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Sample records for metal cluster deposition

  1. The structure of deposited metal clusters generated by laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, P.; Brandstättner, M.; Ding, A.

    1991-09-01

    Metal clusters have been produced using a laser evaporation source. A Nd-YAG laser beam focused onto a solid silver rod was used to evaporate the material, which was then cooled to form clusters with the help of a pulsed high pressure He beam. TOF mass spectra of these clusters reveal a strong occurrence of small and medium sized clusters ( n<100). Clusters were also deposited onto grid supported thin layers of carbon-films which were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Very high resolution pictures of these grids were used to analyze the size distribution and the structure of the deposited clusters. The diffraction pattern caused by crystalline structure of the clusters reveals 3-and 5-fold symmetries as well as fcc bulk structure. This can be explained in terms of icosahedron and cuboctahedron type clusters deposited on the surface of the carbon layer. There is strong evidence that part of these cluster geometries had already been formed before the depostion process. The non-linear dependence of the cluster size and the cluster density on the generating conditions is discussed. Therefore the samples were observed in HREM in the stable DEEKO 100 microscope of the Fritz-Haber-Institut operating at 100 KV with the spherical aberration c S =0.5 mm. The quality of the pictures was improved by using the conditions of minimum phase contrast hollow cone illumination. This procedure led to a minimum of phase contrast artefacts. Among the well-crystallized particles were a great amount of five- and three-fold symmetries, icosahedra and cuboctahedra respectively. The largest clusters with five- and three-fold symmetries have been found with diameters of 7 nm; the smallest particles displaying the same undistorted symmetries were of about 2 mm. Even smaller ones with strong distortions could be observed although their classification is difficult. The quality of the images was improved by applying Fourier filtering techniques.

  2. Nanocrystalline metal/carbon composites produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, G; Lenardi, C; Ducati, C; Agostino, R G; Caruso, T; Amati, M; Blomqvist, M; Barborini, E; Piseri, P; La Rosa, S; Colavita, E; Milani, P

    2005-07-01

    In this work we show that supersonic cluster beam deposition is a viable method for the synthesis of nanocrystalline metal/carbon composites. By assembling carbon and metallic clusters seeded in a supersonic beam, we have grown films consisting of metal nanoparticles embedded in a nano-structured carbon matrix. Samples containing 3d transition metals (Ti, Ni) and noble metals (Au, Pd, Pt) with different metal abundances, particle size and dilution have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The influence of different metals on the structure of the carbon matrix has been investigated. Spatially resolved ultraviolet photoemission electron spectroscopy showed substantial surface oxidation of 3d transition metal clusters. On a micrometric scale, the spatial distribution of the metallic nanoparticles appeared to be homogeneous.

  3. Model studies in catalysis with uhv-deposited metal particles and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppa, H.

    1984-01-01

    Small supported metal particles have become a popular area of intense research interest, and important contributions to the considered problems are being made from the fields of uhv technology, thin film physics surface science, and surface and thin film instrumentation. Attention is given to insulating supports, particulate metal deposits and their properties, metal/support interactions and gas exposures, and integrated experimental approaches. It is concluded that major contributions to the field of model catalysis should be forthcoming in the near future from uhv-based methods of research. Catalysis and catalysis-related problem areas expected to benefit from advanced model studies include catalyst preparation processing, sintering mechanisms for metals and alloys, separation of initial and final state effects for supported clusters, and the influence of particle and/or support morphologies.

  4. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-11-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  5. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  6. Laser ablation source for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Vucković, S; Svanqvist, M; Popok, V N

    2008-07-01

    This work describes construction of a source and optimisation of its parameters for production of cluster ion beams using material ablation by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas pressure, laser power, delay time between gas, and laser pulses as well as nozzle configuration on the cluster formation are studied. For the current experiments the laser ablation cluster source was optimized for production of Con+ cluster ions. Clusters with n up to 150 atoms are registered by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deposition of size-selected Co50+ clusters with kinetic energies in the interval of 250-4850 eV/cluster on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite is studied. At the highest impact energies the clusters are implanted. Craters and well-like structures can be seen by scanning tunneling microscopy at impact spots. A decrease in cluster kinetic energy leads to formation of bumplike structures which probably represent damaged graphite areas with incorporated Co atoms. Further decrease in the cluster impact energy to the level of 450-250 eV/cluster creates condition for so-called cluster pinning when the cluster constituents are intact but the energy transferred to the graphite is still enough to produce radiation defects to which the cluster is bound. PMID:18681696

  7. Tribological coatings for complex mechanical elements produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of metal dichalcogenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, C.; Buttery, M.; Hampson, M. R.; Roberts, E. W.; Ducati, C.; Lenardi, C.; Cavaliere, F.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2015-07-01

    Fullerene-like MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of fluid and solid lubricants. Metal dichalcogenide films have a very low friction coefficient in vacuum, therefore they have mostly been used as solid lubricants in space and vacuum applications. Unfortunately, their use is significantly hampered by the fact that in the presence of humidity, oxygen and moisture, the low-friction properties of these materials rapidly degrade due to oxidation. The use of closed-cage MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles may eliminate this problem, although the fabrication of lubricant thin films starting from dichalcogenide nanoparticles is, to date, a difficult task. Here we demonstrate the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition for the coating of complex mechanical elements (angular contact ball bearings) with nanostructured MoS2 and WS2 thin films. We report structural and tribological characterization of the coatings in view of the optimization of tribological performances for aerospace applications.

  8. Cluster-assembled metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartouzian, Aras

    2013-07-01

    A bottom-up approach to nanofabricate metallic glasses from metal clusters as building blocks is presented. Considering metallic glasses as a subclass of cluster-assembled materials, the relation between the two lively fields of metal clusters and metallic glasses is pointed out. Deposition of selected clusters or collections of them, generated by state-of-the-art cluster beam sources, could lead to the production of a well-defined amorphous material. In contrast to rapidly quenched glasses where only the composition of the glass can be controlled, in cluster-assembled glasses, one can precisely control the structural building blocks. Comparing properties of glasses with similar compositions but differing in building blocks and therefore different in structure will facilitate the study of structure-property correlation in metallic glasses. This bottom-up method provides a novel alternative path to the synthesis of glassy alloys and will contribute to improving fundamental understanding in the field of metallic glasses. It may even permit the production of glassy materials for alloys that cannot be quenched rapidly enough to circumvent crystallization. Additionally, gaining deeper insight into the parameters governing the structure-property relation in metallic glasses can have a great impact on understanding and design of other cluster-assembled materials.

  9. Cluster-assembled metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Kartouzian, Aras

    2013-07-30

    A bottom-up approach to nanofabricate metallic glasses from metal clusters as building blocks is presented. Considering metallic glasses as a subclass of cluster-assembled materials, the relation between the two lively fields of metal clusters and metallic glasses is pointed out. Deposition of selected clusters or collections of them, generated by state-of-the-art cluster beam sources, could lead to the production of a well-defined amorphous material. In contrast to rapidly quenched glasses where only the composition of the glass can be controlled, in cluster-assembled glasses, one can precisely control the structural building blocks. Comparing properties of glasses with similar compositions but differing in building blocks and therefore different in structure will facilitate the study of structure-property correlation in metallic glasses. This bottom-up method provides a novel alternative path to the synthesis of glassy alloys and will contribute to improving fundamental understanding in the field of metallic glasses. It may even permit the production of glassy materials for alloys that cannot be quenched rapidly enough to circumvent crystallization. Additionally, gaining deeper insight into the parameters governing the structure-property relation in metallic glasses can have a great impact on understanding and design of other cluster-assembled materials.

  10. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  11. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition. PMID:26018140

  12. The effect of metal cluster deposition route on structure and photocatalytic activity of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO2 by radiolytic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marek; Nadolna, Joanna; Gołąbiewska, Anna; Mazierski, Paweł; Klimczuk, Tomasz; Remita, Hynd; Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    TiO2 (P25) was modified with small and relatively monodisperse mono- and bimetallic clusters (Ag, Pd, Pt, Ag/Pd, Ag/Pt and Pd/Pt) induced by radiolysis to improve its photocatalytic activity. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), photoluminescence spectrometry (PL), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), scanning transition electron microscopy (STEM) and BET surface area analysis. The effect of metal type (mono- and bimetallic modification) as well as deposition method (simultaneous or subsequent deposition of two metals) on the photocatalytic activity in toluene removal in gas phase under UV-vis irradiation (light-emitting diodes- LEDs) and phenol degradation in liquid phase under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) were investigated. The highest photoactivity under Vis light was observed for TiO2 co-loaded with platinum (0.1%) and palladium (0.1%) clusters. Simultaneous addition of metal precursors results in formation of larger metal nanoparticles (15-30 nm) on TiO2 surface and enhances the Vis-induced activity of Ag/Pd-TiO2 up to four times, while the subsequent metal ions addition results in formation of metal particle size ranging from 4 to 20 nm. Subsequent addition of metal precursors results in formation of BNPs (bimetallic nanoparticle) composites showing higher stability in four cycles of toluene degradation under UV-vis. Obtained results indicated that direct electron transfer from the BNPs to the conduction band of the semiconductor is responsible for visible light photoactivity, whereas superoxide radicals (such as O2rad- and rad OOH) are responsible for pollutants degradation over metal-TiO2 composites.

  13. Photobiomolecular deposition of metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2005-02-08

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  14. Catalysis applications of size-selected cluster deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, Stefan; White, Michael G.

    2015-12-01

    In this Perspective, we review recent studies of size-selected cluster deposition for catalysis applications performed at the U.S. DOE National Laboratories, with emphasis on work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The focus is on the preparation of model supported catalysts in which the number of atoms in the deposited clusters is precisely controlled using a combination of gas-phase cluster ion sources, mass spectrometry, and soft-landing techniques. This approach is particularly effective for investigations of small nanoclusters, 0.5-2 nm (<200 atoms), where the rapid evolution of the atomic and electronic structure makes it essential to have precise control over cluster size. Cluster deposition allows for independent control of cluster size, coverage, and stoichiometry (e.g., the metal-to-oxygen ratio in an oxide cluster) and can be used to deposit on any substrate without constraints of nucleation and growth. Examples are presented for metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide cluster deposition on a variety of supports (metals, oxides, carbon/diamond) where the reactivity, cluster-support electronic interactions, and cluster stability and morphology are investigated. Both UHV and in situ/operando studies are presented that also make use of surface-sensitive X-ray characterization tools from synchrotron radiation facilities. Novel applications of cluster deposition to electrochemistry and batteries are also presented. This review also highlights the application of modern ab initio electronic structure calculations (density functional theory), which can essentially model the exact experimental system used in the laboratory (i.e., cluster and support) to provide insight on atomic and electronic structure, reaction energetics, and mechanisms. As amply demonstrated in this review, the powerful combination of atomically precise cluster deposition and theory is able to address fundamental aspects of size-effects, cluster

  15. Stability of a deposited liquid cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, P. V.; Hippler, R.; Smirnov, B. M.; Bhattacharyya, S. R.

    2010-03-15

    The fragmentation of silver liquid clusters deposited onto a silicon surface is observed after heating the clusters to 1073 K and subsequent annealing with the exposition time 3 min. This contradicts macroscopic models of a liquid drop deposited on a surface if we use critical parameters of bulk silver. Some versions are analyzed that are based on cluster properties and may explain the phenomenon of cluster fragmentation. An experiment is suggested for clarifying the nature of the cluster fragmentation phenomenon and cluster critical phenomena.

  16. Sputter Deposition of Metallic Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2002-01-18

    Metallic films are grown with a sponge-like morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous porosity on the sub-micron scale. The stabilization of the metallic sponge is directly correlated with a limited range for the sputter deposition parameters of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This sponge-like morphology augments the features as generally understood in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings are deposited with working gas pressures up to 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1100 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross-section with scanning electron microscopy. The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) for the deposition processing under which the metallic sponges are produced appear universal for many metals, as for example, including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  17. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  18. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  19. On Charged Insulated Metallic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, K.; Garny, M.; Pomorski, K.

    We determine the wavefunctions and eigen-values of electrons bound to a positively charged mesoscopic metallic cluster covered by an insulating surface layer. The radius of the metal core and the thickness of the insulating surface layer are of the order of a couple of Ångström. We study in particular the electromagnetic decay of externally located electrons into unoccupied internally located states which exhibits a resonance behaviour. This resonance structure has the consequence that the lifetime of the "mesoscopic atoms" may vary by up to 6 orders of magnitude depending on the values of the parameters (from sec to years).

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of gold cluster growth during sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. W.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation scheme that we apply to study the time evolution of the self-organized growth process of metal cluster assemblies formed by sputter-deposited gold atoms on a planar surface. The simulation model incorporates the characteristics of the plasma-assisted deposition process and allows for an investigation over a wide range of deposition parameters. It is used to obtain data for the cluster properties which can directly be compared with recently published experimental data for gold on polystyrene [M. Schwartzkopf et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 7, 13547 (2015)]. While good agreement is found between the two, the simulations additionally provide valuable time-dependent real-space data of the surface morphology, some of whose details are hidden in the reciprocal-space scattering images that were used for the experimental analysis.

  1. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOEpatents

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2001-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  2. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOEpatents

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  3. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates. 1 figure.

  4. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.; Martin, Frank S.

    1994-12-13

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  5. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1993-12-31

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  6. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  7. Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  8. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  9. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  10. A new nanomaterial synthesized from size-selected, ligand-free metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wepasnick, K.; Tang, X.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Bowen, K. H.; Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Huber, J.; Mangler, T.; Luo, Y.; Proch, S.; Gantefoer, G.

    2014-03-01

    Thins films are synthesized by deposition of size-selected Mon- cluster anions on an inert substrate. Scanning tunneling microscopy pictures indicate that the deposited material consists of individual particles with diameters corresponding to the size of the preformed clusters from the gas phase. Previous attempts to manufacture cluster materials from metals failed since these clusters coalesced at room temperature. Our data suggest the possibility to synthesize new nanomaterials from clusters of high fusing metals. This may prove to be the key to harness size-dependent and tuneable properties of clusters for creating novel classes of functional tailor-made materials.

  11. Fission and dipole resonances in metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T. P.; Billas, I. M. L.; Branz, W.; Heinebrodt, M.; Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.

    1997-06-20

    It is not obvious that metal clusters should behave like atomic nuclei--but they do. Of course the energy and distance scales are quite different. But aside from this, the properties of these two forms of condensed matter are amazingly similar. The shell model developed by nuclear physicists describes very nicely the electronic properties of alkali metal clusters. The giant dipole resonances in the excitation spectra of nuclei have their analogue in the plasmon resonances of metal clusters. Finally, the droplet model describing the fission of unstable nuclei can be successively applied to the fragmentation of highly charged metal clusters. The similarity between clusters and nuclei is not accidental. Both systems consist of fermions moving, nearly freely, in a confined space.

  12. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters, metal-organic clusters, metal oxides, and metal-doped silicon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weijun

    The techniques of time-of-flight mass spectrometry and negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized to study metal clusters (Mgn -, Znn-, Can -, Mnn-, CuAln -, LiAln-, and NmSn n-), metal-organic complexes (Tin(benzene) m-, Fn(benzene)m- , Nin(benzene)m-), metal oxides(AuO-, PtO-, TaOn -, HfO2-, and MnnO -), and metal-doped semiconductor clusters (CrSin -, GdmSin- and HoSi n-). The study of magnesium and zinc cluster anions shows that they have magic numbers at size 9, 19 and 34, and the closures and reopenings of the s-p band gap are related to the mass spectra magic numbers. The evolution of electronic structure in Can clusters resembles that of Mgn - and Znn- with band gap closure and reopening. However, the electronic structures Can- clusters are more complicated and the magic numbers are different from those of Mgn- and Znn -. That might due to the involvement of calcium's empty d orbitals. In Mn clusters, a dramatic change of electronic structure was observed at Mn5-. The transition of metallic and magnetic properties is strongly related to the s-d hybridization. The photoelectron study of LiAln- is consistent with theoretical predictions, which described LiAl13 as alkali-halide-like ionic entity, Li+(Al13)-. The results of CuAln- show that copper atom might occupy interior position in these clusters. The results of Nam Snn- implied that Na4Sn 4 and NaSn5- could be described as (Na +)4Sn44- and (Na +)Sn52-, respectively. The formation of these species indicates the existence of Zintl phase structure in the gas phase. Tin(Bz)n+1- clusters have multiple-decker sandwich structures with each titanium atom located between two parallel benzene rings. The structures of Fen(Bz)m - and Nin(Bz)m- are characterized with a metal cluster core caged by benzene molecules. The information for the electronic states of PtO, AuO, and TaOn (n = 1--3) were obtained from the photoelectron spectra of their corresponding negative ions. The coincidence between electron

  13. A Simple MO Treatment of Metal Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Illustrates how a qualitative description of the geometry and electronic characteristics of homogeneous metal clusters can be obtained using semiempirical MO (molecular orbital theory) methods. Computer applications of MO methods to inorganic systems are also described. (CS)

  14. ENERGY DEPOSITION PROFILES AND ENTROPY IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anya; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: subha@tifr.res.in

    2012-11-10

    We report the results of our study of fractional entropy enhancement in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the clusters from the representative XMM-Newton cluster structure survey. We compare the observed entropy profile of these clusters with that expected for the ICM without any feedback, as well as with the introduction of preheating and cooling. We make the first estimate of the total, as well as radial, non-gravitational energy deposition up to r {sub 500} for this large, nearly flux-limited, sample of clusters. We find that the total energy deposition corresponding to the entropy enhancement is proportional to the cluster temperature (and hence cluster mass). The energy deposition per particle scaled by T {sub sp}, {Delta}E/T {sub sp} has a similar profile in all clusters, and is more pronounced in the central regions. Our results support models of entropy enhancement through active galactic nucleus feedback.

  15. Metals Cluster. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, James F.; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed for use in secondary metal trades education in Georgia. Its purpose is to provide for development of entry level skills in metal trades in the areas of knowledge, theoretical structure, tool usage, diagnostic ability, related supportive skills, and occupational survival skills. The first section of six explains…

  16. Packing transition in alkali metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, R.; Sung, Ming Wen; Weare, John H.

    1996-03-01

    Small metallic clusters form a local geometric configuration quite different from the bulk crystals. As the cluster size increases, several transitions in the local coordination take place before the bulk structure appears. These transitions involve change in the nature of chemical bonds. We have systematically investigated the structural transition of various alkali metal clusters including binary compounds using an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Among them, Li clusters exhibit unusual transition in their packing pattern. Small lithium clusters (N <= 21) form open structures based on a ``solvation shell''.(M. Sung, R. Kawai, and J. Weare, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73) (1994) 3552., which is quite different from other alkali metal clusters. The bonding of these small clusters is partially ionic. Above N=25, a close-packed structure is established. However, the local configuration still differ from that of the bulk crystal. As the size further increases, the ionic nature decreases and the system reaches another close-packed structure based on the Mackay icosahedron, which is similar to the bulk crystal structure.

  17. Atmospheric Deposition of Metals to Forest Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Steven E.; Harriss, Robert C.; Turner, Ralph R.

    1982-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition during the growing season contributes one-third or more of the estimated total flux of lead, zinc, and cadium from the forest canopy to soils beneath an oak stand in the Tennessee Valley but less than 10 percent of the flux of manganese. The ratio of the wet to dry deposition flux to the vegetation during this period ranges from 0.1 for manganese to 0.8 for lead to ~ 3 to 4 for cadmium and zinc. Interactions between metal particles deposited on dry leaf surfaces and subsequent acid precipitation can result in metal concentrations on leaves that are considerably higher than those in rain alone.

  18. Atmospheric deposition of metals to forest vegetation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, S E; Harriss, R C; Turner, R R

    1982-03-26

    Atmospheric deposition during the growing season contributes one-third or more of the estimated total flux of lead, zinc, and cadium from the forest canopy to soils beneath an oak stand in the Tennessee Valley but less than 10 percent of the flux of manganese. The ratio of the wet to dry deposition flux to the vegetation during this period ranges from 0.1 for manganese to 0.8 for lead to approximately 3 to 4 for cadmium and zinc. Interactions between metal particles deposited on dry leaf surfaces and subsequent acid precipitation can result in metal concentrations on leaves that are considerably higher than those in rain alone.

  19. Strategic metal deposits of the Arctic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Lobanov, K. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Tarasov, N. N.; Distler, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Chizhova, I. A.; Chefranov, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mineral commodities rank high in the economies of Arctic countries, and the status of mineral resources and the dynamics of their development are of great importance. The growing tendency to develop strategic metal resources in the Circumarctic Zone is outlined in a global perspective. The Russian Arctic Zone is the leading purveyor of these metals to domestic and foreign markets. The comparative analysis of tendencies in development of strategic metal resources of the Arctic Zone in Russia and other countries is crucial for the elaboration of trends of geological exploration and research engineering. This paper provides insight into the development of Arctic strategic metal resources in global perspective. It is shown that the mineral resource potential of the Arctic circumpolar metallogenic belt is primarily controlled by large and unique deposits of nonferrous, noble, and rare metals. The prospective types of economic strategic metal deposits in the Russian Arctic Zone are shown.

  20. DEPOSITION OF METAL ON NONMETAL FILAMENT

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for purifying metallic uranium by passing a halogen vapor continuously over the impure uranium to form uranium halide vapor and immediately passing the halide vapor into contact with a nonmetallic refractory surface which is at a temperature above the melting point of uranium metal. The halide is decomposed at the heated surface depositing molten metal, which collects and falls into a receiver below.

  1. Structural evolution and metallicity of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Daniel A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Johnston, Roy L.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. They are compared to Kubo gaps, which are an indicator of the metallicity in finite particles. Both, experimental and theoretical data suggest that lead clusters are not metallic up to at least 36 atoms.The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps

  2. Cage Destruction in Metal-Fullerene Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.; Frank, S.; Heinebrodt, M.; Billas, I.M.; Martin, T.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mass spectrometric studies on free clusters composed of single fullerene molecules and transition metal atoms (C{sub 60}{ital M}{sub {ital x}} and C{sub 70}{ital M}{sub {ital x}}; {ital x}=0.150, {ital M}{element_of}{l_brace}Ti,V,Nb,Ta{r_brace}) reveal that they undergo a laser induced transformation from metal-fullerene clusters to metal carbide and metallo-carbohedrene clusters. Two types of fragmentation behavior are observed. Fullerenes doped with titanium or vanadium seem to be stable at low laser intensities, whereas tantalum and niobium severely destabilize the fullerene cage. Photofragmentation spectra of preselected C{sub 60}Ta{sub {ital x}} indicate that the C{sub 60} cage is destroyed for {ital x}{ge}3. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  6. Embedded cluster metal-polymeric micro interface and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Menezes, Marlon E.; Birnbaum, Howard K.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2002-01-29

    A micro interface between a polymeric layer and a metal layer includes isolated clusters of metal partially embedded in the polymeric layer. The exposed portion of the clusters is smaller than embedded portions, so that a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an exposed portion of an individual cluster is smaller than a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an embedded portion of the individual cluster. At least half, but not all of the height of a preferred spherical cluster is embedded. The metal layer is completed by a continuous layer of metal bonded to the exposed portions of the discontinuous clusters. The micro interface is formed by heating a polymeric layer to a temperature, near its glass transition temperature, sufficient to allow penetration of the layer by metal clusters, after isolated clusters have been deposited on the layer at lower temperatures. The layer is recooled after embedding, and a continuous metal layer is deposited upon the polymeric layer to bond with the discontinuous metal clusters.

  7. Radial distribution of metallicity in the LMC cluster systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    New determinations of the deprojected distances to the galaxy center for 94 star clusters and their metal abundances are used to investigate the variation of metallicity across the two LMC star cluster systems (Kontizas et al. 1990). A systematic radial trend of metallicity is observed in the extended outer cluster system, the outermost clusters being significantly metal poorer than the more central ones, with the exception of six clusters (which might lie out of the plane of the cluster system) out of 77. A radial metallicity gradient has been found, qualitatively comparable to that of the Milky Way for its system of the old disk clusters. If the six clusters are taken into consideration then the outer cluster system is well mixed up to 8 kpc. The spatial distribution of metallicities for the inner LMC cluster system, consisting of very young globulars does not show a systematic radial trend; they are all metal rich.

  8. APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-03-13

    An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

  9. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  10. The structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    One metal atom surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors is considered for both D(3d) (face-centered cubic-like) and D(3h) (hexagonal close-packed-like) geometries. For Al and Be, the neutral cluster and the positive and negative ions are considered for idealized (all bonds equal) and distorted geometries. The D(3d) geometry is found to be the lowest for Be13, while the D(3h) geometry is lower for Al13. This is the reverse of what is expected based upon the bulk metal structures, Be(hcp) and Al(fcc). Al13 is found to have only small distortions, while Be13 shows large distortions for both the D(3d) and D(3h) geometries. The ions have geometries which are similar to those found for the neutral systems. Both all-electron and effective core potential calculations were carried out on the X13 clusters; the agreement is very good.

  11. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, S. B. Little, B. K.; Xin, Y.; Ridge, C. J.; Lindsay, C. M.; Buszek, R. J.; Boatz, J. A.; Boyle, J. M.

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  12. Empty, filled, and condensed metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Arndt

    1985-03-01

    Aspects of structure, bonding, physical, and chemical properties are discussed for (a) compounds containing discrete empty clusters and clusters with interstitial H atoms: Nb 6I 11, HNb 6I 11, HCsNb 6I 11, (b) metal-rich lanthanide halides and halide carbides,-nitrides and -hydrides, focusing on the role of interstitial atoms: Gd 2Br 2C 2, Gd 2Br 2C, Gd 3Cl 3C, Gd 10Cl 18C 4, Gd 10Il 17C 4, Gd 10I 16C 4, GD 2Cl 3N, Gd XH n ( X=Cl, Br, I; 0.6< n<0.9), GdBrD 2; (c) metal-rich oxides of the alkali metals rubidium and cesium. Chemical bonding in the suboxide clusters Rb 9O 2 and Cs 11O 3 is discussed along the lines valid for (a) and (b) and covers recently described "hypervalent" species as Li 6C, Li 4O, etc.

  13. Electrochemical Deposition Of Thiolate Monolayers On Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Marc D.; Weissharr, Duane E.

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical method devised for coating metal (usually, gold) surfaces with adherent thiolate monolayers. Affords greater control over location and amount of material deposited and makes it easier to control chemical composition of deposits. One important potential use for this method lies in fabrication of chemically selective thin-film resonators for microwave oscillators used to detect pollutants: monolayer formulated to bind selectively pollutant chemical species of interest, causing increase in mass of monolayer and corresponding decrease in frequency of resonance. Another important potential use lies in selective chemical derivatization for purposes of improving adhesion, lubrication, protection against corrosion, electrocatalysis, and electroanalysis.

  14. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  15. Metal clusters in catalysis: Hydrocarbon reactions*

    PubMed Central

    Caulton, K. G.; Thomas, M. G.; Sosinsky, B. A.; Muetterties, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    A set of metal carbonyl clusters, Ru3(CO)12, Os3(CO)12, and Ir4(CO)12, has been evaluated as catalysts for a series of hydrocarbon reactions which comprise skeletal rearrangement, metathesis, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, isomerization, and H-D exchange. None was especially effective as a hydrogenation catalyst even for olefins. Os3(CO)12 was a catalyst for H-D exchange between C6H6 and D2 at 195° but the ruthenium congener was inactive at temperatures below 175°, a temperature where ruthenium metal formed at an appreciable rate. Deuterium incorporation in the benzene was a single-step process. Ir4(CO)12 was an effective catalyst for the conversion of cyclohexadiene to cyclohexene and benzene. A similar reaction occurred with cyclohexene but the rate was extremely low at 160°. The ruthenium and osmium clusters catalyzed the isomerization of linear hexenes, with the former the more active. Relative rates for the hexenes were 1 > 2 > 3. At high temperatures, the osmium and iridium clusters catalyzed skeletal reactions of 2-hexene, as evidenced by the formation of pentenes, heptenes, heptanes, and small amounts of propane. PMID:16592366

  16. Metal Adatoms and Clusters on Ultrathin Zirconia Films

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of transition metals on zirconia has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since STM requires electrical conductivity, ultrathin ZrO2 films grown by oxidation of Pt3Zr(0001) and Pd3Zr(0001) were used as model systems. DFT studies were performed for single metal adatoms on supported ZrO2 films as well as the (1̅11) surface of monoclinic ZrO2. STM shows decreasing cluster size, indicative of increasing metal–oxide interaction, in the sequence Ag < Pd ≈ Au < Ni ≈ Fe. Ag and Pd nucleate mostly at steps and domain boundaries of ZrO2/Pt3Zr(0001) and form three-dimensional clusters. Deposition of low coverages of Ni and Fe at room temperature leads to a high density of few-atom clusters on the oxide terraces. Weak bonding of Ag to the oxide is demonstrated by removing Ag clusters with the STM tip. DFT calculations for single adatoms show that the metal–oxide interaction strength increases in the sequence Ag < Au < Pd < Ni on monoclinic ZrO2, and Ag ≈ Au < Pd < Ni on the supported ultrathin ZrO2 film. With the exception of Au, metal nucleation and growth on ultrathin zirconia films follow the usual rules: More reactive (more electropositive) metals result in a higher cluster density and wet the surface more strongly than more noble metals. These bind mainly to the oxygen anions of the oxide. Au is an exception because it can bind strongly to the Zr cations. Au diffusion may be impeded by changing its charge state between −1 and +1. We discuss differences between the supported ultrathin zirconia films and the surfaces of bulk ZrO2, such as the possibility of charge transfer to the substrate of the films. Due to their large in-plane lattice constant and the variety of adsorption sites, ZrO2{111} surfaces are more reactive than many other oxygen-terminated oxide surfaces. PMID:27213024

  17. Growth modes of thin films of ligand-free metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Bleuel, H.; Marsteller, A.; Gantefoer, G.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Tang, Xin; Bowen, K. H.; Kim, Young Dok

    2015-05-21

    Size-selected Mo{sub n}{sup −}, W{sub n}{sup −}, and Fe{sub n}{sup −} cluster anions are deposited on a weakly interacting substrate (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) and studied ex-situ using atomic force microscopy. Depending on size, three growth modes can be distinguished. Very small clusters consisting of less than 10–30 atoms behave similar to atoms and coalesce into 3-dimensional bulk-like islands. Medium sized clusters consisting of hundreds of atoms do not coalesce and follow a Stanski-Krastanov growth pattern. At low coverage, an almost perfect monolayer is formed. This is a new finding different from all previous studies on deposited metal clusters. For clusters with several thousands of atoms, the growth pattern again changes. At low coverage, the substrate is dotted with individual clusters, while at high coverage, the surface becomes extremely rough.

  18. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  19. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-01

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O2 neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O2-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  20. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  1. Selective Metal-vapor Deposition on Organic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Selective metal-vapor deposition signifies that metal-vapor atoms are deposited on a hard organic surface, but not on a soft (low glass transition temperature, low Tg ) surface. In this paper, we introduce the origin, extension, and applications of selective metal-vapor deposition. An amorphous photochromic diarylethene film shows light-controlled selective metal-vapor deposition, which is caused by a large Tg change based on photoisomerization, but various organic surfaces, including organic crystal and polymers, can be utilized for achieving selective metal-vapor deposition. Various applications of selective metal-vapor deposition, including cathode patterning of organic light-emitting devices, micro-thin-film fuses, multifunctional diffraction gratings, in-plane electrical bistability for memory devices, and metal-vapor integration, have been demonstrated.

  2. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shoji; Sugiyama, Shuta; Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  3. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  4. Metallic nanoparticle deposition techniques for enhanced organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacha, Brian Joseph Gonda

    Energy generation via organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells provide many advantages over alternative processes including flexibility and price. However, more efficient OPVs are required in order to be competitive for applications. One way to enhance efficiency is through manipulation of exciton mechanisms within the OPV, for example by inserting a thin film of bathocuproine (BCP) and gold nanoparticles between the C60/Al and ZnPc/ITO interfaces, respectively. We find that BCP increases efficiencies by 330% due to gains of open circuit voltage (Voc) by 160% and short circuit current (Jsc) by 130%. However, these gains are complicated by the anomalous photovoltaic effect and an internal chemical potential. Exploration in the tuning of metallic nanoparticle deposition on ITO was done through four techniques. Drop casting Ag nanoparticle solution showed arduous control on deposited morphology. Spin-coating deposited very low densities of nanoparticles. Drop casting and spin-coating methods showed arduous control on Ag nanoparticle morphology due to clustering and low deposition density, respectively. Sputtered gold on glass was initially created to aid the adherence of Ag nanoparticles but instead showed a quick way to deposit aggregated gold nanoparticles. Electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) proved a quick method to tune nanoparticle morphology on ITO substrates. Control of deposition parameters affected AuNP size and distribution. AFM images of electrodeposited AuNPs showed sizes ranging from 39 to 58 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy showed the presence of localized plasmon resonance through absorption peaks ranging from 503 to 614 nm. A linear correlation between electrodeposited AuNP size and peak absorbance was seen with a slope of 3.26 wavelength(nm)/diameter(nm).

  5. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  6. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Open clusters are known as excellent tools for various topics in Galactic research. For example, they allow accurately tracing the chemical structure of the Galactic disc. However, the metallicity is known only for a rather low percentage of the open cluster population, and these values are based on a variety of methods and data. Therefore, a large and homogeneous sample is highly desirable. Aims: In the third part of our series we compile a large sample of homogenised open cluster metallicities using a wide variety of different sources. These data and a sample of Cepheids are used to investigate the radial metallicity gradient, age effects, and to test current models. Methods: We used photometric and spectroscopic data to derive cluster metallicities. The different sources were checked and tested for possible offsets and correlations. Results: In total, metallicities for 172 open cluster were derived. We used the spectroscopic data of 100 objects for a study of the radial metallicity distribution and the age-metallicity relation. We found a possible increase of metallicity with age, which, if confirmed, would provide observational evidence for radial migration. Although a statistical significance is given, more studies are certainly needed to exclude selection effects, for example. The comparison of open clusters and Cepheids with recent Galactic models agrees well in general. However, the models do not reproduce the flat gradient of the open clusters in the outer disc. Thus, the effect of radial migration is either underestimated in the models, or an additional mechanism is at work. Conclusions: Apart from the Cepheids, open clusters are the best tracers for metallicity over large Galactocentric distances in the Milky Way. For a sound statistical analysis, a sufficiently large and homogeneous sample of cluster metallicities is needed. Our compilation is currently by far the largest and provides the basis for several basic studies such as the statistical

  7. Flexible and biocompatible microelectrode arrays fabricated by supersonic cluster beam deposition on SU-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelli, Mattia; Divitini, Giorgio; Collini, Cristian; Ravagnan, Luca; Corbelli, Gabriele; Ghisleri, Cristian; Gianfelice, Antonella; Lenardi, Cristina; Milani, Paolo; Lorenzelli, Leandro

    2011-04-01

    We fabricated highly adherent and electrically conductive micropatterns on SU-8 by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD). This technique is based on the aerodynamical acceleration of neutral metallic nanoparticles produced in the gas phase. The kinetic energy acquired by the nanoparticles allows implantation in an SU-8 layer, thus producing a metal-polymer nanocomposite thin layer. The nanocomposite shows ohmic electrical conduction and it can also be used as an adhesion layer for further metallization with a metallic overlayer. We characterized the electrical conduction, adhesion and biocompatibility of microdevices obtained by SCBD on SU-8 demonstrating the compatibility of our approach with standard lift-off technology on 4'' wafer. A self-standing and flexible microelectrode array has been produced. Cytological tests with neuronal cell lines demonstrated improved cell growth on the nanocomposite layer.

  8. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  9. Ubiquitous pentacene monolayer on metals deposited onto pentacene films.

    PubMed

    Jaeckel, B; Sambur, J B; Parkinson, B A

    2007-11-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) was used to study the deposition of metal layers (Ag, Cu, and Au) onto pentacene films. Very low work functions were measured (PhiAg = 3.91 eV, PhiCu = 3.93 eV, and PhiAu = 4.3 eV) for all of the metals, in agreement with results from the literature. The intensities of the C 1s core-level signals from pentacene that were monitored during stepwise metal deposition leveled off at a value of about 30% of a thick pentacene film. This C 1s intensity is comparable to that of one monolayer of pentacene deposited onto the respective metal. The valence band spectra of metals deposited onto pentacene and spectra collected for pentacene deposited onto bare metal surfaces are very similar. These findings lead to the conclusion that approximately one monolayer of pentacene is always present on top of the freshly deposited metal film, which explains the very low work function of the metals when they are deposited onto organic films. We expect similar behavior with other nonreactive metals deposited onto stable organic layers.

  10. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  11. Influence of reactive gas admixture on transition metal cluster nucleation in a gas aggregation cluster source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Tilo; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Gojdka, Björn; Mohammad Ahadi, Amir; Strunskus, Thomas; Zaporojtchenko, Vladimir; Biederman, Hynek; Faupel, Franz

    2012-12-01

    We quantitatively assessed the influence of reactive gases on the formation processes of transition metal clusters in a gas aggregation cluster source. A cluster source based on a 2 in. magnetron is used to study the production rate of titanium and cobalt clusters. Argon served as working gas for the DC magnetron discharge, and a small amount of reactive gas (oxygen and nitrogen) is added to promote reactive cluster formation. We found that the cluster production rate depends strongly on the reactive gas concentration for very small amounts of reactive gas (less than 0.1% of total working gas), and no cluster formation takes place in the absence of reactive species. The influence of discharge power, reactive gas concentration, and working gas pressure are investigated using a quartz micro balance in a time resolved manner. The strong influence of reactive gas is explained by a more efficient formation of nucleation seeds for metal-oxide or nitride than for pure metal.

  12. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sanjubala; Gruner, Markus E; Khanna, Shiv N; Entel, Peter

    2014-08-21

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM13 (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM13 clusters, Co13 is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe13 and Ni13 clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters.

  13. Clusters on surface and embedded in a matrix: comparison between covalent and metallic species

    SciTech Connect

    Broyer, M.; Cottancin, E.; Lerme, J.; Palpant, B.; Pellarin, M.; Ray, C.; Vialle, J. L.; Keghelian, P.; Melinon, P.; Perez, A.; Prevel, B.; Treilleux, M.

    1997-06-20

    The free clusters obtained by the molecular beam technique exhibit original geometric structures. It appears interesting to use these clusters as elementary bricks to build new materials or cluster assembled solids. For this purpose, we use the so called Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition (LECBD). This technique is applied to different kinds of materials. For covalent species, we observed the memory of the free clusters properties for carbon but also for silicon or silicon carbide. On the contrary for metals, the structure of the grain is the bulk structure, but the nanostructured morphology of the films is very interesting and may be controlled. These properties are illustrated for gold clusters. Their optical absorption spectra are measured and the evolution as a function of the size is discussed.

  14. Ruprecht 106 - A young metal-poor Galactic globular cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, R.; Buscema, G.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Richer, H.B.; Fahlman, G.G. Bologna Universita British Columbia Univ., Vancouver )

    1990-12-01

    The first CCD photometric survey in the Galactic globular cluster Ruprecht 106 has been performed. The results show that Ruprecht 106 is a metal-poor cluster with (Fe/H) about -2 located at about 25 kpc from the Galactic center. A sizable, high centrally concentrated population of blue stragglers was detected. Significant differences in the positions of the turnoffs in the color-magnitude diagram are found compared to those in metal-poor clusters. The cluster appears younger than other typical metal-poor Galactic globulars by about 4-5 Gyr; if true, this object would represent the first direct proof of the existence of a significant age spread among old, very metal-poor clusters. 51 refs.

  15. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  16. Enhanced quantum coherence in graphene caused by Pd cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yuyuan; Han, Junhao; Du, Yongping; Li, Zhaoguo; Wan, Xiangang; Han, Min; Song, Fengqi; Guo, Guoping; Song, You; Pi, Li; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-12

    We report on the unexpected increase in the dephasing lengths of a graphene sheet caused by the deposition of Pd nanoclusters, as demonstrated by weak localization measurements. The dephasing lengths reached saturated values at low temperatures. Theoretical calculations indicate the p-type charge transfer from the Pd clusters, which contributes more carriers. The saturated values of dephasing lengths often depend on both the carrier concentration and mean free path. Although some impurities are increased as revealed by decreased mobilities, the intense charge transfer leads to the improved saturated values and subsequent improved dephasing lengths.

  17. Thermochemistry and Reactivity of Transition Metal Cluster Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armentrout, P. B.; Griffin, J. B.; Conceićão, J.

    Reactions of transition metal cluster cations with several small molecules have been examined using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. This technique allows the kinetic energy dependence of the reactions to be measured, thereby allowing thermodynamic information to be extracted. Reactions of iron, chromium, and vanadium clusters with D2, O2, and CO2 are described. Reactions with D2 are endothermic and yield only two types of products. Oxidation of metal clusters by O2 proceeds is very efficient, proceeding at the collision limit, and forms many different products. The CO2 systems exhibit interesting dynamics that appears to be related to interactions of two surfaces of different spin. Bond energies for cluster monodeuterides, monoxides, and dioxides are derived from these studies. The deuteride bond energies appear to be sensitive to the cluster geometry while little variation in oxide bond energies is observed as a function of cluster size. Comparison of these cluster bond energies to bulk phase values finds similar thermochemistry.

  18. Y-Ba-Cu-O film deposition by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on buffered metal substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamanickam, V.; Galinski, G.; DeFrank, J.; Trautwein, C.; Haldar, P.; Balachandran, U.; Lanagan, M.; Chudzik, M.

    1999-10-12

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 2} (YBCO) films have been deposited on buffered metal substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). Cube-textured nickel substrates were fabricated by a thermomechanical process. Epitaxial CeO{sub 2}films were deposited on these substrates by thermal evaporation. Nickel alloy substrates with biaxially-textured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers deposited by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition were also prepared. Highly biaxially-textured YBCO films were deposited by MOCVD on both types of metal substrates. A critical current density greater than 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K has been achieved in YBCO films on metal substrates.

  19. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  20. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  1. Vapor Deposition Of Metal From Gas/Tungsten Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum gas/tungsten-arc vapor-deposition process yields highly reflective, smooth films reproducing contours of surfaces on which deposited. Rate of deposition controlled precisely, and surface texture varied. Capable of deposition at rates double those of standard sputtering. Useful in making thin metallic coats to serve as electrical conductors, radio reflectors or antenna elements, or optical mirrors of partial or ultrahigh reflectivity, and in making semiconductor devices.

  2. Star Clusters in M31. VII. Global Kinematics and Metallicity Subpopulations of the Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2016-06-01

    We carry out a joint spatial–kinematical–metallicity analysis of globular clusters (GCs) around the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), using a homogeneous, high-quality spectroscopic data set. In particular, we remove the contaminating young clusters that have plagued many previous analyses. We find that the clusters can be divided into three major metallicity groups based on their radial distributions: (1) an inner metal-rich group ([Fe/H] > -0.4); (2) a group with intermediate metallicity (with median [Fe/H] = ‑1) and (3) a metal-poor group, with [Fe/H] < -1.5. The metal-rich group has kinematics and spatial properties like those of the disk of M31, while the two more metal-poor groups show mild prograde rotation overall, with larger dispersions—in contrast to previous claims of stronger rotation. The metal-poor GCs are the least concentrated group; such clusters occur five times less frequently in the central bulge than do clusters of higher metallicity. Despite some well-known differences between the M31 and Milky Way GC systems, our revised analysis points to remarkable similarities in their chemodynamical properties, which could help elucidate the different formation stages of galaxies and their GCs. In particular, the M31 results motivate further exploration of a metal-rich GC formation mode in situ, within high-redshift, clumpy galactic disks.

  3. Star Clusters in M31. VII. Global Kinematics and Metallicity Subpopulations of the Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2016-06-01

    We carry out a joint spatial-kinematical-metallicity analysis of globular clusters (GCs) around the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), using a homogeneous, high-quality spectroscopic data set. In particular, we remove the contaminating young clusters that have plagued many previous analyses. We find that the clusters can be divided into three major metallicity groups based on their radial distributions: (1) an inner metal-rich group ([Fe/H] > -0.4); (2) a group with intermediate metallicity (with median [Fe/H] = -1) and (3) a metal-poor group, with [Fe/H] < -1.5. The metal-rich group has kinematics and spatial properties like those of the disk of M31, while the two more metal-poor groups show mild prograde rotation overall, with larger dispersions—in contrast to previous claims of stronger rotation. The metal-poor GCs are the least concentrated group; such clusters occur five times less frequently in the central bulge than do clusters of higher metallicity. Despite some well-known differences between the M31 and Milky Way GC systems, our revised analysis points to remarkable similarities in their chemodynamical properties, which could help elucidate the different formation stages of galaxies and their GCs. In particular, the M31 results motivate further exploration of a metal-rich GC formation mode in situ, within high-redshift, clumpy galactic disks.

  4. Polymer-assisted aqueous deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Jia, Quanxi

    2003-07-08

    An organic solvent-free process for deposition of metal oxide thin films is presented. The process includes aqueous solutions of necessary metal precursors and an aqueous solution of a water-soluble polymer. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is fired at high temperatures to yield optical quality metal oxide thin films.

  5. Interaction of hydrogen with palladium clusters deposited on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Julio A.; Granja, Alejandra; Cabria, Iván; López, María J.

    2015-12-31

    Hydrogen adsorption on nanoporous carbon materials is a promising technology for hydrogen storage. However, pure carbon materials do not meet the technological requirements due to the week binding of hydrogen to the pore walls. Experimental work has shown that doping with Pd atoms and clusters enhances the storage capacity of porous carbons. Therefore, we have investigated the role played by the Pd dopant on the enhancement mechanisms. By performing density functional calculations, we have found that hydrogen adsorbs on Pd clusters deposited on graphene following two channels, molecular adsorption and dissociative chemisorption. However, desorption of Pd-H complexes competes with desorption of hydrogen, and consequently desorption of Pd-H complexes would spoil the beneficial effect of the dopant. As a way to overcome this difficulty, Pd atoms and clusters can be anchored to defects of the graphene layer, like graphene vacancies. The competition between molecular adsorption and dissociative chemisorption of H{sub 2} on Pd{sub 6} anchored on a graphene vacancy has been studied in detail.

  6. Structure of overheated metal clusters: MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    The structure of overheated metal clusters appeared in condensation process was studied by computer simulation techniques. It was found that clusters with size larger than several tens of atoms have three layers: core part, intermediate dense packing layer and a gas- like shell with low density. The change of the size and structure of these layers with the variation of internal energy and the size of cluster is discussed.

  7. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  8. SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF POROUS NANOSTRUCTURED METALS AND NANOSTRUCTURED MEMBRANES FOR CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Ferreira, J L; Hayes, J P

    2003-09-10

    The sputter deposition process can be used to create nanostructured materials that possess continuous open porosity. Characterization of sputter deposited metals and metal-oxide coatings are presented.

  9. Probing Globular Cluster Formation in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Reines, Amy E.

    2008-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of globular clusters around massive galaxies today suggests that these extreme star clusters must have been formed prolifically in the earlier universe in low-metallicity galaxies. Numerous adolescent and massive star clusters are already known to be present in a variety of galaxies in the local universe; however most of these systems have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) > 8, and are thus not representative of the galaxies in which today's ancient globular clusters were formed. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these massive clusters in environments with few heavy elements, we have targeted several low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with radio observations, searching for newly-formed massive star clusters still embedded in their birth material. The galaxies in this initial study are HS 0822+3542, UGC 4483, Pox 186, and SBS 0335-052, all of which have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) < 7.75. While no thermal radio sources, indicative of natal massive star clusters, are found in three of the four galaxies, SBS 0335-052 hosts two such objects, which are incredibly luminous. The radio spectral energy distributions of these intense star-forming regions in SBS 0335-052 suggest the presence of ~12,000 equivalent O-type stars, and the implied star formation rate is nearing the maximum starburst intensity limit.

  10. Atmospheric corrosion and chloride deposition on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, Steven A.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion and chloride deposition on metal surfaces was studied at an unpolluted coastal (marine) site, an unpolluted rural inland site, and a polluted urban site. Chloride deposition by both wet (precipitation) and dry deposition processes over a multi-year period was measured using ion chromatography analysis of incident precipitation and precipitation runoff from the surface of metal samples. Chloride deposition was measured on zinc, copper, lead, mild steel, and non-reactive blank panels, as well as two panels coated with thermal-sprayed zinc alloys. Chloride deposition measured by runoff chemistry was compared with chloride deposition measurements made by the ASTM wet candle technique. Corrosion mass loss as a function of distance from the ocean is presented for copper and mild steel in bold exposures on the west coast.

