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Sample records for metal induced embrittlement

  1. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  2. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. Final report, September 1, 1986--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  3. Embrittlement of Metal by Solute Segregation-Induced Amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.-P.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya; Yuan, Zaoshi; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lu, Gang; Duin, Adri C. T. van

    2010-04-16

    Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10{sup 6}-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics simulations provide the missing link. Namely, an order-of-magnitude reduction of grain-boundary shear strength due to amorphization, combined with tensile-strength reduction, allows the crack tip to always find an easy propagation path.

  4. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, R. P.; Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.; Frohmberg, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement refers to metals stressed while exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere. Tested in air, even after exposure to hydrogen under pressure, this effect is not observed on similar specimens. Much high purity hydrogen is prepared by evaporation of liquid hydrogen, and thus has low levels for potential impurities which could otherwise inhibit or poison the absorbent reactions that are involved. High strength steels and nickel-base allows are rated as showing extreme embrittlement; aluminum alloys and the austenitic stainless steels, as well as copper, have negligible susceptibility to this phenomenon. The cracking that occurs appears to be a surface phenomenon, is unlike that of internal hydrogen embrittlement.

  5. Recent developments in liquid-metal embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews developments in liquid-metal embrittlement of the past 7 years including data on cyclic loading. Embrittlement by solid and liquid metals and by hydrogen has many common features, although the mechanism of embrittler transport differs. Fracture may occur in each type of embrittlement by environmentally assisted shear and by reduced cohesion; embrittlement under cyclic loading has been widely observed, with stress level, temperature, and substrate alloy composition and grain size being the major variables. The degree of embrittlement between any combination of environment (i.e. hydrogen, liquid metal, or solid metal) and substrate depends upon the strength of the interaction with the substrate, the kinetics of embrittler transport, the mutual solubility of embrittler and substrate, and a large number of test and microstructural conditions. A method of calculating the most significant of these variables and the strength of interaction was reviewed and predictions of embrittlement in previously untested couples were made.

  6. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190/sup 0/C and 525/sup 0/C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500/sup 0/C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel.

  7. Noble Metals Would Prevent Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    According to proposal, addition of small amounts of noble metals makes iron- and nickel-based alloys less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen. Metallurgists demonstrated adding 0.6 to 1.0 percent by weight of Pd or Pt eliminates stress/corrosion cracking in type 4130 steel. Proposal based on assumption that similar levels (0.5 to 1.0 weight percent) of same elements effective against hydrogen embrittlement.

  8. Examples of liquiq metal embrittlement in industrial aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchet, Y.; Rodine, A.; Véron, M.; Péron, S.; Deschamps, A.

    2002-09-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) phenomena were investigated in two industrial aluminium alloys. Gallium penetration in 7010 alloys was systematically investigated to shed light on the effect of microstructure and plasticity ahead of the crack tip. Hot temperature shortness in 5083 alloy is given as an example of cleavage induced by LME.

  9. Origin of embrittlement in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Glenn R.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Johnson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their glassy nature, metallic glasses demonstrate a toughness that is extremely sensitive to the frozen-in configurational state. This sensitivity gives rise to “annealing embrittlement,” which is often severe and in many respects limits the technological advancement of these materials. Here, equilibrium configurations (i.e., “inherent states”) of a metallic glass are established around the glass transition, and the configurational properties along with the plane-strain fracture toughness are evaluated to associate the intrinsic glass toughness with the inherent state properties and identify the fundamental origin of embrittlement. The established correlations reveal a one-to-one correspondence between toughness and shear modulus continuous over a broad range of inherent states, suggesting that annealing embrittlement is controlled almost solely by an increasing resistance to shear flow. This annealing embrittlement sensitivity is shown to vary substantially between metallic glass compositions, and appears to correlate well with the fragility of the metallic glass. PMID:27573817

  10. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  11. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  12. Liquid and Solid Metal Embrittlement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-05

    structural parts, as in cadmium on steel or titanium alloys. d) welding , brazing, or soldering operations, as in steels where copper contamination (from...aluminum), by preferential chemical reactions (e.g. lithium on iron containing carbon or carbides), and by corrosion , perhaps aided by cavitation, in... welding electrodes) may occur, or solder contacting stressed iron-base alloys. e) various industrial situations where molten metals are han- dled or where

  13. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  14. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  15. Failures in large gas turbines due to liquid-metal embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, D.W. . Turbo Products Division)

    1994-07-01

    The failures of three gas turbine components, attributed to liquid-metal embrittlement or solid-metal-induced embrittlement, are described. High temperatures inherent in the gas turbine can aggravate these phenomenon if the necessary conditions are present. Examples chosen include a power transmission shaft, flange bolts from a cooling steam line, and a turbine rotor bolt. The respective material couples involved are 17-4PH stainless steel-copper, AISI 4130-cadmium, and IN 718-cadmium. Each case includes information on the source of the aggressive material and relevant operating environment. The implications of the failures with regard to the general failure mechanism are briefly discussed.

  16. Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

  17. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals and its control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed together with characteristics of hydrogen-environment embrittlement, the degree of hydrogen-environment embrittlement of a wide variety of alloys, the effect of hydrogen environments on various properties, (tension, fatigue, creep and fracture mechanics), and the influence of hydrogen exposure parameters on the degree of embrittlement. Design methods for high-pressure hydrogen service and for prevention of hydrogen-environment embrittlement are also covered.

  18. Reduction of liquid metal embrittlement in copper-brazed stainless steel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, T.; Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Wagner, G.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Due to its very good formability and the low raw material cost, pure copper in form of foils is commonly used to braze plate heat exchangers made of stainless steel. The difference in the electrochemical potentials of brazing filler and base material leads to corrosion effects in contact with electrolytes. This may lead to leakages, which decrease the reliability of the heat exchanger during service in potable water. The dissolution of the emerging corrosion products of brazing filler and base material induces the migration of heavy metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Ni2+, into the potable water. The so-called liquid metal embrittlement, which takes place during the brazing process, may intensify the corrosion. The brazing filler infiltrates the stainless steel along the grain boundaries and causes an embrittlement. This paper deals with the determination of the grain boundary erosion dependent on the degree of deformation and heat treatment of the stainless steel AISI 316L.

  19. Liquid metal embrittlement of steel with galvanized coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendala, J.

    2012-05-01

    Article presents the state of knowledge relating occurrences of liquid metals embrittlement. The results of experimental investigations of the LME phenomenon, reasons of its formation and influence of different parameters are described. Selected ideas of the applied research methods accessible in different works are presented. Samples made of C70D steel with tensions stretching (400-800 MPa) at different values and kinds of loading during the hot dip metallization were investigated. Coating processes in two bath: zinc and zinc with 2 % tin addition were made. The processes of hot dip metallization were done at 450 °C temperature and immersion time 180 s. Coated samples were investigated by light microscope to specify possibility appear of LME effect.

  20. Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Sabine; Kumar, Mukul; Somerday, Brian P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-10

    The feasibility of using 'grain-boundary engineering' techniques to reduce the susceptibility of a metallic material to intergranular embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen is examined. Using thermomechanical processing, the fraction of 'special' grain boundaries was increased from 46% to 75% (by length) in commercially pure nickel samples. In the presence of hydrogen concentrations between 1200 and 3400 appm, the high special fraction microstructure showed almost double the tensile ductility; also, the proportion of intergranular fracture was significantly lower and the J{sub c} fracture toughness values were some 20-30% higher in comparison with the low special fraction microstructure. We attribute the reduction in the severity of hydrogen-induced intergranular embrittlement to the higher fraction of special grain boundaries, where the degree of hydrogen segregation at these boundaries is reduced.

  1. Moisture-induced embrittlement of Fe sub 3 Al

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; DeVan, J.H.; Sikka, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent tests at ORNL indicate that the ductility of iron aluminides is very sensitive to the test environment. It is believed that the loss of ductility observed in moist air environments is associated with a hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon as a result of dissociation of water vapor and the intake of atomic hydrogen into the aluminide matrix. This possibility will be investigated in a series of tests under controlled environmental conditions. Compact specimens will be tested under controlled stress intensity conditions. Crack growth rates as a function of the applied stress intensity will be measured with the direct-current potential drop technique. Initial tests will be conducted in moist air and in vacuum at room temperature. In an additional series of tests the temperature of the moist air will be varied to permit the determination of an activation energy for the embrittlement process. Fractographic examination of the fracture surfaces will also be performed. It is anticipated that this series of test will increase our understanding of the environmentally-induced embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Simulation of He embrittlement at grain boundaries in bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masatake

    2015-10-01

    To investigate what atomic properties largely determine vulnerability to He embrittlement at grain boundaries (GB) of bcc metals, we introduce a computational model composed of first principles density functional theory and a He segregation rate theory model. Predictive calculations of He embrittlement at the first wall of the future DEMO fusion concept reactor indicate that variation in the He embrittlement originated not only from He production rate related to neutron irradiation, but also from the He segregation energy at the GB that has a systematic trend in the periodic table.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gibala, R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Topics related to hydrogen embrittlement are discussed, taking into account an overview on hydrogen degradation phenomena, theories of hydrogen induced cracking of steels, the hydrogen embrittlement of steels, hydrogen trapping in iron and steels, some recent results on the direct observation of hydrogen trapping in metals and its consequences on embrittlement mechanisms, fracture mechanics and surface chemistry investigations of environment-assisted crack growth, the role of microstructure in hydrogen embrittlement, and hydrogen related second phase embrittlement of solids. Subjects in the area of stress corrosion cracking are also explored, giving attention to recent observations on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks and their relevance to proposed mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, films and their importance in the nucleation of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel, and fundamentals of corrosion fatigue behavior of metals and alloys. Stress corrosion cracking of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels is also considered along with embrittlement studies on metallic glasses.

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gibala, R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents proceedings which give an account of knowledge and understanding of hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking from the viewpoints of the authors. The book is divided into two sections: (1) hydrogen embrittlement and (2) stress corrosion cracking, with papers by experts in the field contained in each section. Contents include: Hydrogen Embrittlement: Overview on hydrogen degradation phenomena; theories of hydrogen induced cracking of steels; hydrogen embrittlement of steels; hydrogen trapping and hydrogen embrittlement; some recent results on the direct observation of hydrogen trapping in metals and its consequence on embrittlement mechanisms; fracture mechanisms and surface chemistry; investigations of environment-assisted crack growth; the role of microstructure in hydrogen embrittlement; hydrogen related second phase embrittlement of solids. Stress corrosion cracking: Recent observations on the propagation of stress corrosion cracks and their relevance to proposed mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking; films and their importance in the nucleation of stress corrosion cracking stainless steel; stress corrosion cracking of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels; fundamentals of corrosion fatigue behavior of metals and alloys; hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys; hydrogen permeation and embrittlement studies on metallic glasses; and industrial occurrence of stress corrosion cracking and means for prediction.

  5. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  6. Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    While interfacial sulfur is the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al(sub alloy)+3(H2O)(sub air) = Al(OH)(-) (sub 3) +3H(+) may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized Rene N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  7. Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    While interfacial sulfur is the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al(sub alloy)+3(H2O)(sub air) = Al(OH)(-) (sub 3) +3H(+) may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized Rene N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  8. A New Venue Toward Predicting the Role of Hydrogen Embrittlement on Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Burak; Sahin, Ibrahim; Uzun, Alper; Canadinc, Demircan

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new crystal plasticity formulation to predict the role of hydrogen embrittlement on the mechanical behavior of metallic materials. Specifically, a series of experiments were carried out to monitor the role of hydrogen interstitial content on the uniaxial tensile deformation response of iron alloyed with hydrogen, and the classical Voce hardening scheme was modified to account for the shear stresses imposed on arrested dislocations due to the surrounding hydrogen interstitials. The proposed set of physically grounded crystal plasticity formulations successfully predicted the deformation response of iron in the presence of different degrees of hydrogen embrittlement. Moreover, the combined experimental and modeling effort presented herein opens a new venue for predicting the alterations in the performance of metallic materials, where the hydrogen embrittlement is unavoidable.

  9. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  10. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  11. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1993-04-15

    The effect in ambient air the tensile and fatigue behavior of an Fe{sub 3}Al, Cr type intermetallic alloy is examined as a function of test temperature. Hydrogen due to moisture in the air is found to be a major cause of embrittlement. Rates and mechanisms of observed embrittlement appear to be temperature dependent. In addition, the alloy was found to have no notch sensitivity.

  12. Moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-04-01

    FeAl alloys {ge}24 at. %Al are H embrittled by both H2 gas and water vapor. This examines effect of H embrittlement by H2 gas and moisture-bearing air on tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance of two ordered FeAl intermetallic alloys (28, 36 at. % Al) and one disordered Fe-Al alloy (16 at. % Al). Susceptibility to embrittlement varies with both Al content and ordered state. Tensile ductility of disordered low Al alloy is not affected by moisture-bearing air, and fatigue crack growth resistance is affected only slightly by moisture. However, the higher Al alloys are severely embrittled by moisture-bearing air. Oxidation of Al with concurrent release of H2 is responsible for embrittlement of Fe3Al alloys. It is likely that the smaller amount of Al available for the oxidation reaction in the 16at. % alloy precludes such embrittling reactions. In contrast, H2 is found to be embrittling to all alloys in both cyclic and monotonic tests. Fractography shows that H2 preferentially attacks cleavage planes in these alloys. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance in an inert environment of the low Al disordered alloy is found to be much lower than that for the high Al alloys. Fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment can be expressed as superposed mechanical fatigue and corrosion-fatigue components. Fatigue crack growth tests in inert and embrittling environments are used to isolate corrosion fatigue of the crack growth rate in Fe-28at. %Al. The corrosion-fatigue component displays a frequency dependence: At lower frequencies, more time is available for penetration of H ahead of the crack tip. H transport in the Fe-Al alloys occurs primarily by dislocation-assisted transport, which allows for penetration depths of 10-100x the distance that can be achieved by bulk diffusion. An equation is developed for the corrosion-fatigue component of crack growth rate which includes stress intensity range and frequency dependence.

  13. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  14. Rapid Relaxation and Embrittlement of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Electropulsing

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, P; Chen, Y. C.; Chu, J. P.; Chang, S Y; Bei, Hongbin; Jang, J. S.C.; Hsueh, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical relaxation and embrittlement of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 bulk metallic glasses were achieved rapidly by the direct current electropulsing treatment. The temperature profile was recorded by an infrared camera and it was found to be non-uniform in the treated specimen. Specifically, temperatures below the glass transition temperature, near and above the crystallization temperature could be ach- ieved, respectively, at different locations in the same treated specimen. Two sets of nanoindentation were conducted. While the first set investigated the mechanical properties of three individually elec- tropulsed specimens with different conditions, the second set indented a single treated specimen along its temperature gradient. Both sets of indentation revealed that by Joule heating to different tempera- tures, relaxation, embrittlement, and crystallization were significantly accelerated by electrical pulses. Results suggest that electropulsing provides an opportunity to simultaneously achieve plastic forming and mechanical property control of metallic glasses.

  15. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals: A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Frohmber, R. P.; Lewett, R. P.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Walter, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Study includes extensive tests examining effects of hydrogen environment on different high-strength metals and alloys. Recommendations for preventing metal failure include use of hydrogen-resistant coatings and inhibitors. Study includes references to related investigations and discussion of work in progress.

  16. Irradiation-induced embrittlement of a 2.25Cr1Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.-H.; Faulkner, R. G.; Flewitt, P. E. J.; Smith, R. F.; Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.

    2000-07-01

    Irradiation-induced embrittlement of a 2.25Cr1Mo is investigated by means of small punch testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) determined by the small punch test is much lower than that determined by the standard Charpy test. There are some irradiation-induced embrittlement effects after the steel is irradiated at about 270°C for 46 days with a neutron dose rate of 1.05×10 -8 dpa s -1 and at about 400°C for 86 days with a neutron dose rate of 1.75×10 -8 dpa s -1. In addition, there is some temper embrittlement after the steel is aged at about 400°C for 86 days.

  17. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  18. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-08

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking.

  19. Effect of alloying additions on the hydrogen-induced grain boundary embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Tian, Z X; Yan, J X; Hao, W; Xiao, W

    2011-01-12

    Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the influence of Mo, V and Pd on the H-induced grain boundary embrittlement in Fe. We find that, in the high impurity concentration systems, all of the three alloying elements facilitate H embrittlement at the Σ3 (111) [Formula: see text] grain boundary in Fe. The calculated binary effects of the H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) couples are 0.063, 0.074 and 0.040 eV, respectively. On the other hand, in the large unit cell with low impurity concentration, both Mo and V can facilitate H embrittlement, and the binary effects of pairs are 0.152 and 0.164 eV, respectively. While Pd reduces the H embrittlement on the cohesion of the Fe grain boundary with the binary effect of - 0.1 eV. The H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) interactions are interpreted by electronic structure analyses.

  20. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1994-04-19

    Alloy FA-129 undergoes an increase in crack propagation rate and a loss of fracture toughness in moisture-bearing and hydrogen gas environments. A similar effect is seen on ductility of FA-129 in tensile tests. The embrittling effect in air is attributed to oxidation of aluminum in the alloy by water vapor to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrogen gas. Alloy FAP-Y, which is disordered and contains only 16 a%Al is embrittled by hydrogen gas in a manner similar to that of FA-129. However, laboratory air had little effect on the crack growth rates, fracture toughness, or tensile ductility. The lower aluminum content apparently is insufficient to induce the Al-H{sub 2}O reaction. TEM and SEM analyses of microstructure and fracture surfaces were consistent with the change in fracture toughness with order and environment. Testing at elevated temperatures reduces crack growth rates in FA-129, and increases fracture toughness and ductility. This is consistent with the well documented peak in hydrogen embrittlement in structural alloys at or near room temperature. Elevated temperature affects the degree of embrittlement in a complex manner, possibly changing the rates of several of the processes involved.

  1. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  3. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  4. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip. PMID:26435318

  5. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.

  6. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey themore » empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.« less

  7. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.

  8. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of ferritic martensitic steel in liquid lead alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Bosch, R. W.; Sapundjiev, D.; Almazouzi, A.

    2008-06-01

    The susceptibility of the ferritic-martensitic steels T91 and EUROFER97 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) in lead alloys has been examined under various conditions. T91, which is currently the most promising candidate material for the high temperature components of the future accelerator driven system (ADS) was tested in liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), whereas the reduced activation steel, EUROFER97 which is under consideration to be the structural steel for fusion reactors was tested in liquid lead lithium eutectic. These steels, similar in microstructure and mechanical properties in the unirradiated condition were tested for their susceptibility to LME as function of temperature (150-450 °C) and strain rate (1 × 10 -3-1 × 10 -6 s -1). Also, the influence of pre-exposure and surface stress concentrators was evaluated for both steels in, respectively, liquid PbBi and PbLi environment. To assess the LME effect, results of the tests in liquid metal environment are compared with tests in air or inert gas environment. Although both unirradiated and irradiated smooth ferritic-martensitic steels do not show any or little deterioration of mechanical properties in liquid lead alloy environment compared to their mechanical properties in gas as function of temperature and strain rate, pre-exposure or the presence of surface stress concentrators does lead to a significant decrease in total elongation for certain test conditions depending on the type of liquid metal environment. The results are discussed in terms of wetting enhanced by liquid metal corrosion or crack initiation processes.

  9. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  10. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  11. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of vanadium and several vanadium alloys in HFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Garner, F. A.; Pawel, J. E.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    Vanadium, V1Ni, V10Ti and V10Ti1Ni (at%) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600°C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels caused strong embrittlement. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces caused strong increases in the density of the alloy. The resultant shrinkage, possibly compounded by thermal cycling, led to cracks developing at all intersections of grain boundaries with the specimen surface. This caused specimens irradiated at 500°C or below to often fail during retrieval from the reactor, as well as during electropolishing and other handling operations. At 600°C, the cracking and embrittlement processes are so severe that only a fine dust, composed mostly of individual grains or chunks of grains, was found in the irradiation capsule.

  12. The Role of Hydrogen-Enhanced Strain-Induced Lattice Defects on Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of X80 Pipeline Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, M.; Suzuki, H.; Seko, Y.; Takai, K.

    2017-08-01

    Studies to date have not completely determined the factors influencing hydrogen embrittlement of ferrite/bainite X80 pipeline steel. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was evaluated based on fracture strain in tensile testing. We conducted a thermal desorption analysis to measure the amount of tracer hydrogen corresponding to that of lattice defects. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and the amount of tracer hydrogen significantly increased with decreasing crosshead speed. Additionally, a significant increase in the formation of hydrogen-enhanced strain-induced lattice defects was observed immediately before the final fracture. In contrast to hydrogen-free specimens, the fracture surface of the hydrogen-charged specimens exhibited shallower dimples without nuclei, such as secondary phase particles. These findings indicate that the presence of hydrogen enhanced the formation of lattice defects, particularly just prior to the occurrence of final fracture. This in turn enhanced the formation of shallower dimples, thereby potentially causing premature fracture of X80 pipeline steel at lower crosshead speeds.

  13. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  14. Environmental embrittlement in ordered intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1992-12-31

    Ordered intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides possess many promising properties for elevated-temperature applications; however, poor fracture resistance and limited fabricability restrict their use as engineering material. Recent studies have shown that environmental embrittlement is a major cause of low ductility and brittle fracture in many ordered intermetallic alloys. There are two types of environmental embrittlement observed in intermetallic alloys. One is hydrogen-induced embrittlement occurring at ambient temperatures in air. The other is oxygen-induced embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In most cases, the embrittlements are due to a dynamic effect involving generation and penetration of embrittling agents (i.e., hydrogen or oxygen ) during testing. Diffusion of embrittling agents plays a dominant role in fracture of these intermetallic alloys. This chapter summarizes recent progress in understanding and reducing environmental embrittlement in these alloys.

  15. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  16. Hydrogen environment embrittlement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  17. Mercury embrittlement of Cu-Al alloys under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, T. M.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of mercury on the room temperature, high cycle fatigue properties of three alloys: Cu-5.5 pct Al, Cu-7.3 pct Al, and Cu-6.3 pct Al-2.5 pct Fe has been determined. Severe embrittlement under cyclic loading in mercury is associated with rapid crack propagation in the presence of the liquid metal. A pronounced grain size effect is noted under mercury, while fatigue properties in air are insensitive to grain size. The fatigue results are discussed in relation to theories of adsorption-induced liquid metal embrittlement.

  18. The effect of composition on the moisture-induced embrittlement of an Fe(3)Al,Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alven, David A.

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium (0.5 at.% and 1 at.%) and carbon (0.05 at.%) on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fesb3Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. Increasing the moisture content in the test environment, from 21%rH to 81%rH, was found to have a small effect on the fatigue crack growth resistance of the Zr-containing alloys. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  19. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility and Hydrogen-Induced Additive Stress of 7050 Aluminum Alloy Under Various Aging States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, W. J.; Song, R. G.; Qi, X.; Li, H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, C.; Jin, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of 7050 aluminum alloy under various aging states has been investigated by means of cathodic hydrogen permeation, slow strain rate test, hydrogen determinator, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope, and effect of hydrogen on atomic binding force of charged alloy has been calculated by free electron theory in this paper. Simultaneously, hydrogen-induced additive stress (σad) of 7050 aluminum alloy hydrogen charged with different current densities under various aging states have been investigated by flowing stress differential method. The results showed that hydrogen concentration of examined alloy increased with increasing charging time or current density under the same aging state. Hydrogen segregation occurred at grain boundaries which enlarged the crystal lattice constant, meanwhile, it reduced the average bonding energy and interatomic bonding force of the grain boundary atoms, thus resulting in hydrogen embrittlement; moreover, σad of 7050 aluminum alloy increased linearly with increasing hydrogen concentration under the same aging state, i.e., under aged: σad = -1.61 + 9.93 × 105 C H, peak aged: σad = -1.55 + 9.67 × 105 C H, over aged: σad = -0.16 + 9.35 × 105 C H, correspondingly, σad increased the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement ( I HE) further. Under the same charging condition, aging states had a great influence on σad and I HE, the under-aged state alloy was of the highest, the over-aged state alloy was of the lowest, and peak-aged was in the middle.

  20. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Metallic Materials. Part III. Hydrogen Entry and Embrittlement in Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    Memorial Lecture), Trans. ASM, 52 (1960), 54. 3. Bastein, P., and Azou , P., "Effect of Hydrogen on the Deformation and Fracture of Iron and Steel in Simple...Embrittlemnent in Iron and Steels," Fydrogen in Metals, International Conference in Paris, (May-June, 1972), 144h 1C5. Bastein, 11., and Azou , P., Rev

  1. Embrittlement proof nickel-alloy bellows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Thin cover of corrosion-resistant steel (CRES) protects metal bellows and ducts against hydrogen embrittlement. Bellow current carries hydrogen at high pressure and currently is used in the engine of Space Shuttle.

  2. Nondestructive detection and measurement of hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Alex, Franklin; Byrne, Joseph Gerald

    1977-01-01

    A nondestructive system and method for the determination of the presence and extent of hydrogen embrittlement in metals, alloys, and other crystalline structures subject thereto. Positron annihilation characteristics of the positron-electron annihilation within the tested material provide unique energy distribution curves for each type of material tested at each respective stage of hydrogen embrittlement. Gamma radiation resulting from such annihilation events is detected and statistically summarized by appropriate instrumentation to reveal the variations of electron activity within the tested material caused by hydrogen embrittlement therein. Such data from controlled tests provides a direct indication of the relative stages of hydrogen embrittlement in the form of unique energy distribution curves which may be utilized as calibration curves for future comparison with field tests to give on-site indication of progressive stages of hydrogen embrittlement.

  3. Testing for hydrogen embrittlement: Primary and secondary influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the hydrogen embrittlement process, both internal as well as external, to make more clear the type of parameters which must be considered in the selection of a test method and test procedure, so that the resulting data may be meaningfully applied to real engineering structures. Three primary influences on the embrittlement process are considered: (1) the original location and form of the hydrogen, (2) the transport reactions involved in the transport of hydrogen from its origin to some point where it can interact with the metal to cause embrittlement, and (3) the embrittlement interaction itself. A few secondary influences on the embrittlement process are also discussed.

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  5. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  6. Laser peening for reducing hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Zaleski, Tania M.; Chen, Hao-Lin; Hill, Michael R.; Liu, Kevin K.

    2010-05-25

    A laser peening process for the densification of metal surfaces and sub-layers and for changing surface chemical activities provides retardation of the up-take and penetration of atoms and molecules, particularly Hydrogen, which improves the lifetime of such laser peened metals. Penetration of hydrogen into metals initiates an embrittlement that leaves the material susceptible to cracking.

  7. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  8. Nature of hydrogen embrittlement of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Archakov, Yu. I.; Grebeshkova, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement of metals is the result of the origin and development of microcracks, which are formed as the result of the occurence of internal stresses. The specific feature of the appearance of hydrogen embrittlement are the result of the physical properties of the metals and the character of their interaction with hydrogen. The tendency of metals toward hydrogen embrittlement is determined by the following characteristics: their capacity to dissolve hydrogen and its maximum solubility; the chemical activity of the metals and other phases in relation to hydrogen, that is, the capacity toward hydride formation and failure of the carbided sand oxides, and the tendency of the metal toward the occurence and propagation of cracks. The authors cite and discuss two general forms of action of hydrogen on metals, the physical action of hydrogen on metals and the physicochemical action when chemical interaction of hydrogen with the different phases and the individual components of the alloy on the surface and in the volume occurs. The tendency toward hydrogen embrittlement is shown to increase with an increase in the strength of the steel. In addition to the strength, this characteristic also depends upon the chemical composition and structural condition of the steel.

  9. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of V-Ti-Ni and V-Ni alloys in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Garner, F.A.; Pawel, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    Vanadium, V-1Ni, V-10Ti and V-10Ti-1Ni (at %) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels strongly elevated the ductile to brittle transition temperature. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces leads to strong increases in the density of the alloy.

  10. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  11. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement: future directions-discussion.

    PubMed

    Lambert, H; Chen, Y-S

    2017-07-28

    The final session of the meeting consisted of a discussion panel to propose future directions for research in the field of hydrogen embrittlement and the potential impact of this research on public policy.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement: future directions—discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, H.; Chen, Y.-S.

    2017-06-01

    The final session of the meeting consisted of a discussion panel to propose future directions for research in the field of hydrogen embrittlement and the potential impact of this research on public policy. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  14. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Experimental variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, gas purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  15. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Primary and secondary influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    A somewhat phenomological overview of the hydrogen embrittlement process, both internal as well as external, is presented in a effort to make more clear the type of parameters which must be considered in the selection of a test method and test procedure so that the resulting data may be meaningfully applied to real engineering structures. What are believed to be the three primary influences on the embrittlement process are considered - the original location and form of the hydrogen, the transport reactions involved in the transport of hydrogen from its origin to some point it can interact with the metal to cause embrittlement, and the embrittlement interaction itself. Additionally, a few of the large number of secondary influences on the embrittlement process are discussed, for example, the influence of impurity species in the environment, surface hydride films, and surface oxide films.

  16. On surface energy and the hydrogen embrittlement of iron and steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tromans, D. . Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of iron and steels is examined on the basis of changes in surface energy due to adsorption effects, as first proposed by Petch. Attention is directed towards the development of a suitable adsorption isotherm for iron that adequately describes interactions between the surface and a mobile hydrogen solute in the metal lattice. Hydrogen induced changes in surface energy are analyzed for the unstressed lattice, and in the presence of very high localized tensile stresses. It is concluded that the high stresses are necessary to produce a sufficient decrease in surface energy to promote cracking, and that embrittlement proceeds by the formation of microcracks within the metal. The study includes the effects of changes in the concentration (activity) of hydrogen in the metal lattice and the influence of microstructure.

  17. Role of Hf and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the hydrogen embrittlement of aged Ta alloy T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and similar Ta and Cb alloys. It is found that aging ternary Ta alloys such as T-111 near 1040 C for 1000 hr or longer increases their sensitivity to low-temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Segregation of Hf to grain boundaries during aging causes embrittlement upon testing at -196 C and is responsible for the observed hydrogen embrittlement. Binary Ta and Cb alloys, Ta-2Hf and Cb-1Zr, are not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement under the conditions of this study and did not exhibit grain boundary segregation of Hf or Zr. Ternary alloys Ta-8W-.5Hf, Ta-8W-1Hf, and Ta-4W-2Hf are superior to T-111 for containment of alkali metals in that they do not exhibit aging embrittlement. However, these alloys in the aged condition are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement.

  18. Fast Quenching For Hydrogen-Embrittlement Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, Mark J.; Burkhart, Richard L.; Koncel, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus exposes hot metal specimens in hydrogen atmospheres to sudden cooling. Heater surrounds pressure vessel initially. On command, heater slides downward on track, exposing vessel. Spray bar falls over vessel and directs high-pressure jets of cold water at it. Developed to evaluate susceptibilities of specimens to embrittlement by hydrogen. Cools specimens by 1,050 degrees F (580 degrees C) in 160 seconds.

