.; Eastis, J.H.

    1995-02-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) film-type cellular fill is the fill of choice in replacing cement asbestor board fill in existing cooling towers and in new cooling towers because of its high thermal performance, ease of installation, and low initial cost. However, PVC fill has been found to foul quickly with biological and sediment material, significant reducing tower performance and the fill`s useful life. The Anti-Fouling Chemical Additives Test Tower (AFCATT) has been built to study accumulation rates of fouling deposits in corrugated PVC film fill and to study methods of cleaning and preventing the fouling deposits. This small mechanical draft cooling tower is located next to the Unit 4 natural draft cooling tower at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Bowen. The once-through mechanical draft tower receives hot water from the condenser and returns the cold water to the basin of the host tower. The pilot tower is divided into four chambers allowing for three different treatment programs and one control to be run simultaneously. PVC fill packs are suspended from load cells to allow the weight of the fill packs to be measured continuously. Six vendors participated in the summer 1993 test program. Each proposed different methods of cleaning the fouled fill and were given the opportunity to try their proposed method of fill cleaning. The success of each treatment program was determined by its ability to reduce fill pack weight (i.e., reduce fouling).

  8. Chemical fraction, leachability, and bioaccessibility of heavy metals in contaminated soils, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yutong, Zong; Qing, Xiao; Shenggao, Lu

    2016-12-01

    Heavy metals in urban soils may pose risks to both urban environment and human health. However, only a fraction of heavy metals in soil is mobile and/or bioavailable for plant uptake and human ingestion. This study evaluates the chemical fraction and potential mobility and bioaccessibility of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in the contaminated urban topsoils from steel-industrial city (Anshan), Northeastern China. Chemical forms of heavy metals in soils are determined using Tessier sequential extraction technique. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and US Pharmacopeia methodology (USPM) are used to determine the operationally defined potentially mobile and bioaccessible metal fractions, respectively. Sequential extraction results show that Cd has the highest percentage of exchangeable form, whereas Cr primarily exists in residual form. The non-residual fraction of heavy metals increases in the order of Cr < Cu < Pb < Zn < Cd. The leachability of heavy metals evaluated by TCLP test indicates that Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb have much higher mobile than Cr. The bioavailability of heavy metals determined by EDTA extraction decreases in the order of Pb > Cu ≅ Zn > Cd > Cr. The order of bioaccessibility determined by USPM extraction is Pb = Cu > Zn > Cd > Cr. The Cr exhibits the lowest leachability and bioaccessibility among the investigated metals. The Pb has the highest bioaccessibility, indicating higher potential hazard for the human health. There are significant relationships between the EDTA- and USPM-extractable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) and the sum of first three steps of sequential extraction. Highly significant correlation is found between amounts of EDTA-extractable Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn and USPM-extractable metals. The result suggests that EDTA extraction can be helpful to estimate the bioaccessibility of heavy metals for human ingestion. Introduction of mobile and human bioaccessible concentrations

  9. Asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to alkylidene malonates and allylidene malonates via enamine-metal Lewis acid bifunctional catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Sarkisian, Ryan; Xu, Zhenghu; Wang, Hong

    2012-09-07

    Novel enamine-metal Lewis acid bifunctional catalysts were successfully applied to the asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to alkylidene malonates, offering excellent stereoselectivity (up to >99% ee and >99:1 dr). The asymmetric Michael addition of ketones to allylidene malonates was also achieved.

  10. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed C-H Bond Addition to Carbonyls, Imines, and Related Polarized π Bonds.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Joshua R; Boerth, Jeffrey A; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-12-12

    The transition-metal-catalyzed addition of C-H bonds to carbonyls, imines, and related polarized π bonds has emerged as a particularly efficient and powerful approach for the construction of an incredibly diverse array of heteroatom-substituted products. Readily available and stable inputs are typically employed, and reactions often proceed with very high functional group compatibility and without the production of waste byproducts. Additionally, many transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond additions to polarized π bonds occur within cascade reaction sequences to provide rapid access to a diverse array of different heterocyclic as well as carbocyclic products. This review highlights the diversity of transformations that have been achieved, catalysts that have been used, and types of products that have been prepared through the transition-metal-catalyzed addition of C-H bonds to carbonyls, imines, and related polarized π bonds.

  11. Evaluation of laser ultrasonic testing for inspection of metal additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everton, Sarah; Dickens, Phill; Tuck, Chris; Dutton, Ben

    2015-03-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) offers a number of benefits over conventional processes. However, in order for these benefits to be realised, further development and integration of suitable monitoring and closed loop control systems are needed. Laser Ultrasonic Testing (LUT) is an inspection technology which shows potential for in-situ monitoring of metallic AM processes. Non-contact measurements can be performed on curved surfaces and in difficult to reach areas, even at elevated temperatures. Interrogation of each build layer generates defect information which can be used to highlight processing errors and allow for real-time modification of processing parameters, enabling improved component quality and yield. This study evaluates the use of laser-generated surface waves to detect artificially generated defects in titanium alloy (Ti- 6Al-4V) samples produced by laser-based Powder Bed Fusion. The trials undertaken utilise the latest LUT equipment, recently installed at Manufacturing Technology Centre which is capable of being controlled remotely. This will allow the system to optimise or adapt "on-the-fly", simplifying the eventual integration of the system within an AM machine.

  12. Origin of additional capacities in metal oxide lithium-ion battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-Yan; Liu, Zigeng; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Cheng, Jun; Hua, Xiao; Dunstan, Matthew T; Yu, Xiqian; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Du, Lin-Shu; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-01

    Metal fluorides/oxides (MF(x)/M(x)O(y)) are promising electrodes for lithium-ion batteries that operate through conversion reactions. These reactions are associated with much higher energy densities than intercalation reactions. The fluorides/oxides also exhibit additional reversible capacity beyond their theoretical capacity through mechanisms that are still poorly understood, in part owing to the difficulty in characterizing structure at the nanoscale, particularly at buried interfaces. This study employs high-resolution multinuclear/multidimensional solid-state NMR techniques, with in situ synchrotron-based techniques, to study the prototype conversion material RuO2. The experiments, together with theoretical calculations, show that a major contribution to the extra capacity in this system is due to the generation of LiOH and its subsequent reversible reaction with Li to form Li2O and LiH. The research demonstrates a protocol for studying the structure and spatial proximities of nanostructures formed in this system, including the amorphous solid electrolyte interphase that grows on battery electrodes.

  13. Improvement of an integrated system of membrane bioreactor and worm reactor by phosphorus removal using additional post-chemical treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zuo, Wei; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Li, Hui; Li, Lipin

    2016-11-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) coupled with a worm reactor (SSBWR) was designed as SSBWR-MBR for sewage treatment and excess sludge reduction. However, total phosphorus (TP) release caused by worm predation in the SSBWR could increase the effluent TP concentration in the SSBWR-MBR. To decrease the amount of TP excreted, chemical treatment reactor was connected after the SSBWR-MBR to remove the excess phosphorus (P). The effects of chemical treatment at different time intervals on the performance of the SSBWR-MBR were assessed. The results showed that a maximum TP removal efficiency of 21.5 ± 1.0% was achieved in the SSBWR-MBR after chemical treatment. More importantly, a higher sulfate concentration induced by chemical treatment could promote TP release in the SSBWR, which provided further TP removal from the SSBWR-MBR. Additionally, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of the SSBWR-MBR was increased by 1.3% after effective chemical treatment. In the SSBWR-MBR, the chemical treatment had little effects on NH3-N removal and sludge production. Eventually, chemical treatment also alleviated the membrane fouling in the SSBWR-MBR. In this work, the improvement on TP, COD removal and membrane fouling alleviation was achieved in the SSBWR-MBR using additional chemical treatment.

  14. Vitrified metal finishing wastes I. Composition, density and chemical durability.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P A; Hand, R J

    2005-03-17

    Durable phosphate glasses were formed by vitrifying waste filter cakes from two metal finishing operations. Some melts formed crystalline components during cooling. Compositional analysis of dried, heat treated and vitrified samples was made using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and Leco induction furnace combustion analysis. Hydrolytic dissolution, measured by an adapted product consistency test, was reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude upon heat treatment or vitrification, surpassing the performance of borosilicate glass in some cases. This was attributed to the high levels of iron and zinc in the wastes, which greatly improve the durability of phosphate glasses. One of the wastes arose from a metal phosphating process and was particularly suitable for vitrification due to its high P2O5 content and favourable melting behaviour. The other waste, which arose from a number of processes, was less suitable as it had a low P2O5 content and during heating it emitted harmful corrosive gases and underwent violent reactions. Substantial volume reductions were obtained by heat treatment and vitrification of both wastes. Compositions and performances of some vitrified wastes were comparable with those of glasses which are under consideration for the immobilisation of toxic and nuclear wastes.

  15. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

  16. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    White, James H; Schutte, Erick J; Rolfe, Sara L

    2013-05-07

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01metal oxides.

  17. Cyclic Catalytic Upgrading of Chemical Species Using Metal Oxide Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Schutte, Erick J. (Inventor); Rolfe, Sara L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce(sub x)B(sub y)B'(sub z)B''O(sub gamma; wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01metal oxides.

  18. A new route toward ultrasensitive, flexible chemical sensors: metal nanotubes by wet-chemical synthesis along sacrificial nanowire templates.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Ae; Kim, Dong Hwan; Park, Chong-Ook; Lee, Young Wook; Han, Sang Woo; Li, Zhiyong; Williams, R Stan; Park, Inkyu

    2012-01-24

    We developed a novel low-temperature, wet-chemical process for the facile synthesis of metal nanotube arrays through the reduction of metal precursors along sacrificial metal oxide nanowire templates and demonstrated its applications to the ultrasensitive, low-power, mechanically robust, and flexible chemical sensors. The in situ dissolution of ZnO nanowire templates, which were hydrothermally grown on electrode surfaces, during the reaction allows the direct formation of tubular Pd nanostructures on the sensor devices without the need of complex processes for device integration or template removal. Moreover, this simple synthesis was carried out at low-temperature with mild chemical conditions; therefore we could make Pd nanotube devices not only on silicon substrates but also on flexible polymer substrates. The H(2) sensing of such Pd nanotube devices was investigated under various mechanical loading and showed excellent reliability and robustness. The sensitivity of our devices was found to be at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than literature values for H(2) sensors, which can be attributed to the high surface area and the well-formed interconnect of Pd tubular nanostructures in our devices.

  19. Fabrication of a single metal nanowire connected with dissimilar metal electrodes and its application to chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Hsiang-An; Lin, Heh-Nan

    2008-03-15

    We report a convenient method for the fabrication of a single metal nanowire connected with dissimilar metal electrodes and its application to chemical sensing. The method is based on a combination of atomic force microscopy nanomachining and conventional photolithography. The success of this integrated approach is confirmed by the linear current-voltage behavior of the created nanowires and comparable resistivities with those reported previously. The chemical sensing capability is demonstrated by the selective binding of a self-assembled monolayer onto a single Au nanowire connected with Ti electrodes and the subsequent resistance increase due to increased surface scattering effects after adsorption. It is found that the resistance increases by around 9% after the complete coverage of either octadecanethiol or dodecanethiol molecules onto a 20 nm thick Au nanowire. A theoretical explanation for the relationship between the resistance increase and the alkanethiol concentration is also given.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Determination of oxygen content and metal valences in oxide superconductors by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karppinen, M.; Fukuoka, A.; Niinistö, L.; Yamauchi, H.

    1996-03-01

    Several methods of chemical analysis, for example various redox titrations and thermogravimetric approaches, have been adapted to establish the oxygen content in superconducting cuprates and to determine the higher oxidation states of copper and other mixed-valent metals. The present review discusses and complements the authors' own experimental results on the oxygen content and metal valence analyses, but literature data from about 150 other references are reviewed as well.

  1. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  3. A Four-Step and Four-Criteria Approach for Evaluating Evidence of Dose Addition in Chemical Mixture Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose addition is the most frequently-used component-based approach for predicting dose response for a mixture of toxicologically-similar chemicals and for statistical evaluation of whether the mixture response is consistent with dose additivity and therefore predictable from the ...

  4. An experimental study of steam explosions involving chemically reactive metal

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H.; Basu, S.

    1997-07-01

    An experimental study of molten zirconium-water explosions was conducted. A 1-kg mass of zirconium melt was dropped into a column of water. Explosions took place only when an external trigger was used. In the triggered tests, the extent of oxidation of the zirconium melt was very extensive. However, the explosion energetics estimated were found to be very small compared to the potential chemical energy available from the oxidation reaction. Zirconium is of particular interest, since it is a component of the core materials of the current nuclear power reactors. This paper describes the test apparatus and summarizes the results of four tests conducted using pure zirconium melt.

  5. Chemical and Physical Reactions of Wellbore Cement under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effects of Cement Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutchko, B. G.; Strazisar, B. R.; Huerta, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Dzombak, D. A.; Thaulow, N.

    2008-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 into geologic formations requires long-term storage and low leakage rates to be effective. Active and abandoned wells in candidate storage formations must be evaluated as potential leakage points. Wellbore integrity is an important part of an overall integrated assessment program being developed at NETL to assess potential risks at CO2 storage sites. Such a program is needed for ongoing policy and regulatory decisions for geologic carbon sequestration. The permeability and integrity of the cement in the well is a primary factor affecting its ability to prevent leakage. Cement must be able to maintain low permeability over lengthy exposure to reservoir conditions in a CO2 injection and storage scenario. Although it is known that cement may be altered by exposure to CO2, the results of ongoing research indicate that cement curing conditions, fluid properties, and cement additives play a significant role in the rate of alteration and reaction. The objective of this study is to improve understanding of the factors affecting wellbore cement integrity for large-scale geologic carbon sequestration projects. Due to the high frequency use of additives (pozzolan) in wellbore cement, it is also essential to understand the reaction of these cement-pozzolan systems upon exposure to CO2 under sequestration conditions (15.5 MPa and 50°C). Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the physical and chemical changes, as well as the rate of alteration of commonly used pozzolan-cement systems under simulated sequestration reservoir conditions, including both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine. The rate of alteration of the cement-pozzolan systems is considerably faster than with neat cement. However, the alteration of physical properties is much less significant with the pozzolanic blends. Permeability of a carbonated pozzolanic cement paste remains sufficiently small to block significant vertical migration of CO2 in a wellbore. All of the

  6. Metallic sulfide additives for positive electrode material within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, William J.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Yao, Neng-ping; Koura, Kobuyuki

    1976-01-01

    An improved active material for use within the positive electrode of a secondary electrochemical cell includes a mixture of iron disulfide and a sulfide of a polyvalent metal. Various metal sulfides, particularly sulfides of cobalt, nickel, copper, cerium and manganese, are added in minor weight proportion in respect to iron disulfide for improving the electrode performance and reducing current collector requirements.

  7. Students' Predictions about the Sensory Properties of Chemical Compounds: Additive versus Emergent Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We investigated general chemistry students' intuitive ideas about the expected properties of the products of a chemical reaction. In particular, we analyzed college chemistry students' predictions about the color, smell, and taste of the products of chemical reactions represented at the molecular level. The study was designed to explore the extent…

  8. Teachers' Misconceptions about the Effects of Addition of More Reactants or Products on Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Derek; Ma, Hong-jia; Yang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The importance of research on misconceptions about chemical equilibrium is well recognized by educators, but in the past, researchers' interest has centered on student misconceptions and has neglected teacher misconceptions. Focusing on the effects of adding more reactants or products on chemical equilibrium, this article discusses the various…

  9. Chemical characteristic and functional properties of arenga starch-taro (Colocasia esculanta L.) flour noodle with turmeric extracts addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervika Rahayu N., H.; Ariani, Dini; Miftakhussolikhah, E., Maharani P.; Yudi, P.

    2017-01-01

    Arenga starch-taro (Colocasia esculanta L.) flour noodle is an alternative carbohydrate source made from 75% arenga starch and 25% taro flour, but it has a different color with commercial noodle product. The addition of natural color from turmeric may change the consumer preference and affect chemical characteristic and functional properties of noodle. This research aims to identify chemical characteristic and functional properties of arenga starch-taro flour noodle with turmeric extract addition. Extraction was performed using 5 variances of turmeric rhizome (0.06; 0.12; 0.18; 0.24; and 0.30 g (fresh weight/ml water). Then, noodle was made and chemical characteristic (proximate analysis) as well as functional properties (amylose, resistant starch, dietary fiber, antioxidant activity) were then evaluated. The result showed that addition of turmeric extract did not change protein, fat, carbohydrate, amylose, and resistant starch content significantly, while antioxidant activity was increased (23,41%) with addition of turmeric extract.

  10. The Application of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing miniature chemical sensors for a variety of applications including fire detection, emissions monitoring, fuel leak detection, and environmental monitoring. Smart Lick and Stick sensor technology which integrates a sensor array, electronics, telemetry, and power into one microsystem are being developed. These microsystems require low power consumption for long-term aerospace applications. One approach to decreasing power consumption is the use of nanotechnology. Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) carbon monoxide (CO) sensors developed previously by this group have been successfully used for fire detection and emissions monitoring. This presentation will briefly review the overall NASA GRC chemical sensor program and discuss our further effort in nanotechnology applications. New carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing material using doped nanocrystalline SnO2 will be discussed. Nanocrystalline SnO2 coated solid electrolyte CO2 sensors and SnO2 nanorod and nanofiber hydrogen (H2) sensors operated at reduced or room temperatures will also be discussed.

  11. Determination of the Pb, Cr, and Cd distribution patterns with various chlorine additives in the bottom ashes of a low-temperature two-stage fluidized bed incinerator by chemical sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tzu-Huan; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Wey, Ming-Yen

    2015-09-15

    A novel low-temperature two-stage fluidized bed (LTTSFB) incinerator has been successfully developed to control heavy-metal emissions during municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment. However, the characteristics of the residual metal patterns during this process are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the metal patterns in the different partitions of the LTTSFB bottom ash by chemical sequential extraction. Artificial waste was used to simulate the MSW. Different parameters including the first-stage temperature, chloride additives, and operating gas velocity were also considered. Results indicated that during the low-temperature treatment process, a high metal mobility phase exists in the first-stage sand bed. The main patterns of Cd, Pb, and Cr observed were the water-soluble, exchangeable, and residual forms, respectively. With the different Cl additives, the results showed that polyvinyl chloride addition increased metal mobility in the LTTSFB bottom ash, while, sodium chloride addition may have reduced metal mobility due to the formation of eutectic material. The second-stage sand bed was found to have a lower risk of metal leaching. The results also suggested that, the residual ashes produced by the LTTSFB system must be taken into consideration given their high metal mobility.

  12. Dihydrogen addition in a dinuclear rare-earth metal hydride complex supported by a metalated TREN ligand.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Ajay; Fegler, Waldemar; Spaniol, Thomas P; Maron, Laurent; Okuda, Jun

    2011-11-09

    The dinuclear lutetium dihydride dication supported by metalated tripodal ligands undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H(2) to form a trihydride dication. Molecular orbital analysis shows that the LUMO is a bonding Lu···Lu orbital that is poised to activate dihydrogen.

  13. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts.

    PubMed

    Stavroulakis, P I; Leach, R K

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement.

  14. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulakis, P. I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement.

  15. Nonspherical noble metal nanoparticles: colloid-chemical synthesis and morphology control.

    PubMed

    Sau, Tapan K; Rogach, Andrey L

    2010-04-22

    Metal nanoparticles have been the subject of widespread research over the past two decades. In recent years, noble metals have been the focus of numerous studies involving synthesis, characterization, and applications. Synthesis of an impressive range of noble metal nanoparticles with varied morphologies has been reported. Researchers have made a great progress in learning how to engineer materials on a nanometer length scale that has led to the understanding of the fundamental size- and shape-dependent properties of matter and to devising of new applications. In this article, we review the recent progress in the colloid-chemical synthesis of nonspherical nanoparticles of a few important noble metals (mainly Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt), highlighting the factors that influence the particle morphology and discussing the mechanisms behind the nonspherical shape evolution. The article attempts to present a thorough discussion of the basic principles as well as state-of-the-art morphology control in noble metal nanoparticles.