  11. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  12. Controlled reactivity tuning of metal-functionalized vanadium oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Katharina; Forster, Johannes; Ida, Hiromichi; Newton, Graham N; Oshio, Hiroki; Streb, Carsten

    2015-05-18

    Controlling the assembly and functionalization of molecular metal oxides [Mx Oy ](n-) (M=Mo, W, V) allows the targeted design of functional molecular materials. While general methods exist that enable the predetermined functionalization of tungstates and molybdates, no such routes are available for molecular vanadium oxides. Controlled design of polyoxovanadates, however, would provide highly active materials for energy conversion, (photo-) catalysis, molecular magnetism, and materials science. To this end, a new approach has been developed that allows the reactivity tuning of vanadium oxide clusters by selective metal functionalization. Organic, hydrogen-bonding cations, for example, dimethylammonium are used as molecular placeholders to block metal binding sites within vanadate cluster shells. Stepwise replacement of the placeholder cations with reactive metal cations gives mono- and difunctionalized clusters. Initial reactivity studies illustrate the tunability of the magnetic, redox, and catalytic activity.

  13. Trinuclear Metal Clusters in Catalysis by Terpenoid Synthases.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Julie A; Christianson, David W

    2010-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the formation of structurally and stereochemically diverse isoprenoid natural products. Many isoprenoid coupling enzymes and terpenoid cyclases from bacteria, fungi, protists, plants, and animals share the class I terpenoid synthase fold. Despite generally low amino acid sequence identity among these examples, class I terpenoid synthases contain conserved metal binding motifs that coordinate to a trinuclear metal cluster. This cluster not only serves to bind and orient the flexible isoprenoid substrate in the precatalytic Michaelis complex, but it also triggers the departure of the diphosphate leaving group to generate a carbocation that initiates catalysis. Additional conserved hydrogen bond donors assist the metal cluster in this function. Crystal structure analysis reveals that the constellation of three metal ions required for terpenoid synthase catalysis is generally identical among all class I terpenoid synthases of known structure.

  14. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication: A Rapid Metal Deposition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley REsearch Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Thus far, this technique has been demonstrated on aluminum and titanium alloys of interest for aerospace structural applications nickel and ferrous based alloys are also planned. Deposits resulting from 2219 aluminum demonstrations have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials ave exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rated in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 cubic inches per our) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of metal clusters supported on TiO 2 (110): Morphology and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X.; Clair, T. P. St.; Valden, M.; Goodman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A brief review of our laboratory's recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoclusters supported on TiO 2(110) is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on the system {Au}/{TiO2(110) }. The nucleation and growth of the clusters, which were vapor-deposited on TiO 2(110) under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions, were investigated using STM. It was found that Au, Pd, and Ag clusters all grow in a three-dimensional (3D) (Volmer-Weber) fashion on TiO 2(110), but that at low coverages, quasi-two dimensional (quasi-2D) Au and Pd clusters were observed. These quasi-2D clusters are characterized by heights of 1-2 atomic layers. Annealing studies show that Au and Pd clusters form large microcrystals with well-defined hexagonal shapes. Al clusters, which have a strong interaction with the substrate, are oxidized upon deposition, “wetting” the surface and forming small clusters. In addition to the topographic studies, the local electronic properties of these clusters have been studied using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to measure the cluster band gaps. The electronic structure was found to be cluster size-dependent, as seen by the appearance of a band gap as the cluster size decreased. More specifically, the onset of cluster metallic properties correlates with the transition from quasi-2D to 3D cluster growth.

  16. Extraction of heavy metals characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami deposits using multiple classification analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kengo; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Komai, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Tsunami deposits accumulated on the Tohoku coastal area in Japan due to the impact of the Tohoku-oki earthquake. In the study reported in this paper, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in tsunami deposits that had been diluted with water or digested using 1 M HCl. The results suggest that the environmental risk is relatively low, evidenced by the following geometric mean concentrations: Pb, 16 mg kg(-1) and 0.003 ml L(-1); As, 1.8 mg kg(-1) and 0.004 ml L(-1); and Cd, 0.17 mg kg(-1) and 0.0001 ml L(-1). CA was performed after outliers were excluded using PCA. The analysis grouped the concentrations of heavy metals for leaching in water and acid. For the acid case, the first cluster contained Ni, Fe, Cd, Cu, Al, Cr, Zn, and Mn; while the second contained Pb, Sb, As, and Mo. For water, the first cluster contained Ni, Fe, Al, and Cr; and the second cluster contained Mo, Sb, As, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Mn. Statistical analysis revealed that the typical toxic elements, As, Pb, and Cd have steady correlations for acid leaching but are relatively sparse for water leaching. Pb and As from the tsunami deposits seemed to reveal a kind of redox elution mechanism using 1 M HCl. PMID:26469936

  17. Extraction of heavy metals characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami deposits using multiple classification analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kengo; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Komai, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Tsunami deposits accumulated on the Tohoku coastal area in Japan due to the impact of the Tohoku-oki earthquake. In the study reported in this paper, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in tsunami deposits that had been diluted with water or digested using 1 M HCl. The results suggest that the environmental risk is relatively low, evidenced by the following geometric mean concentrations: Pb, 16 mg kg(-1) and 0.003 ml L(-1); As, 1.8 mg kg(-1) and 0.004 ml L(-1); and Cd, 0.17 mg kg(-1) and 0.0001 ml L(-1). CA was performed after outliers were excluded using PCA. The analysis grouped the concentrations of heavy metals for leaching in water and acid. For the acid case, the first cluster contained Ni, Fe, Cd, Cu, Al, Cr, Zn, and Mn; while the second contained Pb, Sb, As, and Mo. For water, the first cluster contained Ni, Fe, Al, and Cr; and the second cluster contained Mo, Sb, As, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Mn. Statistical analysis revealed that the typical toxic elements, As, Pb, and Cd have steady correlations for acid leaching but are relatively sparse for water leaching. Pb and As from the tsunami deposits seemed to reveal a kind of redox elution mechanism using 1 M HCl.

  18. Term rules for simple metal clusters

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Daisuke; Raebiger, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Hund’s term rules are only valid for isolated atoms, but have no generalization for molecules or clusters of several atoms. We present a benchmark calculation of Al2 and Al3, for which we find the high and low-spin ground states 3Πu and , respectively. We show that the relative stabilities of all the molecular terms of Al2 and Al3 can be described by simple rules pertaining to bonding structures and symmetries, which serve as guiding principles to determine ground state terms of arbitrary multi-atom clusters. PMID:26497089

  19. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters

    PubMed

    König; Rabin; Schulze; Ertl

    1996-11-22

    The agglomeration of copper or silver atoms in a matrix of noble gas atoms to form small clusters may be accompanied by the emission of visible light. Spectral analysis reveals the intermediate formation of electronically excited atoms and dimers as the source of the chemiluminescence. A mechanism is proposed, according to which the gain in binding energy upon cluster formation may even lead to the ejection of excited fragments as a result of unstable intermediate configurations. A similar concept was introduced in the field of nuclear reactions by Niels Bohr 60 years ago.

  20. Supercritical Fluid Immersion Deposition: A New Process for Selective Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Young, James S.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical CO2 is used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop metal films on featured or non-featured silicon substrates. Components of supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID) solutions for fabricating Cu and Pd films on silicon substrates are described along with the corresponding experimental setup and procedure. Only silicon substrates exposed and reactive to SFID solutions can be coated. The highly pressurized and gas-like supercritical CO2, combined with the galvanic displacement property of immersion deposition, enables the SFID technique to selectively deposit metal films in small features. SFID may also provide a new method to fabricate palladium silicide in small features or to metallize porous silicon.

  1. Photoionization profiles of metal clusters and the Fowler formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prem, Abhinav; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2012-02-01

    Metal-cluster ionization potentials are important characteristics of these “artificial atoms,” but extracting these quantities from cluster photoabsorption spectra, especially in the presence of thermal smearing, remains a big challenge. Here we demonstrate that the classic Fowler theory of surface photoemission does an excellent job of fitting the photoabsorption profile shapes of neutral Inn=3-34 clusters [Wucher , New J. Phys.NJOPFM1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/10/10/103007 10, 103007 (2008)]. The deduced ionization potentials extrapolate precisely to the bulk work function, and the internal cluster temperatures are in close agreement with values expected for an ensemble of freely evaporating clusters. Supplementing an earlier application to potassium clusters, these results suggest that the Fowler formalism, which is straightforward and physical, may be of significant utility in metal-cluster spectroscopy. It is hoped also that the results will encourage a comprehensive theoretical analysis of the applicability of bulk-derived models to cluster photoionization behavior, and of the transition from atomic and molecular-type to surface-type photoemission.

  2. METAL PRODUCTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: THE NON-GALACTIC COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Joel N.; Anderson, Michael E.; Dai Xinyu E-mail: michevan@umich.ed

    2010-06-10

    The metallicity in galaxy clusters is expected to originate from the stars in galaxies, with a population dominated by high-mass stars likely being the most important stellar component, especially in rich clusters. We examine the relationship between the metallicity and the prominence of galaxies as measured by the star-to-baryon ratio, M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. Counter to expectations, we rule out a metallicity that is proportional to M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, where the best fit has the gas-phase metallicity decreasing with M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, or the metallicity of the gas plus the stars being independent of M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. This implies that the population of stars responsible for the metals is largely proportional to the total baryonic mass of the cluster, not to the galaxy mass within the cluster. If generally applicable, most of the heavy elements in the universe were not produced within galaxies.

  3. SEDIMENT-HOSTED PRECIOUS METAL DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagby, W.C.; Pickthorn, W.J.; Goldfarb, R.; Hill, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Dee mine is a sediment-hosted, disseminated gold deposit in the Roberts Mountains allochthon of north central Nevada. Soil samples were collected from the C-horizon in undisturbed areas over the deposit in order to investigate the usefulness of soil geochemistry in identifying this type of deposit. Each sample was sieved to minus 80 mesh and analyzed quantitatively for Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Tl and semi-quantitative data for an additional 31 elements. Rank sum analysis is successful for the Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Tl suite, even though bedrock geology is disregarded. This method involves data transformation into a total element signature by ranking the data in ascending order and summing the element ranks for each sample. The rank sums are then divided into percentile groups and plotted. The rank sum plot for the Dee soils unequivocally identifies three of four known ore zones.

  4. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  5. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. UV laser deposition of metal films by photogenerated free radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. K.; Mantei, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel photochemical method for liquid-phase deposition of metal films is described. In the liquid phase deposition scheme, a metal containing compound and a metal-metal bonded carbonyl complex are dissolved together in a polar solvent and the mixture is irradiated using a UV laser. The optical arrangement consists of a HeCd laser which provides 7 mW of power at a wavelength of 325 nm in the TEM(OO) mode. The beam is attenuated and may be expanded to a diameter of 5-20 mm. Experiments with photochemical deposition of silver films onto glass and quartz substrates are described in detail. Mass spectrometric analysis of deposited silver films indicated a deposition rate of about 1 A/s at incident power levels of 0.01 W/sq cm. UV laser-induced copper and palladium films have also been obtained. A black and white photograph showing the silver Van Der Pauw pattern of a solution-deposited film is provided.

  7. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  8. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  9. Metal-Insulator Transition of Dirac Fermions: Variational Cluster Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebato, Masaki; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori

    2015-04-01

    A comparative study is made on the metal-insulator transition of Dirac fermions in the honeycomb and π-flux Hubbard models at half filling by means of the variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical impurity approximation. Paying particular attention to the choice of the geometry of solver clusters and the inclusion of particle-bath sites, we show that the direct transition from the Dirac semimetallic state to the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator state occurs in these models, and therefore, the spin liquid phase is absent in the intermediate region, in agreement with recent quantum-Monte-Carlo-based calculations.

  10. Formation and photodetachment of cold metal cluster negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-S.; Brucat, P. J.; Pettiette, C. L.; Yang, S.; Smalley, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    A general method is described for the formation of cold metal cluser negative ion beams which serve as excellent sources for photodetachment experiments. The method involves the pulsed laser vaporization of a metal target at the throat of a pulsed supersonic helium expansion. By the optimization of source conditions, intense beams (greater than 105 ions/pulse) of both positive and negative ions are produced routinely. Ionization of the metal cluster molecules, either during vaporization or by irradiation with 193 nm light, occurs prior to supersonic expansion and produces a cold plasma entrained in the neural flow that is renitent to stray electric and magnetic fields, unlike photoions produced in the collisionless downstream molecular beam. The enhancement of the negative ion flux by 193 nm irradiation is believed to be evidence for efficient electron attachment of low energy photoelectrons generated in the nozzle region. This attachment process, however, is apparently not effective for molecules containing less than ˜4 metal atoms. Laser irradition of mass-selected cluster anions extracted from these cold ion beams reveal that photodetachment of the metal cluster negative ion is always the preferred pathway, even when fragmentation of the ion is possible. This new negative ion production technique should therefore permit measurement of both electron affinities and photoelectron spectra as a function of cluster size and composition.

  11. Empirical metallogeny. Depositional environments, lithologic associations and metallic ores, Vol. 1: Phanerozoic environments, associations and deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Laznicka, P.

    1985-01-01

    This is a single source of data on metallic deposits and their worldwide distribution. With over 1,750 pages it contains: 594 figures illustrating ore styles and their setting; 113 tables providing concise but highly quantitative data on several thousand locality examples; 4 indexes (general, locality, genetic, metals) enabling rapid and thorough searches; and more than 2,000 references. This body of information on metallic ore deposits is arranged by environments in which they presently form or lithologic associations in which they occur. The organization of the book follows the approach employed in regional mineral-potential evaluation and exploration.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of toxics onto Massachusetts Bay—I. Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golomb, D.; Ryan, D.; Eby, N.; Underhill, J.; Zemba, S.

    Wet and dry atmospheric deposition of toxic metals was measured at biweekly intervals for one year, from i5 September i992 to i6 September i993 at two sites on Massachusetts Bay, Nahant, near Boston and Truro, near the tip of Cape Cod. Wet and dry deposition was measured using a conventional wet/dry collector, except that the dry bucket contained a layer of water in order to simulate the uptake of dry deposition onto a water surface. In addition, at Nahant, a dichotomous particle collector was used to measure metal concentrations on particles. Analytical methods were INAA and ICP-MS. Generally, dry deposition of metals was greater at Nahant than at Truro, and wet deposition was greater or equal at Truro than at Nahant. Averaging results from the two sites, the following deposition rates (wet + dry) were obtained for the Bay in μg m -2 yr -1: Al i02000, As i32, Cd 405, Co 58, Cr 2700, Cu 3500, Fe 140,000, Mn 4420, Ni 7200, Pb 2700, Sb i60, Se 264, Zn 7800. Preliminary results are also given for mercury wet deposition, which was measured for 6 weekly periods in the fall of 1993.

  13. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  14. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  15. Supersonic metal cluster beams. Technical progress report, March 16, 1984-April 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  16. Hitomi observations of the Perseus Cluster / Constant metallicity in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Norbert; Simionescu, Aurora; Urban, Ondrej; Allen, Steven

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations with the Suzaku satellite reveal a remarkably homogeneous distribution of iron out to the virial radii of nearby galaxy clusters. Observations of the Virgo Cluster, that also allow us to measure the abundances of Si, S, and Mg out to the outskirts, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is constant on large scales. These observations require that most of the metal enrichment and mixing of the intergalactic medium occurred before clusters formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity. We estimate the ratio between the number of SN Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 15-20%, generally consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy.

  17. Variable Stars In the Unusual, Metal-Rich Globular Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for variable stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6388 using time-series BV photometry. Twenty-eight new variables were found in this survey, increasing the total number of variables found near NGC 6388 to approx. 57. A significant number of the variables are RR Lyrae (approx. 14), most of which are probable cluster members. The periods of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae are shown to be unusually long compared to metal-rich field stars. The existence of these long period RRab stars suggests that the horizontal branch of NGC 6388 is unusually bright. This implies that the metallicity-luminosity relationship for RR Lyrae stars is not universal if the RR Lyrae in NGC 6388 are indeed metal-rich. We consider the alternative possibility that the stars in NGC 6388 may span a range in [Fe/H]. Four candidate Population II Cepheids were also found. If they are members of the cluster, NGC 6388 would be the most metal-rich globular cluster to contain Population II Cepheids. The mean V magnitude of the RR Lyrae is found to be 16.85 +/- 0.05 resulting in a distance of 9.0 to 10.3 kpc, for a range of assumed values of (M(sub V)) for RR Lyrae. We determine the reddening of the cluster to be E(B - V) = 0.40 +/- 0.03 mag, with differential reddening across the face of the cluster. We discuss the difficulty in determining the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 due to the unusual nature of their RR Lyrae, and address evolutionary constraints on a recent suggestion that they are of Oosterhoff type II.

  18. Heavy metals contamination of soils surrounding waste deposits in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matache, M.; Rozylowicz, L.; Ropota, M.; Patroescu, C.

    2003-05-01

    Soils contamination with heavy metals is one of the most severe aspects of environmental pollution in Romania, independently of the origin sources (domestic or industrial activities) or type of disposal (organised landfill or hazardous deposits)[l-2]. This fact is the consequence of the poor state of the existing waste deposits in Romania and of the significant costs involved by the establishing of a new landfill according with the international regulations. The present study is trying to emphasise the contamination of soils surrounding different categories of waste deposits (sewage sludge ponds, domestic and industrial waste landfills, hillocks, sterile deposits) from various regions of Romania. Some case studies show a special interest being localise in a protected area (Iron Gates Natural Park). In order to quantify the concentration of metals like Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Mo in soil samples, analysis were performed using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Romanian standards were used as reference values[3].

  19. Photodissociation Studies of Metal-Containing Clusters and Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey Scott

    1995-01-01

    There have been two major areas of investigation for researchers working with laser ablation in molecular beams. The first area is the study of weakly-bound complexes. These complexes are bound by electrostatic interactions. In the present study the weakly bound interactions of the rare gases with the magnesium ion are investigated with electronic spectroscopy. The second major area is the study of metal and metal-containing clusters. Examples of previous investigations are the alkali metal clusters and the fullerenes. The present investigation is on metal -carbon clusters. The so-called metallo-carbohedrenes and metal-carbon nanocrystals are studied. Resonance enhanced photodissociation spectroscopy is used to obtain electronic excitation spectra of the Mg^+-rare gas species in the ultraviolet region. This investigation is facilitated by a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The interaction of the rare gas with the metal ion is attributed to a "solvation" of the atomic ion transition. Simple bonding arguments predict that the excited state is more bound than the ground state for these complexes. This will result in a shift of the complex vibronic origin to lower energy from the atomic ion transition. This is exactly what is observed in the experiment with progressively larger shifts for the heavier rare gases. The electronic excitation spectra allow the vibrational frequencies and anharmonicities for these complexes to be obtained for the excited state. In turn, the excited state bond dissociation energies can be determined. Finally, conservation of energy allows calculation of the ground state bond dissociation energies. In the metal-carbon systems the stability of the metallo-carbohedrene, met-car, stoichiometry is shown to extend into the transition period at least to the iron group. Photodissociation with a 532 nm laser causes a loss of metal atoms for met-cars formed with first row transition metals and a loss of metal-carbon units for met

  20. Atmospheric deposition of trace metals onto Massachusetts Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Golomb, D.; Ryan, D.; Eby, N.; Underhill, J.

    1997-12-31

    Wet and dry atmospheric deposition of trace metals was measured at biweekly intervals for one year, from 15 September 1992 to 16 September 1993, at two sites on Massachusetts Bay, Nahant, near Boston and Truro, near the tip of Cape Cod. Wet and dry deposition was measured using a conventional wet/dry collector, except that the dry bucket contained a layer of water in order to simulate the uptake of dry deposition onto a water surface. In addition, at Nahant, a dichotomous particle collector was used to measure metal concentrations on particles. Analytical methods were INAA and ICP-MS. Generally, dry deposition of metals was greater at Nahant than at Truro, and wet deposition was greater or equal at Truro than at Nahant. Averaging results from the two sites, the following deposition rates (wet + dry) were obtained for the Bay in {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}: Al 102000, As 132, Cd 405, Co 58, Cr 2700, Cu 3500, Fe 140000, Mn 4420, Ni 7200, Pb 2700, Sb 160, Se 264, Zn 7800.

  1. ELECTROCATALYSIS ON SURFACES MODIFIED BY METAL MONOLAYERS DEPOSITED AT UNDERPOTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    ADZIC,R.

    2000-12-01

    The remarkable catalytic properties of electrode surfaces modified by monolayer amounts of metal adatoms obtained by underpotential deposition (UPD) have been the subject of a large number of studies during the last couple of decades. This interest stems from the possibility of implementing strictly surface modifications of electrocatalysts in an elegant, well-controlled way, and these bi-metallic surfaces can serve as models for the design of new catalysts. In addition, some of these systems may have potential for practical applications. The UPD of metals, which in general involves the deposition of up to a monolayer of metal on a foreign substrate at potentials positive to the reversible thermodynamic potential, facilitates this type of surface modification, which can be performed repeatedly by potential control. Recent studies of these surfaces and their catalytic properties by new in situ surface structure sensitive techniques have greatly improved the understanding of these systems.

  2. Tetrathiomolybdate Inhibits Copper Trafficking Proteins Through Metal Cluster Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Hamsell M.; Xue, Yi; Robinson, Chandler D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Marvin, Rebecca G.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Mondragón, Alfonso; Penner-Hahn, James E.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2010-05-06

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is an orally active agent for treatment of disorders of copper metabolism. Here we describe how TM inhibits proteins that regulate copper physiology. Crystallographic results reveal that the surprising stability of the drug complex with the metallochaperone Atx1 arises from formation of a sulfur-bridged copper-molybdenum cluster reminiscent of those found in molybdenum and iron sulfur proteins. Spectroscopic studies indicate that this cluster is stable in solution and corresponds to physiological clusters isolated from TM-treated Wilson's disease animal models. Finally, mechanistic studies show that the drug-metallochaperone inhibits metal transfer functions between copper-trafficking proteins. The results are consistent with a model wherein TM can directly and reversibly down-regulate copper delivery to secreted metalloenzymes and suggest that proteins involved in metal regulation might be fruitful drug targets.

  3. Structure of fluorescent metal clusters on a DNA template.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovichev, A. A.; Sych, T. S.; Reveguk, Z. V.; Smirnova, A. A.; Maksimov, D. A.; Ramazanov, R. R.; Kononov, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    Luminescent metal clusters are a subject of growing interest in recent years due to their bright emission from visible to near infrared range. Detailed structure of the fluorescent complexes of Ag and other metal clusters with ligands still remains a challenging task. In this joint experimental and theoretical study we synthesized Ag-DNA complexes on a DNA oligonucleotide emitting in violet- green spectral range. The structure of DNA template was determined by means of various spectral measurements (CD, MS, XPS). Comparison of the experimental fluorescent excitation spectra and calculated absorption spectra for different QM/MM optimized structures allowed us to determine the detailed structure of the green cluster containing three silver atoms in the stem of the DNA hairpin structure stabilized by cytosine-Ag+-cytosine bonds.

  4. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses.

  5. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    SciTech Connect

    Maicu, Marina Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter; Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald; Hecker, Dominic

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  6. Molecular Models for DSMC Simulations of Metal Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2011-05-20

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied here to model the electron-beam (e-beam) physical vapor deposition of copper thin films. A suitable molecular model for copper-copper interactions have been determined based on comparisons with experiments for a 2D slit source. The model for atomic copper vapor is then used in axi-symmetric DSMC simulations for analysis of a typical e-beam metal deposition system with a cup crucible. The dimensional and non-dimensional mass fluxes obtained are compared for two different deposition configurations with non-uniformity as high as 40% predicted from the simulations.

  7. Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-03-01

    Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

  8. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-07-01

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated.

  9. Method for the preparation of protective coatings by low-temperature metal--organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloyeros, A.E.; Williams, W.S.; Constant, G.

    1988-07-01

    A simple and effective method is reported for the deposition of protective coatings of titanium carbide using low-temperature (as low as 150 /sup 0/C) metal--organic chemical vapor deposition. This method is based on the thermolysis of metal--organic molecules containing titanium and does not require the high temperature (<1100 /sup 0/C) involved in the standard TiC--CVD technique. Furthermore, the structure of the films produced (crystalline or amorphous) and their purity (inclusion of organic clusters or hydrogen) can be tailored easily by simple variations in the deposition parameters. This technique permits the coating of polymers and low-melting metals that are thermally too fragile for other deposition techniques. The process could be applied to produce films of other materials, e.g., niobium carbide, silicon carbide, titanium diboride, and gallium arsenide.

  10. Method of preparing size-selected metal clusters

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stair, Peter C.

    2010-05-11

    The invention provides a method for depositing catalytic clusters on a surface, the method comprising confining the surface to a controlled atmosphere; contacting the surface with catalyst containing vapor for a first period of time; removing the vapor from the controlled atmosphere; and contacting the surface with a reducing agent for a second period of time so as to produce catalyst-containing nucleation sites.

  11. Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Norton, David P.

    2001-01-01

    A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

  12. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  13. Developing gradient metal alloys through radial deposition additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels.

  14. Developing Gradient Metal Alloys through Radial Deposition Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R. Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  15. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Sanjubala Khanna, Shiv N.; Gruner, Markus E.; Entel, Peter

    2014-08-21

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM{sub 13} (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM{sub 13} clusters, Co{sub 13} is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe{sub 13} and Ni{sub 13} clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters.

  16. Valence bond cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Robert C.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1986-12-01

    We present results of cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding. Using the Generalized Valence Bond (GVB) method, we find a remarkable consistency in the behavoir of bonding orbitals for a variety of systems, including: LiH, CLi4, LiH4 and several hypervalent systems, such as SiH3Li2, SiH4Li2. Our results show that the metal-semiconductor bonding in these systems can be understood in terms of a pairing between McAdon-Goddard type metallic bonding orbitals and a set of equivalent orbitals of the non-metallic species. We propose that the results are relevant to the initial stages of alkali overlayer growth on semiconductor surfaces and lead to a simple picture of the bonding including the transition from a non-conducting to a conducting layer. We have considered numerous proposed hypervalent structures in light of the above results and find that they can be understood.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of Metal Oxide Thin Films on Metallic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi Abari, Ali

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful ultra-thin film deposition technique that uses sequential self-limiting surface reactions to provide conformal atomic scale film growth. Deposition of ALD films on many substrate systems has been studied before; however, limited data is available on deposition on metallic surfaces. The investigation of the growth of Al 2O3, HfO2, and ZrO2 as three technologically important metal oxides on metallic substrates is the subject of this thesis. Al2O3, HfO2, and ZrO2 films were grown by ALD on silicon, as a well-studied substrate, in different operating conditions to investigate the effect of process parameters on film properties. To study the growth of oxides on metals, thin metallic substrates were prepared by sputter deposition on silicon wafers and then were transferred to the ALD chamber where the film growth was monitored by in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The transfer was performed via a load lock system without breaking the vacuum to preserve the pristine metal surface. Formation of a thin interfacial layer of metal oxide was observed during the initial moments of plasma enhanced ALD, that was due to the exposure of metal surface to oxygen plasma. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to accurately measure the thickness change of the growing films including the interfacial layer. The thickness of this interfacial oxide layer depended on various process parameters including deposition temperature, order of precursors and plasma pulse length. The interfacial oxide layer was absent during the conventional thermal ALD. However, thermal ALD of oxides on metals exhibited substrate-inhibited growth, especially at higher deposition temperatures. With the knowledge of ALD growth characteristics on metals, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices were fabricated by both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD and electrically characterized. The presence of the interfacial oxide layer altered the device performance by changing the

  18. Adsorption of heavy metals by road deposited solids.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    The research study discussed in the paper investigated the adsorption/desorption behaviour of heavy metals commonly deposited on urban road surfaces, namely, Zn, Cu, Cr and Pb, for different particle size ranges of solids. The study outcomes, based on field studies and batch experiments, confirmed that road deposited solids particles contain a significantly high amount of vacant charge sites with the potential to adsorb additional heavy metals. Kinetic studies and adsorption experiments indicated that Cr is the most preferred metal element to associate with solids due to the relatively high electronegativity and high charge density of trivalent cation (Cr(3+)). However, the relatively low availability of Cr in the urban road environment could influence this behaviour. Comparing total adsorbed metals present in solids particles, it was found that Zn has the highest capacity for adsorption to solids. Desorption experiments confirmed that a low concentration of Cu, Cr and Pb in solids was present in water-soluble and exchangeable form, whilst a significant fraction of adsorbed Zn has a high likelihood of being released back into solution. Among heavy metals, Zn is considered to be the most commonly available metal among road surface pollutants.

  19. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  20. Deep Mixing and Metallicity in Globular Cluster Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a study of carbon depletion and deep mixing in globular cluster red giants across a wide range of metallicity. CH bandstrengths are measured from low-resolution (R 1000) spectra and converted to [C/Fe] abundances by comparisons with synthetic spectra. Although some models of deep mixing predict that its efficiency will be reduced at high metallicity, no sign of such a cutoff is seen in our data, which span the range -2.29 < [Fe/H] < -1.29.

  1. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  2. Atomic and electronic properties of neutral and cationic metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchin, Andrew Marc

    2000-10-01

    We find optimal atomic and electronic structures for neutral and singly, positively charged clusters of beryllium and beryllium-lithium (of the form BeLik) using density functional theory in the local spin density approximation. Ions are moved with a steepest descent method, and the electronic wave functions optimized using a fictitious dynamics with simulated annealing, as conceived by Car and Parrinello. Shell-like orbitals, filling angular momentum states in the order: 1s 2p 2s 1d, are obtained for the beryllium clusters. The same ordering is found for the BeLik clusters which indicates a departure from the ordering found in pure alkali clusters by the lowering of the 2s level to below the 1d level due to the larger electron affinity of the Be impurity. We similarly calculate an atomic basis to which we relate these shell-like orbitals, and employ a Mulliken population analysis to visualize how the atomic orbitals might hybridize to create them. This analysis also allows us to observe an increasingly metallic behavior with cluster size, by associating the electron density distribution, and in the case of a charged cluster, the distribution of the hole, with atomic sites, and with regions of overlap between atom pairs. We quantitatively show the increase in density associated with bonding as cluster size increases, and the tendency of the hole to distribute itself near the most exterior atomic sites in clusters of high symmetry. Our results are compared with the predictions of the shell/jellium model in the context of our calculated binding energies and ionization potentials.

  3. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  4. Innovations in laser cladding and direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Frank; Nowotny, Steffen; Leyens, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    The present paper reviews recent progress in productivity, precision and quality of laser-based cladding and additive layer manufacturing. Recently, we have demonstrated the great benefits obtained from induction assisted laser cladding. This novel hybrid technology combines high deposition rates with excellent cladding properties. Laser-based direct metal deposition is a novel concept for the fabrication of components and repair as well as geometrical surface modifications. Newly developed nozzle design allows focused powder spots to generate wall thicknesses of about 30 μm. An in-depth understanding of the processes and the resulting materials properties is key for the development of technically viable and economically reasonable customized solutions.

  5. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  6. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  7. The metal content of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6528

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Ortolani, S.; Renzini, A.; Bica, E.; Momany, Y.; Pasquini, L.; Minniti, D.; Rich, R. M.

    2004-08-01

    High resolution spectra of five stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6528 were obtained at the 8m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph. Out of the five stars, two of them showed evidence of binarity. The target stars belong to the horizontal and red giant branch stages, at 4000 < Tefflt; 4800 K. Multiband V, I, J, H, Ks photometry was used to derive initial effective temperatures and gravities. The main purpose of this study is the determination of metallicity and elemental ratios for this template bulge cluster, as a basis for the fundamental calibration of metal-rich populations. The present analysis provides a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.1±0.2 and the α-elements O, Mg and Si, show [α/Fe] ≈ +0.1, whereas Ca and Ti are around the solar value or below, resulting in an overall metallicity Z ≈ Z⊙. Observations collected both at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal and La Silla, Chile (ESO programme 65.L-0340) and with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by AURA Inc. under contract to NASA. Tables \\ref{targets}, \\ref{logobs}, \\ref{tablines} and Fig. \\ref{chart} are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  8. Evaluating the Metal Source(s) of Iron Oxide-Copper-Gold (IOCG) Deposits (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. C.; Bilenker, L.; Lundstrom, C.; Reich, M.; Barra, F.; Hanchar, J. M.; Westhues, A.

    2013-12-01

    Iron oxide - copper - gold deposits (IOCG) are characterized by high modal abundances of magnetite and/or hematite, ubiquitous and variable grades of Cu and Au, and, often, economic grades of other metals including REE, U, Ag, Mo and Zn. The largest deposits contain >1 billion tonnes of iron. There seems to be a general consensus that metals in IOCG deposits were transported by, and precipitated from, aqueous fluids. However, there is a lack of agreement for the source of the metal-bearing aqueous fluid(s) as well as the source of iron and other metals (i.e., magmatic or hydrothermal, or some combination of the two). Published fluid inclusion data indicate that metal-bearing aqueous fluids were trapped over a wide range of temperatures, with homogenization temperatures between 500 and 600 °C for inclusions associated with the precipitation of iron-oxide minerals, and between 300 and 500 °C for inclusions associated with main-stage sulfides (e.g., chalcopyrite, pyrite). The high trapping temperatures for fluid inclusions and the observation that some IOCG deposits appear to be related temporally and spatially to igneous intrusions, characteristics similar to those observed for porphyry-type ore deposits, have led some authors to propose that magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluids are responsible for IOCG formation. Others, however, favor a genetic model that invokes large-scale circulation of basinal brines, which are heated by magmatic intrusions and subsequently leach Fe and other metals from the crust. Evidence cited for this model includes the pervasive alkali metasomatism associated with some IOCG deposits, and the depletion of Fe, Cu and Au in some deposit wall rocks. Stable isotope evidence thus far is inconclusive. Published d34S values for IOCG deposits range from -30 to +30, but generally cluster around zero per mil. d18O ranges from ~0 to +10 per mil. Chlorine isotope values for fluids in inclusions liberated from quartz, calcite and apatite are

  9. Process for electrolytic deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1979-01-30

    A process for the electrolytic deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electrolytic plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article in the presence of an electrode receiving current.

  10. Process for electroless deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the electroless deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electroless plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article upon sufficient contact with the article.

  11. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters: an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal quantum clusters (NMQCs) are the missing link between isolated noble metal atoms and nanoparticles. NMQCs are sub-nanometer core sized clusters composed of a group of atoms, most often luminescent in the visible region, and possess intriguing photo-physical and chemical properties. A trend is observed in the use of ligands, ranging from phosphines to functional proteins, for the synthesis of NMQCs in the liquid phase. In this review, we briefly overview recent advancements in the synthesis of protein protected NMQCs with special emphasis on their structural and photo-physical properties. In view of the protein protection, coupled with direct synthesis and easy functionalization, this hybrid QC-protein system is expected to have numerous optical and bioimaging applications in the future, pointers in this direction are visible in the literature. PMID:22312454

  12. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca E-mail: whitmore@stsci.edu

    2009-09-15

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z {approx} M {sup 0.30{+-}}{sup 0.05}. No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  13. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  14. Controlled deposition of nanoparticle clusters by electrohydrodynamic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, S. N.; Edirisinghe, M. J.; Wang, D. Z.

    2004-11-01

    A suspension containing 20 nm silica particles in ethylene glycol was subjected to electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) in the stable cone-jet mode using a ring-shaped ground electrode. The droplets produced were sized by laser diffraction and were in the range 0.5-20 µm. Immediately after deposition, droplet relics were analysed by optical microscopy and were found to be in the size range 1-80 µm. Subsequently, using a pointed rod-electrode (rather than a ring), and by increasing the intensity of the electric field and by reducing the flow rate of suspension subjected to EHDA, relics of {\\sim }50~\\micmu {\\mathrm {m}} in size were deposited using a patterning device. In both of the above instances, the relics contained two distinct zones, an outer ring of ethylene glycol and a much smaller dense inner region of silica nanoparticles. These results show that, by using EHDA, a novel controlled deposition method of nanosuspensions has been developed.

  15. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397.

  16. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397. PMID:23903747

  17. Controlled Molten Metal Droplet Deposition for Net-Form Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Melissa; Michaelis, Matthew; Smith, Robert

    2001-11-01

    Molten metal droplets generated from capillary stream breakup are employed as the deposition element in a droplet-based net-form manufacturing technique that is under development at UCI. The metallic droplets are electrostatically charged at the time of generation and are subsequently deflected onto a substrate by passing them through an electric field. As a showcase to this new technique, we have employed various combinations of electrostatic charging and substrate motion in order to net-form manufacture rectangular components with both thick (2.8 mm) and thin (0.6 mm) walls, tubular components with clover cross-sections, and intriguing metallic braids up to 3.0 meters in length.

  18. The Sound Parameter Effect in Metal-Rich Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K

    1998-01-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope observations have found that the horizontal branches (HBs) in the metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 slope upward with decreasing B - V. Such a slope is not predicted by canonical HB models and cannot be produced by either a greater cluster age or enhanced mass loss along the red giant branch (RGB). The peculiar HB morphology in these clusters may provide an important clue for understanding the second-parameter effect. We have carried out extensive evolutionary calculations and numerical simulations in order to explore three noncanonical scenarios for explaining the sloped HBs in NGC 6388 and NGC 6441: (1) a high cluster helium abundance scenario, in which the HB evolution is characterized by long blue loops; (2) a rotation scenario, in which internal rotation during the RGB phase increases the HB core mass; and (3) a helium-mixing scenario, in which deep mixing on the RGB enhances the envelope helium abundance. All of these scenarios predict sloped HBs with anomalously bright RR Lyrae variables. We compare this prediction with the properties of the two known RR Lyrae variables in NGC 6388. Additional observational tests of these scenarios are suggested.

  19. Shell structure of magnesium and other divalent metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Diederich, Th.; Doeppner, T.; Fennel, Th.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2005-08-15

    Clusters of the divalent metals magnesium, cadmium, and zinc have been grown in ultracold helium nanodroplets and studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry, with a special emphasis on magnesium. The mass spectra of all materials show similar characteristic features independent of the chosen ionization technique - i.e., electron impact ionization as well as nanosecond and femtosecond multiphoton excitation. In the lower-size range the abundance distributions can be explained by an electronic shell structure. The associated electron delocalization - i.e., metallic bonding - is found to set in at about N=20 atoms. For Mg{sub N} we have resolved crossings of electronic levels at the highest-occupied molecular orbital which result in additional magic numbers compared to the alkali metals: e.g., Mg{sub 40} with 80 electrons. This specific electronic shell structure is also present in the intensity pattern of doubly charged Mg{sub N}. For larger clusters (N{>=}92) a coexistence of electronic shell effects and geometrical packing is observed and a clear signature of icosahedral structure is present beyond N{>=}147.

  20. Statistical sampling of the distribution of uranium deposits using geologic/geographic clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finch, W.I.; Grundy, W.D.; Pierson, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of geologic/geographic clusters was developed particularly to study grade and tonnage models for sandstone-type uranium deposits. A cluster is a grouping of mined as well as unmined uranium occurrences within an arbitrary area about 8 km across. A cluster is a statistical sample that will reflect accurately the distribution of uranium in large regions relative to various geologic and geographic features. The example of the Colorado Plateau Uranium Province reveals that only 3 percent of the total number of clusters is in the largest tonnage-size category, greater than 10,000 short tons U3O8, and that 80 percent of the clusters are hosted by Triassic and Jurassic rocks. The distributions of grade and tonnage for clusters in the Powder River Basin show a wide variation; the grade distribution is highly variable, reflecting a difference between roll-front deposits and concretionary deposits, and the Basin contains about half the number in the greater-than-10,000 tonnage-size class as does the Colorado Plateau, even though it is much smaller. The grade and tonnage models should prove useful in finding the richest and largest uranium deposits. ?? 1992 Oxford University Press.

  1. Multiple populations in more metal-rich galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria J.

    In this thesis we present chemical abundances for bright stars in the intermediate metallicity globular cluster (GC) M5, and the relatively metal-rich GCs M71 and 47 Tuc with the goal of improving the understanding of chemical evolution in the metallicity regime sampled by these three GCs. The first chapter presents a brief historical overview in light element abundance variations in globular clusters. In the second chapter we present the results obtained for 47 Tuc, the most-metal rich cluster of my sample. 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since it is the closest massive GC. Chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu were determined for 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The average [Fe/H]= --0.79+/-0.09 dex is consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ~ --0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields

  2. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: Metallicity and plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang Chaofan; Svensson, Svante; Maartensson, Nils; Bjoerneholm, Olle; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2012-05-28

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with {approx}3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  3. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: metallicity and plasmons.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang, Chaofan; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Svensson, Svante; Mårtensson, Nils; Björneholm, Olle

    2012-05-28

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with ∼3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  4. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: Metallicity and plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang, Chaofan; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Svensson, Svante; Mârtensson, Nils; Björneholm, Olle

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with ˜3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  5. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  6. Supergene processes on ore deposits - a source of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Martycak, K.; Zeman, J.; Vacek-Vesely, M.

    1994-03-01

    The study of supergene processes (i.e., secondary processes running in ore deposits and driven by thermodynamic nonequilibrium between ore- and rock-forming minerals and natural waters, gasses, etc.) is important in order to understand the migration of heavy metals from ore into their adjacent surroundings. The contamination of the local environment can be characterized by the composition of pore waters. The Pb-Zn-Cu ore deposits of Zlate Hory (Czech Republic) have been chosen for a detailed study of pore solutions. A simple model has been created to describe the evolution of supergene processes in the ore deposits. This model is based on the determination of chemical composition of pore solutions. The dilution of pore solutions of such mineral deposits results in acid mine drainage. Pore solutions can have, during specific stages of their evolution, relatively high concentrations of Cu (0.09 mol/kg), Zn (0.1 mol/kg), SO{sub 4} (0.8 mol/kg) and an extremely low pH (1.38). The supergene alteration of pyrite is the most important process determining the character of pore water. This reaction causes significant acidification and is a leading source of acid mine drainage. The leached zone originates from the interaction of pyrite and limonite. Increased concentrations of heavy metals and sulfates occur in pore waters. The dynamic composition of pore waters within ore deposits undergoing the supergene process can be used to distinguish: (1) three main zones - limonite, transition, and primary zone and (2) two areas - an area with the highest intensity of weathering processes and an area of weathering initiation. In these areas the rate of sulfide oxidation is higher as a result of low pH. From the study of these zones and areas we can further our knowledge of ore body, pore solution, acid mine drainage, and contamination of the local environment. 32 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Superatoms and Metal-Semiconductor Motifs for Cluster Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A. W.

    2013-10-11

    A molecular understanding of catalysis and catalytically active materials is of fundamental importance in designing new substances for applications in energy and fuels. We have performed reactivity studies and ultrafast ionization and coulomb explosion studies on a variety of catalytically-relevant materials, including transition metal oxides of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ti, V, Nb, and Ta. We demonstrate that differences in charge state, geometry, and elemental composition of clusters of such materials determine chemical reactivity and ionization behavior, crucial steps in improving performance of catalysts.

  8. Quantum chemical simulations of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides and metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye

    Scaling of SiO2 gate dielectrics to extend the miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices in accordance with Moore's Law has resulted in unacceptable tunneling current leakage levels. The projection that this challenge could significantly limit CMOS performance has prompted the intense search for alternative gate dielectric materials that can achieve high capacitances with physically thicker films which minimize tunneling leakage current. Atomic layer deposition is an ideal deposition method for high-k films because it controls the film thickness with atomic layer precision and can achieve high film conformality and uniformity. We use density functional theory (DFT) to explore chemical reactions involved in ALD processes at the atomic level. We have investigated different metal precursors for ALD process. Compared to halides, metal alkylamides are more favorable on nitrided silicon surfaces and subsequent film growth. Likewise, hafnium alkylamide is more favorable than water to initiate the nucleation on hydrogen terminated silicon surfaces. For deposition on organic self-assembled monolayers, different end groups significantly affect the selectivity towards ALD reactions. The chemical mechanisms involved in ALD of hafnium nitride, aluminum nitride are developed which provide an understanding to the difficulty in producing oxygen free metal nitrides by ALD. By combining ALD of metal oxide and metal nitride, a new method for incorporating nitrogen into oxide films is proposed. In TMA and ozone reaction, it's found that by-product water can be a catalyzer for this reaction.

  9. Nearby Spiral Galaxy Globular Cluster Systems. II. Globular Cluster Metallicities in NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantais, Julie B.; Huchra, John P.; Barmby, Pauline; Olsen, Knut A. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present new metallicity estimates for globular cluster (GC) candidates in the Sd spiral NGC 300, one of the nearest spiral galaxies outside the Local Group. We have obtained optical spectroscopy for 44 Sculptor Group GC candidates with the Boller and Chivens (B&C) spectrograph on the Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. There are two GCs in NGC 253 and 12 objects in NGC 300 with globular-cluster-like spectral features, nine of which have radial velocities above 0 km s-1. The remaining three, due to their radial velocities being below the expected 95% confidence limit for velocities of NGC 300 halo objects, are flagged as possible foreground stars. The non-cluster-like candidates included 13 stars, 15 galaxies, and an H II region. One GC, four galaxies, two stars, and the H II region from our sample were identified in archival Hubble Space Telescope images. For the GCs, we measure spectral indices and estimate metallicities using an empirical calibration based on Milky Way GCs. The GCs of NGC 300 appear similar to those of the Milky Way. Excluding possible stars and including clusters from the literature, the GC system (GCS) has a velocity dispersion of 68 km s-1 and has no clear evidence of rotation. The mean metallicity for our full cluster sample plus one literature object is [Fe/H] = -0.94, lying above the relationship between mean GC metallicity and overall galaxy luminosity. Excluding the three low-velocity candidates, we obtain a mean [Fe/H] = -0.98, still higher than expected, raising the possibility of significant foreground star contamination even in this sample. Visual confirmation of genuine GCs using high-resolution space-based imagery could greatly reduce the potential problem of interlopers in small samples of GCSs in low-radial-velocity galaxies. Data for this project were obtained at the Baade 6.5 m telescope, Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint

  10. Cotton fabrics with UV blocking properties through metal salts deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Hossam E.; Bechtold, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to sunlight is important for human health as this increases the resistance to diverse pathogens, but the higher doses cause skin problems and diseases. Hence, wearing of sunlight protective fabrics displays a good solution for people working in open atmosphere. The current study offered quite simple and technically feasible ways to prepare good UV protection fabrics based on cotton. Metal salts including Zn, Cu and Ti were immobilized into cotton and oxidized cotton fabrics by using pad-dry-cure technique. Metal contents on fabrics were determined by AAS; the highest metal content was recorded for Cu-fabric and it was 360.6 mmol/kg after treatment of oxidized cotton with 0.5 M of copper nitrate. Ti contents on fabrics were ranged between 168.0 and 200.8 mmol/kg and it showed the lowest release as only 38.1-46.4% leached out fabrics after five laundry washings. Metal containing deposits were specified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. UV-transmission radiation over treated fabrics was measured and ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) was calculated. UPF was enhanced after treatment with Cu and Ti salts to be 11.6 and 14, respectively. After five washings, the amount of metal (Cu or Ti) retained indicates acceptable laundering durability.

  11. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  12. Critical Metals In Western Arctic Ocean Ferromanganese Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. R.; Spinardi, F.; Conrad, T. A.; Conrad, J. E.; Genetti, J.