  19. The Mechanisms of Crack Initiation and Crack Propagation in Metal-Induced Embrittlement of Metals. Part I. Delayed Failure in the Embrittlement of 4140 Steel by Indium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-12

    differ. To confirm the presence of this gap , a series of tests was run at several other stress levels at the two temperatures 154°C (just below the...times across the gap at the melting point persists unchanged, within a substantial scatter, for all stress levels at which delayed failure takes place...initiation time at the melting point of indium is larger by a factor of 6.5 in SMIE than in LMIE. This time gap at the melting point persists at about the

  20. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-21

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  1. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated highly embrittled steel and intergranular fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; McCabe, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated a submerged-arc (SA) weld irradiated to a high level of embrittlement and a temper embrittled base metal that exhibits significant intergranular fracture (IGF) relative to representation by the Master Curve. The temper embrittled steel revealed that the intergranular mechanism significantly extended the transition temperature range up to 150 C above To. For the irradiated highly embrittled SA weld study, a total of 21 1T compact specimens were tested at five different temperatures and showed the Master Curve to be nonconservative relative to the results, although that observation is uncertain due to evidence of intergranular fracture.

  2. A comparison of internal hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen environment embrittlement of X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.

    1999-12-01

    Hydrogen has been shown to degrade the mechanical properties of nickel-base alloys. This degradation occurs whether the material is in a hydrogen producing environment or if the material has dissolved hydrogen in the metal due to prior exposure to hydrogen. Materials behave differently under these two conditions. Therefore, the degradation due to hydrogen has been split into two categories, internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE). IHE may be defined as the embrittlement of a material that has been charged with hydrogen prior to testing or service while HEE may be defined by the embrittlement of a material in a hydrogen environment where the hydrogen may come from gaseous hydrogen or generated from a corrosion reaction. This work will compare IHE and HEE of fracture mechanics specimens. Different fugacities of hydrogen for HEE and hydrogen concentrations for IHE were examined for Alloy X-750, a nickel-base super alloy. The test results were analyzed and the role of hydrogen in IHE and HEE was evaluated. A model based on a critical grain boundary hydrogen concentration will be proposed to describe the behavior in both HEE and IHE conditions.

  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Its Control in Hydrogen-Fueled Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    The nature of hydrogen embrittlement by high pressure gaseous hydrogen is described and methods of designing SSME gaseous hydrogen systems, including techniques of hydrogen embrittlement prevention, are discussed. The effects of gaseous hydrogen environments are emphasized. Results of extensive investigations of gaseous hydrogen environments on metals conducted under the SSME program are presented.

  4. Recent advances in the study of hydrogen embrittlement at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M. ,; Liang, Y.; Teter, D. F.; Aravas, N.; Sofronis, Petros,

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work at the University of Illinois on the fundamental mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement. Our approach combines experimental and theoretical methods. We describe the theoretical work on hydride formation and its application to hydrogen embrittlement of Ti alloys through the stress-induced hydride formation and cleavage mechanism, the localization of shear due to solute hydrogen, and finally, we present experimental evidence that favors the decohesion mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in a P-Ti alloy.

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural alloys. A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to hydrogen embrittlement of structural metals and alloys are reviewed. Particular note was taken of documents regarding hydrogen effects in rocket propulsion, aircraft propulsion and hydrogen energy systems, including storage and transfer systems.

  6. Atomic mechanism and prediction of hydrogen embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Curtin, W A

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in metals has posed a serious obstacle to designing strong and reliable structural materials for many decades, and predictive physical mechanisms still do not exist. Here, a new H embrittlement mechanism operating at the atomic scale in α-iron is demonstrated. Direct molecular dynamics simulations reveal a ductile-to-brittle transition caused by the suppression of dislocation emission at the crack tip due to aggregation of H, which then permits brittle-cleavage failure followed by slow crack growth. The atomistic embrittlement mechanism is then connected to material states and loading conditions through a kinetic model for H delivery to the crack-tip region. Parameter-free predictions of embrittlement thresholds in Fe-based steels over a range of H concentrations, mechanical loading rates and H diffusion rates are found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. This work provides a mechanistic, predictive framework for interpreting experiments, designing structural components and guiding the design of embrittlement-resistant materials.

  7. Embrittlement data base, version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water-reactor (LWR) pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials depends on many different factors such as flux, fluence, fluence spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Based on embrittlement predictions, decisions must be made concerning operating parameters and issues such as low-leakage-fuel management, possible life extension, and the need for annealing the pressure vessel. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules and test reactor experiments, comprising many different materials and different irradiation conditions, are needed to develop generally applicable damage prediction models that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Version 1 of the Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data resulting from merging version 2 of the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB). Fracture toughness data were also integrated into Version 1 of the EDB. For power reactor data, the current EDB lists the 1,029 Charpy transition-temperature shift data points, which include 321 from plates, 125 from forgoings, 115 from correlation monitor materials, 246 from welds, and 222 from heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials that were irradiated in 271 capsules from 101 commercial power reactors. For test reactor data, information is available for 1,308 different irradiated sets (352 from plates, 186 from forgoings, 303 from correlation monitor materials, 396 from welds and 71 from HAZs) and 268 different irradiated plus annealed data sets.

  8. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  9. Irradiation embrittlement characterization of the EUROFER 97 material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytka, M.; Brumovsky, M.; Falcnik, M.

    2011-02-01

    The paper summarizes original results of irradiation embrittlement study of EUROFER 97 material that has been proposed as one candidate of structural materials for future fusion energy systems and GEN IV. Test specimens were manufactured from base metal as well as from weld metal and tested in initial unirradiated condition and also after neutron irradiation. Irradiation embrittlement was characterized by testing of toughness properties at transition temperature region - static fracture toughness and dynamic fracture toughness properties, all in sub-size three-point bend specimens (27 × 4 × 3 mm 3). Testing and evaluation was performed in accordance with ASTM and ESIS standards, fracture toughness KJC and KJd data were also evaluated with the "Master curve" approach. Moreover, J- R dependencies were determined and analyzed. The paper compares unirradiated and irradiated properties as well as changes in transition temperature shifts of these material parameters. Discussion about the correlation between static and dynamic properties is also given. Results from irradiation of EUROFER 97 show that this steel - base metal as well as weld metal - is suitable as a structural material for reactor pressure vessels of innovative nuclear systems - fusion energy systems and GEN IV. Transition temperature shifts after neutron irradiation by 2.5 dpa dose show a good agreement in the case of EUROFER 97 base material for both static and dynamic fracture toughness tests. From the results it can be concluded that there is a low sensitivity of weld metal to neutron irradiation embrittlement in comparison with EUROFER 97 base metal.

  10. Pressure induced metallization of Germane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Canales, M.; Bergara, A.; Feng, J.; Grochala, W.

    2006-09-01

    Recently reported superconductivity in lithium under pressure has renewed the interest on hydrogen and hydrogen-rich systems in the long standing quest for room temperature superconductivity. Although the required metallization of pure hydrogen cannot be achieved within correct experimental capabilities, chemical precompression exerted by heavier atoms in compounds with a large hydrogen content is expected to imply that lower pressures might be required to attain the metallic transition in these alloys. In this article, we present an ab initio analysis of pressure induced metallization of germane, as a particular case between group IVa hydrides. According to our calculations, metallization of germane is predicted to occur at an experimentally accessible pressure of around 70 GPa, which corresponds to a compression factor of 3.4.

  11. Aging embrittlement and grain boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thauvin, G.; Lorang, G.; Leymonie, C.

    1992-08-01

    “Clean” 3.5NiCrMoV steels with limited contents in trace elements (P, Sn, As, Sb) are commonly provided for manufacturing big rotor shafts. The possible increase in temperature in future steam turbines has promoted the development of “superclean” steels characterized by an extra drastic decrease of manganese and silicon contents. Their higher cost in comparison to “clean” steels leads to concern above which temperature they must be considered as mandatory for resisting aging embrittlement in operation. 3.5NiCrMoV “clean” steel samples (Mn = 0.30 pct; Si = 0.10 pct) were aged at 300 °C, 350 °C, and 400 °C for 10,000 hours up to 30,000 hours. No embrittlement results from aging at 300 °C and 350 °C, but holding at 400 °C is highly detrimental. Auger spectroscopy confirms that, when aging at 400 °C, phosphorus is the main embrittling trace element. It is suggested that grain boundary embrittlement is associated with the building of a layer that contains, on the one hand, Ni and P and, on the other hand, Mo and Cr.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Structural Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Christopher W

    2014-08-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines; however, it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittlement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a well-established failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. This pressure cycling represents one of the key differences in operating conditions between current hydrogen pipelines and those anticipated in a hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Applying structural integrity models in design codes coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of the reliability/integrity of steel hydrogen pipelines subjected to pressure cycling. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of physics-based predictive models, which provide important insights such as the effects of microstructure on hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth. Successful implementation of these structural integrity and physics-based models enhances confidence in the design codes and enables decisions about materials selection and operating conditions for reliable and efficient steel hydrogen pipelines.

  13. Study of helium embrittlement in boron doped EUROFER97 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.

    2009-04-01

    To simulate helium effects in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels, experimental heats ADS2, ADS3 and ADS4 with the basic composition of EUROFER97 (9%Cr-WVTa) were doped with different contents of natural boron and separated 10B-isotope (0.008-0.112 wt.%) and irradiated in High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten up to 16.3 dpa at 250-450 °C and in Bor-60 fast reactor in Dimitrovgrad up to 31.8 dpa at 332-338 °C. The embrittlement and hardening are investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with subsize specimens. Complete burn-up of 10B isotope under neutron irradiation in HFR Petten led to generation of 84, 432 and 5580 appm He and partial boron-to-helium transformation in Bor-60 led to generation of 9, 46, 880 appm He in ADS2, ADS3 and ADS4 heats, respectively. At low irradiation temperatures Tirr ⩽ 340 °C the boron doped steels show progressive embrittlement with increasing helium amount. Irradiation induced DBTT shift of EUROFER97 based heat doped with 1120 wppm separated 10B isotope could not be quantified due to large embrittlement found in the investigated temperature range. At Tirr ⩽ 340 °C helium induced extra embrittlement is attributed to material hardening induced by helium bubbles and described in terms of phenomenological model.

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  15. Technique to Predict Ultraviolet Radiation Embrittlement of Polymers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the low-Earth-orbit environment, solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation embrittles polymer materials through bond breaking and crosslinking. This UV embrittlement increases the surface hardness of the polymer. Before the durability of polymer materials in the low- Earth-orbit environment can be predicted, the extent of UV embrittlement needs to be determined. However, traditional techniques for measuring the microhardness of materials cannot be employed to measure changes in the hardness of UV-embrittled surfaces because traditional techniques measure bulk hardness and are not sensitive enough to surface changes. A unique technique was used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to quantify polymer surface damage that had been induced by UV radiation. The technique uses an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure surface microhardness. An atomic force microscope measures the repulsive forces between the atoms in a microscopic cantilevered tip and the atoms on the surface of a sample. Typically, an atomic force microscope produces a topographic image of a surface by monitoring the movement of the tip over features of the surface. The force applied to the cantilevered tip, and the indention of the tip into the surface, can be measured. The relationship between force and distance of indentation, the quantity force/distance (newtons/meter), provides a measure of the surface hardness. Under identical operating conditions, direct comparisons of surface hardness values can be made.

  16. Thermal embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Stoller, R.E.; Wang, J.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1995-06-01

    As a result of observations of possible thermal embrittlement from recent studies with welds removed from retired steam generators of the Palisades Nuclear Plant (PNP), an assessment was made of thermal aging of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under nominal reactor operating conditions. Discussions are presented on (1) data from the literature regarding relatively low-temperature thermal embrittlement of RPV steels; (2)relevant data from the US power reactor-embrittlement data base (PR-EDB); and (3)potential mechanisms of thermal embrittlement in low-alloy steels.

  17. Small punch test evaluation of intergranular embrittlement of an alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, J.M.; Buck, O.; Kameda, J.

    1983-12-01

    The ductile-brittle transition temperature in steel is commonly determined using Charpy V-notch impact specimens as specified by ASTM E23-81. In some specific cases, however, the use of this standardized test specimen may be impractical, if not impossible. For instance, it is well known that ferritic steels show a substantial degradation of the mechanical properties after long time exposure to an irradiation environment. Because of the increase in strength and the reduction in ductility due to neutron irradiation, the Charpy V-notch transition temperature is raised causing concern from a safety point of view. To study these radiation effects, a test specimen much smaller than the standard Charpy V-notch specimen would be extremely desirable for two reasons. First, to study neutron damage small specimens take less space within a reactor. Secondly, the damage achieved in simulation experiments, such as proton or electron accelerators, is limited to small penetration depths. Several efforts on the development of such a small test specimen, similar to that used to determine the ductility of sheet metal, as recommended by ASTM E643-78, have been described in the literature. The paper reports on correlations between small punch (SP) and Charpy V-notch (CVN) test results obtained on temper-embrittled NiCr steel. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with intergranular embrittlement being induced by grain boundary segregation of specific impurities was determined. The relation between test results discussed in terms of the micromechanisms of intergranular cracking. It is suggested that in radiation embrittlement investigations similar correlations may be obtained.

  18. Mechanisms of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steel at irradiation temperatures of (50-400)°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Bukina, Z. V.; Frolov, A. S.; Maltsev, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Zhuchkov, G. M.

    2017-07-01

    This work summarizes and analyzes our recent research results on the effect of irradiation temperature within the range of (50-400)°C on microstructure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA class 1 steel (VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base metal). The paper considers the influence of accelerated irradiation with different temperature up to different fluences on the carbide and irradiation-induced phases, radiation defects, yield strength changes and critical brittleness temperature shift (ΔTK) as well as on changes of the fraction of brittle intergranular fracture and segregation processes in the steel. Low temperature irradiation resulted solely in formation of radiation defects - dislocation loops of high number density, the latter increased with increase in irradiation temperature while their size decreased. In this regard high embrittlement rate observed at low temperature irradiation is only due to the hardening mechanism of radiation embrittlement. Accelerated irradiation at VVER-1000 RPV operating temperature (∼300 °C) caused formation of radiation-induced precipitates and dislocation loops, as well as some increase in phosphorus grain boundary segregation. The observed ΔTK shift being within the regulatory curve for VVER-1000 RPV base metal is due to both hardening and non-hardening mechanisms of radiation embrittlement. Irradiation at elevated temperature caused more intense phosphorus grain boundary segregation, but no formation of radiation-induced precipitates or dislocation loops in contrast to irradiation at 300 °C. Carbide transformations observed only after irradiation at 400 °C caused increase in yield strength and, along with a contribution of the non-hardening mechanism, resulted in the lowest ΔTK shift in the studied range of irradiation temperature and fluence.

  19. Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    2000-04-01

    Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

  20. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Gun Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    8217s HY80 and HY130 steels were checked for the critical hydrogen concentrations which were determined to be 6 ppm for HY8O steel 8 and 3 ppm for HY130...JOTC FILE COPY AD-A188 972 AD 1 TECHNICAL REPORT ARCCB-TR-87030 HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF GUN STEEL F’ GERALD L. SPFNCER DTIC DEC 1 5 1987 NOVEMBER...PtEtIOC COVERED HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEHENT OF GUN STEEL Final OG EOTNME 6. PERFORMINGORO EOTNME 7. A*JTNOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Gerald L

  1. Interstitial embrittlement in vanadium laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.; Wagner, L.M.

    1992-02-24

    Efficiencies of interstitial absorption during pulsed ND:YAG laser welding of vanadium were compared for nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Influence of interstitial levels on the embrittlement of vanadium laser welds was also measured. For 1000 ppM contaminant levels in the weld atmosphere, weld hydrogen content increased 9 ppM, nitrogen content increased 190 ppM, and oxygen content increased from 500 ppM relative to baseplate levels. Welds in ultrahigh-purity argon atmospheres contained 3 ppM hydrogen, 40 ppM nitrogen, and 250 ppM oxygen. Longitudinal all-weld tensile specimens and notched-plate specimens were used to measure weld metal tensile properties at [minus]55C. All of the laser weld notch-strength ratios exceeded unity and weld metal tensile strengths all exceeded the baseplate values. For 1000 ppM atmosphere contaminant levels, the only significant decrease in ductility, as measured by reduction-in-area at fracture was for the weld atmosphere containing oxygen. Weld atmospheres containing 1% nitrogen also reduced the weld ductility, and resulted in the onset of cleavage fracture.

  2. Interstitial embrittlement in vanadium laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.; Wagner, L.M.

    1992-02-24

    Efficiencies of interstitial absorption during pulsed ND:YAG laser welding of vanadium were compared for nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Influence of interstitial levels on the embrittlement of vanadium laser welds was also measured. For 1000 ppM contaminant levels in the weld atmosphere, weld hydrogen content increased 9 ppM, nitrogen content increased 190 ppM, and oxygen content increased from 500 ppM relative to baseplate levels. Welds in ultrahigh-purity argon atmospheres contained 3 ppM hydrogen, 40 ppM nitrogen, and 250 ppM oxygen. Longitudinal all-weld tensile specimens and notched-plate specimens were used to measure weld metal tensile properties at {minus}55C. All of the laser weld notch-strength ratios exceeded unity and weld metal tensile strengths all exceeded the baseplate values. For 1000 ppM atmosphere contaminant levels, the only significant decrease in ductility, as measured by reduction-in-area at fracture was for the weld atmosphere containing oxygen. Weld atmospheres containing 1% nitrogen also reduced the weld ductility, and resulted in the onset of cleavage fracture.

  3. Experimental investigation of processes responsible for dehydration weakening and embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, G.; Okazaki, K.; Proctor, B.

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted suites of experiments designed to test the efficacy of dehydration embrittlement for inducing intermediate depth earthquakes. Deformation experiments have been conducted in a Griggs apparatus at 1 to 2 GPa on both antigorite and lawsonite gouge. To scale experimental results to natural conditions, we conducted experiments where we use temperature ramps to induce dehydration while the samples deform at a constant strain rate. The weakening rate of the samples scales with the ratio of the temperature ramp rate over the strain rate. We also conducted experiments at these conditions where the pore fluid pressure is either drained or undrained. In this poster, we will describe the following observations: (1) Experiments on antigorite demonstrate that weakening is associated with an increase in pore-fluid pressure. However, weakening is always stable even when the weakening rate is the same as the apparatus stiffness. Strain rate stepping experiments on both antigorite, and dehydrating antigorite indicate velocity strengthening behavior and no AEs are resolvable during the dehydration reaction. (2) Experiments on lawsonite show unstable weakening (i.e. stick slip behavior) at all ratios of temperature ramp rate over strain rate. Experiments within the lawsonite stability field exhibit stick-slip behavior and AEs are detected both during deformation within the lawsonite stability field and during the dehydration reaction. These results indicate that dehydration embrittlement is suppressed when the reacting phase shows velocity strengthening frictional behavior. The results of the experiments on dehydration of antigorite also suggest that embrittlement of the reaction products is suppressed by enhancement of solution-precipitation processes. This observation provides a possible explanation for why dehydration of antigorite induces embrittlement at lower confining pressures (i.e. 200 MPa), where the dehydration temperature is lower and hence the

  4. Reduced hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in platinum implanted high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, J. G.; Lowder, L. J.; Culbertson, R. J.; Kosik, W. E.; Brown, R.

    1991-07-01

    High strength steels suffer from a high susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in a corrosive atmosphere, a factor which limits their usefulness. A good catalyst, such as platinum, present on the surface of the steel may lead to a low value of hydrogen overvoltage, thereby reducing the accumulation and subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the metal. In the present study, platinum was implanted into high strength electroslag remelted (ESR) 4340 steel specimens to a dose of 10 16 atoms/cm 2. Both Pt-implanted and unimplanted specimens were rate charged with hydrogen. The relative concentration of diffusible hydrogen was determined using an electrochemical measurement device known as a Barnacle Electrode. The specimens implanted with platinum exhibited less diffusible hydrogen than the unimplanted steel. Slow strain rate notched-tensile tests, in an aqueous solution of 3.5 wt.% NaCI, were performed in order to evaluate the effect of hydrogen on strength and ductility. The Pt-implanted specimens were able to sustain significantly higher loads before fracture than their unimplanted counterparts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified the presence of brittle cracking typical of hydrogen embrittlement type failures. Degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement was thus significantly reduced. This suggested that both the electrochemical and catalytic properties of the Pt-implanted surface were responsible for the improvement in properties.

  5. Sulfide stress corrosion study of a super martensitic stainless steel in H2S sour environments: Metallic sulfides formation and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnot, Martin; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Roche, Virginie; Berthomé, Grégory; Chauveau, Eric; Estevez, Rafael; Mantel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their high corrosion resistance, super martensitic stainless steels are commonly used in the oil and gas industry, particularly in sour environments. Some grades are however susceptible to undergo hydrogen and mechanically-assisted corrosion processes in the presence of H2S, depending on the pH. The martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4418 grade exhibits a clear protective passive behavior with no sulfide stress corrosion cracking when exposed to sour environments of pH ≥ 4, but undergoes a steep decrease in its corrosion resistance at lower pH conditions. The present paper investigated this abrupt loss of corrosion resistance with electrochemical measurements as well as different physicochemical characterization techniques. Results indicated that below pH 4.0 the metal surface is covered by a thick (ca 40 μm) porous and defect-full sulfide-rich corrosion products layer shown to be straightforwardly related to the onset of hydrogen and sulfide mechanically-assisted corrosion phenomena.

  6. Cold work embrittlement of interstitial-free sheet steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Kevin Patrick

    The occurrence of brittle intergranular fracture during sheet metal forming operations or during in-service use in low carbon steels is often termed cold work embrittlement (CWE). Interstitial-free steels are especially susceptible to brittle intergranular fracture, as there is little free carbon in solid solution left to segregate to the grain boundaries, where its presence is thought to intrinsically strengthen the grain boundaries and indirectly strengthen the grain boundaries by impeding the segregation of deleterious elements such as phosphorus and tin. These embrittled grain boundaries, coupled with an increased flow stress from cold working, result in intergranular fracture, especially after deep drawing, with cracks propagating in the drawing direction. The purpose of the present work was to identify the key microstructural parameters controlling cold work embrittlement. Tensile tests performed on well-characterized undeformed and predeformed IF steel sheet indicated that the grain shape was a key microstructural parameter. A strain path dependent fracture criterion was developed and used to predict the occurrence of cold work embrittlement for forming operations from the evolution of the resulting intergranular fracture surface and the yield surface with deformation. A series of experiments on deep drawn cups were used to test the key predictions of the model. The role of grain shape, amount of deep drawing, segregation levels, macroscopic residual stresses, strain rate, and surface condition were further clarified. Although a fracture path investigation indicated that low angle boundaries were resistant to fracture, the density of these boundaries were insufficient to affect the bulk macroscopic fracture properties. The potency and amount of segregant at the grain boundary controls the cohesive strength of the grain boundary. Quantitative analytical electron microscopy detected higher levels of phosphorus segregation for batch annealed steel as opposed to

  7. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krasikov, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated

  8. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  9. Laser-Induced Transfer of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Koch, Jürgen; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-10-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metallic micro- and nanostructures based on femtosecond laser-induced transfer of metallic nanodroplets is developed. The size of the transferred droplets depends on the volume of laser-molten metal and can be varied by changing the laser beam focus on the sample surface and the metal film thickness. Controllable fabrication of high quality spherical gold micro- and nanoparticles with sizes between 170 nm and 1500 nm is realized. Fabrication of miscellaneous structures consisting of gold particles as elementary building blocks is demonstrated.

  10. Metal Induced Growth of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides at Controlled Locations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhendong; Huang, Qi; Chen, Peng; Guo, Shouhui; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Xuelei; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Metal induced nucleation is adopted to achieve the growth of transition metal dichalcogenides at controlled locations. Ordered arrays of MoS2 and WS2 have successfully been fabricated on SiO2 substrates by using the patterned Pt/Ti dots as the nucleation sites. Uniform MoS2 monolayers with the adjustable size up to 50 μm are grown surrounding these metal patterns and the mobility of such layer is about 0.86 cm2/V·s. The crystalline flakes of WS2 are also fabricated extending from the metal patterns and the electron mobility of these flakes is up to 11.36 cm2/V·s. PMID:27910917

  11. Evaluation of test procedures for hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Report presents discussion of three common and primary influences on embrittlement process. Application of theoretical considerations to design of test coupons and methods is illustrated for both internal and external hydrogen embrittlement. Acceptable designs and methods are indicated.

  12. Fractography of hydrogen-embrittled iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile specimens of iron-chromium-nickel base alloys were broken in either a hydrogen enviroment or in air following thermal charging with hydrogen. Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Fracture morphology of hydrogen-embrittled specimens was characterized by: changed dimple size, twin-boundary parting, transgranular cleavage, and intergranular separation. The nature and extent of the fracture mode changes induced by hydrogen varied systematically with alloy composition and test temperature. Initial microstructure developed during deformation processing and heat treating had a secondary influence on fracture mode.

  13. Fractography of hydrogen-embrittled iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, Jr, G R

    1980-01-01

    Tensile specimens of iron-chromium-nickel base alloys were broken in either a hydrogen environment or in air following thermal charging with hydrogen. Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Fracture morphology of hydrogen-embrittled specimens was characterized by: changed dimple size, twin-boundary parting, transgranular cleavage, and intergranular separation. The nature and extent of the fracture mode changes induced by hydrogen varied systematically with alloy composition and test temperature. Initial microstructure developed during deformation processing and heat treating had a secondary influence on fracture mode.

  14. Neutron-Induced Swelling and Embrittlement of Pure Iron and Pure Nickel Irradiated in the BN-350 and BOR-60 Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Budylkin, Nikolai I.; Mironova, Elena G.; Chernov, V. M.; Krasnoselov, V. A.; Porollo, S. I.; Garner, Francis A.

    2008-04-30

    Pure iron and nickel were irradiated in the range of 2 to 15 x 10-7 dpa/sec at 345-650 degrees C to very high neutron exposures in two fast reactors, BOR-60 and BN-350, to study void swelling and changes in mechanical properties of these two metals. Both nickel and iron swell in this temperature range with the maximum swelling rate at ~500 degrees C in nickel but possibly at <350 degrees C for iron. It also appears that the swelling rate in nickel may be dependent on the dpa rate, increasing with decreasing dpa rate.

  15. On Hydrogen and Helium embrittlement in Isotopic tailoring Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2000-09-01

    The results of shear punch testing performed on irradiated isotopically tailored alloys are considered in terms of hydrogen and helium embrittlement in order to quantify the observed behavior. The results indicate that hydrogen embrittlement may be more significant than helium embrittlement.

  16. Embrittlement Phenomena in an Austenitic Stainless Steel: Influence of Hydrogen and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamani, Emil; Jouinot, Patrice

    2007-04-01

    The influence of hydrogen and temperature (up to 650°C) on an austenitic stainless steel is studied by means of two main techniques: the disk pressure embrittlement and the special biaxial tensile tests. The embrittlement index of the steel is determined as the ratio of rupture pressures of the disks tested similarly under helium and hydrogen. Furthermore, we studied the effect of loading speed and temperature on rupture pressures. We show that the mechanical behavior of the steel is strongly influenced by the apparition of a second phase: the deformation induced martensite, α'.

  17. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb Welds

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; C.K. Battige; N. Liwis; M.A. Penik; J. Kikel; A.J. Silvia; C.K. McDonald

    2001-03-18

    Nickel based alloys are often welded with argon/hydrogen shielding gas mixtures to minimize oxidation and improve weld quality. However, shielding gas mixtures with {ge} 1% hydrogen additions can result in hydrogen concentrations greater than 5 wt. ppm in the weld metal and reduce ductility via hydrogen embrittlement. For the conditions investigated, the degree of hydrogen embrittlement is highly variable between 5 and 14 wt. ppm. investigation of hydrogen embrittlement of EN82H GTAW welds via tensile testing, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that this variability is due to the inhomogeneous microstructure of the welds, the presence of recrystallized grains, and complex residual plastic strains. Specifically, research indicates that high residual strains and hydrogen trapping lower the ductility of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb weld metal when dissolved hydrogen concentrations are greater than 5 wt. ppm. The inhomogeneous microstructure contains columnar dendritic, cellular dendritic, and recrystallized grains. The decreased tensile ductility observed in embrittled samples is recovered by post weld heat treatments that decrease the bulk hydrogen concentration below 5 wt. ppm.

  18. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of T-250 laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, L.W.; Huang, W.B.; Chen, C.

    1997-04-01

    The tensile properties of laser-welded T-250 maraging steel are measured, with attention paid to the influence of strain rate and gaseous hydrogen on the fracture behavior of welded specimens. Post-weld heat treatments are performed on laser-welded specimens to obtain underaged (WU), peak-aged (WP), and overaged (WO) specimens. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) affects the tensile fracture behavior of the welded specimens; HE changes not only the fracture mode but also the fracture location. Without the influence of hydrogen, the fracture location is at the softest region, the weld metal (WM), and the fracture appearance reveals a ductile dimple fracture. For welds sensitive to HE, the fracture is initiated at the heat-affected zone (HAZ) with coarse grain size, and the associated fracture surface exhibits intergranular and quasi-cleavage fractures that are brittle in nature. In addition, the HAZ with coarse grain size is more prone to HE, as compared to other regions in the welded specimens. The WU specimens are susceptible to HE in air under a low strain rate, while the WP specimens are only susceptible to gaseous hydrogen embrittlement (GHE). However, the WO specimens are immune to GHE and insensitive to strain rate.

  19. Hydrogen transport and hydrogen embrittlement in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Perng, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen-induced slow crack growth (SCG) in metastable austenitic stainless steels, hydrogen permeation and/or cracking velocity were measured and compared for three types of stainless steels. These included austenitic, ferritic, and duplex (..gamma../..cap alpha..) alloys. Deformation in AISI 301 resulted in various amounts of ..cap alpha..' martensite, which enhanced the effective hydrogen diffusivity and permeability. No phase transformation was observed in deformed AISI 310. The effective hydrogen diffusivity in this alloy was slightly reduced after plastic deformation, presumably by dislocation trapping. In either the dynamic or static tensile test, AISI 301 exhibited the greatest hydrogen embrittlement and therefore the highest SCG velocity among all the alloys tested in this work. The SCG velocity was believed to be controlled by the rate of accumulation of hydrogen in the embrittlement region ahead of the crack tip and therefore could be explained with the hydrogen transport parameters measured from the permeation experiments. The relatively high SCG velocity in AISI 301 was probably due to the fast transport of hydrogen through the primarily stress-induced ..cap alpha..' phase around the crack. No SCG was observed in AISI 310. The presence of H/sub 2/O vapor was found to reduce both the hydrogen permeation and SCG velocity.

  20. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  1. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  3. Correlating radiation exposure with embrittlement: Comparative studies of electron- and neutron-irradiated pressure vessel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.; Klingensmith, D.; Gragg, D.