  16. GaN nanowire arrays by a patterned metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. C.; Yuan, G. D.; Wu, R. W.; Lu, H. X.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wei, T. B.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.; Zhang, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    We developed an one-step and two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce self-organized GaN nanowire arrays. In one-step approach, GaN nanowire arrays are synthesized uniformly on GaN thin film surface. However, in a two-step etching processes, GaN nanowires are formed only in metal uncovered regions, and GaN regions with metal-covering show nano-porous sidewalls. We propose that nanowires and porous nanostructures are tuned by sufficient and limited etch rate, respectively. PL spectra shows a red-shift of band edge emission in GaN nanostructures. The formation mechanism of nanowires was illustrated by two separated electrochemical reactions occur simultaneously. The function of metals and UV light was illustrated by the scheme of potential relationship between energy bands in Si, GaN and standard hydrogen electrode potential of solution and metals.

  17. Effects of heavy metal and other elemental additives to activated sludge on growth of Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Narahara, A.

    1981-09-01

    The approximate level at which added concentrations of certain elements would cause an activated sludge to induce a toxic effect upon the growth of Eisenia foetida was determined. During 43 trials on sludge samples obtained throughout 1 year of study, earthworms grew from 3 to 10 mg live wt at hatching to 792 mg +- 18% (mean +- C.V.) in 8 weeks, when sludge was 24/sup 0/C and contained no additives. None of several elements commonly used in microbial growth media enhanced the growth rate of the earthworm. At salt concentrations up to about 6.6% on a dry wt basis, none of six anions tested was in and of itself toxic, while five of 15 cations - Co, Hg, Cu, Ni, and Cd - appeared specifically to inhibit growth rate or cause death. Manganese, Cr, and Pb were innocuous even at the highest levels of application - 22,000, 46,000, and 52,000 mg/kg, respectively. Neither the anionic nor cationic component of certain salts, such as NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl, could be said to inhibit growth, which occurred only at high concentrations of these salts (about 3.3 and/or 6.6%). Below 7 mmho/cm, toxicity could not be correlated with electrolytic conductance, though higher values may help to explain the nonspecific growth inhibitory effects of salts like NaCl and KCl. Nor could toxicity ever be ascribed to hydrogen ion activity, since sludge pH was not altered even at the highest salt dose. It is concluded that except under very extreme conditions, the levels of heavy metals and salts generally found in activated sludges will not have an adverse affect on the growth of E. foetida.

  18. Ecotoxicity of chemically stabilised metal(loid)s in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2014-02-01

    Five chemical amendments (soft rock phosphate, lime, commercial phosphate amendment, red mud and magnesium oxide) were applied across four different shooting range soils to chemically stabilise metal(loid)s in the soils. Soils were contaminated with Pb between 2330 and 12,167 mg/kg, Sb from 7.4 to 325 mg/kg and soil pH ranged from 5.43 to 9.29. Amendments were tested for their ability to reduce the bioavailability of Pb, Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As in the soils to soil organisms after one year of aging, by measuring a series of ecotoxicological endpoints for earthworms and plants and soil microbial activity. Growth-based endpoints for earthworms and plants were not significantly affected by amendment addition, except in the most contaminated soil. Per cent survival and weight-loss reduction of earthworms was enhanced by amendment addition in only the most contaminated soil. Plant biomass and root elongation was not significantly affected by amendment addition (p=<0.05). Red mud and magnesium oxide appeared toxic to plants and earthworms, probably due to highly alkaline pH (9-12). Lead in soil organisms was relatively low despite the high concentrations of Pb in the soils, suggesting low bioavailability of Pb. Uptake of Pb by earthworms was reduced by between 40 and 96 per cent by amendments, but not across all soils. Amendments reduced Sb in earthworms in Townsville soil by up to 92 per cent. For lettuce the average uptake of Pb was reduced by 40 to 70 per cent with amendment addition in Townsville, Darwin and Perth soil. The effect of amendments on the uptake of Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As was variable between soils and amendments. Microbial activity was increased by greater than 50 per cent with amendments addition, with soft rock phosphate and lime being the most effective in Murray Bridge and TV soils and commercial phosphate and MgO being the most effective in Darwin and Perth soils.

  19. Catalyst accessibility to chemical reductants in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Roy, Souvik; Pascanu, Vlad; Pullen, Sonja; González Miera, Greco; Martín-Matute, Belén; Ott, Sascha

    2017-03-18

    A molecular H2-evolving catalyst, [Fe2(cbdt)(CO)6] ([FeFe], cbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate), has been attached covalently to an amino-functionalized MIL-101(Cr) through an amide bond. Chemical reduction experiments reveal that the MOF channels can be clogged by ion pairs that are formed between the oxidized reductant and the reduced catalyst. This effect is lessened in MIL-101-NH-[FeFe] with lower [FeFe] loadings. On longer timescales, it is shown that large proportions of the [FeFe] catalysts within the MOF engage in photochemical hydrogen production and the amount of produced hydrogen is proportional to the catalyst loading.

  20. Refractive index chemical sensing with noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Phillip

    Chemical sensing is a key component in modern society, especially in engineering applications. Because of their widespread impact, improvements to chemical sensors are a significant area of research. One class of sensors, plasmonic sensors, is being heavily researched because of their ability to detect low levels of analyte in near real time without destroying the analyte. This work studies a new class of plasmonic sensor that utilizes diffractive coupling to improve sensor performance. Specifically, this work outlines the first study of diffractive coupling sensors with typical nanoparticle shapes. Sensitivity of this new class of sensor is directly compared to typical localized surface plasmon resonance sensors. Spectral peak location sensitivity was found to be equal to or greater than typical plasmonic sensors. These results were corroborated with numerical simulation with and without nanoparticle interaction to demonstrate the power of harnessing diffractive coupling in nanoparticle sensors. The sensing results were then extended to analyze ordered arrays of nanorings. Nanorings were chosen because they have the highest reported sensitivity of any plasmonic shape (880 nm/RIU) in the literature and have a high surface area to volume ratio, which is a key parameter for plasmonic sensors. Theoretical simulations of diffractive coupling nanorings indicate that sensitivity is comparable to non-coupling nanorings in the literature (890 nm/RIU vs. 880 nm/RIU, respectively). Another metric of sensor performance, the figure of merit, was much higher (34) than the non-coupling ring (2). Ordered nanoring arrays which exhibit diffractive coupling improve upon current refractive index based plasmonic sensors. Further improvements to nanoring sensors' figure of merit are possible based on simulation results for nanosphere arrays.

  1. Synergistic effect of rice husk addition on hydrothermal treatment of sewage sludge: fate and environmental risk of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wansheng; Liu, Chunguang; Shu, Youju; Feng, Chuanping; Lei, Zhongfang; Zhang, Zhenya

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal treatment (HTT) at 200°C was applied to immobilize heavy metals (HMs) and the effect of rice husk (RH) addition was investigated based on total HMs concentration, fractionation and leaching tests. The results indicated that a synergistic effect of RH addition and HTT could be achieved on reducing the risk of HMs from medium and low risk to no risk. Metals were redistributed and transformed from weakly bounded state to stable state during the HTT process under RH addition. Notably at a RH/sludge ratio of 1/1.75 (d.w.), all the HMs showed no eco-toxicity and no leaching toxicity, with the concentrations of leachable Cr, Ni, Cu and Cd decreased by 17%, 89%, 95% and 93%, respectively. This synergistic effect of RH addition and HTT on the risk reduction of HMs implies that HTT process with RH addition could be a promising and safe disposal technology for sewage sludge treatment in practice.

  2. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Schutte, Erick J. (Inventor); Rolfe, Sara L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having one of the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01

  3. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schutte, Erick J.; Rolfe, Sara L.

    2010-11-02

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having one of the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01

  4. Problems of Development and Application of Metal Matrix Composite Powders for Additive Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosteleva, Elena N.; Pribytkov, Gennadii A.; Krinitcyn, Maxim G.; Baranovskii, Anton V.; Korzhova, Victoria V.

    2016-07-01

    The paper considers the problem of structure formation in composites with carbide phase and a metal binder under self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of powder mixtures. The relation between metal binder content and their structure and wear resistance of coatings was studied. It has been shown that dispersion of the carbide phase and volume content of metal binder in the composite powders structure could be regulated purposefully for all of studied composites. It was found that the structure of surfaced coating was fully inherited of composite powders. Modification or coarsening of the structure at the expense of recrystallization or coagulation carbide phase during deposition and sputtering does not occur.

  5. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Moran, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  6. The influence of Si addition in 55AlZn bath on the coating structures obtained in the batch hot-dip metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendala, J.

    2011-05-01

    One of the methods of increasing the corrosion resistance of zinc coatings is the application of zinc and aluminium alloy baths in the metallization process. The coatings obtained are characterized by much better corrosion resistance thanks to the combination of aluminium properties, i.e. the barrier protection provided by naturally created aluminium oxides, with the capacity to protect the steel substrate, which is characteristic of zinc coatings. Zinc coatings with 55 wt. % Al and an addition of Si have gained industrial importance. The introduction of a third alloying component into the metallization bath is a technological addition, the aim of which is to reduce and possibly inhibit the aluminium diffusion towards the substrate. The article presents the results of the examination of coatings obtained in a 55AlZn bath at varied parameters of the technological process, as well as the specification of silicon addition influence on the structure and chemical composition of the coatings, and on the kinetics of growth. The coatings were obtained in three temperatures: 620, 640 and 660°C, and the process was conducted in a 55 wt. % Al bath with Si content of 0, 0.8 and 1.6 wt. % respectively, the remaining content was Zn. For the purposes of evaluating the microstructure and thickness of the coatings obtained, examinations on a light microscope were conducted. In order to determine the chemical composition of the coatings obtained, an EDS analysis was conducted. Quantitative examination of the chemical composition was carried out on the selected cross-sections of samples with coatings considered to be representative ones, using a SEM with a microanalysis system. Moreover, the linear distribution of elements on the cross-sections of the chosen coatings was determined. It is possible to state that the addition of silicon to 55AlZn baths allows reducing the uncontrolled growth of a layer. The layers obtained are more uniform, continuous and they show good adhesion to

  7. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  8. Assessing the effects of adsorptive polymeric resin additions on fungal secondary metabolite chemical diversity

    PubMed Central

    González-Menéndez, Víctor; Asensio, Francisco; Moreno, Catalina; de Pedro, Nuria; Monteiro, Maria Candida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Vicente, Francisca; Bills, Gerald F.; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Tormo, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorptive polymeric resins have been occasionally described to enhance the production of specific secondary metabolites (SMs) of interest. Methods that induce the expression of new chemical entities in fungal fermentations may lead to the discovery of new bioactive molecules and should be addressed as possible tools for the creation of new microbial chemical libraries for drug lead discovery. Herein, we apply both biological activity and chemical evaluations to assess the use of adsorptive resins as tools for the differential expression of SMs in fungal strain sets. Data automation approaches were applied to ultra high performance liquid chromatography analysis of extracts to evaluate the general influence in generating new chemical entities or in changing the production of specific SMs by fungi grown in the presence of resins and different base media. PMID:25379340

  9. Chemical Cartography with APOGEE: Metallicity Distribution Functions and the Chemical Structure of the Milky Way Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Michael R.; Bovy, Jo; Holtzman, Jon A.; Nidever, David L.; Bird, Jonathan C.; Weinberg, David H.; Andrews, Brett H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Anders, Friedrich; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Chiappini, Cristina; Cunha, Katia; Frinchaboy, Peter; García-Herńandez, D. A.; García Pérez, Ana E.; Girardi, Léo; Harding, Paul; Hearty, Fred R.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Minchev, Ivan; O'Connell, Robert; Pan, Kaike; Robin, Annie C.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Shetrone, Matthew; Skrutskie, Michael; Steinmetz, Matthias; Smith, Verne; Wilson, John C.; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-08-01

    Using a sample of 69,919 red giants from the SDSS-III/APOGEE Data Release 12, we measure the distribution of stars in the [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane and the metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) across an unprecedented volume of the Milky Way disk, with radius 3 < R < 15 kpc and height | z| \\lt 2 kpc. Stars in the inner disk (R < 5 kpc) lie along a single track in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H], starting with α-enhanced, metal-poor stars and ending at [α/Fe] ˜ 0 and [Fe/H] ˜ +0.4. At larger radii we find two distinct sequences in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] space, with a roughly solar-α sequence that spans a decade in metallicity and a high-α sequence that merges with the low-α sequence at super-solar [Fe/H]. The location of the high-α sequence is nearly constant across the disk however, there are very few high-α stars at R > 11 kpc. The peak of the midplane MDF shifts to lower metallicity at larger R, reflecting the Galactic metallicity gradient. Most strikingly, the shape of the midplane MDF changes systematically with radius, from a negatively skewed distribution at 3 < R < 7 kpc, to a roughly Gaussian distribution at the solar annulus, to a positively skewed shape in the outer Galaxy. For stars with | z| \\gt 1 kpc or [α/Fe] > 0.18, the MDF shows little dependence on R. The positive skewness of the outer-disk MDF may be a signature of radial migration; we show that blurring of stellar populations by orbital eccentricities is not enough to explain the reversal of MDF shape, but a simple model of radial migration can do so.

  10. (abstract) Studies on AB(sub 5) Metal Hydride Alloys with Sn Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.; Stefano, S. Di; Halpert, G.; Witham, C.; Fultz, B.

    1994-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in alkaline rechargeable cells is becoming increasingly popular, due to several advantages offered by the metal hydrides over conventional anode materials (such as Zn, Cd) in terms of specific energy environmental cycle life and compatibility. Besides, the similarities in the cell voltage pressure characteristics, and charge control methods of the Ni-MH cells to the commonly used Ni-Cd point to a projected take over of 25% of the Ni-Cd market for consumer electronics by the Ni-MH cells in the next couple of years. Two classes of metal hydrides alloys based on rare earth metals (AB(sub 5)) and titanium (AB(sub 2)) are being currently developed at various laboratories. AB(sub 2) alloys exhibit higher specific energy than the AB(sub 5) alloys but the state of the art commercial Ni-MH cells are predominately manufactured using AB(sub 5) alloys.

  11. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Satyawali, Yamini; Seuntjens, Piet; Van Roy, Sandra; Joris, Ingeborg; Vangeel, Silvia; Dejonghe, Winnie; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2011-04-25

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs.

  12. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  13. Substrate Vibrations as Promoters of Chemical Reactivity on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Victoria L; Chen, Nan; Guo, Han; Jackson, Bret; Utz, Arthur L

    2015-12-17

    Studies exploring how vibrational energy (Evib) promotes chemical reactivity most often focus on molecular reagents, leaving the role of substrate atom motion in heterogeneous interfacial chemistry underexplored. This combined theoretical and experimental study of methane dissociation on Ni(111) shows that lattice atom motion modulates the reaction barrier height during each surface atom's vibrational period, which leads to a strong variation in the reaction probability (S0) with surface temperature (Tsurf). State-resolved beam-surface scattering studies at Tsurf = 90 K show a sharp threshold in S0 at translational energy (Etrans) = 42 kJ/mol. When Etrans decreases from 42 kJ/mol to 34 kJ/mol, S0 decreases 1000-fold at Tsurf = 90 K, but only 2-fold at Tsurf = 475 K. Results highlight the mechanism for this effect, provide benchmarks for DFT calculations, and suggest the potential importance of surface atom induced barrier height modulation in heterogeneously catalyzed reactions, particularly on structurally labile nanoscale particles and defect sites.

  14. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Interim Action Proposed Plan for the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.

    2002-06-18

    The purpose of this Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) is to describe the preferred interim remedial action for addressing the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process.

  16. Disappearance of Barrier Metal during Cu Chemical Mechanical Planarization Processing and Its Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akihito; Hirano, Tatsuhiko; Tamai, Kazusei; Morinaga, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    The bald disappearance of barrier metal had been observed on the wafer after Cu chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processing. It was speculated that this phenomenon occurs because the excessively oxidized Ta by electrochemical reaction with Cu ion was removed more easily than the normal Ta oxide around it. The inhibition of the electrochemical reaction is necessary to solve this phenomenon.

  17. Light-emitting silicon nanowires obtained by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrera, Alessia; Josè Lo Faro, Maria; D’Andrea, Cristiano; Alessio Leonardi, Antonio; Artoni, Pietro; Fazio, Barbara; Picca, Rosaria Anna; Cioffi, Nicola; Trusso, Sebastiano; Franzò, Giorgia; Musumeci, Paolo; Priolo, Francesco; Iacona, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    This review reports on a new process for the synthesis of Si nanowires (NWs), based on the wet etching of Si substrates assisted by a thin metal film. The approach exploits the thickness-dependent morphology of the metal layers to define uncovered nanometric Si regions, which behave as precursor sites for the formation of very dense (up to 1 × 1012 NW cm‑2) arrays of long (up to several μm) and ultrathin (diameter of 5–9 nm) NWs. Intense photoluminescence (PL) peaks, characterized by maxima in the 640–750 nm range and by an external quantum efficiency of 0.5%, are observed when the Si NWs are excited at room temperature. The spectra show a blueshift if the size of the NW is decreased, in agreement with the occurrence of quantum confinement effects. The same etching process can be used to obtain ultrathin Si/Ge NWs from a Si/Ge multi-quantum well. The Si/Ge NWs exhibit—in addition to the Si-related PL peak—a signal at about 1240 nm due to Ge nanostructures. The huge surface area of the Si NW arrays can be exploited for sensing and analytical applications. The dependence of the PL intensity on the chemical composition of the surface indeed suggests interesting perspectives for the detection of gaseous molecules. Moreover, Si NWs decorated with Ag nanoparticles can be effectively employed in the interference-free laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry of low-molecular-weight analytes. A device based on conductive Si NWs, showing intense and stable electroluminescence at an excitation voltage as low as 2 V, is also presented. The unique features of the proposed synthesis (the process is cheap, fast, maskless and compatible with Si technology) and the unusual optical properties of the material open the route towards new and unexpected perspectives for semiconductor NWs in photonics.

  18. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5053: A VERY METAL-POOR AND DYNAMICALLY COMPLEX GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-05-10

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO–Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ∼ 75–90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of −2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na–O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  19. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5053: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Complex Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-05-01

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO-Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ˜ 75-90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of -2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na-O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  20. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5053: A Very Metal Poor and Dynamically Complex Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberg, Owen; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the spherical distribution expected from GCs. These features include a ˜6° tidal stream (Lauchner et al. 2006), and a possible, but still debated, bridge-like structure between it and its nearby neighbor NGC 5024 (Chun et al. 2010). These features suggest that the evolution of these clusters has not only been greatly affected by their gravitational interaction with the Galaxy, but possibly each other. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sgr dSph stream (Law & Majewski 2010). Using the WIYN-Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (S/N ˜75-90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch (RGB) stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of -2.46 with a standard deviation of 0.05 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal poor GCs in the Milky Way. The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of Milky Way halo stars at a similar metallicity, with high alpha values and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na-O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the Milky Way. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being a member of the Sgr dSph stream.

  1. A Differential Chemical Element Analysis of the Metal-poor Globular Cluster NGC 6397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    We present chemical abundances in three red giants and two turnoff (TO) stars in the metal-poor Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397 based on spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle high-resolution spectrograph on the Magellan 6.5 m Clay telescope. Our results are based on a line-by-line differential abundance analysis relative to the well-studied red giant Arcturus and the Galactic halo field star Hip 66815. At a mean of -2.10 ± 0.02 (stat.) ±0.07 (sys.), the differential iron abundance is in good agreement with other studies in the literature based on gf-values. As in previous differential works we find a distinct departure from ionization equilibrium in that the abundances of Fe I and Fe II differ by ~0.1 dex, with opposite signs for the red giant branch (RGB) and TO stars. The α-element ratios are enhanced to 0.4 (RGB) and 0.3 dex (TO), respectively, and we also confirm strong variations in the O, Na, and Al/Fe abundance ratios. Accordingly, the light-element abundance patterns in one of the red giants can be attributed to pollution by an early generation of massive Type II supernovae. TO and RGB abundances are not significantly different, with the possible exception of Mg and Ti, which are, however, amplified by the patterns in one TO star additionally belonging to this early generation of GC stars. We discuss interrelations of these light elements as a function of the GC metallicity. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  2. A DIFFERENTIAL CHEMICAL ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6397

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2011-08-15

    We present chemical abundances in three red giants and two turnoff (TO) stars in the metal-poor Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397 based on spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle high-resolution spectrograph on the Magellan 6.5 m Clay telescope. Our results are based on a line-by-line differential abundance analysis relative to the well-studied red giant Arcturus and the Galactic halo field star Hip 66815. At a mean of -2.10 {+-} 0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.07 (sys.), the differential iron abundance is in good agreement with other studies in the literature based on gf-values. As in previous differential works we find a distinct departure from ionization equilibrium in that the abundances of Fe I and Fe II differ by {approx}0.1 dex, with opposite signs for the red giant branch (RGB) and TO stars. The {alpha}-element ratios are enhanced to 0.4 (RGB) and 0.3 dex (TO), respectively, and we also confirm strong variations in the O, Na, and Al/Fe abundance ratios. Accordingly, the light-element abundance patterns in one of the red giants can be attributed to pollution by an early generation of massive Type II supernovae. TO and RGB abundances are not significantly different, with the possible exception of Mg and Ti, which are, however, amplified by the patterns in one TO star additionally belonging to this early generation of GC stars. We discuss interrelations of these light elements as a function of the GC metallicity.