    2013-12-01

    Little exploration for minerals has occurred in the Arctic Ocean due to ice cover and the remote location. Small deposits of seafloor massive sulfides that are rich in copper and zinc occur on Gakkel Ridge, which extends from Greenland to the Laptev Sea, and on Kolbeinsey and Mohns ridges, both located between Greenland and mainland Europe. However, rocks were recently collected by dredge along the western margin of the Canada Basin as part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) program north of Alaska. Sample sites include steep escarpments on the Chukchi Borderland, a newly discovered seamount informally named Healy seamount, the southern part of Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge, and several basement outcrops in Nautilus Basin. These dredge hauls yielded three types of metal-rich mineralized deposits: ferromanganese crusts, ferromanganese nodules, and hydrothermal iron and manganese deposits. Chemical analyses of 43 crust and nodule samples show high contents of many critical metals needed for high-technology, green-technology, and energy and military applications, including cobalt (to 0.3 wt.%), vanadium (to 0.12 wt.%), zirconium (to 459 grams/tonne=ppm), molybdenum (to 453 g/t), the rare-earth elements (including scandium and yttrium; yttrium to 229 g/t), lithium (to 205 g/t), tungsten (to 64 g/t), and gallium (to 26 g/t). The metal contents of these Arctic Ocean crusts and nodules are comparable to those found throughout the global ocean, however, these Arctic Ocean samples are the first that have been found to be enriched in rare metal scandium. The metal contents of these samples indicate a diagenetic component. Crusts typically form by precipitation of metal oxides solely from seawater (hydrogenetic) onto rock surfaces producing a pavement, whereas nodules form by accretion of metal oxides, from both seawater and pore waters (diagenetic), around a nucleus on the surface of soft sediment. The best evidence for this diagenetic input to the crusts is that crusts

  13. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestà, Alessandro; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO2) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  14. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, Alessandro E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it

    2015-12-21

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO{sub 2}) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  15. Latent fingerprint visualization using a scanning Kelvin probe in conjunction with vacuum metal deposition.

    PubMed

    Dafydd, Hefin; Williams, Geraint; Bleay, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The application of vacuum metal deposition before scanning Kelvin probe visualization of fingerprints is investigated. The potential contrast between fingerprint ridges and furrows is maximized by the use of silver deposition for non-noble metals and gold-zinc deposition for noble metals. The higher susceptibility of eccrine fingerprints to vacuum metal overdeposition is confirmed. Additionally, fingerprints are best developed individually and by building the metal deposition slowly to protect against overdevelopment and variation in the rate of metal condensation. The progress of the metal deposition can be monitored using the scanning Kelvin probe by reference to the change in potential and continuity of the new potential on the surface. The use of acetic acid solution for the recovery of overVMD-developed samples is shown not to be useful. Applying the metal deposition has the additional prospect of increasing surface conductivity and homogeneity and both can aid fingerprint visualization using the scanning Kelvin probe.

  16. Volatile metal deposits on lunar soils: Relation to volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Allen, R. O., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1977-01-01

    Parallel leaching and volatilization experiments conducted on lunar samples and similar experiments on sphalerite do not supply the information needed to resolve the question of the chemical nature of pb 204, Zn, Bi and Tl deposits on lunar soil surfaces. It is proposed that in Apollo 17 mare and terra soils and fractions of pb 204, Zn and Tl that are insoluble under mild, hot pH 5HNO3, leaching conditions and involatile at 600 C were originally surface deposits which became immobilized by migration into the silicate substrate or by chemisorption. Only Bi is predominantly indigenous. The implication is also that the soils over their respective times of evolution were exposed to heavy metal vapors or that an episodic exposure occurred after they had evolved. A sequence of events is proposed to account for orange 74220 and black 74001 glasses by lava fountaining and for soil 74241 as tephra from an explosive volcanic eruption.

  17. Deposition and Characterization of Thin Films on Metallic Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatica, Jorge E.

    2005-01-01

    A CVD method was successfully developed to produce conversion coatings on aluminum alloys surfaces with reproducible results with a variety of precursors. A well defined protocol to prepare the precursor solutions formulated in a previous research was extended to other additives. It was demonstrated that solutions prepared following such a protocol could be used to systematically generate protective coatings onto aluminum surfaces. Experiments with a variety of formulations revealed that a refined deposition protocol yields reproducible conversion coatings of controlled composition. A preliminary correlation between solution formulations and successful precursors was derived. Coatings were tested for adhesion properties enhancement for commercial paints. A standard testing method was followed and clear trends were identified. Only one precursors was tested systematically. Anticipated work on other precursors should allow a better characterization of the effect of intermetallics on the production of conversion/protective coatings on metals and ceramics. The significance of this work was the practical demonstration that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques can be used to systematically generate protective/conversion coating on non-ferrous surfaces. In order to become an effective approach to replace chromate-based pre- treatment processes, namely in the aerospace or automobile industry, the process parameters must be defined more precisely. Moreover, the feasibility of scale-up designs necessitates a more comprehensive characterization of the fluid flow, transport phenomena, and chemical kinetics interacting in the process. Kinetic characterization showed a significantly different effect of magnesium-based precursors when compared to iron-based precursors. Future work will concentrate on refining the process through computer simulations and further experimental studies on the effect of other transition metals to induce deposition of conversion/protective films

  18. Growth of cluster assembled ZnO film by nanocluster beam deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, Nilanjan

    2015-06-24

    ZnO is considered as one of the most promising material for optoelectronic devices. The present work emphasizes production of cluster assembled ZnO films by a UHV nanocluster beam deposition technique where the nanoclusters were produced in a laser vaporization cluster source. The microstructural and the optical properties of the ZnO nanocluster film deposited were investigated. As the wet chemical processes are not compatible with current solid state methods of device fabrication, therefore alternative UHV technique described in the paper is the need of the hour.

  19. Deposition of Metal Oxide Films from Metal-EDTA Complexes by Flame Spray Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sekiya, Tetsuo; Toyama, Ayumu; Hasebe, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Atsushi; Noguchi, Masahiro; Li, Yu; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    R2O3 (R = Y, Eu, Er) metal oxides were synthesized from metal-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) complexes using a flame spray technique. As this technique enables high deposition rates, films with thickness of several tens of micrometers were obtained. Films of yttria, europia, and erbia phase were synthesized on stainless-steel substrates with reaction assistance by H2-O2 combustion gas. The oxide films consisted of the desired crystalline phase with micropores. The porosity of the films was in the range of 6-15%, varying with the metal used. These results suggest that the true density of the metal oxide obtained from metal-EDTA powder through the thermal reaction process plays an important role in achieving film with the desired porosity.

  20. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  1. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-17

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  2. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  3. Clusters for biology: immobilization of proteins by size-selected metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; Xirouchaki, C.; Palmer, R. E.; Heath, J. K.; Jones, C. H.

    2004-03-01

    Lateral features of size 1-10 nm are created on graphite, using an RF magnetron gas-condensation cluster beam deposition source. Specifically, size-selected gold clusters, Au55+ and Au70+, are pinned to the graphite surface, in order to explore the immobilization of protein molecules. Refined sample preparation protocols enable the utilization of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to visualize two proteins, histidine affinity tagged green fluorescent protein (pHAT-GFP) and Human Oncostatin M, both in air, and in physiological buffer solution, which mimics their natural environment. Both protein islands (complexes) and individual (or a few) protein molecules are identified. The impetus for single molecule science studies lies in the possible observation of the structural conformation changes of proteins as they perform their individual functions in their native environments. The manner in which specific proteins organize themselves spatially is a key consideration in understanding how they function, e.g., in disease control. The cluster approach creates sufficiently dilute arrays of truly nanoscale features that single molecule optical experiments may also be feasible in the future. Experiments on the re-usability of the nanocluster films provide further proof of the resilience and versatility of this type of nanostructured surface for protein immobilization work.

  4. Influence of metal-support interaction on the surface structure of gold nanoclusters deposited on native SiO(x)/Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Portale, Giuseppe; Sciortino, Luisa; Albonetti, Cristiano; Giannici, Francesco; Martorana, Antonino; Bras, Wim; Biscarini, Fabio; Longo, Alessandro

    2014-04-14

    The structure of small gold nanoclusters (around 2.5 nm) deposited on different silica-on-silicon (SiOx/Si) substrates is investigated using several characterization techniques (AFM, XRD, EXAFS and GISAXS). The grain morphology and the surface roughness of the deposited gold cluster layers are determined by AFM. The in-plane GISAXS intensity is modelled in order to obtain information about the cluster size and the characteristic length scale of the surface roughness. The surface morphology of the deposited clusters depends on whether the native defect-rich (n-SiOx/Si) or the defect-poor substrate obtained by thermal treatment (t-SiO2/Si) is used. Gold clusters show a stronger tendency to aggregate when deposited on n-SiOx/Si, resulting in films characterized by a larger grain dimension (around 20 nm) and by a higher surface roughness (up to 5 nm). The more noticeable cluster aggregation on n-SiOx/Si substrates is explained in terms of metal-support interaction mediated by the defects located on the surface of the native silica substrate. Evidence of metal-support interaction is provided by EXAFS, demonstrating the existence of an Au-O distance for clusters deposited on n-SiOx/Si that is not found on t-SiO2/Si.

  5. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  6. The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds. Progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper reports results on the following five studies: (1) The activation of tertiary amines by osmium cluster complexes; (2) Nucleophilic ring opening of thietane ligand in metal carbonyl cluster complexes; (3) Ring opening of a nitrogen containing strained ring heterocycle by an osmium cluster complex; (4) Insertion of an alkynes into a metal-metal bond -- evidence for an intramolecular insertion with a trans-stereochemistry; and (5) Cyclobutyne -- the ligand. Plans for future research are also briefly discussed. Two studies are planned: (1) studies of the synthesis and reactivity of strained ring ligands in metal cluster compounds; and (2) studies of the reactivity of dimetallic complexes with alkynes.

  7. Synthesis and reactivities of cubane-type sulfido clusters containing noble metals.

    PubMed

    Hidai, M; Kuwata, S; Mizobe, Y

    2000-01-01

    Cubane-type sulfido clusters containing noble metals are newcomers compared with the corresponding clusters of the first transition series metals and molybdenum, which have been extensively studied in relation to metalloenzymes and industrial hydrodesulfurization catalysts. This Account reviews the recent progress in studies on the synthesis and reactivities of these noble metal cubane-type clusters. One of the goals in this new area lies in development of the unique catalysis of the noble metals embedded in the robust and redox-active cubane-type cores. Rational synthetic approaches indispensable to the preparation of such effective cluster catalysts are discussed to a significant extent.

  8. Characteristic properties of the Casimir free energy for metal films deposited on metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Casimir free energy and pressure of thin metal films deposited on metallic plates are considered using the Lifshitz theory and the Drude and plasma model approaches to the role of conduction electrons. The bound electrons are taken into account by using the complete optical data of film and plate metals. It is shown that for films of several tens of nanometers thickness the Casimir free energy and pressure calculated using these approaches differ by hundreds and thousands percent and can be easily discriminated experimentally. According to our results, the free energy of a metal film does not vanish in the limiting case of ideal metal if the Drude model approach is used in contradiction with the fact that the fluctuating field cannot penetrate in its interior. Numerical computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure of Ag and Au films deposited on Cu and Al plates have been performed using both theoretical approaches. It is shown that the free energy of a film can be both negative and positive depending on the metals used. For a Au film on a Ag plate and vice versa the Casimir energy of a film changes its sign with increasing film thickness. Applications of the obtained results for resolving the Casimir puzzle and the problem of stability of thin films are discussed.

  9. Hydrothermal-electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphates on various metals.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Matsuo, K; Mizutani, N; Hasegawa, J

    1999-09-01

    Calcium phosphates were formed on five kinds of substrate metals using a hydrothermal-electrochemical method in an autoclave with two electrodes. The electrolyte dissolving NaCl, K2HPO4, CaCl2.2H2O, tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane, and hydrochloric acid was maintained at 100 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 200 degrees C. The counter electrode, the anode, was platinum plate, 20 x 20 x 0.5 mm, and the working electrodes as cathode were pure titanium, pure zinc, pure nickel, pure iron, and stainless steel plates. A constant direct current at 12.5 mA/cm2 was loaded for 1 hr. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] only deposited at three temperatures on pure titanium plate. On pure zinc plate, both parascholzite [CaZn2(PO4)2.2H2O] and hydroxyapatite were formed at 150 degrees C and both parascholzite and ZnO were formed at 200 degrees C. Both hydroxyapatite and beta-TCP [beta-Ca3(PO4)2] were formed on pure nickel, pure iron, and stainless steel plates at 200 degrees C. It seems that the incorporation of the metal ions released from the electrode decreased the Ca/P ratio of the deposit due to the formation of other compounds except hydroxyapatite.

  10. Analysis and assessment on heavy metal sources in the coastal soils developed from alluvial deposits using multivariate statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinling; He, Ming; Han, Wei; Gu, Yifan

    2009-05-30

    An investigation on heavy metal sources, i.e., Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and Cd in the coastal soils of Shanghai, China, was conducted using multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis, clustering analysis, and correlation analysis). All the results of the multivariate analysis showed that: (i) Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd had anthropogenic sources (e.g., overuse of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, industrial and municipal discharges, animal wastes, sewage irrigation, etc.); (ii) Zn and Cr were associated with parent materials and therefore had natural sources (e.g., the weathering process of parent materials and subsequent pedo-genesis due to the alluvial deposits). The effect of heavy metals in the soils was greatly affected by soil formation, atmospheric deposition, and human activities. These findings provided essential information on the possible sources of heavy metals, which would contribute to the monitoring and assessment process of agricultural soils in worldwide regions. PMID:18976857

  11. Analysis and assessment on heavy metal sources in the coastal soils developed from alluvial deposits using multivariate statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinling; He, Ming; Han, Wei; Gu, Yifan

    2009-05-30

    An investigation on heavy metal sources, i.e., Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and Cd in the coastal soils of Shanghai, China, was conducted using multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis, clustering analysis, and correlation analysis). All the results of the multivariate analysis showed that: (i) Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd had anthropogenic sources (e.g., overuse of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, industrial and municipal discharges, animal wastes, sewage irrigation, etc.); (ii) Zn and Cr were associated with parent materials and therefore had natural sources (e.g., the weathering process of parent materials and subsequent pedo-genesis due to the alluvial deposits). The effect of heavy metals in the soils was greatly affected by soil formation, atmospheric deposition, and human activities. These findings provided essential information on the possible sources of heavy metals, which would contribute to the monitoring and assessment process of agricultural soils in worldwide regions.

  12. Probing the History of Galaxy Clusters with Metallicity and Entropy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkholy, Tamer Yohanna

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects found today in our Universe. The gas they contain, the intra-cluster medium (ICM), is heated to temperatures in the approximate range of 1 to 10 keV, and thus emits X-ray radiation. Studying the ICM through the spatial and spectral analysis of its emission returns the richest information about both the overall cosmological context which governs the formation of clusters, as well as the physical processes occurring within. The aim of this thesis is to learn about the history of the physical processes that drive the evolution of galaxy clusters, through careful, spatially resolved measurements of their metallicity and entropy content. A sample of 45 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy and metallicity profiles. The entropy profiles are computed to larger radial extents than in previous Chandra analyses. The results of this analysis are made available to the scientific community in an electronic database. Comparing metallicity and entropy in the outskirts of clusters, we find no signature on the entropy profiles of the ensemble of supernovae that produced the observed metals. In the centers of clusters, we find that the metallicities of high-mass clusters are much less dispersed than those of low-mass clusters. A comparison of metallicity with the regularity of the X-ray emission morphology suggests that metallicities in low-mass clusters are more susceptible to increase from violent events such as mergers. We also find that the variation in the stellar-to-gas mass ratio as a function of cluster mass can explain the variation of central metallicity with cluster mass, only if we assume that there is a constant level of metallicity for clusters of all masses, above which the observed galaxies add more metals in proportion to their mass. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  13. Vapor phase deposition of transition metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Brigitte; Jacoboni, Charles

    1991-08-01

    Multicomponent fluoride glasses in the PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3 (PZG) vitreous ternary system have been prepared by vapor phase deposition. The thermal stability of the deposited glass was improved by adding stabilizing agents (AlF3, NaF, LiF, InF3). The thin films, deposited on different substrates (fluoride glass, fluoride single crystal, metal, and silica glass) have been characterized by x-ray diffraction. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The quality of the film, adherence, and homogeneity was controlled by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The optical characteristics of the film and PZG glass are given: the visible-infrared (VIS-IR) window is 0.3-8 micrometers and the refractive index 1.59+/- 0.2 depends on the lead content. Mn2+ doped films (up to 3 mole % MnF2) are optically active: Mn2+ exhibits a broad luminescence band at 560-570 nm (orange). The achieved film thickness varies from 0.5 to 80 micrometers , and the refractive index gradient approaches the required geometry for planar waveguides (doping of the film with lanthanides is in progress).

  14. Volatile metal deposits on lunar soils - Relation to volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.; Allen, R. O., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Parallel leaching and volatilization experiments conducted on lunar samples and similar experiments on sphalerite do not supply the information needed to resolve the question of the chemical nature of Pb-204, Zn, Bi, and Tl deposits on lunar soil surfaces. It is proposed that in Apollo 17 mare and terra soils the fractions of Pb-204, Zn, and Tl that are insoluble under mild, hot pH 5 HNO3, leaching conditions and involatile at 600 C were originally surface deposits which became immobilized by migration into the silicate substrate or by chemisorption. Most of the Bi does not seem to be the result of such a deposit. The implication is also that the soils, over their respective times of evolution, were exposed to heavy metal vapors or that an episodic exposure occurred after they had evolved. A sequence of events is proposed to account for orange 74220 and black 74001 glasses by lava fountaining and for soil 74241 as tephra from an explosive volcanic eruption.

  15. Atomically precise arrays of fluorescent silver clusters: a modular approach for metal cluster photonics on DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle E; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-03-24

    The remarkable precision that DNA scaffolds provide for arraying nanoscale optical elements enables optical phenomena that arise from interactions of metal nanoparticles, dye molecules, and quantum dots placed at nanoscale separations. However, control of ensemble optical properties has been limited by the difficulty of achieving uniform particle sizes and shapes. Ligand-stabilized metal clusters offer a route to atomically precise arrays that combine desirable attributes of both metals and molecules. Exploiting the unique advantages of the cluster regime requires techniques to realize controlled nanoscale placement of select cluster structures. Here we show that atomically monodisperse arrays of fluorescent, DNA-stabilized silver clusters can be realized on a prototypical scaffold, a DNA nanotube, with attachment sites separated by <10 nm. Cluster attachment is mediated by designed DNA linkers that enable isolation of specific clusters prior to assembly on nanotubes and preserve cluster structure and spectral purity after assembly. The modularity of this approach generalizes to silver clusters of diverse sizes and DNA scaffolds of many types. Thus, these silver cluster nano-optical elements, which themselves have colors selected by their particular DNA templating oligomer, bring unique dimensions of control and flexibility to the rapidly expanding field of nano-optics.

  16. All-metal clusters that mimic the chemistry of halogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianshan; Li, Yawei; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2013-10-01

    Owing to their s(2)p(5) electronic configuration, halogen atoms are highly electronegative and constitute the anionic components of salts. Whereas clusters that contain no halogen atoms, such as AlH(4), mimic the chemistry of halogens and readily form salts (e.g., Na(+)(AlH(4))(-)), clusters that are solely composed of metal atoms and yet behave in the same manner as a halogen are rare. Because coinage-metal atoms (Cu, Ag, and Au) only have one valence electron in their outermost electronic shell, as in H, we examined the possibility that, on interacting with Al, in particular as AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag, Au), these metal atoms may exhibit halogen-like properties. By using density functional theory, we show that AlAu(4) not only mimics the chemistry of halogens, but also, with a vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 3.98 eV in its anionic form, is a superhalogen. Similarly, analogous to XHX superhalogens (X=F, Cl, Br), XAuX species with VDEs of 4.65, 4.50, and 4.34 eV in their anionic form, respectively, also form superhalogens. In addition, Au can also form hyperhalogens, a recently discovered species that show electron affinities (EAs) that are even higher than those of their corresponding superhalogen building blocks. For example, the VDEs of M(AlAu(4))(2)(-) (M=Na and K) and anionic (FAuF)Au(FAuF) range from 4.06 to 5.70 eV. Au-based superhalogen anions, such as AlAu(4)(-) and AuF(2)(-), have the additional advantage that they exhibit wider optical absorption ranges than their H-based analogues, AlH(4)(-) and HF(2)(-). Because of the catalytic properties and the biocompatibility of Au, Au-based superhalogens may be multifunctional. However, similar studies that were carried out for Cu and Ag atoms have shown that, unlike AlAu(4), AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag) clusters are not superhalogens, a property that can be attributed to the large EA of the Au atom.

  17. Microplasma synthesis of sub-5 nm metal clusters: A novel platform for study and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan

    2013-09-01

    Homogeneous, gas-phase nucleation of particles in reactive plasmas is well known. Dust formation in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes is undesired and can lead to deleterious effects on device fabrication and performance. Recently, plasma systems have been developed to purposefully synthesize nanoparticles for technological applications. The advantage of plasmas over other chemical methods include the high purity, uniformity of particle size, and the possibility of accessing unique chemistries through the non-equilibrium environment. In this talk, I will present our contribution to this rapidly emerging field: the development of a new class of atmospheric-pressure, low-temperature microplasma systems that enables the synthesis of unagglomerated, sub-5 nm particles in a single step. The synthesis of clusters in this size range is of current interest for the study and discovery of novel nanomaterials. To illustrate this point, two examples will be presented. One, clusters of Ni, Fe, and other metals are produced from their corresponding organometallic precursors. Alloys with precisely controlled compositions are also obtained by tuning the relative amount of the precursors in the plasma phase. The availability of metal clusters with well-defined size and composition has allowed us to systematically study carbon nanotube nucleation and growth, and relate the properties of the catalyst to the as-grown tube diameter and chirality. Two, we have carried out studies of carbon cluster formation and observed the presence of diamond-phase carbon. The nucleation of diamond at near ambient conditions supports theoretical predictions of the stability of sp3 diamond over sp2 carbon and suggests a potential route for their existence in the cosmos. NSF Award No. CBET-0746821 and AFOSR Award No. FA9550-10-1-0160.

  18. Visible photoluminescence of the deposited germanium-oxide prepared from clusters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, Yuichi; Nagao, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kamei, Shinichi; Kaya, Koji

    2000-11-01

    Optical properties of the deposited germanium-oxide (Ge-O) prepared from the laser ablation of GeO2 were investigated. When the GenOm clusters, having the compositions mainly at n=m, were deposited onto a substrate as a precursor, strong visible photoluminescence peaked at 500 nm was observed under the excitation of 325 nm laser light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for the deposited Ge-O on the substrate consistently shows the substantial component of the oxidation state of Ge2+, which shows the contributions from 1:1 composition of Ge2+-O2-. Correspondingly, the electronic structures of the germanium-oxide cluster were studied by using photoelectron spectroscopy in gas phase. Our developed method of the halogen atom doping enables us to determine the highest occupied molecular orbital-the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap of the corresponding neutral GenOn clusters experimentally, and it was found that the gap of the GenOn (n=2-5) clusters reasonably corresponds to the energy of the visible light. These results imply that the GenOn clusters can be ascribed to the origin of the visible photoluminescence.

  19. High-dispersion spectroscopy of giants in metal-poor globular clusters. I - Iron abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minniti, Dante; Geisler, Doug; Peterson, Ruth C.; Claria, Juan J.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, high-SNR CCD spectra have been obtained for 16 giants in eight metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. Fe abundances accurate to 0.15 dex have been determined by a fully consistent set of model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis techniques. A metallicity scale is presented for metal-poor clusters that should prove useful for calibrating a wide variety of photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic metallicity indicators.

  20. Permanent excimer superstructures by supramolecular networking of metal quantum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Prato, Mirko; Erratico, Silvia; Campione, Marcello; Lorenzi, Roberto; Pedrini, Jacopo; Santambrogio, Carlo; Torrente, Yvan; De Angelis, Filippo; Meinardi, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Excimers are evanescent quasi-particles that typically form during collisional intermolecular interactions and exist exclusively for their excited-state lifetime. We exploited the distinctive structure of metal quantum clusters to fabricate permanent excimer-like colloidal superstructures made of ground-state noninteracting gold cores, held together by a network of hydrogen bonds between their capping ligands. This previously unknown aggregation state of matter, studied through spectroscopic experiments and ab initio calculations, conveys the photophysics of excimers into stable nanoparticles, which overcome the intrinsic limitation of excimers in single-particle applications—that is, their nearly zero formation probability in ultra-diluted solutions. In vitro experiments demonstrate the suitability of the superstructures as nonresonant intracellular probes and further reveal their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, which enhances their potential as anticytotoxic agents for biomedical applications.

  1. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. PMID:25706750

  2. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection.

  3. Electrochemical deposition of highly-conducting metal dithiolene films.

    PubMed

    Allwright, Emily; Silber, Georg; Crain, Jason; Matsushita, Michio M; Awaga, Kunio; Robertson, Neil

    2016-05-31

    Electrochemical deposition has been used to prepare a thin film of neutral 4',4-(3-alkyl)-thiophene-5',5-hydogen-nickel and copper dithiolenes (Ni-C2, Cu-C2). The application of molecular electrodeposition provides a means to solution process molecular semiconductors of poor solubility, which results from the strong intermolecular interaction required for charge transport. Both Ni-C2 and Cu-C2 form continuous thin films that show intense NIR absorptions, extending to 1800 nm and 2000 nm respectively giving evidence for the strong intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Both films are highly conducting and temperature dependence of resistance gave an activation energy of 0.42 eV and 0.072 eV respectively, with the near-metallic behaviour of Cu-C2 attributed to the additional presence of an unpaired electron. PMID:27184422

  4. Deposition Technique For Chemical Free Black Coatings On Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J. G.; Cobbe, N.; O'Donoghue, J.; Pambaguian, L.; Norman, A.; Liedtke, V.; McCaul, T.

    2012-07-01

    Coatings having specific thermo-optical properties are necessary to manage the temperature equilibrium in space hardware. Incumbent black body coatings have a need to extend their operating temperature as well as increase the range of substrate materials that can be coated; in addition, issues relating to outgassing can limit the application of black body coatings. In this paper a relatively new coating technology, CoBlast, is used to deposit material on to titanium substrates, to produce a black body surface; SolarBlack. CoBlast, replaces the oxide layer of reactive metals with a fused thin surface. The process is uniquely non-complex, requiring no thermal input, no wet chemistry and is performed in an ambient temperature and pressure environment. Thermo optical and micro-structure analysis of SolarBlack was completed and the characterisation results including thermo cycling, up to 700°C, are discussed.

  5. Electrochemical deposition of highly-conducting metal dithiolene films.

    PubMed

    Allwright, Emily; Silber, Georg; Crain, Jason; Matsushita, Michio M; Awaga, Kunio; Robertson, Neil

    2016-05-31

    Electrochemical deposition has been used to prepare a thin film of neutral 4',4-(3-alkyl)-thiophene-5',5-hydogen-nickel and copper dithiolenes (Ni-C2, Cu-C2). The application of molecular electrodeposition provides a means to solution process molecular semiconductors of poor solubility, which results from the strong intermolecular interaction required for charge transport. Both Ni-C2 and Cu-C2 form continuous thin films that show intense NIR absorptions, extending to 1800 nm and 2000 nm respectively giving evidence for the strong intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Both films are highly conducting and temperature dependence of resistance gave an activation energy of 0.42 eV and 0.072 eV respectively, with the near-metallic behaviour of Cu-C2 attributed to the additional presence of an unpaired electron.

  6. Measurements of Metal Depositions in the Archimedes Demonstration Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiping; Agnew, Steve; Lee, Davis; Livak, Andrei; McCartney, Sean; Umstadter, Karl; Winslow, Dave; Yung, Shui-Chow

    2004-11-01

    The Archimedes Demonstration Unit (ADU) is a device built to demonstrate Plasma Mass Filter operation. A coupon measurement technique has been developed to evaluate separation of elements by atomic mass. Coupons are installed in the heavy element collection region and light element collection region. Metal depositions are determined with X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and SEM/EDX. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) measurement results are used to calibrate the XRF and SEM/EDX and get quantitative coating thickness information. An x-ray mass attenuation technique has been developed to measure light element coatings on copper coupons utilizing the x-ray intensity change as coating thickness increases. Cotton swab and tape adhesion techniques are used to measure coating thickness of the ADU inner wall surface. Tube shaped and box coupons have been designed to accommodate re-sputtering effects. Coupon measurements from several ADU operation regimes will be presented.

  7. Cluster Synthesis and Direct Ordering of Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, B; Skomski, R; Li, XZ; Valloppilly, SR; Shield, JE; Hadjipanayis, GC; Sellmyer, DJ

    2011-04-01

    Rare-earth transition-metal (R-TM) alloys show superior permanent magnetic properties in the bulk, but the synthesis and application of R-TM nanoparticles remains a challenge due to the requirement of high-temperature annealing above about 800 degrees C for alloy formation and subsequent crystalline ordering. Here we report a single-step method to produce highly ordered R-TM nanoparticles such as YCo(5) and Y(2)Co(17), without high-temperature thermal annealing, by employing a cluster-deposition system and investigate their structural and magnetic properties. The direct ordering is highly desirable to create and assemble R-TM nanoparticle building blocks for future permanent-magnet and other significant applications.

  8. Metabasalts as sources of metals in orogenic gold deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcairn, Iain K.; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.

    2015-03-01

    Although metabasaltic rocks have been suggested to be important source rocks for orogenic gold deposits, the mobility of Au and related elements (As, Sb, Se, and Hg) from these rocks during alteration and metamorphism is poorly constrained. We investigate the effects of increasing metamorphic grade on the concentrations of Au and related elements in a suite of metabasaltic rocks from the Otago and Alpine Schists, New Zealand. The metabasaltic rocks in the Otago and Alpine Schists are of MORB and WPB affinity and are interpreted to be fragments accreted from subducting oceanic crust. Gold concentrations are systematically lower in the higher metamorphic grade rocks. Average Au concentrations vary little between sub-greenschist (0.9 ± 0.5 ppb) and upper greenschist facies (1.0 ± 0.5 ppb), but decrease significantly in amphibolite facies samples (0.21 ± 0.07 ppb). The amount of Au depleted from metabasaltic rocks during metamorphism is on a similar scale to that removed from metasedimentary rocks in Otago. Arsenic concentrations increase with metamorphic grade with the metabasaltic rocks acting as a sink rather than a source of this element. The concentrations of Sb and Hg decrease between sub-greenschist and amphibolite facies but concentration in amphibolite facies rocks are similar to those in unaltered MORB protoliths and therefore unaltered oceanic crust cannot be a net source of Sb and Hg in a metamorphic environment. The concentrations of Au, As, Sb, and Hg in oceanic basalts that have become integrated into the metamorphic environment may be heavily influenced by the degree of seafloor alteration that occurred prior to metamorphism. We suggest that metasedimentary rocks are much more suitable source rocks for fluids and metals in orogenic gold deposits than metabasaltic rocks as they show mobility during metamorphism of all elements commonly enriched in this style of deposit.

  9. Conical octopole ion guide: Design, focusing, and its application to the deposition of low energetic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Roettgen, Martin A.; Judai, Ken; Antonietti, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus

    2006-01-15

    A design of a radio-frequency (rf) octopole ion guide with truncated conical rods arranged in a conical geometry is presented. The performance is tested in a cluster deposition apparatus used for the soft-landing of size-selected clusters on well-characterized substrates used as a model system in heterogeneous catalysis in ultrahigh vacuum. This device allows us to focus 500 pA of a mass-selected Ni{sub 20}{sup +} cluster ion beam from 9 mm down to a spot size of 2 mm in diameter. The transmittance is 70%{+-}5% at a rf voltage of 420 V{sub pp} applied over an amateur radio transceiver with an interposed homemade amplifier-transformer circuit. An increase of the cluster density by a factor of 15 has been achieved. Three ion trajectories are simulated by using SIMION6, which are relevant for this focusing device: transmitted, reflected, and absorbed. The observed effects in the simulations can be successfully explained by the adiabatic approximation. The focusing behavior of the conical octopole lens is demonstrated by experiment and simulations to be a very useful technique for increasing molecule or cluster densities on a substrate and thus reducing deposition time.

  10. Emergence of metallicity in silver clusters in the 150 atom regime: a study of differently sized silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Erusappan, Jayanthi; Govindarajan, Anuradha; Sugi, K. S.; Udayabhaskararao, Thumu; Ghosh, Atanu; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-06-01

    We report the systematic appearance of a plasmon-like optical absorption feature in silver clusters protected with 2-phenylethanethiol (PET), 4-flurothiophenol (4-FTP) and (4-(t-butyl)benzenethiol (BBS) as a function of cluster size. A wide range of clusters, namely, Ag44(4-FTP)30, Ag55(PET)31, ~Ag75(PET)40, ~Ag114(PET)46, Ag152(PET)60, ~Ag202(BBS)70, ~Ag423(PET)105, and ~Ag530(PET)100 were prepared. The UV/Vis spectra show multiple features up to ~Ag114 and thereafter, from Ag152 onwards, the plasmonic feature corresponding to a single peak at ~460 nm evolves, which points to the emergence of metallicity in clusters composed of ~150 metal atoms. A minor blue shift in the plasmonic peak was observed as cluster sizes increased and merged with the spectrum of plasmonic nanoparticles of 4.8 nm diameter protected with PET. Clusters with different ligands, such as 4-FTP and BBS, also show this behavior, which suggests that the `emergence of metallicity' is independent of the functionality of the thiol ligand.We report the systematic appearance of a plasmon-like optical absorption feature in silver clusters protected with 2-phenylethanethiol (PET), 4-flurothiophenol (4-FTP) and (4-(t-butyl)benzenethiol (BBS) as a function of cluster size. A wide range of clusters, namely, Ag44(4-FTP)30, Ag55(PET)31, ~Ag75(PET)40, ~Ag114(PET)46, Ag152(PET)60, ~Ag202(BBS)70, ~Ag423(PET)105, and ~Ag530(PET)100 were prepared. The UV/Vis spectra show multiple features up to ~Ag114 and thereafter, from Ag152 onwards, the plasmonic feature corresponding to a single peak at ~460 nm evolves, which points to the emergence of metallicity in clusters composed of ~150 metal atoms. A minor blue shift in the plasmonic peak was observed as cluster sizes increased and merged with the spectrum of plasmonic nanoparticles of 4.8 nm diameter protected with PET. Clusters with different ligands, such as 4-FTP and BBS, also show this behavior, which suggests that the `emergence of metallicity' is independent of

  11. Pal 12 - A metal-rich globular cluster in the outer halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. G.; Frogel, J. A.; Persson, S. E.; Zinn, R.

    1980-01-01

    New optical and infrared observations of several stars in the distant globular cluster Pal 12 show that they have CO strengths and heavy element abundances only slightly less than in M 71, one of the more metal-rich globular clusters. Pal 12 thus has a metal abundance near the high end of the range over which globular clusters exist and lies in the outer galactic halo. Its red horizontal branch is not anomalous in view of the abundance that has been found.

  12. Method of depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2002-08-27

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0deposited using sol-gel or metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  13. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This is the first phase of a project that has the objective to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste and hazardous material generation inherent in present plating processes. The project is considering plasma spraying of metal on a substrate using magneto-hydrodynamics to control the plasma/metal stream. The process being developed is considering the use of commercially available plasma torches to generate the plasma/metal stream. The plasma stream is collimated, and directed using magnetic forces to the extent required for precise control of the deposition material. The project will be completed in phases. Phase one of the project, the subject of this grant, is the development of an analytical model that can be used to determine the feasibility of the process and to design a laboratory scale demonstration unit. The contracted time is complete, and the research is still continuing. This report provides the results obtained to date. As the model and calculations are completed those results will also be provided. This report contains the results of the computer code that have been completed to date. Results from a ASMEE Benchmark problem, flow over a backward step with heat transfer, Couette flow with magnetic forces, free jet flow are presented along with several other check calculations that are representative of the cases that were calculated in the course of the development process. The final cases that define a velocity field in the exit of a plasma spray torch with and without a magnetic field are in process. A separate program (SPRAY) has been developed that can track the plating material to the substrate and describe the distribution of the material on the substrate. When the jet calculations are complete SPRAY will be used to compare the distribution of material on the substrate with and without the effect of the magnetic focus.

  14. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  15. A difference in using atomic layer deposition or physical vapour deposition TiN as electrode material in metal-insulator-metal and metal-insulator-silicon capacitors.

    PubMed

    Groenland, A W; Wolters, R A M; Kovalgin, A Y; Schmitz, J

    2011-09-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the MIM capacitors the bottom electrode is a patterned 100 nm TiN layer (called BE type 1), deposited via sputtering, while MIS capacitors have a flat bottom electrode (called BE type 2-silicon substrate). A high quality 50-100 nm thick SiO2 layer, made by inductively-coupled plasma CVD at 150 degrees C, is deposited as a dielectric on top of both types of bottom electrodes. BE type 1 (MIM) capacitors have a varying from low to high concentration of structural defects in the SiO2 layer. BE type 2 (MIS) capacitors have a low concentration of structural defects and are used as a reference. Two sets of each capacitor design are fabricated with the TiN top electrode deposited either via physical vapour deposition (PVD, i.e., sputtering) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). The MIM and MIS capacitors are electrically characterized in terms of the leakage current at an electric field of 0.1 MV/cm (I leak) and for different structural defect concentrations. It is shown that the structural defects only show up in the electrical characteristics of BE type 1 capacitors with an ALD TiN-based top electrode. This is due to the excellent step coverage of the ALD process. This work clearly demonstrates the sensitivity to process-induced structural defects, when ALD is used as a step in process integration of conductors on insulation materials.

  16. Assessment of PM10 and heavy metals concentration in a Ceramic Cluster (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen Vicente, Ana; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teofilo; Bech, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution control is one of the most important goals in pollution risk assessment today. The aim of this study is conducting a retrospective view of the evolution of particulate matter (PM10) and heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni and Pb) at different localities in the Spanish cluster ceramic in the period between January 2007 and December 2011. The study area is in the province of Castellón. This province is a strategical area in the framework of European Union Pollution control. Approximately 80% of European ceramic tiles and ceramic frits manufacturers are concentrated in two areas, forming the so-called "Ceramics Clusters"; one is in Modena (Italy) and the other in Castellón (Spain). In this kind of areas, there are a lot of pollutants from this industry that represent an important contribution to soil contamination so it is necessary to control the air quality in them. These atmospheric particles are deposited in the ground through both dry and wet deposition. Soil is a major sink for heavy metals released into the environment. The level of pollution of soils by heavy metals depends on the retention capacity of the soil, especially on physical-chemical properties (mineralogy, grain size, organic matter) affecting soil particle surfaces and also on the chemical properties of the metal. The most direct consequences on the ground of air pollutants are acidification, salinization and the pollutions that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. For this purpose the levels of PM10 in ambient air and the corresponding annual and weekly trend were calculated. The results of the study show that the PM10 and heavy metals concentrations are below the limit values recommended by European Union Legislation for the protection of human health and ecosystems in the study period. There is an important reduction of them from 2009 in all control stations due to the economic crisis. References Moral, R., Gilkes, R.J., Jordán, M.M., 2005

  17. RHAPSODY-G simulations - II. Baryonic growth and metal enrichment in massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Hahn, Oliver; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E.; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-07-01

    We study the evolution of the stellar component and the metallicity of both the intracluster medium and of stars in massive (Mvir ≈ 6 × 1014 M⊙ h-1) simulated galaxy clusters from the RHAPSODY-G suite in detail and compare them to observational results. The simulations were performed with the AMR code RAMSES and include the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback at the subgrid level. AGN feedback is required to produce realistic galaxy and cluster properties and plays a role in mixing material in the central regions and regulating star formation in the central galaxy. In both our low- and high-resolution runs with fiducial stellar yields, we find that stellar and ICM metallicities are a factor of 2 lower than in observations. We find that cool core clusters exhibit steeper metallicity gradients than non-cool core clusters, in qualitative agreement with observations. We verify that the ICM metallicities measured in the simulation can be explained by a simple `regulator' model in which the metallicity is set by a balance of stellar yield and gas accretion. It is plausible that a combination of higher resolution and higher metal yield in AMR simulation would allow the metallicity of simulated clusters to match observed values; however, this hypothesis needs to be tested with future simulations. Comparison to recent literature highlights that results concerning the metallicity of clusters and cluster galaxies might depend sensitively on the scheme chosen to solve the hydrodynamics.

  18. Near-Infrared Imaging of the Central Regions of Metal-Poor Inner Spheroid Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2001-06-01

    JHK images obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope adaptive optics bonnette are used to investigate the near-infrared photometric properties of red giant branch (RGB) and horizontal-branch (HB) stars in eight metal-poor globular clusters with RGC<=2 kpc. The slope of the RGB on the (K, J-K) CMDs confirms the metal-poor nature of these clusters, four of which (NGC 6287, 6293, 6333, and 6355) are found to have metallicities that are comparable to M92. The luminosity functions of RGB stars in inner spheroid and outer halo clusters have similar slopes, although there is a tendency for core-collapsed clusters to have slightly flatter luminosity functions than noncollapsed clusters. The distribution of red HB stars on the (K, J-K) CMDs of inner spheroid clusters with [Fe/H]~-1.5 is very different from that of clusters with [Fe/H]~-2.2, suggesting that metallicity is the main parameter defining HB content among these objects. The RGB bump is detected in four of the inner spheroid clusters, and this feature is used to compute distances to these objects. Finally, the specific frequency of globular clusters in the inner Galaxy is discussed in the context of the early evolution of the bulge. Based on the ratio of metal-poor to metal-rich clusters in the inner Galaxy it is suggested that the metal-poor clusters formed during an early intense burst of star formation. It is also demonstrated that if the globular cluster formation efficiency for the inner Galaxy is similar to that measured in other spheroidal systems, then the main body of the bulge could have formed from gas that was chemically enriched in situ; hence, material from a separate pre-enriched reservoir, such as the disk or outer halo, may not be required to form the bulge.

  19. Influence of the cluster orientation on the epitaxy: deposition of Co nanoclusters on Cu(001) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sáez, J C; Ettaoussi, M S; Pérez-Martín, A M C; Kerkeb, M L; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J J

    2010-02-01

    Deposition at low energy of 147-atom icosahedral Co nanoclusters on Cu(001) substrates is studied by molecular-dynamics simulations. Atomic interactions were mimicked by a many-body potential based on the tight-binding second-moment approximation. Clusters were rotated by using the two first Euler angles, in the so-called "x-convention," and subsequently, they were deposited on the substrate. The dependence of the degree of epitaxy on these angles has been obtained. Epitaxy is also related to the initial number of (001)-oriented atoms, especially for extreme values of this latter quantity. A better epitaxial matching is connected with a larger spreading index. The explanation of the epitaxial behavior of the supported clusters resides mainly in the dynamical interaction between grains during approximately the first 40 ps. Whenever the newly-formed (001)-oriented grain competes against a large number of grains after the collision, a very low epitaxial matching is obtained.

  20. Snow Core Records of Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2009-12-01

    later group is representative of the more mobile, anthropogenically dominated trace metals. “Crustal” elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Ti), sulfate (S), and the rare earths present similar profiles, with significant burial peaks in spring. These major burial peaks are uniformly spaced (~70 cm apart), indicating consistency in net snow accumulation rates and transport vectors. A suite of trace elements (Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Tl, U) exhibit deposition patterns similar to that of the crustals and S. However, the burial patterns of several other elements (Cu, Sn, Zn, oxyanions) were weakly correlated with the crustals and other modes are apparent. The Hg profile exhibits summer peaks and is anti-correlated with most other elements, but is correlated with TOC. TOC and LMWA are, in general though, poorly correlated with most elements, indicating that post-depositional diagenesis may be significant for carbon. A principal component analysis identified four element clusters that appear to be consistent with deposition modalities and element geochemistry, and which explains 71% of total variance.

  1. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  2. Crossover from the coffee-ring effect to the uniform deposit caused by irreversible cluster-cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivoi, A.; Zhong, X.; Duan, Fei

    2015-09-01

    The coffee-ring effect for particle deposition near the three-phase line after drying a pinned sessile colloidal droplet has been suppressed or attenuated in many recent studies. However, there have been few attempts to simulate the mitigation of the effect in the presence of strong particle-particle attraction forces. We develop a three-dimensional stochastic model to investigate the drying process of a pinned colloidal sessile droplet by considering the sticking between particles, which was observed in the experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that by solely promoting the particle-particle attraction in the model, the final deposit shape is transformed from the coffee ring to the uniform film deposition. This phenomenon is modeled using the colloidal aggregation technique and explained by the "Tetris principle," meaning that unevenly shaped or branched particle clusters rapidly build up a sparse structure spanning throughout the entire domain in the drying process. The influence of the controlled parameters is analyzed as well. The simulation is reflected by the drying patterns of the nanofluid droplets through the surfactant control in the experiments.

  3. Crossover from the coffee-ring effect to the uniform deposit caused by irreversible cluster-cluster aggregation.

    PubMed

    Crivoi, A; Zhong, X; Duan, Fei

    2015-09-01

    The coffee-ring effect for particle deposition near the three-phase line after drying a pinned sessile colloidal droplet has been suppressed or attenuated in many recent studies. However, there have been few attempts to simulate the mitigation of the effect in the presence of strong particle-particle attraction forces. We develop a three-dimensional stochastic model to investigate the drying process of a pinned colloidal sessile droplet by considering the sticking between particles, which was observed in the experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that by solely promoting the particle-particle attraction in the model, the final deposit shape is transformed from the coffee ring to the uniform film deposition. This phenomenon is modeled using the colloidal aggregation technique and explained by the "Tetris principle," meaning that unevenly shaped or branched particle clusters rapidly build up a sparse structure spanning throughout the entire domain in the drying process. The influence of the controlled parameters is analyzed as well. The simulation is reflected by the drying patterns of the nanofluid droplets through the surfactant control in the experiments. PMID:26465468

  4. Deposition of heavy metals from particulate settleable matter in soils of an industrialized area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfeliu, Teófilo

    2010-05-01

    Particulate air pollutants from industrial emissions and natural resource exploitation represent an important contribution to soil contamination. These atmospheric particles, usually settleable particulate matter form (which settle by gravity) are deposited on soil through both dry and wet. The most direct consequences on soil of air pollutants are acidification and salinization, not to mention the pollution that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of air pollution in soil composition. For this purpose, has been conducted a study of the composition of heavy metals in the settleable particulate matter in two locations (Almazora and Vila-real) with high industrial density (mainly ceramic companies) located in the ceramic cluster of Castellón (Spain). Settleable air particles samples were collected with a PS Standard Britannic captor (MCV-PS2) for monthly periods between January 2007 and December 2009. We analyzed the following elements: Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Sb and Bi which are highly toxic and have the property of accumulating in living organisms. It has been determined the concentration of heavy metals in the soluble fraction of settleable air particles by ICP-MS. The annual variation of the results obtained in both populations shows a decline over the study period the concentrations of heavy metals analyzed. This fact is associated with the steady implementation of corrective measures in the main industrial sector in the area based on the treatment of mineral raw materials. Moreover, this decline is, in turn, a lower intake of heavy metals to the soil. REFERENCES Gómez E.T.; Sanfeliu T.; Rius J.; Jordán M.M. (2005) "Evolution, sources and distribution of mineral particles and amorphous phase of atmospheric aerosol in an industrial and Mediterranean coastal area" Water, air and Soil Pollution 167:311-330 Moral R., Gilkes R.J.; Jordán M.M. (2005) "Distribution of heavy

  5. [Multivariate analysis of heavy metal element concentrations in atmospheric deposition in Harbin City, northeast China].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Han, Wei-Zheng; Li, Na; Li, Zhao-Yang; Bian, Jian-Min; Li, Hai-Yi

    2011-11-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of atmospheric heavy metal deposition in Harbin City, 46 deposition samples were collected which were taken using bulk deposition samplers during the period of 2008-2009 (about 365 days). The samples were analyzed for heavy metal concentration by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic spectrometry (ICP-AES). The deposition flux was calculated. Sources analysis was made by the method of principal component analysis (PCA), Pearsons and enrichment factor (EF). The following points can be gained through multivariate analysis. Mn and Co are mostly from natural sources while the others may be brought by coal dust, vehicle emissions and metal smelting.

  6. Metal patterning using maskless vacuum evaporation process based on selective deposition of photochromic diarylethene

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Rie; Masui, Kyoko; Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2008-11-24

    We developed an electrode/wiring patterning method that does not employ evaporation shadow masks; this method is based on selective metal deposition of photochromic diarylethene (DAE). In the selective Mg deposition based on the photoisomerization of DAE, Mg vapor atoms are deposited only on colored DAE film obtained upon UV irradiation, but not on uncolored film. We demonstrated fine metal Mg patterning with a minimum width of 3 {mu}m and the preparation of a patterned cathode. The selective metal deposition method has significant potential for preparing fine electrodes/wiring for various organic electronic devices.

  7. Color-magnitude diagrams for six metal-rich, low-latitude globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, Taft E.