    1999-12-22

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results show the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiate samples relative to unalloyed iron. Despite their disparate nature of defect production similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  4. Pressure-induced metallization of silane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Song, Yang; Goncharov, Alexander F; Ahart, Muhtar; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2008-01-08

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH(4)), silane (SiH(4)), and germane (GeH(4)) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH(4) undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27-30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization.

  5. Pressure-induced metallization of silane

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Song, Yang; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Ahart, Muhtar; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH4), silane (SiH4), and germane (GeH4) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH4 undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27–30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization. PMID:18162539

  6. (Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels)

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.

    1990-09-24

    The traveler served as a member of the two-man US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored team who visited the Prometey Complex in Leningrad to assess the potential for expanded cooperative research concerning integrity of the primary pressure boundary in commercial light-water reactors. The emphasis was on irradiation embrittlement, structural analysis, and fracture mechanics research for reactor pressure vessels. At the irradiation seminar in Cologne, presentations were made by German, French, Finnish, Russian, and US delegations concerning many aspects of irradiation of pressure vessel steels. The traveler made presentations on mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and on important aspects of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program results of irradiated fracture mechanics tests.

  7. Fuel Manifold Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, T.

    1986-01-01

    Completely-cast hydrogen-compatible alloy preferable to protective plating. Complexity of plating, welding, and brazing unnecessary if hydrogen-compatible alloy used for entire casting instead of protective overlay. Parts exposed to high-pressure hydrogen made immune to hydrogen embrittlement if fabricated from new alloy, Incoly 903 (or equivalent). Material strong and compatible with hydrogen at all temperatures and adapted for outlet manifold of Space Shuttle main combustion chamber.

  8. Helium embrittlement of a lamellar titanium aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, P.; Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Sauvage, T.; Hoffelner, W.; Spätig, Ph.

    2013-03-01

    Embrittlement by helium was investigated in a lamellar TiAl alloy under two conditions: Specimens were implanted to various amounts of helium up to 762 appm at temperatures from 630 °C to 1000 °C and some of them subsequently creep-tested at the same temperature under stresses from 150 to 300 MPa. The microstructure and fracture surfaces of creep-deformed and non-creep-deformed specimens were then studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Specimens were implanted to various amounts of helium at a low temperature (150 °C) and post-implantation annealed at elevated temperatures for TEM studies. Embrittlement was revealed by reduction in time- and strain-to-rupture and by a transition in fracture surface from ductile to an inter-lamellar appearance. Embrittlement occurred above a critical He concentration, which decreased from about 10 appm at 700 °C to below 6 appm at 900 °C. TEM showed that embrittlement could be associated to reaching a critical bubble diameter of about 5 nm. Bubble diameters increased with increasing temperature ranging in high-temperature implanted specimens from about 3 nm (630 °C) to 20 nm (1000 °C) and in post-implantation annealed ones from 1.2 nm (600 °C) to 2.2 nm (900 °C), respectively. With increasing temperature, the bubble distribution grew less homogenous with a lower density of larger bubbles situated preferentially at interfaces and sinks. This was ascribed to a change in bubble nucleation mode from homogeneous di-atomic nucleation at lower temperatures to multi-atomic nucleation at sinks at higher temperature.

  9. Neurodegeneration Induced by Metals in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Soares, Felix Antunes; Fagundez, Daiandra Almeida; Avila, Daiana Silva

    2017-01-01

    Metals are a component of a variety of ecosystems and organisms. They can generally be divided into essential and nonessential metals. The essential metals are involved in physiological processes once the deficiency of these metals has been associated with diseases. Although iron, manganese, copper, and zinc are important for life, it has been evidenced that they are also involved in neuronal damage in many neurodegenerative disorders. Nonessential metals, which are metals without physiological functions, are present in trace or higher levels in living organisms. Occupational, environmental, or deliberate exposures to lead, mercury, aluminum, and cadmium are clearly correlated with the increase of toxicity and varied kinds of pathological situations. Actually, the field of neurotoxicology needs to satisfy two opposing demands: the testing of a growing list of chemicals and resource limitations and ethical concerns associated with testing using traditional mammalian species. Toxicological assays using alternative animal models may relieve some of this pressure by allowing testing of more compounds while reducing expenses and using fewer mammals. The nervous system is by far the more complex system in C. elegans. Almost a third of their cells are neurons (302 neurons versus 959 cells in adult hermaphrodite). It initially underwent extensive development as a model organism in order to study the nervous system, and its neuronal lineage and the complete wiring diagram of its nervous system are stereotyped and fully described. The neurotransmission systems are phylogenetically conserved from nematodes to vertebrates, which allows for findings from C. elegans to be extrapolated and further confirmed in vertebrate systems. Different strains of C. elegans offer a new perspective on neurodegenerative processes. Some genes have been found to be related to neurodegeneration induced by metals. Studying these interactions may be an effective tool to slow neuronal loss and

  10. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  11. Crack Growth in Mercury Embrittled Aluminum Alloys under Cyclic and Static Loading Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    argument is given further credence by the unpublished work of Lynn and Warke reported by Stoloff.3 In that study, static fatigue of 4140 steel plated...Continue on reverae aide If neceaaary and Identify by block number) Fracture Fatigue Fracture Mechanics Adsorption Liquid Metal Embrittlement Mercury...Behavior for 79 the 11g-Si Aluminum Alloy 6061-T651 4.2.1 Static Fatigue 79 4.2.2 Cyclic Fatigue 84 5. ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION 88 6. CONCLUSIONS

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement of cathodically protected subsea bolting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, L.H.; Burnette, C.C.; Joosten, M.W. )

    1993-07-01

    Normal operations of cathodic protection (CP) systems caused hydrogen embrittlement failures of subsea bolts made of Monel K-500 alloy (UNS N05500) on offshore platforms. Subsequent testing showed that the embrittlement could be predicted from cathodically protected slow strain rate tensile tests. Additional slow strain rate tests have shown that CP caused embrittlement of Ferralium 255 (S32550), Inconel X-750 (N07750), Inconel 718 (N07718), high strength steel, and 13% chromium alloys. Beryllium copper (C17200), A-286 steel (S66286), Beta-C titanium (R58640), and steel at a yield strength of 793 MPa (115 ksi) were not embrittled under the same conditions.

  13. Embrittlement of Alloy 400 by lead in secondary side steam generator environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.D.; Goszczynski, G.; Peca, F.

    1995-12-31

    An investigation of intergranular attack and cracking of Alloy 400 steam generator tubes from an Ontario Hydro nuclear power plant identified lead as a possible embrittling agent. The aim of the present work was to establish whether Alloy 400 is susceptible to solid metal embrittlement (SME) or any other cracking mechanism by lead. A program of constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests on Alloy 400 was performed, concentrating on the role of lead oxide in secondary side water. These show that a high level of lead ({>=}1,700 ppm), added as PbO, results in intergranular cracking. Changing from reducing to oxidizing conditions at 2,000 ppm lead exacerbates cracking, as does the addition of sulphate and chloride ions. PbO is thought to enhance nickel dissolution at the grain boundaries producing Metallic lead in the process. Metallic lead itself is not thought to be the embrittling agent. Sulphate and chloride exacerbate the cracking because they form semi-protective films thereby focusing nickel dissolution in regions of film rupture.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  15. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  16. Hydrogen embrittlement of aluminum: the crucial role of vacancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2005-04-22

    We report first-principles calculations which demonstrate that vacancies can combine with hydrogen impurities in bulk aluminum and play a crucial role in the embrittlement of this prototypical ductile solid. Our studies of hydrogen-induced vacancy superabundant formation and vacancy clusterization in aluminum lead to the conclusion that a large number of H atoms (up to 12) can be trapped at a single vacancy, which overcompensates the energy cost to form the defect. In the presence of trapped H atoms, three nearest-neighbor single vacancies which normally would repel each other, aggregate to form a trivacancy on the slip plane of Al, acting as embryos for microvoids and cracks and resulting in ductile rupture along these planes.

  17. Internal hydrogen embrittlement of ultrahigh-strength AERMET 100 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Richard L. S.; Scully, John R.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2003-02-01

    Near-peak-aged AERMET 100 is susceptible to severe internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) at 23 °C, if a sufficient diffusible hydrogen content is present, compromising the high toughness of this ultrahigh-strength steel (UHSS). Evidence includes the threshold stress intensity for subcritical IHE ( K TH ) as low as 10 pct of the plane-strain fracture toughness ( K IC ) and a fracture-mode transition from microvoid coalescence to brittle transgranular (TG) cracking, apparently along martensite lath interfaces and cleavage planes. The K TH value decreases from a K IC value of 132 to 143 MPa√m to 12 MPa√m, and the amount of brittle TG fracture increases to nearly 100 pct as the concentration of diffusible H increases from essentially 0 to 8 wppm, with severe embrittlement in the 0 to 2 wppm H regime. The IHE is time dependent, as evidenced by increasing K TH values with increasing dK/dt and K-independent subcritical crack growth rates, and is attributed to diffusional H repartition from reversible trap sites to the stressed crack tip. The partition distance is ˜1 µm, consistent with the fine-scale microstructure of AERMET 100. The causes of the susceptibility of AERMET 100 to TG IHE are very high crack-tip stresses and a reservoir of mobile H trapped reversibly at (Fe,Cr,Mo)2C precipitates. These factors enable repartition of H to misoriented martensite lath interfaces and interstitial sites near cleavage planes, with each prone to decohesion along a connected path. Predissolved H also reduces the ductile fracture toughness of AERMET 100 at high loading rates, perhaps due to reduced void growth caused by H trapped strongly at undissolved metal carbides.

  18. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  19. Nondestructive Technique To Assess Embrittlement In Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research at NASA Langley Research Center led to identification of nondestructive technique for detection of temper embrittlement in HY80 steel. Measures magnetoacoustic emission associated with reversible motion of domain walls at low magnetic fields. Of interest to engineers responsible for reliability and safety of various dynamically loaded and/or thermally cycled steel parts. Applications include testing of landing gears, naval vessels, and parts subjected to heat, such as those found in steam-pipe fittings, boilers, turbine rotors, and nuclear pressure vessels.

  20. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  1. The effects of hydrogen embrittlement of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Delbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Titanium alloys, by virtue of their attractive strength to density ratio, fatigue, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance are now commonly used in various aerospace and marine applications. The cost, once very expensive, has been reduced, making titanium even more of a competitive material today. Titanium and titanium alloys have a great affinity to several elements. Hydrogen, even in small amounts, can cause embrittlement, which in turn causes a reduction in strength and ductility. The reduction of strength and ductility is the subject of this investigation.

  2. Apparatus For Tests Of Embrittlement By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C.; Lycou, Peter P.

    1992-01-01

    Test apparatus exposes disk specimens to hydrogen in controlled, repeatable way simulating conditions in use. Disk specimen constitutes thin wall between pressure and vacuum chambers. Test proceeds until hydrogen weakens disk enough that it ruptures. Aluminum impact plate absorbs debris from ruptured disk. Apparatus replicates aspects of service environments relevant to embrittlement by hydrogen in such equipment as storage tanks, valves, and fluid-handling components containing hydrogen at high absolute or gauge pressure. Hydrogen inside permeates stressed material and produces gradient of concentration as hydrogen diffuses through material to low-pressure side.

  3. Prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Chistyakov, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new method has been proposed for prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The method is based on the test results for materials in two conditions, namely, aged at temperatures of temper embrittlement and annealed after irradiation. The prediction is based on the McLean's equation and the dependencies describing thermally activated and radiation-enhanced phosphorus diffusion. Experimental studies have been carried out for estimation of thermal ageing of the WWER-1000 RPV 2Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel. The ductile to brittle transition temperature shift ΔTk due to phosphorus segregation has been estimated on the basis of experimental data processed by the proposed method for the time t = 5 × 105 h (more than 60 years of operation) for the base and weld metals of the WWER-1000 RPV.

  4. Topological superconductivity induced by ferromagnetic metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; MacDonald, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent experiments have provided evidence that one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductivity can be realized experimentally by placing transition-metal atoms that form a ferromagnetic chain on a superconducting substrate. We address some properties of this type of system by using a Slater-Koster tight-binding model to account for important features of the electronic structure of the transition-metal chains on the superconducting substrate. We predict that topological superconductivity is nearly universal when ferromagnetic transition-metal chains form straight lines on superconducting substrates and that it is possible for more complex chain structures. When the chain is weakly coupled to the substrate and is longer than superconducting coherence lengths, its proximity-induced superconducting gap is ˜Δ ESO/J where Δ is the s -wave pair potential on the chain, ESO is the spin-orbit splitting energy induced in the normal chain state bands by hybridization with the superconducting substrate, and J is the exchange splitting of the ferromagnetic chain d bands. Because of the topological character of the 1D superconducting state, Majorana end modes appear within the gaps of finite length chains. We find, in agreement with the experiment, that when the chain and substrate orbitals are strongly hybridized, Majorana end modes are substantially reduced in amplitude when separated from the chain end by less than the coherence length defined by the p -wave superconducting gap. We conclude that Pb is a particularly favorable substrate material for ferromagnetic chain topological superconductivity because it provides both strong s -wave pairing and strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, but that there is an opportunity to optimize properties by varying the atomic composition and structure of the chain. Finally, we note that in the absence of disorder, a new chain magnetic symmetry, one that is also present in the crystalline topological insulators, can stabilize multiple

  5. Embrittlement of an AISI 8640 lower bainite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rinnovatore, J.V. . Development and Engineering Center); Lukens, K.F.; Reinhold, J.; Mahon, W. . Development and Engineering Center)

    1993-09-01

    A study was performed to determine the cause of an abnormally low fracture toughness of an AISI 8640 resulfurized steel. The embrittlement effects of phosphorus and arsenic on this steel heat-treated to a lower bainitic structure were studied by employing fracture toughness tests, Charpy impact tests, X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the steel was embrittled by phosphorus at prior austenite grain boundaries in a manner similar to the tempered martensite embrittlement (TME) phenomenon. Arsenic is also believed to be involved in the embrittlement effect, specifically as related to producing a reduction in the upper shelf Charpy impact energy. Embrittlement was manifested by a reduced fracture toughness, an increase in the Charpy transition temperature, and intergranular fracture.

  6. Radiation annealing of radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2016-02-01

    Influence of neutron irradiation on RPV steel degradation are examined with reference to the possible reasons of the substantial experimental data scatter and furthermore - nonstandard (non-monotonous) and oscillatory embrittlement behavior. In our glance this phenomenon may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. We suppose that the main factor affecting steel anomalous embrittlement is fast neutron intensity (dose rate or flux), flux effect manifestation depends on state-of-the-art fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Data on radiation damage change including through the ex-service RPVs taking into account chemical factor, fast neutron fluence and neutron flux were obtained and analyzed. In our opinion controversy in the estimation on neutron flux on radiation degradation impact may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. Therefore flux effect manifestation depends on fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Moreover as a hypothesis we suppose that at some stages of irradiation damaged metal have to be partially restored by irradiation i.e. neutron bombardment. Nascent during irradiation structure undergo occurring once or periodically transformation in a direction both degradation and recovery of the initial properties. According to our hypothesis at some stage(s) of metal structure degradation neutron bombardment became recovering factor. As a result oscillation arise that in tern lead to enhanced data scatter.

  7. Investigation of Teflon FEP embrittlement on spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(TM) fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) is used on the exterior of spacecraft surfaces in the low earth orbit environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized Teflon(TM) FEP used in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provided evidence of the low earth orbit environments. Samples from the LDEF and HST were evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  8. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  9. Embrittlement of MISSE 5 Polymers After 13 Months of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Aobo; Yi, Grace T.; Ashmead, Claire C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding space environment induced degradation of spacecraft materials is essential when designing durable and stable spacecraft components. As a result of space radiation, debris impacts, atomic oxygen interaction, and thermal cycling, the outer surfaces of space materials degrade when exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO). The objective of this study was to measure the embrittlement of 37 thin film polymers after LEO space exposure. The polymers were flown aboard the International Space Station and exposed to the LEO space environment as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 5 (MISSE 5). The samples were flown in a nadir-facing position for 13 months and were exposed to thermal cycling along with low doses of atomic oxygen, direct solar radiation and omnidirectional charged particle radiation. The samples were analyzed for space-induced embrittlement using a bend-test procedure in which the strain necessary to induce surface cracking was determined. Bend-testing was conducted using successively smaller mandrels to apply a surface strain to samples placed on a semi-suspended pliable platform. A pristine sample was also tested for each flight sample. Eighteen of the 37 flight samples experienced some degree of surface cracking during bend-testing, while none of the pristine samples experienced any degree of cracking. The results indicate that 49 percent of the MISSE 5 thin film polymers became embrittled in the space environment even though they were exposed to low doses (approx.2.75 krad (Si) dose through 127 mm Kapton) of ionizing radiation.

  10. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  11. Ion-Induced Electron Emission from Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Joseph Francis

    1992-01-01

    Ion-induced electron emission (IIEE) from several metals under 100 keV proton bombardment has been investigated. Room temperature (RT) yields, i.e., the number of electrons emitted per incident ion, were measured for gold, copper, and indium after sputter cleaning and agreed with published values. New experimental results indicate a lowering of the RT yield after ultra-high vacuum anneals and very light sputtering. Previously published RT yields, gamma _{rm sputtered}, were measured only after extensive sputter cleaning. Copper, after an anneal near 390^circC, had a room temperature gamma_{rm anneal} = 1.58 +/- 0.02 e^-/ion with gamma _{rm sputtered} = 1.77 +/- 0.02 e^-/ion. The yield for solid indium after melting and resolidification was measured as gamma_{rm anneal} = 1.69 +/- 0.02 e^-/ion with gamma _{rm sputtered} = 1.95 +/- 0.03 e^-/ion. It is believed that annealing orders the surface, while gamma_{rm sputtered} yield values are from disordered surfaces. Yield data as a function of target temperature were also measured. For copper and indium, yields were found to vary linearly with temperature up to at least 330^circC for Cu and 195 ^circC for In. The dgamma/ dT values found were 2.7 +/- 0.2 times 10^{ -4} and 3.3 +/- 0.3 times 10^{-4} e^-/ion/K, respectively. Yields for liquid indium and through the melting transition were also measured. UHV yields for liquid metals have not been reported before. After melting, no change was found in the yield (|Deltagamma/gamma |<0.2%). A semi-empirical model for the yields in nearly free electron metals has been developed and is based on the formalism of Sigmund and Tougaard. It suggests a strong dependence of yield on the surface potential barrier, U, which must be overcome for emission. The dependence of gamma on U^{ -2.5} has not been previously realized. The model explains yields measured by others, as well as the temperature dependent yield phenomena observed in this study. It also predicts relatively large yields

  12. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  13. Influence of nitrogen alloying on hydrogen embrittlement in AISI 304-type stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, Simo-Pekka; Hänninen, Hannu; Tähtinen, Seppo

    1984-12-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 304-type austenitic stainless steels has been studied with special emphasis on the effects of the nitrogen content of the steels. Hydrogen charging was found to degrade the mechanical properties of all the steels studied, as measured by a tensile test. The fracture surfaces of hydrogen charged specimens were brittle cleavage-like whereas the uncharged specimens showed ductile, dimpled fracture. In sensitized materials transgranular cleavage mode of fracture was replaced by an intergranular mode of fracture and the losses of mechanical properties were higher. Nitrogen alloying decreased the hydrogen-induced losses of mechanical properties by increasing the stability of austenite. In sensitized steels the stability of austenite and nitrogen content were found to have only a minor effect on hydrogen embrittlement, except when sensitization had caused α'-martensite transformation at the grain boundaries.

  14. Evaluation of the current status of hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.

    1981-12-01

    A review of recent studies on hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in steels shows there are several critical areas where data is either ambiguous, contradictory, or non-existent. A relationship exists between impurity segregation and hydrogen embrittlement effects but it is not known if the impurities sensitize a preferred crack path for hydrogen-induced failure or if impurity and hydrogen effects are additive. Furthermore, grain boundary impurities may enhance susceptibility through interactions with some environments. Some studies show that an increase in grain size increases susceptibility; at least one study shows an opposite effect. Recent work also shows that fracture initiates at different locations for external and internal hydrogen environments. How this influences susceptibility is unknown.

  15. Radiation embrittlement of manganese-stabilized martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    Fractographic examination has been performed on selected Charpy specimens of manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels in order to identify the cause of irradiation embrittlement. Embrittlement was found to be partly due to enhanced failure at grain boundaries arising from precipitation. Microstructural examination of a specimen irradiated at higher temperature has demonstrated the presence of Fe-Cr-Mn chi phase, a body centered cubic intermetallic phase known to cause embrittlement. This work indicated that manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels are prone to intermetallic phase formation which is detrimental to mechanical properties.

  16. Influence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Kendig, M. W.; Meisels, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments performed to determine the roles of hydrogen absorption and hydrogen electron transfer on the susceptibility of Fe- and Ni-base alloys to ambient-temperature hydroen embrittlement. An apparent independence is noted between hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal hydrogen embrittlement. The experiments were performed on Inconel 718, Incoloy 903, and A286. The electrochemical results obtained indicate that Inconel 718 either adsorbs hydrogen more rapidly and/or the electrochemical oxidation of the adsorbed hydrogen occurred more rapidly than in the other two materials.

  17. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals. PMID:25184144

  18. Biomedical implications of heavy metals induced imbalances in redox systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  19. Localized slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinized dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Renard, François; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    Dehydration of partly or completely serpentinized ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure, a process referred to as dehydration embrittlement. However the extents of strain localization and unstable frictional sliding during deserpentinization are still under debate. In the layered ultramafic sections of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides, prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of Mg-rich and coarse-grained olivine with abundant magnetite inclusions and δ18O values 1.0- 1.5 ‰ below the host rock. Embrittlement associated with the dehydration caused faulting along highly localized (<10 μm-wide) slip planes near the centers of the original serpentinite veins and pulverization of wall rock olivine. These features along with an earthquake-like size distribution of fault offsets suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. Structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins clearly have first-order controls on strain localization and frictional sliding during dehydration. As most of the oceanic lithosphere is incompletely serpentinized, heterogeneities represented by a non-uniform distribution of serpentinite are common and may increase the likelihood that dehydration embrittlement triggers earthquakes.

  20. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(registered trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene-propylene) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized FEP is used for the outer layer of thermal control blankets because of its low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. FEP is also preferred over other spacecraft polymers because of its relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its low atomic oxygen erosion yield, FEP has not been protected in the space environment. Recent, long term space exposures such as on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF, 5.8 years in space), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST, after 3.6 years in space) have provided evidence of LEO environmental degradation of FEP. These exposures provide unique opportunities for studying environmental degradation because of the long durations and the different conditions (such as differences in altitude) of the exposures. Samples of FEP from LDEF and from HST (retrieved during its first servicing mission) have been evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen. Micro-indenter results indicate that the surface hardness increased as the ratio of atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence decreased for the LDEF samples. FEP multilayer insulation (MLI) retrieved from HST provided evidence of severe embrittlement on solar facing surfaces. Micro-indenter measurements indicated higher surface hardness values for these samples than LDEF samples, but the solar exposures were higher. Cracks induced during bend testing were significantly deeper for the HST samples with the highest solar exposure than for LDEF samples with similar atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence ratios. If solar fluences are compared, the LDEF samples appear as damaged as HST samples, except that HST had deeper induced cracks. The results illustrate difficulties in comparing LEO exposed materials from

  1. Evaluation of temper embrittlement in turbine rotor material

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A.; Pepe, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A major requirement for the reliable operation of modern NiCrMoV steel low pressure (LO) rotor forgings is a toughness level high enough to tolerate small flaws. Since LP rotor forgings operate at elevated temperatures for prolonged periods of time, it is important to insure that the rotor's toughness does not degrade due to thermal exposure during its service life. One phenomena which is known to degrade the toughness of NiCrMoV rotor forging material with time is temper embrittlement. Temper embrittlement is of most concern in the temperature range 316--510{degree}C (600--950{degree}F). The major chemical elements responsible for temper embrittlement are known to be P, Si, Sn, Sb and As. This report describes the development of a mathematical model obtained by regression techniques for prediction of the degree of temper embrittlement based on the chemistry, strength, mechanical properties and other characteristics of the rotor. In addition, the effects of temper embrittlement on the fracture toughness as determined by J{sub Ic} samples and on the fatique life were examined. Finally, a model was developed for the prediction of temper embrittlement in CrMoV rotor steels based on some limited available data. 45 refs., 46 figs., 22 tabs.

  2. The hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    It has been proposed that the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of nickel-based alloys in low-temperature hydrogenated water is due to hydrogen embrittlement. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of chromium on hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys and thus develop a better understanding of the low-temperature SCC phenomenon. The effect of chromium on the hydrogen embrittlement was examined using tensile tests followed by material evaluation via scanning electron microscopy and light optical microscopy. Four alloys were prepared with chromium contents ranging from 6 wt. percent to 35 wt. percent. In the noncharged condition, ductility, as measured by the percent elongation or reduction in area, increased as the alloy chromium content increased. Hydrogen appeared to have only minor effects on the mechanical properties of the low chromium alloys. The addition of hydrogen had a marked effect on the ductility of the higher chromium alloys. In the 26% chromium alloy, the elongation to failure was reduced from 53% to 14% with a change in fracture mode from ductile dimple to intergranular failure. A maximum in embrittlement was observed in the 26% Cr alloy. The maximum in embrittlement coincided with the minimum in stacking-fault energy. It is proposed that the increased hydrogen embrittlement in the high-chromium alloys is due to increased slip planarity caused by the low stacking-fault energy. Slip planarity did not appear to affect the fracture of the noncharged specimens.

  3. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  4. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  5. The influence of composition on environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of water vapor in air and hydrogen gas on the tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys have been studied at room temperature. Fe-28a% Al-5a% Cr alloys to which either Zr alone or Zr and C have been added and tested in controlled humidity air environments as well as in 1.3 atm hydrogen or oxygen gas and in vacuum. As with other Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, oxygen produces the lowest crack growth rates as well as the highest critical stress intensities and tensile ductility in each of the alloys tested. However, while Zr lowers crack growth rates in the Paris regime, there is no apparent beneficial effect on crack growth thresholds. Hydrogen gas also produces unusual results. While crack growth rates are very high in hydrogen in the Paris regime for all alloys, hydrogen only lowers the crack growth threshold relative to air in ternary Fe-28Al-5Cr; it does not lower the threshold in the Zr-containing alloys. It was found that decreased test frequency leads to increased crack growth rates in a Zr-containing alloy which points to a moisture-induced embrittlement mechanism responsible for the higher crack growth rates in air. Fracture path tends to be insensitive to environment for each alloy.

  6. Effect of the bainitic and martensitic microstructures on the hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, B.; Averty, X.; Wident, P.; Forget, P.; Barcelo, F.

    2015-10-01

    The hardening and the embrittlement under neutron irradiation of an A508 type RPV steel considering three different microstructures (bainite, bainite-martensite and martensite)have been investigated These microstructures were obtained by quenching after autenitization at 1100 °C. The irradiation induced hardening appears to depend on microstructure and is correlated to the yield stress before irradiation. The irradiation induced embrittlement shows a more complex dependence. Martensite bearing microstructures are more sensitive to non hardening embrittlement than pure bainite. This enhanced sensitivity is associated with the development of intergranular brittle facture after irradiation; the pure martensite being more affected than the bainite-martensite. It is of interest to note that this mixed microstructure appears to be more embrittled than the pure bainitic or martensitic phases in terms of temperature transition shift. This behaviour which could emerge from the synergy of the embrittlement mechanisms of the two phases needs further investigations. However, the role of microstructure on brittle intergranular fracture development appears to be qualitatively similar under neutron irradiation and thermal ageing.

  7. Generation of metal-carbon and metal-nitrogen clusters with a laser induced plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. C.; Wei, S.; Chen, Z.; Kerns, K. P.; Purnell, J.; Buzza, S.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-10-01

    During the course of investigating dehydrogenation reactions induced by transition metals, we find that using a carrier gas containing hydrocarbons and ammonia instead of pure helium, in conjunction with a laser vaporization device, enables the facile production of metal-carbon and metal-nitrogen clusters in both the neutral and ionic forms. With only a change in the nature of the carrier gas, a variety of new classes of clusters can be produced.

  8. Thermal embrittlement of carbon steels in canistered waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    It is known that fracture toughness in steels, especially in low steels, in severely reduced by exposure at the temperature range of 350-575{degrees}C through isothermal aging or slow cooling. It is also well recognized that segregation of impurities, such as Sb, P, Sn, As, along prior austenite grain boundaries is the main cause of thermal (temper) embrittlement. The most potent embrittling elements, in order of decreasing potency, are Sb, Sn, P, and As. However, Sb, Sn, and As are not generally present in steels. Therefore P is usually the most concerned element in steels. McMahon has concluded in his review that plain C steels containing less than 0.5 wt% Mn are not susceptible to temper embrittlement. However, he also noted the strong effect of Mn as an enhancement of the P aging of plain C-Mn steels, particularly high Mn contents, to disregard the possibility of thermal embrittlement. A516 plain carbon steels has been been proposed as a corrosion allowable material (CRM) for the outer barrier of canistered waste disposal containers. The expected peak temperature for a waste package container if as high as 200{degrees}C for many years. Therefore concern has been raised whether thermal embrittlement would occur in this steel after the long term temperature exposure expected in the current nuclear waste packages. The current report documents our recent analysis for this problem.

  9. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-04

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  10. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  11. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  12. Role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by metal mixture.

    PubMed

    Martín, Silva-Aguilar; Emilio, Rojas; Mahara, Valverde

    2011-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity.

  13. SSME - Materials and Methods for Addressing High-Pressure Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczk, Daniel; Russell, Dale; Frandsen, Jon; Swanson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    From the humid, corrosion-friendly atmosphere of KSC, to the extreme heat of ascent, to the cold vacuum of space, the Space Shuttle faced one hostile environment after another. One of those harsh environments the hydrogen environment existed within the shuttle itself. Liquid hydrogen was the fuel that powered the shuttle s complex, powerful, and reusable main engine. Hydrogen provided the high specific impulse the bang per pound of fuel needed to perform the shuttle s heavy lifting duties. Hydrogen, however, was also a potential threat to the very metal of the propulsion system that used it. The diffusion of hydrogen atoms into a metal can make it more brittle and prone to cracking a process called hydrogen embrittlement. This effect can reduce the toughness of carefully selected and prepared materials. A concern that exposure to hydrogen might encourage crack growth was present from the beginning of the Space Shuttle Program, but the rationale for using hydrogen was compelling. This paper outlines the material characterization, anomaly resolution, and path to understanding of hydrogen embrittlement on superalloys through the course of the SSME program. Specific examples of nickel alloy turbine housings and single crystal turbine blades are addressed. The evolution of fracture mechanics analytical methods is also addressed.