  3. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  4. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  5. Chemical and microstructural analyses for heavy metals removal from water media by ceramic membrane filtration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asmaa; Ahmed, Abdelkader; Gad, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the ability of low cost ceramic membrane filtration in removing three common heavy metals namely; Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) from water media. The work includes manufacturing ceramic membranes with dimensions of 15 by 15 cm and 2 cm thickness. The membranes were made from low cost materials of local clay mixed with different sawdust percentages of 0.5%, 2.0%, and 5.0%. The used clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Aqueous solutions of heavy metals were prepared in the laboratory and filtered through the ceramic membranes. The influence of the main parameters such as pH, initial driving pressure head, and concentration of heavy metals on their removal efficiency by ceramic membranes was investigated. Water samples were collected before and after the filtration process and their heavy metal concentrations were determined by chemical analysis. Moreover, a microstructural analysis using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was performed on ceramic membranes before and after the filtration process. The chemical analysis results showed high removal efficiency up to 99% for the concerned heavy metals. SEM images approved these results by showing adsorbed metal ions on sides of the internal pores of the ceramic membranes.

  6. Alkali-metal-catalyzed addition of primary and secondary phosphines to carbodiimides. A general and efficient route to substituted phosphaguanidines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Nishiura, Masayoshi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2006-09-28

    Organo alkali metal compounds such as (n)BuLi and (Me3Si)2NK act as excellent catalyst precursors for the addition of phosphine P-H bonds to carbodiimides, offering a general and atom-economical route to substituted phosphaguanidines, with excellent tolerability to aromatic C-Br and C-Cl bonds.

  7. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  8. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  9. Effect of metal oxide additions to quality on Ge/GeO2 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongfei; Robertson, John; Okuno, Yasutoshi

    2016-10-01

    Alloying amorphous GeO2 with Y2O3 or related group IIIA oxides is known experimentally to improve its properties as a gate dielectric in field effect transistors. The mechanism of this is studied here by density functional calculations. The metal site coordination is found to be 6-7, by increasing the oxygen coordination to 3 or higher. The alloying is found to increase the bulk modulus. Alloying also increases the diffusion energy of the oxygen vacancies in GeO2 next to the metal and also increases the vacancy formation energy of oxygens that are second neighbors of the metal sites. In this way, a relatively small metal concentration can reduce the O vacancy diffusion rate and thereby the GeO evolution rate. Oxygen vacancies at the Ge/GeO2 interface next to a metal site are found to divide into two types, those which rebond across the vacancy (La, Hf) and those without rebonding (Y, Sc, Al), the latter being preferable as they do not give rise to interfacial gap states.

  10. Effect of solvents on the chemical and physical properties of ionic polymer-metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Zamani, Shahram; Tor, Yitzhak

    2006-05-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) consist of a perfluorinated ionomer membrane (usually Nafion® or Flemion®) plated on both faces with a noble metal such as gold or platinum and neutralized with a certain amount of counterions that balance the electrical charge of anions covalently fixed to the backbone ionomer. IPMCs are electroactive materials with potential applications as actuators and sensors. Their electrical-chemical-mechanical response is dependent on the cations used, the nature and the amount of solvent uptake, the morphology of the electrodes, the composition of the backbone ionomer, the geometry and boundary conditions of the composite element, and the magnitude and spatial and time variation of the applied potential. With water as the solvent, the applied electric potential must be limited to less than 1.3 V at room temperature, to avoid electrolysis. Moreover, water evaporation in open air presents additional problems. These and related factors limit the application of IPMCs with water as the solvent. We present the results of a series of tests on both Nafion- and Flemion-based IPMCs with ethylene glycol, glycerol, and crown ethers as solvents. IPMCs with these solvents have greater solvent uptake and can be subjected to relatively high voltages without electrolysis. They can be actuated in open air for rather long time periods, and at low temperatures. They may be good actuators when high-speed actuation is not necessary. In addition, their slow response in open air allows direct observation of the physical characteristics of the cathode and anode surfaces of a cantilever during actuations. This can provide additional clues for unraveling the underpinning micromechanisms of their actuation. Remarkably, solvents are found to have profound effects on the nature of the IPMCs' actuation. For example, Nafion-based IPMCs in Li+ form show very small back relaxation when hydrated, but extensive back relaxation with all other solvents that we have

  11. Control of Metal/graphite Interfacial Energy Through the Interfacial Segregation of Alloying Additions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Utpal

    Equilibrium segregation of Ni to the interface of a solid Pb/graphite and Au/graphite was studied using a solid state wetting approach and the crater edge profiling technique on a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). All experiments were performed under ultra high vacuum (UHV) to reduce the effects due to surface adsorption of impurities. For the Pb/graphite system, increasing amounts of Ni ranging from 0 to 0.2wt% Ni added to Pb were found to systematically lower the contact angle for samples equilibrated at 285 ^circC. No significant surface segregation of Ni was observed at the Pb surface. The reduction of the contact angle was therefore attributed entirely to the lowering of the interfacial energy by interfacial adsorption of Ni. The interfacial energy and interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of bulk Ni content. The presence of excess Ni at the interface was also determined using the crater edge profiling technique on the SAM for various bulk concentrations of Ni in Pb. The temperature dependence of the segregation process was also studied using the solid state wetting approach. The contact angle of Pb(Ni)/graphite was found to vary as a function of temperature for a given Ni content. No temperature dependence was observed in the case of pure Pb/graphite. The change in interfacial energy and the interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of temperature from thermodynamic considerations, and from that the enthalpy and the entropy of interfacial segregation were determined. For the Au/graphite system at 850^circC, addition of 15at%Ni to Au caused a reduction of contact angle by 7.8^circ with accompanying reduction in interfacial energy. Ni was found to segregate to both the free Au surface as well as to the Au/graphite interface. In addition C was also found to segregate to the Au surface thus lowering the surface energy. The modified surface energy was considered in the determination of the interfacial energy and interfacial Ni

  12. Recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries with chemical deposition and solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Junmin; Han, Dongmei; Zuo, Xiaoxi

    This paper describes a new recycling process of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). After the dismantling of the spent batteries steel crusts, the leaching of battery internal substances with alkaline solution and the dissolving of the residues with H 2SO 4 solution were carried out. Then mass cobalt was chemically deposited as oxalate, and Acorga M5640 and Cyanex272 extracted the small quantities of copper and cobalt, respectively. Lithium was recovered as deposition of lithium carbonate. It is shown that about 90% cobalt was deposited as oxalate with less than 0.5% impurities, and Acorga M5640 and Cyanex272 were efficient and selective for the extraction of copper and cobalt in sulfate solution. Over 98% of the copper and 97% of the cobalt was recovered in the given process. In addition, the waste solution was treated innocuously, and LiCoO 2 positive electrode material with good electrochemical performance was also synthesized by using the recovered compounds of cobalt and lithium as precursors. The process is feasible for the recycling of spent LIBs in scale-up.

  13. Highly scalable, atomically thin WSe2 grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Eichfeld, Sarah M; Hossain, Lorraine; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Piasecki, Aleksander F; Kupp, Benjamin; Birdwell, A Glen; Burke, Robert A; Lu, Ning; Peng, Xin; Li, Jie; Azcatl, Angelica; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M; Kim, Moon J; Mayer, Theresa S; Redwing, Joan M; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-02-24

    Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) is a two-dimensional material that is of interest for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to its direct bandgap of 1.65 eV in the monolayer form and excellent transport properties. However, technologies based on this 2D material cannot be realized without a scalable synthesis process. Here, we demonstrate the first scalable synthesis of large-area, mono and few-layer WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) and dimethylselenium ((CH3)2Se). In addition to being intrinsically scalable, this technique allows for the precise control of the vapor-phase chemistry, which is unobtainable using more traditional oxide vaporization routes. We show that temperature, pressure, Se:W ratio, and substrate choice have a strong impact on the ensuing atomic layer structure, with optimized conditions yielding >8 μm size domains. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm crystalline monoto-multilayer WSe2 is achievable. Finally, TEM and vertical current/voltage transport provide evidence that a pristine van der Waals gap exists in WSe2/graphene heterostructures.

  14. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries in the United Kingdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    A study analyzed the occupational structure and qualifications associated with the field of environmental protection in the metal and chemical industries in the United Kingdom. The analysis included nine case studies based on interviews with firms in the chemicals and metals sectors. Information was gathered within an analytical framework that…

  15. Plasmonic-metal nanostructures for efficient conversion of solar to chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip; Ingram, David B

    2011-11-23

    Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the harvesting and conversion of solar energy. Among various technologies, the direct conversion of solar to chemical energy using photocatalysts has received significant attention. Although heterogeneous photocatalysts are almost exclusively semiconductors, it has been demonstrated recently that plasmonic nanostructures of noble metals (mainly silver and gold) also show significant promise. Here we review recent progress in using plasmonic metallic nanostructures in the field of photocatalysis. We focus on plasmon-enhanced water splitting on composite photocatalysts containing semiconductor and plasmonic-metal building blocks, and recently reported plasmon-mediated photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures of noble metals. We also discuss the areas where major advancements are needed to move the field of plasmon-mediated photocatalysis forward.

  16. Structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants for strategies against metal and metalloid exposure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties. PMID:20716905

  17. Photonic crystal membrane reflectors by magnetic field-guided metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasundaram, Karthik; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong; Li, Xiuling

    2013-11-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) is a simple etching method that uses metal as the catalyst for anisotropic etching of semiconductors. However, producing nano-structures using MacEtch from discrete metal patterns, in contrast to interconnected ones, has been challenging because of the difficulties in keeping the discrete metal features in close contact with the semiconductor. We report the use of magnetic field-guided MacEtch (h-MacEtch) to fabricate periodic nanohole arrays in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers for high reflectance photonic crystal membrane reflectors. This study demonstrates that h-MacEtch can be used in place of conventional dry etching to produce ordered nanohole arrays for photonic devices.

  18. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-02-01

    Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600-730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  19. Effects of sorghum flour addition on chemical and rheological properties of hard white winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was carried out to investigate the chemical and rheological properties of different blends prepared using hard white winter wheat and whole or decorticated sorghum. Whole and decorticated sorghum were used to replace 5, 10, 15, and 20% of wheat flour. Wheat samples had higher protein, moi...

  20. USING DOSE ADDITION TO ESTIMATE CUMULATIVE RISKS FROM EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires the EPA to consider the cumulative risk from exposure to multiple chemicals that have a common mechanism of toxicity. Three methods, hazard index (HI), point-of-departure index (PODI), and toxicity equivalence factor (TEF), ...

  1. A chemical additive to limit potential bacterial contamination in chill tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler carcasses with different types and numbers of bacteria are commonly chilled together in an ice water bath which may lead to transfer of unwanted bacteria from carcass to carcass. Historically chill tanks have been chlorinated to help prevent cross contamination and recently other chemical a...

  2. Immobilization of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cr, Zn, Cd, Mn) in the mineral additions containing concrete composites.

    PubMed

    Giergiczny, Zbigniew; Król, Anna

    2008-12-30

    The presented work determines the level of heavy metals (Pb+2, Cu+2, Zn+2, Cr+6, Cd+2, Mn+2) immobilization in the composites produced using Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as well as of binders containing large amount of mineral additives in its composition-siliceous fly ash (FA), fluidized bed combustion ash (FFA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). Heavy metals were introduced to cementitious materials in the form of soluble salts as well as components of hazardous wastes (medical ash, metallurgical dust). It has been stated, that the level of heavy metals immobilization is combined with composites composition. Majority of analyzed heavy metals, added to binders' composition in the form of heavy metal salts achieves high level of immobilization, in mortar based on binder with 85% GGBFS and 15% OPC. The lowest immobilization level was reached for chromium Cr+6 added to hardening mortars as Na2Cr2O72H2O. The level ranges from 85.97% in mortars made on blended binder (20% OPC, 30% FFA and 50% GGBFS) to 93.33% in mortar produced on OPC. The increase of the so-called immobilization degree with time of hardened material maturing was found. This should be attributed to the pozzolanic or pozzolanic/hydraulic properties of components used; their effect on microstructure of hardened material is also important. Mineral additions enter the hydration reactions in the mixtures and favor the formation of specific microstructure promoting the immobilization of hazardous elements.

  3. Evaluation of trace metals bioavailability in Japanese river waters using DGT and a chemical equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Hanai, Yoshimichi; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2013-09-15

    To develop efficient and effective methods of assessing and managing the risk posed by metals to aquatic life, it is important to determine the effects of water chemistry on the bioavailability of metals in surface water. In this study, we employed the diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) to determine the bioavailability of metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb) in Japanese water systems. The DGT results were compared with a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0) calculation to examine its robustness and utility to predict dynamic metal speciation. The DGT measurements showed that biologically available fractions of metals in the rivers impacted by mine drainage and metal industries were relatively high compared with those in urban rivers. Comparison between the DGT results and the model calculation indicated good agreement for Zn. The model calculation concentrations for Ni and Cu were higher than the DGT concentrations at most sites. As for Pb, the model calculation depended on whether the precipitated iron(III) hydroxide or precipitated aluminum(III) hydroxide was assumed to have an active surface. Our results suggest that the use of WHAM 7.0 combined with the DGT method can predict bioavailable concentrations of most metals (except for Pb) with reasonable accuracy.

  4. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  5. Improved magneto-caloric effect of the Gd50Co50 metallic glass by minor Si addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B. Z.; Yu, P.; Ding, D.; Wu, C.; Xia, L.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, we studied the effect of minor Si addition on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of the Gd50Co50 metallic glass. The Gd50Co50-xSix (x=2, 5) as-spun ribbons show typical amorphous characteristics in structure and magneto-caloric behaviors. The peak values for the magnetic entropy change (-ΔSmpeak) of the Gd50Co50-xSix (x=0, 2, 5) metallic glasses increase significantly with the addition of Si. The mechanism for the enhanced MCE by minor addition of Si was investigated by revealing the relationship between -ΔSmpeak and the Curie temperature in the Gd-Co-based amorphous ribbons.

  6. Characterization of Steel-Ta Dissimilar Metal Builds Made Using Very High Power Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (VHP-UAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Norfolk, Mark; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing is a solid-state additive manufacturing technique that utilizes ultrasonic vibrations to bond metal tapes into near net-shaped components. The major advantage of this process is the ability to manufacture layered structures with dissimilar materials without any intermetallic formation. Majority of the published literature had focused only on the bond formation mechanism in Aluminum alloys. The current work pertains to explain the microstructure evolution during dissimilar joining of iron and tantalum using very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing and characterization of the interfaces using electron back-scattered diffraction and Nano-indentation measurement. The results showed extensive grain refinement at the bonded interfaces of these metals. This phenomenon was attributed to continuous dynamic recrystallization process driven by the high strain rate plastic deformation and associated adiabatic heating that is well below 50 pct of melting point of both iron and Ta.

  7. The joint effects on Photobacterium phosphoreum of metal oxide nanoparticles and their most likely coexisting chemicals in the environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Gao, Ya; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Zhang, Weixian

    2014-09-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been used increasingly and are likely to accumulate in natural water bodies, where they encounter and interact with other environmental chemicals. These interactions result in joint effects on biological systems and the environment. However, compared with the intensive research examining the toxicities of individual NPs, the toxicities of NP mixtures remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we studied the joint effects of NPs and their most likely coexisting chemicals in the environment, including NPs with different compositions, humic substances, and surfactants. Our results indicate that the joint effects of NP mixtures were usually simple addition, which is commonly adopted in real risk assessment. However, the joint effects obtained for mixtures that contained ZnO were exclusively associated with antagonism. In addition, the mixtures of NPs and surfactants resulted in complex joint effects, i.e., antagonistic, additive, and synergistic effects were found for the mixtures with ZnO, NiO, and Fe-oxide, respectively. Our study suggests that the assessments of the ecological risk of NPs, particularly ZnO NPs, should consider the impact of their coexisting chemicals in the environment.

  8. The Effects of Chemical Wash Additives on the Corrosion of Aerospace Alloys in Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Joseph; Hodge, Tim; Barile, Ronald; Heidersbach, Robert; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for comparing the relative effectiveness of four chemical products used for rinsing airplanes and helicopters. The products were applied on a weekly basis to a series of flat alloy panels exposed to an oceanfront marine environment for one year. The results are presented along with comparisons of exposures of the same alloys that were not washed, were washed with seawater, or washed with de-ionized water.

  9. Synthesis and nanorod growth of n-type phthalocyanine on ultrathin metal films by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshiba, Yasuko; Nishimoto, Mihoko; Misawa, Asuka; Misaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    The thermal behavior of 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene (TCNB), the synthesis of metal-2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octacyanophthalocyanine-metal [MPc(CN)8-M] (M = Cu, Fe, Ni) complexes by the tetramerization of TCNB, and the growth of MPc(CN)8-M nanorods were investigated. By chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in vacuum, MPc(CN)8 molecules were synthesized and MPc(CN)8-M nanorods were formed on all substrates. Among them, CuPc(CN)8 molecules were synthesized in high yield, and CuPc(CN)8-Cu nanorods were deposited uniformly and in high density, with diameters and lengths of 70-110 and 200-700 nm, respectively. The differences in the growth of MPc(CN)8-M nanorods were mainly attributed to the stability of the MPc(CN)8-M complex, the oxidation of ultrathin metal films, and the diffusion of metal atoms. Additionally, the tetramerization of TCNB by CVD at atmospheric pressure was performed on ultrathin Cu films, and the synthesis of CuPc(CN)8 molecules was observed by in situ UV-vis spectroscopy. CVD under atmospheric pressure is also useful for the synthesis of CuPc(CN)8 molecules.

  10. The use of fly ash and portland cement to chemically fix metal mine drainage treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Hustwit, C.C.

    1996-11-01

    The conventional treatment of metal mine drainages produces a sludge consisting principally of metal hydroxides and oxides. There are no commonly used treatment technologies or methods to convert the metal hydroxides and oxides to more stable chemical forms. Industrial solid or semisolid wastes are often stabilized prior to final disposal with admixtures of fly ash, portland cement, or a combination of these materials. In this study, an adaptation of this stabilization method was evaluated for its ability to improve the settling rate, density, and chemical stability of a metal mine drainage treatment sludge. The corresponding properties of a hydrated lime-generated sludge were used as the basis of comparison. Hydrated lime is frequently used as a neutralizing reagent in mine drainage treatment. In this adaptation, the stabilizing materials were mixed with the mine drainage during treatment, rather than added to the sludge after treatment. There were two reasons for doing this. First, metal mine drainage treatment systems include mixers and their use for blending the stabilizing agent with the sludge during treatment would eliminate the need for separate mixing equipment. Second, the stabilizing agents tested were alkaline materials and may reduce the volume of hydrated lime required for treatment. Water treatment performance was also evaluated in this study.

  11. Metal ferrite oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion of solid fuels

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Fan, Yueying

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a metal ferrite oxygen carrier for the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The metal ferrite oxygen carrier comprises MFe.sub.xO.sub.y on an inert support, where MFe.sub.xO.sub.y is a chemical composition and M is one of Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Co, Mn, and combinations thereof. For example, MFe.sub.xO.sub.y may be one of MgFe.sub.2O.sub.4, CaFe.sub.2O.sub.4, SrFe.sub.2O.sub.4, BaFe.sub.2O.sub.4, CoFe.sub.2O.sub.4, MnFeO.sub.3, and combinations thereof. The MFe.sub.xO.sub.y is supported on an inert support. The inert support disperses the MFe.sub.xO.sub.y oxides to avoid agglomeration and improve performance stability. In an embodiment, the inert support comprises from about 5 wt. % to about 60 wt. % of the metal ferrite oxygen carrier and the MFe.sub.xO.sub.y comprises at least 30 wt. % of the metal ferrite oxygen carrier. The metal ferrite oxygen carriers disclosed display improved reduction rates over Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and improved oxidation rates over CuO.