    1988-01-01

    Colors and magnitudes for stars on CCD frames for six metal-rich, low-latitude, previously unstudied globular clusters and one well-studied, metal-rich cluster (47 Tuc) have been derived and color-magnitude diagrams have been constructed. The photometry for stars in 47 Tuc are in good agreement with previous studies, while the V magnitudes of the horizontal-branch stars in the six program clusters do not agree with estimates based on secondary methods. The distances to these clusters are different from prior estimates. Redding values are derived for each program cluster. The horizontal branches of the program clusters all appear to lie entirely redwards of the red edge of the instability strip, as is normal for their metallicities.

  8. Determination of the Structures of Silicon and Metal Doped Silicon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Jonathan T.; Fielicke, Andre; Janssens, Ewald; Lievens, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Strongly bound clusters are often used as convenient models for bulk material. Silicon clusters are particularly interesting due to their importance in the electronics industry. We perform experimental IR multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the gas-phase, which makes use of a free electron laser, and compare the results with that predicted by density functional and MP2 theory calculations. Comparison of the vibrational spectra with that predicted by theoretical calculations for several structural isomers for each cluster size leads to accurate structural assignments. Here, we present our results for silicon clusters, and compare the structures with those of select transition metal doped SinM clusters. Of particular interest is the transition from exohedral to endoheral metal doped silicon clusters and how the transition size changes for different metal dopant atoms. Journal of Chemical Physics 2012, 136, 064301 e.g., ChemPhysChem 2014, 15, 328.

  9. A uniform metal distribution in the intergalactic medium of the Perseus cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Werner, Norbert; Urban, Ondrej; Simionescu, Aurora; Allen, Steven W

    2013-10-31

    Most of the metals (elements heavier than helium) produced by stars in the member galaxies of clusters currently reside within the hot, X-ray-emitting intra-cluster gas. Observations of X-ray line emission from this intergalactic medium have suggested a relatively small cluster-to-cluster scatter outside the cluster centres and enrichment with iron out to large radii, leading to the idea that the metal enrichment occurred early in the history of the Universe. Models with early enrichment predict a uniform metal distribution at large radii in clusters, whereas those with late-time enrichment are expected to introduce significant spatial variations of the metallicity. To discriminate clearly between these competing models, it is essential to test for potential inhomogeneities by measuring the abundances out to large radii along multiple directions in clusters, which has not hitherto been done. Here we report a remarkably uniform iron abundance, as a function of radius and azimuth, that is statistically consistent with a constant value of ZFe = 0.306 ± 0.012 in solar units out to the edge of the nearby Perseus cluster. This homogeneous distribution requires that most of the metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium occurred before the cluster formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity.

  10. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residue deposited on heated metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Deposits laid down in patches on metal strips in a high pressure/high temperature fuel system simulator operated with aerated fuel at varying flow rates were analyzed by emission FTIR in terms of functional groups. Significant differences were found in the spectra and amounts of deposits derived from fuels to which small concentrations of oxygen-, nitrogen-, or sulfur-containing heterocyclics or metal naphthenates were added. The spectra of deposits generated on strips by heating fuels and air in a closed container were very different from those of the flowing fluid deposits. One such closed-container dodecane deposit on silver gave a strong surface-enhanced Raman spectrum.

  11. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  12. Study of Flux Ratio of C60 to Ar Cluster Ion for Hard DLC Film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Miyauchi, K.; Toyoda, N.; Kanda, K.; Matsui, S.; Kitagawa, T.; Yamada, I.

    2003-08-26

    To study the influence of the flux ratio of C60 molecule to Ar cluster ion on (diamond like carbon) DLC film characteristics, DLC films deposited under various flux ratios were characterized with Raman spectrometry and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). From results of these measurements, hard DLC films were deposited when the flux ratio of C60 to Ar cluster ion was between 0.7 and 4. Furthermore the DLC film with constant sp2 content was obtained in the range of the ratio from 0.7 to 4, which contents are lower values than that of conventional films such as RF plasma. DLC films deposited under the ratio from 1 to 4 had hardness from 40 to 45GPa. It was shown that DLC films with stable properties of low sp2 content and high hardness were formed even when the fluxes were varied from 1 to 4 during deposition. It was indicated that this process was useful in the view of industrial application.

  13. First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lamei; Fan Yong; Wang Yan; Xiao Lina; Hu Yangyang; Peng Yu; Wang Tiegang; Gao Zhongmin; Zheng Dafang; Cui Xiaobing; Xu Jiqing

    2012-07-15

    Two new organic-inorganic compounds based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands: [BW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl](H{sub 2}4, 4 Prime -bpy){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 3}O{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O (1) and [HPW{sub 12}O{sub 40}][Cd{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}](4, 4 Prime -bpy) (2) (Phen=1, 10-phenanthroline, bpy=bipyridine), have been prepared and characterized by IR, UV-vis, XPS, XRD and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Crystal structure analyses reveal that compound 1 is constructed from [BW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-}, metal halide clusters [Cu{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl]{sup +}and 4, 4 Prime -bpy ligands, while compound 2 is constructed from [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-}, metal halide cluster [Cd{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}]{sup 2+} and 4, 4 Prime -bpy ligands. Compound 1 and compound 2 are not common hybrids based on polyoxometalates and metal halide clusters, they also contain dissociated organic ligands, therefore, compound 1 and 2 are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. - Graphical Abstract: Two new compounds have been synthesized and characterized. Structure analyses revealed that the two compounds are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different kinds of metal halide clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Supramolecular structures based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybridization of three different of building blocks.

  14. Photosensitized Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Solution Using Noble-Metal Clusters for Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshima, Naoki; Yamaji, Yumi; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    1995-03-01

    Carbon dioxide was reduced to methane by visible-light irradiation of a solution composed of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(III) as photosensitizer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt as sacrificial reagent, methyl viologen as electron relay, and a colloidal dispersion of polymer-protected noble-metal clusters, prepared by alcohol-reduction, as catalyst. Among the noble-metal clusters examined, Pt clusters showed the highest activity for the formation of methane as well as hydrogen. In order to improve the activity, oxidized clusters and bimetallic clusters were also applied. For example, the CH4 yield in 3-h irradiation increased from 51 x 10-3 μmol with unoxidized Pt clusters to 72 x 10-3 μmol with partially oxidized ones. In the case of Pt/Ru bimetalic systems, the improvement of the catalytic activity by air treatment was much greater than in case of monometallic clusters.

  15. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Detailed abundances in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Roman, I.; Muñoz, C.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S.; Kacharov, N.; Koch, A.; Carraro, G.; Tautvaišiene, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Flaccomio, E.; Francois, P.; Korn, A. J.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Bergemann, M.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Heiter, U.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Masseron, T.; Morbidelli, L.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-07-01

    We present the abundance analysis for a sample of 7 red giant branch stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372 based on UVES spectra acquired as part of the Gaia-ESO Survey. This is the first extensive study of this cluster from high-resolution spectroscopy. We derive abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni, Y, Ba, and La. We find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.19 ± 0.03 and find no evidence of any metallicity spread. This metallicity makes NGC 4372 one of the most metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. We also find an α-enhancement typical of halo globular clusters at this metallicity. Significant spreads are observed in the abundances of light elements. In particular, we find a Na-O anticorrelation. Abundances of O are relatively high compared with other globular clusters. This could indicate that NGC 4372 was formed in an environment with high O for its metallicity. A Mg-Al spread is also present that spans a range of more than 0.5 dex in Al abundances. Na is correlated with Al and Mgabundances at a lower significance level. This pattern suggests that the Mg-Al burning cycle is active. This behavior can also be seen in giant stars of other massive, metal-poor clusters. A relation between light and heavy s-process elements has been identified.

  16. Solution-based deposition of ultrathin metal oxide films on metal and superconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Glenn

    Solution chemical methods were used to deposit ultrathin metal oxide films on metal and superconductor surfaces. Platinum-molybdenum oxide films were deposited by spontaneous adsorption and electrodeposition of hexamolybdoplatinate, PtMO6O248-. Spectroscopic characterization by 17O and 195Pt NMR showed that the PtMo6O248- anion is stable in aqueous solution below pH 4. The interaction of this solution stable anion with Au and Ag was characterized by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The anion was partially reduced upon adsorption on Ag, but spontaneously adsorbed on Au to form an amorphous surface phase. The electrodeposition of hexamolybdoplatinate on Au electrodes resulted in an electrode surface that was different from the spontaneously adsorbed species, in terms of composition, voltammetry, and reactivity. Cyclic voltammetry was also used to compare the reactivity of these materials for the electrooxidation of methanol. Ultrathin zirconia films were deposited on YBa2Cu3O 7-delta by alternating exposures to tetra n-propyl zirconate, Zr4(OPrn)16, and H2O in n-propanol. Physical and chemical characterization of these films was done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The zirconia films were determined to be ultrathin (<10 nm) and highly conformal to the surface of YBa2Cu3O7-delta. Metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions fabricated in this fashion were characterized by current-voltage and conductivity-voltage measurements. Solution deposition from Zr4(OPrn) 16 was also used to deposit ultrathin zirconia films on gold, silver, and aluminum surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to compare the physical properties of these films. Electrical measurements showed that zirconia films on Ag and Au are not insulating, but aluminum-zirconia-aluminum capacitors fabricated by this method

  17. Heavy metals in particulate and colloidal matter from atmospheric deposition of urban Guangzhou, South China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Duan, Dandan; Zhang, Yulong; Cheng, Hefa; Ran, Yong

    2014-08-30

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) and colloidal matter (COM) in annual dry and wet deposition samples in urban Guangzhou were for the first time collected, and their trace metals were investigated by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The deposition flux of SPM and of metal elements varied largely among the investigated seasons, and reached the maximum in spring. The correlation analysis indicated that significant correlations existed among some of the metal elements in the deposition samples. The enrichment factors (EF) of metals in COM in the deposition ranging from 79.66 to 130,000 were much higher than those of SPM ranging from 1.65 to 286.48, indicating the important role of COM. The factor analysis showed that emissions from street dust, non-ferrous metal production, and heavy fuel oil were major sources of the trace metals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was used to quantitatively estimate anthropogenic source.

  18. Solution synthesis of mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and spray deposition of precursor films

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A colloidal suspension comprising metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is made by reacting a metal salt with a chalcogenide salt in an organic solvent to precipitate a metal chalcogenide, recovering the metal chalcogenide, and admixing the metal chalcogenide with a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is spray deposited onto a substrate to produce a semiconductor precursor film which is substantially free of impurities.

  19. Formation of Cu-Zr-M ternary bulk metallic glasses based on atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. H.; Wang, Q.; Wu, J.; Dong, C.

    2008-02-01

    Ternary Cu-Zr-M (M= Al, Ti and Ag) bulk metallic glasses are investigated using a cluster line approach. New bulk metallic glass rods with compositions lying along the cluster line Cu5Zr6-M were fabricated by copper mould suction, where binary cluster Cu5Zr6 is an Archimedean octahedral antiprism, M being about 4~13.2 at.% for Al, 8.3 at.% for Ti and 9 at.% for Ag. The relevant mechanism was discussed in the light of the cluster-plus-glue-atom model.

  20. Synthesis Single Layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides with Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Hsien; Wang, Han; Yu, Lili; Fang, Wenjing; Palacios, Tomas; Li, Lain-Jong; Kong, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Recently, monolayers of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMD), such as MX2 (M =Mo, W and X =S, Se), have been reported to exhibit significant spin-valley coupling and optoelectronic performances because of the unique structural symmetry and band structures. Monolayers in this class of materials offered a burgeoning field in fundamental physics, energy harvesting, electronics and optoelectronics. However, most studies to date are hindered with great challenges on the synthesis and transfer of high quality LTMD monolayers. Hence, a feasible synthetic process to overcome the challenges is essential. Here, we demonstrate the growth of high-quality MS2 (M =Mo, W) monolayers using ambient-pressure-chemical-vapor-deposition (APCVD) with the seeding of aromatic molecules. Electronic transport and optical performances of the as-grown MS2 monolayers are comparable to those of exfoliated MS2 monolayers. The growth of MS2 monolayer is achieved on various surfaces. Growth mechanism on the novel synthetic process is investigated. Understanding and better control of seeds for the novel growth on the class of materials may stimulate the progress in the emerging filed.

  1. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-26

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel-MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium-MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium-MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal-MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications. PMID:27419644

  2. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-01

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel-MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium-MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium-MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal-MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications.

  3. Processing Parameters Optimization for Material Deposition Efficiency in Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    Ti6Al4V is an important Titanium alloy that is mostly used in many applications such as: aerospace, petrochemical and medicine. The excellent corrosion resistance property, the high strength to weight ratio and the retention of properties at high temperature makes them to be favoured in most applications. The high cost of Titanium and its alloys makes their use to be prohibitive in some applications. Ti6Al4V can be cladded on a less expensive material such as steel, thereby reducing cost and providing excellent properties. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an additive manufacturing process is capable of producing complex part directly from the 3-D CAD model of the part and it also has the capability of handling multiple materials. Processing parameters play an important role in LMD process and in order to achieve desired results at a minimum cost, then the processing parameters need to be properly controlled. This paper investigates the role of processing parameters: laser power, scanning speed, powder flow rate and gas flow rate, on the material utilization efficiency in laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V. A two-level full factorial design of experiment was used in this investigation, to be able to understand the processing parameters that are most significant as well as the interactions among these processing parameters. Four process parameters were used, each with upper and lower settings which results in a combination of sixteen experiments. The laser power settings used was 1.8 and 3 kW, the scanning speed was 0.05 and 0.1 m/s, the powder flow rate was 2 and 4 g/min and the gas flow rate was 2 and 4 l/min. The experiments were designed and analyzed using Design Expert 8 software. The software was used to generate the optimized process parameters which were found to be laser power of 3.2 kW, scanning speed of 0.06 m/s, powder flow rate of 2 g/min and gas flow rate of 3 l/min.

  4. Reactions of metal cluster anions with inorganic and organic molecules in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-07-28

    The study of gas phase ion-molecule reactions by state-of-the-art mass spectrometric experiments in conjunction with quantum chemistry calculations offers an opportunity to clarify the elementary steps and mechanistic details of bond activation and conversion processes. In the past few decades, a considerable number of publications have been devoted to the ion-molecule reactions of metal clusters, the experimentally and theoretically tractable models for the active phase of condensed phase systems. The focus of this perspective concerns progress on activation and transformation of important inorganic and organic molecules by negatively charged metal clusters. The metal cluster anions cover bare metal clusters as well as ligated systems with oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, among others. The following important issues have been summarized and discussed: (i) dependence of chemical reactivity and selectivity on cluster structures and sizes, metals and metal oxidation states, odd-even electron numbers, etc. and (ii) effects of doping, ligation, and pre-adsorption on the reactivity of metal clusters toward rather inert molecules. PMID:27346242

  5. Communication: New insight into electronic shells of metal clusters: Analogues of simple molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Longjiu; Yang, Jinlong

    2013-04-01

    A new concept of super valence bond is proposed, of which superatoms can share both valence pairs and nuclei for shell closure thus forming delocalized super bonding. Using Li clusters as a test case, we theoretically find that metal clusters can mimic the behavior of simple molecules in electronic shells. It is found that Li14, Li10, and Li8 clusters are analogues of F2, N2, and CH4 molecules, respectively, in molecular orbital diagrams and bonding patterns. This new concept shows new insights in understanding the stability of clusters and designing the cluster-assembling materials.

  6. Optimal deposition conditions of TiN barrier layers for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Céspedes, J.; Álvarez-García, J.; Zhang, X.; Hampshire, J.; Bertran, E.

    2009-05-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical deposition (PECVD) has proven over the years to be the preferred method for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (VACNTs and VACNFs, respectively). In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on metallic surfaces present a great potential for high power applications, including low resistance electrical contacts, high power switches, electron guns or supercapacitors. Nevertheless, the deposition of CNTs onto metallic substrates is challenging, due to the intrinsic incompatibility between such substrates and the metallic precursor layers required to promote the growth of CNTs. In particular, the formation of CNT films is assisted by the presence of a nanometric (10-100 nm) monolayer of catalyst clusters, which act as nucleation sites for CNTs. The nanometric character of the precursor layer, together with the high growth temperature involved during the PECVD process (~700 °C), strongly favours the in-diffusion of the catalyst nanoclusters into the bulk of the metallic substrate, which results in a dramatic reduction in the nucleation of CNTs. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to coat the metallic substrate with a diffusion barrier layer, prior to the growth of the catalyst precursor. Unlike other conventional ceramic barrier layers, TiN provides high electrical conductivity, thus being a promising candidate for use as barrier material in applications involving low resistance contacts. In this work we investigate the anti-diffusion properties of TiN sputtered coatings and its potential applicability to the growth of CNTs onto copper substrates, using Fe as catalyst material. The barrier and catalyst layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusivity of Fe into TiN. Morphological characterization of the CNTs coatings was performed on scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to

  7. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters were studied at a high level of approximation, including all the valence electrons in the calculation and extensive electron correlation, in order to understand the electronic structure of these small metal clusters. By comparison of dimers, trimers, and possibly higher clusters, the information obtained was used to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals. Small metal clusters are currently of considerable experimental interest and some information is becomming available both from matrix electron spin resonance studies and from gas phase spectroscopy. Collaboration between theorists and experimentalists is thus expected to be especially profitable at this time since there is some experimental information which can serve to guide the theoretical work.

  8. Low energy cluster beam deposited BN films as the cascade for field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, L.; Ge, J.; Wang, G.

    2005-07-01

    The atomic deposited BN films with the thickness of nanometers (ABN) were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and the nanostructured BN films (CBN) were prepared by Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition. UV-Vis Absorption measurement proves the band gap of 4.27 eV and field emission of the BN films were carried out. F-N plots of all the samples give a good fitting and demonstrate the F-N tunneling of the emission process. The emission of ABN begins at the electric field of 14.6 V/μ m while that of CBN starts at 5.10 V/μ m. Emission current density of 1 mA/cm2 for ABN needs the field of 20 V/μ m while that of CBN needs only 12.1 V/μ m. The cluster-deposited BN on n-type Silicon substrate proves a good performance in terms of the lower gauge voltage, more emission sites and higher electron intensity and seems a promising substitute for the cascade of field emission.

  9. Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

  10. Electrophoretic Deposition Applied to Thick Metal-Ceramic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Windes, William Enoch; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Reimanis, Ivar E.

    2002-08-01

    Electrophoretic deposition was used to fabricate thick (4 mm) metal–ceramic deposits from a non-aqueous slurry of nickel and alumina particles. A high solid volume in the slurry was identified as the primary parameter for depositing thick cermet coatings rather than the applied electric potential or ionic additive concentration. Ionic additives (MgCl2, AlCl3, etc.) were found to adequately suspend the alumina particles and provide rapid deposition rates. The nickel particles proved to be more difficult to suspend in solution, thereby sacrificing control of the deposition composition. The use of small (3.0 µm) particles and continuously pumping the slurry alleviated the suspension problems but small electric potentials (100 V/cm) were required to avoid the formation of rough, columnar deposits on the depositing electrode.

  11. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  12. Mixed protein-templated luminescent metal clusters (Au and Pt) for H2O2 sensing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective method to synthesize the luminescent noble metal clusters (Au and Pt) in chicken egg white aqueous solution at room temperature is reported. The red-emitting Au cluster is used as fluorescent probe for sensitive detection of H2O2. PMID:23601828

  13. A molecular placeholder strategy to access a family of transition-metal-functionalized vanadium oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Katharina; Margraf, Johannes T; Clark, Timothy; Streb, Carsten

    2014-09-15

    Systematic access to metal-functionalized polyoxometalates has thus far been limited to lacunary tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide clusters. The first controlled, stepwise bottom-up assembly route to metal-functionalized molecular vanadium oxides is now presented. A di-vacant vanadate cluster with two metal binding sites, (DMA)2[V12O32Cl](3-) (DMA = dimethylammonium) is formed spontaneously in solution and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, ESI mass spectrometry, (51)V NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analyses. In the cluster, the metal binding sites are selectively blocked by hydrogen-bonded DMA placeholder cations. Reaction of the cluster with transition metals TM (Fe(3+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)) gives access to mono-functionalized vanadate clusters (DMA)[{TM(L)}V12O32Cl](n-) (L = ligand). Metal binding is accomplished by significant distortions of the vanadium oxide framework reminiscent of a pincer movement. Cluster stability under technologically relevant conditions in the solid-state and solution is demonstrated.

  14. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-01

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel‑MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium‑MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium‑MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal‑MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications.

  15. Physics of small metal clusters: Topology, magnetism, and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. K.; Jena, P.

    1985-08-01

    The electronic structure of small clusters of lithium atoms has been calculated using the self-consistent-field, molecular-orbital method. The exchange interaction is treated at the unrestricted Hartree-Fock level whereas the correlation is treated perturbatively up to second order by including pair excitations. This is done in two steps, one involving only the valence electrons and the other including all the electrons. A configuration-interaction calculation has also been done with all possible pair excitations. The equilibrium geometries of both the neutral and ionized clusters have been obtained by starting from random configurations and using the Hellmann-Feynman forces to follow the path of steepest descent to a minimum of the energy surface. The clusters of Li atoms each containing one to five atoms are found to be planar. The equilibrium geometry of a cluster is found to be intimately related to its electronic structure. The preferred spin configuration of a cluster has been found by minimizing the total energy of the cluster with respect to various spin assignments. The planar clusters are found to be less magnetic than expected by Hund's-rule coupling. For three-dimensional clusters, however, the magnetism is governed by Hund's rule. The effect of correlation has been found to have decisive influence on the equilibrium topology and magnetism of the clusters. The binding energy per atom, the energy of dissociation, and the ionization potential of the clusters are compared with experiment and with previous calculations. The physical origin of the magic numbers and the effect of the basis functions on the calculated properties have also been investigated.

  16. Deposition of acrylonitrile cluster ions on solid substrates: thin film formation by intracluster polymerization products.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2006-03-01

    Cluster anions of acrylonitrile (AN), known to give intracluster anionic polymerization products, were deposited on solid substrates. The obtained films were examined by using infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The acquired spectroscopic data are similar to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), while the normal polymerization of AN or reactions related to PAN seemed not to occur noticeably. On the contrary, the product analysis shows that most of the constituent molecules of the films are formed via cyclohexane-1,3,5-tricarbonitrile (CHTCN), a dominant product of the intracluster polymerization of AN, accompanied by fragmentation and dimerization. PMID:16509718

  17. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Ming-Show; Li, Dong; Chung, Yip-Wah; Sproul, William D.; Chu, Xi; Barnett, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

  18. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Chu, X.; Barnett, S.A.

    1998-07-07

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

  19. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Ming-Show; Li, Dong; Chung, Yin-Wah; Sproul, William D.; Chu, Xi; Barnett, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

  20. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Xi Chu; Barnett, S.A.

    1998-03-10

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

  1. Clustered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Evidence for sediment deposition during floodwater ponding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique clustering of layered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles is hypothesized to reflect a significant hydraulic event. The forms, interpreted as sedimentary, are attributed to extensive sediment deposition during ponding and then streamlining of this sediment behind flow obstacles during ponded water outflow. These streamlined forms are analogous to those found in depositional basins and other loci of ponding in terrestrial catastrophic flood landscapes. These terrestrial streamlined forms can provide the best opportunity for reconstructing the history of the terrestrial flooding. Likewise, the streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles may provide the best opportunity to reconstruct the recent geologic history of this young Martian outflow channel. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. One-dimensional fast migration of vacancy clusters in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Zinkle, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    The migration of point defects, e.g. crystal lattice vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), typically occurs through three-dimensional (3-D) random walk. However, when vacancies and SIAs agglomerate with like defects forming clusters, the migration mode may change. Recently, atomic-scale computer simulations using molecular dynamics (MD) codes have reported that nanometer-sized two-dimensional (2-D) clusters of SIAs exhibit one-dimensional (1-D) fast migration1-7. The 1-D migration mode transports the entire cluster containing several tens of SIAs with a mobility comparable to single SIAs3. This anisotropic migration of SIA clusters can have a significant impact on the evolution of a material fs neutron-irradiation damage microstructure, which dominates the material fs lifetime in nuclear reactor environments8-9. This is also proposed to be a key physical mechanism for the self-organization of nanometer-sized sessile vacancy cluster arrays10-13. Given these findings for SIA clusters, a fundamental question is whether the 1-D migration mode is also possible for 2-D clusters of vacancies. Preceding MD results predicted that 1-D migration of vacancy clusters is possible in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron, but not in face-centered cubic (fcc) copper2. Previous experimental studies have reported 1-D migration of SIA clusters14, but there have been no observations of 1-D vacancy cluster migration. Here we present the first experimental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) dynamic observation demonstrating the 1-D migration of vacancy clusters in fcc gold. It was found that the mobility of the vacancy clusters via the 1-D migration is much higher than single vacancies via 3-D random walk and comparable to single SIAs via 3-D random walk. Hence, the mobility of the glissile clusters is not associated with the character of their constituent point defects. Dynamic conversion of a planar vacancy loop into a 3-D stacking fault tetrahedron geometry was also observed.

  3. The LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of Star Clusters in M31. II. Metallicities, Ages, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingqiu; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Yuan, Haibo; Huang, Yang; Shi, Jianrong; Fan, Zhou; Huo, Zhiying; Wang, Chun; Ren, Juanjuan; Tian, Zhijia; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Gaochao; Cao, Zihuang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-08-01

    We select from Paper I a sample of 306 massive star clusters observed with the Large Sky Area Multi–Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) in the vicinity fields of M31 and M33, and determine their metallicities, ages, and masses. Metallicities and ages are estimated by fitting the observed integrated spectra with stellar synthesis population (SSP) models with a pixel–to–pixel spectral fitting technique. Ages for most young clusters are also derived by fitting the multi–band photometric measurements with model spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The estimated cluster ages span a wide range, from several million years to the age of the universe. The numbers of clusters younger and older than 1 Gyr are, respectively, 46 and 260. With ages and metallicities determined, cluster masses are then estimated by comparing the multi–band photometric measurements with SSP model SEDs. The derived masses range from ˜ {10}3 to ˜ {10}7 M ⊙, peaking at ˜ {10}4.3 and ˜ {10}5.7 M ⊙ for young (\\lt 1 Gyr) and old (\\gt 1 Gyr) clusters, respectively. Our estimated metallicities, ages, and masses are in good agreement with available literature values. Old clusters richer than [Fe/H] ˜ ‑0.7 dex have a wide range of ages. Those poorer than [Fe/H] ˜ ‑0.7 dex seem to be composed of two groups, as previously found for Galactic globular clusters—one of the oldest ages with all values of metallicity down to ˜ -2 dex and another with metallicity increasing with decreasing age. The old clusters in the inner disk of M 31 (0–30 kpc) show a clear metallicity gradient measured at ‑0.038 ± 0.023 dex kpc‑1.

  4. The LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of Star Clusters in M31. II. Metallicities, Ages, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingqiu; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Yuan, Haibo; Huang, Yang; Shi, Jianrong; Fan, Zhou; Huo, Zhiying; Wang, Chun; Ren, Juanjuan; Tian, Zhijia; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Gaochao; Cao, Zihuang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-08-01

    We select from Paper I a sample of 306 massive star clusters observed with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) in the vicinity fields of M31 and M33, and determine their metallicities, ages, and masses. Metallicities and ages are estimated by fitting the observed integrated spectra with stellar synthesis population (SSP) models with a pixel-to-pixel spectral fitting technique. Ages for most young clusters are also derived by fitting the multi-band photometric measurements with model spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The estimated cluster ages span a wide range, from several million years to the age of the universe. The numbers of clusters younger and older than 1 Gyr are, respectively, 46 and 260. With ages and metallicities determined, cluster masses are then estimated by comparing the multi-band photometric measurements with SSP model SEDs. The derived masses range from ˜ {10}3 to ˜ {10}7 M ⊙, peaking at ˜ {10}4.3 and ˜ {10}5.7 M ⊙ for young (\\lt 1 Gyr) and old (\\gt 1 Gyr) clusters, respectively. Our estimated metallicities, ages, and masses are in good agreement with available literature values. Old clusters richer than [Fe/H] ˜ -0.7 dex have a wide range of ages. Those poorer than [Fe/H] ˜ -0.7 dex seem to be composed of two groups, as previously found for Galactic globular clusters—one of the oldest ages with all values of metallicity down to ˜ -2 dex and another with metallicity increasing with decreasing age. The old clusters in the inner disk of M 31 (0-30 kpc) show a clear metallicity gradient measured at -0.038 ± 0.023 dex kpc-1.

  5. Nature of excitations in small metal clusters and connection with their geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Bonacic-Koutecky, V.

    1993-12-31

    The contribution of quantum chemical ab-initio studies of optical response properties towards understanding of specific electronic and structural properties of small metal clusters will be presented. The role of cluster size, geometry, number of valence electrons and chemical composition will be pointed out. It will be shown that an appropriate many electron description of excited states for stable cluster structures allows for the quantum molecular interpretation of the absorption spectra and other optical probes. The nature of excitation responsible for characteristic spectroscopic patterns will be discussed. From comparison of predicted and measured spectroscopic observables the structural assignments will be made. Metallization phenomena in finite systems will be addressed.

  6. Metal cluster structures and properties from Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaminici, Patrizia Köster, Andreas M. Vásquez-Pérez, José Manuel Martínez, Gabriel Ulises Gamboa

    2015-01-22

    Density functional theory (DFT) Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of metal clusters are presented. The calculations have been performed with the deMon2k [1] code employing all-electron basis sets and local and non-local functionals. The capability to perform reasonable long (∼ 100 ps) first-principle BOMD simulations in order to explore potential energy landscape of metallic clusters will be presented [2,3]. The evolution of the cluster structures and properties, such as polarizability and heat capacity, with temperature is discussed.

  7. The old, massive, metal rich open cluster NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    NGC~6791 is a rich open cluster that attracted a lot of attention in the last decade. Recent estimates indicate that the mass is even larger, around 5000\\,$\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$. This is quite remarkable: the cluster is in fact 8\\,Gyr old, while the typical dissolution time for Galactic open clusters is a few Myr only. This might imply that the cluster managed to survive so long either because its original mass was much larger, or because it moved along a preferential orbit. In any case, such combination of old age and large mass is unique among Galactic open clusters, especially for clusters located in the inner regions of the Galactic disk. This is not the only special property of NGC 6791. Its abundance in iron is [Fe/H] $\\sim$ +0.40. again unique among Galactic star clusters of the same age range. Significant dispersions in various elements have been detected, that are not routinely found in Galactic open clusters. The combined UV flux of the few hot HB stars makes the cluster the closest proxy of an elliptical galaxy. This surprising result might indeed indicate that NGC 6791 was massive enough at origin to experience a strong burst of star formation and a fast enrichment.This pletora of unique properties renders NGC 6791 an extremely important object to study and understand.How and where could such a stellar system have formed? Is NGC 6791 just an open cluster? Did it form close to the bulge? How could have survived in the adverse, high-density, environment of the inner Galactic disk?These are difficult questions to answer to, of course. One of the still missing key observational evidence is whether the cluster suffered from tidal interaction, that could have significantly decreased its mass. We find such evidences, and use them as an argument to support a scenario in which the cluster formed as a massive object. We also estimate, using approximate analytic description based on available $N$-body models, how much mass NGC~6791 lost, and which was its

  8. Depositing aluminum as sacrificial metal to reduce metal-graphene contact resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-cheng, Mao; Zhi, Jin; Shao-qing, Wang; Da-yong, Zhang; Jing-yuan, Shi; Song-ang, Peng; Xuan-yun, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Reducing the contact resistance without degrading the mobility property is crucial to achieve high-performance graphene field effect transistors. Also, the idea of modifying the graphene surface by etching away the deposited metal provides a new angle to achieve this goal. We exploit this idea by providing a new process method which reduces the contact resistance from 597 Ω·μm to sub 200 Ω·μm while no degradation of mobility is observed in the devices. This simple process method avoids the drawbacks of uncontrollability, ineffectiveness, and trade-off with mobility which often exist in the previously proposed methods. Project by the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX02707.3), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61136005), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KGZD-EW-303), and the Project of Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. Z151100003515003).

  9. Assessment of the Altitudinal Atmospheric Metal(loid) Deposition in a Mountainous City by Mosses.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Zhang, Guoping; Liu, Hong; Li, Ling; Fu, Zhiping; Ouyang, Xiaoxue; Chen, Jingjing; Hu, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Samples of moss (Haplocladium microphyllum) were collected at different elevations on a mountain and four representative sites in Guiyang City, and the concentrations of metal(loid)s were determined by ICP-MS. The altitudinal deposition of soil-originated metals differed from that of anthropogenic metal(loid)s. The concentrations of soil-related elements decreased with elevation, indicating that these elements tend to deposit at lower elevations and their impact on the higher elevations is less. The concentrations of anthropogenic elements varied only slightly with elevation, indicating that the atmospheric deposition of these elements did not vary largely with elevation. The results of this study showed that the mosses at different locations may serve to indicate a vertical gradient of atmospheric metal(loid) deposition. PMID:26055166

  10. Preventing Technique of Metal Deposition on Optical Devices in Space Diode Laser Welding for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Kenji; Ohtani, Masato; Shobako, Shinichiro; Terajima, Noboru; Hiraoka, Nobuaki

    In future space developments, the welding in space may be required for the repairs of the ISS and the constructions of lunar base and space structures. The authors have studied the space Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc (GHTA) welding process since 1993. This paper describes the results for space applying the space Diode Laser (DL) welding process which the authors proposed in 2002. It is necessary to prevent the metal deposition on optical devices in order to utilize the space DL welding process in space. The authors studied the preventing technique of metal deposition which covered optical devices with the nozzle and blew the shielding gas out from nozzle outlet. The metal deposition can be reduced by supplying the nozzle with inert gas and blowing the gas out from nozzle outlet. The shielding gas argon perfectly prevents the metal deposition on optical devices when argon pressurizes the nozzle to over 19.9 Pa and spouts out from the nozzle outlet.

  11. The Globular Cluster System of NGC 5128: Ages, Metallicities, Kinematics and Structural Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, K. A.; Gómez, M.

    2010-10-01

    We review our recent studies of the globular cluster system of NGC 5128. First, we have obtained low-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy of 72 globular clusters using Gemini-S/GMOS to obtain the ages, metallicities, and the level of alpha enrichment of the metal-poor and metal-rich globular cluster subpopulations. Second, we have explored the rotational signature and velocity dispersion of the galaxy's halo using over 560 globular clusters with radial velocity measurements. We have also compared the dependence of these properties on galactocentric distance and globular cluster age and metallicity. Using globular clusters as tracer objects, we have analyzed the mass, and mass-to-light ratio of NGC 5128. Last, we have measured the structural parameters, such as half-light radii, of over 570 globular clusters from a superb 1.2-square-degree Magellan/IMACS image. We will present the findings of these studies and discuss the connection to the formation and evolution of NGC 5128.

  12. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  13. Nanostructured europium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in a He buffer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, H.; Franceschini, D. F.; Prioli, R.; Guimaraes, R. B.; Sanchez, C. M.; Canal, G. P.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2010-09-15

    Nanostrucured europium oxide and hydroxide films were obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser ablation of a europium metallic target, in the presence of a 1 mbar helium buffer atmosphere. Both the produced film and the ambient plasma were characterized. The plasma was monitored by an electrostatic probe, for plume expansion in vacuum or in the presence of the buffer atmosphere. The time evolution of the ion saturation current was obtained for several probe to substrate distances. The results show the splitting of the plume into two velocity groups, being the lower velocity profile associated with metal cluster formation within the plume. The films were obtained in the presence of helium atmosphere, for several target-to-substrate distances. They were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, for as-deposited and 600 deg. C treated-in-air samples. The results show that the as-deposited samples are amorphous and have chemical composition compatible with europium hydroxide. The thermally treated samples show x-ray diffraction peaks of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with chemical composition showing excess oxygen. Film nanostructuring was shown to be strongly correlated with cluster formation, as shown by velocity splitting in probe current versus time plots.

  14. Structures and stability of metal-doped GenM (n = 9, 10) clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-06-26

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic Ge nM (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge9 and Ge10 clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Gen clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe9,10,MnGe9,10 and Ge10Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Suchmore » cage-like transition metal doped Gen clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge9,10Fe and Ge9Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.« less

  15. Mo-Cu metal cluster formation and binding in an orange protein isolated from Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Carepo, Marta S P; Pauleta, Sofia R; Wedd, Anthony G; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    The orange protein (ORP) isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas (11.8 kDa) contains a mixed-metal sulfide cluster of the type [S2MoS2CuS2MoS2](3-) noncovalently bound to the polypeptide chain. The D. gigas ORP was heterologously produced in Escherichia coli in the apo form. Different strategies were used to reconstitute the metal cluster into apo-ORP and obtain insights into the metal cluster synthesis: (1) incorporation of a synthesized inorganic analogue of the native metal cluster and (2) the in situ synthesis of the metal cluster on the addition to apo-ORP of copper chloride and tetrathiomolybdate or tetrathiotungstate. This latter procedure was successful, and the visible spectrum of the Mo-Cu reconstituted ORP is identical to the one reported for the native protein with absorption maxima at 340 and 480 nm. The (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra of the reconstituted ORP obtained by strategy 2, in contrast to strategy 1, exhibited large changes, which required sequential assignment in order to identify, by chemical shift differences, the residues affected by the incorporation of the cluster, which is stabilized inside the protein by both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  16. Structures and stability of metal-doped GenM (n = 9, 10) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic GenM (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge9 and Ge10 clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Gen clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe9,10,MnGe9,10 and Ge10Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Such cage-like transition metal doped Gen clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge9,10Fe and Ge9Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.

  17. Deposition of metal nanoparticles on phospholipid multilayer membranes modified by gramicidin.

    PubMed

    Han, Won Bae; Kim, Yongdeok; An, Hyeun Hwan; Kim, Hee-Soo; Yoon, Chong Seung

    2013-10-29

    A planar dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multilayer phospholipid membrane was structurally modified by introducing a transmembrane protein, gramicidin (up to 25 mol %), to study its effect on the metal nanoparticles deposited on the membrane. Without gramicidin, when 3-nm-thick Ag, Sn, Al, and Au were deposited, the nanoparticles hardly nucleated on the DPPC membrane in rigid gel state (except for Au); however, the gramicidin addition dramatically enhanced the DPPC membrane surface's affinity for metal atoms so that a dense array of metal (Ag, Sn, and Au) or metal-oxide (Al-oxide) nanoparticles was produced on the membrane surface. The particle sizes ranged from 3 to 15 nm depending on the metal and gramicidin concentration, whereas the particle density was strongly dictated by the gramicidin concentration. The proposed method provides a convenient, generally applicable synthesis route for preparing different metal or metal-oxide nanoparticles on a relatively robust biocompatible membrane.

  18. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters at a high level of approximation i.e. including all the valence electrons in the calculation and also including extensive electron correlation were studied. Perhaps the most useful end result of these studies is the qualitative information about the electronic structure of these small metal clusters, including the nature of the bonding. The electronic structure studies of the small clusters are directly applicable to problems in catalysis. From comparison of dimers, trimers and possibly higher clusters, it is possible to extrapolate the information obtained to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals and their interaction with other atoms and molecules at both surface and interior locations.

  19. Application of a static quadrupole deviator to the deposition of size-selected cluster ions from a laser vaporization source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alayan, R.; Arnaud, L.; Bourgey, A.; Broyer, M.; Cottancin, E.; Huntzinger, J. R.; Lermé, J.; Vialle, J. L.; Pellarin, M.; Guiraud, G.

    2004-07-01

    An electrostatic quadrupole deviator is used to separate charged from neutral clusters produced by a laser vaporization source. Because of their rather constant velocity, this device which is basically an energy selector also acts as an efficient mass filter. We have simulated and studied its capability to generate beams of size-selected charged clusters. Typical beam currents of a few tens of pA allow the formation of two-dimensional cluster deposits within a few minutes. Platinum and indium clusters are deposited on electron microscopy grids coated with an amorphous carbon film. For low-density assemblies of particles in the nanometer range, size histograms are discussed in relation with the mass selectivity of the apparatus. An upper limit for the dispersion of selected cluster diameters is found to be of the order of ±8% which is at least five times better than the dispersion of neutral species.

  20. Process for preparation of a seed layer for selective metal deposition

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for selective metal deposition comprising of the steps of: a. formation of an initial surface on a substrate, said initial surface being comprised of at least two layers of which the uppermost is inert, b. exposing the surface to a source of heat in pre-determined places wherein surface activation is desired, and c. deposition of metal on activated portions of said surface.

  1. Introduction: advances and opportunities in cluster research. [Neutral (metal) and ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of neutral and ionic clusters include these in the upper and lower atmosphere, interstellar grain formation, combustion, radiation physics and chemistry, surface bombardment, fission product transport in reactors, corrosion, etc. This paper is a brief overview of some recent developments in cluster research. (DLC)

  2. Elucidation of Proton-Assisted Fluxionality in Transition-Metal Oxide Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath O.; Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Becher, Edwin L. Becher, Iii; Chowdhury, Arefin; Raghavachari(s), Krishnan

    2012-06-01

    The phenomenon of fluxionality in the reactions of transition-metal oxide clusters provides many opportunities in various industrial and catalytic processes. We present an electronic structure investigation of the fluxionality pathways when anionic W3O6- and Mo3O6- clusters react with three small molecules - water, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. The presentation features a detailed understanding of (a) how the fluxionality pathway occurs and (b) the various factors that affect the fluxionality pathway - such as the metal, different spin-states and the nature of the non-metal in the reacting small molecule.

  3. Spontaneous electrochemical processing in conventional organic solutions for iron ion removal and metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jinghua

    2002-01-01

    In one part of this research, spontaneous electrochemical redox reactions in conventional organic solutions commonly used in solvent extraction were demonstrated. In these reactions, the more noble metal is reduced while the less noble metal dissolves simultaneously. This technique was successfully applied in metal recovery or impurity separation in laboratory tests using synthetic and commercially produced solutions. The second use of the process was in depositing metal seed layers on metallized wafers for use in chip manufacture. The patented process in the first application, called galvanic stripping, has been demonstrated on batch and continuous levels to separate iron from a sulfate medium using DEHPA. The use of zinc and steel scrap as reductants was evaluated. The reductant was found to be one of the most important components in the galvanic stripping process. The effects of other processing variables such as solution chemistry, reductant surface area, ferric ion concentration in the organic phase, agitation, and aqueous pH on iron recovery and efficiency were also evaluated. An experimental design with statistical analysis was utilized to optimize overall iron removal and process efficiency. The continuous test allowed the cycling of the organic and strip aqueous solutions and produced a concentrated iron sulfate strip solution containing ferrous ions in the range of 90 to 130 g/L. Based on the galvanic stripping principle a novel metal deposition technique was successfully applied for depositing seed layers on TiSiN and other metal films on Si wafers for subsequent electroless copper deposition as well as the deposition of gold onto a sputtered copper film. XPS measurements confirmed that the deposited particles or films were a pure metallic metal phase. The effects of various factors including the organic bath composition, reaction time, temperature and agitation on the deposit surface morphologies and the distribution of nuclei were investigated.

  4. Vacuum deposited polymer/metal films for optical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.D.; Martin, P.M.; Gross, M.E.; Coronado, C.; Greenwell, E.

    1995-04-01

    Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Tantalum/Polymer/Aluminum Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuun web coating operation on polyester substrates with a new, high speed deposition process. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 0.8{mu}m. This new vacuum processing technique has been shown to be capable of deposition line speeds in excess of 500 linear meters/minute. Central to this technique is a new position process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process -- for Polymer Multi-Layer. Also, vacuum deposited, index matched, polymer/CaF{sub 2} composites were fabricated from monomer slurries that were subsequently cured with LTV light. This second technique is called the Liquid Multi-Layer (or LML) process. Each of these polymer processes is compatible with each other and with conventional vacuum deposition processes such as sputtering or evaporation.

  5. Processing of metal and oxygen from lunar deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Constance F.

    1992-01-01

    On the moon, some whole rocks may be ores for abundant elements, such as oxygen, but beneficiation will be important if metallic elements are sought from raw lunar dirt. In the extraction process, a beneficiated metallic ore, such as an oxide, sulfide, carbonate, or silicate mineral, is converted to reduced metal. A variety of plausible processing technologies, which includes recovery of meteoritic iron, and processing of lunar ilmenite, are described in this report.

  6. Polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD): a full-solution strategy for flexible, stretchable, compressible, and wearable metal conductors.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Yan, Casey; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-08-20

    Metal interconnects, contacts, and electrodes are indispensable elements for most applications of flexible, stretchable, and wearable electronics. Current fabrication methods for these metal conductors are mainly based on conventional microfabrication procedures that have been migrated from Si semiconductor industries, which face significant challenges for organic-based compliant substrates. This Research News highlights a recently developed full-solution processing strategy, polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD), which is particularly suitable for the roll-to-roll, low-cost fabrication of high-performance compliant metal conductors (Cu, Ni, Ag, and Au) on a wide variety of organic substrates including plastics, elastomers, papers, and textiles. This paper presents i) the principles of PAMD, and how to use it for making ii) flexible, stretchable, and wearable conductive metal electrodes, iii) patterned metal interconnects, and d) 3D stretchable and compressible metal sponges. A critical perspective on this emerging strategy is also provided. PMID:24458846

  7. Critical field of two-dimensional superconducting Sn{sub 1-x}/Si{sub x} bimetallic composite cluster assembled films with energetic cluster impact deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Yuichiro; Hihara, Takehiko; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2013-05-07

    Sn{sub 1-x}/Si{sub x} cluster assembled films have been prepared by an energetic cluster impact deposition using a plasma-gas-condensation cluster beam deposition apparatus. Transmission electron microscope images indicated that individual clusters have composite morphologies, where Sn and Si were separated from each other. The superconducting critical magnetic fields, H{sub c}, of Sn{sub 1-x}/Si{sub x} cluster assembled films were measured and found to be much higher than the critical magnetic field of the bulk Sn. We estimated the H{sub c} values by using a theory of the superconducting thin film. The estimated values are in good agreement with the experiments, indicating that the Sn{sub 1-x}/Si{sub x} cluster assembled films can be regarded as a two-dimensional system although thickness, t, of Sn{sub 1-x}/Si{sub x} cluster assembled films (t Almost-Equal-To 1000 nm) is thicker than conventional superconducting thin film (t < 100 nm).