  14. SSME - Materials and Methods for Addressing High-Pressure Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczk, Daniel; Russell, Dale; Frandsen, Jon; Swanson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    From the humid, corrosion-friendly atmosphere of KSC, to the extreme heat of ascent, to the cold vacuum of space, the Space Shuttle faced one hostile environment after another. One of those harsh environments the hydrogen environment existed within the shuttle itself. Liquid hydrogen was the fuel that powered the shuttle s complex, powerful, and reusable main engine. Hydrogen provided the high specific impulse the bang per pound of fuel needed to perform the shuttle s heavy lifting duties. Hydrogen, however, was also a potential threat to the very metal of the propulsion system that used it. The diffusion of hydrogen atoms into a metal can make it more brittle and prone to cracking a process called hydrogen embrittlement. This effect can reduce the toughness of carefully selected and prepared materials. A concern that exposure to hydrogen might encourage crack growth was present from the beginning of the Space Shuttle Program, but the rationale for using hydrogen was compelling. This paper outlines the material characterization, anomaly resolution, and path to understanding of hydrogen embrittlement on superalloys through the course of the SSME program. Specific examples of nickel alloy turbine housings and single crystal turbine blades are addressed. The evolution of fracture mechanics analytical methods is also addressed.

  15. Electrophobic interaction induced impurity clustering in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Long; Jiang, W.; Lu, Guang-Hong; Aguiar, J. A.; Liu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the concept of electrophobic interaction, analogous to hydrophobic interaction, for describing the behavior of impurity atoms in a metal, a 'solvent of electrons'. We demonstrate that there exists a form of electrophobic interaction between impurities with closed electron shell structure, which governs their dissolution behavior in a metal. Using He, Be and Ar as examples, we predict by first-principles calculations that the electrophobic interaction drives He, Be or Ar to form a close-packed cluster with a clustering energy that follows a universal power-law scaling with the number of atoms (N) dissolved in a free electron gas, as well as W or Al lattice, as Ec is proportional to (N2/3-N). This new concept unifies the explanation for a series of experimental observations of close-packed inert-gas bubble formation in metals, and significantly advances our fundamental understanding and capacity to predict the solute behavior of impurities in metals, a useful contribution to be considered in future material design of metals for nuclear, metallurgical, and energy applications.

  16. Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zn-Ni Plating Qualification and Implementation on Landing Gear Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Ogden Air Logistics Center Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zn-Ni Plating Qualification and Implementation on Landing Gear Components Dave...00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zn-Ni Plating Qualification and Implementation on Landing Gear...Passed)  Adhesion (ASTM B571) (Passed)  Hydrogen Embrittlement (ASTM F519) (Passed)  Re- embrittlement (ASTM F519 & USAF DWG 9825019) (All

  17. Metal-leachate-induced conjugate protein instability.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Osborne, Brandi; Singh, Satish K; Wang, Wei

    2012-08-01

    During the scale-up of an ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) step for a protein-based conjugate vaccine, significant precipitation was observed at room temperature. It was found that a specific type of metal hosebarb fitting used in the UF/DF system, when placed in the conjugate solution, caused the precipitation. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis showed significant amounts of Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cu(II) present in the conjugate solution. A kinetic study showed that the concentration of these metal ions gradually increased with increasing incubation time with a corresponding decrease in conjugate concentration. Direct spiking of trace amounts of NiCl₂, ZnCl₂, and CuCl₂ into the conjugate solution also caused precipitation, and spiking studies showed that the metal ions caused precipitation of the conjugate but not of the carrier protein, antigen, or carrier protein + linker. The precipitation was found to be significantly dependent on buffer species but not solution pH and led to an irreversible loss of tertiary structure even after dissolution in and removal of guanidine hydrochloride. The precipitation is likely the result of formation of transition-metal complexes with histidine residues on the antigen peptide, which may involve both intraconjugate and interconjugate antigens. Such complexation may lead to formation of multimers that may exceed the solubility limit.

  18. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  19. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-05-10

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  20. Noble metal surface degradation induced by organothiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Poel, Wester; Gasseling, Anouk; Mulder, Peter; Steeghs, Antoon P. G.; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; van Enckevort, Willem J. P.; Rowan, Alan E.; Vlieg, Elias

    2017-08-01

    Copper, silver and gold layers evaporated on the muscovite mica (001) surface were exposed to a series of molecules containing an organothiol and/or a carboxylic acid chemical functional group to investigate the potential of these compounds to modify the surfaces. The surfaces were investigated using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis of X-rays, and X-ray diffraction. Organothiols containing a carboxylic acid group were found to change the surface morphology drastically over a period of days, while molecules containing only one of these functional groups were usually not able to do so. The mechanism is most likely a reaction between the organothiol and the metal surface, forming a thermodynamically stable new compound. This finding could be of importance in the many applications where organothiols are used to functionalize noble metal surfaces.

  1. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found.

  2. Atomistic study of hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries in nickel: I. Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehranchi, A.; Curtin, W. A.

    Hydrogen ingress into a metal is a persistent source of embrittlement. Fracture surfaces are often intergranular, suggesting favorable cleave crack growth along grain boundaries (GBs) as one driver for embrittlement. Here, atomistic simulations are used to investigate the effects of segregated hydrogen on the behavior of cracks along various symmetric tilt grain boundaries in fcc Nickel. An atomistic potential for Ni-H is first recalibrated against new quantum level computations of the energy of H in specific sites within the NiΣ5(120)⟨100⟩ GB. The binding energy of H atoms to various atomic sites in the NiΣ3(111) (twin), NiΣ5(120)⟨100⟩, NiΣ99(557)⟨110⟩, and NiΣ9(221)⟨110⟩ GBs, and to various surfaces created by separating these GBs into two possible fracture surfaces, are computed and used to determine equilibrium H concentrations at bulk H concentrations typical of embrittlement in Ni. Mode I fracture behavior is then studied, examining the influence of H in altering the competition between dislocation emission (crack blunting; ;ductile; behavior) and cleavage fracture (;brittle; behavior) for intergranular cracks. Simulation results are compared with theoretical predictions (Griffith theory for cleavage; Rice theory for emission) using the computed surface energies. The deformation behavior at the GBs is, however, generally complex and not as simple as cleavage or emission at a sharp crack tip, which is not unexpected due to the complexity of the GB structures. In cases predicted to emit dislocations from the crack tip, the presence of H atoms reduces the critical load for emission of the dislocations and no cleavage is found. In the cases predicted to cleave, the presence of H atoms reduces the cleavage stress intensity and makes cleavage easier, including NiΣ9(221)⟨110⟩ which emits dislocations in the absence of H. Aside from the one unusual NiΣ9(221)⟨110⟩ case, no tendency is found for H to cause a ductile

  3. Ultraviolet-induced erasable photochromism in bilayer metal oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakado, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nakazawa, Akira

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate that the optical transmittance of bilayer samples consisting of pyrolytically coated amorphous Mg-Sn-O and metal oxide films such as In 2O 3 and SnO 2 decreases upon ultraviolet illumination, but can be recovered by annealing in air at ˜300 ∘C. Spectral, structural, and compositional studies suggest that this photochromic phenomenon is induced by photoelectronic excitation in the Mg-Sn-O film, electron injection into the metal oxide, which becomes negatively charged, and subsequent formation of metallic particles, which absorb and/or scatter visible light.

  4. Effect of cerium on temper embrittlement of P-doped Mn structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhexi, Yuan; Shenhua, Song; Faulkner, R.G.; Tingdong, Xu

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cerium on temper embrittlement of P-doped Mn structural steels has been investigated by measurements of the ductile-brittle transition temperature and observations by AES, SIMS and SEM of the fracture surfaces of isothermally embrittled steels. It is shown that P can bring about the temper embrittlement of Mn structural steels; cerium may reduce the temper embrittlement of the steels and the segregation of cerium to grain boundaries may play an important part in reducing the temper embrittlement of the steels.

  5. Pressure-induced metallization in Erbium trihydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.; Tkacz, M.

    2017-09-01

    Electrical resistivity and Raman spectra of ErH3 were studied in a diamond anvil cell under high pressure up to 140 GPa in the temperature range 4-300 K. A crossover from a semiconductor-like to a metallic temperature dependence of resistivity at fixed pressures was observed at about 50 GPa. In the pressure range 80-140 GPa a resistivity maximum was observed at the R(T) dependencies. The temperature corresponding to this maximum linearly increased with pressure increase, reaching 26 K at 140 GPa. No superconductivity was observed in the studied pressure-temperature range.

  6. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  7. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  8. Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial-Free Steels

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    Interstitial-free (IF) steels are defined by their low amounts of solute interstitial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen. During secondary forming, strain can be localized at the grain boundaries of these steels, resulting in secondary cold work embrittlement (CWE).

  9. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  10. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-12-31

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV.

  11. Effect of Various Factors on Hydrogen Embrittlement of Structural Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanzhin, V. G.; Turilina, V. Yu.; Rogachev, S. O.; Nikitin, A. V.; Belov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of studies of hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels of different strength are presented. The effect of various factors on delayed hydrogen fracture is analyzed using the results of investigations by the methods of acoustic emission, metallography and fractography of bolts under the conditions of tension with bending after galvanic hydrogen charging.

  12. Laser-induced plasmonic colours on metals.

    PubMed

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Calà Lesina, Antonino; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Poitras, Daniel; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2017-07-18

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles have been used since antiquity to colour glasses. The use of metal nanostructures for surface colourization has attracted considerable interest following recent developments in plasmonics. However, current top-down colourization methods are not ideally suited to large-scale industrial applications. Here we use a bottom-up approach where picosecond laser pulses can produce a full palette of non-iridescent colours on silver, gold, copper and aluminium. We demonstrate the process on silver coins weighing up to 5 kg and bearing large topographic variations (∼1.5 cm). We find that colours are related to a single parameter, the total accumulated fluence, making the process suitable for high-throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of laser-irradiated surfaces reveal various nanoparticle size distributions. Large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations based on these nanoparticle distributions reproduce trends seen in reflectance measurements, and demonstrate the key role of plasmonic resonances in colour formation.

  13. Laser-induced plasmonic colours on metals

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Calà Lesina, Antonino; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Poitras, Daniel; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles have been used since antiquity to colour glasses. The use of metal nanostructures for surface colourization has attracted considerable interest following recent developments in plasmonics. However, current top-down colourization methods are not ideally suited to large-scale industrial applications. Here we use a bottom-up approach where picosecond laser pulses can produce a full palette of non-iridescent colours on silver, gold, copper and aluminium. We demonstrate the process on silver coins weighing up to 5 kg and bearing large topographic variations (∼1.5 cm). We find that colours are related to a single parameter, the total accumulated fluence, making the process suitable for high-throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of laser-irradiated surfaces reveal various nanoparticle size distributions. Large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations based on these nanoparticle distributions reproduce trends seen in reflectance measurements, and demonstrate the key role of plasmonic resonances in colour formation. PMID:28719576

  14. Laser-induced plasmonic colours on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Calà Lesina, Antonino; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Poitras, Daniel; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles have been used since antiquity to colour glasses. The use of metal nanostructures for surface colourization has attracted considerable interest following recent developments in plasmonics. However, current top-down colourization methods are not ideally suited to large-scale industrial applications. Here we use a bottom-up approach where picosecond laser pulses can produce a full palette of non-iridescent colours on silver, gold, copper and aluminium. We demonstrate the process on silver coins weighing up to 5 kg and bearing large topographic variations (~1.5 cm). We find that colours are related to a single parameter, the total accumulated fluence, making the process suitable for high-throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of laser-irradiated surfaces reveal various nanoparticle size distributions. Large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations based on these nanoparticle distributions reproduce trends seen in reflectance measurements, and demonstrate the key role of plasmonic resonances in colour formation.

  15. Differential metal response and regulation of human heavy metal-inducible genes.

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Gong, P; Suzuki, K; Koizumi, S

    1999-07-01

    A number of heavy metal-inducible genes have been reported, but their ranges of response to various metal species are not well known. It is also unclear if these genes are regulated through common mechanisms. To answer these questions, we compared induction kinetics of human metal-inducible genes including the MT-IIA (coding for a metallothionein isoform), hsp70 (coding for the 70-kDa heat-shock protein), and c-fos genes in HeLa cells exposed to Zn, Cd, Ag, Hg, Cu(II), Co, or Ni ions. Transcripts from these three genes were increased after exposure to wide ranges of metals, but each gene was unique in its induction kinetics. Generally, induction was observed at lower metal concentrations in the order of MT-IIA, hsp70, and c-fos. These genes also showed differential responses in time course: more rapid induction was observed in the order of c-fos, hsp70, and MT-IIA after exposure to Zn or Cd. Since the metal-responsive element (MRE) and heat shock element (HSE) of the MT-IIA and hsp70 genes, respectively, are thought to be the cis-acting DNA elements that mediate metal response, we compared the properties of proteins that specifically bind to these elements. MRE-binding activity was detected only in the extract from cells exposed to Zn. By contrast, HSE-binding activity was detected in extracts from cells treated with Zn, Cd, Ag, and Cu. The former was also activated by Zn in vitro, while the latter was not. Each of these DNA-binding activities showed no affinity to the recognition sequence of the other. These results demonstrate that the human metal-inducible genes have broad ranges of response to a variety of heavy metals, but suggest that they are probably regulated through independent mechanisms.

  16. Influence of transmutation on microstructure, density change, and embrittlement of vanadium and vanadium alloys irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Pawel, J.; Garner, F.A.

    1994-06-01

    Addition of 1 at.% nickel to vanadium and V-10Ti, followed by irradiation along with the nickel-free metals in HFIR to 2.3 {times} 10{sup 22}n cm{sup {minus}2}, E > 0.1MeV (corresponding to 17.7 dpa) at 400 C, has been used to study the influence of helium on microstructural evolution and embrittlement. Approximately 15.3% of the vanadium transmuted to chromium in these alloys. The {approximately}50 appm helium generated from the {sup 58}Ni(n,{gamma}){sup 59}Ni(n,{alpha}){sup 56}Fe sequence was found to exert much less influence than either the nickel directly or the chromium formed by transmutation. The V-10Ti and V-10Ti-1Ni alloys developed an extreme fragility and broke into smaller pieces in response to minor physical insults during density measurements. A similar behavior was not observed in pure V or V-1Ni. Helium`s role in determination of mechanical properties and embrittlement of vanadium alloys in HFIR is overshadowed by the influence of alloying elements such as titanium and chromium. Both elements have been shown to increase the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) rather rapidly in the region of 10% (Cr + Ti). Since Cr is produced by transmutation of V, this is a possible mechanism for the embrittlement. Large effects on the DBTT may have also resulted from uncontrolled accumulation of interstitial elements such as C, N, and O during irradiation.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of metal ion-induced protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Herr, Andrew B; Conrady, Deborah G

    2011-01-01

    A large number of biological systems are regulated by metal ion-induced protein assembly. This phenomenon can play a critical role in governing protein function and triggering downstream biological responses. We discuss the basic thermodynamic principles of linked equilibria that pertain to metal ion-induced dimerization and describe experimental approaches useful for studying such systems. The most informative techniques for studying these systems are sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation, although a wide range of other spectroscopic, chromatographic, or qualitative approaches can provide a wealth of useful information. These experimental procedures are illustrated with examples from two systems currently under study: zinc-induced assembly of a staphylococcal protein responsible for intercellular adhesion in bacterial biofilms and calcium-induced dimerization of a human nucleotidase.

  18. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  19. Sliding induced crystallization of metallic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear experiments, electron microscopy, and diffraction studies were conducted with an Fe67Co18B14Si1 ferrous-base metallic glass in sliding contact with aluminum oxide at room temperature in air. The results indicate that the amorphous alloy can be crystallized during the sliding process. Crystallization of the wear surface causes high friction. Plastic flow occurred on the amorphous alloy with sliding, and the flow film of the alloy transferred to the aluminum oxide surface. Two distinct types of wear debris were observed as a result of sliding: an alloy wear debris, and powdery and whiskery oxide debris. Generation of oxide wear debris particles on an alloy can cause transitions in friction behavior.

  20. Polyaspartamide Vesicle induced by Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Hyun; Cha, Chaenyung; Kaczmarowski, Amy; Haan, John; Oh, Soonnam; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2012-01-09

    Polymer vesicles are being extensively studied to emulate self-assembly in biological systems and also use them in a variety of biological and industrial applications. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to prepare polymer vesicles in a pure aqueous medium by driving the micelle-to-vesicle transition with metallic nanoparticles. We synthesized poly(2-amino-2-hydroxyethyl aspartamide) (PAHA) substituted with octadecyl chains, which could form micelle-like self-aggregates in the aqueous medium and chemically bind with platinum precursors. Then, in situ polymerization of Pt nanoparticles within the PAHA self-aggregates generated polymer vesicles that possess nanoparticles within bilayers, because of the increase of the hydrophilic mass ratio to total mass of PAHA, f (w). This new strategy to prepare polymer vesicles would greatly serve to facilitate the control of self-assembly and ultimately improve the functionality of a wide array of polymer vesicles.

  1. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity.

  2. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  3. Laser-induced torques in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We study laser-induced torques in bcc Fe, hcp Co, and L 10 FePt based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and the Keldysh nonequilibrium formalism. We find that the torques have two contributions, one from the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) and one from the optical spin-transfer torque (OSTT). Depending on the ferromagnet at hand and on the quasiparticle broadening the two contributions may be of similar magnitude, or one contribution may dominate over the other. Additionally, we determine the nonequilibrium spin polarization in order to investigate its relation to the torque. We find the torques and the perpendicular component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization to be odd in the helicity of the laser light, while the spin polarization that is induced parallel to the magnetization is helicity independent. The parallel component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization is orders of magnitude larger than the perpendicular component. In the case of hcp Co we find good agreement between the calculated laser-induced torque and a recent experiment.

  4. Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 binds metals and protects against metal-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-08-02

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD.

  5. Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 Binds Metals and Protects against Metal-induced Cytotoxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-01-01

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD. PMID:23792957

  6. Polyamorphism in Yb-based metallic glass induced by pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Liangliang; Luo, Qiang; Li, Renfeng; ...

    2017-04-25

    The Yb62.5Zn15Mg17.5Cu5 metallic glass is investigated using synchrotron x-ray total scattering method up to 38.4 GPa. The polyamorphic transformation from low density to high density with a transition region between 14.1 and 25.2 GPa is observed, accompanying with a volume collapse reflected by a discontinuousness of isothermal bulk modulus. This collapse is caused by that distortional icosahedron short range order precedes to perfect icosahedron, which might link to Yb 4f electron delocalization upon compression, and match the result of in situ electrical resistance measurement under high pressure conditions. Furthermore, this discovery in Yb-based metallic glass, combined with the previous reportsmore » on other metallic glass systems, demonstrates that pressure induced polyamorphism is the general behavior for typical lanthanide based metallic glasses.« less

  7. Light-induced binding of metal nanoparticles via surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Zheng, M. J.; Yu, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, nanomachines based on the interaction of nanosize objects with nanostructrued surfaces have attracted much attention. In this work, we study theoretically the light-induced binding forces between a metallic nanosphere and a planar structure, and also between nanoparticles in a diatomic plamonic chain of shelled and unshelled metallic nanoparticles placed alternatively. These forces are calculated by Bergman-Milton spectral representation and multiple image methods within the long wavelength limit. When we tune the incident frequency to the surface plasmon resonant frequency, a stable local minimum in the potential energy is found. It signifies a binding between nanoparticles (nanostructures), which indicates a possible stable structure of the metallic clusters. Such binding is caused by the excitation of collective plasmon modes, which depends on the interparticle distances. This study has potential applications in plasmonic waveguides and colloidal metallic clusters on the nanoscales.

  8. Polyamorphism in Yb-based metallic glass induced by pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Luo, Qiang; Li, Renfeng; Zhao, Haiyan; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Wang, Luhong; Liu, Haozhe

    2017-04-25

    The Yb62.5Zn15Mg17.5Cu5 metallic glass is investigated using synchrotron x-ray total scattering method up to 38.4 GPa. The polyamorphic transformation from low density to high density with a transition region between 14.1 and 25.2 GPa is observed, accompanying with a volume collapse reflected by a discontinuousness of isothermal bulk modulus. This collapse is caused by that distortional icosahedron short range order precedes to perfect icosahedron, which might link to Yb 4f electron delocalization upon compression, and match the result of in situ electrical resistance measurement under high pressure conditions. This discovery in Yb-based metallic glass, combined with the previous reports on other metallic glass systems, demonstrates that pressure induced polyamorphism is the general behavior for typical lanthanide based metallic glasses.

  9. Polyamorphism in Yb-based metallic glass induced by pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangliang; Luo, Qiang; Li, Renfeng; Zhao, Haiyan; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Wang, Luhong; Liu, Haozhe

    2017-01-01

    The Yb62.5Zn15Mg17.5Cu5 metallic glass is investigated using synchrotron x-ray total scattering method up to 38.4 GPa. The polyamorphic transformation from low density to high density with a transition region between 14.1 and 25.2 GPa is observed, accompanying with a volume collapse reflected by a discontinuousness of isothermal bulk modulus. This collapse is caused by that distortional icosahedron short range order precedes to perfect icosahedron, which might link to Yb 4f electron delocalization upon compression, and match the result of in situ electrical resistance measurement under high pressure conditions. This discovery in Yb-based metallic glass, combined with the previous reports on other metallic glass systems, demonstrates that pressure induced polyamorphism is the general behavior for typical lanthanide based metallic glasses. PMID:28440339

  10. Pressure-induced superconductivity in europium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Debessai, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hamlin, J.J.; Bi, W.; Meng, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Schilling, J.S.

    2010-05-24

    Of the 52 known elemental superconductors among the 92 naturally occurring elements in the periodic table, fully 22 only become superconducting under sufficiently high pressure. In the rare-earth metals, the strong local magnetic moments originating from the 4f shell suppress superconductivity. For Eu, however, Johansson and Rosengren have suggested that sufficiently high pressures should promote one of its 4f electrons into the conduction band, changing Eu from a strongly magnetic (J=7/2) 4f{sup 7}-state into a weak Van Vleck paramagnetic (J=0) 4f{sup 6}-state, thus opening the door for superconductivity, as in Am (5f{sup 6}). We report that Eu becomes superconducting above 1.8 K for pressures exceeding 80 GPa, T{sub c} increasing linearly with pressure to 142 GPa at the rate +15 mK/GPa. Eu thus becomes the 53rd elemental superconductor in the periodic table. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies to 92 GPa at ambient temperature reveal four structural phase transitions.

  11. Selective Metallization Induced by Laser Activation: Fabricating Metallized Patterns on Polymer via Metal Oxide Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihai; Zhou, Tao; Wen, Liang

    2017-02-28

    Recently, metallization on polymer substrates has been given more attention due to its outstanding properties of both plastics and metals. In this study, the metal oxide composite of copper-chromium oxide (CuO·Cr2O3) was incorporated into the polymer matrix to design a good laser direct structuring (LDS) material, and the well-defined copper pattern (thickness =10 μm) was successfully fabricated through selective metallization based on 1064 nm near-infrared pulsed laser activation and electroless copper plating. We also prepared polymer composites incorporated with CuO and Cr2O3; however, these two polymer composites both had very poor capacity of selective metallization, which has no practical value for LDS technology. In our work, the key reasons causing the above results were systematically studied and elucidated using XPS, UV-vis-IR, optical microscopy, SEM, contact angle, ATR FTIR, and so on. The results showed that 54.0% Cu(2+) in the polymer composite of CuO·Cr2O3 (the amount =5 wt %) is reduced to Cu(0) (elemental copper) after laser activation (irradiation); however, this value is only 26.8% for the polymer composite of CuO (the amount =5 wt %). It was confirmed that to achieve a successful selective metallization after laser activation, not only was the new formed Cu(0) (the catalytic seeds) the crucial factor, but the number of generated Cu(0) catalytic seeds was also important. These two factors codetermined the final results of the selective metallization. The CuO·Cr2O3 is very suitable for applications of fabricating metallic patterns (e.g., metal decoration, circuit) on the inherent pure black or bright black polymer materials via LDS technology, which has a prospect of large-scale industrial applications.

  12. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database - Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Subramani, Ranjit

    2008-03-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. "User-friendly" utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  13. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  14. Metal-Induced Reconstructions on Semiconductor Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian

    1995-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been used to study the surface morphology induced by In, Ga, and Sn overlayers on Si(100) and Si(311) surfaces. STM and low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) were used to study the surface morphology of Pb overlayer grown on Si(100) -(2 x 1). Reconstructions on clean alpha -SiC(0001) and alpha-SiC(0001) surfaces and those induced by deposition of Ti were also studied. We found that deposition of In produced step bunching and faceting on vicinal Si(100) surface. At coverages >=1 ML, the original step direction of (01 1) changed to a zig-zag along low-index (010) and (001) directions, and the bunched steps became {130} facets. At annealing temperatures >=550^ circC, the {130} facets disappeared and the bunched steps were restored with meandering step directions. For the case of Pb adsorption on Si(100)-(2 x 1) surface, surface reconstructions of (2 x 2), c(4 x 8), (2 x 1), and c(4 x 4) were observed as Pb coverages increased from 0.5 to 1.5 ML. After the appearance of the c(4 x 4) phase, Pb islands with threefold-symmetric (111) orientation were observed on the twofold or fourfold-symmetric Si(100) surface. Both Sn and Ga adsorption on Si(100)-(2 x 1) and Si(311)-(3 x 2) surfaces induced complex surface morphologies when the coverage exceeded 1 ML. Rectangular and square depressions shaped like inverted pyramids were formed at Ga coverage above 1 ML. The walls of the inverted pyramids were (311). Deposition of Sn on Si(100) at coverages exceeding 2 ML also produced (311) facets, but they formed the faces of long parallel and orthogonal prisms, giving rise to a large scale maze-like structure on the surface. Deposition of Ga on the Si(311)-(3 x 2) surface produced ordered (211) and (611) facets at coverage above 1 ML. On the other hand, deposition of Sn on Si(311)-(3 x 2) did not produce any facet. Instead, layer-by-layer growth of (1 x 1) pseudomorphic Sn was observed on the Si(311) surface up to 6 ML. Ge growth on Si(100

  15. The formation and structure of the oxide and hydroxide chemisorbed phases at the aluminum surface, and relevance to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael; Kelly, Robert; Neurock, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum alloys used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) induced by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) (Gangloff and Ives 1990). Crack growth experiments have demonstrated a linear relation between the relative humidity of the environment and crack growth rates, indicating the importance of water (Speidel and Hyatt 1972). While the presence of water has been demonstrated to be necessary for EAC of aluminum, crack growth rates have been linked to the diffusivity of hydrogen in aluminum (Gangloff 2003) and hydrogen densities at the crack tip as high as Al2H have been observed (Young and Scully 1998). While the mechanism by which hydrogen embrittles aluminum is yet not well understood, without the entry of hydrogen into the aluminum matrix, embrittlement would not occur. While at the crack tip high hydrogen concentrations exist, the solubility of hydrogen in aluminum is normal near 1 ppm (Wolverton 2004). In this work combined first principles and kinetic Monte Carlo methods will be used to examine the oxide and hydroxide structure resulting from exposure of aluminum to H2O or O2 and relevance to hydrogen entry as well as EAC is discussed.

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  17. Zinc rapidly induces a metal response element-binding factor.

    PubMed Central

    Czupryn, M; Brown, W E; Vallee, B L

    1992-01-01

    Metal activation of metallothionein gene transcription is mediated by specific promoter sequences, termed metal regulatory elements (MREs). Nuclear extracts prepared from various human cell lines were assayed for their capacity to bind to a synthetic human MREa (hMREa) oligomer. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays with extracts from control cells detected a single hMREa-containing complex. Addition to the growth medium of zinc, cadmium, or copper--metals known to induce MT biosynthesis in vivo--resulted in the rapid but reversible appearance of a second distinct hMREa-protein complex in all cell lines studied. This result was not seen when the metals were added directly to the extracts from control cells. DNA-binding protein blotting, UV crosslinking, and electroelution experiments were used to characterize the two hMREa-binding factors, termed BF1 and BF2. MRE-BF1 has an apparent molecular mass of approximately 86 kDa and binds to the hMREa in control cells, whereas MRE-BF2 consists of two molecules of approximately 28 kDa and binds to the hMREa in metal-treated cells. EDTA and o-phenanthroline inhibited binding of both factors to hMREa in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that a metal atom or atoms are essential for interaction of the factors with DNA. Images PMID:1332048

  18. Latent Cracking of Tantalum-Titanium Welds Due to Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossick-Schott, Joachim; Reiterer, Markus; Heffelfinger, Jason; Hintz, Mike; Ringle, Mike; Levina, Iryna; Gaffney, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    Establishing electrical interconnects in implantable electronic medical devices frequently requires joining of dissimilar materials. A weld between a tantalum wire and titanium sheet metal on a contact module is presented as an example for dissimilar joining. Latent, brittle cracking was observed in the proximity of the weld upon pull testing. The weld cracking occurs by the mechanism known as hydrogen stress cracking (HSC) and is due to titanium hydride formation. Diffusion facilitated hydrogen transport into the weld area. Diffusing hydrogen accumulates preferably in regions of high stress, causing latent titanium hydride formation and embrittlement of the weld. A broad array of analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and nanoindentation were utilized to identify the root cause for HSC.

  19. Grain boundary structure effects on cold work embrittlement of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lehockey, E.M.; Palumbo, G.; Lin, P.

    1998-07-03

    Microalloyed steels (e.g., SAE 1005) used in deep drawing applications can often be susceptible to cold work embrittlement. Although cracks can propagate both intergranularly and transgranularly, initiation is believed to occur intergranularly. Grain boundaries having misorientations described by low-{Sigma} values in the Coincident Site Lattice (CSL) framework are recognized to exhibit increased resistance to sliding, cavitation, and cracking. Increasing the frequency of low-{Sigma}, special grain boundaries has been demonstrated to significantly enhance ductility and toughness in a wide variety of pure metals and alloys. Reduced susceptibility to these intergranular degradation processes arise from the increased structural order expected of low-{Sigma} CSL interfaces and possible reduced interaction with harmful impurities. The intention of the present work is to evaluate the effect of low-{Sigma} CSL boundaries on the nucleation and propagation of cracks during deep-draw forming operations in ultra-low carbon microalloyed steels.

  20. Composition Effect on Intrinsic Plasticity or Brittleness in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  1. Oxidation embrittlement of grain boundaries in nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gendron, T.S.; Cleland, R.D.; Newman, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    Intergranular oxidation-embrittlement of Alloy 600 has been studied by surface analysis of fractured thin foils pre-exposed to hydrogenated steam at 400 C. The results are believed to be relevant to primary-water stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants. Earlier work had shown that pre-exposure to this environment caused several micrometers of intergranular failure during subsequent straining. This cracking had none of the characteristics of hydrogen embrittlement and could be due to oxidation of chromium and/or carbon at the grain boundaries, or to ingress of a monolayer of oxygen. New results show that an oxide phase of chromium does indeed penetrate but most of the cracking seems to be due to oxygen segregation. Sulfur was also found on the fractured boundaries.