  12. Chemical speciation of trace metals emitted from Indonesian peat fires for health risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betha, Raghu; Pradani, Maharani; Lestari, Puji; Joshi, Umid Man; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2013-03-01

    Regional smoke-induced haze in Southeast Asia, caused by uncontrolled forest and peat fires in Indonesia, is of major environmental and health concern. In this study, we estimated carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risk due to exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) as emitted from peat fires at Kalimantan, Indonesia. For the health risk analysis, chemical speciation (exchangeable, reducible, oxidizable, and residual fractions) of 12 trace metals (Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V and Zn) in PM2.5 was studied. Results indicate that Al, Fe and Ti together accounted for a major fraction of total metal concentrations (~ 83%) in PM2.5 emissions in the immediate vicinity of peat fires. Chemical speciation reveals that a major proportion of most of the metals, with the exception of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cd, was present in the residual fraction. The exchangeable fraction of metals, which represents their bioavailability, could play a major role in inducing human health effects of PM2.5. This fraction contained carcinogenic metals such as Cd (39.2 ng m- 3) and Ni (249.3 ng m- 3) that exceeded their WHO guideline values by several factors. Health risk estimates suggest that exposure to PM2.5 emissions in the vicinity of peat fires poses serious health threats.

  13. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  14. Effect of stainless steel chemical composition on brazing ability of filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Kei; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-08-01

    Many kinds of stainless steel have been used in the engineering field. So it is necessary to investigate the effect of SUS chemical compositions on the brazing ability of filler metal. In this study, SUS315J containing Cr, Ni, Si, Cu, and Mo was employed as a base metal. Excellent spreading ability of the molten nickel-based brazing filler on SUS315J was obtained as compared with that on SUS316. Copper and silicon influenced the significant spreading ability of the filler.

  15. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of phase change Ge1Sb2Te4 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Longo, Massimo; Fallica, Roberto; Wiemer, Claudia; Salicio, Olivier; Fanciulli, Marco; Rotunno, Enzo; Lazzarini, Laura

    2012-03-14

    The self-assembly of Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, catalyzed by Au nanoislands in a narrow range of temperatures and deposition pressures. In the optimized conditions of 400 °C, 50 mbar, the NWs are Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) single hexagonal crystals. Phase change memory switching was reversibly induced by nanosecond current pulses through metal-contacted NWs with threshold voltage of about 1.35 V.

  16. Polyimide/metal composite films via in situ decomposition of inorganic additives - Soluble polyimide versus polyimide precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rancourt, J. D.; Porta, G. M.; Moyer, E. S.; Madeleine, D. G.; Taylor, L. T.

    1988-01-01

    Polyimide-metal oxide (Co3O4 or CuO) composite films have been prepared via in situ thermal decomposition of cobalt (II) chloride or bis(trifluoroacetylacetonato)copper(II). A soluble polyimide (XU-218) and its corresponding prepolymer (polyamide acid) were individually employed as the reaction matrix. The resulting composites exhibited a greater metal oxide concentration at the air interface with polyamide acid as the reaction matrix. The water of imidization that is released during the concurrent polyamide acid cure and additive decomposition is believed to promote metal migration and oxide formation. In contrast, XU-218 doped with either HAuCl4.3H2O or AgNO3 yields surface gold or silver when thermolyzed (300 C).

  17. Photon Doppler Velocimeter to Measure Entrained Additive Manufactured Bulk Metal Powders in Hot Subsonic and Supersonic Oxygen Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Parts produced by additive manufacturing, particularly selective laser melting (SLM), have been shown to silt metal particulate even after undergoing stringent precision aerospace cleaning processes (Lowrey 2016). As printed parts are used in oxygen systems with increased pressures, temperatures, and gas velocity, the risk of ignition by particle impact, the most common direct ignition source of metals in oxygen, substantially increases. The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), desires to test the ignitability of SLM metals by particle impact in heated oxygen. The existing test systems rely on gas velocity calculations to infer particle velocity in both subsonic and supersonic particle impact systems. Until now, it was not possible to directly measure particle velocity. To increase the fidelity of planned SLM ignition studies, it is necessary to validate that the Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) test system can accurately measure particle velocity.

  18. Low Solar Absorbing Chemical Agent Resistant Coatings with Nano-Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    quantify ratio of side products vs. NCO:OH ratio • Adjust additives, reaction conditions, etc. – to make more favorable distribution UNCLASSIFIED...Polyester Resin (functional -OH) HDI Biuret (NCO) 75% resin solids, 25% solvent Siliceous B Army Green Hydroxyl Functional PU Water Dispersible Modified...Nav/Air Grey Conventional Polyester: 100% solid (low MW) Blend of HDI Trimers 100% solid Siliceous w./fluoro additives HDI Biuret HDI Trimer Poly

  19. Evaluation of the protective effect of chemical additives in the oxidation of phenolic compounds catalysed by peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juliana Arriel; Chagas, Pricila Maria Batista; Silva, Maria Cristina; Dos Santos, Custódio Donizete; Corrêa, Angelita Duarte

    2016-01-01

    The use of oxidoredutive enzymes in removing organic pollutants has been the subject of much research. The oxidation of phenolic compounds in the presence of chemical additives has been the focus of this study. In this investigation, the influence of the additives polyethylene glycol and Triton X-100 was evaluated in the phenol oxidation, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and total phenolic compounds present in coffee processing wastewater (CPW) at different pH values, performed by turnip peroxidase and peroxidase extracted from soybean seed hulls. The influence of these additives was observed only in the oxidation of phenol and caffeic acid. In the oxidation of other studied phenolic compounds, the percentage of oxidation remained unchanged in the presence of these chemical additives. In the oxidation of CPW in the presence of additives, no change in the oxidation of phenolic compounds was observed. Although several studies show the importance of evaluating the influence of additives on the behaviour of enzymes, this study found a positive response from the economic point of view for the treatment of real wastewater, since the addition of these substances showed no influence on the oxidation of phenolic compounds, which makes the process less costly.

  20. The effect of diborane additive on the plasma-chemical properties of deposited carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, E. N.; Karasev, P. A.; Titov, A. I.; Podsvirov, O. A.; Vinogradov, A. Ya.; Karasev, N. N.; Pozdnyakov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of studies of the optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of diamondlike carbon films prepared by plasma-chemical vapor deposition from a mixture of methane and diborane in various proportions. Upon reaching the threshold concentration ( 12%) of diborane in the mixture, inclusions of a new phase start to form in the structure of the films. This leads to nonlinear dependence of the interior stresses and the surface resistance of coatings on the composition of the mixture with minimum values corresponding to a diborane concentration of about 12%.

  1. Effect of the Addition of Schisandra chinensis Powder on the Physico-chemical Characteristics of Sausage

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S. K.; Park, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    The individual and interactive effects of Schisandra chinensis powder (SCP) and sodium nitrite additions on color, pH, water holding capacity, residual nitrite, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), volatile basic nitrogen, texture properties, fatty acids, amino acids and sensory evaluation of cooked pork sausages were investigated after 20 d of storage at 4°C. The powders (0, 0.5 and 1.0%) were added to sausages either alone or in combination with nitrite (0 and 100 ppm). SCP added-sausages showed lower L* (lightness) and W (whiteness) values, and higher b* (yellowness) values than sausage containing no nitrite, and exhibited the highest a* values at a 0.5% addition (p<0.05). Residual nitrite and TBARS values were found to be significantly reduced as the addition levels of SCP increased (p<0.05). As the addition of SCP increased, the sausage showed gradually decreased brittleness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness, while adhesiveness increased. Polyunsaturated fatty acid, n-6 and n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio concentrations were significantly higher in sausages containing SCP (p<0.05). The addition of SCP to sausage significantly (p<0.05) increased the ammonia content (by 0.5% SCP) and aromatic amino acid concentrations (by 1.0% SCP) (p<0.05). Inclusion of SCP in sausage meat resulted in a significant deterioration in quality characteristics of flavor, springiness, juiciness and overall acceptability (p<0.05). As expected, the observed changes in a*, W, pH, shear force, texture property, TBARS, fatty acid, amino acid and sensory score of sausages, depended on the rate of addition of nitrite (p<0.05). These results suggest that SCP addition is not an effective way of improving the sensory evaluation of sausages, but may beneficially affect TBARS, nitrite scavenging activity, fatty acid and amino acid content in pork sausages. PMID:25049766

  2. Post-synthesis addition of transition metal ions and lanthanide ions to the surface of anatase titanium (IV) dioxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasanthiran, Choumini

    Solar energy utilization is an attractive option for new energy technology and economic development. Our research is the formulation of catalyst materials for solar production of hydrogen from water. Titanium(IV) oxide has been explored for water splitting; however, a major challenge is that titanium(IV) oxide can only absorb UV light. Visible light absorption can be increased by metal ion or anion doping by creating interband states. Most dopant protocols lead to deposition of dopant ions throughout the solid, and interfacial deposition has received very little attention. We have developed a method to selectively attach transition metal ions and lanthanide ions on the surface of titanium(IV) oxide nanorods using metal chlorides as precursors. The present study demonstrates that Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu (II), Eu(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Er(III) were coordinated to the surface of oleic acid capped TiO2 nanorods (NRs) by post-synthesis method without any phase or morphology transformation. Metal ion loading could be carefully controlled, and we show a titration curve for addition of transition metal ions and Eu(III) to the nanorod surface. The materials were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, XPS and powder X-ray diffraction. X-ray photoelectron spectra were obtained for a series of M-TiO2 samples in which transition metal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) ions are directly attached to the surface of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. Further, we report sequential, quantitative loading of transition metal ions (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) to the surface of rod-shape anatase TiO2 nanocrystals in bimetallic combinations (6C2 = 15). TEM, PXRD, UV-Vis, XPS and elemental analysis characterization show that bimetallic combinations were synthesized successfully.

  3. Conservation characteristics of wilted perennial ryegrass silage made using biological or chemical additives.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, P; O'Kiely, P; O'Mara, F P

    2010-02-01

    The effects of 7 additive treatments on the fermentation and aerobic stability characteristics of wilted grass silage were studied under laboratory conditions. Treatments included no additive applied (untreated control), ammonium tetraformate at 3 and 6 L/t, homofermentative lactic acid bacteria alone ((ho)LAB), a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri plus homofermentative lactic acid bacteria ((he+ho)LAB), and an antimicrobial mixture of sodium benzoate, sodium propionate, sodium nitrite, and hexamethylenetetramine at 2.5 and 5 L/t. Additives were compared across 3 consecutive harvests of 2 perennial ryegrass cultivars (AberDart and Fennema) following a 24-h wilt. Silos were opened after at least 100 d of ensilage and aerobic stability was assessed. Season of harvest had a large effect on grass composition at ensiling, producing herbages of relatively low (approximately 145g/kg), medium (approximately 250g/kg), and high (approximately 365g/kg) dry matter (DM) concentrations. Within harvests there were lesser differences between cultivars. The untreated control and (ho)LAB additive produced badly fermented silage from the low-DM herbages and well-fermented silage from the medium- and high-DM herbages. The ammonium tetraformate treatments produced both well-fermented and badly fermented silage from the low-DM herbages depending on cultivar, and consistently well-fermented silage from the medium- and high-DM herbages. The (he+ho)LAB silages had similar or slightly lower standard of fermentation than the untreated and (ho)LAB silages. The antimicrobial mixture produced more silages of lower standard of fermentation than the untreated control and ammonium tetraformate and (ho)LAB additives. All additive treatments, including the untreated control, failed to consistently increase residual water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations at silo opening. Ammonium tetraformate at 6 L/t was the most successful and (he+ho)LAB the least successful additive at increasing residual WSC

  4. Metal adsorption by agricultural biosorbents: Adsorption isotherm, kinetic and biosorbents chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Sadeek, Sadeek A; Negm, Nabel A; Hefni, Hassan H H; Wahab, Mostafa M Abdel

    2015-11-01

    Biosorption of Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) ions from aqueous solutions by rice husk, palm leaf and water hyacinth was investigated as a function of initial pH, initial heavy metal ions concentration and treatment time. The adsorption process was examined by two adsorption isotherms: Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data of biosorption process were analyzed using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium biosorption isotherms showed that the three studied biosorbents possess high affinity and sorption capacity for Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) ions. Rice husk showed more efficiency than palm leaf and water hyacinth. Adsorption of Cu(II) and Co(II) was more efficient in alkaline medium (pH 9) than neutral medium due to the high solubility of metal ion complexes. The metal removal efficiency of each biosorbent was correlated to its chemical structure. DTA studies showed formation of metal complex between the biosorbents and the metal ions. The obtained results showed that the tested biosorbents are efficient and alternate low-cost biosorbent for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous media.

  5. Structural Modification of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Chemical Vapor Synthesis and Related Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jai-Sung; Lee, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyoung-No

    2011-10-01

    This paper overviews recent studies on structural modification of metal oxide nanoparticles occurring in the process of chemical vapour condensation (CVC) and related peculiar properties. Hollow nanostructure is controlled at specific process conditions where the pressure in the reactor and the evaporation temperature play an important role in terms of kinematical equilibrium during particle formation and decomposition of precursors in the CVC reactor. As a natural consequence, particle properties also rely on a large surface area from the hollow nanostructure. In this review paper, phase transformation, chemical reactivity and microstructural evolution of nanoparticles are discussed based on hollow nanostructure.

  6. Chemical effects in ion mixing of a ternary system (metal-SiO2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banwell, T.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Sands, T.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    The mixing of Ti, Cr, and Ni thin films with SiO2 by low-temperature (- 196-25 C) irradiation with 290 keV Xe has been investigated. Comparison of the morphology of the intermixed region and the dose dependences of net metal transport into SiO2 reveals that long range motion and phase formation probably occur as separate and sequential processes. Kinetic limitations suppress chemical effects in these systems during the initial transport process. Chemical interactions influence the subsequent phase formation.

  7. Work function shifts of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas visualized by terahertz chemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiwa, Toshihiko; Hagiwara, Takafumi; Shinomiya, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Kenji; Tsukada, Keiji

    2012-05-21

    Terahertz chemical microscopy (TCM) was applied to visualize the distribution of the work function shift of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas. TCM measures the chemical potential on the surface of a SiO(2)/Si/sapphire sensing plate without any contact with the plate. By controlling the bias voltage between an electrode on the SiO(2)/ surface and the Si layer, the relationship between the voltage and the THz amplitude from the sensing plate can be obtained. As a demonstration, two types of structures were fabricated on the sensing plate, and the work function shifts due to catalytic reactions were visualized.

  8. Corrosion protection of Al alloys and Al-based metal-matrix composites by chemical passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Lin, S.; Sim, S.; Shih, H.

    1989-08-01

    Chemical passivation by immersion of aluminium alloys and aluminium 6061/ silicon carbide and aluminium 6061/graphite metal-matrix composites in cerium chloride solution produces very corrosion-resistant surfaces. Aluminium 6061 and aluminium 7075-T6 that had been immersed in 1000 ppm cerium chloride for one week did not suffer from pitting corrosion during immersion in acerated 0.5 N NaCl for three weeks. For aluminium 7075-T7l3 some improvement of the corrosion resistance was also achieved, but to a much lesser extent. Chemical passivation in cerium chloride was also successful for aluminium/silicon carbide and Allgraphite.

  9. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  10. Effects of chemical additives on hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation in freshwater marsh microcosms.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J A; Klerks, P L; Bhattacharyya, S

    2007-09-01

    We determined how a cleaner and a dispersant affected hydrocarbon biodegradation in wetland soils dominated by the plant Panicum hemitomon, which occurs throughout North and South America. Microcosms received no hydrocarbons, South Louisiana crude, or diesel; and no additive, a dispersant, or a cleaner. We determined the concentration of four total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measures and 43 target hydrocarbons in water and sediment fractions 1, 7, 31, and 186 days later. Disappearance was distinguished from biodegradation via hopane-normalization. After 186 days, TPH disappearance ranged from 24% to 97%. There was poor correlation among the four TPH measures, which indicated that each quantified a different suite of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation were unaltered by these additives under worse-case scenarios. Any use of these additives must generate benefits that outweigh the lack of effect on biodegradation demonstrated in this report, and the increase in toxicity that we reported earlier.

  11. Chemical thermodynamics as a predictive tool in the reactive metal brazing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Lannutti, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    Thermodynamics have long been applied to the understanding of the reactive wetting phenomena in metal-ceramic joining. The authors postulate the existence of a ``solvent effect`` due to the interaction between the reactive element addition and the brazing alloy. This effect plays a significant role in reactive wetting. By taking this effect into account, more realistic reactivities of different reactive element additions into a given brazing base alloy are predicted. Irreversible thermodynamics are also used to characterize the driving forces for reactive metal-ceramic joining.

  12. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation using heterostructures of Si and chemically exfoliated metallic MoS2.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Meng, Fei; English, Caroline R; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Shearer, Melinda J; Liang, Dong; Daniel, Andrew S; Hamers, Robert J; Jin, Song

    2014-06-18

    We report the preparation and characterization of highly efficient and robust photocathodes based on heterostructures of chemically exfoliated metallic 1T-MoS2 and planar p-type Si for solar-driven hydrogen production. Photocurrents up to 17.6 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode were achieved under simulated 1 sun irradiation, and excellent stability was demonstrated over long-term operation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed low charge-transfer resistances at the semiconductor/catalyst and catalyst/electrolyte interfaces, and surface photoresponse measurements also demonstrated slow carrier recombination dynamics and consequently efficient charge carrier separation, providing further evidence for the superior performance. Our results suggest that chemically exfoliated 1T-MoS2/Si heterostructures are promising earth-abundant alternatives to photocathodes based on noble metal catalysts for solar-driven hydrogen production.

  13. Carrier dynamics in Si nanowires fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Zhu, Li-Guo; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xuejin; Shan, Jie; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2012-09-25

    Silicon nanowire arrays fabricated by metal-assisted wet chemical etching have emerged as a promising architecture for solar energy harvesting applications. Here we investigate the dynamics and transport properties of photoexcited carriers in nanowires derived from an intrinsic silicon wafer using the terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. Both the dynamics and the pump fluence dependence of the photoinduced complex conductivity spectra up to several THz were measured. The photoinduced conductivity spectra follow a Lorentz dependence, arising from surface plasmon resonances in nanowires. The carrier lifetime was observed to approach 0.7 ns, which is limited primarily by surface trapping. The intrinsic carrier mobility was found to be ~1000 cm(2)/(V · s). Compared to other silicon nanostructures, these relative high values observed for both the carrier lifetime and mobility are the consequences of high crystallinity and surface quality of the nanowires fabricated by the metal-assisted wet chemical etching method.

  14. Effects of chemical additives on the fermentation quality and N distribution of alfalfa silage in south of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Ji, Shuren; Hou, Chen; Tang, Haiyang; Wang, Qian; Shen, Yixin

    2016-12-01

    In order to better utilize the last cut alfalfa harvested before killing frost in a high moisture environment, the effects of chemical additives on the quality of alfalfa silage were studied in south of China. The alfalfa was freshly harvested at branching stage, and wilted by dry matter content of about 300 g/kg (fresh matter basis). Silage was prepared by using a small-scale silage fermentation system, where sucrose, potassium citrate, sodium carbonate, formic acid, acetic acid and propionic acid were used as silage additives, and no additives served as control. These silos were stored at ambient temperature (5-20°C), and the silage qualities were analyzed after 120 days of fermentation. All additive treatments affected the chemical composition and N distribution, increased the water-soluble content and crude protein contents, decreased non-protein nitrogen (NPN) content, and enhanced the in vitro ruminal dry matter digestibility (except for sodium carbonate). Silages treated with organic acids were preserved with significantly (P < 0.05) lower pH value, ethanol content and NPN content compared with control. When the fermentation quality, chemical composition and N distribution were considered, the treatment with sucrose or organic acids resulted in high quality of alfalfa silage ensiled before killing frost, with formic acid having the best effect.

  15. Susceptibility of a carabid beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus fab., from a gradient of heavy metal pollution to additional stressors.

    PubMed

    Lagisz, Malgorzata; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2007-11-01

    Insects inhabiting contaminated areas show increased susceptibility to other stressors, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether this phenomenon had a genetic basis. We investigated changes in susceptibility to food deprivation and insecticide (dimethoate) treatment of the ground beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus originating from four populations situated along a metal pollution gradient. To determine whether the increased susceptibility to additional stressors found in field-exposed animals from chronically metal-polluted sites had a genetic basis, our research was conducted on the second generation of laboratory-reared animals. There was no difference in susceptibility to the additional stressors indicating that the differences between populations observed in earlier studies do not have a genetic basis.