  8. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  9. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  10. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  11. Full spectral fitting of Milky Way and M 31 globular clusters: ages and metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezario, E.; Coelho, P. R. T.; Alves-Brito, A.; Forbes, D. A.; Brodie, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of disk galaxies are long standing questions in astronomy. Understanding the properties of globular cluster systems can lead to important insights on the evolution of its host galaxy. Aims: We aim to obtain the stellar population parameters - age and metallicity - of a sample of M 31 and Galactic globular clusters. Studying their globular cluster systems is an important step towards understanding their formation and evolution in a complete way. Methods: Our analysis employs a modern pixel-to-pixel spectral fitting technique to fit observed integrated spectra to updated stellar population models. By comparing observations to models we obtain the ages and metallicities of their stellar populations. We apply this technique to a sample of 38 globular clusters in M 31 and to 41 Galactic globular clusters, used as a control sample. Results: Our sample of M 31 globular clusters spans ages from 150 Myr to the age of the Universe. Metallicities [Fe/H] range from -2.2 dex to the solar value. The age-metallicity relation obtained can be described as having two components: an old population with a flat age-[Fe/H] relation, possibly associated with the halo and/or bulge, and a second one with a roughly linear relation between age and metallicity, higher metallicities corresponding to younger ages, possibly associated with the M 31 disk. While we recover the very well known Galactic GC metallicity bimodality, our own analysis of M 31's metallicity distribution function (MDF) suggests that both GC systems cover basically the same [Fe/H] range yet M 31's MDF is not clearly bimodal. These results suggest that both galaxies experienced different star formation and accretion histories. Table 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Modeling electrochemical deposition inside nanotubes to obtain metal-semiconductor multiscale nanocables or conical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Konstantin; Mafé, Salvador; Stroeve, Pieter

    2005-08-01

    Nanocables with a radial metal-semiconductor heterostructure have recently been prepared by electrochemical deposition inside metal nanotubes. First, a bare nanoporous polycarbonate track-etched membrane is coated uniformly with a metal film by electroless deposition. The film forms a working electrode for further deposition of a semiconductor layer that grows radially inside the nanopore when the deposition rate is slow. We propose a new physical model for the nanocable synthesis and study the effects of the deposited species concentration, potential-dependent reaction rate, and nanopore dimensions on the electrochemical deposition. The problem involves both axial diffusion through the nanopore and radial transport to the nanopore surface, with a surface reaction rate that depends on the axial position and the time. This is so because the radial potential drop across the deposited semiconductor layer changes with the layer thickness through the nanopore. Since axially uniform nanocables are needed for most applications, we consider the relative role of reaction and axial diffusion rates on the deposition process. However, in those cases where partial, empty-core deposition should be desirable (e.g., for producing conical nanopores to be used in single nanoparticle detection), we give conditions where asymmetric geometries can be experimentally realized. PMID:16852830

  13. Modeling electrochemical deposition inside nanotubes to obtain metal-semiconductor multiscale nanocables or conical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Konstantin; Mafé, Salvador; Stroeve, Pieter

    2005-08-01

    Nanocables with a radial metal-semiconductor heterostructure have recently been prepared by electrochemical deposition inside metal nanotubes. First, a bare nanoporous polycarbonate track-etched membrane is coated uniformly with a metal film by electroless deposition. The film forms a working electrode for further deposition of a semiconductor layer that grows radially inside the nanopore when the deposition rate is slow. We propose a new physical model for the nanocable synthesis and study the effects of the deposited species concentration, potential-dependent reaction rate, and nanopore dimensions on the electrochemical deposition. The problem involves both axial diffusion through the nanopore and radial transport to the nanopore surface, with a surface reaction rate that depends on the axial position and the time. This is so because the radial potential drop across the deposited semiconductor layer changes with the layer thickness through the nanopore. Since axially uniform nanocables are needed for most applications, we consider the relative role of reaction and axial diffusion rates on the deposition process. However, in those cases where partial, empty-core deposition should be desirable (e.g., for producing conical nanopores to be used in single nanoparticle detection), we give conditions where asymmetric geometries can be experimentally realized.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  15. Influence of substrate metal alloy type on the properties of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited using a novel ambient temperature deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Barry, J N; Cowley, A; McNally, P J; Dowling, D P

    2014-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are applied widely to enhance the level of osteointegration onto orthopedic implants. Atmospheric plasma spray (APS) is typically used for the deposition of these coatings; however, HA crystalline changes regularly occur during this high-thermal process. This article reports on the evaluation of a novel low-temperature (<47°C) HA deposition technique, called CoBlast, for the application of crystalline HA coatings. To-date, reports on the CoBlast technique have been limited to titanium alloy substrates. This study addresses the suitability of the CoBlast technique for the deposition of HA coatings on a number of alternative metal alloys utilized in the fabrication of orthopedic devices. In addition to titanium grade 5, both cobalt chromium and stainless steel 316 were investigated. In this study, HA coatings were deposited using both the CoBlast and the plasma sprayed techniques, and the resultant HA coating and substrate properties were evaluated and compared. The CoBlast-deposited HA coatings were found to present similar surface morphologies, interfacial properties, and composition irrespective of the substrate alloy type. Coating thickness however displayed some variation with the substrate alloy, ranging from 2.0 to 3.0 μm. This perhaps is associated with the electronegativity of the metal alloys. The APS-treated samples exhibited evidence of both coating, and significantly, substrate phase alterations for two metal alloys; titanium grade 5 and cobalt chrome. Conversely, the CoBlast-processed samples exhibited no phase changes in the substrates after depositions. The APS alterations were attributed to the brief, but high-intensity temperatures experienced during processing.

  16. The interaction of fingermark deposits on metal surfaces and potential ways for visualisation.

    PubMed

    Wightman, G; Emery, F; Austin, C; Andersson, I; Harcus, L; Arju, G; Steven, C

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of fingermark deposits on metals has been examined by a variety of techniques. Visualisation by film growth has been the main area of investigation through: thermal oxidation, anodising, peroxide solution, and the interaction with vapour of iodine and ammonium sulphide. Corrosion of the underlying metal has also been examined as an alternative means of visualisation. Confocal microscopy was used to look at the film thickness and corrosion products around the prints. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM-EDX) examined a number of metal samples to investigate film growth and the elemental distribution. The observations suggest that differential oxidation was occurring as well as corrosion into the metal. Fingermark deposits on metals can corrode into the metal depending on the reactivity of the metal and leave a recoverable mark. However, fingermark deposits can also alter the rate of chemical reaction of the substrate metal by oxidation. In some cases organic matter can inhibit reaction, both when forming an oxide layer and when corroding the metal. However, signs of third level detail from pore contact may also be visible and the monovalent ions from salts could also influence film growth. Whilst further work would need to be carried out to decide whether any of these techniques may have application in fingermark recovery, this study does suggest that fingermarks on metals may be recoverable after incidents such as fires or immersion in water.

  17. Coulomb frustration of the multiphoton ionization of metallic clusters under intense EUV FEL evidenced by ion spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, T.; Devetta, M.; Milani, P.; Motomura, K.; Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Yamada, A.; Okunishi, M.; Nagaya, K.; Iwayama, H.; Sugishima, A.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Saito, N.; Coreno, M.; Fennel, Th; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Togashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.; Piseri, P.

    2015-12-01

    Free electron laser light sources delivering high intensity pulses of short wavelength radiation are opening novel possibilities for the investigation of matter at the nanoscale and for the discovery and understanding of new physical processes occurring at the exotic transient states they make accessible. Strong ionization of atomic constituents of a nano-sized sample is a representative example of such processes and the understanding of ionization dynamics is crucial for a realistic description of the experiments. We report here on multiple ionization experiments on free clusters of titanium, a high cohesive energy metal. The time of flight ion spectra reveal a saturation of the cluster ionization at ∼1016 photons per pulse per cm2. Our results also show a clear lack of any explosion process, opposite to what is observed for a rare-gas cluster under similar conditions. A simple and generalized multi-step ionization model including Coulomb frustration of the photoemission process effectively reproduces with a good agreement the main features of the experimental observation and points to an interpretation of the data involving a substantial energy deposition into the cluster through electronic system heating upon scattering events within photoemission.

  18. Chemical bonding topology of ternary transition metal-centered bismuth cluster halides: from molecules to metals.

    PubMed

    King, R Bruce

    2003-12-29

    The bismuth polyhedra in ternary transition metal-centered bismuth cluster halides may form discrete molecules or ions, infinite chains, and/or infinite layers. The chemical bonding in many of these diverse structures is related to that in deltahedral boranes exhibiting three-dimensional aromaticity by replacing the multicenter core bond in the boranes with two-center two-electron (2c-2e) bonds from the central transition metal to the nearest neighbor bismuth vertices. Examples of discrete molecules or ions include octahedral MBi(6)(micro-X)(12)(z)()(-) (X = Br, I; M = Rh, Ir, z = 3; M = Ru, z = 4) with exclusively 2c-2e bonds and pentagonal bipyramidal RhBi(7)Br(8) with a 5c-4e bond in the equatorial pentagonal plane indicative of Möbius aromaticity. The compound Ru(3)Bi(24)Br(20) contains a more complicated discrete bismuth cluster ion Ru(2)Bi(17)(micro-Br)(4)(5+), which can be dissected into a RuBi(5) closo octahedron and a RuBi(8) nido capped square antiprism bridged by a Ru(2)Bi(4)(micro-Br)(4) structural unit. In RuBi(4)X(2) (X = Br, I), the same Ru(2)Bi(4)(micro-Br)(4) structural unit bridges Bi(4) squares similar to those found in the known Zintl ion Bi(4)(2)(-) to give infinite chains of Ru(2)Bi(4) octahedra. The electron counts of the RuBi(5), RuBi(8), and Ru(2)Bi(4) polyhedra in these structures follow the Wade-Mingos rules. A different infinite chain structure is constructed from fused RhBi(7/2)Bi bicapped trigonal prisms in Rh(2)Bi(9)Br(3). This Rh(2)Bi(9)Br(3) structure can alternatively be derived from alternating Rh(2/2)Bi(4) octahedra and Rh(2/)(2)Bi(5) pentagonal bipyramids with electron counts obeying the Wade-Mingos rules. Related chemical bonding principles appear to apply to more complicated layer structures such as Pt(3)Bi(13)I(7) containing Kagomé nets of PtBi(8/2) cubes and Ni(4)Bi(12)X(3) containing linked chains of NiBi(6/3)Bi capped trigonal prisms.

  19. Mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric heavy metal deposition: spatial patterns and temporal trends in Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, H; Norris, D A; Steinnes, E; Kubin, E; Piispanen, J; Alber, R; Aleksiayenak, Y; Blum, O; Coşkun, M; Dam, M; De Temmerman, L; Fernández, J A; Frolova, M; Frontasyeva, M; González-Miqueo, L; Grodzińska, K; Jeran, Z; Korzekwa, S; Krmar, M; Kvietkus, K; Leblond, S; Liiv, S; Magnússon, S H; Mankovská, B; Pesch, R; Rühling, A; Santamaria, J M; Schröder, W; Spiric, Z; Suchara, I; Thöni, L; Urumov, V; Yurukova, L; Zechmeister, H G

    2010-10-01

    In recent decades, mosses have been used successfully as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition of heavy metals. Since 1990, the European moss survey has been repeated at five-yearly intervals. Although spatial patterns were metal-specific, in 2005 the lowest concentrations of metals in mosses were generally found in Scandinavia, the Baltic States and northern parts of the UK; the highest concentrations were generally found in Belgium and south-eastern Europe. The recent decline in emission and subsequent deposition of heavy metals across Europe has resulted in a decrease in the heavy metal concentration in mosses for the majority of metals. Since 1990, the concentration in mosses has declined the most for arsenic, cadmium, iron, lead and vanadium (52-72%), followed by copper, nickel and zinc (20-30%), with no significant reduction being observed for mercury (12% since 1995) and chromium (2%). However, temporal trends were country-specific with sometimes increases being found.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  1. Melting of bcc Transition Metals and Icosahedral Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Boehler, R; Japel, S

    2006-05-26

    In contrast to polyvalent metals, transition metals have low melting slopes(dT/dP) that are due to partially filled d-bands that allow for a lowering of liquid phase energy through s-d electron transfer and the formation of local structures. In the case of bcc transition metals we show the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting of Mo can be understood by reexamining the shock data for V and Ta and introducing the presence of an icosahedral short range order (ISRO) melt phase.

  2. A DFT study of Ni clusters deposition on titania and zirconia (101) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosoni, Sergio; Chen, Hsin-Yi Tiffany; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Density functional calculations are employed to simulate the deposition of an isolated Ni atom and a Ni10 particle on the stoichiometric and reduced anatase TiO2 (101) and tetragonal ZrO2 (101) surfaces. The main purpose of this work is to study the modification of the electronic structure of the oxide induced by the metal, aiming at the understanding of the physical properties of new catalysts for biomass conversion. When the adsorption of a Ni atom takes place on stoichiometric surfaces, no major charge transfer is observed. On reduced titania, and more pronouncedly on reduced zirconia, the Ni atom is negatively charged, provided that the vacancy is in direct contact with the adsorbed metal atom. For Ni10, on titania the bonding is dominated by the hybridization of the metal and the oxide states but we did not find evidence for a direct reduction of the oxide via formation of Ti3 + states. For Ni10 on zirconia, the metal particle is positively charged on the stoichiometric surface and negatively charged on the reduced one but, again, there is no indication of a direct reduction of the oxide. Finally, the reverse oxygen spillover is considered as a possible route to reduce the oxide support. The result is that Ni10 promotes oxygen spillover on titania almost spontaneously, while on zirconia this process is thermodynamically unfavourable.

  3. The Catalytic Manganese Cluster: Organization of the Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, V.K.

    2007-02-09

    The light-induced oxidation of water to O{sub 2} is catalyzed by a four-manganese atom cluster associated with Photosystem II (PS II). This chapter summarizes ongoing investigations of the oxidation state, the structure and the associated cofactors calcium and chloride of the catalytic Mn cluster using X-ray and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese K-edge X-ray spectroscopy, K{beta} X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies have not only determined the oxidation states and structural features, but also changes that occur in oxidation state of the Mn cluster and in its structural organization during the accumulation of oxidizing equivalents leading to O{sub 2} formation. Combining X-ray spectroscopy information with X-ray diffraction studies, and consistent with the available EPR data, we have succeeded in limiting the range of likely structures of the Mn cluster. EXAFS studies at the strontium and calcium K-edges have provided evidence that the catalytic center is a Mn/Ca heteronuclear complex. Based on the X-ray spectroscopy data, models for the structure and a mechanism for O{sub 2} evolution are presented.

  4. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  5. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sonia; Hajji, Messaoud; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications.

  6. Selective Metal Deposition on a Phase-Separated Polymer Blend Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2013-07-01

    We report selective metal deposition on a phase-separated polymer blend surface. A polymer blend film consisting of polystyrene (PS) and a polystyrene-block-polybutadiene copolymer (PS-BR) was annealed, and a micro-phase-separated film was obtained. Pb was evaporated onto the phase-separated surface without an evaporation mask and was selectively deposited on the PS phase but not on the PS-BR phase. We achieved fine metal patterns corresponding to the microphase separation. This result suggests a novel method of preparing fine metal patterns for electronics and photonics.

  7. Metal contamination of Ganga River (India) as influenced by atmospheric deposition.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J; Shubhashish, K; Pandey, Richa

    2009-08-01

    Metal contamination of Ganga river in relation to atmospheric deposition was investigated. The data revealed that, although Cr and Cu remained below their maximum admissible concentrations, levels of Cd and Pb in mid-stream waters at five out of six stations were higher than their respective maximum admissible concentration. About 62% of water samples contained Ni above its maximum admissible concentration of 20 microg L(-1). Metal concentrations in water showed significant correlation and seasonal synchrony with atmospheric deposition. The study forms the first report on air-driven metal contamination of Ganga and has relevance from human health perspectives.

  8. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  9. Metal contamination of Ganga River (India) as influenced by atmospheric deposition.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J; Shubhashish, K; Pandey, Richa

    2009-08-01

    Metal contamination of Ganga river in relation to atmospheric deposition was investigated. The data revealed that, although Cr and Cu remained below their maximum admissible concentrations, levels of Cd and Pb in mid-stream waters at five out of six stations were higher than their respective maximum admissible concentration. About 62% of water samples contained Ni above its maximum admissible concentration of 20 microg L(-1). Metal concentrations in water showed significant correlation and seasonal synchrony with atmospheric deposition. The study forms the first report on air-driven metal contamination of Ganga and has relevance from human health perspectives. PMID:19434353

  10. The role of guest molecules in the self-assembly of metal-ligand clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Darren William

    The role guest molecules play in the self-assembly of supramolecular metal-ligand clusters is examined in the context of several predictive design strategies for forming these types of assemblies. Chapter One serves as an introduction and literature survey of this topic. These large assemblies often house guest molecules which play a previously uncharacterized role in the self-assembly processes. Chapter One seeks to categorize this role: Do the guest molecules act as templates in the synthesis? Are the guest molecules necessary for cluster formation? Does the guest drive cluster assembly by forming a stable host-guest complex with the cluster? In Chapter Two a series of heterometallic-hybrid ligand clusters of stoichiometry M2M'3L6 are presented. These result from a predictive design strategy in which two different metals, one hard and one soft, supply all the symmetry elements in these C3h "mesocates." The early examples of these clusters were synthesized in a stepwise manner; however, complete self-assembly of all eleven components can be achieved using appropriate guest molecules. The self-assembly of a novel geometry for metal-ligand clusters, D3 symmetry M6L6 "cylinders," is presented in Chapter Three. This chapter presents the fortuitous synthesis of these cylinders and demonstrates the tendency for discrete clusters to form over oligomers when rigid ligands and labile metals are combined. The ligand presented was designed to assemble M4L4 tetrahedra with trivalent metal ions, however cylinders were formed in all cases examined. Guest molecules were not found to play a role in this self-assembly, but solvent molecules were found disordered within the solid state structures of these clusters. Chapter Four describes a bis-bidentate catecholamide ligand with a structure between the design for M2L3 helicate formation and M 4L6 tetrahedron formation. The two design strategies are briefly discussed, and molecular modeling studies are presented which suggested that

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of energy-deposit clustering for ions of the same LET in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Francis, Z; Incerti, S; Ivanchenko, V; Champion, C; Karamitros, M; Bernal, M A; El Bitar, Z

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a Monte Carlo study of energy depositions due to protons, alpha particles and carbon ions of the same linear-energy-transfer (LET) in liquid water. The corresponding track structures were generated using the Geant4-DNA toolkit, and the energy deposition spatial distributions were analyzed using an adapted version of the DBSCAN clustering algorithm. Combining the Geant4 simulations and the clustering algorithm it was possible to compare the quality of the different radiation types. The ratios of clustered and single energy depositions are shown versus particle LET and frequency-mean lineal energies. The estimated effect of these types of radiation on biological tissues is then discussed by comparing the results obtained for different particles with the same LET.

  12. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  13. An aligned stream of low-metallicity clusters in the halo of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2002-07-26

    One of the long-standing problems in modern astronomy is the curious division of Galactic globular clusters, the "Oosterhoff dichotomy," according to the properties of their RR Lyrae stars. Here, we find that most of the lowest metallicity ([Fe/H] < -2.0) clusters, which are essential to an understanding of this phenomenon, display a planar alignment in the outer halo. This alignment, combined with evidence from kinematics and stellar population, indicates a captured origin from a satellite galaxy. We show that, together with the horizontal-branch evolutionary effect, the factor producing the dichotomy could be a small time gap between the cluster-formation epochs in the Milky Way and the satellite. The results oppose the traditional view that the metal-poorest clusters represent the indigenous and oldest population of the Galaxy.

  14. Metal Transport and Heating in the Core of the Antlia Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, Marie

    2008-10-01

    Understanding the transport of energy and metals from central dominant galaxies in clusters into the intracluster medium (ICM) is vital to any model for the evolution of structure in the Universe. We propose to use a 50ks EPIC MOS+pn observation of the core (inner 12') of the Antlia Cluster to study the role of gas motions and turbulent diffusion in the chemical enrichment and heating of the ICM in a cluster with a sharply rising abundance profile, but without a cool core. We will map temperature, density and abundances throughout the Antlia cluster core, construct pressure and entropy maps to track gas motions and heat flows, and test models of metal enrichment due to turbulent motions powered by episodic outbursts from the central galaxy's AGN.

  15. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings from metal (Mg alloy)-drug deposited onto medical implant by laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir; Serbezov, Svetlin

    2013-03-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are active implants whose function is to create healing effects. The current requirements for active medical coatings for Drug-eluting medical implants are to be biocompatible, biodegradable, polymer free, mechanically stable and enable a controlled release of one or more drugs and defined degradation. This brings hybrid nanocomposite coatings into focus especially in the field of cardiovascular implants. We studied the properties of Metal (Mg alloy)-Paclitaxel coatings obtained by novel Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition Technique (LAAD) onto cardiovascular stents from 316 LVM stainless steel material. The morphology and topology of coatings were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Comparative measurements were made of the morphology and topology of hybrid, polymer free nanocomposite coatings deposited by LAAD and polymerdrug coatings deposited by classical spray technique. The coatings obtained by LAAD are homogeneous without damages and cracks. Metal nanoparticles with sizes from 40 nm to 230 nm were obtained in drug matrixes. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of metal nanoparticles presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The new technology opens up possibilities to obtain new hybrid nanocomposite coatings with applications in medicine, pharmacy and biochemistry.

  16. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1990-06-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs.

  17. Gold, base-metal, and related deposits of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luttrell, Gwendolyn Werth

    1978-01-01

    Gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, pyrite, tin, cobalt, molybdenum, tungsten, barite, and rare-earths have been mined in North Carolina. Gold, with by-product silver, occurs in veins and mineralized shear zones in metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont province and in placers derived from these deposits. Copper occurs with complex sulfide ores in quartz veins in the metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont province and in massive pyrrhotite-pyrite deposits in crystalline rocks west of the Blue Ridge. Lead and zinc occur in complex ores of gold, copper, lead, zinc, and silver in veins and replacements in metamorphic rocks. Pyrite occurs in crystalline metamorphic rocks. Tin occurs in pegmatite and placer deposits in crystalline rocks near Kings Mountain. Cobalt minerals with ores of iron or gold have been reported in a few areas in the Piedmont. Molybdenum occurs along the borders of a granite body in Halifax County. Tungsten minerals occur with copper sulfide ores in Cabarrus and Vance Counties. Barite occurs in quartz veins and associated with sulfide minerals in Orange, Madison, Cleveland, and Gaston Counties. Ore-earths occur with sulfides in vein deposits in Cabarrus County.

  18. Cage Opening of a Carborane Ligand by Metal Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Os3 (CO)10 (NCMe)2 with closo-o-C2 B10 H10 has yielded two interconvertible isomers Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -4,5,9-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 a) and Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -3,4,8-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 b) formed by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster. Two BH bonds of the o-C2 B10 H10 were activated in its addition to the osmium cluster. A second triosmium cluster was added to the 1 a/1 b mixture to yield the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)2 (μ3 -4,5,9-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H7 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)3 (2) that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. When heated, 2 was transformed to the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)(μ3 -3,4,8-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H8 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H) (3) by a novel opening of the carborane cage with loss of H2 . PMID:26971388

  19. A review of lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Huang, Jun; Yann Liaw, Bor; Metzler, Viktor; Zhang, Jianbo

    2014-05-01

    Major aspects related to lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries are reviewed. For lithium-ion batteries with carbonaceous anode, lithium deposition may occur under harsh charging conditions such as overcharging or charging at low temperatures. The major technical solutions include: (1) applying electrochemical models to predict the critical conditions for deposition initiation; (2) preventions by improved battery design and material modification; (3) applying adequate charging protocols to inhibit lithium deposition. For lithium metal secondary batteries, the lithium deposition is the inherent reaction during charging. The major technical solutions include: (1) the use of mechanistic models to elucidate and control dendrite initiation and growth; (2) engineering surface morphology of the lithium deposition to avoid dendrite formation via adjusting the composition and concentration of the electrolyte; (3) controlling battery working conditions. From a survey of the literature, the areas that require further study are proposed; e.g., refining the lithium deposition criteria, developing an effective AC self pre-heating method for low-temperature charging of lithium-ion batteries, and clarifying the role the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays in determining the deposition morphology; to facilitate a refined control of the lithium deposition.

  20. Synthesis and catalytic properties of metal clusters encapsulated within small-pore (SOD, GIS, ANA) zeolites.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sarika; Wu, Zhijie; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-10-24

    The synthesis protocols for encapsulation of metal clusters reported here expand the diversity in catalytic chemistries made possible by the ability of microporous solids to select reactants, transition states, and products on the basis of their molecular size. We report a synthesis strategy for the encapsulation of noble metals and their oxides within SOD (Sodalite, 0.28 nm × 0.28 nm), GIS (Gismondine, 0.45 nm × 0.31 nm), and ANA (Analcime, 0.42 nm × 0.16 nm) zeolites. Encapsulation was achieved via direct hydrothermal synthesis for SOD and GIS using metal precursors stabilized by ammonia or organic amine ligands, which prevent their decomposition or precipitation as colloidal hydroxides at the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis (<380 K) and favor interactions between metal precursors and incipient aluminosilicate nuclei during self-assembly of microporous frameworks. The synthesis of ANA requires higher crystallization temperatures (~415 K) and high pH (>12), thereby causing precipitation of even ligand-stabilized metal precursors as hydroxides. As a result, encapsulation was achieved by the recrystallization of metal clusters containing GIS into ANA, which retained these metal clusters within voids throughout the GIS-ANA transformation.

  1. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  2. Low-metallicity Young Clusters in the Outer Galaxy. I. Sh 2-207

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Chikako; Kobayashi, Naoto; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao; Izumi, Natsuko

    2016-03-01

    To study star formation in low-metallicity environments ([M/H] ˜ -1 dex), we obtained deep near-infrared (NIR) images of Sh 2-207 (S207), which is an H ii region in the outer Galaxy with a spectroscopically determined metallicity of [O/H] ≃ -0.8 dex. We identified a young cluster in the western region of S207 with a limiting magnitude of KS = 19.0 mag (10σ) that corresponds to a mass detection limit of ≲0.1 M⊙ and enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of the S207 cluster are estimated at 2-3 Myr and ˜4 kpc, respectively. The estimated age is consistent with the suggestion of small extinctions of stars in the cluster (AV ˜ 3 mag) and the non-detection of molecular clouds. The reasonably good fit between the observed KLF and the model KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the cluster down to the detection limit is not significantly different from the typical IMFs in the solar metallicity. From the fraction of stars with NIR excesses, a low disk fraction (<10%) in the cluster with a relatively young age is suggested, as we had previously proposed.

  3. A study of rotating globular clusters. The case of the old, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 4372 is a poorly studied old, very metal-poor globular cluster (GC) located in the inner Milky Way halo. Aims: We present the first in-depth study of the kinematic properties and derive the structural parameters of NGC 4372 based on the fit of a Plummer profile and a rotating, physical model. We explore the link between internal rotation to different cluster properties and together with similar studies of more GCs, we put these in the context of globular cluster formation and evolution. Methods: We present radial velocities for 131 cluster member stars measured from high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations. Their membership to the GC is additionally confirmed from precise metallicity estimates. We build a velocity dispersion profile and a systemic rotation curve using this kinematic data set. Additionally, we obtain an elliptical number density profile of NGC 4372 based on optical images using a Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting algorithm. From this, we derive the cluster's half-light radius and ellipticity as rh = 3.44' ± 0.04' and ɛ = 0.08 ± 0.01. Finally, we give a physical interpretation of the observed morphological and kinematic properties of this GC by fitting an axisymmetric, differentially rotating, dynamical model. Results: Our results show that NGC 4372 has an unusually high ratio of rotation amplitude to velocity dispersion (1.2 vs. 4.5 km s-1) for its metallicity. This puts it in line, however, with two other exceptional, very metal-poor GCs: M 15 and NGC 4590. We also find a mild flattening of NGC 4372 in the direction of its rotation. Given its old age, this suggests that the flattening is indeed caused by the systemic rotation rather than tidal interactions with the Galaxy. Additionally, we estimate the dynamical mass of the GC Mdyn = 2.0 ± 0.5 × 105M⊙ based on the dynamical model, which constrains the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 4372 between 1.4 and 2.3 M⊙/L⊙, representative of an old, purely stellar population. Based on

  4. Volcano emissions of trace metals, atmospheric deposition, and supply to biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkley, T.; Thornber, C. R.; Matsumoto, A.

    2003-12-01

    Quiescently degassing (not exploding) volcanoes inject into the troposphere plumes that have remarkably high concentrations of ordinarily-rare, volatile trace metals. In pre-industrial times, these emissions appear to have accounted for the strong "enrichments" (relative to concentrations in crustal material or in ocean solute) of many such trace metals in the material deposited from the atmosphere. This has been shown by measuring the source strength of the emissions of metals from volcanoes, and comparing that to the amounts of the metals (excess over amounts accounted for by rock dust and sea salt) deposited onto high-latitude ice sheets: volcano degassing outputs of metals and deposition masses of metals to ice are comparable, on the basis of the masses (fluxes) and proportions of the metals, and from the proportions of lead (Pb) isotopes. There is indication that in modern industrial times the elevated trace metal fractions in the atmospheric material that has small particle size and long atmospheric residence time is still more strongly influenced by volcano emissions than by industrial emissions. Throughout earth's history it is likely that volcano emissions were a major control on the environmental background levels of trace elements, in which plants and animals evolved their tolerances to these mostly-poisonous substances.

  5. Metal dust deposition in a shotgun wound associated with barrel modification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew S; Bowes, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Contact-range gunshot wounds commonly demonstrate deposition of black soot in and around the wound. Deposition of other visible pigments originating from the firearm has not been specifically described. In the current case, an adult male was found dead adjacent to a shotgun fixed in a vice grip with a modified, shortened barrel. A handheld, powered, metal grinding wheel was nearby. Autopsy revealed an intraoral gunshot wound, including soot deposition in and around the mouth and within the wound track. In addition, there was a peculiar, gray, lustrous film on the lips, gingiva, and anterior teeth. The material was concentrated around the most severe areas of injury in the anterior mouth and easily rubbed off with a cotton swab. It was not visualized in the rest of the mouth and not present in the larynx, or the esophagus. Overall, our opinion is that this unique, gray, lustrous film represents deposition of fine metallic dust that accumulated in the barrel of the shotgun during its modification with the grinding wheel. This type of unique pigment deposition should be recognized by forensic pathologists as possibly being related to the discharge of a firearm with a recently modified barrel or other cause for fine metallic dust accumulation within the barrel. Depending on the circumstances of the case, collection of samples of such metal dust deposits could be indicated for subsequent analysis. PMID:26782960

  6. Metal dust deposition in a shotgun wound associated with barrel modification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew S; Bowes, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Contact-range gunshot wounds commonly demonstrate deposition of black soot in and around the wound. Deposition of other visible pigments originating from the firearm has not been specifically described. In the current case, an adult male was found dead adjacent to a shotgun fixed in a vice grip with a modified, shortened barrel. A handheld, powered, metal grinding wheel was nearby. Autopsy revealed an intraoral gunshot wound, including soot deposition in and around the mouth and within the wound track. In addition, there was a peculiar, gray, lustrous film on the lips, gingiva, and anterior teeth. The material was concentrated around the most severe areas of injury in the anterior mouth and easily rubbed off with a cotton swab. It was not visualized in the rest of the mouth and not present in the larynx, or the esophagus. Overall, our opinion is that this unique, gray, lustrous film represents deposition of fine metallic dust that accumulated in the barrel of the shotgun during its modification with the grinding wheel. This type of unique pigment deposition should be recognized by forensic pathologists as possibly being related to the discharge of a firearm with a recently modified barrel or other cause for fine metallic dust accumulation within the barrel. Depending on the circumstances of the case, collection of samples of such metal dust deposits could be indicated for subsequent analysis.

  7. Dialkyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes - a new class of single source precursors for deposition of metal selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sajid N.; Akhtar, Masood; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Qadeer Malik, Abdul; Azad Malik, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    We report here a new synthetic approach for convenient and high yield synthesis of dialkyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes. A number of diphenyldiselenophosphinato-metal as well as diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes have been synthesized and used as precursors for deposition of semiconductor thin films and nanoparticles. Cubic Cu2-xSe and tetragonal CuInSe2 thin films have been deposited by AACVD at 400, 450 and 500 °C whereas cubic PbSe and tetragonal CZTSe thin films have been deposited through doctor blade method followed by annealing. SEM investigations revealed significant differences in morphology of the films deposited at different temperatures. Preparation of Cu2-xSe and In2Se3 nanoparticles using diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal precursors has been carried out by colloidal method in HDA/TOP system. Cu2-xSe nanoparticles (grown at 250 °C) and In2Se3 nanoparticles (grown at 270 °C) have a mean diameter of 5.0 ± 1.2 nm and 13 ± 2.5 nm, respectively.

  8. Solution-Membrane Equilibrium at Metal-Deposited Cation-Exchange Membranes: Chronopotentiometric Characterization of Metal-Modified Membranes.

    PubMed

    Shahi; Prakash; Ramachandraiah; Rangarajan; Vasudevan

    1999-08-01

    Copper- and lead-deposited interpolymer cationic membranes have been prepared by electroless plating by an ion-exchange method and characterized by chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry. The parameters such as transition time (tau), Itau1/2, the potential drop (E0) across these membranes immediately after the application of constant current (I), and the height of the potential jump (DeltaE) across the membrane at tau have been measured by chronopotentiometry and compared with those of plain membranes. The approximate percentage of metal coverage and the number of ionic sites masked by the deposited metal in terms of NaCl concentration have been estimated from the differences in Itau1/2 values of plain and metal-deposited membranes. The quantity of metal deposited in a unit area of the membrane surface was measured by differential pulse polarography. The oxidation and reduction peak potentials corresponding to Cu(0)/Cu(II) and Pb(0)/Pb(II) couples were identified by cyclic voltammetry at pH 2.8 and 4.5 of 0.2 M CH3COONa-H2SO4. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10395776

  9. Optical spectra of hot alkali-metal clusters from the random-matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Akulin, V.M.; Brechignac, C.; Sarfati, A.

    1997-01-01

    We show that the experimentally observed spectra of optical absorption of sodium cluster ions can be explained in the framework of the same random-matrix model, that has been employed earlier [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 75}, 220 (1995)] for the ground-state properties of alkali-metal clusters. This approach reveals the effect of cluster symmetry {open_quotes}on average{close_quotes} on the optical-absorption profiles, describes their temperature dependence, and predicts the line shapes of two-photon absorption. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. DFT study of adsorption of CO2 on palladium cluster doped by transition metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputro, A. G.; Agusta, M. K.; Wungu, T. D. K.; Suprijadi; Rusydi, F.; Dipojono, H. K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a theoretical study of CO2 adsorption on Pd6-M (M: Ni, Cu, Pt, Rh) cluster using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that CO2 molecule is adsorbed with a bidendate configuration on Pd7 and on most of Pd6M clusters. The bidendate adsorption configuration is formed due to the filling of the unoccupied n* orbital of CO2 molecule upon its interaction with d-orbitals of the cluster. We find that transition metal doping could modify the adsorption energy, adsorption site and adsorption configuration of CO2 molecule on Pd7 cluster. We also predict that the usage of Pd6M clusters as CO2 hydrogenation catalysts might facilitate the formations of HCOO/COOH.

  11. Photoemission Studies of Metallic Photocathodes Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, V.; Lorusso, A.; Perrone, A.; De Rosa, H.; Cultrera, L.

    2010-11-10

    We present the results of our investigation on metallic films as suitable photocathodes for the production of intense electron beams in RF photoinjector guns. Pulsed laser ablation deposition technique was used for growing Mg and Y thin films onto Si and Cu substrates in high vacuum and at room temperature.Different diagnostic methods were used to characterize the thin films deposited on Si with the aim to optimize the deposition process. Photoelectron performances were investigated on samples deposited on Cu substrate in an ultra high vacuum photodiode chamber at 10{sup -7} Pa. Relatively high quantum efficiencies have been obtained for the deposited films, comparable to those of corresponding bulks. Samples could stay for several months in humid open air before being tested in a photodiode cell. The deposition process and the role of the photocathode surface contamination and its influence on the photoelectron performances are presented and discussed.

  12. Multiscale approaches for simulation of nucleation, growth, and additive chemistry during electrochemical deposition of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ryan Mark

    Molecularly engineered deposition processes require computational algorithms that efficiently capture phenomena present at widely varying length and time scales. In this work, the island dynamics method was applied to simulation of kinetically-limited metal nucleation and growth by electrodeposition in the presence of additives. The model included additive kinetics, surface diffusion of adatoms, nucleation, and growth. The model was demonstrated for copper deposition in acid sulfate electrolyte containing [bis(3-sulfopropyl)disulfide], polyethylene glycol, and chloride. Simulation results were compared with kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) calculations and found to be within 1% for fractional coverage values, and within 10% for nucleation density. The computational time was more than 10X faster than comparable KMC simulations over the range studied. The island dynamics algorithm was applied to the electrodeposition of a metal onto a substrate initially configured with an array of hemispherical seed clusters. It was found that the presence of chloride in the model additive system caused high densities of nuclei on the substrate surrounding the initial seed clusters, which led to the formation of a continuous thin metal film. Simulations carried out under low-chloride conditions resulted in the growth only of the initial seed clusters, without significant nucleation or thin film formation. Additional phenomena were explored by linking the molecular scale island dynamics algorithm to a continuum model that described the migration and diffusion in the diffusion layer near the electrode surface. The multiscale linkage allowed simulation of nucleation, growth, and additive chemistry under mass transport limited conditions, including the formation of nucleation exclusion zones surrounding growing nuclei. A two-step approach was used to calculate the spatial distribution of nucleation events on an electrode undergoing deposition by electrolysis under the influence of mass

  13. Insulating or metallic: coexistence of different electronic phases in zinc clusters.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Andrés; Vega, Andrés; Lebon, Alexandre; von Issendorff, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    How many of the several attributes of the bulk metallic state persist in a nanoparticle containing a finite number of atoms of a metallic element? Do all those attributes emerge suddenly at a well-defined cluster size or do they rather evolve at different rates and in a broad size range? These fundamental questions have been addressed through a conjoint experimental/theoretical investigation of zinc clusters. We report the observation of novel coexistence phenomena involving different electronic phases: for some sizes, metallic and insulating electronic states coexist within a single, Janus-like, nanoparticle; for the rest of sizes, we report the coexistence of two weakly interacting metallic phases with different dimensionalities, localized at the shell and the core of the nanoparticle. These fascinating features are due to an anomalously long core-shell separation that equips the shell and core regions with largely independent structural, vibrational, and thermal properties.

  14. System for the galvanic deposition of metals such as aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Doetzer, R.; Gehring, J.; Hini, P.; Stoeger, K.

    1984-04-24

    A system for the galvanic deposition of aluminum incorporating a tubular cell through which goods to be treated can be moved in the axial direction. An electrolyte is pumped through the tubular cell preferably with the aid of an electrolyte circulating system which is self-contained. The electrolyte is gated out by means of T-shaped connecting components which are adjoined by airlock arrangements associated with the tubular cell.

  15. CW laser compaction of aqueous solution deposited metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Dennis, T.

    1997-12-01

    Zirconium dioxide films were spin cast onto silica or silicon substrates from an aqueous solution comprised of the precursor metal nitrate and an organic complexant such as glycine. The hydrated films so derived consist of an amorphous organic phase in which the metal cations and nitrate anions are homogeneously dispersed. Heating to temperatures above 200 {degrees}C leads to film dehydration followed by an auto-catalyzed oxidation reaction whereby the bound nitrate oxidizes the organic matrix leaving behind an intact stoichiometric and crystalline metal oxide film. Films are characterized using AFM, XRD, and optical methods. Transformation processes in these films have been studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and laser induced fluorescence from films doped with a suitable rare earth probe ion such as SM{sup +3}. In the latter case, the measured fluorescence emission spectra are used to identify the hydrated, dehydrated, amorphous and crystalline metal oxide phases which evolve during processing. These transformations also have been induced upon visible CW laser irradiation at fluences in excess of 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Under these conditions, the film dehydrates and compacts within the footprint of the incident laser beam rendering this region of the film water insoluble. Post irradiation washing of the film with water removes all vestiges of the film outside of the beam footprint suggesting a possible use of this technique for lithography applications. Films subjected to laser irradiation and post irradiation heating have been characterized with respect to thickness, phase composition, crystallite size and optical constants.

  16. Advanced use of high-performance liquid chromatography for synthesis of controlled metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niihori, Yoshiki; Matsuzaki, Miku; Uchida, Chihiro; Negishi, Yuichi

    2014-06-01

    Because the synthesis of metal clusters with multiple ligand types results in a distribution of ligands, high-resolution separation of each unique cluster from the mixture is required for precise control of the ligand composition. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography combined with appropriate transitioning of the mobile phase composition is an extremely effective means of separating ligand combinations when working with metal clusters protected by two different types of thiolates. We report herein advanced use of this method. The studies involving Au24Pd(SR1)18-x(SR2)x and Au24Pd(SR1)18-x(SeR2)x (SR1, SR2 = thiolate, SeR2 = selenolate) revealed the following. (1) In general, an increase in the difference between the polarities of the functional groups incorporated in the two types of ligands improves the separation resolution. A suitable ligand combination for separation can be predicted from the retention times of Au24Pd(SR1)18 and Au24Pd(SR2)18, which cause the terminal peaks in a series of peaks. (2) The use of a step-gradient program during the mobile phase substitution results in improved resolution compared to that achievable with the linear gradients applied in prior work. (3) This technique is also useful for the evaluation of the chemical compositions of metal clusters protected by two different types of ligands with similar molecular weights. These findings will provide clear design guidelines for the functionalization of metal clusters via control of the ligand composition, and will also improve our understanding of the high-resolution isolation of metal clusters.Because the synthesis of metal clusters with multiple ligand types results in a distribution of ligands, high-resolution separation of each unique cluster from the mixture is required for precise control of the ligand composition. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography combined with appropriate transitioning of the mobile phase composition is an extremely effective

  17. Response of mosses to the heavy metal deposition in Poland--an overview.

    PubMed

    Grodzińska, K; Szarek-Łukaszewska, G

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn) in Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt., a common moss species, were used to indicate relative levels of atmospheric deposition in Poland in the years 1975-1998. Spatial and temporal differences in the heavy metal concentrations in mosses were found. The highest concentration of heavy metals was recorded in the moss samples from the southern, most industrialised part of the country, and the lowest from north-eastern Poland. A significant decrease of heavy metals over 20 years (1975-1998) was found. PMID:11584642

  18. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  19. Phosphorus vacancy cluster model for phosphorus diffusion gettering of metals in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Renyu; Trzynadlowski, Bart; Dunham, Scott T.

    2014-02-07

    In this work, we develop models for the gettering of metals in silicon by high phosphorus concentration. We first performed ab initio calculations to determine favorable configurations of complexes involving phosphorus and transition metals (Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Ti, Mo, and W). Our ab initio calculations found that the P{sub 4}V cluster, a vacancy surrounded by 4 nearest-neighbor phosphorus atoms, which is the most favorable inactive P species in heavily doped Si, strongly binds metals such as Cu, Cr, Ni, and Fe. Based on the calculated binding energies, we build continuum models to describe the P deactivation and Fe gettering processes with model parameters calibrated against experimental data. In contrast to previous models assuming metal-P{sub 1}V or metal-P{sub 2}V as the gettered species, the binding of metals to P{sub 4}V satisfactorily explains the experimentally observed strong gettering behavior at high phosphorus concentrations.

  20. Metal-containing carbon clusters. Structures, isomerization, and formation of NbC{sub n}{sup +} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, D.E.; Jarrold, M.E.

    1995-08-30

    Injected ion drift tube techniques, including ion mobility measurements and annealing and fragmentation studies, have been used to examine the isomers present for NbC{sub n}{sup +} (n = 15-50) clusters. Isomers attributed to niobium-containing monocyclic and bicyclic rings, graphitic sheets, and metallofullerenes have been identified. Monocyclic rings, where the niobium atom appears to be either inserted into or bound to the outside of the ring, dominate for NbC{sub n}{sup +} with n < 22. Isomers assigned to bicyclic rings are first observed and become dominant around NbC{sub 22}{sup +}. They probably consist of two rings joined together by a niobium atom. An isomer attributed to NbC{sub n}{sup +} graphitic sheets is present for n > 22 and becomes important for clusters with around 30 carbon atoms. Metallofullerenes are first observed for NbC{sub 28}{sup +} and become a major isomer for clusters with n > 31. Both endohedral metallofullerenes and networked metallofullerenes (where the metal atom is part of the cage) have been identified. For clusters with more than around 30 carbon atoms the NbC{sub n}{sup +} bicyclic rings can be annealed into metallofullerenes and, for the smaller ones, metal-containing graphitic sheets. The isomers observed for NbC{sub n}{sup +} are similar to those found for pure C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +}, but the niobium atom has a substantial effect on the properties and the abundances of the different isomers. 47 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Atmospheric Deposition of Heavy Metals in Soil Affected by Different Soil Uses of Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, J. A.; Faz, A.; Martínez-Martínez, S.; Bech, J.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metals are a natural constituent of rocks, sediments and soils. However, the heavy metal content of top soils is also dependent on other sources than weathering of the indigenous minerals; input from atmospheric deposition seems to be an important pathway. Atmospheric deposition is defined as the process by which atmospheric pollutants are transferred to terrestrial and aquatic surfaces and is commonly classified as either dry or wet. The interest in atmospheric deposition has increased over the past decade due to concerns about the effects of deposited materials on the environment. Dry deposition provides a significant mechanism for the removal of particles from the atmosphere and is an important pathway for the loading of heavy metals into the soil ecosystem. Within the last decade, an intensive effort has been made to determine the atmospheric heavy metal deposition in both urban and rural areas. The main objective of this study was to identification of atmospheric heavy metals deposition in soil affected by different soil uses. Study area is located in Murcia Province (southeast of Spain), in the surroundings of Murcia City. The climate is typically semiarid Mediterranean with an annual average temperature of 18°C and precipitation of 350 mm. In order to determine heavy metals atmospheric deposition a sampling at different depths (0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-15 cm and 15-30 cm) was carried out in 7 sites including agricultural soils, two industrial areas and natural sites. The samples were taken to the laboratory where, dried, passed through a 2 mm sieve, and grinded. For the determination of the moisture the samples were weighed and oven dried at 105 °C for 24 h. The total amounts of metals (Pb, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn, Ni and Cr) were determined by digesting the samples with nitric/perchoric acids and measuring with ICP-MS. Results showed that zinc contamination in some samples of industrial areas was detected, even this contamination reaches 30 cm depth; thus it is

  2. The IMF in galaxy clusters: What is needed to account for high metal production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian; Heath, Caitlin; Workman, Jared

    2015-08-01

    The gas in galaxy clusters is enriched in metal, typically to about 30% of solar metallicity. However, stars a relatively rare in clusters, meaning that the amount of metal produced per star is about 3 times as much as in the Milky Way. We set out to determine what changes to standard star formation are needed to reproduce the observed metal enhancement. Modifications include expanding the IMF to high mass (>130 M_sun) stars and including metal production from pair-instability supernovae, using an enhanced type-Ia SN rate, and using various modifications of the IMF to make it more top-heavy. For each set of assumptions, we use theoretical nucleosynthesis models to calculate the expected total metal yield per mass of star formation, and to predict the relative abundances of different elements. Including pair-instability supernovae will dramatically increase the amount of metal produced, and, combined with a slightly flatter IMF, can lead to 3 times the metal production per solar mass of star formation, along with an increase abundance of intermediate-mass elements.

  3. Microplasmas for direct, substrate-independent deposition of nanostructured metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Katherine E.; Pebley, Andrew C.; Butala, Megan M.; Zhang, Jinping; Stucky, Galen D.; Gordon, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A general, substrate-independent method for plasma deposition of nanostructured, crystalline metal oxides is presented. The technique uses a flow-through, micro-hollow cathode plasma discharge (supersonic microplasma jet) with a "remote" ring anode to deliver a highly directed flux of growth species to the substrate. A diverse range of nanostructured materials (e.g., CuO, α-Fe2O3, and NiO) can be deposited on any room temperature surface, e.g., conductors, insulators, plastics, fibers, and patterned surfaces, in a conformal fashion. The effects of deposition conditions, substrate type, and patterning on film morphology, nanostructure, and surface coverage are highlighted. The synthesis approach presented herein provides a general and tunable method to deposit a variety of functional and hierarchical metal oxide materials on many different surfaces. High surface area, conversion-type CuO electrodes for Li-ion batteries are demonstrated as a proof-of-concept example.

  4. Transport and deposition of heavy metals in the Ross Sea Region, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuohy, Andrea; Bertler, Nancy; Neff, Peter; Edwards, Ross; Emanuelsson, Daniel; Beers, Thomas; Mayewski, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Emissions and long-range transport of toxic metals and metalloids pose a global threat to ecosystems and human health. Global industrialization occurring from the late nineteenth century releases large quantities of pollutants into the Earth's atmosphere. Despite international efforts to mitigate emissions, accumulation of metals is still observed in the most remote regions of the planet. New baseline studies are needed to determine (i) natural background concentration of pollutants, (ii) contributions of anthropogenic emissions, and (iii) potential remobilization of previously deposited metals. Constructing such records requires distinguishing source strength from transport efficiency to the recording site and accounting for local depositional effects. Here we investigate the sensitivity and representation of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Al, Mn, Pb, Tl, and As) in the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core, a new coastal Antarctic ice core site. Concentration variability with precipitation is explored in daily surface snow samples collected over 70 days, while seasonal deposition is investigated through snow pit sampling. We find that snow sample concentrations increase with particular snow precipitation types (rime and fog) and enhanced meridional atmospheric transport to the site. Snow pit heavy metals peak in summer and also show variable intraannual peaks. Seasonal airmass modeling based on ERA Interim reanalysis data indicates a synoptic shift during the spring and summer months. We conclude that modern heavy metal concentrations are influenced by transport efficiency and scavenging behavior; and thus, time series records from RICE have the potential to provide representative data of regional changes in heavy metals.