  2. Assessment of thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for assessing thermal embrittlement and predicting Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve of cast stainless steel components under Light Water Reactor operating conditions from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Fracture properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. A common ``predicted lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  3. An evolution of understanding of reactor pressure vessel steel embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the lifetime contributions of Prof. G. Robert Odette to our understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on reactor pressure vessel steel embrittlement. These contributions span the entire range of phenomena that contribute to embrittlement, from the production and evolution of fine scale features by radiation damage processes, to the effects of this damage microstructure on mechanical properties. They include the development and application of unique and novel experimental tools (from Seebeck Coefficient to Small Angle Neutron Scattering to confocal microscopy and fracture reconstruction), the design and implementation of large multi-variable experimental matrices, the application of multiscale modeling to understand the underlying mechanisms of defect evolution and property change, and the development of predictive methodologies employed to govern reactor operations. The ideas and discoveries have provided guidance worldwide to improving the safety of operating nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  4. Embrittlement Database from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance capsules of U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors and from experiments in material test reactors. The collected data are contained in either the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) or the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB). The EDB work includes verification of the quality of the EDB, provision for user-friendly software to access and process the data, exploration and/or confirmation of embrittlement prediction models, provision for rapid investigation of regulatory issues, and provision for the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards or regulatory guides. The EDB is designed for use with a personal computer. The data are collected into "raw data files." Traceability of all data is maintained by including complete references along with the page numbers. External data verification of the PR-EDB is the responsibility of the vendors, who were responsible for the insertion and testing of the materials in the surveillance capsules. Internal verification is accomplished by checking against references and checking for inconsistencies. Examples of information contained in the EDBs are: Charpy data, tensile data, reactor type, irradiation environments, fracture toughness data, instrumented Charpy data, pressure-temperature (P-T) data, chemistry data, and material history. The TR-EDB additionally has annealing Charpy data. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the test results from 269 Charpy capsules irradiated in 101 reactors. These results include 320 plate data points, 123 forging data points, 113 standard reference materials (SRMS) or correlation monitor (CM) points, 244 weld material data points, and 220 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) material data points. Similarly, the TR-EDB contains information for 290 SRM or CM points, 342 plate data points, 165 forging data points, 378 welds, and 55 HAZ materials. [copied from http://rsicc.ornl.gov/RelatedLinks.aspx?t=edb

  5. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO/sub 2/ along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar/sup +/ ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000/sup 0/C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450/sup 0/C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150/sup 0/C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures.

  6. Investigation of gold embrittlement in connector solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine to what extent typical flight connector solder joints may be embrittled by the presence of gold. In addition to mapping of gold content in connector solder joints by an electron microprobe analyzer, metallographic examinations and mechanical tests (thermal shock, vibration, impact and tensile strength) were also conducted. A description of the specimens and tests, a discussion of the data, and some conclusions are presented.

  7. Photo-induced-heat localization on nanostructured metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Ceren; Kahler, Niloofar; de Peralta, Luis Grave; Kumar, Golden; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2017-09-01

    Materials with large photo-thermal energy conversion efficiency are essential for renewable energy applications. Photo-excitation is an effective approach to generate controlled and localized heat at relatively low excitation optical powers. However, lateral heat diffusion to the surrounding illuminated areas accompanied by low photo-thermal energy conversion efficiency remains a challenge for metallic surfaces. Surface nanoengineering has proven to be a successful approach to further absorption and heat generation. Here, we show that pronounced spatial heat localization and high temperatures can be achieved with arrays of amorphous metallic glass nanorods under infrared optical illumination. Thermography measurements revealed marked temperature contrast between illuminated and non-illuminated areas even under low optical power excitation conditions. This attribute allowed for generating legible photo-induced thermal patterns on textured metallic glass surfaces.

  8. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  9. Irreversible embrittlement of Alloy 600 in hydrogenated steam at 400 C

    SciTech Connect

    Gendron, T.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Intergranular embrittlement of Alloy 600 has been studied by pre-exposing thin foils, 20--30 pm thick, in high-pressure steam/hydrogen at 400 C, then fracturing them at room temperature. Hydrogen egress was believed to be complete before fracture, so any embrittlement was due to irreversible damage at the grain boundaries. Embrittlement was observed in both as-received and cold-worked material, to a depth of a few microns. The kinetics of this embrittlement are insufficient to account for stress corrosion velocities measured in this environment, unless one postulates an improbably frequent crack advance. The most likely cause of embrittlement is selective intergranular oxidation of chromium. Various other internal embrittlement processes are discussed.

  10. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-12-31

    The irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Models were developed based on a combination of statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, and the current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and a surrogate hardness data base. This work demonstrates that microhardness recovery is i good surrogate for shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between he observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  11. Low-temperature radiation embrittlement of copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A. Pokrovsky, A.S.; Zinkle, S.J.; Edwards, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of low-temperature (T{sub irr} less than 0.3. T{sub melt}) irradiation on the tensile properties of copper and precipitation-hardened (PH) and dispersion-strengthened (DS) copper alloys was investigated. Samples were irradiated with fission neutrons at temperatures of 80 to 200{degrees}C to doses of 0.6 to 5 dpa. Irradiation at temperatures <150{degrees}C resulted in significant hardening and accompanying embrittlement in all of the materials. By comparing the present results with literature data, it is concluded that severe radiation embrittlement occurs in copper alloys irradiated at temperatures {le}I00{degrees}C for doses above {approximately} 0.01 to 0.1 dpa. On the other hand, irradiation at temperatures above 150{degrees}C causes only moderate embrittlement for doses up to {approximately}5 dpa. It is recommended that the minimum operating temperature for copper alloys intended for structural applications in fusion energy systems should be 150{degrees}C, unless uniform elongations

  12. Integrated analysis of WWER-440 RPV weld re-embrittlement after annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Debarberis, L.; Ballesteros, A.; Krsjak, V.; Burcl, R.; Rogozhkin, S. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Aleev, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Grafutin, V. I.; Ilyukhina, O.; Funtikov, Yu V.; Zeman, A.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of WWER-440 RPV welds mechanical properties and behaviour of nanoscale structural features under primary irradiation, thermal annealing and re-irradiation has been performed in the framework of the international research project PRIMAVERA. The weld material of WWER-440 with three different levels of phosphorus contents, specifically 0.025, 0.03 and 0.04 wt.% were investigated in the framework of the project. It has been demonstrated that the copper atoms create under irradiation small clusters (d ˜ 1-2 nm) surrounded by P, Si or Mn atoms. The phosphorus atoms segregate on Cu-clusters, dislocations and form P-clusters and atmospheres. These mechanisms lead to the embrittlement of RPV steel, which is revealed by the increasing of yield stress and transition temperature shift after irradiation. Due to thermal annealing a substantial part of irradiation induced copper and phosphorus clusters has been dissolved. Moreover, dissolution of Cu clusters occurs simultaneously with the growth of the Cu precipitates. Both steel tensile properties and transition temperature recover due to thermal annealing. A substantial phosphorus effect on ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift occurs under re-irradiation. Because in the annealed steel a substantial part of the Cu atoms is in the precipitates, the material embrittlement under re-irradiation does not depend so much on Cu, and the Tk shift under re-irradiation is less as compared with primary irradiation. Considering the vacancy type defects, the PAS experiments show that basically three different processes play a role in the microstructure evolution: irradiation induced creation of point defects, thermal induced annealing of these defects and thermal/irradiation induced coarsening of defects. Although, the influence of the vacancy type defects on the mechanical properties was found to be little in comparison to the effect of the Cu-P clusters, the presence of these defects in the irradiated and annealed

  13. Superconductivity of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in superconducting metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon is reviewed, mainly focusing on the results of the author’s group. After a brief introduction of an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV)-low-temperature (LT)-compatible electron transport measurement system, direct observation of the zero resistance state for the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface is described, which demonstrates the existence of a superconducting transition in this class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The measurement and analysis of the temperature dependence of the critical current density indicate that a surface atomic step works as a Josephson junction. This identification is further confirmed by LT-scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation of Josephson vortices trapped at atomic steps on the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface. These experiments reveal unique features of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon that may be utilized to explore novel superconductivity.

  14. Observations of impact-induced molten metal-silicate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, Linda R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of molten mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-molybdenum (Mo) interactions produced by shock experiments provide insight into impact and differentiation processes involving metal-silicate partitioning. Analysis of fragments recovered from experiments (achieving MORB liquid shock pressures from 0.8 to 6 GPa) revealed significant changes in the composition of the MORB and Mo due to reaction of the silicate and metal liquids on a short time scale (less than 13 s). The FeO concentration of the shocked liquid decreases systematically with increasing pressure. In fact, the most highly shocked liquid (6 GPa) contains only 0.1 wt% FeO compared to an initial concentration of 9 wt% in the MORB. We infer from the presence of micrometer-sized Fe-, Si- and Mo-rich metallic spheres in the shocked glass that the Fe and Si oxides in the MORB were reduced in an estimated oxygen fugacity of 10(exp -17) bar and subsequently alloyed with the Mo. The in-situ reduction of FeO in the shocked molten basalt implies that shock-induced reduction of impact melt should be considered a viable mechanism for the formation of metallic phases. Similar metallic phases may form during impact accretion of planets and in impacted material found on the lunar surface and near terrestrial impact craters. In particular, the minute, isolated Fe particles found in lunar soils may have formed by such a process. Furthermore, the metallic spheres within the shocked glass have a globular texture similar to the textures of metallic spheroids from lunar samples and the estimated, slow cooling rate of less than or equal to 140 C/s for our spheres is consistent with the interpretation that the lunar spheroids formed by slow cooling within a melted target.

  15. Metal ion-inducing metabolite accumulation in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, Muhammad; Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2008-09-29

    Plants face a number of biotic and abiotic environmental stress factors during growth. Among the abiotic factors, in particular, a great deal of attention has been paid to metals not only because of their increasing amounts in the environment due to rapid industrial development but also because of the variation of metal composition in soil. Cultivation of crops close to industrial areas or irrigation with contaminated water may result in both growth inhibition and tissue accumulation of metals. Brassica species are well known as metal accumulators and are being used for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. However, the metal tolerance mechanism in the plant still remains unclear. In order to investigate the metabolomic changes induced by metal ions in Brassica, plants were subjected to concentrations 50, 100, 250 and 500 mmol of copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in separate treatments. (1)H NMR and two-dimensional NMR spectra coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to investigate the metabolic change in Brassica rapa (var. Raapstelen). The (1)H-NMR analysis followed by the application of chemometric methods revealed a number of metabolic consequences. Among the metabolites that showed variation, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids conjugated with malates were found to be the discriminating metabolites as were primary metabolites like carbohydrates and amino acids. This study shows that the effects of Cu and Fe on plant metabolism were larger than those of Mn and that the metabolomic changes varied not only according to the type of metal but also according to its concentration.

  16. Development of Press Hardening Steel with High Resistance to Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jian; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Lu, Hongzhou; Wang, Wenjun

    Press hardening has become the state-of-art technology in the car body manufacturing to enhance safety standard and to reduce CO2 emission of new vehicles. However the delayed cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement remains to be a critical issue. Generally press hardening steel is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement due to ultra-high strength and martensitic microstructure. The hydrogen charging tests clearly demonstrate that only a few ppm of diffusible hydrogen is sufficient to cause such embrittlement. Currently the hydrogen embrittlement cannot be detected in the press hardened components and the embitteled components could collapse in the crash situation with fatal consequences arisen through dramatic loss in both strength and ductility. This paper introduces a new metallurgical solution to increase the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement of conventional press hardening steel based on 22MnB5 by Nb microalloying. In the hydrogen embrittlement and permeation tests the impact of Nb microalloying on the hydrogen embrittlement behavior was investigated under different hydrogen charging conditions and constant load. The test results revealed that Nb addition increases the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement due to reduced hydrogen diffusivity. The focus of this paper is to investigate the precipitation behavior of microalloying elements by using TEM and STEM and to find out the mechanisms leading to higher performance against hydrogen embrittlement of Nb alloyed steels.

  17. The role of gamma rays and freely-migrating defects in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E.

    1996-09-01

    Gamma ray effects are often neglected when evaluating reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement. However, recent analyses indicate that in newer style light water reactors, gamma damage can be a substantial fraction of the total displacement damage experienced by the (RPV); ignoring this damage will lead to errors in embrittlement predictions. Furthermore, gamma rays may be more efficient than fast neutrons at producing freely-migrating defects and as such can impact certain embrittlement mechanisms more effectively than fast neutrons. Consideration of these gamma effects are therefore essential for a more complete understanding of radiation embrittlement.

  18. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effect of alloy modification were investigated. Results show that T-111 possesses a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss in ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. It was found that this occurs because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries, which also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effects of alloy modification were investigated. Results showed that T-111 contains a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss of ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. This appears to occur because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries and this also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; however, most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. Role of metal nanoparticles on porosification of silicon by metal induced etching (MIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Yogi, Priyanka; Yadav, Pooja; Mishra, Suryakant; Pandey, Haardik; Rai, Hari Mohan; Kumar, Vivek; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Porosification of silicon (Si) by metal induced etching (MIE) process has been studied here to understand the etching mechanism. The etching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of electron transfer from Si to metal ion (Ag+) and metal to H2O2. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the etching process has been investigated by studying the effect of AgNPs coverage on surface porosity. A quantitative analysis of SEM images, done using Image J, shows a direct correlation between AgNPs coverage and surface porosity after the porosification. Density of Si nanowires (NWs) also varies as a function of AgNPs fractional coverage which reasserts the fact that AgNPs governs the porosification process during MIE. The Raman and PL spectrum show the presence of Si NSs in the samples.

  1. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  2. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemery, Samuel; Berdin, Clotilde; Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture.

  3. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Schwen, Daniel; Chakraborty, Pritam; Bai, Xianming

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  4. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) (DuPont) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces for thermal control in the low-Earth orbit environment. Silverized or aluminized Teflon FEP is used for the outer layers of the thermal control blanket because of its high reflectance, low solar absorptance, and high thermal emittance. Teflon FEP is also desirable because, compared with other spacecraft polymers (such as Kapton), it has relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its comparably low atomic oxygen erosion yield, Teflon FEP has been used unprotected in the space environment. Samples of Teflon FEP from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (retrieved during its first servicing mission) were evaluated for solar-induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  5. Damage dosimetry and embrittlement monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels in real time by magnetic properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.; Ougouag, A.M.; Williams, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a technique for real-time monitoring of neutron dose and of the onset and progression of embrittlement in operating nuclear pressure vessels. The technique relies on the measurement of magnetic properties of steel and other magnetic materials which are extremely sensitive to radiation-induced properties changes. The approach being developed here is innovative and unique. It promises to be readily applicable to all existing and planned reactor structures. The significance of this program is that it addresses a major concern in the operation of existing nuclear pressure vessels. The development of microscopic defect clusters during irradiation in the nuclear pressure vessel beltline region leads to an increase in material yield strength and a concomitant decrease in ductility, or ability to absorb energy in fracture (i.e. fracture toughness). This decrease in fracture toughness is alarming since it may impair the ability of the pressure vessel to resist fracture during unusual loading situations.

  6. Nanocluster-induced quantum photoyield of metal alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, V. G.; Kondrashev, A. I.; Maksimchuk, I. N.

    2010-10-01

    In order to find the origin of photoemission and increase the low quantum yield (QY) suitable metals such as magnesium and aluminium, a correlation between the QY in the UV-spectrum range and the electron density of states (DOS) near the Fermi level is considered for light metal alloy systems by using the data of UV-photoelectron spectroscopy, volume paramagnetic susceptibility, and HRTEM studies. The spectral responses of the photoyield for the HCP Mg-Ba alloys are proven to be in agreement with Fowler’s law for a near-free-electron model. The Mg16Ba2 bimetallic nanocluster-induced distribution of the DOS, calculated by the ab initio FLAPW method near the Fermi level closely resembles that obtained by the UV-photoelectron spectroscopy in the bulk Mg-2% Ba alloy. It means that a substantial increase in the DOS near the Fermi level is caused by the electron structure of the cluster to be formed. These metallic-like nanoclusters of 8 nm in diameter embedded in the bulk of extended solid solution crystals act as new and much more efficient photoemission centers and insure a drastic increase in the QY of the massive magnesium photocathode by several orders of magnitude. The new approach is applicable to similar metal alloy systems such as the FCC Al-Li, Ba as regards their treatment on the basis of the physical principles of small-scale alloying with emission-active and cluster-forming additives.

  7. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis.

  8. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  9. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  10. Galvanic corrosion couple-induced Marangoni flow of liquid metal.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si-Cong; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gui, Han; Ding, Yu-Jie; Wang, Lei; Yuan, Bin; Liu, Jing

    2017-03-22

    The Marangoni flow of room temperature liquid metal has recently attracted significant attention in developing advanced flexible drivers. However, most of its induction methods are limited to an external electric field. This study disclosed a new Marangoni flow phenomenon of liquid gallium induced by the gallium-copper galvanic corrosion couple. To better understand this effect, the flow field distribution of liquid gallium was modeled and quantitatively calculated. Then, the intrinsic mechanism of this flow phenomenon was interpreted, during which natural convection and temperature gradient were both excluded and the galvanic corrosion couple was identified as the main reason. In addition, this conclusion was further confirmed by combining the experimental measurement of liquid gallium surface potential and the thermocapillary effect. Moreover, the temperature condition was found to be an indirect factor to the Marangoni flow. This finding broadens the classical understanding of liquid metal surface flow, which also suggests a new way for the application of soft machines.

  11. Pressure-induced electronic phase transitions in transition metal oxides and rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Brian Ross

    Electron correlation can affect profound changes in a material's bulk properties. When the degree of correlation is changed, phase transitions can sometimes result. Applying pressure can inducing changes in the degree of electron correlation by altering the interatomic distances of crystalline materials. This dissertation presents a study of a number of correlated systems at ultrahigh pressures generated by diamond-anvil cells. The Mott transition is an example of a phase transition resulting from changes in the degree of electron correlation. A sharp transition induced by pressure from a highly correlated, insulating state to a weakly correlated, metallic state was predicted for the transition metal monoxides (MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO) some 50 years ago. Numerous studies aimed at observing this transition have been unsuccessful. We present a study of MnO designed to determine its crystal structure and magnetic properties at high pressure. Our results provide the first observance of the Mott transition in a transition metal monoxide. A high pressure study of various light rare-earth metals using similar techniques to those used to study MnO is presented. Our results show that these materials do not undergo Mott transitions at high pressure as some have suggested. A key signature of the Mott transition, i.e., a vanishing magnetic moment, was absent in the lanthanides. These results suggest that a Kondo-like model, not a Mott transition model, best describes the electron correlation behavior in the lanthanides. A number of related materials were also studied at high pressure. Among these materials, half-metallic chromium dioxide (CrO2) presents a unique opportunity to study the effects of electronic structure on a material's structural properties due to its very common rutile crystal structure. We present a high pressure structural study of CrO2 and compare our findings to other rutile-structured compounds. Strong systernatics are uncovered linking the ambient pressure

  12. The Role of Vanadium Carbide Traps in Reducing the Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of High Strength Alloy Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    A723 steel was not sufficient to induce any appreciable embrittlement. 7.0 4.0 HY80 X 0.0i-r 50 4340 r—,—,—|—i—i—i—r—t—i—i—i—i—I—i—’—’—> l...carbide, V4C3) was identified in the A723 steel by x- ray diffraction. V4C3 traps effectively reduced the hydrogen concentrations at the crack ...ALLOY STEELS G. L. SPENCER D. J. DUQUETTE AUGUST 1998 US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER CLOSE COMBAT ARMAMENTS CENTER

  13. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  14. Hydrogen Embrittlement in a 2000-Series Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, D. A.; Taheri, M.; Thompson, Anthony W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1982-02-01

    Tensile tests were performed on an Al-Cu-Mg alloy, 2124, in plate form, after aging to seven different tempers. Cathodic charging with hydrogen caused no significant loss of ductility for any temper, in contrast, for example, to 7075. Simultaneous straining and cathodic charging did, however, result in reduction in area losses up to 25 pct. The fracture mode was not altered by hydrogen. In general, the results conformed to the framework established through investigation of 7075 alloys, in that the underaged microstructures were the most susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement; this susceptibility can be explained in terms of microstructure and slip behavior.

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement of 45 steel in electrolytes in torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Marichev, V.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate the influence of electrochemical polarization on corrosion crack growth in corrosion cracking of high-strength steel during torsion. It was established that anodic polarization has practically no influence on the crack growth rate while cathodic accelerates crack growth. Crack growth at the corrosion potentials in NaCl solution is eased significantly more than in CrO/sub 3/ solution. Hydrogen embrittlement makes a larger contribution to the corrosion cracking mechanism of 45 high-strength steel in torsion than in tension.

  16. Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation.

  17. Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.S.

    1987-10-02

    A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO + H/sub 2/) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

  18. Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven S.

    1989-01-01

    A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO+H.sub.2) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

  19. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  20. Hydrogen embrittlement of ultra-pure alloys of the inconel 600 type: Influence of the additions of elements (C, P, Sn, Sb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, M.; Bertrand, C.; Belo, M. Da Cunha

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of very high purity nickel base alloys of the Inconel 600 type that were simultaneously charged with hydrogen and deformed in tension was investigated. Experimental results show that this procedure decreases markedly the fracture strain of the pure 76 pct Ni-16 pct Cr-8 pct Fe alloy; cracks are observed after two to four pct elongation, and the fracture is completely intercrystalline. Hydrogen embrittlement appears as an intrinsic property of the Ni-Cr-Fe system in the sense that the grain boundary cohesion decreases when the purity of the alloy increases. The presence of carbon or phosphorus in the alloys increases grain boundary cohesion. The addition of metallic elements such as antimony or tin has relatively little effect on intergranular embrittlement.

  1. Temper embrittlement of CrMoV turbine-rotor steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhe, Q.; Fu, S.C.; McMahon, C.J. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    Samples from the hot and cold ends of two retired CrMoV steam turbine rotors (Joppa No. 3 and Buck No. 6) and of the failed Gallatin rotor were studied with respect to the degree of temper embrittlement, fracture mode, impurity segregation, and microstructure in the as-received condition and after various heat treatments. The Joppa material showed no temper embrittlement, presumably due to its relatively higher purity and due to the presence of ferrite. The Buck material exhibited an extraordinarily large amount of temper embrittlement, due to its unusually large contents of P and Sn, both of which were found to be segregated to the prior austenite grain boundaries, particularly at the hot end of the rotor. The Gallatin material from the hot end exhibited some temper embrittlement due to P segregation, but because of its extraordinarily fine grain size, the FATT in the embrittled condition remained relatively low.

  2. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  3. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  4. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  5. Inducibility of a molecular bioreporter system by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimowski, L.; Rayms-Keller, A.; Olson, K.E.; Yang, R.S.H.; Tessari, J.; Carlson, J.; Beaty, B.

    1996-02-01

    The authors have developed a molecular bioreporter model for detecting an invertebrate response to heavy metals in streams. The bioreporter system, pMt2-luc, utilizes a Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein promoter to regulate luciferase expression in stably transformed mosquito cells.The LucC5 clone, which was isolated from pMt2-luc transformed, hygromycin-resistant C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) cells, demonstrated a 12-fold increase in luciferase-specific activity 48 h after exposure to 13 ppm copper (Cu). In addition to Cu, exposure of LucC5 cells to 19 ppm lead (Pb) or 3 ppm mercury (Hg) for 48 h induced luciferase expression threefold and fourfold, respectively. Exposures of up to 30 ppm arsenic (As), 8 ppm cadmium (Cd), 7 ppm chromium (Cr), or 5 ppm nickel (Ni) had no effect on luciferase induction. LucC5 cells exposed to metal mixtures of 13 ppm Cu and 19 ppm Pb yielded an additive response with a 14-fold increase in luciferase expression. When organic chemicals such as phenol (3 ppm) were mixed with 13 ppm Cu, 19 ppm Pb, or 3 ppm Hg a significant reduction in luciferase activity was noted. Additionally, atomic absorption spectroscopy suggested that two of the metals, Cu and Pb, show marked differences in accumulation within the LucC5 cell line.

  6. Role of Tungsten in the Tempered Martensite Embrittlement of a Modified 9 Pct Cr Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseeva, Alexandra; Dudova, Nadezhda; Kaibyshev, Rustam

    2017-03-01

    The effect of tempering on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of two 3 pct Co-modified 9 pct Cr steels with 2 and 3 wt pct W was examined. Both steels were ductile in tension tests and tough under impact tests in high-temperature tempered conditions. At T ≤ 923 K (650 °C), the addition of 1 wt pct W led to low toughness and pronounced embrittlement. The 9Cr2W steel was tough after low-temperature tempering up to 723 K (450 °C). At 798 K (525 °C), the decomposition of retained austenite induced the formation of discontinuous and continuous films of M23C6 carbides along boundaries in the 9Cr2W and the 9Cr3W steels, respectively, which led to tempered martensite embrittlement (TME). In the 9Cr2W steel, the discontinuous boundary films played a role of crack initiation sites, and the absorption energy was 24 J cm-2. In the 9Cr3W steel, continuous films provided a fracture path along the boundaries of prior austenite grains (PAG) and interlath boundaries in addition that caused the drop of impact energy to 6 J cm-2. Tempering at 1023 K (750 °C) completely eliminated TME by spheroidization and the growth of M23C6 carbides, and both steels exhibited high values of adsorbed energy of ≥230 J cm-2. The addition of 1 wt pct W extended the temperature domain of TME up to 923 K (650 °C) through the formation of W segregations at boundaries that hindered the spheroidization of M23C6 carbides.

  7. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures.

  8. Plasmon-induced hot carriers in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Jun G; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter

    2014-08-26

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. However, despite very significant experimental effort, a comprehensive theoretical description of the hot carrier generation process is still missing. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. In this model, the conduction electrons of the metal are described as free particles in a finite spherical potential well, and the plasmon-induced hot carrier production is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. Specifically, larger nanoparticle sizes and shorter lifetimes result in higher carrier production rates but smaller energies, and vice versa. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. The results presented here contribute to the basic understanding of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and provide insight for optimization of the process.

  9. Radiation embrittlement and annealing of VVER pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Pressure vessels of the Soviet-designed VVERs are exposed to up to 10X the fast flux of the vessels of US PWRs. They are fabricated of 2 1/2% Cr, 1% Mo or 2 1/2% Cr, 1% Ni steels developed for that purpose. Consequently, the data base on irradiation effects differs somewhat from that of Western-designed pressure vessels. The role of phosphorus, which is high in the older VVER steels, is especially important. Newer grades of steels, low in copper and phosphorus, have been developed. Pressure vessels fabricated before about 1980 were unclad. The embrittlement of these can be tested in situ with a remote microhardness measuring device. Hydrogen pickup from corrosion does not increase the embrittlement due to irradiation. Considerable research has been performed on pressure vessel annealing, and anneals of the core weld region of the pressure vessels of three operating VVERs have been completed at temperatures 160-185{degree}C higher than the irradiation temperature for 150 hours to one week. Recoveries, monitored with a remote microhardness tester, have ranged upward from 70%.

  10. The modelling of irradiation embrittlement in submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, C.J.; Buswell, J.T.; Jones, R.B.; Moskovic, R.; Priest, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    Until very recently, the irradiation embrittlement behavior of submerged-arc welds has been interpreted in terms of two mechanisms, namely a matrix damage component and an additional component due to the irradiation-enhanced production of copper-rich precipitates. However, some of the weld specimens from a recent accelerated re-irradiation experiment have shown high Charpy shifts which exceeded the values expected from the measured shift in yield stress. Microstructural examination has revealed the occurrence of intergranular fracture (IGF) in these specimens, accompanied by grain boundary segregation of phosphorus. Theoretical models were developed to predict the parametric dependence of irradiation-enhanced phosphorus segregation on experimental variables. Using these parametric forms, along with the concept of a critical level of segregation for the onset of IGF instead of cleavage, a three mechanism trend curve has been developed. The form of this trend curve, taking into account IGF as well as matrix and copper embrittlement, is thus mechanistically based. The constants in the equation, however, are obtained by a statistical fit to the actual Charpy shift database.

  11. Alloy and composition dependence of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in high-strength steel fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahimi, S. V.; Yue, S.; Sriraman, K. R.

    2017-06-01

    High-strength steel fasteners characterized by tensile strengths above 1100 MPa are often used in critical applications where a failure can have catastrophic consequences. Preventing hydrogen embrittlement (HE) failure is a fundamental concern implicating the entire fastener supply chain. Research is typically conducted under idealized conditions that cannot be translated into know-how prescribed in fastener industry standards and practices. Additionally, inconsistencies and even contradictions in fastener industry standards have led to much confusion and many preventable or misdiagnosed fastener failures. HE susceptibility is a function of the material condition, which is comprehensively described by the metallurgical and mechanical properties. Material strength has a first-order effect on HE susceptibility, which increases significantly above 1200 MPa and is characterized by a ductile-brittle transition. For a given concentration of hydrogen and at equal strength, the critical strength above which the ductile-brittle transition begins can vary due to second-order effects of chemistry, tempering temperature and sub-microstructure. Additionally, non-homogeneity of the metallurgical structure resulting from poorly controlled heat treatment, impurities and non-metallic inclusions can increase HE susceptibility of steel in ways that are measurable but unpredictable. Below 1200 MPa, non-conforming quality is often the root cause of real-life failures. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  12. Alloy and composition dependence of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in high-strength steel fasteners.

    PubMed

    Brahimi, S V; Yue, S; Sriraman, K R

    2017-07-28

    High-strength steel fasteners characterized by tensile strengths above 1100 MPa are often used in critical applications where a failure can have catastrophic consequences. Preventing hydrogen embrittlement (HE) failure is a fundamental concern implicating the entire fastener supply chain. Research is typically conducted under idealized conditions that cannot be translated into know-how prescribed in fastener industry standards and practices. Additionally, inconsistencies and even contradictions in fastener industry standards have led to much confusion and many preventable or misdiagnosed fastener failures. HE susceptibility is a function of the material condition, which is comprehensively described by the metallurgical and mechanical properties. Material strength has a first-order effect on HE susceptibility, which increases significantly above 1200 MPa and is characterized by a ductile--brittle transition. For a given concentration of hydrogen and at equal strength, the critical strength above which the ductile-brittle transition begins can vary due to second-order effects of chemistry, tempering temperature and sub-microstructure. Additionally, non-homogeneity of the metallurgical structure resulting from poorly controlled heat treatment, impurities and non-metallic inclusions can increase HE susceptibility of steel in ways that are measurable but unpredictable. Below 1200 MPa, non-conforming quality is often the root cause of real-life failures.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Nondestructive evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement for reactor vessel steel by magnetomechanical acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noriyoshi; Yamaguchi, Atsunori; Saito, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Taiji; Komura, Ichiroh; Chujou, Noriyuki

    1999-10-01

    A modified magnetomechanical acoustic emission (MAE) technique denoted Pulse MAE, in which the magnetizing current has a rectangular wave form, was developed as an NDE technique. Its applicability to the radiation damage for reactor pressure vessel steel was evaluated. The reactor pressure vessel steel A533B base metal and weld metal were irradiated to the two fluence levels: 5 {times} 10{sup 22} and 3 {times} 10{sup 23} n/m{sup 2} at 288 C. One side of the specimen was electropolished after irradiation. Pulse MAE signals were measured with a 350 kHz resonance frequency AE sensor at the moment when the magnetizing voltage is applied from zero to the set-up value abruptly. The AE signals were analyzed and the peak voltage Vp was determined for the measuring parameter. The peak voltage Vp showed the tendency to increase monotonically with increasing neutron fluence. The relationship between the Vp and mechanical properties such as yield stress, tensile strength and Charpy transition temperature were also obtained. The Pulse MAE technique proved to have the possibility to detect and evaluate the neutron irradiation embrittlement. The potential of the Pulse MAE as an effective NDE technique and applicability to the actual components are discussed.