  16. Chemical additive to maximize antimicrobial effect of chlorine during pilot scale immersion chilling of broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prior laboratory scale study demonstrated the potential for T-128, a proprietary blend including propylene glycol and phosphoric acid, to enhance the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine during immersion chilling of broiler parts. The objective of the current study was to test the addition of T-128...

  17. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  18. Detailed differential chemical analysis of a metal poor star: new evidences about planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, M. G. C. C.; Milone, A. de C.; Meléndez, J.

    2014-10-01

    The present project emphasizes on the study of metal-poor stars, with and without planets, to investigate the existence (or not) of a connection between anomalies in the chemical composition and the presence of planets by inspecting the high resolution spectra (R = 65 000), in order to derive chemical abundances with high precision using the differential technique. In this method, measurements of equivalent widths of the target star are compared to a standard star with predetermined photospheric parameters that are similar to those of the target star (effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity). Therefore, we have compared the star HD111232 (standard) with HD020794, such that the first holds a hot Jupiter-type planet and around the second one there are three super-Earths. These solar-type stars are moderately metal-poor and had their spectra collected with the MIKE spectrograph at the 6.5m Magellan telescope in the Las Campanas Observatory. Among the main results, we have derived the classical photospheric parameters and chemical abundances of refractory and volatile elements with such a high precision, particularly with errors about 0.01 dex, which is essential for the study of chemical connection between planets and star. We have also added to the differential method the spectral synthesis of molecular bands and atomic lines to recover abundances of volatile elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We thus present the parameters effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity [Fe/H], microturbulence velocity and differential elemental abundances. For some elements, we have performed comparisons of the abundances measured by spectral synthesis with those obtained directly through measurements of equivalent widths. Specifically, the preliminary abundance difference δ[E/H] is 0.04(7) dex for carbon, 0.12(14) for nitrogen and 0.08(7) for oxygen.

  19. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  20. Lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-19

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  1. Metal and Oxide Additives as Agents for Munitions Self-Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    for the chemical reduction of RDX, and - Characterize the effectiveness of powdered, WO3 -doped, anatase, titanium dioxide ( TiO2 ) as a photocatalyst ...15 weight-percent anatase TiO2 (doped with 3 wt% WO3 ). 33 Figure 14. Temporal trends in (A) temperature, (B) UV-A irradiance, and (C...accelerate explosives treatment with bimetallic alloys. Powdered Anatase. Titanium dioxide ( TiO2 ) is well documented as a photocatalyst (Diebold

  2. Prebiotic coordination chemistry: The potential role of transition-metal complexes in the chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, M.

    1979-01-01

    In approaching the extremely involved and complex problem of the origin of life, consideration of the coordination chemistry appeared not only as a possibility but as a necessity. The first model experiments appear to be promising because of prebiotic-type synthesis by means of transition-metal complexes. It is especially significant that in some instances various types of vitally important substances (nucleic bases, amino acids) are formed simultaneously. There is ground to hope that systematic studies in this field will clarify the role of transition-metal complexes in the organizatorial phase of chemical evolution. It is obvious that researchers working in the fields of the chemistry of cyano and carbonyl complexes, and of the catalytic effect of transition-metal complexes are best suited to study these aspects of the attractive and interesting problem of the origin of life.

  3. Defectivity control of aluminum chemical mechanical planarization in replacement metal gate process of MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhang; Yuling, Liu; Chenqi, Yan; Yangang, He; Baohong, Gao

    2016-04-01

    The replacement metal gate (RMG) defectivity performance control is very challenging in high-k metal gate (HKMG) chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). In this study, three major defect types, including fall-on particles, micro-scratch and corrosion have been investigated. The research studied the effects of polishing pad, pressure, rotating speed, flow rate and post-CMP cleaning on the three kinds of defect, which finally eliminated the defects and achieved good surface morphology. This study will provide an important reference value for the future research of aluminum metal gate CMP. Project supported by the Major National Science and Technology Special Projects (No. 2009ZX02308), the Natural Science Foundation for the Youth of Hebei Province (Nos. F2012202094, F2015202267), and the Outstanding Youth Science and Technology Innovation Fund of Hebei University of Technology (No. 2013010).

  4. A new perspective on metals and other contaminants in fluoridation chemicals*

    PubMed Central

    Mullenix, Phyllis J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluoride additives contain metal contaminants that must be diluted to meet drinking water regulations. However, each raw additive batch supplied to water facilities does not come labeled with concentrations per contaminant. This omission distorts exposure profiles and the risks associated with accidents and routine use. Objectives: This study provides an independent determination of the metal content of raw fluoride products. Methods: Metal concentrations were analyzed in three hydrofluorosilicic acid (HFS) and four sodium fluoride (NaF) samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Arsenic levels were confirmed using graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis. Results: Results show that metal content varies with batch, and all HFS samples contained arsenic (4.9–56.0 ppm) or arsenic in addition to lead (10.3 ppm). Two NaF samples contained barium (13.3–18.0 ppm) instead. All HFS (212–415 ppm) and NaF (3312–3630 ppm) additives contained a surprising amount of aluminum. Conclusions: Such contaminant content creates a regulatory blind spot that jeopardizes any safe use of fluoride additives. PMID:24999851

  5. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as a structure with at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm, have the potential to be used in a variety of consumer products due to their improved functionality compared to similar particles of larger size. Their small size is associated with increased strength, improved catalytic properties, and increased reactivity; however, their size is also associated with increased toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Numerous toxicological studies have been conducted to determine the properties of nanomaterials that increase their toxicity in order to manufacture new nanomaterials with decreased toxicity. Data indicates that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can dramatically alter their toxicity profile. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation was to determine how altering the shape, size, and chemical composition of various metal oxide nanoparticles would affect their toxicity. Metal oxides are used in variety of consumer products, from spray-sun screens, to food coloring agents; thus, understanding the toxicity of metal oxides and determining which aspects affect their toxicity may provide safe alternatives nanomaterials for continued use in manufacturing. Tungstate nanoparticles toxicity was assessed in an in vitro model using RAW 264.7 cells. The size, shape, and chemical composition of these nanomaterials were altered and the effect on reactive oxygen species and general cytotoxicity was determined using a variety of techniques. Results demonstrate that shape was important in reactive oxygen species production as wires were able to induce significant reactive oxygen species compared to spheres. Shape, size, and chemical composition did not have much effect on the overall toxicity of these nanoparticles in RAW 264.7 cells over a 72 hour time course, implicating that the base material of the nanoparticles was not toxic in these cells. To further assess how chemical composition can affect toxicity

  6. Modelling the chemical evolution of molecular clouds as a function of metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, E. M.; Cuppen, H. M.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2014-04-01

    The Galaxy is in continuous elemental evolution. Since new elements produced by dying stars are delivered to the interstellar medium, the formation of new generations of stars and planetary systems is influenced by this metal enrichment. We aim to study the role of the metallicity on the gas phase chemistry of the interstellar medium. Using a system of coupled ordinary differential equations to model the chemical reactions, we simulate the evolution of the abundance of molecules in the gas phase for different initial interstellar elemental compositions. These varying initial elemental compositions consider the change in the `elemental abundances' predicted by a self-consistent model of the elemental evolution of the Galaxy. As far as we are aware, this is the first attempt to combine elemental evolution of the Galaxy and chemical evolution of molecular clouds. The metallicity was found to have a strong effect on the overall gas phase composition. With decreasing metallicity, the number of long carbon chains was found to increase, the time-scale on which small molecular species are increases, and the main form of oxygen changed from O and CO to O2. These effects were found to be mainly due to the change in electron, H_3^+, and atomic oxygen abundance.

  7. Metal removal from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration fly ash: A comparison between chemical leaching and bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Funari, V; Mäkinen, J; Salminen, J; Braga, R; Dinelli, E; Revitzer, H

    2017-02-01

    Bio- and hydrometallurgical experimental setups at 2-l reactor scale for the processing of fly ash from municipal waste incinerators were explored. We aimed to compare chemical H2SO4 leaching and bioleaching; the latter involved the use of H2SO4 and a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria. The leaching yields of several elements, including some of those considered as critical (Mg, Co, Ce, Cr, Ga, Nb, Nd, Sb and Sm), are provided. At the end of the experiments, both leaching methods resulted in comparable yields for Mg and Zn (>90%), Al and Mn (>85%), Cr (∼65%), Ga (∼60%), and Ce (∼50%). Chemical leaching showed the best yields for Cu (95%), Fe (91%), and Ni (93%), whereas bioleaching was effective for Nd (76%), Pb (59%), and Co (55%). The two leaching methods generated solids of different quality with respect to the original material as we removed and significantly reduced the metals amounts, and enriched solutions where metals can be recovered for example as mixed salts for further treatment. Compared to chemical leaching the bioleaching halved the use of H2SO4, i.e., a part of agent costs, as a likely consequence of bio-produced acid and improved metal solubility.

  8. The chemical and catalytic properties of nanocrystalline metal oxides prepared through modified sol-gel synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnes, Corrie Leigh

    The goal of this research was to synthesize, characterize and study the chemical properties of nanocrystalline metal oxides. Nanocrystalline (NC) ZnO, CuO, NiO, Al2O3, and the binary Al2O 3/MgO and ZnO/CuO were prepared through modified sol gel methods. These NC metal oxides were studied in comparison to the commercial (CM) metal oxides. The samples were characterized by XRD, TGA, FTIR, BET, and TEM. The NC samples were all accompanied by a significant increase in surface area and decrease in crystallite size. Several chemical reactions were studied to compare the NC samples to the CM samples. One of the reactions involved a high temperature reaction between carbon tetrachloride and the oxide to form carbon dioxide and the corresponding metal chloride. A similar high temperature reaction was conducted between the metal oxide and hydrogen sulfide to form water and the corresponding metal sulfide. A room temperature gas phase adsorption was studied where SO2 was adsorbed onto the oxide. A liquid phase adsorption conducted at room temperature was the destructive adsorption of paraoxon (a toxic insecticide). In all reactions the NC samples exhibited greater activity, destroying or adsorbing a larger amount of the toxins compared to the CM samples. To better study surface area effects catalytic reactions were also studied. The catalysis of methanol was studied over the nanocrystalline ZnO, CuO, NiO, and ZnO/CuO samples in comparison to their commercial counterparts. In most cases the NC samples proved to be more active catalysts, having higher percent conversions and turnover numbers. A second catalytic reaction was also studied, this reaction was investigated to look at the support effects. The catalysis of cyclopropane to propane was studied over Pt and Co catalysts. These catalysts were supported onto NC and CM alumina by impregnation. By observing differences in the catalytic behavior, support effects have become apparent.

  9. Radiative properties of Ceramic Metal-Halide High Intensity Discharge lamps (CMH) containing additives in argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Zissis, Georges; Laplace Team

    2015-09-01

    The lighting represents a consumption of about 19% of the world electricity production. We are thus searching new effective and environment-friendlier light sources. The Ceramic Metal-Halide High Intensity Lamps (CMH) are one of the options for illuminating very high area. The new CMH lamps are mercury free and contain additives species which lead to a richer spectrum in specific spectral intervals, a better colour temperature or colour rendering index. This work is particularly focused on the power radiated by these lamps, estimated using the Net Emission Coefficient, and depending on several additives (calcium, sodium, tungsten, dysprosium, thallium or strontium).

  10. Quantum-chemical model evaluations of thermodynamics and kinetics of oxygen atom additions to narrow nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Slanina, Zdenĕk; Stobinski, Leszek; Tomasik, Piotr; Lin, Hong-Ming; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a computational study of oxygen additions to narrow nanotubes, a problem frequently studied with fullerenes. In fact, fullerene oxides were the first observed fullerene derivatives, and they have naturally attracted the attention of both experiment and theory. C60O had represented a long-standing case of experiment-theory disagreement, and there has been a similar problem with C60O2. The disagreement has been explained by kinetic rather than thermodynamic control. In this paper a similar computational approach is applied to narrow nanotubes. Recently, very narrow nanotubes have been observed with a diameter of 5 A and even with a diameter of 4 A. It has been supposed that the narrow nanotubes are closed by fragments of small fullerenes like C36 or C20. In this report we perform calculations for oxygen additions to such model nanotubes capped by fragments of D2d C36, D4d C32, and Ih C20 fullerenic cages (though the computational models have to be rather short). The three models have the following carbon contents: C84, C80, and C80. Both thermodynamic enthalpy changes and kinetic activation barriers for oxygen addition to six selected bonds are computed and analyzed. The lowest isomer (thermodynamically the most stable) is never of the 6/6 type, that is, the enthalpically favored structures are produced by oxygen additions to the nanotube tips. Interestingly enough, the lowest energy isomer has, for the D2d C36 and D4d C32 cases, the lowest kinetic activation barrier as well.

  11. The enhanced stability and biodegradation of dispersed crude oil droplets by Xanthan Gum as an additive of chemical dispersant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiqin; Li, Yiming; Yang, Xiaolong; Bao, Mutai; Cheng, Hua

    2017-03-07

    It is necessary for chemical dispersant to disperse oil effectively and maintain the stability of oil droplets. In this work, Xanthan Gum (XG) was used as an environmentally friendly additive in oil dispersant formulation to enhance the stability and biodegradation of dispersed crude oil droplets. When XG was used together with chemical dispersant 9500A, the dispersion effectiveness of crude oil in artificial sea water (ASW) and the oil droplet stability were both greatly enhanced. In the presence of XG, lower concentration of 9500A was needed to achieve the effective dispersion and stabilization. In addition to the enhancement of dispersion and stabilization, it was found that the biodegradation rate of crude oil by bacteria was dramatically enhanced when a mixture of 9500A and XG was used as a dispersant. Because of the low environmental impact of XG, this would be a potential way to formulate the dispersant with lower toxicity.

  12. Organic polymer-metal nano-composites for opto-electronic sensing of chemicals in agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Czarick, Michael; Fairchild, Brian D.; Liang, Yi; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Curley, Michael J.

    2013-03-01

    Recent research findings led the team to conclude that a long lasting and inexpensive colorimetric sensor for monitoring ammonia emission from manure in confined animal feeding operations could eventually become feasible. The sensor uses robust method of opto-electronic spectroscopic measurement of the reversible change of the color of a sensitive nano-composite reagent film in response to ammonia. The film is made of a metal (gold, platinum, or palladium) nano-colloid in a polymer matrix with an ammonia-sensitive indicator dye additive. The response of the indicator dye (increase of the optical absorption in the region 550 to 650 nm) is enhanced by the nano-particles (~10 nm in size) in two ways: (a) concentration of the optical field near the nano-particle due to the plasmon resonance; and (b) catalytic acceleration of the chemical reaction of deprotonization of the indicator dye in the presence of ammonia and water vapor. This enhancement helps to make a miniature and rugged sensing element without compromising its sensitivity of less than 1 ppm for the range 0 to 100 ppm. The sensor underwent field tests in commercial broiler farms in Georgia, Alabama, and Arkansas and was compared against a commercial photoacoustic gas analyzer. The sensor output correlated well with the data from the photoacoustic analyzer (correlation coefficient not less than 0.9 and the linear regression slope after calibration close to 1.0) for several weeks of continuous operation. The sources of errors were analyzed and the conclusions on the necessary improvements and the potential use of the proposed device were made.

  13. Effects of microbial additives on chemical composition and fermentation characteristics of barley silage.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, S M; Kim, D H; Lee, H J; Joo, Y H; Kim, S B; Kim, S C

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the effects of bacterial inoculants on chemical composition and fermentation indices of barley silage. Barley forage (Youngyang) was harvested at 24% dry matter (DM) and wilted to 47.9% DM. The wilted barley forage was chopped to 3-5 cm length and applied with no inoculant (CON), L. plantarum (1×10(10) cfu/g, LP) or Effective Microorganisms (0.5×10(9) cfu/g, EM). Then the forages were ensiled in four replications for each treatment in 20 L mini silos and stored for 100 days. The contents of crude protein and ether extract were higher in CON silage ensiled for 100-d, while the contents of DM and crude ash were higher in EM silage (p<0.05). The contents of ADF, NDF and hemicellulose as well as the in vitro DM digestibility were not affected by microbial inoculation (p>0.05). The pH, ammonia-N concentration and lactate to acetate ratio were higher (p<0.05) in CON silage, while lactate concentrations were higher (p<0.05) in CON and LP silage. Acetate concentration and lactic acid bacteria was increased (p<0.05) by both inoculants (LP and EM), but propionate concentration and yeast was increased (p<0.05) by EM and LP, respectively. These results indicated that the fermentation quality of barley silage was improved by the application of bacterial inoculants.

  14. Effects of Microbial Additives on Chemical Composition and Fermentation Characteristics of Barley Silage

    PubMed Central

    Amanullah, S. M.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, H. J.; Joo, Y. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of bacterial inoculants on chemical composition and fermentation indices of barley silage. Barley forage (Youngyang) was harvested at 24% dry matter (DM) and wilted to 47.9% DM. The wilted barley forage was chopped to 3–5 cm length and applied with no inoculant (CON), L. plantarum (1×1010 cfu/g, LP) or Effective Microorganisms (0.5×109 cfu/g, EM). Then the forages were ensiled in four replications for each treatment in 20 L mini silos and stored for 100 days. The contents of crude protein and ether extract were higher in CON silage ensiled for 100-d, while the contents of DM and crude ash were higher in EM silage (p<0.05). The contents of ADF, NDF and hemicellulose as well as the in vitro DM digestibility were not affected by microbial inoculation (p>0.05). The pH, ammonia-N concentration and lactate to acetate ratio were higher (p<0.05) in CON silage, while lactate concentrations were higher (p<0.05) in CON and LP silage. Acetate concentration and lactic acid bacteria was increased (p<0.05) by both inoculants (LP and EM), but propionate concentration and yeast was increased (p<0.05) by EM and LP, respectively. These results indicated that the fermentation quality of barley silage was improved by the application of bacterial inoculants. PMID:25049981

  15. Surfactant-modified diffusion on transition-metal surfaces (reprinted with the addition of the appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    2000-03-01

    Wanting to convert surface impurities from a nuisance to a systematically applicable nano-fabrication tool, the authors have sought to understand how such impurities affect self-diffusion on transition-metal surfaces. Their field-ion microscope experiments reveal that in the presence of surface hydrogen, self-diffusion on Rh(100) is promoted, while on Pt(100), not only is it inhibited, but its mechanism changes. First-principles calculations aimed at learning how oxygen fosters perfect layerwise growth on a growing Pt(111) crystal contradict the idea in the literature that it does so by directly promoting transport over Pt island boundaries. The discovery that its real effect is to burn off adventitious adsorbed carbon monoxide demonstrates the predictive value of state-of-the-art calculation methods.

  16. Emissions from a Diesel Engine using Fe-based Fuel Additives and a Sintered Metal Filtration System.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D; Hummer, Jon A; Stachulak, Jozef S; Miller, Arthur; Patts, Larry D; Cauda, Emanuele G

    2016-03-01

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to assess the effects of Fe-containing fuel additives on aerosols emitted by a diesel engine retrofitted with a sintered metal filter (SMF) system. Emission measurements performed upstream and downstream of the SMF system were compared, for cases when the engine was fueled with neat ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and with ULSD treated with two formulations of additives containing Fe-based catalysts. The effects were assessed for four steady-state engine operating conditions and one transient cycle. The results showed that the SMF system reduced the average total number and surface area concentrations of aerosols by more than 100-fold. The total mass and elemental carbon results confirmed that the SMF system was indeed very effective in the removal of diesel aerosols. When added at the recommended concentrations (30 p.p.m. of iron), the tested additives had minor adverse impacts on the number, surface area, and mass concentrations of filter-out (FOut) aerosols. For one of the test cases, the additives may have contributed to measurable concentrations of engine-out (EOut) nucleation mode aerosols. The additives had only a minor impact on the concentration and size distribution of volatile and semi-volatile FOut aerosols. Metal analysis showed that the introduction of Fe with the additives substantially increased Fe concentration in the EOut, but the SMF system was effective in removal of Fe-containing aerosols. The FOut Fe concentrations for all three tested fuels were found to be much lower than the corresponding EOut Fe concentrations for the case of untreated ULSD fuel. The results support recommendations that these additives should not be used in diesel engines unless they are equipped with exhaust filtration systems. Since the tested SMF system was found to be very efficient in removing Fe introduced by the additives, the use of these additives should not result in a measurable increase in emissions of de novo generated

  17. Emissions from a Diesel Engine using Fe-based Fuel Additives and a Sintered Metal Filtration System

    PubMed Central

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D.; Hummer, Jon A.; Stachulak, Jozef S.; Miller, Arthur; Patts, Larry D.; Cauda, Emanuele G.