  5. Formation of Deep Sea Umber Deposits Linked to Microbial Metal Oxidation at the South Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Ta, Kaiwen; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Hengchao

    2015-04-01

    Umber deposits are important metalliferous deposits, which occur in off-axis half-graben structures at ancient and modern ocean floor. The genesis of umber deposits has remained controversial for several decades. Recently, microbial Fe(II) oxidation associated with low-temperature diffuse venting has been identified as a key process for the formation of umber deposits, but the exact biochemical mechanisms involved to the precipitation of Mn oxides and co-precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in umber deposits still remain unknown. Here, we used nano secondary ion mass spectrometer, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular techniques to demonstrate the coexistence of two types of metal-oxidizing bacteria within deep-sea hydrothermal umber deposits at the South Atlantic Ridge, where we found unique spheroids composed of biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in the deposits. Our data suggest that Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides are metabolic by-products of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. The hydrothermal vents fuel lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, which constitute a trophic base that may support the activities of heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The biological origin of umber deposits underscore the importance of geomicrobiologcial interaction in triggering the formation of deep-sea deposits, with important implications for the generation of submarine Mn deposits and crusts.

  6. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China: estimation based on native moss analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, G Geoff; Fang, Yan-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We studied atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China, using moss (Haplocladium microphyllum and H. angustifolium) as a biomonitoring agent. Moss samples were collected from 49 sites determined by a systematic sampling method. The top layer of soil on each site was also sampled. No significant correlation (P < 0.05) was observed between the moss and soil concentrations for any of the six heavy metal elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn), indicating that the soil substrate had little effect on the heavy metal concentrations in the moss materials. The metal enrichment capacity of the moss material, characterized by the concentration ratio between the moss and soil samples for each heavy metal, was topped by Cd and then followed by Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Ni, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found among the six elements in mosses, suggesting potential anthropogenic inputs of these heavy metal pollutants. Based on concentrations of the heavy metals in mosses and the calculated contamination factors, we evaluated the contamination level of each heavy metal on the 49 sampling sites. Spatial distribution maps of heavy metal deposition for each element were interpolated using ArcGIS 9.0. A total pollution coefficient was calculated for each sampling site to identify the seriously polluted areas in the region.

  7. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China: estimation based on native moss analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, G Geoff; Fang, Yan-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We studied atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China, using moss (Haplocladium microphyllum and H. angustifolium) as a biomonitoring agent. Moss samples were collected from 49 sites determined by a systematic sampling method. The top layer of soil on each site was also sampled. No significant correlation (P < 0.05) was observed between the moss and soil concentrations for any of the six heavy metal elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn), indicating that the soil substrate had little effect on the heavy metal concentrations in the moss materials. The metal enrichment capacity of the moss material, characterized by the concentration ratio between the moss and soil samples for each heavy metal, was topped by Cd and then followed by Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Ni, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found among the six elements in mosses, suggesting potential anthropogenic inputs of these heavy metal pollutants. Based on concentrations of the heavy metals in mosses and the calculated contamination factors, we evaluated the contamination level of each heavy metal on the 49 sampling sites. Spatial distribution maps of heavy metal deposition for each element were interpolated using ArcGIS 9.0. A total pollution coefficient was calculated for each sampling site to identify the seriously polluted areas in the region. PMID:27207630

  8. Electrochemical Deposition of Metal-ceramic Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Hong-Min; Feng, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Nano-composite electrodeposition can improve the organizational structure of composite coatings and significantly improve the quality of the coating. Metal-ceramic composite coatings have improved mechanical, chemical and oxidation resistance properties, such as corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance and heat resistance. Content and distribution of codeposited particles determine the quality and performance of the coating. The factors which influenced the amount and distribution of codeposited particles were reviewed. The amount and distribution of codeposited particles are influenced by many process parameters, such as electrolyte composition and operating parameters. Finally an insight of the coming efforts to develop metal-ceramic composite coating is provided. It is the focus of future research to resolve reunion nanoparticles and improve codeposition amount and uniformly distributed nanoparticles of the coating.

  9. Determining the availability of sediment-bound trace metals to aquatic deposit-feeding animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Cain, D.J.; Thomson, E.A.; Johansson, C.; Jenne, E.A.; Bryan, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Physicochemical form affects, by as much as 1000 fold, the uptake rate by deposit-feeding clams of metals bound to sediments. The strength of metal binding to the different sedimentary binding substrates controls this effect. Statistical studies that were spatially intensive (comparing 35 stations in 17 estuaries) and temporally intensive (2 stations through 2 years time) indicate that sediments control the availability of Ag, Cd, Co, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Mn, and possibly Cu to clams and polychaete worms in nature. Metal concentrations removed from sediments by chemical extractants generally follow availability better than do total metal concentrations, but the specific extractant differs among different metals. Concentrations of binding substrates (Fe, Mn, organic carbon, humic substances) also statistically explain a proportion of the variance of metal concentrations in the animals, suggesting that metal partitioning among substrates in sediments is an important control on metal availability. The specific substrates which contribute to availability also differ among metals. Statistical assessment of metal form in sediments suggested that different substrates compete for the partitioning of metals, that each metal is partitioned among a variety of forms in an oxidized sediment, and that partitioning will vary with the physicochemical characteristics of the sediments. (USGS)

  10. Sites of mineral deposition in metal-accumulating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.Z.; Simkiss, K.

    1982-06-01

    The basophil cells of the hepatopancrease of gastropods containing intracellular granules, which act as the sites of accumulation or detoxification of environmentally available metals, are discissed. A technique is described which results in the loss of these concretions and allows an ultrastructural study of their formation. Manganese ions are used as a probe for this mineralization process which is shown to occur on the inner surface of a vesicular membrane.

  11. Investigation of Cu coatings deposited by kinetic metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Y.K.; Birbilis, N.; Spencer, K.; Zhang, M.-X.; Muddle, B.C.

    2010-11-15

    Interfacial characterisation of Kinetic Metallization (KM) sprayed Cu coatings applied on metal substrates was performed using optical and electron microscopy, as well as microindentation hardness testing and microchemical analysis. The interfacial characterisation of KM coatings remains scarce to date. Cross sectional observations of KM coatings on light metal substrates revealed an undulating, patelliform profile with thin-lipped cusps at the interface. Pure Al and Mg substrates exhibited a mechanically impinged zone <{approx}5 {mu}m on the substrate material, approximately the size of deformed Cu powder particles. Examination of the Cu side of the interface indicated there was no long range interaction in the coating. On the substrate side of the interface, the KM process induced phase transformations (i.e. recrystallisation and an alloyed zone) in thin layers contiguous to the interface on pure Al and Mg substrates. Zones of elemental interdiffusion were identified at the interface upon Al and Mg substrates using scanning TEM. The width of intermixing zones was in the vicinity of < 1 {mu}m. This metallurgical interaction at the interface occurred on the length scales involving the initial single layer of Cu particles bonded on the substrate.

  12. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  13. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of phase change Ge1Sb2Te4 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Longo, Massimo; Fallica, Roberto; Wiemer, Claudia; Salicio, Olivier; Fanciulli, Marco; Rotunno, Enzo; Lazzarini, Laura

    2012-03-14

    The self-assembly of Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, catalyzed by Au nanoislands in a narrow range of temperatures and deposition pressures. In the optimized conditions of 400 °C, 50 mbar, the NWs are Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) single hexagonal crystals. Phase change memory switching was reversibly induced by nanosecond current pulses through metal-contacted NWs with threshold voltage of about 1.35 V.

  14. Molecular-dynamics simulations of collisions between energetic clusters of atoms and metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Horngming; Averback, R. S.; Sellers, Harrell; Flynn, C. P.

    1992-02-01

    The collisional dynamics between clusters of Cu, Ni, or Al atoms, with energies of 92 eV to 1.0 keV and sizes of 4 to 92 atoms, and substrates of these same metals were studied using molecular-dynamics computer simulations. A diverse behavior was observed, depending sensitively on the size and energy of the cluster, the elastic and chemical properties of the cluster-substrate combination, and the relative mass of the cluster and substrate atoms. For the 92-atom Cu clusters impacting a Cu substrate, the cluster can form a ``glob'' on the surface at low energy, while penetrating the substrate and heavily deforming it at high energies. When the cluster energy exceeds ~=25 eV/atom, the substrate suffers radiation damage. The 92-atom Al clusters do not much deform Ni substrates, but rather tend to spread epitaxially over the surface, despite the 15% lattice mismatch. For 1-keV collisions, several Al atoms dissociate from the cluster, either reflecting into the vacuum or scattering over the surface. 326-eV Ni clusters embed themselves almost completely within Al substrates and form localized amorphous zones. The potentials for these simulations were derived from the embedded-atom method, although modified to treat the higher-energy events. IAb initioP linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals-molecular-orbitals calculations were employed to test these potentials over a wide range of energies. A simple model for the expected macroscopic behavior of cluster-solid interactions is included as an appendix for a comparison with the atomistic description offered by the simulations.

  15. Energy deposition and microstructural modification in dynamically consolidated metal powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the deposition of energy at powder particle surfaces during dynamic consolidation. The average energy flux incident on the surface of a powder particle is estimated to be E/tauA where E is the specific energy deposited by the shock, tau is the shock rise time, and A the measured powder specific surface area. This flux is assumed to be constant over the rise time of the shock, falling abruptly to zero for times longer than tau. Solution of the thermal transport equation subject to this boundary condition yields the thermal history within a powder particle having the area-equivalent diameter D = 6/rho/sub 0/A, where rho/sub 0/ is the solid density. The magnitude of the temperatures and the heating and cooling rates indicate likely material transformations. The penetration of a given isotherm provides an estimate of the volume fraction of material transformed. Good agreement is found between model calculations and measurements of the extent of local martensite formation in consolidated 4330V steel powder and of local melting in consolidated aluminum-6% silicon and copper powders. The general implications of the model are discussed.

  16. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  17. Light-Induced In Situ Transformation of Metal Clusters to Metal Nanocrystals for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Xing; Zeng, Zhiping; Hsu, Shao-Hui; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Hao Ming; Liu, Bin

    2015-12-30

    In situ transformation of glutathione-capped gold (Aux) clusters to gold (Au) nanocrystals under simulated solar light irradiation was achieved and utilized as a facile synthetic approach to rationally fabricate Aux/Au/TiO2 ternary and Au/TiO2 binary heterostructures. Synergistic interaction of Aux clusters and Au nanocrystals contributes to enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalysis.

  18. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1991-07-01

    BVRI CCD photometry is presented in two overlapping fields in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372. The observations extend approximately 2 mag below the main-sequence turnoff to V about 21. By comparing the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with those of clusters with similar metallicities, it is found that E(B-V) = 0.50 {plus minus} 0.03, and (m-M)v = 14.75 {plus minus} 0.06. Comparison with theoretical isochrones leads to a value E(B-V) = 0.53 {plus minus} 0.03. Comparison of the CMD with that of bright stars published by other authors yields a value for Delta V(TO-HB) = 3.3 {plus minus} 0.3. The weighted mean value of the age of the cluster, derived from the four colors, is 15 {plus minus} 4 Gyr (estimated external uncertainty). 17 refs.

  19. Transition-state searches in metal clusters by first-principle methods.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Olvera, Domingo; Vasquez, Alejandra de la Trinidad; Geudtner, Gerald; Vásquez-Pérez, José Manuel; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M

    2015-03-01

    Elucidation of the chemical reactivity of metal clusters is often cumbersome due to the nonintuitive structures of the corresponding transition states. In this work, a hierarchical transition-state algorithm as implemented in the deMon2k code has been applied to locate transition states of small sodium clusters with 6-10 atoms. This algorithm combines the so-called double-ended interpolation method with the uphill trust region method. The minimum structures needed as input were obtained from Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. To connect the found transition states with the corresponding minimum structures, the intrinsic reaction coordinates were calculated. This work demonstrates how nonintuitive rearrangement mechanisms can be studied in metal clusters. PMID:25072358

  20. Mineral Deposit Data for Epigenetic Base- and Precious-metal and Uranium-thorium Deposits in South-central and Southwestern Montana and Southern and Central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Metal deposits spatially associated with the Cretaceous Boulder and Idaho batholiths of southwestern Montana and southern and central Idaho have been exploited since the early 1860s. Au was first discovered in placer deposits; exploitation of vein deposits in bedrock soon followed. In 1865, high-grade Ag vein deposits were discovered and remained economically important until the 1890s. Early high-grade deposits of Au, Ag and Pb were found in the weathered portions of the veins systems. As mining progressed to deeper levels, Ag and Pb grades diminished. Exploration for and development of these vein deposits in this area have continued until the present. A majority of these base- and precious-metal vein deposits are classified as polymetallic veins (PMV) and polymetallic carbonate-replacement (PMR) deposits in this compilation. Porphyry Cu and Mo, epithermal (Au, Ag, Hg and Sb), base- and precious-metal and W skarn, W vein, and U and Th vein deposits are also common in this area. The world-class Butte Cu porphyry and the Butte high-sulfidation Cu vein deposits are in this study area. PMV and PMR deposits are the most numerous in the region and constitute about 85% of the deposit records compiled. Several types of syngenetic/diagenetic sulfide mineral deposits in rocks of the Belt Supergroup or their equivalents are common in the region and they have been the source of a substantial metal production over the last century. These syngenetic deposits and their metamorphosed/structurally remobilized equivalents were not included in this database; therefore, deposits in the Idaho portion of the Coeur d'Alene district and the Idaho Cobalt belt, for example, have not been included because many of them are believed to be of this type.

  1. Behavior of metallic nanoparticles in Al matrix under high electronic energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizza, G.; Dunlop, A.; Dezellus, A.

    2007-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (Pb and Bi) embedded in a crystalline Al matrix were irradiated with 30 MeV C60 cluster ions at 300 K. Experimental evidence of partial amorphization of bismuth nanoparticles is observed. On the other hand, Pb inclusions remain crystalline. The condition under which embedded nanoparticles can be amorphized is discussed.

  2. Rutile-Deposited Pt–Pd clusters: A Hypothesis Regarding the Stability at 50/50 Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Mai-Anh; Dadras, Mostafa J.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2014-10-03

    Mixed Pt–Pd clusters deposited on oxides have been of great interest to catalysis. Clusters containing Pt and Pd in roughly equal proportions were found to be unusually stable against sintering, one of the major mechanisms of catalyst deactivation. After aging of such catalysts, the 50/50 Pt–Pd and Pd–O clusters appeared to be the two most prevalent phases. The reason for the enhanced stability of these equally proportioned clusters has remained unclear. In the following, sintering of mixed Pt–Pd clusters on TiO2(110) for various initial atomic concentrations of Pt and Pd and at a range of catalytically relevant temperatures was simulated. It is confirmed that equally mixed clusters have the relatively highest survival rate. Surprisingly, subnanoclusters containing Pt and Pd in all proportions have very similar geometries and chemical bonding, revealing no apparent explanation for favoring the 1:1 Pt/Pd ratio. However, it was discovered that at high temperatures, the 50/50 clusters have considerably more thermally accessible isomers than clusters containing Pt and Pd in other proportions. Hence, one of the reasons for stability is entropic stabilization. Electrostatics also plays a key role as a subtle charge redistribution, and a shift of electron density to the slightly more electronegative Pt results in the partially charged atoms being further stabilized by intracluster Coulomb attraction; this effect is greatest for 1:1 mixtures.

  3. Tritium release from ceramic breeder materials deposited with noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, Kenzo; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Wajima, Takaaki; Wada, Kohei; Hara, Keisuke; Shinozaki, Takashi; Takeishi, Toshiharu; Knitter, Regina; Bekris, Nicolas; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    Lithium orthosilicate and lithium aluminate are the candidates of the breeder material of the tritium-breeding blanket. To enhance the rate of tritium release from these breeder materials, 0.2 wt.% of palladium was impregnated into the breeder materials by the incipient wet impregnation method. The lithium orthosilicate and the lithium aluminate pebbles with or without Pd were irradiated in the Kyoto university research reactor, and out-of-pile annealing experiments were performed. When the breeder materials were deposited with a catalytic additive, such as Pd the ratio of the tritium discharged in the molecular form of tritium (HT) increased. It was also found that the amount of the tritium discharged from the lithium orthosilicate pebbles with a catalytic additive at the low temperatures is greater compared with lithium aluminate.

  4. XAFS Study on Nano-Sized Pd Metal Catalyst Deposited on Ti-Containing Zeolite by a Photo-Assisted Deposition (PAD) Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hiromi; Miura, Yuki; Tomonari, Masanori; Masui, Yosuke; Mori, Kohsuke

    2007-02-02

    The nano-sized Pd metal catalyst can be highly deposited on Ti-containing silicalite zeolite (TS-1) under UV-light irradiation (PAD-Pd/TS-1) using a photo-assisted deposition (PAD) method. The nano-sized Pd metal was deposited having the direct interaction with the photo-excited tetrahedrally coordinated titanium oxide moieties of TS-1. Under a flow of H2 and O2 in water, H2O2 could be synthesized efficiently on this nano-sized Pd metal catalyst.

  5. Metal transports and enrichments in iron depositions hosted in basaltic rocks. II: Metal rich fluids and Fe origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Xuetong; Hu, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on revealing the mechanism of metal transport, enrichment and Fe origin of iron deposition during water basalt interactions occurred in basaltic rocks. Observations of the iron deposits (anhydrite-magnetite-pyroxene type deposits) hosted in K-rich basaltic rocks in the Mesozoic volcanic area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River valley, China, indicate that the mechanism of metal transport and enrichment for those deposits are significant objective to scientists, and the Fe origin problem is not well resolved. Here the metal transport, enrichment and iron origin have been investigated in high temperature experiments of water basaltic interactions. These deposits were accompanying a wide zone with metal alteration. The effects of hydrothermal alteration on major rock-forming element concentrations in basaltic rock were investigated by systematically comparing the chemical compositions of altered rocks with those of fresh rocks. In the deposits, these metals are distributed throughout altered rocks that exhibit vertical zoning from the deeper to the shallow. Then, combined with the investigations of the metal-alterations, we performed kinetic experiments of water-basaltic rock interactions using flow-through reactors in open systems at temperatures from 20 °C to 550 °C, 23-34 MPa. Release rates for the rock-forming elements from the rocks have been measured. Experiments provide the release rates for various elements at a large temperature range, and indicate that the dissolution rates (release rates) for various elements vary with temperature. Si, Al, and K have high release rates at temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C; the maximum release rates (RMX) for Si are reached at temperatures from 300 °C to 400 °C. The RMXs for Ca, Mg, and Fe are at low temperatures from 20 °C to 300 °C. Results demonstrate that Fe is not released from 400 °C to 550 °C, and indicate that when deep circling fluids passed through basaltic rocks, Fe was not mobile, and

  6. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  7. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-01

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  8. Cluster ion beam assisted fabrication of metallic nanostructures for plasmonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Iram; Tilakaratne, Buddhi P.; Li, Yang; Bao, Jiming; Wijesundera, Dharshana N.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2016-08-01

    We report a high-throughput, single-step method for fabricating rippled plasmonic nanostructure arrays via self-assembly induced by oblique angle cluster ion beam irradiation of metal surfaces. This approach does not require lithographic or chemical processes and has the prominent advantage of possible large surface area coverage and applicability to different starting materials. The polarization dependent plasmonic property of the gold nano-ripple is due to their one dimension structure. The localized plasmon resonance frequency of synthesized nano-ripple arrays is tunable by changing nano-ripple dimensions that can be engineered by changing the cluster ion beam irradiation parameters. In this specific case presented, using 30 keV Ar-gas cluster ion beam, we fabricate gold nano-ripple arrays that show localized plasmon resonance in the visible range through near IR range, tunable by varying cluster ion irradiation fluence.

  9. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the stellar density substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge. Wide-field near-infrared (JHK s ) imaging data were obtained from WFCAM of UKIRT telescope. Field stars contamination around the globular clusters was reduced by using a statistical weighted filtering algorithm. Tidal stripping stellar substructures in the form of tidal tail (NGC 6266 and NGC 6626) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) were found around the four globular clusters in the two-dimensional density contour maps. We also find the overdensity features, which deviate from the theoretical models, in the outer region of radial density profiles. The observed results imply that the four globular clusters have experienced a strong tidal force or the bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy.

  10. On the Nature of Bonding in Parallel Spins in Monovalent Metal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason

    2016-05-27

    As we approach the Lewis model centennial, it may be timely to discuss novel bonding motifs. Accordingly, this review discusses no-pair ferromagnetic (NPFM) bonds that hold together monovalent metallic atoms using exclusively parallel spins. Thus, without any traditional electron-pair bonds, the bonding energy per atom in these clusters can reach 20 kcal mol(-1). This review describes the origins of NPFM bonding using a valence bond (VB) analysis, which shows that this bonding motif arises from bound triplet electron pairs that are delocalized over all the close neighbors of a given atom in the cluster. The VB model accounts for the tendency of NPFM clusters to assume polyhedral shapes with rather high symmetry and for the very steep rise of the bonding energy per atom. The advent of NPFM clusters offers new horizons in chemistry of highly magnetic species sensitive to magnetic and electric fields. PMID:27070320

  11. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. II. Sodium abundance variations on the asymptotic giant branch as a function of globular cluster age and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Chantereau, William

    2016-02-01

    Context. Long-lived stars in globular clusters exhibit chemical peculiarities with respect to their halo counterparts. In particular, sodium-enriched stars are identified as belonging to a second stellar population born from cluster material contaminated by the hydrogen-burning ashes of a first stellar population. Their presence and numbers in different locations of the colour-magnitude diagram provide important constraints on the self-enrichment scenarios. In particular, the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) has recently been found to vary strongly from cluster to cluster (NGC 6752, 47 Tuc, and NGC 2808), while it is relatively constant on the red giant branch (RGB). Aims: We investigate the impact of both age and metallicity on the theoretical sodium spread along the AGB within the framework of the fast rotating massive star (FRMS) scenario for globular cluster self-enrichment. Methods: We computed evolution models of low-mass stars for four different metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.2, -1.75, -1.15, -0.5) assuming the initial helium-sodium abundance correlation for second population stars derived from the FRMS models and using mass loss prescriptions on the RGB with two realistic values of the free parameter in the Reimers formula. Results: Based on this grid of models we derive the theoretical critical initial mass for a star born with a given helium, sodium, and metal content that determines whether that star will climb or not the AGB. This allows us to predict the maximum sodium content expected on the AGB for globular clusters as a function of both their metallicity and age. We find that (1) at a given metallicity, younger clusters are expected to host AGB stars exhibiting a larger sodium spread than older clusters and (2) at a given age, higher sodium dispersion along the AGB is predicted in the most metal-poor globular clusters than in the metal-rich ones. We also confirm the strong impact of the mass loss rate in the earlier

  12. Theoretical research program to predict the properties of molecules and clusters containing transition metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary focus of this research has been the theoretical study of transition metal (TM) chemistry. A major goal of this work is to provide reliable information about the interaction of H atoms with iron metal. This information is needed to understand the effect of H atoms on the processes of embrittlement and crack propagation in iron. The method in the iron hydrogen studies is the cluster method in which the bulk metal is modelled by a finite number of iron atoms. There are several difficulties in the application of this approach to the hydrogen iron system. First the nature of TM-TM and TM-H bonding for even diatomic molecules was not well understood when these studies were started. Secondly relatively large iron clusters are needed to provide reasonable results.

  13. Tidal stripping stellar substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color–magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  14. Non-collinear magnetism induced by frustration in transition-metal nanostructures deposited on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lounis, S

    2014-07-01

    How does magnetism behave when the physical dimension is reduced to the size of nanostructures? The multiplicity of magnetic states in these systems can be very rich, in that their properties depend on the atomic species, the cluster size, shape and symmetry or choice of the substrate. Small variations of the cluster parameters may change the properties dramatically. Research in this field has gained much by the many novel experimental methods and techniques exhibiting atomic resolution. Here we review the ab-initio approach, focusing on recent calculations on magnetic frustration and occurrence of non-collinear magnetism in antiferromagnetic nanostructures deposited on surfaces.

  15. Motion Planning for a Direct Metal Deposition Rapid Prototyping System

    SciTech Connect

    AMES,ARLO L.; HENSINGER,DAVID M.; KUHLMANN,JOEL L.

    1999-10-18

    A motion planning strategy was developed and implemented to generate motion control instructions from solid model data for controlling a robotically driven solid free-form fabrication process. The planning strategy was tested using a PUMA type robot arm integrated into a LENS{trademark} (Laser Engineered Net Shape) system. Previous systems relied on a series of x, y, and z stages, to provide a minimal coordinated motion control capability. This limited the complexity of geometries that could be constructed. With the coordinated motion provided by a robotic arm, the system can produce three dimensional parts by ''writing'' material onto any face of existing material. The motion planning strategy relied on solid model geometry evaluation and exploited robotic positioning flexibility to allow the construction of geometrically complex parts. The integration of the robotic manipulator into the LENS{trademark} system was tested by producing metal parts directly from CAD models.

  16. Spectroscopic age and metallicity for a sample of Globular Clusters from Stellar Population Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. J.; Calderón, P.

    2009-05-01

    We present spectroscopic age and metallicity predictions for a sample of 20 Globular Clusters in the massive E0 galaxy NGC 1407 (data from Cenarro et al. 2007, AJ, 134, 391) and for the Galacic Globular Clusters data from the Library of Integrated Spectra of Galactic Globular Clusters (GGC's) from Schiavon et al. (2005, ApJS, 160, 163) including the widely studied 47 Tuc cluster. Using index-index plots we compared model Single Stellar Populations (SSP's) spectra to the integrated spectra of both samples of Globular Clusters using high resolution line strength indices (Stock, in prep.) and the syntethic SSP's models from P. Coelho (2007, private comm.) as well as the CB07 solar models. For the GC's in NGC1407, the predictions from the syntethic models's with [α /Fe]=0.4 are in good agreement with the results from Cenarro et al. (2007, AJ, 134, 391), taking into account that the dispersion is partially due to the fact that the mean [α/Fe] ratio of the sample is ≈ 0.3 dex, resulting in younger ages and lower metallicities (Thomas et al. 2003, A&A, 401, 429). We observe a bimodal distribution of the Fe4383+ index which is in turn an indicator of metallicity, also seen in Cenarro et al. (2005). The CB07 models predict ages that are widely spread over the plot yielding ages greater than 14 Gyrs. The metallicity derived from these models are very low for almost all the objects (Z < 0.008). The distribution of the GGC's on the syntethic model grid shows a trend in the sense that metal poor clusters are younger than metal rich ones, but this effect might not be real (de Angeli et al. 2005, AJ, 130, 116). For 47 Tuc we estimate an age of ≈ 10 Gyr, and metallicity Z < 0.011 (<[Fe/H]= -0.5) which are both comparable with the values reported in the literature (Carretta et al. 2000; Liu & Chaboyer 2000, ApJ, 544, 818; Schiavon et al. 2002, ApJ, 580, 873; Gratton et al. 2003, A&A, 408, 529).

  17. Transient behaviour of deposition of liquid metal droplets on a solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, J.; Romero, E.; Soulié, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms that contribute to the spreading of liquid metal macro-drop deposited during Stationary Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding on an initially cold solid workpiece. Surface tension and inertial effects take an important part in the behaviour of the liquid metal macro-drop, but in this configuration the influence of energetic effects can also be significant. The experimental results are discussed in the light of dimensional analysis in order to appreciate the influence of the process parameters and the physical mechanisms involved on the spreading of a macro-drop. A law is established to model forced non-isothermal spreading.

  18. Visualisation of fingermarks and grab impressions on dark fabrics using silver vacuum metal deposition.

    PubMed

    Knighting, Susan; Fraser, Joanna; Sturrock, Keith; Deacon, Paul; Bleay, Stephen; Bremner, David H

    2013-09-01

    Vacuum metal deposition (VMD) involves the thermal evaporation of metal (silver) in a vacuum, resulting in a uniform layer being deposited on the specimen being treated. This paper examines the use of silver on dark fabrics, thus offering a simpler operation and more obvious colouration to that of the traditional use of gold and zinc metals which must be evaporated separately. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fabric type, donor, mark age and method of fingermark deposition on the quality of marks visualised using silver VMD. This was achieved by collecting fingermark deposits from fifteen donors, of both sexes and various ages, by a grab or a press method. Four different fabrics: satin, polyester, polycotton and cotton were studied over a 10day timeline of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 14, 21 and 28+ days. It was found that satin and polyester gave the most positive results, with polyester often producing excellent ridge detail. Cotton and polycotton were less successful with no ridge detail being observed. The donors also had an observable effect on the results obtained probably due to variations in secretions produced or pressures applied during specimen collection. The age of the mark or the method of mark deposition had little influence on the results obtained. Silver VMD is a viable process for visualising marks on certain dark fabrics and has the advantage over gold/zinc VMD in that the marks visualised are light in colour which contrasts well against the dark background.

  19. The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides: The use of homoleptic alkyls

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, M.D.; Smith, D.C.; Springer, R.W.; Rubiano, R.R.; Springer, R.W.; Parmeter, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, and Cr) from tetraneopentyl-metal precursors has been carried out. Metal carbides can be deposited on Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and stainless steel substrates from M[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} at temperatures in the range of 300 to 750 C and pressures from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Thin films have also been grown using a carrier gas (Ar, H{sub 2}). The effects of variation of the metal center, deposition conditions, and reactor design on the resulting material have been examined by SEM, XPS, XRD, ERD and AES. Hydrocarbon fragments generated in the deposition chamber have been studied in by in-situ mass spectrometry. Complementary studies examining the UHV surface decomposition of Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} have allowed for a better understanding of the mechanism leading to film growth.

  20. Surface treatment of polyimide film for metal magnetron deposition in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V.; Vertyanov, D.; Timoshenkov, S.; Nikolaev, V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper brings forward a solution for acquisition of good quality metallization layers on the polyimide substrate by magnetron deposition in vacuum environment. Different film type structures have been analyzed after refining and activation surface treatment operations. Positive effect was shown after the application of polyimide lacquer for surface dielectric film planarization and for structural defects elimination.

  1. Sol-gel deposition of buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substances

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  2. Lead Isotope Constraints on the Sources of Ore Metals in SW Mexican Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, A.; Macfarlane, A. W.

    2007-12-01

    Lead isotope ratios from mineral deposits in southern Mexico increase with distance from the trench from 206Pb/204Pb values between 18.597 and 18.650 in the coastal area to values between 18.712 and 19.069 approximately 800 km east from the trench. This variation has been attributed to increasing assimilation of radiogenic lead from the crust with increasing distance from the trench. New sampling was undertaken in this area to provide a clearer picture of the potential sources of ore metals in this arc system, and also, if possible, to examine whether ore metal sources differ among the proposed tectonostratigraphic exotic terranes of southern Mexico. New TIMS lead isotope analyses are presented for samples from the metamorphic basement rocks of the Guerrero Terrane, the Late Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks from the Upper Mesozoic Assemblage, and for mid-Cretaceous igneous rocks, as well as for samples from the Oligocene La Verde, Esmeralda, and El Malacate copper prospects. Whole rock samples of schist from the Jurassic-Cretaceous Arteaga Complex and phyllite and slate from the Tierra Caliente Complex contain radiogenic lead relative to bulk earth models, with 206Pb/204Pb ranging from 18.981-19.256. These values are substantially more radiogenic than published values of analyses of metagabbro and charnockite from the Grenvillian-age Oaxaca Terrane. Sedimentary rocks (sandstones, siltstones, and marls) belonging to the Huetamo Sequence have 206Pb/204Pb values ranging between 18.630 to 18.998, close to the published data for the sediments from IPOD-DSDP Sites 487 and 488, Cocos Plate. Whole rock analyses of igneous rocks (granodiorite) collected from La Verde and El Malacate have 206Pb/204Pb ranging from 18.764 to 18.989, clustering between the fields represented by the sedimentary and the metamorphic rocks, suggesting assimilation of lead from these components. Ore samples from La Verde and Esmeralda have 206Pb/204Pb between 18.685 and 18.731 and plot within

  3. The Second-Parameter Effect in Metal-Rich Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1999-01-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations have shown that the metal-rich globular clusters (GCs) NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 exhibit a pronounced 2nd parameter effect. Ordinarily metal-rich GCs have only a red horizontal-branch (HB) clump. However, NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 also possess an unexpected population of blue HB stars, indicating that some 2nd parameter is operating in these clusters. Quite remarkably, the HBs in both clusters slope upward with decreasing B -V from the red clump to the top of the blue tail. We review the results of ongoing stellar evolution calculations which indicate (1) that NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 might provide a crucial diagnostic for understanding the origin of the 2nd parameter effect, (2) that differences in age or mass loss along the red-giant branch (RGB) - the two most prominent 2nd parameter candidates - cannot explain the HB morphology of these GCs, and (3) that noncanonical effects involving an enhanced helium abundance or rotation can produce upward sloping HBs. Finally we suggest a new metal-depletion scenario which might help to resolve a baffling conundrum concerning the surface gravities of the blue HB stars in these clusters.

  4. Geochronology and historical deposition of trace metals in three tropical estuaries in the Gulf of Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, Edem; Nyarko, Elvis; Hulme, Samuel; Swarzenski, Peter; Asiedu, Daniel K.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2016-08-01

    The depositional histories of trace metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) in sediment cores from three Ghanaian estuaries were reconstructed using radioisotope-derived (210Pb and 137Cs) geochronologies. A core collected from each of the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries was analyzed for trace metals and radionuclides. Lead-210 and 137Cs dating via gamma spectroscopy, and trace metal analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used in deriving sedimentation rates, geochronologies and accumulation trends of trace metals. The sedimentation rates in all three estuaries (in the range of 0.54-0.83 cm yr-1) were greater than the predicted sea level rise (∼0.33 cm yr-1) for the Accra Coast of Ghana. The 210Pb depositional rates of 6.83 dpm cm-2 y-1, 2.74 dpm cm-2 y-1 and 1.75 dpm cm-2 y-1 estimated for the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries, respectively, are higher than those recorded in other latitudes. Trace metal analysis revealed differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn between deeper and surficial layers of each core to be in the range of 10-20%, which is well within the natural variations attributed to geochemical factors. Relative to the Amisa and Volta estuaries, the temporal profiles of Al-normalized metal concentrations and estimated fluxes suggest anthropogenic processes augmented the natural fluxes of trace metals, particularly Zn into the Sakumo II estuary during the last 7 years.

  5. Biomagnetic monitoring of heavy metals contamination in deposited atmospheric dust, a case study from Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Samira; Khademi, Hossein; Cano, Angel Faz; Acosta, Jose A

    2016-05-15

    Tree leaves are considered as one of the best biogenic dust collectors due to their ability to trap and retain particulate matter on their surfaces. In this study, the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the concentration of selected heavy metals of plane tree (Platanus orientalis L.) leaves and deposited atmospheric dust, sampled by an indirect and a direct method, respectively, were determined to investigate the relationships between leaf magnetic parameters and the concentration of heavy metals in deposited atmospheric dust. The objective was to develop a biomagnetic method as an alternative to the common ones used for determining atmospheric heavy metal contaminations. Plane tree leaves were monthly sampled on the 19th of May to November, 2012 (T1-T7), for seven months from 21 different sites in the city of Isfahan, central Iran. Deposited atmospheric dust samples were also collected using flat glass surfaces from the same sites on the same dates, except for T1. MS (χlf, χhf) values in washed (WL) and unwashed leaves (UL) as well as Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in UL and deposited atmospheric dust samples were determined. The results showed that the MS content with a biogenic source was low with almost no significant change during the sampling period, while an increasing trend was observed in the MS content of UL samples due to the deposition of heavy metals and magnetic particles on leaf surfaces throughout the plant growth. The latter type of MS content could be reduced through washing off by rain. Most heavy metals examined, as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) in UL, showed statistically significant correlations with MS values. The correlation between heavy metals content in atmospheric dust deposited on glass surfaces and leaf MS values was significant for Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn. Moreover, the similarity observed between the spatial distribution maps of leaf MS and deposited atmospheric dust PLI provided convincing evidence regarding

  6. Comparative Investigation of Guided Fuzzy Clustering and Mean Shift Clustering for Edge Detection in Electrical Resistivity Tomography Images of Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wil; Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jon; Bai, Li

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical surveying using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used as a rapid non-intrusive method to investigate mineral deposits [1]. One of the key challenges with this approach is to find a robust automated method to assess and characterise deposits on the basis of an ERT image. Recent research applying edge detection techniques has yielded a framework that can successfully locate geological interfaces in ERT images using a minimal assumption data clustering technique, the guided fuzzy clustering method (gfcm) [2]. Non-parametric clustering techniques are statistically grounded methods of image segmentation that do not require any assumptions about the distribution of data under investigation. This study is a comparison of two such methods to assess geological structure based on the resistivity images. In addition to gfcm, a method called mean-shift clustering [3] is investigated with comparisons directed at accuracy, computational expense, and degree of user interaction. Neither approach requires the number of clusters as input (a common parameter and often impractical), rather they are based on a similar theory that data can be clustered based on peaks in the probability density function (pdf) of the data. Each local maximum in these functions represents the modal value of a particular population corresponding to a cluster and as such the data are assigned based on their relationships to these model values. The two methods differ in that gfcm approximates the pdf using kernel density estimation and identifies population means, assigning cluster membership probabilities to each resistivity value in the model based on its distance from the distribution averages. Whereas, in mean-shift clustering, the density function is not calculated, but a gradient ascent method creates a vector that leads each datum towards high density distributions iteratively using weighted kernels to calculate locally dense regions. The only parameter needed in both methods

  7. Metal semiconductor transition in undoped ZnO films deposited by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavasoglu, Nese; Sertap Kavasoglu, A.

    2008-08-01

    ZnO films were deposited on glass substrate by using spray pyrolysis method. Films were deposited at different solution molarities 0.02 and 0.1 M. The films are highly transparent in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum with a transmission reaching up values to 90%. Band gaps were calculated as 3.24 and 3.28 eV with the help of transmission spectrums. When the solution molarity of the sprayed solution is increased from 0.02 to 0.1 M, carrier concentrations of the films increase from 1.6×10 19 cm -3 to 5.1×10 19 cm -3. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements of these conducting and transparent films also showed, for the first time, a metal-semiconductor transition (MST). The deposited ZnO films show metallic conductivity above ∼420 K and semiconducting behavior at temperatures below it.

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of molten metal droplet deposition applied to rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, SuLi; Wei, ZhengYing; Du, Jun; Zhao, Guangxi; Wang, Xin; Lu, BingHeng

    2016-08-01

    Rapid prototyping based on molten metal droplets deposition is an additive process in which parts are produced from molten materials in a single operation without the use of any mold or other tooling. Near-net shaped parts are fabricated by sequentially depositing molten droplets layer by layer. This paper presents a systematic numerical and experimental investigation of the transient transport phenomenon during the droplets impinging onto a substrate surface. The 3D models based on a volume of fluid (VOF) method were developed to investigate the deposition of molten metal droplets on a horizontally aluminum substrate surface. Based on the above research, a semiquantitative relationship between external morphology and internal microstructure was proposed, which was further certified by investigating the piled vertical columns and the three-dimensional parts. The works should be helpful for the process optimization and non-destructive detection of drop-based rapid prototyping techniques.

  9. Direct Metal Deposition of H13 Tool Steel on Copper Alloy Substrate: Parametric Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M. Khalid; Masood, S. H.; Brandt, Milan

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated interest in tribology and prototyping by the laser aided material deposition process. Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) enables the formation of a uniform clad by melting the powder to form desired component from metal powder materials. In this research H13 tool steel has been used to clad on a copper alloy substrate using DMD. The effects of laser parameters on the quality of DMD deposited clad have been investigated and acceptable processing parameters have been determined largely through trial-and-error approaches. The relationships between DMD process parameters and the product characteristics such as porosity, micro-cracks and microhardness have been analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), image analysis software (ImageJ) and microhardness tester. It has been found that DMD parameters such as laser power, powder mass flow rate, feed rate and focus size have an important role in clad quality and crack formation.

  10. Characteristics of some silver-, and base metal-bearing, epithermal deposits of Mexico and Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.

    1984-01-01

    Although many characteristics of the geology and geochemistry of this type of deposit were considered, the most important criterion for choosing these deposits was that they have substantial quantities of precious- and base-metal mineralization. Additional criteria for selecting the deposits were that they be hosted primarily by calc-alkaline volcanic rocks of intermediate to silicic composition and that they be younger than Tertiary in age. Many deposits in Mexico and Peru and other parts of Central and South America were excluded because the literature describing the districts is not readily available. Furthermore, many districts have not been examined in detail or the information available is of limited geological scope. The four districts that are compiled in this report were chosen because they are described in abundant literature dating from early mining reports on the general geology and mineralogy to very recent data on detailed geochemical and mineralogical studies. They were chosen as being fairly typical, classic examples of near-surface, low-temperature vein deposits as described by Lindgren (1928) in his treatise on ore deposits (Mineral deposits, McGraw-Hill, 1049 p.). These deposits are similar in aspects of their geology and geochemistry to many of the famous, epithermal silver mining districts in Colorado and Nevada including Creede, Colorado, Tonapah, Nevada, and the Sunnyside Mine of the Eureka district, Colorado, and, in the special case of Julcani, to Summitville, Colorado, and Goldfield, Nevada. The characteristics that distinguish them include overall size, production and alteration assemblage. The information documented in each summary will be used in a forthcoming series of papers on the comparative anatomy of precious and base metal deposits in North and South America.

  11. Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) of a Cubic Metal Cluster with Multicentered Mn(I)-Mn(I) Bonds.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huan-Cheng; Hu, Han-Shi; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Ping; Cheng, Peng; Li, Jun

    2015-09-28

    MOFs with both multicentered metal-metal bonds and low-oxidation-state (LOS) metal ions have been underexplored hitherto. Here we report the first cubic [Mn(I) 8 ] cluster-based MOF (1) with multicentered Mn(I)-Mn(I) bonds and +1 oxidation state of manganese (Mn(I) or Mn(I)), as is supported by single-crystal structure determination, XPS analyses, and quantum chemical studies. Compound 1 possesses the shortest Mn(I)-Mn(I) bond of 2.372 Å. Theoretical studies with density functional theory (DFT) reveal extensive electron delocalization over the [Mn(I) 8 ] cube. The 48 electrons in the [Mn(I) 8 ] cube fully occupy half of the 3d-based and the lowest 4s-based bonding orbitals, with six electrons lying at the nonbonding 3d-orbitals. This bonding feature renders so-called cubic aromaticity. Magnetic properties measurements show that 1 is an antiferromagnet. This work is expected to inspire further investigation of cubic metal-metal bonding, MOF materials with LOS metals, and metalloaromatic theory.

  12. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  13. Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boffa, A B

    1994-07-01

    The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

  14. Seamount mineral deposits: A source of rare metals for high-technology industries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Conrad, T.A.; Staudigel, H.

    2010-01-01

    The near exponential growth in Earth's population and the global economy puts increasing constraints on our planet's finite supply of natural metal resources, and, consequently, there is an increasing need for new sources to supply high-tech industries. To date, effectively all of our raw-metal resources are produced at land-based sites. Except for nearshore placer deposits, the marine environment has been largely excluded from metal mining due to technological difficulties, even though it covers more than 70% of the planet. The case can be made that deep-water seabed mining is inevitable in the future, owing to the critical and strategic metal needs for human society. In this paper, we evaluate the case that seamounts offer significant potential for mining. deposits can be formed in volcanic arc seamounts, no commercially viable deposits have yet been identified in the submarine environment. However, a substantial body of research suggests that hydrogenous Fe-Mn crusts may provide significant resources, especially for "high-tech metals" that are increasingly used in solar cells, computer chips, and hydrogen fuel cells.

  15. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  16. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  17. On the lithium dip in the metal poor open cluster NGC 2243

    SciTech Connect

    François, P.; Pasquini, L.; Palsa, R.; Biazzo, K.; Bonifacio, P.

    2014-05-02

    Lithium is a key element for studying the mixing mechanisms operating in stellar interiors. It can also be used to probe the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Measuring the abundance of Lithium in stars belonging to Open Clusters (hereafter OC) allows a detailed comparison with stellar evolutionary models. NGC 2243 is particularly interesting thanks to its relative low metallicity ([Fe/H]=−0.54 ± 0.10 dex). We performed a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object facility FLAMES at the VLT 8.2m telescope. Lithium abundance has been measured in 27 stars. We found a Li dip center of 1.06 M{sub ⊙}, which is significantly smaller than that observed in solar metallicity and metal-rich clusters. This finding confirms and strengthens the conclusion that the mass of the stars in the Li dip strongly depends on stellar metallicity. The mean Li abundance of the cluster is log n(Li) = 2.70 dex, which is substantially higher than that observed in 47 Tue. We derived an iron abundance of [Fe/H]=−0.54±0.10 dex for NGC 2243, in agreement (within the errors) with previous findings.

  18. Fast Electronic Relaxation in Metal Clusters via Excitation of Coherent Shape Deformations: Slipping Through a Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly; Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Kresin, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    We introduce and describe a fast electronic relaxation channel which is particular to free metallic nanoclusters. This channel overcomes the possibility of a phonon bottleneck by invoking the essential role of cluster shape deformations. Such a deformation entails the appearance of coherent surface phonon excitations and enables internal conversion at the level crossing point, thus allowing large energy transfer from an excited electron to the ionic subsystem. As a result, one can show that (unlike usual multiphonon processes) the shape deformation channel is capable of producing short electronic relaxation times, much less than a picosecond. The calculations are in agreement with recent pump-probe photoelectron measurements of relaxation in Aln^- clusters.

  19. Potential use of a roadside fern (Pteris vittata) to biomonitor Pb and other aerial metal deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Y.B.; Tai, K.M.

    1985-10-01

    Lead, widely used as antiknock additives in gasoline in many parts of the world, is released from vehicular exhausts and contaminates the roadside environment. The Pb-containing particulates often settle onto roadside vegetation by sedimentation, impaction and interception resulting in high Pb content in the vegetation. The concentrations of Pb in such plants in turn are often used to demonstrate the extent of aerial deposition of Pb along roadsides. Hong Kong is a city with high traffic density of over 200 vehicles per kilometer of road. In these studies it was found that some plants could be utilized as biomonitors of atmospheric Pb and other trace metals in the roadside environment. This paper reports on the Pb and other trace metal levels in the fern Pteris vittata growing along roadside and its possible use as biomonitor species for aerial deposition of metals.

  20. Ruthenium based metals using atomic vapor deposition for gate electrode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhwan; Ando, Takashi; Narayanan, Vijay

    2011-02-01

    The impacts of ruthenium-based metal gate electrodes (Ru,RuOx,RuSiOx) with atomic vapor deposition (AVD) on flatband voltage (VFB) and equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are demonstrated using a low temperature (<400 °C) process. Increasing thickness of Ru and RuOx exhibits higher VFB, attributed to filling oxygen vacancies [Vo] in high-k gate dielectric with oxygen supplied from AVD metal gate electrodes upon annealing. Ru is efficient to attain a higher work-function and thinner EOT compared to RuOx and RuSiOx. Subsequent physical-vapor-deposition (PVD) TiN capping on AVD metals blocks oxygen out-diffusion, leading to higher VFB than PVD W or AVD TiN capping.

  1. A Precious Metal-Free Electroless Technique for the Deposition of Copper on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Dehui; Yao, Guangchun; Cao, Zhuokun

    2012-11-01

    This article introduces a new technique of electroless copper deposition on carbon fibers in the absence of precious metal as the catalyst. Copper layers were electrolessly deposited on the surface of carbon fiber without using the conventional palladium or silver catalyst to initiate redox reactions leading to metallization. This new technique shows that nickel seeds can serve as excellent catalysts to expedite the redox reactions. By performing experiments, parameters such as activation temperature, nickel ion concentration, and pH value were optimized, and an orbicular copper plating layer of carbon fiber was obtained in the copper sulfate salt-based conventional electroless solution. The surface morphology of copper coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that uniform and smooth copper coating could be obtained by the new precious-metal free activation process. The resulting copper coating thickness is about 1 μm.

  2. Nutrient and trace metals atmospheric deposition in the western Mediterranean: source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, Karine; Bon Nguyen, Elisabeth; Simeoni, Pasquale; Dulac, François

    2015-04-01

    Mediterranean Sea is a typical LNLC region particularly well adapted to assess the role of ocean-atmosphere exchanges. Throughout the summer stratification period when diffusion through the thermocline is low, atmospheric inputs become the main external source of nutrients to the surface open waters of the MS, mostly by wet deposition in the western basin.Here, we show a 3-yr time continuous series of nutrient (N, P) and trace metals (Cr, Cu, Fe, P, V, Zn) total deposition fluxes in Corsica. Between March 2008 and May 2011, a monitoring station was operated with a weekly sampling time step at Galeria (42.44°N; 8.65°E) on the western coast of Corsica in the framework of the projects DUNE (a Dust Experiment in a Low Nutrient Low Chlorophyll Ecosystem) and then ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerososl Mediterranean Experiment). Monthly fluxes were measured to assess the temporal variability of the measured elements over the Western Mediterranean. Nutrients deposition presented a clear seasonal pattern which was different for each studied nutrients, emphasizing a difference of sources for the nutrients. The results show no dust event larger than 0.68 g m-2 so that the maximum yearly flux was among the lowest ever observed in Corsica (1.7 g m-2 y-1). One dust deposition event could contribute up to 30% of yearly deposition fluxes of nutrient and trace metals, confirming the high temporal variability of atmospheric deposition. However a source apportionment work via statistical methods shows that the yearly deposition fluxes of considered nutrient and trace metals were dominated by anthropogenic sources, except for Fe. Acknowledgements: DUNE project was funded by ANR. ChArMEx (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is funded by CNRS/INSU, ADEME, CEA and Météo-France in the framework of the programme MISTRALS (http://www.mistrals-home.org)

  3. [Pollution evaluation and health risk assessment of heavy metals from atmospheric deposition in Lanzhou].