  14. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  15. Heavy metal-induced glutathione accumulation and its role in heavy metal detoxification in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Piao; Liu, Liang; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Zhao, Meihua; Huang, Chao; Li, Ningjie; Wei, Zhen; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Chen; Lai, Mingyong; He, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium are known to be vital hyperaccumulation species for heavy metal removal with admirable intracellular bioaccumulation capacity. This study analyzes the heavy metal-induced glutathione (GSH) accumulation and the regulation at the intracellular heavy metal level in P. chrysosporium. P. chrysosporium accumulated high levels of GSH, accompanied with high intracellular concentrations of Pb and Cd. Pb bioaccumulation lead to a narrow range of fluctuation in GSH accumulation (0.72-0.84 μmol), while GSH plummeted under Cd exposure at the maximum value of 0.37 μmol. Good correlations between time-course GSH depletion and Cd bioaccumulation were determined (R (2) > 0.87), while no significant correlations have been found between GSH variation and Pb bioaccumulation (R (2) < 0.38). Significantly, concentration-dependent molar ratios of Pb/GSH ranging from 0.10 to 0.18 were observed, while molar ratios of Cd/GSH were at the scope of 1.53-3.32, confirming the dominant role of GSH in Cd chelation. The study also demonstrated that P. chrysosporium showed considerable hypertolerance to Pb ions, accompanied with demand-driven stimulation in GSH synthesis and unconspicuous generation of reactive oxygen stress. GSH plummeted dramatically response to Cd exposure, due to the strong affinity of GSH to Cd and the involvement of GSH in Cd detoxification mechanism mainly as Cd chelators. Investigations into GSH metabolism and its role in ameliorating metal toxicity can offer important information on the application of the microorganism for wastewater treatment.

  16. Harnessing Aggregation-Induced Emission (aie) of Tetraphenylethylenes in Metal Ion Sensing and Luminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigge, F. Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Tetraphenylethylene derivatives have emerged as valuable building blocks for construction of luminescent molecular sensor materials based on their ability to display aggregation induced emission. This paper summarizes recent efforts aimed at combining the luminescent properties of tetraphenylethylenes with metal ligating capability as a means to achieve metal ion detection. Research describing the incorporation of tetraphenylethylene ligands in metal-organic frameworks is also discussed. Though these areas of investigation have not received a great deal of attention, metal coordination complexes of tetraphenylethylenes show tremendous promise as switchable fluorescent sensors/indicators with a variety of potential applications.

  17. The Information Fusion Embrittlement Models for U.S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dependencies observed in typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material embrittlement data, as well as the inherent large uncertainties and scatter in the radiation embrittlement data, make prediction of radiation embrittlement a difficult task. Conventional statistical and deterministic approaches have only resulted in rather large uncertainties, in part because they do not fully exploit domain-specific mechanisms. The domain models built by researchers in the field, on the other hand, do not fully exploit the statistical and information content of the data. As evidenced in previous studies, it is unlikely that a single method, whether statistical, nonlinear, or domain model, will outperform all others. More generally, considering the complexity of the embrittlement prediction problem, it is highly unlikely that a single best method exists and is tractable, even in theory. In this paper, we propose to combine a number of complementary methods including domain models, neural networks, and nearest neighbor regressions (NNRs). Such a combination of methods has become possible because of recent developments in measurement-based optimal fusers in the area of information fusion. The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor RPV steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation-parameters are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results-temperature indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The

  18. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-18

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  19. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  20. Pressure-induced elastic anomaly in a polyamorphous metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zeng, Zhidan; Lou, Hongbo; Kono, Yoshio; Zhang, Bo; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Mao, Wendy L.

    2017-05-01

    The pressure-induced transitions discovered in metallic glasses (MGs) have attracted considerable research interest offering an exciting opportunity to study polyamorphism in densely packed systems. Despite the large body of work on these systems, the elastic properties of the MGs during polyamorphic transitions remain unclear. Here, using an in situ high-pressure ultrasonic sound velocity technique integrated with x-ray radiography and x-ray diffraction in a Paris-Edinburgh cell, we accurately determined both the compressional and shear wave velocities of a polyamorphous Ce68Al10Cu20Co2 MG up to 5.8 GPa. We observed elastic anomalies of a MG with minima (at ˜1.5 GPa) in the sound velocities, bulk modulus, and Poisson's ratio during its polyamorphic transition. This behavior was discussed in comparison to the elastic anomalies of silica glass and crystalline Ce.

  1. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  2. Application of magnetoacoustic emission technique to temper embrittlement characterization of HY-80 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denale, R.; Namkung, M.; Todhunter, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic phenomena associated with the use of the magnetoacoustic emission technique for the temper embrittlement characterization of HY-80 steel are investigated in an attempt to explain some peculiarities observed in highly embrittled HY-80 samples. In particular, attention is given to the effects of the ac magnetic field frequency and shape. The peak amplitude of the magnetoacoustic burst, which is directly related to the width of the pulse height distribution, is shown to be a critical parameter in the determination of the degree of temper embrittlement in the steel.

  3. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    SciTech Connect

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel; Duin, Adri C. T. van; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-18

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  4. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; van Duin, Adri C. T.; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Kiwi, Miguel; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  5. The dual role of coherent twin boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seita, Matteo; Hanson, John P.; Gradečak, Silvija; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) causes engineering alloys to fracture unexpectedly, often at considerable economic or environmental cost. Inaccurate predictions of component lifetimes arise from inadequate understanding of how alloy microstructure affects HE. Here we investigate hydrogen-assisted fracture of a Ni-base superalloy and identify coherent twin boundaries (CTBs) as the microstructural features most susceptible to crack initiation. This is a surprising result considering the renowned beneficial effect of CTBs on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of many engineering alloys. Remarkably, we also find that CTBs are resistant to crack propagation, implying that hydrogen-assisted crack initiation and propagation are governed by distinct physical mechanisms in Ni-base alloys. This finding motivates a re-evaluation of current lifetime models in light of the dual role of CTBs. It also indicates new paths to designing materials with HE-resistant microstructures.

  6. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  7. The dual role of coherent twin boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Seita, Matteo; Hanson, John P; Gradečak, Silvija; Demkowicz, Michael J

    2015-02-05

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) causes engineering alloys to fracture unexpectedly, often at considerable economic or environmental cost. Inaccurate predictions of component lifetimes arise from inadequate understanding of how alloy microstructure affects HE. Here we investigate hydrogen-assisted fracture of a Ni-base superalloy and identify coherent twin boundaries (CTBs) as the microstructural features most susceptible to crack initiation. This is a surprising result considering the renowned beneficial effect of CTBs on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of many engineering alloys. Remarkably, we also find that CTBs are resistant to crack propagation, implying that hydrogen-assisted crack initiation and propagation are governed by distinct physical mechanisms in Ni-base alloys. This finding motivates a re-evaluation of current lifetime models in light of the dual role of CTBs. It also indicates new paths to designing materials with HE-resistant microstructures.

  8. Application of hydrogen embrittlement models to the crack growth behavior of fusion reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1986-03-01

    Hydrogen induced crack growth rates of HT-9 have been estimated for three sources of hydrogen: the plasma, nuclear reaction and aqueous corrosion. Estimates of crack growth rates were derived using hydrogen embrittlement models which describe the temperature and hydrogen activity dependence of cracking. A crack growth rate of 10/sup -3/ cm/s at a reactor operating temperature of 400/sup 0/C was obtained for a steady-state hydrogen concentration of 0.5 appM resulting from (n,p) reactions, while a much slower crack growth rate was predicted for the same steady-state hydrogen concentration with an alternate model. These calculations have shown the need for further research to assess the effect of temperature on crack growth. Other sources of hydrogen give very slow hydrogen induced crack growth rates at reactor operating temperatures, while significant hydrogen induced crack growth rates are possible at lower temperatures. For instance, hydrogen from a cathodic corrosion reaction could produce a crack growth rate of 10/sup -7/ cm/s at 25/sup 0/C which could be significant during extended downtime. Also, a non-equilibrium hydrogen uptake from the plasma could occur from surface reaction controlled effects, and a crack growth rate of 10/sup -1/ cm/s was estimated for this condition at a temperature of 75/sup 0/C.

  9. Chemically and temperature-induced phase transformations of metal vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patridge, Christopher James

    Metal vanadates contain a diverse family of compounds due to the facile accessibility of different vanadium oxidation states and local coordination environments. Though these systems present a number of applications in catalysis and electronics, there may exist untapped physical phenomena that only reveal themselves when scaling these materials to nanoscale dimensions. Finite-size effects result from a number of factors including surface energy structural instabilities, nanostructure "self-purification," and physical constraints on mechanistic or conductive pathways. The MxV2O 5 bronze materials possess non-stoichiometry and this interesting property has hindered synthetic techniques to procure perfect crystalline material which is needed to expose the true physical properties. Through hydrothermal synthesis methods, pseudo one---dimensional nanostructures of Mx V2O5 display fascinating new properties and may be model systems for studying fundamentals associated with correlated electron dynamics in solid-state physics. Electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction reveal the near-perfect crystalline nanostructures. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies show strong evidence for the localization of electron density and long-range crystal structure alignment of the nanowires. Single-nanowire electron transport measurements for the beta'-CuxV2O5 and the delta-KxV2O5 data shows novel temperature-induced reversible metal---insulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. The unprecedented magnitude (˜105) and discontinuous nature of the MIT suggests a mechanism closely associated with correlated electron motion. Additionally, the MIT can be induced by voltage ramping. The simultaneous temperature/voltage studies of single-nanowire transport support the existence of a critical threshold to overcome in order to facilitate instability in the insulating phase and transition to a metallic phase for the delta-KxV2O5 bronze. The MIT transition magnitudes of several

  10. Inhibitory Activity Of Curcumin Derivatives Towards Metal-free And Metal-induced Amyloid-β Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Akiko; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Vithanarachchi, Sashiprabha M; Padmini, Vediappen; Allen, Matthew J; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-01-01

    When Alzheimer's disease (AD) progresses, several pathological features arise including accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates [e.g., amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques], metal ion dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. These characteristics are recently suggested to be interconnected through a potential factor, metal-associated Aβ (metal-Aβ) species. The role of metal-Aβ species in AD pathogenesis remains unclear, however. To elucidate the contribution of metal-Aβ species to AD pathology, as well as to develop small molecules as chemical tools and/or theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) agents for this disease, curcumin (Cur), a natural product from turmeric, and its derivatives have been studied towards both metal-free and metal-induced Aβ aggregation. Although Cur has indicated anti-amyloidogenic activities and antioxidant properties, its biological use has been hindered due to low solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions. Herein, we report the reactivity of Cur and its derivatives (Gd-Cur, a potential multimodal Aβ imaging agent; Cur-S, a water soluble derivative of Cur that has substitution at the phenolic hydroxyls) with metal-free Aβ and metal-Aβ species. Our results and observations indicate that Gd-Cur could modulate Cu(II)-triggered Aβ aggregation more noticeably over metal-free or Zn(II)-induced analogues; however, Cur-S was not observed to noticeably modulate Aβ aggregation with and without metal ions. Overall, our studies present information that could aid in optimizing the molecular scaffold of Cur for the development of chemical tools or theranostics for metal-Aβ species.

  11. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-03-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  12. Autocatalytic effects in the mechanically induced hydriding of refractory metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bab, M. A.; Baum, L. A.; Mendoza-Zélis, L.

    2007-02-01

    Mechanical milling of powders in a gaseous ambient is an efficient tool to induce gas-solid reactions and several nanocrystalline metallic oxides, nitrides and hydrides may be obtained at room temperature and moderated pressures by this route. We present here a study of the mechanically induced hydriding of Ti, Zr and Hf elemental powders, ground in an oscillatory mill under hydrogen gas at constant volume. The final formation of nanocrystalline cubic δ-MH 2, together with a varying fraction of tetragonal ε-MH 2, was verified by X-ray diffraction. From the measured pressure drop during the milling process the hydriding kinetics was determined and two distinct regimes were observed. For Ti and-at low milling frequencies-for Zr and Hf, a normal regime, characterized by a sigmoidal trend and a linear dependence of the rate constant on the milling intensity, was found. Otherwise, a sudden increase in the reacted fraction was observed in the absorption curve, typical of a self-sustained regime. The magnitude of the observed jump increases with the milling intensity and afterwards the reaction proceeds normally until it is completed. This critical behavior is discussed in terms of the reaction rate, the degree of transformation and the ε-phase content.

  13. Ablation processes induced by UV lasers in metals and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocana, Jose L.; Nicolas, Gines; Autric, Michel L.; Garcia-Beltran, A.; Molpeceres, C.

    1998-09-01

    The interaction in air of high intensity excimer lasers (KrF) with metals (Aluminum and aluminum alloys) and ceramics (Al2O3, ZrO2, AlN, SiC) has been investigated. Results concern the dynamics of the generated plasma and include the visualization of the luminous plasma front and the developed shock waves by means of an ICCD camera. At the same time, a shadowgraphy optical device has allowed to observe simultaneously the formation and expansion of plasma and shock wave fronts propagating into the surrounding gas during and after the irradiation pulse (20 ns). Complex structures inside the plasma plume have been observed inducing turbulence phenomena after irradiation that could be detrimental for high repetition rates and need further study. From a theoretical point of view, numerical simulations of the described irradiation experiments have been attempted trying to predict the observed plasma dynamics and, at the same time, to provide a macroscopic estimate of the mechanical transformations induced in the treated material. A 1D thermofluiddynamic code with detailed atomic and EOS parameters has been used for the simulation of the plasma dynamics and a full 3D finite element code provided with temperature dependent material data has been used for the macroscopic assessment.

  14. Plasmonic induced transparency in a coupled system composed of metal-insulate-metal stub and trapezoid cavity resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pengfei; Yang, Huimin; Jiao, Linsen; Fan, Meiyong; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2017-08-01

    A plasmonic induced transparency system constructed by a metal-insulate-metal stub coupled with a trapezoid cavity resonator was proposed. The results show that the spectra of different narrow modes in the trapezoid resonator can overlap with the broad stub mode and induce the plasmonic induced transparency effect. However, some of them cannot produce a plasmonic induced transparency effect because there is hardly any near field overlap between the trapezoid cavity mode and the stub mode, which was proved by the mode field distributions in the coupled resonator system. The ;disappeared; plasmonic induced transparency can be reproduced by changing the relative position between the stub and trapezoid resonator. Also the coupling strength can be modulated by this method to manipulate the plasmonic induced transparency and slow light effect.

  15. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  16. Proton Irradiation-Induced Metal Voids in Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    IRRADIATION-INDUCED METAL VOIDS IN GALLIUM NITRIDE HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS by Michael G. Wade September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Todd...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PROTON IRRADIATION-INDUCED METAL VOIDS IN GALLIUM NITRIDE HIGH ELECTRON...were present. The gate-finger’s silicon nitride passivation layer and Au metallization layer were removed via focused ion beam stripping in order to

  17. Applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Molten Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Shaymus W.; Craparo, Joseph; De Saro, Robert; Apelian, Diran

    2017-10-01

    In order for metals to meet the demand for critical applications in the automotive, aerospace, and defense industries, tight control over the composition and cleanliness of the metal must be achieved. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for applications in metal processing has generated significant interest for its ability to perform quick analyses in situ. The fundamentals of LIBS, current techniques for deployment on molten metal, demonstrated capabilities, and possible avenues for development are reviewed and discussed.

  18. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels: effects of thermomechanical treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of thermomechanical treatments on the stress corrosion crack initiation and hydrogen assisted crack growth of 26 Cr-1Mo alloys in boiling 42% LiCl solutions and 5% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions was investigated using a uniaxial constant load fixture. Annealing at temperatures where only recovery processes operate, reduces the susceptibility of prestrained low interstitial 26 Cr-1Mo alloy (E-Brite) to SCC in boiling chloride solutions. Both slip-step height and density, which are the major parameters controlling the breakdown of protective films in these alloys, are reduced substantially by annealing near 300/sup 0/C for 1 hour. Continuous exposure of unfilmed metal to the progressive environment is provided during SCC due to creep; this causes reduction in overall repassivation rate. Grain coarsening and prestraining operations result in larger slip step height and density due to increase in dislocation density. Crack propagation potential for as-received (mill-annealed) E-Brite during SCC in boiling chloride solution is the protection potential for the localized corrosion. Crack growth in SCC of these ferritic stainless steels is by the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  20. Characterization of the hydrogen embrittlement behavior of high strength steels for Army applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P.; Placzankis, B.; Beatty, J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    The hydrogen embrittlement characterization of LNS G43406 and UNS K92580 was conducted using a rising step load bend test and potentiodynamic scans. A relationship between K{sub Iscc} and open circuit potentials of these steels at similar hardnesses was shown. Potentiodynamic scans were used to explain this relationship in light of the hydrogen ion reaction in acidified environments. Methods for the mitigation of hydrogen embrittlement in high strength steels are discussed.

  1. In vivo severe corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of retrieved modular body titanium alloy hip-implants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Danieli C; Urban, Robert M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity, and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination, and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion.

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement of a 1500-MPa Tensile Strength Level Steel with an Ultrafine Elongated Grain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yihong; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu; Yin, Fuxing; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2012-05-01

    A deformation of a tempered martensitic structure ( i.e., tempforming) at 773 K (500 °C) was applied to a 0.6 pct C-2 pct Si-1 pct Cr steel. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) property of the tempformed (TF) steel was investigated by a slow strain rate test (SSRT) and an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test (AACT). Hydrogen content within the samples after SSRT and AACT was measured by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The tempforming at 773 K (500 °C) using multipass caliber rolling with an accumulative are reduction of 76 pct resulted in the evolution of an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with a strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture and a dispersion of spheroidized cementite particles. The SSRT of the pre-hydrogen-charged notched specimens and the AACT demonstrated that the TF sample had superior potential for HE resistance to the conventional quenched and tempered (QT) sample at a tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The TDS analysis also indicated that the hydrogen might be mainly trapped by reversible trapping sites such as grain boundaries and dislocations in the TF sample, and the hydrogen trapping states of the TF sample were similar to those of the QT sample. The QT sample exhibited hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture along the boundaries of coarse prior-austenite grains. In contrast, the hydrogen-induced cracking occurred in association with the UFEG structure in the TF sample, leading to the higher HE resistance of the TF sample.

  3. IN VIVO SEVERE CORROSION AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF RETRIEVED MODULAR BODY TITANIUM ALLOY HIP-IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Danieli C.; Urban, Robert M.; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  4. Influence of Al grain boundaries segregations and La-doping on embrittlement of intermetallic NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anatoly I.; Wainstein, Dmitry L.; Rashkovskiy, Alexander Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The microscopic nature of intergranular fracture of NiAl was experimentally investigated by the set of electron spectroscopy techniques. The paper demonstrates that embrittlement of NiAl intermetallic compound is caused by ordering of atomic structure that leads to formation of structural aluminum segregations at grain boundaries (GB). Such segregations contain high number of brittle covalent interatomic bonds. The alloying by La increases the ductility of material avoiding Al GB enrichment and disordering GB atomic structure. The influence of La alloying on NiAl mechanical properties was investigated. GB chemical composition, atomic and electronic structure transformations after La doping were investigated by AES, XPS and EELFS techniques. To qualify the interatomic bonds metallicity the Fermi level (EF) position and electrons density (neff) in conduction band were determined in both undoped and doped NiAl. Basing on experimental results the physical model of GB brittleness formation was proposed.

  5. Autoimmunity-inducing metals (Hg, Au and Ag) modulate mast cell signaling, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Toshio; Ra, Chisei

    2011-11-01

    The three heavy metals, mercury, gold and silver commonly and specifically induce aberrant immunological responses leading to autoimmune disorders in genetically susceptible animals and humans. The disorders are characterized by autoantibody production, increases in serum IgG and IgE, polyclonal activation of B and T lymphocytes and renal immune complex deposition and glomerulonephritis. Mast cells play key roles in allergic and inflammatory reactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that mast cells are key players in innate and adaptive immunity and involved in autoimmune diseases. Mast cells are also direct targets for autoimmunity-inducing metals both in vitro and in vivo and play a role in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. The three metals specifically modulate mast cell function, including degranulation and secretion of arachidonic acid metabolites and cytokines such as interleukin-4. Divergent signaling components, including mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, reactive oxygen and nitric oxide generation and Ca2+ influx are modulated by the metals. Furthermore, the metals have considerable impacts on mast cell survival, which also species seems to be involved in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the impacts of the three metals on mast cell signaling, function and survival and their possible roles in the pathologies of metal-induced autoimmunity.

  6. Photo-induced currents in the sandwich metal-ferroelectric-metal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Karpets, Yu; Perkov, Yu

    2017-01-01

    It was described the photoelectric effect in thin sandwich metal-ferroelectric-metal system. The effect was observed in doped lithium niobate crystals with two electrodes of different metals. The effect is observed only in doped lithium niobate crystals and has a maximum for concentrations of impurities of iron around 0.3 % weight. This paper proposed thermal model of the investigated phenomena resulting from field contact potential difference on the borders of section of metal-ferroelectric material. The results obtained can be used to develop radiation receivers, as well as in the interpretation of experimental results on studying the properties of sandwiched metal-ferroelectric-metal structure.

  7. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage. PMID:28098147

  8. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  9. Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zinc-Nickel (Zn-Ni) Qualification Test Result and Process Parameters Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    Low Hydrogen Embrittlement (LHE) Zinc-Nickel (Zn-Ni) Qualification Test Result and Process Parameters Development Dave Frederick, USAF Craig...Option 1: Develop an accelerated hydrogen embrittlement test procedure : Prototype Tank Implementation www.ES3inc.com ● 1669 E. 1400 S ● Clearfield...801) 926-1150 ● fax (801) 926-1155 8 LHE Zn-Ni Hydrogen Embrittlement Testing • Coupons manufactured per ASTM F519

  10. Ab Initio Theory of Coherent Laser-Induced Magnetization in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berritta, Marco; Mondal, Ritwik; Carva, Karel; Oppeneer, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first materials specific ab initio theory of the magnetization induced by circularly polarized laser light in metals. Our calculations are based on nonlinear density matrix theory and include the effect of absorption. We show that the induced magnetization, commonly referred to as inverse Faraday effect, is strongly materials and frequency dependent, and demonstrate the existence of both spin and orbital induced magnetizations which exhibit a surprisingly different behavior. We show that for nonmagnetic metals (such as Cu, Au, Pd, Pt) and antiferromagnetic metals the induced magnetization is antisymmetric in the light's helicity, whereas for ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co, Ni, FePt) the imparted magnetization is only asymmetric in the helicity. We compute effective optomagnetic fields that correspond to the induced magnetizations and provide guidelines for achieving all-optical helicity-dependent switching.

  11. Coverage and chemical dependence of adsorbate-induced bond weakening in metal substrate surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sette, F.; Hashizume, T.; Comin, F.; MacDowell, A.A.; Citrin, P.H.

    1988-09-19

    Strongly coverage-dependent outward relaxation and enhanced in-plane vibrational amplitudes of metal surface atoms have been observed from S- and Cl-covered Ni(001) and Cu(001) by means of temperature- and polarization-dependent surface extended-x-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements. These results explicitly demonstrate the weakening of both interlayer and intralayer metal-metal substrate bonds. A model based on adsorbate-metal charge rearrangement explains these chemisorption-induced changes in the geometric and dynamic properties of the metal surface.

  12. A model for electromigration induced flow in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kumar, Praveen; Pratap, Rudra

    2017-10-01

    Electromigration in liquid metals can be used for mass transport over a considerable length with micro- and nano-scale flow features. Exploitation of this phenomenon, however, requires a sound understanding of the liquid metal flow under an applied electric field. Depending on the sign of the effective charge number, Z *, liquid metals flow along a set direction under the applied electric field. A few liquid metals, e.g. Ga, Sn, etc, flow in the direction of the electric field, while a few others, e.g. Pb, flow in the opposite direction. Here, we propose a new model for predicting the direction of the aforementioned flow for a given liquid metal. Our model incorporates Lennard-Jones potential into the cell model of liquids in order to calculate the value of Z * as a function of temperature. We then carry out experiments on a few metals to validate the model and show that it indeed correctly predicts the ensuing flow.

  13. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-08-17

    Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery.

  14. Fano response induced by the interference between localized plasmons and interface reflections in metal-insulator-metal waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Ju; Wang, Ling-Ling; Zhai, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The original Fano response induced by the interference between the localized plasmons and interface-reflected surface plasmon polaritons in a single metal-insulator-metal waveguide with two parallel separated metal strips is predicted theoretically through the coupled mode theory combined with the Fano function. The prominent asymmetric line shape resulting from the coupling between the discrete dipole resonance formed between metal strips and an interface-reflected-induced continuum is confirmed by the performed numerical simulations. The novel Fano spectrum is tuned easily by varying the length and coupling distance of metal strips. By introducing another separated metal strip, the outstanding double Fano behavior is obtained, and the corresponding underlying physics is illustrated. In particular, based on the performed refractive index sensing spectra, the high sensitivity of 855 nm/RIU and figure of merit up to 30 are achieved via the double Fano resonance. Undoubtedly, such ingenious structure may benefit the fabrications of nano-integrated plasmonic devices for optical switching and sensing.

  15. Oxidation Embrittlement Observed in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive materials characterization program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, tensile creep-rupture tests were performed on a SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite. The results of these tests and subsequent analysis revealed an oxidation embrittlement phenomena that occurs readily at a discreet temperature range below the maximum use temperature. The graph shows rupture lives for a creep stress of 83 MPa as a function of temperature. Note that the rupture time is constant at an intermediate temperature range of 700 to 982 C. This graph also shows the failure location, as measured from the center of the specimen. Whereas for temperatures of 500 to 700 C, failure occurred in the specimen gage section; at higher temperatures, the failure location migrated toward the cooled grip ends. Although the results initially suggested that the test procedure was influencing the measured creep rupture lives and driving the failure location out of the gage section, subsequent experiments and thermal stress analyses verified the robustness of the test method employed.

  16. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of PH 13-8 Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y. S.; Tsay, L. W.; Chiang, M. F.; Chen, C.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, notched tensile and fatigue crack growth tests in gaseous hydrogen were performed on PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel specimens at room temperature. These specimens were susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), but at different degrees, depending on the aging conditions or the microstructures of the alloys. In hydrogen, the accelerated fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) usually accompanied a reduced notched tensile strength (NTS) of the specimens, i.e., the faster the FCGR the lower the NTS. It was proposed that the same fracture mechanism could be applied to these two different types of specimens, regardless of the loading conditions. Rapid fatigue crack growth and high NTS loss were found in the H800 (426 °C under-aged) and H900 (482 °C peak-aged) specimens. The HE susceptibility of the steel was reduced by increasing the aging temperature above 593 °C, which was attributed to the increased amount of austenite in the structure. Extensive quasi-cleavage fracture was observed for the specimens that were deteriorated severely by HE.

  17. Anisotropic embrittlement in high-hardness ESR 4340 steel forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.; Anctil, A.A.; DeSisto, T.S.; Kula, E.B.

    1983-08-01

    ESR 4340 steel forgings tempered to a hardness of HRC 55 exhibit a severe loss of tensile ductility in the short transverse direction which is strain-rate and humidity dependent. The anisotropy is also reflected in blunt-notch Charpy impact energy, but is absent in the sharp-crack fracture toughness. Brittle behavior is associated with regions of smooth intergranular fracture aligned with microstructural banding Scanning Auger microprobe analysis indicates intergranular segregation of phosphorus and sulfur. The anisotropic embrittlement is attributed to an interaction of nonequilibrium segregation on solidification with local equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries during austenitizing. The regions are prone to brittle fracture under impact conditions and abnormal sensitivity to environmental attack during low strain-rate deformation. A relatively sparse distribution of these defects accounts for the discrepancy between smooth bar and blunt-notch tests vs sharp-crack tests. Isotropic properties are restored by homogenization treatment. For application of these steels at extreme hardness levels, homogenization treatment is essential.

  18. Anisotropie embrittlement in high-hardness ESR 4340 steel forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, G. B.; Anctil, A. A.; Desisto, T. S.; Kula, E. B.

    1983-08-01

    ESR 4340 steel forgings tempered to a hardness of HRC 55 exhibit a severe loss of tensile ductility in the short transverse direction which is strain-rate and humidity dependent. The anisotropy is also reflected in blunt-notch Charpy impact energy, but is absent in the sharp-crack fracture toughness. Brittle behavior is associated with regions of smooth intergranular fracture which are aligned with microstructural banding. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis indicates some intergranular segregation of phosphorus and sulfur in these regions. The anisotropic embrittlement is attributed to an interaction of nonequilibrium segregation on solidification with local equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries during austenitizing. This produces defective regions of enhanced intergranular impurity segregation which are oriented during forging. The regions are prone to brittle fracture under impact conditions and abnormal sensitivity to environmental attack during low strain-rate deformation. A relatively sparse distribution of these defects (˜10cm-3) accounts for the discrepancy between smooth bar and blunt-notch tests vs sharp-crack tests. Isotropie properties are restored by homogenization treatment. For application of these steels at extreme hardness levels, homogenization treatment is essential.

  19. Compositional Constraints on Dehydration Embrittlement in Serpentinized Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Zhang, J.; Green, H. W.