    2015-01-01

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to assess the effects of Fe-containing fuel additives on aerosols emitted by a diesel engine retrofitted with a sintered metal filter (SMF) system. Emission measurements performed upstream and downstream of the SMF system were compared, for cases when the engine was fueled with neat ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and with ULSD treated with two formulations of additives containing Fe-based catalysts. The effects were assessed for four steady-state engine operating conditions and one transient cycle. The results showed that the SMF system reduced the average total number and surface area concentrations of aerosols by more than 100-fold. The total mass and elemental carbon results confirmed that the SMF system was indeed very effective in the removal of diesel aerosols. When added at the recommended concentrations (30 p.p.m. of iron), the tested additives had minor adverse impacts on the number, surface area, and mass concentrations of filter-out (FOut) aerosols. For one of the test cases, the additives may have contributed to measurable concentrations of engine-out (EOut) nucleation mode aerosols. The additives had only a minor impact on the concentration and size distribution of volatile and semi-volatile FOut aerosols. Metal analysis showed that the introduction of Fe with the additives substantially increased Fe concentration in the EOut, but the SMF system was effective in removal of Fe-containing aerosols. The FOut Fe concentrations for all three tested fuels were found to be much lower than the corresponding EOut Fe concentrations for the case of untreated ULSD fuel. The results support recommendations that these additives should not be used in diesel engines unless they are equipped with exhaust filtration systems. Since the tested SMF system was found to be very efficient in removing Fe introduced by the additives, the use of these additives should not result in a measurable increase in emissions of de novo generated

  18. Addition of HOBt improves the conversion of thioester-Amine chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    Todorovski, Toni; Suñol, David; Riera, Antoni; Macias, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    The syntheses of large peptides and of those containing non-natural amino acids can be facilitated by the application of convergent approaches, dissecting the native sequence into segments connected through a ligation reaction. We describe an improvement of the ligation protocol used to prepare peptides and proteins without cysteine residues at the ligation junction. We have found that the addition of HOBt to the ligation, improves the conversion of the ligation reaction without affecting the epimerization rate or chemoselectivity, and it can be efficiently used with peptides containing phosphorylated amino acids.

  19. Peptide-Metal Organic Framework Swimmers that Direct the Motion toward Chemical Targets.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Fang, Justin; Wasik, Tomasz L; Shi, Menglu; Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-10

    Highly efficient and robust chemical motors are expected for the application in microbots that can selectively swim toward targets and accomplish their tasks in sensing, labeling, and delivering. However, one of major issues for such development is that current artificial swimmers have difficulty controlling their directional motion toward targets like bacterial chemotaxis. To program synthetic motors with sensing capability for the target-directed motion, we need to develop swimmers whose motions are sensitive to chemical gradients in environments. Here we create a new intelligent biochemical swimmer by integrating metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and peptides that can sense toxic heavy metals in solution and swim toward the targets. With the aid of Pb-binding enzymes, the peptide-MOF motor can directionally swim toward PbSe quantum dots (QD) by sensing pH gradient and eventually complete the motion as the swimmer reaches the highest gradient point at the target position in solution. This type of technology could be evolved to miniaturize chemical robotic systems that sense target chemicals and swim toward target locations.

  20. Ag-mediated charge transport during metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Nadine; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Leipner, Hartmut S; Werner, Peter

    2013-05-22

    The charge transport mechanism during metal-assisted chemical etching of Si nanowires with contiguous metal films has been investigated. The experiments give a better insight how the charges and reaction products can penetrate to the etching front. The formation of a layer of porous Si between the metal film and the bulk Si is a prerequisite for the etching process. The electronic holes (positive charges) necessary for the etching of porous Si are generated at the surface of the metal in contact with the oxidative agent. Because of the insulating character of the thin walls of the porous Si, the transport of the electronic holes through this layer is not possible. Instead, it is found that the transport of electronic holes proceeds primarily by means of the Ag/Ag(+) redox pair circulating in the electrolyte and diffusing through the etched pores in the Si. The charge transport occurs without the ionic contribution at the positions where the metal is in direct contact with the Si. Here, an electropolishing process takes place, leading to an extensive removal of the Si and sinking in of the film into the Si substrate.

  1. Humic acid metal cation interaction studied by spectromicroscopy techniques in combination with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M K; Denecke, M A; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the (5)D(0) --> (7)F(1,2) fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a ;pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  2. Heavy metal content in sediments along the Calore river: relationships with physical-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, G; Papa, S; Sagnella, E; Fioretto, A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, trace metals contents (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) and physico-chemical parameters (nitrogen, organic and inorganic carbon, pH and particle size) in sediments samples along the Calore river were analyzed in two seasons. Sediment samples were collected in ten sites upstream and downstream of the city of Benevento and its industrial area, the confluence of Sabato and Tammaro tributaries, and the confluence of Calore and Volturno rivers. The highest contents of trace metals were found, generally, in the sites immediately downstream of industrial area and of Benevento city. The sites on the Tammaro and Sabato also showed relatively high contents of Ni and, only for Sabato sites, of Cr, and Fe. With the exception of Cd, the heavy metal contents were highest in the last site of Calore river, which therefore is a source of pollution to the Volturno river. Besides the sites downstream of Benevento city showed the higher pH values and also the highest contents of fine particles size and organic matter. Positive correlations among trace metals, organic substance, particle size sediments were found. The data obtained in this study were analyzed with reference to Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines and indicated moderate-to-high pollution by some trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu).

  3. Textile/metal-organic-framework composites as self-detoxifying filters for chemical-warfare agents.

    PubMed

    López-Maya, Elena; Montoro, Carmen; Rodríguez-Albelo, L Marleny; Aznar Cervantes, Salvador D; Lozano-Pérez, A Abel; Cenís, José Luis; Barea, Elisa; Navarro, Jorge A R

    2015-06-01

    The current technology of air-filtration materials for protection against highly toxic chemicals, that is, chemical-warfare agents, is mainly based on the broad and effective adsorptive properties of hydrophobic activated carbons. However, adsorption does not prevent these materials from behaving as secondary emitters once they are contaminated. Thus, the development of efficient self-cleaning filters is of high interest. Herein, we report how we can take advantage of the improved phosphotriesterase catalytic activity of lithium alkoxide doped zirconium(IV) metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to develop advanced self-detoxifying adsorbents of chemical-warfare agents containing hydrolysable P-F, P-O, and C-Cl bonds. Moreover, we also show that it is possible to integrate these materials onto textiles, thereby combining air-permeation properties of the textiles with the self-detoxifying properties of the MOF material.

  4. A Chemical Signature from Fast-rotating Low-metallicity Massive Stars: ROA 276 in ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Norris, John E.; Da Costa, Gary S.; Stanford, Laura M.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Shingles, Luke J.; Hirschi, Raphael; Pignatari, Marco

    2017-03-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of a metal-poor star, ROA 276, in the stellar system ω Centauri. We confirm that this star has an unusually high [Sr/Ba] abundance ratio. Additionally, ROA 276 exhibits remarkably high abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for all elements from Cu to Mo along with normal abundance ratios for the elements from Ba to Pb. The chemical abundance pattern of ROA 276, relative to a primordial ω Cen star ROA 46, is best fit by a fast-rotating low-metallicity massive stellar model of 20 {M}ȯ , [Fe/H] = ‑1.8, and an initial rotation 0.4 times the critical value; no other nucleosynthetic source can match the neutron-capture element distribution. ROA 276 arguably offers the most definitive proof to date that fast-rotating massive stars contributed to the production of heavy elements in the early universe. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  6. Competitive adsorption of metal cations onto two gram positive bacteria: testing the chemical equilibrium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowle, David A.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    1999-10-01

    In order to test the ability of a surface complexation approach to account for metal-bacteria interactions in near surface fluid-rock systems, we have conducted experiments that measure the extent of adsorption in mixed metal, mixed bacteria systems. This study tests the surface complexation approach by comparing estimated extents of adsorption based on surface complexation modeling to those we observed in the experimental systems. The batch adsorption experiments involved Ca, Cd, Cu, and Pb adsorption onto the surfaces of 2 g positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis. Three types of experiments were performed: 1. Single metal (Ca, Cu, Pb) adsorption onto a mixture of B. licheniformis and B. subtilis; 2. mixed metal (Cd, Cu, and Pb; Ca and Cd) adsorption onto either B. subtilis or B. licheniformis; and 3. mixed or single metal adsorption onto B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. %Independent of the experimental results, and based on the site specific stability constants for Ca, Cd, Cu, and Pb interactions with the carboxyl and phosphate sites on B. licheniformis and B. subtilis determined by Fein et al. (1997), by Daughney et al. (1998) and in this study, we estimate the extent of adsorption that is expected in the above experimental systems. Competitive cation adsorption experiments in both single and double bacteria systems exhibit little adsorption at pH values less than 4. With increasing pH above 4.0, the extent of Ca, Cu, Pb and Cd adsorption also increases due to the increased deprotonation of bacterial surface functional groups. In all cases studied, the estimated adsorption behavior is in excellent agreement with the observations, with only slight differences that were within the uncertainties of the estimation and experimental procedures. Therefore, the results indicate that the use of chemical equilibrium modeling of aqueous metal adsorption onto bacterial surfaces yields accurate predictions of the distribution of metals in complex

  7. The chemical and mechanical behaviors of polymer / reactive metal systems under high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yubin

    As one category of energetic materials, impact-initiated reactive materials are able to release a high amount of stored chemical energy under high strain rate impact loading, and are used extensively in civil and military applications. In general, polymers are introduced as binder materials to trap the reactive metal powders inside, and also act as an oxidizing agent for the metal ingredient. Since critical attention has been paid on the metal / metal reaction, only a few types of polymer / reactive metal interactions have been studied in the literature. With the higher requirement of materials resistant to different thermal and mechanical environments, the understanding and characterization of polymer / reactive metal interactions are in great demand. In this study, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) 7A / Ti (Titanium) composites were studied under high strain rates by utilizing the Taylor impact and SHPB tests. Taylor impact tests with different impact velocities, sample dimensions and sample configurations were conducted on the composite, equipped with a high-speed camera for tracking transient images during the sudden process. SHPB and Instron tests were carried out to obtain the stress vs. strain curves of the composite under a wide range of strain rates, the result of which were also utilized for fitting the constitutive relations of the composite based on the modified Johnson-Cook strength model. Thermal analyses by DTA tests under different flow rates accompanied with XRD identification were conducted to study the reaction mechanism between PTFE 7A and Ti when only heat was provided. Numerical simulations on Taylor impact tests and microstructural deformations were also performed to validate the constitutive model built for the composite system, and to investigate the possible reaction mechanism between two components. The results obtained from the high strain rate tests, thermal analyses and numerical simulations were combined to provide a systematic study on

  8. Chemical and sensory evaluation of dark chocolate with addition of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.).

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Andrea B; Brandelli, Adriano; Macedo, Fernanda C; Pieta, Luiza; Klug, Tâmmila V; de Jong, Erna V

    2010-03-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is a good source of vitamin E containing high quality protein. A dark chocolate with the addition of 12, 16 or 20% quinoa was developed. The protein concentration of the products increased as the percentage of quinoa increased. The product containing 20% quinoa showed only 9% increase in vitamin E, while the quantity of polyphenols decreased from 23.5 to 18 μmol pirocatechin/g. The amount of essential amino acids was improved in samples containing quinoa. Cysteine, tyrosine and methionine increased by 104, 72, 70%, respectively in chocolate containing 20% quinoa. The amino acid pattern was as per WHO standards, which was adequate to human needs. The chocolate with quinoa was approved by 92% of the sensory panel. All the samples showed an index of acceptance above 70%. Quinoa could be used at the levels evaluated in this study adding its potential health benefit to the dark chocolate.

  9. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  10. Metal-air cell comprising an electrolyte with a room temperature ionic liquid and hygroscopic additive

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Krishnan, Ramkumar; Tang, Toni; Wolfe, Derek

    2014-08-19

    An electrochemical cell comprising an electrolyte comprising water and a hydrophobic ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. A hydrophilic or hygroscopic additive modulates the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquid to maintain a concentration of the water in the electrolyte is between 0.001 mol % and 25 mol %.

  11. Novel Ceramic Additives for Screen-Printable Silicon Solar Cell Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yu-Chou; Shao, Yue; Shi, Frank G.

    2016-08-01

    The interfacial structure between front-side silver electrodes and n-type silicon emitters plays a very crucial role for the electrical and mechanical properties of silicon solar cells. Studies show that the residual glass layers at the Ag/Si interfaces will significantly increase the contact resistance, and this subsequently leads to a decrease in the overall efficiency of the silicon solar cells. In this work, silver-coated nano-sized non-glass frits using an electroless plating method were employed to improve the interfacial conductivity. Transfer length method was applied to evaluate the electrical performance of the samples made with different ceramic additives. For samples made with nano-sized silver-coated ceramic additives, the improvement of conductivity was found to be about 22% compared to additives with the same compositions with no surface treatment. The results indicate that the silver layer on the surface of ceramic additives provides a conducting channel within the residual insulating layer and therefore reduces overall electrical resistance.

  12. Investigation of slurry systems in metal and dielectric chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhenyu

    The properties of slurries play a significant role in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of metal and dielectric films in semiconductor device manufacturing. This study investigates the effects of the size, shape, and hardness of uniform abrasive particles of simple and composite natures on the polishing of copper, tantalum, and thermal oxide films in the presence of different chemical reagents. It was shown that the total surface area of the solids in the slurry controlled the material removal rate by pure silica for both Cu and Ta, while the surface quality of the polished films was better when using higher silica contents. Ceria particles are the choice abrasives in polishing of oxide surfaces. Since it is difficult to prepare in quantities uniform ceria particles of various shapes, the latter were prepared by using monodispersed cubic and ellipsoidal hematite (Fe2O3) particles and spherical silica, and coating them with nanosized ceria. The polishing data were then obtained using slurries of all these particles and the results were compared with slurries containing only nanosized ceria. At the same pH and the same solid content, the removal rates of these slurries followed the contact area model. Furthermore, slurries containing mixtures of particles performed more efficiently than those of individual particles. Interactions of abrasive particles with surface films to be polished are also very important in CMP. In this study, the packed column technique was employed to investigate the physical and chemical reactions at the particle/film interfaces under conditions that simulate CMP processes. Well-defined dispersions of uniform particles, including spherical silica, calcined alumina, and silica cores coated with nanosized ceria particles were used to evaluate particle adhesion on copper and glass beads. It was shown that pH and the slurry flow rate had significant effects on particle deposition and detachment. The attachment results of silica particles on

  13. Hydrogen production from water decomposition by redox of Fe 2O 3 modified with single- or double-metal additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Hui

    2010-05-01

    Iron oxide modified with single- or double-metal additives (Cr, Ni, Zr, Ag, Mo, Mo-Cr, Mo-Ni, Mo-Zr and Mo-Ag), which can store and supply pure hydrogen by reduction of iron oxide with hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of reduced iron oxide with steam (Fe 3O 4 (initial Fe 2O 3)+4H 2↔3Fe+4H 2O), were prepared by impregnation. Effects of various metal additives in the samples on hydrogen production were investigated by the above-repeated redox. All the samples with Mo additive exhibited a better redox performance than those without Mo, and the Mo-Zr additive in iron oxide was the best effective one enhancing hydrogen production from water decomposition. For Fe 2O 3-Mo-Zr, the average H 2 production temperature could be significantly decreased to 276 °C, the average H 2 formation rate could be increased to 360.9-461.1 μmol min -1 Fe-g -1 at operating temperature of 300 °C and the average storage capacity was up to 4.73 wt% in four cycles, an amount close to the IEA target.

  14. Metal-Assisted Oxo Atom Addition to an Fe(III) Thiolate.

    PubMed

    Villar-Acevedo, Gloria; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Blakely, Maike N; Rees, Julian A; Ganas, Abbie S; Hanada, Erin M; Kaminsky, Werner; Kovacs, Julie A

    2017-01-11

    Cysteinate oxygenation is intimately tied to the function of both cysteine dioxygenases (CDOs) and nitrile hydratases (NHases), and yet the mechanisms by which sulfurs are oxidized by these enzymes are unknown, in part because intermediates have yet to be observed. Herein, we report a five-coordinate bis-thiolate ligated Fe(III) complex, [Fe(III)(S2(Me2)N3(Pr,Pr))](+) (2), that reacts with oxo atom donors (PhIO, IBX-ester, and H2O2) to afford a rare example of a singly oxygenated sulfenate, [Fe(III)(η(2)-S(Me2)O)(S(Me2))N3(Pr,Pr)](+) (5), resembling both a proposed intermediate in the CDO catalytic cycle and the essential NHase Fe-S(O)(Cys114) proposed to be intimately involved in nitrile hydrolysis. Comparison of the reactivity of 2 with that of a more electron-rich, crystallographically characterized derivative, [Fe(III)S2(Me2)N(Me)N2(amide)(Pr,Pr)](-) (8), shows that oxo atom donor reactivity correlates with the metal ion's ability to bind exogenous ligands. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the mechanism of S-oxygenation does not proceed via direct attack at the thiolate sulfurs; the average spin-density on the thiolate sulfurs is approximately the same for 2 and 8, and Mulliken charges on the sulfurs of 8 are roughly twice those of 2, implying that 8 should be more susceptible to sulfur oxidation. Carboxamide-ligated 8 is shown to be unreactive towards oxo atom donors, in contrast to imine-ligated 2. Azide (N3(-)) is shown to inhibit sulfur oxidation with 2, and a green intermediate is observed, which then slowly converts to sulfenate-ligated 5. This suggests that the mechanism of sulfur oxidation involves initial coordination of the oxo atom donor to the metal ion. Whether the green intermediate is an oxo atom donor adduct, Fe-O═I-Ph, or an Fe(V)═O remains to be determined.

  15. Minority additive distributions in a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp using high-energy x-ray induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.; Adler, H. G.; Shastri, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-09-01

    X-ray induced fluorescence is used to measure the elemental densities of minority additives in a metal-halide arc contained inside a translucent ceramic envelope. A monochromatic x-ray beam from the Sector 1 Insertion Device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is used to excite K-shell x-ray fluorescence in the constituents of a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp dosed with DyI3 and CsI. Fluorescence and scattered photons are collected by a cryogenic energy-resolving Ge detector. The high signal-to-noise spectra show strong fluorescence from Dy, Cs, and I, as well as elastic scattering from Hg. Radial distributions of the absolute elemental densities of Dy, Cs, and I are obtained.

  16. Minority additive distributions in a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp using high-energy x-ray induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Adler, H. G.; Shastri, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-09-24

    X-ray induced fluorescence is used to measure the elemental densities of minority additives in a metal-halide arc contained inside a translucent ceramic envelope. A monochromatic x-ray beam from the Sector 1 Insertion Device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is used to excite K-shell x-ray fluorescence in the constituents of a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp dosed with DyI{sub 3} and CsI. Fluorescence and scattered photons are collected by a cryogenic energy-resolving Ge detector. The high signal-to-noise spectra show strong fluorescence from Dy, Cs, and I, as well as elastic scattering from Hg. Radial distributions of the absolute elemental densities of Dy, Cs, and I are obtained.

  17. Effect of addition of Versagel on microbial, chemical, and physical properties of low-fat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Ramchandran, L; Shah, N P

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of Versagel on the growth and proteolytic activity of Streptococcus thermophilus 1275 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus 1368 and angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of the peptides generated thereby as well as on the physical properties of low-fat yogurt during a storage period of 28 d at 4 degrees C. Three different types of low-fat yogurts, YV0, YV1, and YV2, were prepared using Versagel as a fat replacer. The fermentation time of the low-fat yogurts containing Versagel was less than that of the control yogurt (YV0). The starter cultures maintained their viability (8.68 to 8.81 log CFU/g of S. thermophilus and 8.51 to 8.81 log CFU/g of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus) in all the yogurts throughout the storage period. There was some decrease in the pH of the yogurts during storage and an increase in the concentration of lactic acid. However, the proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory potential of the starter cultures was suppressed in the presence of Versagel. On the other hand, the addition of Versagel had a positive impact on the physical properties of the low-fat yogurt, namely, spontaneous whey separation, firmness, and pseudoplastic properties.