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Xue, Su-Yin; Wang, Sheng-Li; Nan, Zhong-Ren

    2014-03-01

    In order to evaluate the contamination and health risk of heavy metals from atmospheric deposition in Lanzhou, samples of atmospheric deposition were collected from 11 sampling sites respectively and their concentrations of heavy metals were determined. The results showed that the average contents of Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn and Mn were 82.22, 130.31, 4.34, 88.73, 40.64, 369.23 and 501.49 mg x kg(-1), respectively. There was great difference among different functional areas for all elements except Mn. According to the results, the enrichment factor score of Mn was close to 1, while the enrichment of Zn, Ni, Cu and Cr was more serious, and Pb and Cd were extremely enriched. The assessment results of geoaccumulation index of potential ecological risk indicated that the pollution of Cd in the atmospheric deposition of Lanzhou should be classified as extreme degree, and that of Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb as between slight and extreme degrees, and Cr as practically uncontaminated. Contaminations of atmospheric dust by heavy metals in October to the next March were more serious than those from April to August. Health risk assessment indicated that the heavy metals in atmospheric deposition were mainly ingested by human bodies through hand-mouth ingestion. The non-cancer risk was higher for children than for adults. The order of non-cancer hazard indexes of heavy metals was Pb > Cr > Cd > Cu > Ni > Zn. The non-cancer hazard indexes and carcinogen risks of heavy metals were both lower than their threshold values, suggesting that they will not harm the health.

  4. Deposition of binary, ternary and quaternary metal selenide thin films from diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahboob, Sumera; Malik, Sajid N.; Haider, Nazre; Nguyen, C. Q.; Malik, Mohammad A.; O'Brien, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The tetragonal chalcopyrite phases CuInSe2, CuGaSe2 and CuIn0.7Ga0.3Se2 have been deposited onto the glass substates by Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) from a mixture of [Mx(iPr2PSe2)y] complexes (M=In, Ga, Cu) at temperatures between 300 °C and 500 °C. The thin films were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The bulk compositional properties have been studied by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. SEM and AFM studies demonstrate a significant variation in morphology of the deposited materials at different deposition temperatures.

  5. Cobalt(I) Olefin Complexes: Precursors for Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Purity Cobalt Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jeff A; Pugh, Thomas; Johnson, Andrew L; Kingsley, Andrew J; Richards, Stephen P

    2016-07-18

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a family of organometallic cobalt(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and diene ligands. The molecular structures of the complexes cyclopentadienyl-cobalt(I) diolefin complexes are described, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis and thermal stability studies of the complexes highlighted the isoprene, dimethyl butadiene, and cyclohexadiene derivatives [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2CHC(Me)CH2)] (1), [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2C(Me)C(Me)CH2)] (2), and [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-C6H8)] (4) as possible cobalt metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was employed using precursor 1, to synthesize thin films of metallic cobalt on silicon substrates under an atmosphere (760 torr) of hydrogen (H2). Analysis of the thin films deposited at substrate temperatures of 325, 350, 375, and 400 °C, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal temperature-dependent growth features. Films grown at these temperatures are continuous, pinhole-free, and can be seen to be composed of hexagonal particles clearly visible in the electron micrograph. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show the films to be highly crystalline, high-purity metallic cobalt. Raman spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of cobalt silicides at the substrate/thin film interface. PMID:27348614

  6. Deep BV CCD Photometry of the Metal-Rich Globular Cluster M71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, H.-S.; Chun, M.-S.; Byun, Y.-I.

    Deep BV photometry for about 15,000 stars in the globular cluster M71 has been obtained from the 2.2 m University Hawaii Telescope using 2k CCD. The frames cover a 7.5' times 7.5' region of the cluster center through 220'' (about 7 core radii). A complete color-magnitude diagram(CMD) from the upper red-giant branch to the lower main sequence(Vlimit ~22 approximately 5 mag below the main-sequence turnoff) has been constructed. From the fitting of the CMD fiducial sequence to the New Yale Isochrone and the similar metallicity globular cluster 47 Tuc, we estimated the absolute and relative ages of this ``disk population'' globluar cluster. A luminosity function to Mv ~8.3 for the cluster main-sequence has been derived. Applying several theoretical mass-luminosity relations, we derived mass function of M71. We discuss the implications of this on recent HST results about low mass main-sequence stars' lumisoty function and on dynamical evolution of the globular cluster.

  7. Effects of intrusions on grades and contents of gold and other metals in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.; Berger, V.I.; Mosier, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The reason some VMS deposits contain more gold or other metals than others might be due to the influence of intrusions. A new approach examining this possibility is based on examining the information about many VMS deposits to test statistically if those with associated intrusions have significantly different grades or amounts of metals. A set of 632 VMS deposits with reported grades, tonnages, and information about the observed presence or absence of subvolcanic or plutonic intrusive bodies emplaced at or after VMS mineralization is statistically analyzed. Deposits with syn-mineralization or post-mineralization intrusions nearby have higher tonnages than deposits without reported intrusions, but the differences are not statistically significant. When both kinds of intrusions are reported, VMS deposit sizes are significantly higher than in the deposits without any intrusions. Gold, silver, zinc, lead, and copper average grades are not significantly different in the VMS deposits with nearby intrusions compared to deposits without regardless of relative age of intrusive. Only zinc and copper contents are significantly higher in VMS deposits with both kinds of intrusive reported. These differences in overall metal content are due to significantly larger deposit sizes of VMS deposits where both intrusive kinds are observed and reported, rather than any difference in metal grades. ?? 2010.

  8. Age and metallicity effects in single stellar populations: application to M 31 clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    1997-03-01

    We have recently calculated (Borges et al. 1995AJ....110.2408B) integrated metallicity indices for single stellar populations (SSP). Effects of age, metallicity and abundances were taken into account. In particular, the explicit dependence of the indices Mg_2_ and NaD respectively on the ratios [Mg/Fe] and [Na/Fe] was included in the calibration. We report in this work an application of those models to a sample of 12 globular clusters in M 31. A fitting procedure was used to obtain age, metallicity and the [Mg/Fe] ratio for each object, which best reproduce the data. The mean age of the sample is 15+/-2.8Gyr and the mean [Mg/Fe] ratio is 0.35+/-0.10. These values and the derived metallicity spread are comparable to those found in galactic counterparts.

  9. Trends in methanol decomposition on transition metal alloy clusters from scaling and Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmood, Faisal; Rankin, Rees B.; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-05-15

    A combination of first principles Density Functional Theory calculations and thermochemical scaling relationships are employed to estimate the thermochemistry and kinetics of methanol decomposition on unsupported subnanometer metal clusters. The approach uses binding energies of various atomic and molecular species, determined on the pure metal clusters, to develop scaling relationships that are then further used to estimate the methanol decomposition thermodynamics for a series of pure and bimetallic clusters with four atoms per cluster. Additionally, activation energy barriers are estimated from Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi plots relating transition and final state energies on these clusters. The energetic results are combined with a simple, microkinetically-inspired rate expression to estimate reaction rates as a function of important catalytic descriptors, including the carbon and atomic oxygen binding energies to the clusters. Finally, based on these analyses, several alloy clusters are identified as promising candidates for the methanol decomposition reaction.

  10. Structurally Well-Defined Sigmoidal Gold Clusters: Probing the Correlation between Metal Atom Arrangement and Chiroptical Response.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Wang, Yuechao; Jiang, Hong; Zhao, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetric arrangement of metal atoms is crucial for understanding the chirality origin of chiral metal nanoclusters and facilitating the design and development of new chiral catalysts and chiroptical devices. Here, we describe the construction of four asymmetric gold and gold-silver clusters by chirality transfer from diimido ligands. The acquired metal clusters show strong circular dichroism (CD) response with large anisotropy factors of up to 6 × 10(-3), larger than the values of most reported chiral gold nanoclusters. Regardless of the same absolute configuration of the applied three diimido ligands, sigmoidal and reverse-sigmoidal arrangements of gold atoms both can be achieved, which resultantly produce an opposite Cotton effect within a specific absorption range. On the basis of the detailed structural characterization via X-ray crystallography and contrast experiments, the chirality contribution of the imido ligand, the asymmetrically arranged metal cluster, and the chiral arrangement of aromatic rings of phosphine ligands have been qualitatively evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that the chiroptical property of the acquired metal clusters is mainly influenced by the asymmetrically arranged metal atoms. Correlation of asymmetric arrangements of metal atoms in clusters with their chiroptical response provides a viable means of fabricating a designable chiral surface of metal nanoclusters and opens a broader prospect for chiral cluster application.

  11. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: On the metallicity of open clusters. II. (Heiter+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.; Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.

    2013-11-01

    In Table 1 we list the basic information for each star and each metallicity determination in the starting sample, which should be sufficient to extract the corresponding atmospheric parameters from the PASTEL catalogue. Table 4 lists the weighted mean metallicities for each OC and each paper, which were computed using the metallicities from the references in Table 1. For the weights we used the inverse square of the individual errors quoted by the authors. Table 4 also gives the ranges of effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (logg) of the stars corresponding to each paper. After removing all determinations with Teff outside the range 4400 to 6500K and with logg<2.0, we constructed a list of recommended cluster metallicities, which we call the final high-resolution sample. The weighted mean metallicities for each cluster in the final sample are given in Table 11, and the individual determinations included in the final sample are identified in Table 1 (first column). (3 data files).

  13. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Buck, Kristen N; Casey, John R; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu(2+) concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity.

  14. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Buck, Kristen N; Casey, John R; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu(2+) concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity

  15. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Buck, Kristen N.; Casey, John R.; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W.; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu2+ concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity. PMID

  16. The puzzle of metallicity and multiple stellar populations in the globular clusters in Fornax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antona, F.; Caloi, V.; D'Ercole, A.; Tailo, M.; Vesperini, E.; Ventura, P.; Di Criscienzo, M.

    2013-09-01

    All models for the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters (GCs) imply an initial mass of the systems several times greater than the present mass. A recent study of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Fornax, where the low-metallicity ([Fe/H] ≲ -2) stars contained in GCs appear to account for ˜20 per cent of the total number, seems to constrain the initial mass of the four low-metallicity GCs in Fornax to be at most a factor of 5-6 greater than their present mass. We examine the photometric data for Fornax clusters, focusing our attention on their horizontal branch (HB) colour distribution and, when available, on the fraction and period distribution of RR Lyrae variables. Based on our understanding of the HB morphology in terms of varying helium content (and red giant mass-loss rate) in the context of multiple stellar generations, we show that the clusters F2, F3 and F5 must contain substantial fractions of second-generation stars (˜54-65 per cent). On the basis of a simple chemical evolution model we show that the helium distribution in these clusters can be reproduced by models with cluster initial masses ranging from values equal to ˜4 to ˜10 times greater than the current masses. Models with a very short second-generation star formation episode can also reproduce the observed helium distribution but require greater initial masses up to about 20 times the current mass. While the lower limit of this range of possible initial GC masses is consistent with those suggested by observations of the low-metallicity field stars, we also discuss the possibility that the metallicity scale of field stars (based on Ca II triplet spectroscopy) and the metallicities derived for the clusters in Fornax may not be consistent with each other. In this case, observational constraints would allow greater initial cluster masses. Two interesting hypotheses are needed in order to reproduce the HB morphology of the clusters F2, F3 and F5. (i) The first-generation HB stars all

  17. Tunable two types of Fano resonances in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Qu-Quan; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate that two types of Fano resonances could be observed in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticle heptamer clusters. The first kind of Fano resonance is caused by the coupling between electric dipolar plasmon modes. It still remains with high refractive index shells even though metal cores are separated by them. The second one is caused by the interference between scattering electromagnetic modes of dielectric shell and modified plasmon modes. The energy and line shape of these Fano resonances are highly tunable with shell index and particle geometry, which could find applications in nanophotonics.

  18. AGES AND METALLICITIES OF CLUSTER GALAXIES IN A779 USING MODIFIED STROeMGREN PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha; Rakos, Karl D.; Hensler, Gerhard; Zeilinger, Werner W.; Odell, Andrew P.

    2012-03-01

    In the quest for the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters, Rakos and co-workers introduced a spectrophotometric method using modified Stroemgren photometry, but with the considerable debate toward the project's abilities, we re-introduce the system by testing for the repeatability of the modified Stroemgren colors and compare them with the Stroemgren colors, and check for the reproducibility of the ages and metallicities (using the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique and the GALEV models) for the six common galaxies in all three A779 data sets. As a result, a fair agreement between two filter systems was found to produce similar colors (with a precision of 0.09 mag in (uz - vz), 0.02 mag in (bz - yz), and 0.03 mag in (vz - vz)) and the generated ages and metallicities are also similar (with an uncertainty of 0.36 Gyr and 0.04 dex from PCA and 0.44 Gyr and 0.2 dex using the GALEV models). We infer that the technique is able to relieve the age-metallicity degeneracy by separating the age effects from the metallicity effects, but it is still unable to completely eliminate it. We further extend this paper to re-study the evolution of galaxies in the low mass, dynamically poor A779 cluster (as it was not elaborately analyzed by Rakos and co-workers in their previous work) by correlating the luminosity (mass), density, and radial distance with the estimated age, metallicity, and the star formation history. Our results distinctly show the bimodality of the young, low-mass, metal-poor population with a mean age of 6.7 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr) and the old, high-mass, metal-rich galaxies with a mean age of 9 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr). The method also observes the color evolution of the blue cluster galaxies to red (Butcher-Oemler phenomenon), and the downsizing phenomenon. Our analysis shows that modified Stroemgren photometry is very well suited for studying low- and intermediate-z clusters, as it is capable of observing deeper with better spatial resolution at

  19. Effects of acid deposition on paints and metals: Results of a controlled field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edney, E. O.; Cheek, S. F.; Stiles, D. C.; Corse, E. W.; Wheeler, M. L.; Spence, J. W.; Haynie, F. H.; Wilson, W. E.

    A controlled field study was conducted in Research Triangle Park, NC to determine the impact of acid deposition on paints and metals. A computer-controlled system was designed so that test panels of galvanized steel, five exterior paints and Teflon could be exposed under the following conditions: (1) dry deposition only; (2) dry plus ambient wet deposition; and (3) dry deposition plus deionized water. A 78-day, 11-rain-event exposure experiment was conducted in which ambient and DI run-off samples were collected from each material on a rain-event basis and chemically analyzed. The run-off results show that the dry and wet deposition of acidic species accelerates the dissolution rates of galvanized-steel corrosion products and alkaline compounds in exterior paints. CaCO 3 and ZnO in latex paints and Al in aluminum flake paint react with acids either directly deposited or produced in thin films of moisture covering the surfaces. The results indicate that the uptake of SO 2 into moisture is strongly influenced by the reactivity of the material towards H +. Galvanized steel was found to have the highest SO 2 deposition velocity, whereas an oil-based paint, containing no known alkaline compounds, had the smallest value. Run-off results also suggest that Zn corrosion products were dissolved in ambient precipitation by acids produced by dissolved CO 2.

  20. Electron affinities of d1 transition metal chloride clusters and onset of super halogen behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Swayamprabha; Joseph, Jorly; Jena, Purusottam

    2011-03-01

    Geometry, electronic structure, and electron affinity of d1 transition metal chloride clusters (MCl n , M = Sc,Y, La; n = 1--5) have been calculated using density functional theory. Chlorine atoms are chemically bound in all cases except for MCl 5 . The electron affinities of MCl n (n = 1--3) are small and increase only marginally as a function of n until the valence of the metal atom is consumed. Beyond this, they rise sharply and reach a value of 5.96, 6.03 and 5.90 eV for ScCl 4 , YCl 4 and LaCl 4 , respectively and remain high for n = 5. MCl n , (n = 4,5) clusters, therefore, behave as superhalogens. Results are compared with available experimental data

  1. Electron affinities of d1 transition metal chloride clusters and onset of super halogen behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Jorly; Behera, Swayamprabha; Jena, Purusottam

    2010-09-01

    Geometry, electronic structure, and electron affinity of d1 transition metal chloride clusters (MCl n, M = Sc, Y, La; n = 1-5) have been calculated using density functional theory. Chlorine atoms are chemically bound in all cases except for MCl 5. The electron affinities of MCl n ( n = 1-3) are small and increase only marginally as a function of n until the valence of the metal atom is consumed. Beyond this, they rise sharply and reach a value of 5.96, 6.03 and 5.90 eV for ScCl 4, YCl 4 and LaCl 4, respectively and remain high for n = 5. MCl n, ( n = 4,5) clusters, therefore, behave as superhalogens. Results are compared with available experimental data.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity of the γ Vel cluster (Spina+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Randich, S.; Palla, F.; Sacco, G. G.; Magrini, L.; Franciosini, E.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Alfaro, E. J.; Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Sousa, S. G.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Montes, D.; Tabernero, H.; Klutsch, A.; Gilmore, G.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofre, P.; de Laverny, P.; Masseron, T.; Worley, C.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric parameters, radial velocities, lithium equivalent widths are products of the Gaia-ESO Survey that were used for our membership analysis of the 48 UVES targets observed in the Gamma Velorum fields. Also photometry from Jeffries et al. (2009MNRAS.393..538J) has been used. Iron abundances of these stars have been used to determine the metal content of the cluster. We also discussed the metallicity derived through the iron abundances of the 208 cluster members targeted with GIRAFFE and identified by Jeffries et al. (2014A&A...563A..94J). Stellar parameters of 39 stars targeted by both UVES and GIRAFFE have been used to check the quality of the data. (4 data files).

  3. On the Metallicity Distribution of the Peculiar Globular Cluster M22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Woo

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we showed that the peculiar globular cluster (GC) M22 contains two distinct stellar populations, namely the Ca-w and Ca-s groups, which have different physical properties, chemical compositions, spatial distributions, and kinematics. We proposed that M22 was most likely formed via a merger of two GCs with heterogeneous metallicities in a dwarf galaxy environment and then later accreted to our Galaxy. In their recent study, Mucciarelli et al. claimed that M22 is a normal monometallic globular cluster without any perceptible metallicity spread among the two groups of stars, which challenges our results and those of others. We devise new strategies for the local thermodynamic equilibrium abundance analysis of red giant branch stars in GCs and show that there exists a spread in the iron abundance distribution in M22.

  4. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  5. Fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering of data from abandoned mine site contaminated with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourjabbar, A.; Sârbu, C.; Kostarelos, K.; Einax, J. W.; Büchel, G.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of pore water and slate samples are critically analyzed using fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering statistical techniques. The main aim of this study was to investigate the source of contamination near an abandoned uranium mine in Germany. The mining activities were abandoned in 1990 the site was closed, and the surrounding area was remediated. However, heavy metal contamination is still detectable in water, soil and plants today. Hence, investigating the source of the current contamination is an important task. In order to achieve the goal, results from chemical analysis of both pore water samples and leachates from slate samples were initially analyzed using hard (classical) hierarchical clustering algorithms that did not provide meaningful results. By using two fuzzy clustering algorithms, Fuzzy Divisive Hierarchical Clustering (FDHC) and Fuzzy Hierarchical Cross-Clustering (FHCC), a relationship between the leachate from Ordovician-Silurian slate samples (10 samples collected from the test site and the surrounding area) and pore water samples (53 samples collected from 3 locations within the test site at 3 depths over the course of 4 years) was identified. The leachate data formed a cluster which was statistically similar to the cluster formed by the pore water samples collected from two of three locations. In addition, the fuzzy cross-clustering approach allowed for the identification of the characteristics (qualitative and quantitative) responsible for the observed similarities between all the samples. We conclude that the fuzzy algorithms were a better tool for the analysis and interpretation of geological/hydrogeological data where the data sets have an inherent vagueness/uncertainty.

  6. Tetrahedral clusters of GaMo{sub 4}S{sub 8-} type compounds: A metal bonding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beuze, A..; Loirat, H.; Zerrouki, M.C.; Lissillour, R.

    1995-11-15

    Extended Hueckel tight binding calculations have been performed on ligated as well as on ligand-free Mo{sub 4} and Mo{sub 6} extended frames, in order to analyze the metal-metal bonding within the clusters and particularly the appreciable changes of the metal-metal bond lengths through the M{sub 4} tetrahedral units contained in GaM{sub 4}X{sub 8} (M = Mo, Nb, V, Ta; X = S, Se, Te), units of the MMo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Y{sub 4} (Y = Cl, Br, I). A comparison with the M{sub 6} octahedral units of the MMo{sub 6}X{sub 8} (M = Pb, Ag, La; X = S, Se) series is made. By means of DOS, COOP curves, and overlap populations, results clearly display the strong reorganization of the electronic structure of the bare metal clusters network while the ligand interactions occur, inducing a strong reduction of the strength of the metal-metal bonds. We outline the relationship between the metal-metal bond lengths and various parameters such as the valence electron count (VEC) per cluster and the nature of the ligands. Our results indicate that the two series M{sub 4} and M{sub 6} differ: M-M bond lengths are unaffected by the VEC in the regular M{sub 4} cluster; whereas some M-M bond lengths undergo a significant change when the VEC increases in the distorded M{sub 6} clusters. Likewise, it is worthy to note that metal d orbitals have a more significant effect in M{sub 4} cluster series. In contrast, the metal-ligand covalency induces similar enlongations of metal-metal bonds in the two series.

  7. Structural strengthening of rocket nozzle extension by means of laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honoré, M.; Brox, L.; Hallberg, M.

    2012-03-01

    Commercial space operations strive to maximize the payload per launch in order to minimize the costs of each kg launched into orbit; this yields demand for ever larger launchers with larger, more powerful rocket engines. Volvo Aero Corporation in collaboration with Snecma and Astrium has designed and tested a new, upgraded Nozzle extension for the Vulcain 2 engine configuration, denoted Vulcain 2+ NE Demonstrator The manufacturing process for the welding of the sandwich wall and the stiffening structure is developed in close cooperation with FORCE Technology. The upgrade is intended to be available for future development programs for the European Space Agency's (ESA) highly successful commercial launch vehicle, the ARIANE 5. The Vulcain 2+ Nozzle Extension Demonstrator [1] features a novel, thin-sheet laser-welded configuration, with laser metal deposition built-up 3D-features for the mounting of stiffening structure, flanges and for structural strengthening, in order to cope with the extreme load- and thermal conditions, to which the rocket nozzle extension is exposed during launch of the 750 ton ARIANE 5 launcher. Several millimeters of material thickness has been deposited by laser metal deposition without disturbing the intricate flow geometry of the nozzle cooling channels. The laser metal deposition process has been applied on a full-scale rocket nozzle demonstrator, and in excess of 15 kilometers of filler wire has been successfully applied to the rocket nozzle. The laser metal deposition has proven successful in two full-throttle, full-scale tests, firing the rocket engine and nozzle in the ESA test facility P5 by DLR in Lampoldshausen, Germany.

  8. Reactive sputter deposition of pyrite structure transition metal disulfide thin films: Microstructure, transport, and magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Baruth, A.; Manno, M.; Narasimhan, D.; Shankar, A.; Zhang, X.; Johnson, M.; Aydil, E. S.; Leighton, C.

    2012-09-01

    Transition metal disulfides crystallizing in the pyrite structure (e.g., TMS{sub 2}, with TM = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are a class of materials that display a remarkably diverse array of functional properties. These properties include highly spin-polarized ferromagnetism (in Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S{sub 2}), superconductivity (in CuS{sub 2}), an antiferromagnetic Mott insulating ground state (in NiS{sub 2}), and semiconduction with close to optimal parameters for solar absorber applications (in FeS{sub 2}). Exploitation of these properties in heterostructured devices requires the development of reliable and reproducible methods for the deposition of high quality pyrite structure thin films. In this manuscript, we report on the suitability of reactive sputter deposition from metallic targets in an Ar/H{sub 2}S environment as a method to achieve exactly this. Optimization of deposition temperature, Ar/H{sub 2}S pressure ratio, and total working gas pressure, assisted by plasma optical emission spectroscopy, reveals significant windows over which deposition of single-phase, polycrystalline, low roughness pyrite films can be achieved. This is illustrated for the test cases of the ferromagnetic metal CoS{sub 2} and the diamagnetic semiconductor FeS{sub 2}, for which detailed magnetic and transport characterization are provided. The results indicate significant improvements over alternative deposition techniques such as ex situ sulfidation of metal films, opening up exciting possibilities for all-sulfide heterostructured devices. In particular, in the FeS{sub 2} case it is suggested that fine-tuning of the sputtering conditions provides a potential means to manipulate doping levels and conduction mechanisms, critical issues in solar cell applications. Parenthetically, we note that conditions for synthesis of phase-pure monosulfides and thiospinels are also identified.

  9. Heat-Resistant Co-W Catalytic Metals for Multilayer Graphene Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Karasawa, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Satoru; Baba, Shotaro; Hanai, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sakuma, Naoshi; Kajita, Akihiro; Sakai, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) is expected to be a low-resistance and high-reliability interconnect material replacing copper (Cu) in nanoscale interconnects. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic metals is expected as a practical method for MLG deposition. To obtain high-quality MLG films without catalyst agglomeration by CVD, heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals were investigated. The agglomeration of the Co-W catalytic metals was suppressed by increasing the W composition; however, MLG deposition was suppressed at the same time. The effects of W addition on the MLG growth were discussed from the viewpoints of the crystallographic change of the Co-W catalysts and chemical reactions. It was found that the Co grain size was reduced and the fcc Co formation was suppressed by W addition. In addition, graphite formation was supposed to be suppressed by W addition owing to the formation of phases other than fcc Co according to the Co-W-C phase diagram. With the optimum W concentration, MLG crystallinity was improved by high-temperature CVD using the heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals (0.7 at. %) without agglomeration, compared with that in the case of using pure-Co catalysts.

  10. Lithium abundance in the metal-poor open cluster NGC 2243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, P.; Pasquini, L.; Biazzo, K.; Bonifacio, P.; Palsa, R.

    2013-04-01

    Context. Lithium is a fundamental element for studying the mixing mechanisms acting in the stellar interiors, for understanding the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. The study of Li in stars of open clusters (OC) allows a detailed comparison with stellar evolutionary models and permits us to trace its galactic evolution. The OC NGC 2243 is particularly interesting because of its low metallicity ([Fe/H] = -0.54 ± 0.10 dex). Aims: We measure the iron and lithium abundance in stars of the metal-poor OC NGC 2243. The first aim is to determine whether the Li dip extends to such low metallicities, the second is to compare the results of our Li analysis in this OC with those present in 47 Tuc, a globular cluster of similar metallicity. Methods: We performed a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object facility FLAMES at the ESO VLT 8.2 m telescope. Lithium abundance was derived through line equivalent widths and the OSMARCS atmosphere models. Iron abundances from Fe i and Fe ii lines have also been measured and used to check the atmospheric model parameters. Results: The Li line is detected in 27 stars confirmed as likely cluster members by repeated radial velocity measurements. We determine a Li dip center of 1.06 M⊙, which is much smaller than that observed in solar metallicity and metal-rich clusters. This finding confirms and strengthens the conclusion that the mass of the stars in the Li dip strongly depends on stellar metallicity. The mean Li abundance of the cluster is log n(Li) = 2.70 dex, which is substantially higher than that observed in 47 Tuc. We estimated an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.54 ± 0.10 dex for NGC 2243, which is similar (within the errors) to previous findings. The [α/Fe] content ranges from 0.00 ± 0.14 for Ca to 0.20 ± 0.22 for Ti, which is low when compared to thick disk stars and to Pop II stars, but compatible with thin disk objects. We found a mean radial velocity of 61

  11. Carbon clusters containing two metals atoms: Structures, growth mechanism, and fullerene formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shelimov, K.B.; Jarrold, M.F.

    1996-02-07

    Gas phase ion mobility measurments have been used to probe the structures and interconversion of La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1-100) isomers. The smallest La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} clusters (n = 10) appear to be planar rings. However, planar mono and bicylic rings (the dominant isomers for C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +}, n = 30, clusters) are not observed for the larger La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} species. Instead, isomers which appear to be three-dimensional ring complexes dominate for unannealed La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n + 17) clusters. The formation of these complexes is probably driven by electrostatic forces. For n = 30 the three-dimensional ring complexes isomerize into metallofullerenes (and metal-containing graphite sheets for n = 30-37). The estimated activation energies for these isomerization processes are about 1eV lower than those estimated for similar processes for planar C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +} rings. Metallofullerenes with two non-endohedral metal atoms (for n = 28-29), one endohedral metal atom (for n = 31-100), and two endohedral metal atoms (for n > 64, only even n), are identified. Fullerene derivatives (presumably fullerene + ring complexes) are abundant in the unannealed isomer distributions for La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n > 50) clusters, but readily isomerize into regular fullerenes upon collisional heating. 47 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Mie Resonant Absorption and Infrared Emission in InN Related to Metallic Indium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, T. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Kop'ev, P. S.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Kavokin, A.; Amano, H.; Kamiyama, S.; Iwaya, M.; Akasaki, I.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W. J.; Kasic, A.; Monemar, B.

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate that resonant optical losses related to metallic In clusters can significantly modify absorption spectra of InN with any optical gap. Thermally detected absorption spectra with a pronounced Mie resonance are successfully simulated using a dielectric function of InN corresponding to the 1.2-1.4 eV optical gap. The resonance is observed in spectra of conventional absorption at low temperatures being smoothed out at room temperature.

  13. Atmospheric deposition and critical loads for nitrogen and metals in Arctic Alaska: Review and current status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linder, Greg L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Neitlich, Peter; Little, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To protect important resources under their bureau’s purview, the United States National Park Service’s (NPS) Arctic Network (ARCN) has developed a series of “vital signs” that are to be periodically monitored. One of these vital signs focuses on wet and dry deposition of atmospheric chemicals and further, the establishment of critical load (CL) values (thresholds for ecological effects based on cumulative depositional loadings) for nitrogen (N), sulfur, and metals. As part of the ARCN terrestrial monitoring programs, samples of the feather moss Hylocomium splendens are being col- lected and analyzed as a cost-effective means to monitor atmospheric pollutant deposition in this region. Ultimately, moss data combined with refined CL values might be used to help guide future regulation of atmospheric contaminant sources potentially impacting Arctic Alaska. But first, additional long-term studies are needed to determine patterns of contaminant deposition as measured by moss biomonitors and to quantify ecosystem responses at particular loadings/ ranges of contaminants within Arctic Alaska. Herein we briefly summarize 1) current regulatory guidance related to CL values 2) derivation of CL models for N and metals, 3) use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition and loadings, 4) preliminary analysis of vulnerabilities and risks associated with CL estimates for N, 5) preliminary analysis of existing data for characterization of CL values for N for interior Alaska and 6) implications for managers and future research needs.

  14. Atmospheric Deposition and Critical Loads for Nitrogen and Metals in Arctic Alaska: Review and Current Status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linder, Greg L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Neitlich, Peter; Little, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To protect important resources under their bureau’s purview, the United States National Park Service’s (NPS) Arctic Network (ARCN) has developed a series of “vital signs” that are to be periodically monitored. One of these vital signs focuses on wet and dry deposition of atmospheric chemicals and further, the establishment of critical load (CL) values (thresholds for ecological effects based on cumulative depositional loadings) for nitrogen (N), sulfur, and metals. As part of the ARCN terrestrial monitoring programs, samples of the feather moss Hylocomium splendens are being col- lected and analyzed as a cost-effective means to monitor atmospheric pollutant deposition in this region. Ultimately, moss data combined with refined CL values might be used to help guide future regulation of atmospheric contaminant sources potentially impacting Arctic Alaska. But first, additional long-term studies are needed to determine patterns of contaminant deposition as measured by moss biomonitors and to quantify ecosystem responses at particular loadings/ ranges of contaminants within Arctic Alaska. Herein we briefly summarize 1) current regulatory guidance related to CL values 2) derivation of CL models for N and metals, 3) use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition and loadings, 4) preliminary analysis of vulnerabilities and risks associated with CL estimates for N, 5) preliminary analysis of existing data for characterization of CL values for N for interior Alaska and 6) implications for managers and future research needs.

  15. Metal deposition by electroless plating on polydopamine functionalized micro- and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Giovanni; Wisser, Florian M; Leifert, Annika; Mohamed-Noriega, Nasser; Grothe, Julia; Dörfler, Susanne; Kaskel, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metal coated micro- and nanoparticles by functionalization with a thin polydopamine layer followed by electroless plating is reported. The particles are initially coated with polydopamine via self-polymerization. The resulting polydopamine coated particles have a surface rich in catechols and amino groups, resulting in a high affinity toward metal ions. Thus, they provide an effective platform for selective electroless metal deposition without further activation and sensitization steps. The combination of a polydopamine-based functionalization with electroless plating ensures a simple, scalable, and cost-effective metal coating strategy. Silver-plated tungsten carbide microparticles, copper-plated tungsten carbide microparticles, and copper-plated alumina nanoparticles were successfully fabricated, showing also the high versatility of the method, since the polymerization of dopamine leads to the formation of an adherent polydopamine layer on the surface of particles of any material and size. The metal coated particles produced with this process are particularly well suited for the production of metal matrix composites, since the metal coating increases the wettability of the particles by the metal, promoting their integration within the matrix. Such composite materials are used in a variety of applications including electrical contacts, components for the automotive industries, magnets, and electromagnetic interference shielding. PMID:24041548

  16. Spectroscopic Metallicities for Fornax Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies, Globular Clusters, and Nucleated Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieske, S.; Hilker, M.; Infante, L.; Jordán, A.

    2006-05-01

    Various formation channels for the puzzling ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) have been proposed in the last few years. To better judge some of the competing scenarios, we present spectroscopic [Fe/H] estimates for a sample of 26 compact objects in the central region of the Fornax Cluster, covering the magnitude range of UCDs and bright globular clusters (18 magmetallicity distribution of compact objects at MV~=-11 mag (~=3×106 Msolar): for MV<-11 mag the mean metallicity is [Fe/H]=-0.62+/-0.05 dex, 0.56+/-0.15 dex higher than the value of -1.18+/-0.15 dex found for MV>-11 mag. This metallicity break is accompanied by a change in the size-luminosity relation for compact objects, as deduced from Hubble Space Telescope imaging: for MV<-11 mag, rh scales with luminosity, while for MV>-11 mag, rh is almost luminosity-independent. In our study we therefore assume a limiting absolute magnitude of MV=-11 mag between UCDs and globular clusters. The mean metallicity of five Fornax nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxy (dE,N) nuclei included in our study is about 0.8 dex lower than that of the UCDs, a difference significant at the 4.5 σ level. This difference is marginally higher than expected from a comparison of their (V-I) colors, indicating that UCDs are younger than or at most coeval to dE,N nuclei. Because of the large metallicity discrepancy between UCDs and nuclei, we disfavor the hypothesis that most of the Fornax UCDs are the remnant nuclei of tidally stripped dE,Ns. Our metallicity estimates for UCDs are closer to but slightly below those derived for young massive clusters (YMCs) of comparable masses. We therefore favor a scenario in which most UCDs in Fornax are successors of merged YMCs produced in the course of violent galaxy-galaxy mergers. It is noted that, in contrast, the properties of Virgo UCDs are more consistent with the stripping scenario, suggesting that different UCD formation channels may

  17. Globular cluster system of the galaxy. II. The spatial and metallicity distributions, the second parameter phenomenon, and the formation of the cluster system

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, R.

    1980-10-15

    The metal abundance measurements that were collected for 84 globular clusters in the first paper of this series are used here to describe the cluster system. The ranking of the clusters by metallicity has been calibrated by a new (Fe/H) scale, which is based in part on the measurement of (Fe/H)=-1.2 for M71. According to this scale, the metal abundance gradient between the inner and outer halo clusters (i.e., R<9 kpc and 9< or =R< 40 kpc) is only a small fraction of that found with previous (Fe/H) scales. It is not clear, however, that the new scale is to be preferred over the old ones; consequently the size of this gradient remains in doubt. The most significant properties of the cluster system that do not depend on the validity of the (Fe/H) scale are the following; (i) there is a wide range in metal abundance among the cluster in the zone 9< or =R<40 kpc, but no evidence of a gradient with R or with distance from the galactic plane, Vertical BarZVertical Bar; (ii) among the clusters with R<9 kpc, there is a metal abundance gradient with Vertical BarZVertical Bar; and (iii) the magnitude of the second parameter effect increases with R, and if age is the second parameter, then over the range 0cluster age declines by approx.3 Gyr and the scatter in age increases from less than 1 Gyr to approx.2 Gyr.

  18. Nonlinear Color-Metallicity Relations of Globular Clusters. III. On the Discrepancy in Metallicity between Globular Cluster Systems and Their Parent Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Blakeslee, John P.; Peng, Eric W.; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Cho, Jaeil; Kim, Hak-Sub; Chung, Chul; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Young-Wook

    2011-12-01

    One of the conundrums in extragalactic astronomy is the discrepancy in observed metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) between the two prime stellar components of early-type galaxies—globular clusters (GCs) and halo field stars. This is generally taken as evidence of highly decoupled evolutionary histories between GC systems and their parent galaxies. Here we show, however, that new developments in linking the observed GC colors to their intrinsic metallicities suggest nonlinear color-to-metallicity conversions, which translate observed color distributions into strongly peaked, unimodal MDFs with broad metal-poor tails. Remarkably, the inferred GC MDFs are similar to the MDFs of resolved field stars in nearby elliptical galaxies and those produced by chemical evolution models of galaxies. The GC MDF shape, characterized by a sharp peak with a metal-poor tail, indicates a virtually continuous chemical enrichment with a relatively short timescale. The characteristic shape emerges across three orders of magnitude in the host galaxy mass, suggesting a universal process of chemical enrichment among various GC systems. Given that GCs are bluer than field stars within the same galaxy, it is plausible that the chemical enrichment processes of GCs ceased somewhat earlier than that of the field stellar population, and if so, GCs preferentially trace the major, vigorous mode of star formation events in galactic formation. We further suggest a possible systematic age difference among GC systems, in that the GC systems in more luminous galaxies are older. This is consistent with the downsizing paradigm whereby stars of brighter galaxies, on average, formed earlier than those of dimmer galaxies; this additionally supports the similar nature shared by GCs and field stars. Although the sample used in this study (the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel, WFPC2, and WFC3 photometry for the GC systems in the Virgo galaxy cluster) confines our

  19. Influence of group 10 metals on the growth and subsequent Coulomb explosion of small silicon clusters under strong light pulses.

    PubMed

    Ross, Matt W; Castleman, A W

    2013-03-18

    Growth and ionization patterns of small silicon clusters are studied using ultrafast pulses centered at 624 nm by varying the metal electron source for cluster formation using group 10 transition metals. The silicon-cluster size was observed to change as the electron source was varied from Pdcluster growth in the palladium system is attributed to the higher work function of palladium metal, producing less collisions of the laser-induced plasma with the silane. This shows that changing the metal electron source while holding the laser intensity constant affects the degree of dehydrogenation of SiH4 due to the number of collisions in the cluster source. The saturation intensities of each atomic charge state of silicon, resulting from Coulomb explosion of pure silicon clusters, formed with each metal are measured and compared to those calculated by using semi-classical tunneling theory assuming sequential ionization. The ion signal of silicon atomic charge states produced when using palladium as electron source for cluster formation shows a greater degree of ionization enhancement than that observed for the nickel and platinum systems. This is reflected by the smaller-size clusters formed in the palladium system. Based on a plot of the ion signal as a function of laser intensity compared to the simulated ion signal from tunneling theory, the ionization enhancement of silicon high-charge states is found to increase by varying the electron source from Ni

  20. Magnetic properties of bimetallic clusters composed of Gd and transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2016-02-01

    Gadolinium, a rare earth metal, is ferromagnetic, while Mn, a transition metal atom, is antiferromagnetic in the bulk phase. Clusters of these elements, however, share some common properties; both exhibit ferrimagnetic behavior and maintain magnetic moments close to their free atomic value. Using density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for exchange and correlation, we have studied the magnetic properties of bimetallic clusters composed of Gd and Mn to see if they show unusual behavior. The coupling between Gd and Mn spins is found to be antiferromagnetic, while that between Mn atoms is ferromagnetic. Moreover, the bonding between Gd and Mn atoms is stronger than that between the Gd atoms or Mn atoms, thus enabling the possibility of creating more stable magnetic particles. A systematic study of the magnetic and binding properties of clusters composed of Gd atom and other transition metal atoms such as V, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Co is also carried out to probe the effect of 3d-orbital occupation on magnetic coupling.

  1. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R{sub Fe} {proportional_to} P {sup 0.42}{sub jet}, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}.

  2. Molecular heterometallic hydride clusters composed of rare-earth and d-transition metals.

    PubMed

    Shima, Takanori; Luo, Yi; Stewart, Timothy; Bau, Robert; McIntyre, Garry J; Mason, Sax A; Hou, Zhaomin

    2011-09-18

    Heteromultimetallic hydride clusters containing both rare-earth and d-transition metals are of interest in terms of both their structure and reactivity. However, such heterometallic complexes have not yet been investigated to a great extent because of difficulties in their synthesis and structural characterization. Here, we report the synthesis, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies, and hydrogen addition and release properties of a family of rare-earth/d-transition-metal heteromultimetallic polyhydride complexes of the core structure type 'Ln(4)MH(n)' (Ln = Y, Dy, Ho; M = Mo, W; n = 9, 11, 13). Monitoring of hydrogen addition to a hydride cluster such as [{(C(5)Me(4)SiMe(3))Y}(4)(μ-H)(9)Mo(C(5)Me(5))] in a single-crystal to single-crystal process by X-ray diffraction has been achieved for the first time. Density functional theory studies reveal that the hydrogen addition process is cooperatively assisted by the Y/Mo heteromultimetallic sites, thus offering unprecedented insight into the hydrogen addition and release process of a metal hydride cluster.

  3. The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    Research during the current award period has covered several related topics which have emerged and grown as a consequence of the various discoveries that have been made during this award period. They have been divided into the following subsections for clarity and emphasis: The activation of tertiary amines by osmium cluster complexes; CH bond activation and ring opening of a nitrogen containing strained ring heterocycle by an osmium cluster complex; Ring opening of cyclic thioethers; cyclooligomerization of Thietanes; Studies of the cyclobutyne ligand; Insertion of an alkynes into metal-metal bonds; and Energy storage in metal clusters. A summary of the results of these studies is given in the following sections of this report. These studies have resulted in 50 scientific publications over the last three years and details of their studies beyond that given in the following sections can be found in those reports. All of these reports are listed in the final section of this report by the author`s names, title and journal citation.

  4. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Strader, Jay

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  5. The grape cluster, metal particle 63344,1. [in lunar coarse fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Axon, H. J.; Agrell, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    The grape cluster metal particle 63344,1 found in lunar coarse fines is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe, and an optical microscope. This metal particle is approximately 0.5 cm in its largest dimension and consists of hundreds of metallic globules welded together to form a structure somewhat like a bunch of grapes. Electron microprobe analysis for Fe, Ni, Co, P, and S in the metal was carried out using wavelength dispersive detectors. No primary solidification structure is observed in the globules, and the particle is slow cooled from the solidification temperature (nearly 1300 C) taking days to probably months to reach 600 C. Two mechanisms for the formation of globules are proposed. One mechanism involves the primary impact of an iron meteorite which produces a metallic liquid and vapor phase. The second mechanism involves the formation of a liquid pool of metal after impact of an iron meteorite projectile followed by a secondary impact in the liquid metal pool.

  6. Seamount mineral deposits--A source of rare metals for high technology industries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Conrad, Tracey A.; Staudigel, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    The near exponential growth in Earth’s population and the global economy puts increasing constraints on our planet’s finite supply of natural metal resources, and, consequently, there is an increasing need for new sources to supply high-tech industries. To date, effectively all of our raw-metal resources are produced at land-based sites. Except for nearshore placer deposits, the marine environment has been largely excluded from metal mining due to technological difficulties, even though it covers more than 70% of the planet. The case can be made that deep-water seabed mining is inevitable in the future, owing to the critical and strategic metal needs for human society. In this paper, we evaluate the case that seamounts offer significant potential for mining.

  7. Method for localized deposition of noble metal catalysts with control of morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 .degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick .times.10 .mu.m wide .times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer.

  8. Solute transport and composition profile during direct metal deposition with coaxial powder injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiuli; Song, Lijun; Yu, Gang; Mazumder, Jyoti

    2011-11-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) with coaxial powder injection allows fabrication of three-dimensional geometry with rapidly solidified microstructure. During DMD, addition of powder leads to the interaction between laser and powder, and also the redistribution of solute. The concentration distribution of the alloying element is very important for mechanical properties of the deposited clad material. The evolution of concentration distribution of carbon and chromium in the molten pool is simulated using a self-consistent three-dimensional model, based on the solution of the equations of mass, momentum, energy conservation and solute transport in the molten pool. The experimental and calculated molten pool geometry is compared for model validation purposes.

  9. Preparation and characterization of YBCO coating on metallic RABiT substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonal, M. R.; Prajapat, C. L.; Igalwar, P. S.; Maji, B. C.; Singh, M. R.; Krishnan, M.

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting YBCO films are coated on metallic Rolling Assisted Bi-axially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) Ni-5wt % W (NiW) (002) substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. Targets of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and buffer layers of Ceria and 8 mole % Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of high density are synthesized. At each stage of deposition coatings are characterized by XRD. Transport studies show superconducting nature of YBCO only when two successive buffer layers of YSZ and CeO2 are used.

  10. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  11. The Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Open Sites on Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Michael Mark

    Coordinatively unsaturated corner and edge atoms have been hypothesized to have the highest activity of sites responsible for many catalytic reactions on a metal surface. Recent studies have validated this hypothesis in varied reaction systems. However, quantification of different types of coordinatively unsaturated sites, and elucidation of their individual catalytic rates has remained a largely unresolved challenge when understanding catalysis on metal surfaces. Yet such structure-function knowledge would be invaluable to the design of more active and selective metal-surface catalysts in the future. I investigated the catalytic contributions of undercoordinated sites such as corner and edge atoms are investigated in a model reaction system using organic ligands bound to the gold nanoparticle surface. The catalyst consisted of 4 nm gold nanoparticles on a metal oxide support, using resazurin to resorufin as a model reaction system. My results demonstrate that in this system, corner atom sites are the most undercoordinated sites, and are over an order of magnitude more active when compared to undercoordinated edge atom sites, while terrace sites remain catalytically inactive for the reduction reaction of resazurin to resorufin. Catalytic activity has been also demonstrated for calixarene-bound gold nanoparticles using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. With the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction, a comparative study was undertaken to compare calixarene phosphine and calixarene thiol bound 4 nm gold particles. The results of the study suggested that a leached site was responsible for catalysis and not sites on the original gold nanoparticles. Future experiments with calixarene bound gold clusters could investigate ligand effects in reactions where the active site is not a leached or aggregated gold species, possibly in oxidation reactions, where electron-rich gold is hypothesized to be a good catalyst. The results that emphasize the enhanced catalytic activity of

  12. The role of gas dynamics in operation conditions of a Pulsed Microplasma Cluster Source for nanostructured thin films deposition.

    PubMed

    Tafreshi, H Vahedi; Piseri, P; Benedek, G; Milani, P

    2006-04-01

    This study intends to explain the fluid dynamic characteristics of a Pulsed Microplasma Cluster Source (PMCS). An axially symmetric steady state simulation is performed for modeling the real-life three-dimensional unsteady flow of hypersonic helium inside our PMCS. Hypersonic helium flow is simulated using Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model. We obtained the jet velocity, density, and pressure field inside our PMCS for the conditions considered and discussed them with respect to our experimental observations. We also presented a qualitative discussion on the formation-termination process of this hypersonic jet. In particular, simulation, in agreement with the experiment, indicates that the middle stage of the injection process, where the Mach disk stands close to the ablation target and at the same time the mass flow rate is relatively high, is almost the appropriate time for firing the electric discharge. We simulated the jet-electrode impingement and tracked the trajectory of the ablated carbon clusters, considered as rigid spheres, inside the PMCS. We noticed that the spatial distribution of the clusters inside PMCS is highly conserved during the free expansion of the cluster beam out of the nozzle (in the vacuum chambers) and is recognizable in the deposited carbon film. This indicates that the geometry of PMCS plays a significant role in the uniformity of the deposited film.