    2012-12-01

    Double seismic zones (DSZ) which have two parallel planes of seismicity separated by 15-40 km are a global feature of subduction zones in the 70-250 km depth range (Brudzinski et al., 2007). While the physical mechanism of lower plane seismicity is still controversial, the leading hypotheses currently are associated with dehydration of antigorite serpentine within the subducting mantle plate (Peacock, 2001; Jung et al., 2004). In this study, we are conducting high-pressure (1-3GPa), high-temperature (720-750 Celsius), deformation experiments on specimens of varying compositions of serpentine plus peridotite in our 4GPa Modified Griggs apparatus. Using samples composed of interlayered thin discs of antigorite and harzburgite, we find that dehydration embrittlement occurs down to less than ~30 vol % antigorite. Interlayered mineralogy was impractical at lower antigorite fractions so we prepared homogeneous mixtures of powders of the two rock types (35-75 μm grain-size) and "warm" pressed them to a coherent solid with little porosity. Subsequent deformation of these specimens extended the faulting regime to as little as ~8 vol % antigorite. In summary, we find that faulting occurs during dehydration in a wide range of serpentinized peridotite compositions but not during dehydration of nearly pure serpentinite nor nearly pure peridotite. We suggest that the lack of faulting in nearly pure peridotite is a consequence of too little H2O production and the lack of faulting in nearly pure serpentine is due to extensive crystal plasticity.

  20. Models for embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surrounding the core of a commercial nuclear power plant is subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons. The effects of irradiation embrittlement can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. However, a means of quantitatively assessing the effectiveness of annealing for embrittlement recovery is needed. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data on this issue and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. Data were gathered from the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base and from various annealing reports. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Independent variables considered in the analysis included material chemistries, annealing time and temperature, irradiation time and temperature, fluence, and flux. To identify important variables and functional forms for predicting embrittlement recovery, advanced statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, were applied together with current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. Models were calibrated using multivariable surface-fitting techniques. Several iterations of model calibration, evaluation with respect to mechanistic and statistical considerations, and comparison with the trends in hardness data produced correlation models for estimating Charpy upper shelf energy and transition temperature after irradiation and annealing. This work provides a clear demonstration that (1) microhardness recovery is generally a very good surrogate for shift recovery, and (2) there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  1. Reflectance Changes during Shock-induced Phase Transformations in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.

    2010-06-01

    In performing shock wave experiments to study the characteristics of metals at high pressures, wave profiles (i.e., velocity measurements of the surface of the sample) are an established and useful way to study phase transformations. For example, a sudden change in the velocity or its slope can occur when the phase transformation induces a large volume change leading to a change in particle velocity. Allowing the shock to release into a transparent window that is in contact with the sample surface allows the study of conditions away from the shock Hugoniot. However, in cases where the wave profile is not definitive an additional phase-transformation diagnostic would be useful. Changes in the electronic structure of the atoms in the crystal offer opportunities to develop new phase-change diagnostics. We have studied optical reflectance changes for several phase transformations to see whether reflectance changes might be a generally applicable phase-transformation diagnostic. Shocks were produced by direct contact with explosives or with impacts from guns. Optical wavelengths for the reflectance measurements ranged from 355 to 700 nm. We studied samples of tin, iron, gallium, and cerium as each passed through a phase transformation during shock loading and, if observable, a reversion upon unloading. For solid-solid phase changes in tin and iron we saw small changes in the surface scattering characteristics, perhaps from voids or rough areas frozen into the surface of the sample as it transformed to a new crystal structure. For melt in gallium and cerium we saw changes in the wavelength dependence of the reflectance, and we surmise that these changes may result from changes in the crystal electronic structure. It appears that reflectance measurements can be a significant part of a larger suite of diagnostics to search for difficult-to-detect phase transformations.

  2. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  3. Defect distribution and Schottky barrier at metal/Ge interfaces: Role of metal-induced gap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shogo; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    The defect distribution and Schottky barrier at metal/Ge interfaces were studied using first-principles calculation. It was shown that the defect density markedly increases around the interface owing to the stabilization caused by the hybridization of defect electronic states with metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and by the associated small elastic energy loss around the interface. By comparing the formation energies of various defects at a variety of metal/substrate interfaces, we showed that MIGS not only control the Schottky barrier but also promote a defect-density increase at most metal/semiconductor interfaces. Moreover, we showed that interface oxide layers block MIGS penetration into the Ge substrate and promote the observed breakdown of Fermi-level pinning.

  4. Microbially-induced Carbonate Precipitation for Immobilization of Toxic Metals.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepika; Qian, Xin-Yi; Pan, Xiangliang; Achal, Varenyam; Li, Qianwei; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and industrialization resulting from growing populations contribute to environmental pollution by toxic metals and radionuclides which pose a threat to the environment and to human health. To combat this threat, it is important to develop remediation technologies based on natural processes that are sustainable. In recent years, a biomineralization process involving ureolytic microorganisms that leads to calcium carbonate precipitation has been found to be effective in immobilizing toxic metal pollutants. The advantage of using ureolytic organisms for bioremediating metal pollution in soil is their ability to immobilize toxic metals efficiently by precipitation or coprecipitation, independent of metal valence state and toxicity and the redox potential. This review summarizes current understanding of the ability of ureolytic microorganisms for carbonate biomineralization and applications of this process for toxic metal bioremediation. Microbial metal carbonate precipitation may also be relevant to detoxification of contaminated process streams and effluents as well as the production of novel carbonate biominerals and biorecovery of metals and radionuclides that form insoluble carbonates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation on the Effect of Composition on Radiation Hardening and Embrittlement in Model FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Edmondson, Philip; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Howard, Richard; Parish, Chad M.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-18

    This report details the findings of post-radiation mechanical testing and microstructural characterization performed on a series of model and commercial FeCrAl alloys to assist with the development of a cladding technology with enhanced accident tolerance. The samples investigated include model alloys with simple ferritic grain structure and two commercial alloys with minor solute additions. These samples were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to nominal doses of 7.0 dpa near or at Light Water Reactor (LWR) relevant temperatures (300-400 C). Characterization included a suite of techniques including small angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom probe tomography (APT), and transmission based electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical testing included tensile tests at room temperature on sub-sized tensile specimens. The goal of this work was to conduct detailed characterization and mechanical testing to begin establishing empirical and/or theoretical structure-property relationships for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement in the FeCrAl alloy class. Development of such relationships will provide insight on the performance of FeCrAl alloys in an irradiation environment and will enable further development of the alloy class for applications within a LWR environment. A particular focus was made on establishing trends, including composition and radiation dose. The report highlights in detail the pertinent findings based on this work. This report shows that radiation hardening in the alloys is primarily composition dependent due to the phase separation in the high-Cr FeCrAl alloys. Other radiation induced/enhanced microstructural features were less dependent on composition and when observed at low number densities, were not a significant contributor to the observed mechanical responses. Pre-existing microstructure in the alloys was found to be important, with grain boundaries and pre-existing dislocation

  6. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.G.

    1993-01-31

    Objective of this project is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. If neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress can be measured via changes in magnetic properties, this should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. This first-year report addresses the issue of using magnetic property changes to detect neutron embrittlement. The magnetic measurements were all done on irradiated specimens previously broken in two in a Charpy test to determine their embrittlement. The magnetic properties of the broken charpy specimens from D.C. Cook did not correlate well with fluence or embrittlement parameters, possible due to metallurgical reasons. correlation was better with Indian Point 2 specimens, with the nonlinear harmonic amplitudes showing the best correlation (R[sup 2][approximately]0.7). However, correlation was not good enough. It is recommended that tests be done on unbroken irradiated Charpy specimens, for which magnetic characterization data prior to irradiation is available, if possible.

  7. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Ma, L.M.; Li, Y.Y.

    2004-06-28

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  8. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Ma, L. M.; Li, Y. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  9. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel at very high neutron fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Debarberis, L.; von Estorff, U.; Gillemot, F.; Oszvald, F.

    2012-03-01

    For the prediction of radiation embrittlement of RPV materials beyond the NPP design time the analysis of research data and extended surveillance data up to a fluence ˜23 × 1020 cm-2 (E > 0.5 MeV) has been carried out. The experimental data used for the analysis are extracted from the International Database of RPV materials. Key irradiation embrittlement mechanisms, direct matrix damage, precipitation and element segregation have been considered. The essential part of the analysis concerns the assessment of irradiation embrittlement of WWER-440 steel irradiated with very high neutron fluence. The analysis of several surveillance sets irradiated at a fluence up to 23 × 1020 cm-2 (E > 0.5 MeV) has been performed. The effect of the main influencing chemical elements phosphorus and copper has been verified up to a fluence of 4.6 × 1020 cm-2 (E > 0.5 MeV). The data are indicating good radiation stability, in terms of the Charpy transition temperature shift and yield strength increase for steels with relatively low concentrations of copper and phosphorus. The linear dependence between ΔTk and ΔRp0.2 can be an evidence of strengthening mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and absence of non-hardening embrittlement even at very high neutron fluence.

  10. Electrically induced reorganization phenomena of liquid metal film printed on biological skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cangran; Yi, Liting; Yu, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal has been demonstrated to be directly printable on biological skin as physiological measurement elements. However, many fundamental issues remained unclear so far. Here, we disclosed an intriguing phenomenon of electrically induced reorganization of liquid metal film. According to the experiments, when applying an external electric field to liquid metal films which were spray printed on biological skin, it would induce unexpected transformations of the liquid metals among different morphologies and configurations. These include shape shift from a large liquid metal film into a tiny sphere and contraction of liquid metal pool into spherical one. For comprehensively understanding the issues, the impacts of the size, voltage, orientations of the liquid metal electrodes, etc., were clarified. Further, effects of various substrates such as in vitro skin and in vivo skin affecting the liquid metal transformations were experimentally investigated. Compared to the intact tissues, the contraction magnitude of the liquid metal electrode appears weaker on in vivo skin of nude mice under the same electric field. The mechanisms lying behind such phenomena were interpreted through theoretical modeling. Lastly, typical applications of applying the current effect into practical elements such as electrical gating devices were also illustrated as an example. The present findings have both fundamental and practical values, which would help design future technical strategies in fabricating electronically controlled liquid metal electronics on skin.

  11. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205).

  12. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  13. Protective effect of curcumin against heavy metals-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2014-07-01

    Occupational or environmental exposures to heavy metals produce several adverse health effects. The common mechanism determining their toxicity and carcinogenicity is the generation of oxidative stress that leads to hepatic damage. In addition, oxidative stress induced by metal exposure leads to the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/antioxidant response elements (Nrf2/Keap1/ARE) pathway. Since antioxidant and chelating agents are generally used for the treatment of heavy metals poisoning, this review is focused on the protective role of curcumin against liver injury induced by heavy metals. Curcumin has shown, in clinical and preclinical studies, numerous biological activities including therapeutic efficacy against various human diseases and anti-hepatotoxic effects against environmental or occupational toxins. Curcumin reduces the hepatotoxicity induced by arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead and mercury, prevents histological injury, lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) depletion, maintains the liver antioxidant enzyme status and protects against mitochondrial dysfunction. The preventive effect of curcumin on the noxious effects induced by heavy metals has been attributed to its scavenging and chelating properties, and/or to the ability to induce the Nrf2/Keap1/ARE pathway. However, additional research is needed in order to propose curcumin as a potential protective agent against liver damage induced by heavy metals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Air pollution-related metals induce differential cytokine responses in bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Låg, M; Øvrevik, J; Totlandsdal, A I; Lilleaas, E M; Thormodsæter, A; Holme, J A; Schwarze, P E; Refsnes, M

    2016-10-01

    Different transition metals have been shown to induce inflammatory responses in lung. We have compared eight different metal ions with regard to cytokine responses, cytotoxicity and signalling mechanisms in a human lung epithelial cell model (BEAS-2B). Among the metal ions tested, there were large differences with respect to pro-inflammatory potential. Exposure to Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) induced CXCL8 and IL-6 release at concentrations below 100μM, and Mn(2+) and Ni(2+) at concentrations above 200μM. In contrast, VO4(3-), Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) did not induce any significant increase of these cytokines. An expression array of 20 inflammatory relevant genes also showed a marked up-regulation of CXCL10, IL-10, IL-13 and CSF2 by one or more of the metal ions. The most potent metals, Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) induced highest levels of oxidative activity, and ROS appeared to be central in their CXCL8 and IL-6 responses. Activation of the MAPK p38 seemed to be a critical mediator. However, the NF-κB pathway appeared predominately to be involved only in Zn(2+)- and As(3+)-induced CXCL8 and IL-6 responses. Thus, the most potent metals Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) seemed to induce a similar pattern for the cytokine responses, and with some exceptions, via similar signalling mechanisms.

  15. Metal nanoparticle fluids with magnetically induced electrical switching properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghoon; Cho, Jinhan

    2013-06-07

    We report the successful preparation of solvent-free metal nanoparticle (NP) fluids with multiple-functionalities, such as rheological properties, magnetism, ionic conductivity, and electrical properties, allowing for facile synthesis and mass production. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) used in this study were synthesized using tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr) in toluene and then directly phase-transferred to solvent-free low-molecular-weight (Mw) imidazolium-type ionic liquid media containing thiol groups (i.e., IL-SH). Magnetic metal fluids (i.e., MIL-SH-AuNPs) were prepared by the addition of FeCl3 powder to metal fluids (i.e., IL-SH-AuNPs). These fluids showed relatively high ionic and electrical conductivities compared with those of conventional metal NP fluids based on organic ILs with high Mw. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that these fluids could be used as electric switches operated using an external magnetic field in organic media.

  16. Multiple plasmon-induced transparency effects in a multimode-cavity-coupled metal-dielectric-metal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiquan; Li, Hongjian; He, Zhihui; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Mingfei; Zhao, Mingzhuo

    2017-09-01

    We numerically and theoretically investigate multiple plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) effects in a multimode-cavity-coupled metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide system. The introduced multimode coupled-radiating oscillator theory (MC-ROT) gives a clear understanding of multiple PIT effects in the proposed system. Two and three PIT peaks appear in the transmission spectra corresponding to the symmetrical and asymmetrical structures, respectively. Evolution of the PIT peaks can be effectively tuned by adjusting the geometric dimensions and asymmetry of the structure. The ultra-compact plasmonic waveguide structure may have important applications for multichannel filters, optical switches, and other devices in integrated optical circuits.

  17. Pressure induced quantum phase transitions in metallic oxides and pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel

    Quantum phase transitions occur as a result of competing ground states. The focus of the present work is to understand quantum criticality and its consequences when the competition is between insulating and metallic ground states. Metal-insulator transitions are studied by means of electronic transport measurements and quantum critical points are approached by applying hydrostatic pressure in two different compounds namely Eu2Ir22O 7 and FeCrAs. The former is a ternary metal oxide and the latter is a ternary metal pnictide. A major component of this work was the development of the ultra-high pressure measurements by means of Anvil cells. A novel design is introduced which minimizes the alignment accessory components hence, making the cell more robust and easier to use. Eu2Ir22O7 is a ternary metal oxide and a member of the pyrochlore iridate family. Resistivity measurements under pressure in moissanite anvil cells show the evolution of the ground state of the system from insulating to metallic. The quantum phase transition at Pc ˜ 6 GPa appears to be continuous. A remarkable correspondence is revealed between the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on Eu2Ir22O7 and the effect of chemical pressure by changing the R size in the R2Ir2O7 series. This suggests that in both cases the tuning parameter controls the t2g bandwidth of the iridium 5d electrons. Moreover, hydrostatic pressure unveils a curious cross-over from incoherent to conventional metallic behaviour at a T* > 150 K in the neighbourhood of Pc, suggesting a connection between the high and low temperature phases. The possibility of a topological semi-metallic ground state, predicted in recent theoretical studies, is explained. FeCrAs is a ternary metal pnictide with Fermi liquid specific heat and susceptibility behaviour but non-metallic non-Fermi liquid resistivity behaviour. Characteristic properties of the compound are explained and compared to those of superconducting pnictides. Antiferromagnetic (AFM

  18. Electrochemically induced maskless metal deposition on micropore wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Hébert, Clément; Pham, Pascale; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Haguet, Vincent; Livache, Thierry; Mailley, Pascal

    2012-05-07

    By applying an external electric field across a micropore via an electrolyte, metal ions in the electrolyte can be reduced locally onto the inner wall of the micropore, which was fabricated in a silica-covered silicon membrane. This maskless metal deposition on the silica surface is a result of the pore membrane polarization in the electric field. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental studies of hydrogen embrittlement of materials using both experimental observations and numerical simulations of the hydrogen/deformation interactions have been conducted. Our approach integrates mechanical property testing at the macro-scale, microstructural analyses and TEM observations of the deformation processes at the micro- and nano-scale, first-principles calculations of interfacial cohesion at the atomic scale, and finite element simulation and modeling at the micro- and macro-level. Focused Ion Beam machining in conjunction with Transmission Electron Microscopy were used to identify the salient micro-mechanisms of failure in the presence of hydrogen. Our analysis of low strength ferritic steels led to the discovery that “quasi-cleavage” is a dislocation plasticity controlled failure mode in agreement with the hydrogen enhanced plasticity mechanism. The microstructure underneath the fracture surface of 304 and 316 stainless steels was found to be significantly more complex than would have been predicted by the traditional models of fatigue. The general refinement of the microstructure that occurred near the fracture surface in the presence of hydrogen was such that one may argue that hydrogen stabilizes microstructural configurations to an extent not achievable in its absence. Finite element studies of hydrogen and deformation field similitude for cracks in real-life pipelines and laboratory fracture specimens yielded that the Single Edge Notch Tension specimen can be used to reliably study hydrogen material compatibility for pipeline structures. In addition, simulation of onset of crack propagation in low strength ferritic systems by void growth indicated that hydrogen can reduce the fracture toughness of the material by as much as 30%. Both experimental observations and numerical studies of hydrogen transport on hydrogen accumulations ahead of a crack tip yielded that dislocation transport can markedly enhance hydrogen populations which

  20. A study of the neutron irradiation effects on the susceptibility to embrittlement of A316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapundjiev, D.; Al Mazouzi, A.; Van Dyck, S.

    2006-09-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the susceptibility to liquid metal embrittlement of two primary selected materials for MYRRHA project an accelerator driven system (ADS), was investigated by means of slow strain rate tests (SSRT). The latter were carried out at 200 °C in nitrogen and in liquid Pb-Bi at a strain rate of 5 × 10 -6 s -1. The small tensile specimens were irradiated at the BR-2 reactor in the MISTRAL irradiation rig at 200 °C for 3 reactor cycles to reach a dose of about 1.50 dpa. The SSR tests were carried out under poor and under dissolved oxygen conditions (˜1.5 × 10 -12 wt% dissolved oxygen) which at this temperature will favour formation of iron and chromium oxides. Although both materials differ in structure (fcc for A316L against bcc for T91), their flow behaviour in contact with liquid lead bismuth eutectic before and after irradiation is very similar. Under these testing conditions none of them was found susceptible to liquid metal embrittlement (LME).

  1. Laser-induced metal reduction from liquid electrolyte precursor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongsoo; Choi, Choljin

    2013-11-01

    A special sort of laser methods such as direct writing of metal and thin film deposition from liquid precursors was developed for the surface processing and the localized metallization of different kinds of materials. Laser radiation initiates the chemical reaction resulted in the reduction of the metal complexes to the metals in the liquid electrolyte, followed by the metal deposition on the substrate with a high degree of the adhesion. In this study, continuous wave of Ar+ laser generated in multiwave regime with laser power from 5 to 500 mW was chosen for the Copper reduction and deposition on SiO2 substrate. In order to investigate the effect of salt precursors on the properties of the deposited structures, two kinds of electrolyte solution were prepared on the base of CuSO4 and CuCl2. It was shown that metal deposition can be initiated at the laser power of 50 mW. The width of the deposits was found to be substantially dependent on the applied laser power. Deposits were revealed as conductive layers and the resistance of the layers depends strongly on the solution temperature and the salt precursor.

  2. X-ray induced modification of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ming-Kun; Lamontagne, Boris; Martinu, Ludvik; Selmani, Amine

    1993-08-01

    Metal adhesion to polymers depends on the chemical structure at the interface. In the present work, we study the evaporation of Cr, Ti, and Au onto Teflon PFA (perfluoromethyl-vinyl-ether) substrates, and we modify the interface by post-deposition x-ray irradiation. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that deposition of reactive metals such as Cr and Ti leads immediately to crosslinking and to the formation of carbide and fluoride species. Less reactive metals, such as Au, cause only small loss of fluorine without formation of any new species. The metal/PFA interface is strongly affected by x-ray irradiation in the case of Cr and Ti: remarkably enhanced crosslinking has been observed, which further increases with the metal coverage, while the carbides and fluorides remain basically unaffected. On the other hand, crosslinking increases only very slightly for pure PFA and for the Au/PFA interface, regardless of the Au thickness. These results suggest that radical recombination reactions are responsible for crosslinking at the interface between PFA and reactive metals.

  3. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed.

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement: the game changing factor in the applicability of nickel alloys in oilfield technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento Klapper, Helmuth; Klöwer, Jutta; Gosheva, Olesya

    2017-06-01

    Precipitation hardenable (PH) nickel (Ni) alloys are often the most reliable engineering materials for demanding oilfield upstream and subsea applications especially in deep sour wells. Despite their superior corrosion resistance and mechanical properties over a broad range of temperatures, the applicability of PH Ni alloys has been questioned due to their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), as confirmed in documented failures of components in upstream applications. While extensive work has been done in recent years to develop testing methodologies for benchmarking PH Ni alloys in terms of their HE susceptibility, limited scientific research has been conducted to achieve improved foundational knowledge about the role of microstructural particularities in these alloys on their mechanical behaviour in environments promoting hydrogen uptake. Precipitates such as the γ', γ'' and δ-phase are well known for defining the mechanical and chemical properties of these alloys. To elucidate the effect of precipitates in the microstructure of the oil-patch PH Ni alloy 718 on its HE susceptibility, slow strain rate tests under continuous hydrogen charging were conducted on material after several different age-hardening treatments. By correlating the obtained results with those from the microstructural and fractographic characterization, it was concluded that HE susceptibility of oil-patch alloy 718 is strongly influenced by the amount and size of precipitates such as the γ' and γ'' as well as the δ-phase rather than by the strength level only. In addition, several HE mechanisms including hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and hydrogen-enhanced local plasticity were observed taking place on oil-patch alloy 718, depending upon the characteristics of these phases when present in the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  5. Type of cell death induced by seven metals in cultured mouse osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Contreras, René García; Vilchis, José Rogelio Scougall; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yuko; Nakamura, Yukio; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The use of dental metal alloys in the daily clinic makes it necessary to evaluate the cytotoxicity of eluted metal components against oral cells. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced by dental metals in osteoblasts have not been well characterized. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of seven metals against the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. alpha-MEM was used as a culture medium, since this medium provided much superior proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells over DMEM. Ag (NH(3))(2)F was the most cytotoxic, followed by CuCl>CuCl(2) >CoCl(2), NiCl(2)>FeCl(3) and FeCl(2) (least toxic). None of the metals showed any apparent growth stimulating effect (so-called 'hormesis') at lower concentrations. A time course study demonstrated that two hours of contact between oral cells and Ag (NH(3))(2)F, CuCl, CoCl(2) or NiCl(2) induced irreversible cell death. Contact with these metals induced a smear pattern of DNA fragmentation without activation of caspase-3. Preincubation of MC3T3-E1 cells with either a caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) or autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) failed to rescue them from metal cytotoxicity. These data suggest the induction of necrotic cell death rather than apoptosis and autophagy by metals in this osteoblastic cell line.

  6. Ultra-High Efficiency / Low Hydrogen Embrittlement Nanostructured Zn-Based Electrodeposits as Environmentally Benign Cd-Replacement Coatings for High Strength Steel Fasteners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    FINAL REPORT Ultra-High Efficiency / Low Hydrogen Embrittlement Nanostructured ZN-Based Electrodeposits as Environmentally Benign CD... hydrogen embrittlement performance. Based on the Phase I results, the alkaline Zn-Ni, acid Zn-Ni and acid Zn-Ni-Co plating systems where selected as the... Embrittlement , Hydrogen Re- embrittlement , Salt Spray, Zinc, Nickel 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES

  7. Role of HF and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the hydrogen embrittlement of aged T-111 and similar Ta and Cb alloys and to describe the mechanisms believed responsible for the increased sensitivity of T-111 to low temperature hydrogen embrittlement after aging for 1000 hr or longer near 1040 C. A total of eight Ta-base alloys and two Cb-base alloys were investigated. The effects of pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature and environment, and alloy composition on the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated. The primary method of determining the effects of these variables on the ductility of T-111 was by bend testing at 25 and -196 C. Fractured specimens were examined by the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, metallography, and X-ray diffraction.

  8. Embrittlement of nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base superalloys by exposure to hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Five nickel-base alloys (Inconel 718, Udimet 700, Rene 41, Hastelloy X, and TD-NiCr), one cobalt-base alloy (L-605), and an iron-base alloy (A-286) were exposed in hydrogen at 0.1 MN/sq m (15 psi) at several temperatures in the range from 430 to 980 C for as long as 1000 hours. These alloys were embrittled to varying degrees by such exposures in hydrogen. Embrittlement was found to be: (1) sensitive to strain rate, (2) reversible, (3) caused by large concentrations of absorbed hydrogen, and (4) not associated with any detectable microstructural changes in the alloys. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. Role of Hf and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement of aged T-111 and similar Ta and Cb alloys is characterized and the mechanisms believed responsible for the increased sensitivity of T-111 to low temperature hydrogen embrittlement after aging for 1000 hours or longer near 1040 C are described. A total of eight Ta base alloys and two Cb base alloys were investigated. The effects of pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature and environment, and alloy composition on the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated. The primary method of determining the effects of these variables on the ductility of T-111 was by bend testing at 25 and -196 C. Fractured specimens were examined by the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, metallography and X-ray diffration.

  10. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium - A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sq m) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment.

  11. Role of HF and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the hydrogen embrittlement of aged T-111 and similar Ta and Cb alloys and to describe the mechanisms believed responsible for the increased sensitivity of T-111 to low temperature hydrogen embrittlement after aging for 1000 hr or longer near 1040 C. A total of eight Ta-base alloys and two Cb-base alloys were investigated. The effects of pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature and environment, and alloy composition on the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated. The primary method of determining the effects of these variables on the ductility of T-111 was by bend testing at 25 and -196 C. Fractured specimens were examined by the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, metallography, and X-ray diffraction.

  12. Restoration of the ductility of thermally embrittled amorphous alloys under neutron-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerling, R.; Schimansky, F.P.; Wagner, R.

    1987-05-01

    The ductility of amorphous alloys which have been thermally embrittled at low temperatures can be completely regained after subsequent irradiation. These changes in the mechanical behaviour are strongly correlated with changes in the density. Using ribbons of amorphous FeNiB, FeNiP and CuTi exposed to different kinds of irradiation, it is shown that the ductility can be restored in all the glassy alloys studied regardless of the nature of the damaging projectiles employed. However, the damage-level required for restoration of the ductility depends on the state of embrittlement prior to the irradiation, and is strongly correlated with the type of irradiation. Experiments with specimens alternatively thermally embrittled and irradiated to become ductile again, revealed a high degree of reversibility of both processes.

  13. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin V : Results of Weather-Exposure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1929-01-01

    In a series of weather exposure tests of sheet duralumin, upon which accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory by the wet-and-dry corrosion method in a sodium chloride solution has already been carried out, a close parallelism between the results of the two kinds of tests was found to exist. The exposure tests showed that the lack of permanence of sheet duralumin is largely, if not entirely, due to corrosion. A corrosion attack of an intercrystalline nature is very largely responsible for the degree of embrittlement produced. The rate of embrittlement was greatly accelerated by a marine atmosphere and by the tropical climate. Variations in corrosion and embrittlement are noted in relation to heat treatment, cold working, and types of protective coatings.

  14. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Itoh, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased.

  15. [Chemical hazards induced by heavy metals refining processes].

    PubMed

    Gaweda, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Processes of refining heavy metals consist in removing impurities, which can be found in metals produced on industrial scale. People involved in heavy metals refining processes are primarily exposed to metals (Pb, Cd, Cu), metalloids (As, Se) and metal compounds. Exposure to dusts (from 2 to 50% SiO2) and sulfuric acid is an additional hazard. The air concentrations of harmful chemical agents at heavy metals refining stations in two Polish Plants are presented. Several tens of workers employed in the processes of copper, lead, nickel sulfate, zinc, cadmium and silver production were examined. Concentrations of Cd, Ni, Se, Cu, Pb, Ag, As and Sb were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with a graphite tube, whereas Fe, ZnO oxide (as Zn), MgO (as Mg) and CaO (as Ca) by AAS with air-acetylene flame, and sulfuric acid by method described in PN-91/Z-04056/02. Lead concentrations in the samples collected in both Plants were often high (significantly exceeding Polish MAC values at some workstations). Arsenic concentrations ranged from very low in all processes in one Plant to very high, exceeding Polish MAC values, at some workstations in the other. In general, air concentrations of other agents were not high (fraction of MAC). The occurrence of antimony and magnesium oxide was not determined. The risk created by metals and metalloids at the workstations in two Plants was diversified. There is no need to determine Sb and MgO in further studies. Lead should be determined at all workstations, other agents can be determined at workstations with concentrations exceeding the determinability of relevant methods.

  16. Cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction in rainbow trout: Effects of binary and quaternary metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Veldhoen, Nik; Carew, Amanda C; Helbing, Caren C; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-03-01

    A functioning olfactory response is essential for fish to be able to undertake essential behaviors. The majority of work investigating the effects of metals on the olfactory response of fish has focused on single-metal exposures. In this study we exposed rainbow trout to cadmium, copper, nickel, zinc, or a mixture of these four metals at or below the current Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Measurement of olfactory acuity using an electro-olfactogram demonstrated that cadmium causes significant impairment of the entire olfactory system, while the other three metals or the mixture of all four metals did not. Binary mixtures with cadmium and each of the other metals demonstrated that nickel and zinc, but not copper, protect against cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction. Testing was done to determine if the protection from cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction could be explained by binding competition between cadmium and the other metals at the cell surface, or if the protection could be explained by an up-regulation of an intracellular detoxification pathway, namely metallothionein. This study is the first to measure the effects of binary and quaternary metal mixtures on the olfactory response of fish, something that will aid in future assessments of the effects of metals on the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metals induce transient folding and activation of the twister ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Hua, Boyang; Zegarra, Diego; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2017-10-01

    Twister is a small ribozyme present in almost all kingdoms of life that rapidly self-cleaves in variety of divalent metal ions. We used activity assays, bulk FRET and single-molecule FRET (smFRET) to understand how different metal ions promote folding and self-cleavage of the Oryza sativa twister ribozyme. Although most ribozymes require additional Mg(2+) for catalysis, twister inverts this expectation, requiring 20-30 times less Mg(2+) to self-cleave than to fold. Transition metals such as Co(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) activate twister more efficiently than Mg(2+) ions. Although twister is fully active in ≤ 0.5 mM MgCl2, smFRET experiments showed that the ribozyme visits the folded state infrequently under these conditions. Comparison of folding and self-cleavage rates indicates that most folding events lead to catalysis, which correlates with metal bond strength. Thus, the robust activity of twister reports on transient metal ion binding under physiological conditions.