  18. Effect of metal oxides addition on the superconducting properties of YBaCuO.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Heon; Choi, Yong

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting properties of YBCO superconductor with ZrO2 addition prepared by different contents were prepared by a unique method so called thermal pyrolysis process to study the effect of the zirconium oxide on the electromagnetic properties and superconducting mechanism of the superconductor. The critical temperature of YBCO superconductor was not predominately dependent upon the zirconium oxide. The maximum magnetism was observed by adding 2% zirconium oxide. The addition of zirconium oxide forming a pinning center of magnetic flux due to ZrO2 phase which was related to the change of electromagnetic properties of the YBCO superconductor. The result indicates that magnetization is proportional to the number of magnetic flux lines passing through the sample. The added ZrO2 appear to contribute the increasing Vickers hardness.

  19. Field Method for Detection of Metal Deactivator Additive in Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    sulphonic acid on the silica support. The SCX stationary phase is a silica gel with propylbenzenesulfonyl groups bound to the silica, Figure 6. S O O O...They can be grouped into three main categories based on the property of the additive they are detecting. The categories are the; a. Dispersant...was less prominent when lower concentrations of MDA were used. The elution properties of the copper and nickel MDA complexes was examined in a range

  20. Development of coatings for ultrasonic additive manufacturing sonotrode using laser direct metal deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Jordan, Brian H.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-10-01

    ORNL partnered with Fabrisonic, LLC to develop galling resistant hard facing coatings on sonotrodes used to fabricate 3D printed materials using ultrasonic additive manufacturing. The development and deployment of a coated sonotrode is expected to push the existing state of the art to facilitate the solidstate additive manufacturing of hard steels and titanium alloys. To this effect a structurally amorphous stainless steel material and cobalt chrome material were deposited on the sonotrode material. Both the deposits showed good adhesion to the substrate. The coatings made using the structurally amorphous steel materials showed cracking during the initial trials and cracking was eliminated by deposition on a preheated substrate. Both the coatings show hardness in excess of 600 HVN. Thus the phase 1 of this project has been used to identify suitable materials to use to coat the sonotrode. Despite the fact that successful deposits were obtained, the coatings need to be evaluated by performing detailed galling tests at various temperatures. In addition field tests are also necessary to test the stability of these coatings in a high cycle ultrasonic vibration mode. If awarded, phase 2 of the project would be used to optimize the composition of the deposit material to maximize galling resistance. The industrial partner would then use the coated sonotrode to fabricate builds made of austenitic stainless steel to test the viability of using a coated sonotrode.

  1. Effects of 8 chemical and bacterial additives on the quality of corn silage.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, O C M; Arriola, K G; Daniel, J L P; Adesogan, A T

    2013-09-01

    This project aimed to evaluate the effects 8 additives on the fermentation, dry matter (DM) losses, nutritive value, and aerobic stability of corn silage. Corn forage harvested at 31% DM was chopped (10mm) and treated with (1) deionized water (control); (2) Buchneri 500 (BUC; 1×10(5) cfu/g of Pediococcus pentosaceus 12455 and 4×10(5) cfu/g of Lactobacillus buchneri 40788; Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Milwaukee, WI); (3) sodium benzoate (BEN; 0.1% of fresh forage); (4) Silage Savor acid mixture (SAV: 0.1% of fresh forage; Kemin Industries Inc., Des Moines, IA); (5) 1×10(6) cfu/g of Acetobacter pasteurianus-ATCC 9323; (6) 1×10(6) cfu/g of Gluconobacter oxydans-ATCC 621; (7) Ecosyl 200T (1×10(5) cfu/g of Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1; Ecosyl Products Inc., Byron, IL); (8) Silo-King WS (1.5×10(5) cfu/g of L. plantarum, P. pentosaceus and Enterococcus faecium; Agri-King, Fulton, IL); and (9) Biomax 5 (BIO; 1×10(5) cfu/g of L. plantarum PA-28 and K-270; Chr. Hansen Animal Health and Nutrition, Milwaukee, WI). Treated forage was ensiled in quadruplicate in mini silos at a density of 172 kg of DM/m(3) for 3 and 120 d. After 3 d of ensiling, the pH of all silages was below 4 but ethanol concentrations were least in BEN silage (2.03 vs. 3.24% DM) and lactic acid was greatest in SAV silage (2.97 vs. 2.51% DM). Among 120-d silages, additives did not affect DM recovery (mean=89.8% ± 2.27) or in vitro DM digestibility (mean=71.5% ± 0.63). The SAV silage had greater ammonia-N (0.85 g/kg of DM) and butyric acid (0.22 vs. 0.0% DM) than other treatments. In contrast, BEN and Silo-King silages had the least ammonia-N concentration and had no butyric acid. The BEN and A. pasteurianus silages had the lowest pH (3.69) and BEN silage had the least ethanol (1.04% DM) and ammonia nitrogen (0.64 g/kg DM) concentrations, suggesting that fermentation was more extensive and protein degradation was less in BEN silages. The BUC and BIO silages had greater acetic acid concentrations than

  2. Multifunctional polymer-metal nanocomposites via direct chemical reduction by conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Han, Xijiang; Zhang, Bin; Du, Yunchen; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2014-03-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted continuous attention due to their promising applications in chemistry, physics, bioscience, medicine and materials science. As an alternative to conventional solution chemistry routes, MNPs can be directly synthesized through a conjugated polymer (CP) mediated technique utilizing the redox chemistry of CPs to chemically reduce the metal ions and modulate the size, morphology, and structure of the MNPs. The as-prepared multifunctional CP-MNP nanocomposites have shown application potentials as highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, effective heterogeneous catalysts for organic synthesis and electrochemistry, and key components for electronic and sensing devices. In this tutorial review, we begin with a brief introduction to the chemical nature and redox properties of CPs that enable the spontaneous reduction of noble metal ions to form MNPs. We then focus on recent progress in control over the size, morphology and structure of MNPs during the conjugated polymer mediated syntheses of CP-MNP nanocomposites. Finally, we highlight the multifunctional CP-MNP nanocomposites toward their applications in sensing, catalysis, and electronic devices.

  3. A review of chemical and physical characterisation of atmospheric metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Paul; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the human health impacts associated with airborne nanoparticle exposure has led to considerable research activity aimed at better characterising these particles and understanding which particle properties are most important in the context of effects on health. Knowledge of the sources, chemical composition, physical structure and ambient concentrations of nanoparticles has improved significantly as a result. Given the known toxicity of many metals and the contribution of nanoparticles to their oxidative potential, the metallic content of the nanoparticulate burden is likely to be an important factor to consider when attempting to assess the impact of nanoparticle exposure on health. This review therefore seeks to draw together the existing knowledge of metallic nanoparticles in the atmosphere and discuss future research priorities in the field. The article opens by outlining the reasons behind the current research interest in the field, and moves on to discuss sources of nanoparticles to the atmosphere. The next section reviews ambient concentrations, covering spatial and temporal variation, mass and number size distributions, air sampling and measurement techniques. Further sections discuss the chemical and physical composition of particles. The review concludes by summing up the current state of research in the area and considering where future research should be focused.

  4. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bronson, M.C.

    1995-02-14

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing. 6 figs.

  5. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bronson, Mark C.

    1995-01-01

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing.

  6. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-04-01

    In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for NaOH and Ba(OH)2 it was ∼15 min. KOH and LiOH peeled off graphene very efficiently as compared to NaOH and Ba(OH)2 from the Pt electrode. In case of copper, the peeling time is ∼3-5 min. Different characterizations like optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were done to analyze the as grown and transferred graphene samples.

  7. Effects of soil water content and organic matter addition on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C

    2012-04-15

    The mobility and bioavailability of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc were evaluated in three soils amended with different organic materials for two moisture regimes. Agricultural and reclamation activities impose fresh inputs of organic matter on soil while intensive irrigation and rainstorm increase soil waterlogging incidence. Moreover, scarcity of irrigation water has prompted the use of greywater, which contain variable concentrations of organic compounds such as anionic surfactants. Soils added with hay, maize straw or peat at 1% w/w were irrigated, at field capacity (FC) or saturated (S), with an aqueous solution of the anionic surfactant Aerosol 22 (A22), corresponding to an addition of 200 mgC/kgsoil/day. Soil solution was extracted after one month and analysed for total soluble metals, dissolved soil organic matter and UV absorbance at 254 nm. Speciation analyses were performed with WHAM VI for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. For selected scenarios, metal uptake by barley was determined. Metal mobility increased for all treatments and soils (Pb>Cu>Cd≥Zn) compared to control assays. The increase was significantly correlated (p<0.05) with soil organic matter solubilisation for Cd (R=0.68), Cu (R=0.73) and Zn (R=0.86). Otherwise, Pb release was related to aluminium solubilisation (R=0.75), which suggests that Pb was originally co-precipitated with Al-DOC complexes in the solid phase. The effect of A22 in metal bioavailability, determined as free ion activities (FIA), was mainly controlled by soil moisture regime. For soil 3, metal bioavailability was up to 20 times lower for soil amended with hay, peat or maize compared to soil treated only with A22. When soil was treated with A22 at FC barley yield significantly decreased (p<0.05) for the increase of Pb (R=0.71) and Zn (R=0.79) concentrations in shoot, while for saturated conditions such uptake was up to 3 times lower. Overall, metal bioavailability was controlled by solubilisation of soil organic matter and formation

  8. Ecological risk assessment for radionuclides and metals: A radiological and chemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mahini, X.; Mahini, R.; Fan, A.

    1995-12-31

    In response to the regulatory concern over the adverse effects of depleted uranium (DU) on ecological receptors at two sites contaminated with DU and metals, an ecological risk assessment (ERA) was performed, in conjunction with a radiological/chemical human health risk assessment (HRA). To date, most research on the harmful effects of radiation has focused only on humans. With regard to radiation protection of the environment, national and international radiation protection advisory committees have concluded that levels protecting human health should be sufficient to protect the environment as well. To select chemicals of potential ecological concern, a qualitative ERA was first performed by comparing chemical stressor concentrations in abiotic media with various benchmarked criteria. The results indicate that, as with the case of human health, DU was the ecological risk-driving chemical at these sites. Both radiological and chemical effects posed by DU were then estimated for the bald eagle, an endangered species that represents the assessment end point of the quantitative ERA. Abiotic media and food webs evaluated were: soils, surface water, plants, terrestrial (both mammalian and avian) species, and aquatic species. The results of the quantitative ERA indicate that the decision to cleanup DU contamination at these sites can solely be based on human health effects as limiting criteria. The risk assessments were well received by the regulatory agencies overseeing the project.

  9. Structures of alkali metals in silica gel nanopores: new materials for chemical reductions and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shatnawi, Mouath; Paglia, Gianluca; Dye, James L; Cram, Kevin C; Lefenfeld, Michael; Billinge, Simon J L

    2007-02-07

    Alkali metals and their alloys can be protected from spontaneous reaction with dry air by intercalation (with subsequent heating) into the pores of silica gel (SG) at loadings up to 40 wt %. The resulting loose, black powders are convenient materials for chemical reduction of organic compounds and the production of clean hydrogen. The problem addressed in this paper is the nature of the reducing species present in these amorphous materials. The atomic pair distribution function (PDF), which considers both Bragg and diffuse scattering components, was used to examine their structures. Liquid Na-K alloys added to silica gel at room temperature (stage 0) or heated to 150 degrees C (stage I) as well as stage I Na-SG, retain the overall pattern of pure silica gel. Broad oscillations in the PDF show that added alkali metals remain in the pores as nanoscale metal clusters. 23Na MAS NMR studies confirm the presence of Na(0) and demonstrate that Na+ ions are formed as well. The relative amounts of Na(0) and Na(+) depend on both the overall metal loading and the average pore size. The results suggest that ionization occurs near or in the SiO2 walls, with neutral metal present in the larger cavities. The fate of the electrons released by ionization is uncertain, but they may add to the silica gel lattice, or form an "electride-like plasma" near the silica gel walls. A remaining mystery is why the stage I material does not show a melting endotherm of the encapsulated metal and does not react with dry oxygen. Na-SG when heated to 400 degrees C (stage II) yields a dual-phase reaction product that consists of Na(4)Si(4) and Na(2)SiO(3).

  10. Mass and metallicity requirement in stellar models for galactic chemical evolution applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Benoit; West, Christopher; Heger, Alexander; Ritter, Christian; O'Shea, Brian W.; Herwig, Falk; Travaglio, Claudia; Bisterzo, Sara

    2016-12-01

    We used a one-zone chemical evolution model to address the question of how many masses and metallicities are required in grids of massive stellar models in order to ensure reliable galactic chemical evolution predictions. We used a set of yields that includes seven masses between 13 and 30 M⊙, 15 metallicities between 0 and 0.03 in mass fraction, and two different remnant mass prescriptions. We ran several simulations where we sampled subsets of stellar models to explore the impact of different grid resolutions. Stellar yields from low- and intermediate-mass stars and from Type Ia supernovae have been included in our simulations, but with a fixed grid resolution. We compared our results with the stellar abundances observed in the Milky Way for O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Mn. Our results suggest that the range of metallicity considered is more important than the number of metallicities within that range, which only affects our numerical predictions by about 0.1 dex. We found that our predictions at [Fe/H] ≲ -2 are very sensitive to the metallicity range and the mass sampling used for the lowest metallicity included in the set of yields. Variations between results can be as high as 0.8 dex. At higher [Fe/H], we found that the required number of masses depends on the element of interest and on the remnant mass prescription. With a monotonic remnant mass prescription where every model explodes as a core-collapse supernova, the mass resolution induces variations of 0.2 dex on average. But with a remnant mass prescription that includes islands of non-explodability, the mass resolution can cause variations of about 0.2-0.7 dex depending on the choice of the lower limit of the metallicity range. With such a remnant mass prescription, explosive or non-explosive models can be missed if not enough masses are selected, resulting in over- or underestimations of the mass ejected by massive stars.

  11. Activation and stabilization of the hydroperoxide lyase enzymatic extract from mint leaves (Mentha spicata) using selected chemical additives.

    PubMed

    Akacha, Najla B; Karboune, Salwa; Gargouri, Mohamed; Kermasha, Selim

    2010-03-01

    The effects of selected lyoprotecting excipients and chemical additives on the specific activity and the thermal stability of the hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) enzymatic extract from mint leaves were investigated. The addition of KCl (5%, w/w) and dextran (2.5%, w/w) to the enzymatic extract, prior to lyophilization, increased the HPL specific activity by 2.0- and 1.2-fold, respectively, compared to the control lyophilized extract. From half-life time (t (1/2)), it can be seen that KCl has enhanced the HPL stability by 1.3- to 2.3-fold, during long-period storage at -20 degrees Celsius and 4 degrees Celsius. Among the selected additives used throughout this study, glycine appeared to be the most effective one. In addition to the activation effect conferred by glycine, it also enhanced the HPL thermal stability. In contrast, polyhydroxyl-containing additives were not effective for stabilizing the HPL enzymatic extract. On the other hand, there was no signification increase in HPL activity and its thermal stability with the presence of Triton X-100. The results also showed that in the presence of glycine (10%), the catalytic efficiency of HPL was increased by 2.45-fold than that without additive.

  12. A new, energy-efficient chemical pathway for extracting Ti metal from Ti minerals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhigang Zak; Middlemas, Scott; Guo, Jun; Fan, Peng

    2013-12-11

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element, fourth among common metals, in the Earth's crust. Apart from some high-value applications in, e.g., the aerospace, biomedicine, and defense industries, the use of titanium in industrial or civilian applications has been extremely limited because of its high embodied energy and high cost. However, employing titanium would significantly reduce energy consumption of mechanical systems such as civilian transportation vehicles, which would have a profound impact on the sustainability of a global economy and the society of the future. The root cause of the high cost of titanium is its very strong affinity for oxygen. Conventional methods for Ti extraction involve several energy-intensive processes, including upgrading ilmenite ore to Ti-slag and then to synthetic rutile, high-temperature carbo-chlorination to produce TiCl4, and batch reduction of TiCl4 using Mg or Na (Kroll or Hunter process). This Communication describes a novel chemical pathway for extracting titanium metal from the upgraded titanium minerals (Ti-slag) with 60% less energy consumption than conventional methods. The new method involves direct reduction of Ti-slag using magnesium hydride, forming titanium hydride, which is subsequently purified by a series of chemical leaching steps. By directly reducing Ti-slag in the first step, Ti is chemically separated from impurities without using high-temperature processes.

  13. Metrology test object for dimensional verification in additive manufacturing of metals for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Matthew G; Kopacz, Alexander J; Nikolov, Hristo N; Holdsworth, David W

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing continues to increase in popularity and is being used in applications such as biomaterial ingrowth that requires sub-millimeter dimensional accuracy. The purpose of this study was to design a metrology test object for determining the capabilities of additive manufacturing systems to produce common objects, with a focus on those relevant to medical applications. The test object was designed with a variety of features of varying dimensions, including holes, cylinders, rectangles, gaps, and lattices. The object was built using selective laser melting, and the produced dimensions were compared to the target dimensions. Location of the test objects on the build plate did not affect dimensions. Features with dimensions less than 0.300 mm did not build or were overbuilt to a minimum of 0.300 mm. The mean difference between target and measured dimensions was less than 0.100 mm in all cases. The test object is applicable to multiple systems and materials, tests the effect of location on the build, uses a minimum of material, and can be measured with a variety of efficient metrology tools (including measuring microscopes and micro-CT). Investigators can use this test object to determine the limits of systems and adjust build parameters to achieve maximum accuracy.

  14. THE MOST METAL-POOR STARS. II. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF 190 METAL-POOR STARS INCLUDING 10 NEW STARS WITH [Fe/H] {<=} -3.5 , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, David; Norris, John E.; Bessell, M. S.; Asplund, M.; Christlieb, N.; Beers, Timothy C.; Barklem, P. S.; Frebel, Anna; Ryan, S. G. E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: martin@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: afrebel@mit.edu

    2013-01-01

    We present a homogeneous chemical abundance analysis of 16 elements in 190 metal-poor Galactic halo stars (38 program and 152 literature objects). The sample includes 171 stars with [Fe/H] {<=} -2.5, of which 86 are extremely metal poor, [Fe/H] {<=} -3.0. Our program stars include 10 new objects with [Fe/H] {<=} -3.5. We identify a sample of 'normal' metal-poor stars and measure the trends between [X/Fe] and [Fe/H], as well as the dispersion about the mean trend for this sample. Using this mean trend, we identify objects that are chemically peculiar relative to 'normal' stars at the same metallicity. These chemically unusual stars include CEMP-no objects, one star with high [Si/Fe], another with high [Ba/Sr], and one with unusually low [X/Fe] for all elements heavier than Na. The Sr and Ba abundances indicate that there may be two nucleosynthetic processes at lowest metallicity that are distinct from the main r-process. Finally, for many elements, we find a significant trend between [X/Fe] versus T {sub eff}, which likely reflects non-LTE and/or three-dimensional effects. Such trends demonstrate that care must be exercised when using abundance measurements in metal-poor stars to constrain chemical evolution and/or nucleosynthesis predictions.

  15. Phosphate chemical conversion coatings on metallic substrates for biomedical application: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Xian; Xiao, Gui-yong; Lu, Yu-peng

    2015-02-01

    Phosphate chemical conversion (PCC) technology has been investigated for improving the surface performance of metallic implants in the biomedical field over the last decade. The metallic materials, such as magnesium and its alloys, titanium, pure iron and stainless steel are widely used as orthopedic devices for immobilization of bone fractures in clinic. They were previously studied as metal substrates for PCC coating aiming to modify their biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Zinc, calcium and zinc-calcium PCC coatings are frequently utilized considering their nature and the end-use. Although PCC coating has been confirmed to potentially improve the bio-performance of metallic implants in vitro and in vivo by many researchers, there are no unified standards or regulations to give quantitative appraisal of its quality and property. As such, an overview of several main phosphate phases together with their properties and behaviors in vitro and in vivo was conducted. The mechanism of phosphating was also briefly discussed. Critical qualities of PCC coating used for biomedical application including corrosion resistance, wettability and bonding strength were analyzed separately. Biological response including in vitro cell investigations and in vivo tissue response were discussed in terms of the cytocompatibility and bioactivity of PCC coating. Further investigations are proposed to develop appropriate performance evaluation measurements by combining conventional technologies and biomedical procedures.