  13. A very deep Chandra view of metals, sloshing and feedback in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Russell, H. R.; Blundell, K. M.; Canning, R. E. A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Walker, S. A.; Grimes, C. K.

    2016-03-01

    We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100 pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10 s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ˜7 kpc `notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are multiple shocks, including a 1.9-kpc-radius inner shell-like structure and a weak 1.1-1.4 Mach number shock around the central cavities. Within a 10 kpc radius are nine depressions in surface brightness, several of which appear to be associated with radio emission. The shocks and cavities imply that the nucleus has been repeatedly active on 5-10 Myr time-scales, indicating a tight balance between heating and cooling. We confirm the presence of a series of linear quasi-periodic structures. If they are sound waves, the ˜5 kpc spacing implies a period of 6 Myr, similar to the ages of the shocks and cavities. Alternatively, these structures may be Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, their associated turbulence or amplified magnetic field layers.

  14. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    SciTech Connect

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Sneden, Christopher; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R. E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  15. Atmospheric Parameters and Metallicities for 2191 Stars in the Globular Cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca; Sneden, Christopher; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Nascimbeni, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V <= 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  16. Is it possible to estimate atmospheric deposition of heavy metals by analysis of terrestrial mosses?

    PubMed

    Aboal, J R; Fernández, J A; Boquete, T; Carballeira, A

    2010-11-15

    Here we present a critical review of diverse research studies involving estimation of atmospheric deposition of heavy metals from the concentrations of the contaminants in terrestrial moss. The findings can be summarized as follows: i) significant correlations between the concentrations of contaminants in moss and bulk deposition were observed in only 40.1% of the cases in which the relationship was studied and in only 14.1% of the cases, the coefficient of correlation was >0.7; ii) some method-related problems were identified (i.e. small sample sizes, elimination of some data from the regression analyses, large distances between the moss sampling sites and the bulk precipitation collectors, differences in times of exposure of the moss samples and collection times for the bulk precipitation), so that the results of the studies may not be completely valid, and iii) evidence was found in the relevant literature that moss does not actually integrate the atmospheric deposition received. We also discuss the reason why, in accordance with the published data, bulk deposition cannot be correctly estimated by determination of the final concentrations of contaminants in the organism, such as the existence of different sources of contamination, the physicochemical characteristics of the sources of deposition, physicochemical processes to which the organism is subjected and the biological processes that take place in the moss. Taking into account the above findings, it was concluded that, except for certain elements and specific cases (i.e. Pb and Cd), atmospheric deposition of elements cannot be accurately estimated from the concentrations of metals and metalloids in moss tissues. However, the analysis of moss does provide information about the presence of contaminants in the atmosphere, their spatial and temporal patterns of distribution and how they are taken up by live organisms. Use of mosses is therefore recommended as a complementary (rather than an alternative

  17. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gaveau, Marc-André; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S←{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup −1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  18. Copper Benzenetricarboxylate Metal-Organic Framework Nucleation Mechanisms on Metal Oxide Powders and Thin Films formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Paul C; Zhao, Junjie; Williams, Philip S; Walls, Howard J; Shepherd, Sarah D; Losego, Mark D; Peterson, Gregory W; Parsons, Gregory N

    2016-04-13

    Chemically functional microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals are attractive for filtration and gas storage applications, and recent results show that they can be immobilized on high surface area substrates, such as fiber mats. However, fundamental knowledge is still lacking regarding initial key reaction steps in thin film MOF nucleation and growth. We find that thin inorganic nucleation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) can promote solvothermal growth of copper benzenetricarboxylate MOF (Cu-BTC) on various substrate surfaces. The nature of the ALD material affects the MOF nucleation time, crystal size and morphology, and the resulting MOF surface area per unit mass. To understand MOF nucleation mechanisms, we investigate detailed Cu-BTC MOF nucleation behavior on metal oxide powders and Al2O3, ZnO, and TiO2 layers formed by ALD on polypropylene substrates. Studying both combined and sequential MOF reactant exposure conditions, we find that during solvothermal synthesis ALD metal oxides can react with the MOF metal precursor to form double hydroxy salts that can further convert to Cu-BTC MOF. The acidic organic linker can also etch or react with the surface to form MOF from an oxide metal source, which can also function as a nucleation agent for Cu-BTC in the mixed solvothermal solution. We discuss the implications of these results for better controlled thin film MOF nucleation and growth.

  19. Hydrazine-Free Solution-Deposited CuIn(S,Se)2 Solar Cells by Spray Deposition of Metal Chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Arnou, Panagiota; van Hest, Maikel F A M; Cooper, Carl S; Malkov, Andrei V; Walls, John M; Bowers, Jake W

    2016-05-18

    Solution processing of semiconductors, such as CuInSe2 and its alloys (CIGS), can significantly reduce the manufacturing costs of thin film solar cells. Despite the recent success of solution deposition approaches for CIGS, toxic reagents such as hydrazine are usually involved, which introduce health and safety concerns. Here, we present a simple and safer methodology for the preparation of high-quality CuIn(S, Se)2 absorbers from metal sulfide solutions in a diamine/dithiol mixture. The solutions are sprayed in air, using a chromatography atomizer, followed by a postdeposition selenization step. Two different selenization methods are explored resulting in power conversion efficiencies of up to 8%. PMID:27135679

  20. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kozen, Alexander C; Lin, Chuan-Fu; Pearse, Alexander J; Schroeder, Marshall A; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang-Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Noked, Malachi

    2015-06-23

    Lithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode for next-generation batteries due to its high energy density of 3840 mAh g(-1). However, the extreme reactivity of the Li surface can induce parasitic reactions with solvents, contamination, and shuttled active species in the electrolyte, reducing the performance of batteries employing Li metal anodes. One promising solution to this issue is application of thin chemical protection layers to the Li metal surface. Using a custom-made ultrahigh vacuum integrated deposition and characterization system, we demonstrate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of protection layers directly on Li metal with exquisite thickness control. We demonstrate as a proof-of-concept that a 14 nm thick ALD Al2O3 layer can protect the Li surface from corrosion due to atmosphere, sulfur, and electrolyte exposure. Using Li-S battery cells as a test system, we demonstrate an improved capacity retention using ALD-protected anodes over cells assembled with bare Li metal anodes for up to 100 cycles. PMID:25970127

  1. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kozen, Alexander C; Lin, Chuan-Fu; Pearse, Alexander J; Schroeder, Marshall A; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang-Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Noked, Malachi

    2015-06-23

    Lithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode for next-generation batteries due to its high energy density of 3840 mAh g(-1). However, the extreme reactivity of the Li surface can induce parasitic reactions with solvents, contamination, and shuttled active species in the electrolyte, reducing the performance of batteries employing Li metal anodes. One promising solution to this issue is application of thin chemical protection layers to the Li metal surface. Using a custom-made ultrahigh vacuum integrated deposition and characterization system, we demonstrate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of protection layers directly on Li metal with exquisite thickness control. We demonstrate as a proof-of-concept that a 14 nm thick ALD Al2O3 layer can protect the Li surface from corrosion due to atmosphere, sulfur, and electrolyte exposure. Using Li-S battery cells as a test system, we demonstrate an improved capacity retention using ALD-protected anodes over cells assembled with bare Li metal anodes for up to 100 cycles.

  2. Formation of the metal and energy-carrier price clusters on the world market of nonferrous metals in the postcrisis period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Shevelev, I. M.; Chernyi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The laws of formation of price clusters are revealed upon statistical processing of the data on changing the quotation prices of nonferrous and precious metals, oil, black oil, gasoline, and natural gas in the postcrisis period from January 1, 2009 to November 1, 2013. It is found that the metal prices entering in the price cluster of nonferrous metals most strongly affect the formation of the nonferrous metal price and that the prices of precious metals and energy carriers correct the exchange price of the metal to some extent but do not determine its formation. Equations are derived to calculate the prices. The results of calculation by these equations agree well with the real nonferrous metal prices in the near future.

  3. Salt-Driven Deposition of Thermoresponsive Polymer-Coated Metal Nanoparticles on Solid Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyue; Maji, Samarendra; da Fonseca Antunes, André B; De Rycke, Riet; Hoogenboom, Richard; De Geest, Bruno G

    2016-06-13

    Here we report on a simple, generally applicable method for depositing metal nanoparticles on a wide variety of solid surfaces under all aqueous conditions. Noble-metal nanoparticles obtained by citrate reduction followed by coating with thermoresponsive polymers spontaneously form a monolayer-like structure on a wide variety of substrates in presence of sodium chloride whereas this phenomenon does not occur in salt-free medium. Interestingly, this phenomenon occurs below the cloud point temperature of the polymers and we hypothesize that salt ion-induced screening of electrostatic charges on the nanoparticle surface entropically favors hydrophobic association between the polymer-coated nanoparticles and a hydrophobic substrate. PMID:27142455

  4. Effect of Temperature on Morphology of Metallic Iron and Formation of Clusters of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Alencar, Jean Philippe Santos Gherardi; de Resende, Valdirene Gonzaga; de Castro, Luiz Fernando Andrade

    2016-02-01

    The increase of the reduction temperature in direct reduction furnaces has been a recurring tool due to the benefits that it provides to the process. However, its increase cannot be performed without taking into account some considerations, since the sticking phenomenon is directly correlated with it and could lead to permeability problems and reactor performance. An analysis of the formation of pellets clusters at different temperatures was carried out with focus on morphological characterization of reduced materials to better understand the causes and effects of these actions. The results showed a correlation between the morphology of the metallic iron present in the samples and the clustering index. At low reduction temperatures, 1123 K (850 °C), the iron formed is eroded and deformed and the cluster hardly remains after tumbling. When forming iron with fibrous structure, 1223 K (950 °C), the clustering index increases because of anchor points which make the material to stick together. Finally, under the effect of high temperature and long time, it generates fresh precipitated iron, enhancing the resistance of the clusters so that they cannot be separated.

  5. Symmetry analysis in the investigation of clusters in complex metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, W.; Malinowski, J.; Kuna, A.; Pytlik, L.

    2008-03-01

    In the complex metallic alloys (CMA) it is often found that some parts of the unit cell form well-defined nanoscale building blocks, called clusters, which are characterized by a specific local symmetry and separated from the 'matrix' crystal lattice by a partially disordered interface zone. The interior of the cluster is usually a close packed structure, the structure of which is not always exactly known, because of the partial disorder in the outer coordination shells. In many CMA's the clusters form a high-symmetry superlattice structure, what usually leads to a giant cubic or pseudo cubic unit cell. The present paper shows a possibility to analyze the changes in local symmetry of the clusters (objects decorating the superlattice nodes) during transformations of the global crystal symmetry. The symmetry analysis method applied to tensor objects, attributed to the clusters, provides information about the symmetry relations between the objects located in different nodes as well as the local symmetry of individual objects (local principal axes, local anisotropy etc.)

  6. Ir Spectroscopy of First-Row Transition Metal Clusters and Their Complexes with Simple Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiawi, D. M.; Bakker, J.; Oomens, J.; Buma, W. J.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2014-06-01

    Iron is an important element in the formation of solids in space. Spectroscopic observations of interstellar iron shows that its atomic gas-phase abundance is strongly depleted with respect to that of hydrogen. In contrast, sulfur is mostly found in the gas phase in low-density regions of interstellar space, but is highly depleted in regions of star- and planet formation. Furthermore, the dominant source of sulfur in our solar system is solid FeS, as found in primitive meteorites, implying an efficient chemical pathway to convert sulphur or sulphur containing compounds into solid FeS during the (early phases of) the star formation process. We address the evolution of iron and sulfur in space on a molecular level by studying metal nanoclusters and their interaction with ligands using IR action spectroscopy. Clusters are formed through laser ablation of solid precursor materials and brought into a molecular beam environment. Complexes with ligands are obtained by directing the beam through a reaction channel containing low-pressure reactant gas. Mass-selected IR action spectra are recorded by irradiating the clusters using the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX). Experimental spectra are then compared with DFT predictions which enables us to determine the structure of the selected cluster and its binding interactions with ligands. As part of this project, we here present IR action spectra of size-selected Fe clusters and the chemically closely related Co clusters, and their complexes with relevant ligands.

  7. Mono- and Dinuclear Macrocyclic Calcium Complexes as Platforms for Mixed-Metal Complexes and Clusters.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Emma A; Leeland, James W; Love, Jason B

    2016-01-19

    Mono- and dinuclear calcium complexes of the Schiff-base macrocycles H4L have been prepared and characterized spectroscopically and crystallographically. In the formation of Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)), Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), and Ca2(THF)4(L(2)), the ligand framework adopts a bowl-shaped conformation instead of the conventional wedge, Pacman-shaped structure as seen with the anthracenyl-hinged complex Ca2(py)5(L(3)). The mononuclear calcium complex Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)) reacts with various equivalents of LiN(SiMe3)2 to form calcium/alkali metal clusters and dinuclear transition metal complexes when reacted subsequently with transition metal salts. The dinuclear calcium complex Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), when reacted with various equivalents of NaOH, is shown to act as a platform for the formation of calcium/alkali metal hydroxide clusters, displaying alternate wedged and bowl-shaped conformations. PMID:26709870

  8. Mono- and Dinuclear Macrocyclic Calcium Complexes as Platforms for Mixed-Metal Complexes and Clusters.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Emma A; Leeland, James W; Love, Jason B

    2016-01-19

    Mono- and dinuclear calcium complexes of the Schiff-base macrocycles H4L have been prepared and characterized spectroscopically and crystallographically. In the formation of Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)), Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), and Ca2(THF)4(L(2)), the ligand framework adopts a bowl-shaped conformation instead of the conventional wedge, Pacman-shaped structure as seen with the anthracenyl-hinged complex Ca2(py)5(L(3)). The mononuclear calcium complex Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)) reacts with various equivalents of LiN(SiMe3)2 to form calcium/alkali metal clusters and dinuclear transition metal complexes when reacted subsequently with transition metal salts. The dinuclear calcium complex Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), when reacted with various equivalents of NaOH, is shown to act as a platform for the formation of calcium/alkali metal hydroxide clusters, displaying alternate wedged and bowl-shaped conformations.

  9. Production of strontium sulfide coatings by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, T.S.; Dye, R.C.; Tuenge, R.T.

    1998-11-01

    This work was focused on the MOCVD of the cerium-doped strontium sulfide (SrS:Ce) phosphor for use in thin film electroluminescent displays (TFELs). Following previous research on a small scale reactor, a feasibility scale-up using a commercially available reactor enlarged the size of the deposition area to a 4`` diameter wafer or a 2`` by 2`` glass slide. Films were deposited from the reaction of Sr(thd){sub 2}, Ce(thd){sub 4}, and H{sub 2}S at 450{degrees}C and 5 torr. This system employed a liquid delivery system for the accurate and repeatable delivery of the metal organic reagents. The deposition from this reactor was shown to be crystalline-as-deposited SrS with a (200) orientation, possibly a result of the thin nature of the coating and the involvement of (200) grains in the initial nucleation process. The wafers showed good uniformity, but had some thickness variation near the outer radius of the wafer resulting from the addition of H{sub 2}S from the outer edge. There were eighteen total deposition experiments, of which nine were characterized for EL performance. The highest brightness observed was 5 fL.. The samples were exceedingly thin as a result of the fifteen fold increase in the surface area between the deposition reactors. Increasing the sample thickness to 7,000{angstrom} or higher will dramatically increase the brightness of the emission.

  10. Synthesis of novel barium precursors and their use to deposit thin films by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studebaker, Daniel Bliss

    A new class of volatile compounds of barium were synthesized. These 'capsule' compounds were prepared to saturate the coordination sphere of barium with one ligand. The covalent bonding of the polyglyme ligand to the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione or similar ligand also increased the chelate effect, making loss of the glyme ligand on sublimation less likely. Single crystal X-ray crystal diffraction studies were done on these complexes. One of the complexes was used to grow BaTiO3 thin films to display the ability for these complexes to be used as metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Thin films of the superconducting material YBa2Cu3O 7-x were deposited on silver substrates by MOCVD. These films were analyzed by microscopy, and the electrical properties are discussed. The first reported growth of beta-BaBLO4 thin films by MOCVD is given. These films were grown on platinum, fused silica, sapphire, and silicon. Second harmonic generation of light from a Nd:YAG laser is observed in optical measurements.

  11. Characteristics Of Atmospheric Dry Deposition Of Metals To The Region Of Lake Asan And Sapgyo, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Shin, H.; Lee, M.; Lim, Y.; Seo, M.; Jung, I.

    2008-12-01

    Environment includes a multi-media such as air, surface water, soil, underground water and ecosystem. Some pollutants transfer among a multi-media, posing serious threat to humans, animals and plants. Pollutants released into the environment remain for long times and transport long distances while going through physical and chemical interactions such as transports between multi-media ; air, water and soil, deposition, and absorption and release from organisms. This study assessed the amount of heavy metals transferred from air to water and soil using dry deposition plate and water surface sampler during spring (June 13 ~ 21, 2007) and winter (October 23 ~ 30 in 2007) at 9 locations including Dangjin, Pyeongtaek and Asan. Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, MOUDI was used to confirm the size distribution. The measured heavy metal deposition flux was compared with the expectation obtained with deposition model. In addition, amount of heavy metal deposition at Asan and Sapgyo lakes were evaluated to verify the water pollution state driven by atmospheric deposition. Atmospheric dry deposition flux of metals are 133.92 microgram m-2 day-1, 44.01 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.915 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.175 microgram m-2 day-1 during spring, and 72.86 microgram m-2 day- 1, 88.14 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.991 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.189 microgram m-2 day-1 during fall, for lead, nickel, arsenic, and cadmium, respectively. It is required to re- calculation the dry deposition flux by land use type due to possibility of underestimating the flux in case of using grease surrogate surface having low surface roughness. The cadmium, lead, and arsenic size distribution was mono-modal with the peaks in the 0.65 ~ 1.1 micrometer size range in the fine mode showing sharp peak in the condensation submode especially for cadmium and lead because of effect of primary emission. The nickel size distribution was bimodal, a typical size distribution for an urban atmosphere, showing sharp

  12. Protected Noble-Metal Clusters at the Transition from Molecules to Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetten, Robert L.

    2015-03-01

    Protected noble-metal clusters are found at a molecular level of definite composition and structure up to a size of 145-165 metal atoms. Curiously, this size-range is also where several key signatures of metallic character begin to converge. These substances have been of great interest for many application-areas in the past couple decades, but the understanding of their structure and bonding, remarkable self-selection, electronic structure and optical properties has only recently started to reach a fundamental or molecular level of definition. This presentation emphasizes this recent progress and also outlines the prospects for extending the molecular domain of metallurgy well beyond the 200- atom range, thanks to advances in experimental & theoretical methods.

  13. Grain Size Effect on the Microhardness of BCC Metal Vapor Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P; Saw, C K; Vallier, R F; Go, J; Bliss, R A

    2004-09-08

    The physical vapor deposition methods of evaporation and sputtering are used to prepare foils of the body-centered-cubic metals, vanadium and tantalum. A two-fold increase in the micro-hardness is measured as the grain size decreases to the sub-micron scale. The micro-hardness of vanadium increases to 2.7 GPa and for tantalum to 2.9 GPa.

  14. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  15. Variable Stars in the Unusual, Metal-Rich Globular Cluster NGC-6441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for variable stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6441 using time-series BV photometry. The total number of variables found near NGC 6441 has been increased to approx. 104, with 48 new variables being found in this survey. A significant number of the variables are RR Lyrae stars (approx. 46), most of which are probable cluster members. As was noted by Layden et al. (1999), the periods of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae are unusually long compared to field stars of similar metallicity. The existence of these long period RRab stars is consistent with Sweigart & Catelan's (1998) prediction that the horizontal branch of NGC 6441 is unusually bright. This result implies that the metallicity-luminosity relationship for RR Lyrae stars is not universal. We discuss the difficulty in determining the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 6441 due to the unusual nature of its RR Lyrae. A number of ab-type RR Lyrae are found to be both brighter and redder than the other probable RRab found along the horizontal branch, which may be a result of blending with stars of redder color. A smaller than usual gap is found between the shortest period fundamental mode and the longest period first-overtone mode RR Lyrae. We determine the reddening of the cluster to be E(B - V) = 0.51 +/- 0.02 mag, with substantial differential reddening across the face of the cluster. The mean V magnitude of the RR Lyrae is found to be 17.51 +/- 0.02 resulting in a distance of 10.4 to 11.9 kpc, for a range of assumed values of < M(sub V)> for RR Lyrae stars. The possibility that stars in NGC 6441 may span a range in [Fe/H] is also discussed.

  16. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  17. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  18. Atomic Resolution of the Structure of a Metal Support Interface: Triosmium Clusters on MgO (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Nigel D.; Chi, Miaofang; Gates, Bruce C.; kulkarni, Apoorva; Ortalan, Volkan

    2010-01-01

    Aberration-corrected STEM images of MgO-supported triosmium clusters show that the osmium atoms reside atop magnesium atoms. On the basis of the results, structural models of the clusters that include the metal-support interaction are derived.

  19. Characterization of calcium phosphate deposited on valve metal by anodic oxidation with polarity inversion.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Seigo; Homma, Kikuo; Kanatani, Mitsugu; Watanabe, Kouichi

    2009-07-01

    Electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphate (CAP) on valve metals such as Ta, Nb, and Zr, was performed by anodic oxidation with alternate polarity inversion at an applied 20 VDC. A saturated hydroxyapatite(HAP)-phosphoric acid solution (pH 3) was used as the electrolyte. FTIR, XRD, and XPS were employed to investigate the detailed characteristics of the deposition. HAP was precipitated on Ta; HAP including brushite and monetite on Nb; and HAP and monetite on Zr. The Ca/P atomic ratios were 1.3-1.5 by XPS, and HPO(4)(2- )bands were detected on Ta by FTIR. Therefore, the HAP precipitated on Ta was a Ca-deficient HAP. In addition, the XPS spectra of the specimens showed that phosphate ions were incorporated into the anodic oxide film. Deposits with nano-grain size were observed by AFM. The results confirmed that CAP with nano-grain size was deposited on valve metals by the anodic oxidation with polarity inversion. PMID:19721291

  20. Magnetic- and particle-based techniques to investigate metal deposition on urban green.

    PubMed

    Castanheiro, Ana; Samson, Roeland; De Wael, Karolien

    2016-11-15

    Urban green works as a recorder of atmospheric PM. This paper reports on the utility of combining magnetic- and particle-based techniques to investigate PM leaf deposition as a bio-indicator of metal pollution. Ivy (Hedera helix) leaves were collected from five different land use classes, i.e. forest, rural, roadside, industrial, train. Leaf magnetic measurements were done in terms of saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (leaf SIRM), while ca. 40,000 leaf-deposited particles were analyzed through SEM/EDX to estimate the elemental composition. The influence of the different land use classes was registered both magnetically and in terms of metal content. Leaf area-normalized SIRM values ranged from 19.9 to 444.0μA, in the following order forestmetals Cr and Cu. Although presenting a similar metal content, roadside and train were magnetically very distinct. By exhibiting a very high content in Pb, and with an Fe content being comparable to the one observed at the forest and rural land uses, the industrial leaf-deposited particles showed to be mainly due to industrial activity. While SEM/EDX is a suitable approach for detailed particle analysis, leaf SIRM of ivy can be used as a rapid discriminatory tool for metal pollution. Their complementary use delivers further knowledge on land use classes reflecting different PM conditions and/or sources. PMID:27422722

  1. THE METALLICITY BIMODALITY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS: A TEST OF GALAXY ASSEMBLY AND OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tonini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    We build a theoretical model to study the origin of the globular cluster metallicity bimodality in the hierarchical galaxy assembly scenario. The model is based on empirical relations such as the galaxy mass-metallicity relation [O/H]-M {sub star} as a function of redshift, and on the observed galaxy stellar mass function up to redshift z {approx} 4. We make use of the theoretical merger rates as a function of mass and redshift from the Millennium simulation to build galaxy merger trees. We derive a new galaxy [Fe/H]-M {sub star} relation as a function of redshift, and by assuming that globular clusters share the metallicity of their original parent galaxy at the time of their formation, we populate the merger tree with globular clusters. We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations of the galaxy hierarchical assembly, and study the properties of the final globular cluster population as a function of galaxy mass, assembly and star formation history, and under different assumptions for the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation. The main results and predictions of the model are the following. (1) The hierarchical clustering scenario naturally predicts a metallicity bimodality in the galaxy globular cluster population, where the metal-rich subpopulation is composed of globular clusters formed in the galaxy main progenitor around redshift z {approx} 2, and the metal-poor subpopulation is composed of clusters accreted from satellites, and formed at redshifts z {approx} 3-4. (2) The model reproduces the observed relations by Peng et al. for the metallicities of the metal-rich and metal-poor globular cluster subpopulations as a function of galaxy mass; the positions of the metal-poor and metal-rich peaks depend exclusively on the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation and the [O/Fe], both of which can be constrained by this method. In particular, we find that the galaxy [O/Fe] evolves linearly with redshift from a value of {approx}0.5 at redshift

  2. Chemical Bonding of Transition-Metal Co13 Clusters with Graphene.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2015-12-01

    We carried out density functional calculations to study the adsorption of Co13 clusters on graphene. Several free isomers were deposited at different positions with respect to the hexagonal lattice nodes, allowing us to study even the hcp 2d isomer, which was recently obtained as the most stable one. Surprisingly, the Co13 clusters attached to graphene prefer icosahedron-like structures in which the low-lying isomer is much distorted; in such structures, they are linked with more bonds than those reported in previous works. For any isomer, the most stable position binds to graphene by the Co atoms that can lose electrons. We find that the charge transfer between graphene and the clusters is small enough to conclude that the Co-graphene binding is not ionic-like but chemical. Besides, the same order of stability among the different isomers on doped graphene is kept. These findings could also be of interest for magnetic clusters on graphenic nanostructures such as ribbons and nanotubes.

  3. Structure and Function of Non-Native Metal Clusters in Human Arginase I

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Edward L.; Hai, Yang; Christianson, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Various binuclear metal ion clusters and complexes have been reconstituted in crystalline human arginase I by removing the Mn2+2-cluster of the wild-type enzyme with metal chelators and subsequently soaking the crystalline apoenzyme in buffer solutions containing NiCl2 or ZnCl2. X-ray crystal structures of these metal ion variants are correlated with catalytic activity measurements that reveal differences resulting from metal ion substitution. Additionally, treatment of crystalline Mn2+2-human arginase I with Zn2+ reveals for the first time the structural basis for inhibition by Zn2+, which forms a carboxylate-histidine-Zn2+ triad with H141 and E277. The imidazole side chain of H141 is known to be hyper-reactive and its chemical modification or mutagenesis is known to similarly compromise catalysis. The reactive substrate analogue 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) binds as a tetrahedral boronate anion to Mn2+2, Co2+2, Ni2+2, and Zn2+2 clusters in human arginase I, and it can be stabilized by a third inhibitory Zn2+ ion coordinated by H141. Since ABH binds as an analogue of the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis, this implies that the various metallosubstituted enzymes are capable of some level of catalysis with an actual substrate. Accordingly, we establish the following trend for turnover number (kcat) and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM): Mn2+ > Ni2+ ≈ Co2+ ≫ Zn2+. Therefore, Mn2+ is required for optimal catalysis by human arginase I. PMID:23061982

  4. Encapsulation of metal clusters within MFI via interzeolite transformations and direct hydrothermal syntheses and catalytic consequences of their confinement.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sarika; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-10-29

    The encapsulation of metal clusters (Pt, Ru, Rh) within MFI was achieved by exchanging cationic metal precursors into a parent zeolite (BEA, FAU), reducing them with H2 to form metal clusters, and transforming these zeolites into daughter structures of higher framework density (MFI) under hydrothermal conditions. These transformations required MFI seeds or organic templates for FAU parent zeolites, but not for BEA, and occurred with the retention of encapsulated clusters. Clusters uniform in size (1.3-1.7 nm) and exposing clean and accessible surfaces formed in BEA and FAU zeolites; their size remained essentially unchanged upon transformation into MFI. Encapsulation selectivities, determined from the relative hydrogenation rates of small (toluene) and large (alkyl arenes) molecules and defined as the ratio of the surface areas of all the clusters in the sample to that of external clusters, were very high (8.1-40.9) for both parent and daughter zeolites. Encapsulation into MFI via direct hydrothermal syntheses was unsuccessful because metal precursors precipitated prematurely at the pH and temperatures required for MFI synthesis. Delayed introduction of metal precursors and F(-) (instead of OH(-)) as the mineralizing agent in hydrothermal syntheses increased encapsulation selectivities, but they remained lower than those achieved via interzeolite transformations. These interconversions provide a general and robust strategy for encapsulation of metals when precursors can be introduced via exchange into a zeolite that can be transformed into target daughter zeolites with higher framework densities, whether spontaneously or by using seeds or structure-directing agents (SDA).

  5. A comparative study of AumRhn (4 ≤ m + n ≤ 6) clusters in the gas phase versus those deposited on (100) MgO.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Fernando; Vargas, Jorge A; Beltrán, Marcela R; Davis, Jack B A; Johnston, Roy L

    2016-08-10

    A comparative theoretical study has been performed of the gas phase and deposited AumRhn (4 ≤ m + n ≤ 6) clusters. The combined use of a genetic algorithm and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations allows us to explore the potential energy surface and, therefore, find efficiently and automatically the global minimum configuration for each composition. Our results show interesting effects on the geometries of the clusters on deposition. This occurs because the rhodium atoms (electronically) prefer to be in contact with the MgO surface, sometimes promoting planar clusters to become three-dimensional when deposited, and three-dimensional clusters in the gas phase to become two-dimensional. Together with the change in geometries, the magnetic moment is reduced from the gas phase, as the electrons rearrange themselves when the cluster interacts with the substrate. PMID:27444254

  6. [Pollution Evaluation and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals from Atmospheric Deposition in the Parks of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Qian, Xin; Li, Hui-ming; Sun, Yi-xuan; Wang, Jin-hua

    2016-05-15

    Contents of heavy metals involving As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn from atmospheric deposition in 10 parks of Nanjing were analyzed. The pollution level, ecological risk and health risk were evaluated using Geoaccumulation Index, Potential Ecological Risk Index and the US EPA Health Risk Assessment Model, respectively. The results showed that the pollution levels of heavy metals in Swallow Rock Park, Swallow Rock Park and Mochou Lake Park were higher than the others. Compared to other cities such as Changchun, Wuhan and Beijing, the contents of heavy metals in atmospheric deposition of parks in Nanjing were higher. The evaluation results of Geoaccumulation Index showed that Pb was at moderate pollution level, Zn and Cu were between moderate and serious levels, while Cd was between serious and extreme levels. The ecological risk level of Cd was high. The assessment results of Health Risk Assessment Model indicated that there was no non-carcinogenic risk for all the seven heavy metals. For carcinogenic risk, the risks of Cd, Cr and Ni were all negligible (Risk < 1 x 10⁻⁶), whereas As had carcinogenic risk possibility but was considered to be acceptable (10⁻⁶ < Risk < 10⁻⁴). PMID:27506017

  7. Fabrication and design of metal nano-accordion structures using atomic layer deposition and interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, J.-H.; Bagal, A.; Mundy, J. Z.; Oldham, C. J.; Wu, B.-I.; Parsons, G. N.; Chang, C.-H.

    2016-02-01

    Metal nanostructures have attractive electrical and thermal properties as well as structural stability, and are important for applications in flexible conductors. In this study, we have developed a method to fabricate and control novel complex platinum nanostructures with accordion-like profile using atomic layer deposition on lithographically patterned polymer templates. The template removal process results in unique structural transformation of the nanostructure profile, which has been studied and modeled. Using different template duty cycles and aspect ratios, we have demonstrated a wide variety of cross-sectional profiles from wavy geometry to pipe array patterns. These complex thin metal nanostructures can find applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, photonics and nanofluidics.Metal nanostructures have attractive electrical and thermal properties as well as structural stability, and are important for applications in flexible conductors. In this study, we have developed a method to fabricate and control novel complex platinum nanostructures with accordion-like profile using atomic layer deposition on lithographically patterned polymer templates. The template removal process results in unique structural transformation of the nanostructure profile, which has been studied and modeled. Using different template duty cycles and aspect ratios, we have demonstrated a wide variety of cross-sectional profiles from wavy geometry to pipe array patterns. These complex thin metal nanostructures can find applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, photonics and nanofluidics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08566g

  8. [Pollution Evaluation and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals from Atmospheric Deposition in the Parks of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Qian, Xin; Li, Hui-ming; Sun, Yi-xuan; Wang, Jin-hua

    2016-05-15

    Contents of heavy metals involving As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn from atmospheric deposition in 10 parks of Nanjing were analyzed. The pollution level, ecological risk and health risk were evaluated using Geoaccumulation Index, Potential Ecological Risk Index and the US EPA Health Risk Assessment Model, respectively. The results showed that the pollution levels of heavy metals in Swallow Rock Park, Swallow Rock Park and Mochou Lake Park were higher than the others. Compared to other cities such as Changchun, Wuhan and Beijing, the contents of heavy metals in atmospheric deposition of parks in Nanjing were higher. The evaluation results of Geoaccumulation Index showed that Pb was at moderate pollution level, Zn and Cu were between moderate and serious levels, while Cd was between serious and extreme levels. The ecological risk level of Cd was high. The assessment results of Health Risk Assessment Model indicated that there was no non-carcinogenic risk for all the seven heavy metals. For carcinogenic risk, the risks of Cd, Cr and Ni were all negligible (Risk < 1 x 10⁻⁶), whereas As had carcinogenic risk possibility but was considered to be acceptable (10⁻⁶ < Risk < 10⁻⁴).

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Hydride Cluster Anions and Their Roles in Hydrogenation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit

    The interaction between transition metals and hydrogen has been an intriguing research topic for such applications as hydrogen storage and catalysis of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation. Special bonding features between TM and hydrogen are interesting not only because they are scarcely reported but also because they could help to discover and understand the nature of chemical bonding. Very recently, we discovered a PtZnH5- cluster which possessed an unprecedented planar pentagonal coordination between the H5- moiety and Pt, and exhibited special σ-aromaticity. The H5-kernel as a whole can be viewed as a η5-H5 ligand for Pt. As the second example, an H2 molecule was found to act as a ligand in the PdH3-cluster, in which two H atoms form a η2-H2 type of ligation to Pd. These transition metal hydride clusters were considered to be good hydrogen sources for hydrogenation. The reactions between PtHn- and CO2 were investigated. We observed formate in the final product H2Pt(HCO2)- .

  10. Properties of large area ErBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films deposited by ionized cluster beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levenson, L. L.; Stan, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1991-01-01

    ErBa2Cu3O(7-x) films have been produced by simultaneous deposition of Er, Ba, and Cu from three ionized cluster beam (ICB) sources at acceleration voltages of 0.3 to 0.5 kV. Combining ozone oxidation with ICB deposition at 650 C eliminated any need of post annealing processing. The substrates were rotated at 10 rotations per minute during the deposition which took place at a rate of about 3 to 4 nm. Films with areas up to 70 mm in diameter have been made by ICB deposition. These films, 100 nm thick, were deposited on SrTiO3 (100) substrates at 650 C in a mixture of six percent O3 in O2 at a total pressure of 4 x 10(exp -4) Torr. They had T(sub c) ranging from 84.3 K to 86.8 K over a 70 mm diameter and J(sub c) above 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K. X ray diffraction measurements of the three samples showed preferential c-axis orientation normal to the substrate surface. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of the three samples also show some texture dependence on sample position. For the three samples, there is a correlation between SEM texture, full width at half-maximum of rocking curves and J(sub c) versus temperature curves.

  11. Black metal thin films by deposition on dielectric antireflective moth-eye nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Alexander B.; Caringal, Gideon P.; Clausen, Jeppe S.; Grajower, Meir; Taha, Hesham; Levy, Uriel; Asger Mortensen, N.; Kristensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Although metals are commonly shiny and highly reflective, we here show that thin metal films appear black when deposited on a dielectric with antireflective moth-eye nanostructures. The nanostructures were tapered and close-packed, with heights in the range 300-600 nm, and a lateral, spatial frequency in the range 5–7 μm−1. A reflectance in the visible spectrum as low as 6%, and an absorbance of 90% was observed for an Al film of 100 nm thickness. Corresponding experiments on a planar film yielded 80% reflectance and 20% absorbance. The observed absorbance enhancement is attributed to a gradient effect causing the metal film to be antireflective, analogous to the mechanism in dielectrics and semiconductors. We find that the investigated nanostructures have too large spatial frequency to facilitate efficient coupling to the otherwise non-radiating surface plasmons. Applications for decoration and displays are discussed. PMID:26035526

  12. Corrosion protection of metal implants by hard biocompatible ceramic coatings deposited by radio-frequency sputtering.

    PubMed

    Sella, C; Martin, J C; Lecoeur, J; Bellier, J P; Harmand, M F; Naji, A; Davidas, J P; Le Chanu, A

    1990-01-01

    Most metals used for orthopaedic and stomatology implants and prostheses belong to the families of titanium or nickel-based and cobalt-based superalloys designed for advanced technology industries (e.g. space, aeronautic and nuclear industries). Ideal materials should be as insoluble and biologically compatible as possible. In the present paper the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys in biological media is evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization tests. It is shown that these metals exhibit some minor release of the component elements and degradation products, which may induce cytotoxic and allergic effects. The corrosion resistance of these alloys can be strongly enhanced by hard ceramic coatings deposited by radio-frequency sputtering. The biocompatibility of coated and uncoated metals is compared from differentiated human cell cultures.

  13. Melting temperature of metal polycrystalline nanowires electrochemically deposited into the pores of anodic aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Shilyaeva, Yu I; Bardushkin, V V; Gavrilov, S A; Silibin, M V; Yakovlev, V B; Borgardt, N I; Volkov, R L; Smirnov, D I; Zheludkevich, M L

    2014-09-28

    The arrays of metallic nanowires are considered as promising precursors for 1D semiconductor nanostructures after appropriate treatment at temperatures close to the melting point. Therefore the melting behaviour of the metallic structures in oxide templates is a key parameter for the subsequent conversion process. The present paper focuses on understanding of the effect of mechanical stress generated during heating on the melting point of the metal nanowires deposited into the pores of anodic alumina. Extremely high local compressive stress appears due to the difference in the thermal coefficients of the oxide template and nanowires inside the pores. The effect of the composite structural parameter that may be related to the concentration of nanowires on the melting temperature has been investigated. A numerical model predicting the melting point has been developed for composites with indium, tin, and zinc nanowires. The simulation results obtained using the suggested model were compared with the experimental data.

  14. Deposition and chemistry of pollutant metals in lakes around the smelters at Sudbury, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Nriagu, J.O.; Wong, H.K.T.; Coker, R.D.

    1982-09-01

    Analyses of the suspended particulates in lakes within a 30-km radius of the smelting complex at Sudbury show average Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations of 1500, 420, 540, and 360 ..mu..g g/sup -1/, respectively. Organic matter constitutes 35-60% of the suspended material in the lakes but plays a minor role in the transport of metals to the sediments. The rates of metal accumulation in the sediments have been estimated typically to be 100-600, 50-300, 10-60, and 5-30 mg m/sup -2/ year/sup -1/ for Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, respectively. The enrichment factors for metals in surficial sediments typically are 12-115 for Ni, 10-77 for Cu, 2-10 for Pb, and 2-8 for Zn. These enrichment factors and deposition rates for Ni and Cu are among the highest recorded anywhere in the world. Some of the lakes with pH values of 4.5 or less show no enrichment or accumulation of pollutant metals in their surface sediments, indicating that pollutant metals previously stored in the sediments have since been leached away. This documentation that the contaminated sediments can release substantial quantities of toxic metals to the overlying water must have interesting ramifications with regard to the limnological impacts of acid rains.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Transition Metal Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yura; Park, Eun-Sil; Mees, Karina; Park, Ho-Seon; Willert-Porada, Monika; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers were synthesized on transition metal (Fe, Co, Cu) catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The variations of thickness and surface of the fibers were investigated according to the concentration of the transition metal. In order to prepare the metal catalysts for synthesis, transition metal nitrate and copper nitrate at a weight ratio were dissolved in distilled water. The obtained catalyst precipitates were filtered and then dried for more than 24 hours at 110 degrees C. Carbon nanofibers were synthesized by using ethylene gas of carbon source by CVD after pulverization of the fully-dried catalyst precipitates. They were characterized by SEM, EDS, Raman, XRD, XPS and TG/DTA, and their specific surface area was measured by BET. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of the metal catalysts. Especially, uniform carbon nanofibers grew when the concentration ratio of Fe and Cu was 7:3, and that of Co and Cu was 6:4. Carbon nanofibers synthesized under such concentration conditions had the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts of different concentration ratios, and revealed high amorphicity as well as high specific surface area. PMID:26716326

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy study: From clean surface to surfaces adsorbed with atom/cluster or metallic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xieqiu

    2007-12-01

    Nanostructures, namely materials in the nanometer or sub-nanometer scales, can possess completely diRTMerent properties from their bulk counterparts. Due to the potential applications in different disciplines, the study of nanostructures has attracted extensive attention worldwide in recent years. Metal nanostructures grown on semiconductor substrates are a special group of nanostructures. Since these nanostructures can be prepared in ultrahigh vacuum with high controllability, one can use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to obtain information in situ on both the structural and electronic properties of these nanostructures simultaneously. In this thesis, I will present the growth behavior of metal or semiconductor nanostructures at the initial stage and the novel electronic properties of some of these nanostructures. The study of single Ge atoms adsorbed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface shows that different deposition temperatures result in diRTMerent adsorption structures. We find Ge substitution for the Si adatoms during high temperature growth and simple Ge adsorption above the Si atoms during low temperature growth. Small Ag clusters, formed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface at controlled coverages, show a strong rectification effect, which is an indication of the initial stage of Schottky barrier formation and possibly the smallest Schottky diode. On the surfaces of heavily n-doped and p-doped Si substrates, although the 7x7 is metallic at room temperature, an energy gap opens at low temperatures. This energy gap is correlated well with the electronic localization induced by the doping impurities. For Pb nanoislands, a pseudogap was discovered at temperatures higher than the superconducting transition temperature. The strength of the pseudogap depends on the lateral size and temperature, which is speculated to originate from the weak electronic localization induced by structural disorder.

  17. High-throughput shadow mask printing of passive electrical components on paper by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Francesco; Bellacicca, Andrea; Milani, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We report the rapid prototyping of passive electrical components (resistors and capacitors) on plain paper by an additive and parallel technology consisting of supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) coupled with shadow mask printing. Cluster-assembled films have a growth mechanism substantially different from that of atom-assembled ones providing the possibility of a fine tuning of their electrical conduction properties around the percolative conduction threshold. Exploiting the precise control on cluster beam intensity and shape typical of SCBD, we produced, in a one-step process, batches of resistors with resistance values spanning a range of two orders of magnitude. Parallel plate capacitors with paper as the dielectric medium were also produced with capacitance in the range of tens of picofarads. Compared to standard deposition technologies, SCBD allows for a very efficient use of raw materials and the rapid production of components with different shape and dimensions while controlling independently the electrical characteristics. Discrete electrical components produced by SCBD are very robust against deformation and bending, and they can be easily assembled to build circuits with desired characteristics. The availability of large batches of these components enables the rapid and cheap prototyping and integration of electrical components on paper as building blocks of more complex systems.

  18. Metals in bulk deposition and surface waters at two upland locations in northern England.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, A J; Tipping, E

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of aluminium and minor metals (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Ba, Pb) were measured in precipitation and surface water at two upland locations (Upper Duddon Valley, UDV; Great Dun Fell, GDF) in northern England for 1 year commencing April 1998. At both locations, the loads in bulk precipitation were at the lower ends of ranges reported for other rural and remote sites, for the period 1985-1995. The deposited metals were mostly in the dissolved form, and their concentrations tended to be greatest when rainfall volumes were low. The concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb in deposition were correlated (r2 > or = 0.40) with concentrations of non-marine sulphate. Three streams, ranging in mean pH from 5.07 to 7.07, and with mean concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) < 1 mg l(-1). were monitored at UDV, and two pools (mean pH 4.89 and 6.83, mean DOC 22 and 15 mg l(-1)) at GDF. Aluminium and the minor metals were mainly in the dissolved form, and in the following ranges (means of 49-51 samples. microg l(-1)): Al 36-530. Mn 4.4-36, Ni 0.26-2.8, Cu 0.25-1.7, Zn 2.1-30, Cd 0.03-0.16, Ba 1.9-140, Pb 0.10-4.5. Concentrations were generally higher at GDF. Differences in metal concentrations between the two locations and between waters at each location, and temporal variations in individual waters, can be explained qualitatively in terms of sorption to solid-phase soil organic matter and mineral surfaces, complexation and transport by DOC, and chemical weathering. The UDV catchments are sinks for Pb and sources of Al, Mn, Sr, Cd and Ba. The GDF catchments are sources of Al, Mn, Ni, Zn, Sr, Cd and Ba. Other metals measured at the two locations are approximately in balance. Comparison of metal:silicon ratios in the surface waters with values for silicate rocks indicates enrichment of Ni and Cu, and substantial enrichment of Zn, Cd and Pb. These enrichments, together with high metal deposition in the past, make it likely that concentrations of the metals in the surface

  19. Deposition of metallic gallium on re-crystallized ceramic material during focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz-Tabares, J.A.; Reyes-Gasga, J.

    2013-12-15

    We report a new kind of artifact observed in the preparation of a TEM sample of zirconia by FIB, which consists in the deposition of metallic gallium nano-dots on the TEM sample surface. High resolution TEM images showed a microstructure of fine equiaxed grains of ∼ 5 nm, with some of them possessing two particular characteristics: high contrast and well-defined fast Fourier transform. These grains could not be identified as any phase of zirconia but it was possible to identify them as gallium crystals in the zone axis [110]. Based on HRTEM simulations, the possible orientations between zirconia substrate and deposited gallium are discussed in terms of lattice mismatch and oxygen affinity. - Highlights: • We show a new type of artifact induced during preparation of TEM samples by FIB. • Deposition of Ga occurs due to its high affinity for oxygen. • Materials with small grain size (∼ 5 nm) could promote Ga deposition. • Small grain size permits the elastic accommodation of deposited Ga.

  20. Transition-Metal Planar Boron Clusters: a New Class of Aromatic Compounds with High Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with computational studies over the past decade has shown that boron clusters possess planar or quasi-planar structures, in contrast to that of bulk boron, which is dominated by three-dimensional cage-like building blocks. All planar or quasi-planar boron clusters are observed to consist of a monocyclic circumference with one or more interior atoms. The propensity for planarity has been found to be due to both σ and π electron delocalization throughout the molecular plane, giving rise to concepts of σ and π double aromaticity. We have found further that the central boron atoms can be substituted by transition metal atoms to form a new class of aromatic compounds, which consist of a central metal atom and a monocyclic boron ring (M B_n). Eight-, nine-, and ten-membered rings of boron have been observed, giving rise to octa-, ennea-, and deca-coordinated aromatic transition metal compounds [1-3]. References: [1] ``Aromatic Metal-Centered Monocyclic Boron Rings: Co B_9^- and Ru B_9^-" (Constantin Romanescu, Timur R. Galeev, Wei-Li Li, A. I. Boldyrev, and L. S. Wang), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. {50}, 9334-9337 (2011). [2] ``Transition-Metal-Centered Nine-Membered Boron Rings: M B_9 and M B_9^- (M = Rh, Ir)" (Wei-Li Li, Constantin Romanescu, Timur R. Galeev, Zachary Piazza, A. I. Boldyrev, and L. S. Wang), J. Am. Chem. Soc. {134}, 165-168 (2012). [3] ``Observation of the Highest Coordination Number in Planar Species: Decacoordinated Ta B10^- and Nb B_9^- Anions" (Timur R. Galeev, Constantin Romanescu, Wei-Li Li, L. S. Wang, and A. I. Boldyrev), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. {51}, 2101-2105 (2012).