  16. Chemical Forms of Heavy Metals in Bottom Sediments of the Mitręga Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowska, Lidia

    2016-06-01

    Bottom sediments originating from the Mitręga water reservoir were studied. It was assayed, in what chemical forms heavy metals (zinc, copper, nickel, cadmium and lead) occur in sediments, using the method of sequential extraction BCR. According to the geochemical criteria with respect to the content of Zn, Cu and Ni, the sediments in all measuring points were classified as uncontaminated, however because of the Cd content - as moderately contaminated. The highest Cu and Ni content was found in the sediment collected in the southern part of the reservoir, 15 and 11 mg/kg d.m, respectively. In the case of Zn, Pb and Cd, the sediment collected at the outflow of the Mitręga river was the most contaminated; metal content amounted to 136; 35; 3 mg/kg d.m., respectively. Based on the conducted fractionation of heavy metals, it was found that the potential mobility of metals, hence the possibility of secondary pollution of the reservoir open water, are arranged in the following order: Zn> Cd> Ni> Cu ~ Pb.

  17. Effect of Microbial and Chemical Combo Additives on Nutritive Value and Fermentation Characteristic of Whole Crop Barley Silage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hyeon; Amanullah, Sardar M.; Lee, Hyuk Jun; Joo, Young Ho; Kim, Sam Churl

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effects of microbial and chemical combo additives on nutritive values, fermentation indices and aerobic stability of whole crop barley silage. Barley forage (Youngyang) was harvested at about 30% dry matter (DM) by treatments, chopped to 5 cm length and treated with distilled water only (CON), Lactobacillus plantarum (INO), propionic acid (PRO) or an equal mixture of INO and PRO (MIX). Barley forages were ensiled in 4 replications for 0, 2, 7, and 100 days. On 100 days of ensiling, MIX silage had higher (p<0.05) in vitro DM digestibility than CON silage, but lower (p<0.05) acid detergent fiber concentration. The pH in all treated silages was lower (p<0.05) than CON silage. The MIX silage had higher (p<0.05) lactate concentration and lactate to acetate ratio than in CON, but lower (p<0.05) yeast count. Aerobic stability in CON, PRO, and MIX silages were higher (p<0.05) than in INO silage. It is concluded that microbial and chemical combo additives using L. plantarum and propionic acid could efficiently improve nutritive values of barley silage in terms of increased in vitro DM digestibility compared to other treatments. In addition, all treatments except CON reduced yeast count which is the initiate microorganism of aerobic spoilage. PMID:26323517

  18. [Effects of different perlite additions on physical and chemical properties of sewage sludge compost and growth of Tagetes patula].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Tong; Shi, Lian-Hui; Liu, Deng-Min; Tong, Shao-Wei; Wei, Mei-Yan; Sun, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In order to resolve the problem of poor permeability of sewage sludge compost (SSC) which was used as the substitution of peat, perlite was used to regulate the permeability of the sewage. The pure SSC was used as control. The proportions of perlite in the mixtures with SSC were 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% (V/V), respectively. The effects of different perlite ratios on the physical and chemical properties and the growth of Tagetes patula were studied. The bulk density, water holding porosity and water holding porosity to aeration porosity decreased, but the total porosity and aeration porosity increased with the increasing addition of perlite to the SSC. For the chemical properties, the pH increased, and the EC and nutrient contents decreased with the increasing addition of perlite to the SSC. The aboveground biomass and flowers of T. patula were the highest in the 60% perlite treatment, and the lowest in the pure SSC treatment. The root morphology and activity were the best in the 40%, 60% and 80% perlite treatments. Aeration was the strongest factor to impact the maximum root length and average root diameter. Perlite promoted the growth of T. patula mainly through impacting the physical properties of the SSC. The addition of 60% perlite to the SSC could significantly improve the poor aeration and decrease the high salinity greatly in the SSC and regulate the growth of the root and aboveground of T. patula.

  19. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Hang; Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-01

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%-90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr3+ and Cr6+. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  20. The first chemical enrichment in the universe and the formation of hyper metal-poor stars.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Umeda, Hideyuki; Tominaga, Nozomu; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Maeda, Keiichi

    2005-07-15

    The recent discovery of a hyper-metal-poor (HMP) star, with a metallicity Fe/H smaller than 1/100,000 of the solar ratio, together with one earlier HMP star, has raised a challenging question whether these HMP stars are the actual first-generation, low-mass stars of the universe. We argue that these HMP stars are second-generation stars formed from gases that were chemically enriched by the first-generation supernovae. The key to this solution is the very unusual abundance patterns of these HMP stars and the similarities and differences between them. We can reproduce these abundance features with core-collapse "faint" supernova models that include extensive matter mixing and fallback during explosions.

  1. Chemical abundances in Virgo cluster spirals - what drives the environmental dependence of galaxy metallicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara; Skillman, Evan; Chung, Aeree

    2009-08-01

    The Virgo cluster is not only our nearest massive cluster, but its dynamical infancy also renders it an ideal laboratory for studies of cluster formation and galaxy evolution. Given the intense interest in Virgo, it is astounding that only 9 out of over 100 spirals in its firmament have chemical abundance measurements. We propose to simultaneously address this gap in our fundamental knowledge of Virgo cluster spirals and investigate how the metallicity and abundance gradients of star forming galaxies are sensitive to environment. Our sample consists of 13 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies, preferentially gas-poor early types, which complement the existing metallicity measurements. We also sample a range of clustercentric distances (0.3 -- 3 Mpc from M87), local densities and include several galaxies which exhibit evidence for interactions with the intra-cluster medium.

  2. Dual-Function Metal-Organic Framework as a Versatile Catalyst for Detoxifying Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Moon, Su-Young; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-12-22

    The nanocrystals of a porphyrin-based zirconium(IV) metal-organic framework (MOF) are used as a dual-function catalyst for the simultaneous detoxification of two chemical warfare agent simulants at room temperature. Simulants of nerve agent (such as GD, VX) and mustard gas, dimethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, have been hydrolyzed and oxidized, respectively, to nontoxic products via a pair of pathways catalyzed by the same MOF. Phosphotriesterase-like activity of the Zr6-containing node combined with photoactivity of the porphyrin linker gives rise to a versatile MOF catalyst. In addition, bringing the MOF crystals down to the nanoregime leads to acceleration of the catalysis.

  3. Dislocation analysis of InGaN/GaN quantum dots grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di; Wang, Lai; Hao, Zhi-Biao; Luo, Yi; Sun, Changzheng; Han, Yanjun; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongtao

    2016-11-01

    The dislocations in InGaN/GaN quantum dots grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy combining the Fourier filtering process. The misfit dislocations were observed in uncapped InGaN/GaN quantum dots. However, for the capped InGaN/GaN quantum dots, the GaN capping layer was found to suppress the generation of misfit dislocations and hence hindered the strain relaxation. Therefore, an overgrowth InGaN layer was used to relieve the strain in InGaN quantum dots and misfit dislocations were correspondingly found in these samples. In addition, defects were observed in low temperature GaN layers which suggested the existence of stacking faults.

  4. Solid lithium electrolyte via addition of lithium salts to metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Wiers, Brian M.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of the invention disclose that the uptake of LiO.sup.iPr in Mg.sub.2(dobdc) (dobdc.sup.4-=1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate) followed by soaking in a typical electrolyte solution leads to a new solid lithium electrolyte Mg.sub.2(dobdc).0.35LiO.sup.iPr.0.25LiBF.sub.4.EC.DEC. Two-point ac impedance data show a pressed pellet of this material to have a conductivity of 3.1.times.10.sup.-4 S/cm at 300 K. In addition, the results from variable-temperature measurements reveal an activation energy of approximately 0.15 eV, while single-particle data suggest that intraparticle transport dominates conduction.

  5. Solid lithium electrolyte via addition of lithium salts to metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiers, Brian M.; Balsara, Nitash P.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2016-12-20

    Various embodiments of the invention disclose that the uptake of LiO.sup.iPr in Mg.sub.2(dobdc) (dobdc.sup.4-=1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate) followed by soaking in a typical electrolyte solution leads to a new solid lithium electrolyte Mg.sub.2(dobdc).0.35LiO.sup.iPr.0.25LiBF.sub.4.EC.DEC. Two-point ac impedance data show a pressed pellet of this material to have a conductivity of 3.1.times.10.sup.-4 S/cm at 300 K. In addition, the results from variable-temperature measurements reveal an activation energy of approximately 0.15 eV, while single-particle data suggest that intraparticle transport dominates conduction.

  6. Multiscale approaches for simulation of nucleation, growth, and additive chemistry during electrochemical deposition of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ryan Mark

    Molecularly engineered deposition processes require computational algorithms that efficiently capture phenomena present at widely varying length and time scales. In this work, the island dynamics method was applied to simulation of kinetically-limited metal nucleation and growth by electrodeposition in the presence of additives. The model included additive kinetics, surface diffusion of adatoms, nucleation, and growth. The model was demonstrated for copper deposition in acid sulfate electrolyte containing [bis(3-sulfopropyl)disulfide], polyethylene glycol, and chloride. Simulation results were compared with kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) calculations and found to be within 1% for fractional coverage values, and within 10% for nucleation density. The computational time was more than 10X faster than comparable KMC simulations over the range studied. The island dynamics algorithm was applied to the electrodeposition of a metal onto a substrate initially configured with an array of hemispherical seed clusters. It was found that the presence of chloride in the model additive system caused high densities of nuclei on the substrate surrounding the initial seed clusters, which led to the formation of a continuous thin metal film. Simulations carried out under low-chloride conditions resulted in the growth only of the initial seed clusters, without significant nucleation or thin film formation. Additional phenomena were explored by linking the molecular scale island dynamics algorithm to a continuum model that described the migration and diffusion in the diffusion layer near the electrode surface. The multiscale linkage allowed simulation of nucleation, growth, and additive chemistry under mass transport limited conditions, including the formation of nucleation exclusion zones surrounding growing nuclei. A two-step approach was used to calculate the spatial distribution of nucleation events on an electrode undergoing deposition by electrolysis under the influence of mass

  7. Chemical speciation of sulfur and metals in biogas reactors - Implications for cobalt and nickel bio-uptake processes.

    PubMed

    Yekta, Sepehr Shakeri; Skyllberg, Ulf; Danielsson, Åsa; Björn, Annika; Svensson, Bo H

    2017-02-15

    This article deals with the interrelationship between overall chemical speciation of S, Fe, Co, and Ni in relation to metals bio-uptake processes in continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (CSTBR). To address this topic, laboratory CSTBRs digesting sulfur(S)-rich stillage, as well as full-scale CSTBRs treating sewage sludge and various combinations of organic wastes, termed co-digestion, were targeted. Sulfur speciation was evaluated using acid volatile sulfide extraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Metal speciation was evaluated by chemical fractionation, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses. Relative Fe to S content is identified as a critical factor for chemical speciation and bio-uptake of metals. In reactors treating sewage sludge, quantity of Fe exceeds that of S, inducing Fe-dominated conditions, while sulfide dominates in laboratory and co-digestion reactors due to an excess of S over Fe. Under sulfide-dominated conditions, metals availability for microorganisms is restricted due to formation of metal-sulfide precipitates. However, aqueous concentrations of different Co and Ni species were shown to be sufficient to support metal acquisition by microorganisms under sulfidic conditions. Concentrations of free metal ions and labile metal complexes in aqueous phase, which directly participate in bio-uptake processes, are higher under Fe-dominated conditions. This in turn enhances metal adsorption on cell surfaces and bio-uptake rates.

  8. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  9. Design and development of a layer-based additive manufacturing process for the realization of metal parts of designed mesostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher Bryant

    Low-density cellular materials, metallic bodies with gaseous voids, are a unique class of materials that are characterized by their high strength, low mass, good energy absorption characteristics, and good thermal and acoustic insulation properties. In an effort to take advantage of this entire suite of positive mechanical traits, designers are tailoring the cellular mesostructure for multiple design objectives. Unfortunately, existing cellular material manufacturing technologies limit the design space as they are limited to certain part mesostructure, material type, and macrostructure. The opportunity that exists to improve the design of existing products, and the ability to reap the benefits of cellular materials in new applications is the driving force behind this research. As such, the primary research goal of this work is to design, embody, and analyze a manufacturing process that provides a designer the ability to specify the material type, material composition, void morphology, and mesostructure topology for any conceivable part geometry. The accomplishment of this goal is achieved in three phases of research: (1) Design---Following a systematic design process and a rigorous selection exercise, a layer-based additive manufacturing process is designed that is capable of meeting the unique requirements of fabricating cellular material geometry. Specifically, metal parts of designed mesostructure are fabricated via three-dimensional printing of metal oxide ceramic powder followed by post-processing in a reducing atmosphere. (2) Embodiment ---The primary research hypothesis is verified through the use of the designed manufacturing process chain to successfully realize metal parts of designed mesostructure. (3) Modeling & Evaluation ---The designed manufacturing process is modeled in this final research phase so as to increase understanding of experimental results and to establish a foundation for future analytical modeling research. In addition to an analysis of

  10. Chemically assisted release of transition metals in graphite vaporizers for atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Darangwa, Nicholas; Grotti, Marco

    2006-05-01

    decomposition of metal oxide, is the most probable source of chemical energy, which facilitates the vaporization. Intensity of the process depends on chemical properties of the sample and substrate and efficiency of mass and heat transfer by the protective gas. The discussed mechanism of chemically assisted vapor release signifies the energy exchange between all participants of the vaporization process in ET AAS including the matrix, modifier, purge gas and analyte. The finding contributes in the ET AAS theory regarding the mechanisms of vaporization and mass transfer in the presence of matrix and modifiers.

  11. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  12. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  13. Empirical Approach to Understanding the Fatigue Behavior of Metals Made Using Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Albright, Thomas V.; Patel, Dhruv N.

    2016-08-01

    High-cycle fatigue measurements were performed on alloys prepared by powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing techniques. Selective laser melted (SLM) nickel-based superalloy 625 and electron beam melted (EBM) Ti-6Al-4V specimens were prepared as round fatigue specimens and tested with as-built surfaces at stress ratios of -1, 0.1 and 0.5. Data collected at R = -1 were used to construct Goodman diagrams that correspond closely to measured experimental data collected at R > 0. A second way to interpret the HCF data is based on the influence of surface roughness on fatigue, and approximate the surface feature size as a notch. On this basis, the data were interpreted using the fatigue notch factor k f and average stress models relating k f and stress concentration factor K t. The depth and root radius of surface features associated with fatigue crack initiation were used to estimate a K t of 2.8 for SLM 625. For Ti-6Al-4V, a direct estimate of K t from HCF data was not possible, but approximate values of k f based on HCF data and K t from crack initiation site geometry are found to explain other published EBM Ti-6Al-4V.

  14. Morphological and physical - chemical issues of metal nanostructures used in medical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duceac, L. D.; Velenciuc, N.; Dobre, E. C.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years applications of nanotechnology integrated into nanomedicine and bio-nanotechnology have attracted the attention of many researchers from different fields. Processes from chemical engineering especially nanostructured materials play an important role in medical and pharmaceutical development. Fundamental researches focused on finding simple, easily accomplished synthesis methods, morphological aspects and physico-chemical advanced characterization of nanomaterials. More over, by controlling synthesis conditions textural characteristics and physicochemical properties such as particle size, shape, surface, porosity, aggregation degree and composition can be tailored. Low cytotoxicity and antimicrobial effects of these nanostructured materials makes them be applied in medicine field. The major advantage of metal based nanoparticles is the use either for their antimicrobial properties or as drug-carriers having the potential to be active at low concentrations against infectious agents.

  15. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  16. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored.

  17. Prediction of Heavy Metal Uptake by Marsh Plants Based on Chemical Extraction of Heavy Metals from Dredged Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    A field and laboratory study was conducted to establish the extent of heavy metal absorption and uptake by marsh plant species from dredged material...emphasizes the need for a method to predict heavy metal availability from dredged material to plants. DTPA extraction of heavy metals gave the best correlations with actual heavy metal concentrations in marsh plants.

  18. Evaluation of reaction mechanism of coal-metal oxide interactions in chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Poston, James; Tian, Hanjing; Miller, Duane; Simonyi, Thomas

    2010-11-15

    The knowledge of reaction mechanism is very important in designing reactors for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. Recent CLC studies have considered the more technically difficult problem of reactions between abundant solid fuels (i.e. coal and waste streams) and solid metal oxides. A definitive reaction mechanism has not been reported for CLC reaction of solid fuels. It has often been assumed that the solid/solid reaction is slow and therefore requires that reactions be conducted at temperatures high enough to gasify the solid fuel, or decompose the metal oxide. In contrast, data presented in this paper demonstrates that solid/solid reactions can be completed at much lower temperatures, with rates that are technically useful as long as adequate fuel/metal oxide contact is achieved. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations as well as experimental techniques such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), flow reactor studies, in situ X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate how the proximal interaction between solid phases proceeds. The data indicate that carbon induces the Cu-O bond breaking process to initiate the combustion of carbon at temperatures significantly lower than the spontaneous decomposition temperature of CuO, and the type of reducing medium in the vicinity of the metal oxide influences the temperature at which the oxygen release from the metal oxide takes place. Surface melting of Cu and wetting of carbon may contribute to the solid-solid contacts necessary for the reaction. (author)

  19. Adherent and Conformal Zn(S,O,OH) Thin Films by Rapid Chemical Bath Deposition with Hexamethylenetetramine Additive.

    PubMed

    Opasanont, Borirak; Van, Khoa T; Kuba, Austin G; Choudhury, Kaushik Roy; Baxter, Jason B

    2015-06-03

    ZnS is a wide band gap semiconductor whose many applications, such as photovoltaic buffer layers, require uniform and continuous films down to several nanometers thick. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) is a simple, low-cost, and scalable technique to deposit such inorganic films. However, previous attempts at CBD of ZnS have often resulted in nodular noncontinuous films, slow growth rates at low pH, and high ratio of oxygen impurities at high pH. In this work, ZnS thin films were grown by adding hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) to a conventional recipe that uses zinc sulfate, nitrilotriacetic acid trisodium salt, and thioacetamide. Dynamic bath characterization showed that HMTA helps the bath to maintain near-neutral pH and also acts as a catalyst, which leads to fast nucleation and deposition rates, continuous films, and less oxygen impurities in the films. Films deposited on glass from HMTA-containing bath were uniform, continuous, and 90 nm thick after 1 h, as opposed to films grown without HMTA that were ∼3 times thinner and more nodular. On Cu2(Zn,Sn)Se4, films grown with HMTA were continuous within 10 min. The films have comparatively few oxygen impurities, with S/(S+O) atomic ratio of 88%, and high optical transmission of 98% at 360 nm. The Zn(S,O,OH) films exhibit excellent adhesion to glass and high resistivity, which make them ideal nucleation layers for other metal sulfides. Their promise as a nucleation layer was demonstrated with the deposition of thin, continuous Sb2S3 overlayers. This novel HMTA chemistry enables rapid deposition of Zn(S,O,OH) thin films to serve as a nucleation layer, a photovoltaic buffer layer, or an extremely thin continuous coating for thin film applications. HMTA may also be applied in a similar manner for solution deposition of other metal chalcogenide and oxide thin films with superior properties.

  20. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in silicon/zinc sulfide quantum confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretschneider, Eric Colin

    A comprehensive study of low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of zinc sulfide and silicon has been performed. The parameter space for successful deposition of both materials has been investigated and found to overlap, allowing successful deposition of both zinc sulfide and silicon under similar conditions. Undoped and aluminum doped zinc sulfide and silicon films were grown on both (100) and (111) 4sp° off orientation silicon substrates. Diethyl zinc, hydrogen sulfide, triethyl aluminum and disilane where used as precursor materials. It was found that high quality epitaxial zinc sulfide films could be deposited over the temperature range of 300 to 650sp°C. Growth rate was found to be nearly independent of temperature over this temperature range indicating a mass transfer limited growth mechanism. Aluminum doping yielded low resistivity, n-type material. Key parameters affecting the surface roughness of zinc sulfide films were determined using a fractional factorial design. This method increases the efficiency of data collection and allows easy determination of the magnitude of multi-parameter interactions. The parameters studied included substrate orientation, deposition temperature, precursor concentrations, total hydrogen flow and the push flow ratio of the alkyl and hydride injectors. Silicon growth rates varied from 120 to 9000 A/hour at 450 and 600sp° C respectively. A strong temperature dependence of the growth rate was found indicating a reaction limited step with an activation energy of 153.6 ± 18.0 kJ/mol. This agrees well with the energy barrier of 144.3 ± 19.2 kJ/mol for surface diffusion of hydrogen. Quantum mechanical calculations that take into account the differences in effective masses for electrons and holes in silicon and zinc sulfide indicate that the band gap energy of a silicon quantum well shifts into the visible portion of the spectrum for well widths below 20A. Samples containing single and multiple quantum wells