  18. Stress induced half-metallicity in surface defected germanium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sk, Mahasin Alam; Ng, Man-Fai; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Lim, Kok Hwa

    2012-01-21

    Germanium nanowires (GeNWs) with single, double, quadruple and octuple surface dangling bonds (SDBs) are investigated using density-functional-theory calculations. We show that single SDB defected GeNWs remain semiconducting as their non-defected form while double or multiple SDB defects result in either semiconducting or metallic GeNWs, depending on the defect's locations on the surface. More importantly, we show that the electronic properties of surface defected GeNWs can also be fine-tuned by applying tensile and compressive strains. Upon the right loading, the surface defected GeNWs become half-metallic. In addition, we determine that the surface defected GeNWs can be classified into three classes: (1) GeNWs with zero magnetic moment, which are either metallic or semiconducting; (2) GeNWs with net magnetic moments equal to the number of SDBs, which are semiconducting with distinct spin-up and spin-down configurations; and (3) GeNWs with net magnetic moments significantly lower than the number of SDBs. We also find that only the defected GeNWs that fall under (3) are potentially half-metallic. Our results predict that half-metallic GeNWs can be obtained via engineering of the surface defects and the structures without the presence of impurity dopants.

  19. Influence of structural parameters on the tendency of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steel to temper embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Zabusov, O.; Fedotova, S.; Frolov, A.; Saltykov, M.; Maltsev, D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the influence of structural parameters on the tendency of steels to reversible temper embrittlement was studied for assessment of performance properties of reactor pressure vessel steels with extended service life. It is shown that the growth of prior austenite grain size leads to an increase of the critical embrittlement temperature in the initial state. An embrittlement heat treatment at the temperature of maximum manifestation of temper embrittlement (480 °C) shifts critical embrittlement temperature to higher values due to the increase of the phosphorus concentration on grain boundaries. There is a correlation between phosphorus concentration on boundaries of primary austenite grains and the share of brittle intergranular fracture (that, in turn, depends on impact test temperature) in the fracture surfaces of the tested Charpy specimens.

  20. Charged and metallic molecular monolayers through surface-induced aromatic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Heimel, G; Duhm, S; Salzmann, I; Gerlach, A; Strozecka, A; Niederhausen, J; Bürker, C; Hosokai, T; Fernandez-Torrente, I; Schulze, G; Winkler, S; Wilke, A; Schlesinger, R; Frisch, J; Bröker, B; Vollmer, A; Detlefs, B; Pflaum, J; Kera, S; Franke, K J; Ueno, N; Pascual, J I; Schreiber, F; Koch, N

    2013-03-01

    Large π-conjugated molecules, when in contact with a metal surface, usually retain a finite electronic gap and, in this sense, stay semiconducting. In some cases, however, the metallic character of the underlying substrate is seen to extend onto the first molecular layer. Here, we develop a chemical rationale for this intriguing phenomenon. In many reported instances, we find that the conjugation length of the organic semiconductors increases significantly through the bonding of specific substituents to the metal surface and through the concomitant rehybridization of the entire backbone structure. The molecules at the interface are thus converted into different chemical species with a strongly reduced electronic gap. This mechanism of surface-induced aromatic stabilization helps molecules to overcome competing phenomena that tend to keep the metal Fermi level between their frontier orbitals. Our findings aid in the design of stable precursors for metallic molecular monolayers, and thus enable new routes for the chemical engineering of metal surfaces.

  1. X-ray induced, substrate-carrier mediated deposition of metal on GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Qing; Divan, R.; Mancini, D. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.; Quintana, J. P.; Keane, D. T.

    2006-08-21

    A wet metal deposition process on GaAs surfaces is described. The process is induced by high energy x-ray photons and is mediated by photon-generated carriers through the photoelectrochemical mechanism similar to that for light-induced wet etching. The micrometer to submicrometer feature fabrication using this process is demonstrated.

  2. Behavior of cerium in boundary segregation and temper embrittlement of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z.; Li, J.; Feng, S.

    1986-01-01

    The co-segregation of manganese and phosphorus causes temper embrittlement. As the tempering is prolonged, the concentration of manganese in (Fe,Mn)/sub 3/C increases. It upsets the equilibrium of co-segregation and, in turn, reduces the degree of co-segregation of manganese and phosphorus, thus lessening the increase in FATT 50%. Cerium reduces the amounts of phosphorus and manganese segregated to the grain boundaries. As the grain-boundary concentration of cerium increases unceasingly, the resistance against co-segregation increases and the rate of embrittling decreases.

  3. The effects of composition on the environmental embrittlement of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews recent research on embrittlement of iron aluminides at room temperature brought about by exposure to moisture or hydrogen. The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of several Fe-28Al-5Cr alloys with small additions of Zr and C are described. It will be shown that fatigue crack growth behavior is dependent on composition, environment, humidity level, and frequency. Environments studied include vacuum, oxygen, hydrogen gas, and moist air. All cases of embrittlement are ultimately traceable to the interaction of hydrogen with the crack tip.

  4. The effect of microstructure on hydrogen embrittlement of the nickel base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Material from a single heat of cast and wrought Udimet 700 was processed and/or heat treated to produce five material conditions with identical chemical compositions but with distinct microstructural variations, and then evaluated for susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Two prealloyed powder conditions exhibited significantly improved resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, as compared to wrought material. No degradation in notch or smooth tensile strengths occurred, and average ductilities of 25 percent reduction of area were determined for 2 hydrogen evaluation procedures. For the most severe hydrogenation procedure, ductility levels were reduced to 15 percent. These improvements were attributed to cleaner grain boundaries and decreased grain size.

  5. The effect of microstructure on hydrogen embrittlement of the nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Material from a single heat of cast and wrought Udimet 700 was processed and/or heat treated to produce five material conditions with identical chemical compositions but with distinct microstructural variations, and then evaluated for susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Two prealloyed powder conditions exhibited significantly improved resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, as compared to wrought material. No degradation in notch or smooth tensile strengths occurred, and average ductilities of 25 percent reduction of area were determined for 2 hydrogen evaluation procedures. For the most severe hydrogenation procedure, ductility levels were reduced to 15 percent. These improvements were attributed to cleaner grain boundaries and decreases grain size.

  6. Hydrogen embrittlement considerations in niobium-base alloys for application in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.T. ); Hull, A.B.; Loomis, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The ITER divertor will be subjected to hydrogen from aqueous corrosion by the coolant and by transfer from the plasma. Global hydrogen concentrations are one factor in assessing hydrogen embrittlement but local concentrations affected by source fluxes and thermotransport in thermal gradients are more important considerations. Global hydrogen concentrations is some corrosion- tested alloys will be presented and interpreted. The degradation of mechanical properties of Nb-base alloys due to hydrogen is a complex function of temperature, hydrogen concentration, stresses and alloy composition. The known tendencies for embrittlement and hydride formation in Nb alloys are reviewed.

  7. Hydrogen embrittlement considerations in niobium-base alloys for application in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.T.; Hull, A.B.; Loomis, B.A.

    1991-12-31

    The ITER divertor will be subjected to hydrogen from aqueous corrosion by the coolant and by transfer from the plasma. Global hydrogen concentrations are one factor in assessing hydrogen embrittlement but local concentrations affected by source fluxes and thermotransport in thermal gradients are more important considerations. Global hydrogen concentrations is some corrosion- tested alloys will be presented and interpreted. The degradation of mechanical properties of Nb-base alloys due to hydrogen is a complex function of temperature, hydrogen concentration, stresses and alloy composition. The known tendencies for embrittlement and hydride formation in Nb alloys are reviewed.

  8. Method and apparatus for using magneto-acoustic remanence to determine embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temperature embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component are presented. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an AC current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a DC current to the electromagnets and then by turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  9. Attenuated total reflection response to wavelength tuning of plasmon-induced transparency in a metal-insulator-metal structure.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kouki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Neo, Yoichiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Tomita, Makoto

    2016-11-15

    We experimentally demonstrated a plasmon-induced transparency in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure based on the attenuated total reflection (ATR) response. Here, the MIM waveguide (MIMWG) mode and the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonance mode acted as low- and high-Q resonance modes, respectively. The dependence of the resonance angles of SPP and MIMWG mode resonances on the incident wavelength differed, which allowed the coupling condition between the two modes to be tuned via the wavelength. When the resonance angles of the two modes coincided, the ATR response showed a symmetric plasmon-induced transparency spectrum; in contrast, when the resonance angles were detuned, the ATR exhibited a sharp asymmetric spectrum characteristic to off-resonance Fano interference.

  10. Electrical-stress-induced transport and surface potential characterizations of metal/ TiO 2/metal planar junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Haeri; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2011-03-01

    Electric-field-induced resistive switching (RS) phenomena in metal oxides have attracted considerable research interest due to their potential use in nonvolatile memory device applications. Intensive investigations have revealed that coupled electron ion dynamics play a key role the RS mechanism. Metal/single crystal junction can be an ideal model system to study how the ionic drift and diffusion can affect the resistance. We investigated transport and local electrical properties of Pt/ Ti O2 single crystal/Ti planar junctions with micron- sized gaps between the electrodes. Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) showed that negative (positive) electrical stress to the Pt electrodes significantly reduced (hardly affected) the Pt/ Ti O2 contact resistance. The SKPM results also revealed that the electrical stress caused alteration of the local work function of Ti O2 . The comparative investigations of the transport and SKPM results suggested that the electrical stress induced redistribution of ions, resulting in the change of the junction resistance.

  11. Metal nanoparticle fluids with magnetically induced electrical switching properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghoon; Cho, Jinhan

    2013-05-01

    We report the successful preparation of solvent-free metal nanoparticle (NP) fluids with multiple-functionalities, such as rheological properties, magnetism, ionic conductivity, and electrical properties, allowing for facile synthesis and mass production. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) used in this study were synthesized using tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr) in toluene and then directly phase-transferred to solvent-free low-molecular-weight (Mw) imidazolium-type ionic liquid media containing thiol groups (i.e., IL-SH). Magnetic metal fluids (i.e., MIL-SH-AuNPs) were prepared by the addition of FeCl3 powder to metal fluids (i.e., IL-SH-AuNPs). These fluids showed relatively high ionic and electrical conductivities compared with those of conventional metal NP fluids based on organic ILs with high Mw. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that these fluids could be used as electric switches operated using an external magnetic field in organic media.We report the successful preparation of solvent-free metal nanoparticle (NP) fluids with multiple-functionalities, such as rheological properties, magnetism, ionic conductivity, and electrical properties, allowing for facile synthesis and mass production. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) used in this study were synthesized using tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr) in toluene and then directly phase-transferred to solvent-free low-molecular-weight (Mw) imidazolium-type ionic liquid media containing thiol groups (i.e., IL-SH). Magnetic metal fluids (i.e., MIL-SH-AuNPs) were prepared by the addition of FeCl3 powder to metal fluids (i.e., IL-SH-AuNPs). These fluids showed relatively high ionic and electrical conductivities compared with those of conventional metal NP fluids based on organic ILs with high Mw. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that these fluids could be used as electric switches operated using an external magnetic field in organic media. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00653k

  12. Ultrathin metallic coatings can induce quantum levitation between nanosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Mathias; Ninham, Barry W.; Brevik, Iver; Persson, Clas; Parsons, Drew F.; Sernelius, Bo E.

    2012-06-01

    There is an attractive Casimir-Lifshitz force between two silica surfaces in a liquid (bromobenze or toluene). We demonstrate that adding an ultrathin (5-50 Å) metallic nanocoating to one of the surfaces results in repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces above a critical separation. The onset of such quantum levitation comes at decreasing separations as the film thickness decreases. Remarkably, the effect of retardation can turn attraction into repulsion. From that we explain how an ultrathin metallic coating may prevent nanoelectromechanical systems from crashing together.

  13. Methodology for Estimating Thermal and Neutron Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds during Service in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Rao, A

    2016-08-01

    The effect of thermal aging on the degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties of austenitic stainless steel (SS) welds has been characterized at reactor temperatures. The solidification behavior and the distribution and morphology of the ferrite phase in SS welds are described. Thermal aging of the welds results in moderate decreases in Charpy-impact strength and fracture toughness. The upper-shelf Charpy-impact energy of aged welds decreases by 50–80 J/cm2. The decrease in fracture toughness J-R curve, or JIc is relatively small. Thermal aging has minimal effect on the tensile strength. The fracture properties of SS welds are insensitive to filler metal; the welding process has a significant effect. The large variability in the data makes it difficult to establish the effect of the welding process on fracture properties of SS welds. Consequently, the approach used for evaluating thermal and neutron embrittlement of austenitic SS welds relies on establishing a lower-bound fracture toughness J-R curve for unaged and aged, and non-irradiated and irradiated, SS welds. The existing fracture toughness J-R curve data for SS welds have been reviewed and evaluated to define lower-bound J-R curve for submerged arc (SA)/shielded metal arc (SMA)/manual metal arc (MMA) welds and gas tungsten arc (GTA)/tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in the unaged and aged conditions. At reactor temperatures, the fracture toughness of GTA/TIG welds is a factor of about 2.3 higher than that of SA/SMA/MMA welds. Thermal aging decreases the fracture toughness by about 20%. The potential combined effects of thermal and neutron embrittlement of austenitic SS welds are also described. Lower-bound curves are presented that define the change in coefficient C and exponent n of the power-law J-R curve and the JIc value for SS welds as a function of neutron dose. The potential effects of reactor coolant environment on the fracture toughness of austenitic SS welds are also discussed.

  14. Structural anisotropy in metallic glasses induced by mechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Egami, T.

    2009-03-06

    We observed structural anisotropy in metallic glasses samples deformed by homogenous mechanical creep and by inhomogeneous compression using high energy X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis indicates bond anisotropy in the first atomic shell. This suggests that mechanical deformation involves rearrangements in a cluster of atoms by a bond reformation.

  15. Measurement and modeling of temperature-dependent hydrogen embrittlement of chromium-molybdenum steel to enable fitness-for-service life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rumaih, Abdullah M.

    Thick-wall vessels in petrochemical applications, fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, operate in pressurized H2 at elevated temperature for more than 20 years. There is a concern regarding the interactive effects of temper-embrittlement and hydrogen-embrittlement on fitness-for-service during startup/shutdown near ambient temperatures. The database of degraded material properties is inadequate to enable accurate assessment. Specifically, H loss from small fracture mechanics specimens was substantial during either long-term or elevated temperature experiments. In addition, the influence of temperature on H-embrittlement of Cr-Mo steel is not fundamentally understood. The objectives of this research are to (1) design a novel laboratory method to retain H in small fracture mechanics specimens, (2) characterize the temperature dependent internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) of Cr-Mo weld metal using the developed method, and (3) model H distribution near a stressed crack tip in a H-trap laden bainitic microstructure to fundamentally understand the temperature dependent IHE. The new slotted CT specimen approach, with 3.0 wppm total H produced on the slot surface from acidified thiosulfate charging, quantitatively characterized the temperature dependent threshold stress intensity (KIH and K TH) and kinetics (da/dtRISE and da/dtHOLD) of IHE in Cr-Mo weld metal during both rising and slowly falling K loading. IHE was produced successfully and damage was more severe during rising K loading due to the role of crack tip plasticity in H cracking of low to moderate strength steel. The critical temperature at which embrittlement ceased is in the range 45°C < Tc ≤ 60°C for the weld metal and H content studied. This method provides a useful new tool to generate fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service data. A three-dimensional finite element diffusion model, that accounts for the effect of crack tip plasticity and trapping on H transport, established K, dK/dt and temperature

  16. Experimental Deformation of Dehydrating Antigorite: Challenging Models of Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Chernak, Linda

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes in subduction zones are caused by the dehydration of hydrous phases, we conducted temperature-ramping experiments on antigorite serpentinite. Cold-pressed powdered samples of antigorite were deformed to a high differential stress at 400°C and 1.0 GPa, within the antigorite stability field, where we have shown that deformation localizes. Temperature was then increased at different rates, 1800°C/hr and 180°C/hr, to cross the reaction boundary while the sample continued to deform; samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-5 s-1 and 10-6 s-1. Two additional experiments were conducted in a similar manner at 300°C, 1.5 GPa and 10-5 s-1 but samples remained 'statically' at high stress during the temperature increase. Our results show that although the decrease in stress during temperature ramping is large, stress relaxes stably, even after dehydration. We find that the slopes of the unloading curves are approximately the same for constant values of the ratio (strain rate/ramp rate) and that the unloading slope is greater for higher values of this ratio. In addition, we find that the unloading curves with the greatest slopes are similar to the apparatus compliance, suggesting that we are generating 'slow earthquakes' in our experiments over the course 5 to 10s of minutes. A strain rate stepping experiment indicates that antigorite has velocity strengthening behavior at 700°C and 1.5 GPa suggesting that as soon as an instability develops in the antigorite, the material strengthens sufficiently to not go unstable. Our results thus suggest that antigorite dehydration does not result in 'dehydration embrittlement' but that it may promote slow earthquakes. We have also conducted a preliminary experiment to study the role of effective pressure on deformation behavior after dehydration. A cold-pressed powdered sample of antigorite with a small core of coarse-grained olivine at one end was deformed at 700

  17. Structural Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses Induced by Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Metallic glasses have been studied vigorously since the first report on amorphous gold-silicon alloy back in 1960.[1] Initially soft magnetic properties were the most promising features for industrial applications. The recent development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)[2 5] initiated interests in engineering applications such as structural or biomedical materials because of attractive properties such as high strength,[6] high elasticity,[7,8] and good corrosion resistance,[9,10] among others. In addition, high temperature processing of BMGs allows for near-net-shape formability,[11 13] which could simplify and possibly reduce the cost of the final product. The glasses retain the disordered atomic structure of a liquid, and ideally are isotropic solids. Frequently because of processing conditions, such as directional heat flow, some structural anisotropy is produced during quenching, and has been observed by structural investigations. Usually, annealing at high temperatures results in an isotropic structure. Also, formation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy[14] had been observed in studies of creep deformed ferromagnetic metallic glasses. Samples with a near-zero magnetostriction coefficient had been studied to establish the origin of the magnetic anisotropy. It was concluded that anisotropy resulted from the atomic level anisotropy[15] and not the heterogeneous internal stress distribution. Indeed X-ray diffraction study of the creep deformed metallic glass showed bond anisotropy.[ 16,17] Such structural studies had been cumbersome and lengthy because they required measurement of many orientations with high statistics. Recently we have shown that use of an area detector and high energy X-rays at a synchrotron source can speed up data collection without compromising statistics.[18] In this contribution, we present data showing structural anisotropy in glassy samples after homogenous (creep) and inhomogeneous (compression) mechanical deformation. The observation of the

  18. X-ray Methods in High-Intensity Discharges and Metal-Halide Lamps: X-ray Induced Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, John J.; Lapatovich, Walter P.; Henins, Albert

    2011-12-09

    We describe the use of x-ray induced fluorescence to study metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps and to measure equilibrium vapor pressures of metal-halide salts. The physical principles of metal-halide lamps, relevant aspects of x-ray-atom interactions, the experimental method using synchrotron radiation, and x-ray induced fluorescence measurements relevant to metal-halide lamps are covered.

  19. Type of cell death induced by various metal cations in cultured human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, René García; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Metal ions are released from casting alloys and cause damage to cell structures and local inflammation. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced in human gingival fibroblast (HGF) by contact with dental metals have not been well characterized. Here the cytotoxicity of eight metals against HGF was investigated. Cytoxicity of metals against HGF was in the following order: Ag(NH(3))(2)F (most cytotoxic)>AgCl>CuCl(2)>CuCl, CoCl(2)> NiCl(2)>FeCl(2), FeCl(3) (least cytotoxic). None of the metals showed any apparent hormetic growth stimulation at lower concentrations, except for Ag(NH(3))(2)F at 20 or higher population-doubling level of HGF. The sensitivity of HGF against Ag(NH(3))(2)F was reduced during in vitro aging, similar to previous report with sodium fluoride. Contact with Ag(NH(3))(2)F for only one hour induced irreversible cell death, whereas longer duration of contact with AgCl or CuCl(2) was necessary to induce irreversible cell death. These metals induced neither DNA fragmentation nor caspase-3 activation. Pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) did not apparently affect the cytotoxicity of metals, when corrected for the effect of inhibitor alone on growth. We also found that Ag(NH(3))(2)F induced much higher cytotoxicity than AgCl in mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1, possibly inducing necrosis. These data suggest the importance of cautious application of Ag(NH(3))(2)F to the oral cavity.

  20. Effects of transition metal ion coordination on the collision-induced dissociation of polyalanines.

    PubMed

    Watson, Heather M; Vincent, John B; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2011-11-01

    Transition metal-polyalanine complexes were analyzed in a high-capacity quadrupole ion trap after electrospray ionization. Polyalanines have no polar amino acid side chains to coordinate metal ions, thus allowing the effects metal ion interaction with the peptide backbone to be explored. Positive mode mass spectra produced from peptides mixed with salts of the first row transition metals Cr(III), Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(I), and Cu(II) yield singly and doubly charged metallated ions. These precursor ions undergo collision-induced dissociation (CID) to give almost exclusively metallated N-terminal product ions whose types and relative abundances depend on the identity of the transition metal. For example, Cr(III)-cationized peptides yield CID spectra that are complex and have several neutral losses, whereas Fe(III)-cationized peptides dissociate to give intense non-metallated products. The addition of Cu(II) shows the most promise for sequencing. Spectra obtained from the CID of singly and doubly charged Cu-heptaalanine ions, [M + Cu - H](+) and [M + Cu](2+) , are complimentary and together provide cleavage at every residue and no neutral losses. (This contrasts with [M + H](+) of heptaalanine, where CID does not provide backbone ions to sequence the first three residues.) Transition metal cationization produces abundant metallated a-ions by CID, unlike protonated peptides that produce primarily b- and y-ions. The prominence of metallated a-ions is interesting because they do not always form from b-ions. Tandem mass spectrometry on metallated (Met = metal) a- and b-ions indicate that [b(n)  + Met - H](2+) lose CO to form [a(n)  + Met - H](2+), mimicking protonated structures. In contrast, [a(n)  + Met - H](2+) eliminate an amino acid residue to form [a(n-1)  + Met - H](2+), which may be useful in sequencing. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Interaction Of Hydrogen With Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on interaction of hydrogen with number of metal alloys. Discusses relationship between metallurgical and crystallographic aspects of structures of alloys and observed distributions of hydrogen on charging. Also discusses effect of formation of hydrides on resistances of alloys to hydrogen. Describes attempt to correlate structures and compositions of alloys with their abilities to resist embrittlement by hydrogen.

  2. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  3. Application of Δ- and Λ-Isomerism of Octahedral Metal Complexes for Inducing Chiral Nematic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hisako; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    The Δ- and Λ-isomerism of octahedral metal complexes is employed as a source of chirality for inducing chiral nematic phases. By applying a wide range of chiral metal complexes as a dopant, it has been found that tris(β-diketonato)metal(III) complexes exhibit an extremely high value of helical twisting power. The mechanism of induction of the chiral nematic phase is postulated on the basis of a surface chirality model. The strategy for designing an efficient dopant is described, together with the results using a number of examples of Co(III), Cr(III) and Ru(III) complexes with C2 symmetry. The development of photo-responsive dopants to achieve the photo-induced structural change of liquid crystal by use of photo-isomerization of chiral metal complexes is also described. PMID:20057959

  4. Assessment of fission-gas-induced transient swelling in metallic fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sevy, R H; Cahalan, J E

    1985-03-01

    A model for fission-gas-induced transient swelling in metallic fuel is described. An observation that the strength of metallic fuel becomes very small at a temperature several hundred degrees below the solidus forms the basis for an assumption that, above this temperature, the fuel proceeds through a series of stress-free equilibrium states for a large range of heating rates. Gas bubble coalescence and growth and any effects from ingested sodium are ignored such that the model may tend to underestimate swelling in some circumstances. The fuel swelling model is used to predict the reactivity effect of fission-gas-induced axial expansion of metallic fuel during transient overpower excursions. Comparisons to oxide fuel behavior are made. Sensitivity of results to metallic fuel modeling assumptions are assessed in a parametric study.

  5. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, G.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of moderate intensity near-infrared few cycle laser pulses with nano-scale metal tips. Local field enhancement in a nanometric region around the tip apex triggers coherent electron emission on the nanometer length and femtosecond time scale. The quantum dynamics at the surface are simulated with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and interpreted based on the simple man's model. We investigate the dependence of the emitted electron spectra on the laser wavelength.

  6. Agriculturally Induced Heavy Metal Accumulation in Seyfe Lake, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bölükbaşı, Vildan; Akın, Beril Salman

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present 1-year study was to investigate the effect of heavy metals in synthetic fertilizers on water and sediment quality in the Seyfe Lake, where agricultural activity was the only anthropogenic source. Metal concentrations of five different types of synthetic fertilizers used in agricultural fields within the Seyfe Lake closed basin were as follows: Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd > As > Ni > Co. The annual average of heavy metal concentrations in the sediment samples were as follows: Zn > Pb > As > Cr > Ni > Cu > Cd > Co. Seyfe Lake sediment was classified as anthropogenically "highly polluted" in terms of the As and Zn concentrations at each sample station based on the sediment quality guidelines. Furthermore, the sediment could be classified as "moderately to highly polluted" in terms of the As concentration, based on the geo-accumulation index.

  7. Irradiation-Induced Thermal Effects in Alloyed Metal Fuel of Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, F. N.; Nikitin, O. N.; Kuzmin, S. V.; Belyaeva, A. V.; Gilmutdinov, I. F.; Grin, P. I.; Zhemkov, I. Yu

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studying alloyed metal fuel after irradiation in a fast reactor. Determined is the mechanism of fuel irradiation swelling, mechanical interaction between fuel and cladding, and distribution of fission products. Experience gained in fuel properties and behavior under irradiation as well as in irradiation-induced thermal effects occurred in alloyed metal fuel provides for a fuel pin design to have a burnup not less than 20% h. a.

  8. Induced metal tolerance in microbenthic communities from three lowland rivers with different metal loads

    PubMed

    Lehmann; Tubbing; Admiraal

    1999-05-01

    The response of microbenthic communities to sustained metal stress was studied in three lowland rivers with different levels of pollution. Tolerance against zinc and cadmium was determined in short-term toxicity tests with microbenthic assemblages colonizing glass discs. Photosynthetic activity served as an endpoint in tests for algae, whereas for bacteria thymidine incorporation was determined. For bacterial assemblages from unpolluted locations, EC50 values in short-term tests ranged between 6.7 and 56.2 &mgr;M zinc, and 8.7 and 25.5 &mgr;M cadmium, respectively. Bacterial assemblages from the two most polluted sites were significantly more tolerant for zinc (EC50: 994 &mgr;M and >1,000 &mgr;M) and cadmium (EC50: 218 &mgr;M and 154 &mgr;M). Results indicated a shift in community composition toward pollution-adapted organisms when a threshold concentration of 1 &mgr;M zinc is exceeded. Although an increasing community tolerance was also indicated for algae, EC50 values for microbenthic algae from all sites exceeded in most cases the highest metal concentrations tested (Zn: 1,000 &mgr;M; Cd: 320 &mgr;M). Since species composition of algal assemblages was found to change at much lower metal levels, it is concluded that short-term toxicity tests measuring photosynthesis inhibition do not reflect well the long-term effects of these metals. Toxic effects of metals on both algal and bacterial assemblages are attenuated by precipitation and complexing capacities of the biofilm.

  9. 3D amino-induced electroless plating: a powerful toolset for localized metallization on polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alexandre; Berthelot, Thomas; Viel, Pascal; Jégou, Pascale; Palacin, Serge

    2011-11-18

    The "3D amino-induced electroless plating" (3D-AIEP) process is an easy and cost-effective way to produce metallic patterns onto flexible polymer substrates with a micrometric resolution and based on the direct printing of the mask with a commercial printer. Its effectiveness is based on the covalent grafting onto substrates of a 3D polymer layer which presents the ability to entrap Pd species. Therefore, this activated Pd-loaded and 3D polymer layer acts both as a seed layer for electroless metal growth and as an interdigital layer for enhanced mechanical properties of the metallic patterns. Consequently, flexible and transparent poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) sheets were selectively metalized with nickel or copper patterns. The electrical properties of the obtained metallic patterns were also studied.

  10. Linking pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) and microbial community structure in chronically metal polluted estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Lesley A; Grant, Alistair

    2008-03-01

    We tested the ability of pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) to detect the effects of chronic metal pollution on estuarine sediment microbial communities, along a gradient spanning two orders of magnitude in metal concentrations. In tandem, we investigated the associated microbial community structure using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Tolerance of microbes to Cu, measured as IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50%), was strongly correlated with pore water Cu concentration (r(2)=0.842). No strong correlation existed for other metals tested, highlighting the ability of PICT to identify the pollutant causing a toxic effect. There was no correlation between microbial community structure and community tolerance to metals tested, but analysis of community structure did provide some information on reasons for observed PICT response. PICT methodology used here provided a greater strength and consistency of association with pollutant concentration compared to microbial community structure and can be recommended as a sensitive indicator of metal pollution on estuarine sediment microbial communities.

  11. Overview of the activities in Spain on irradiation embrittlement of RPV steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bros, J.; Ballesteros, A.

    1994-12-31

    Specific problems such as the embrittlement of the VVER reactors or the integrity evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, show the necessity of continuing in the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the embrittlement. Besides, in order to increase the safety and performance of the nuclear power plants, it is important to optimize the surveillance programs and develop the mitigation techniques of the damage caused by neutron radiation. The main activities carried out in Spain are related to the surveillance programs and to phase 3 of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program, although other smaller projects also show the interest of the utilities in the embrittlement issues. The extension of the work performed as well as some of the most relevant results are shown in this paper. Some new projects are being considered. The participation in the recently created European Action Group for RPV Materials Irradiation Effects and Studies (AMES) is of huge value for Spain. This Group tries mainly to give a European response in the field of the standards. In spite of the nuclear moratorium that has been in vigor in Spain for several years and the present economic crisis, there is a general interest in participation in international projects. That is the case of the Spanish contribution to the certification of Advanced Light-Water Reactors. In particular, regarding the embrittlement problem, in the development of a reactor pressure vessel and support skirt material surveillance program for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR).

  12. Intergranular diffusion and embrittlement of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy in Te vapor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongwei; Li, Zhijun; Leng, Bin; Zhang, Wenzhu; Han, Fenfen; Jia, Yanyan; Zhou, Xingtai

    2015-12-01

    Nickel and some nickel-base alloys are extremely sensitive to intergranular embrittlement and tellurium (Te) enhanced cracking, which should be concerned during their serving in molten salt reactors. Here, a systematic study about the effects of its temperature on the reaction products at its surface, the intergranular diffusion of Te in its body and its embrittlement for a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy contacting Te is reported. For exposed to Te vapor at high temperature (823-1073 K), the reaction products formed on the surface of the alloy were Ni3Te2, CrTe, and MoTe2, and the most serious embrittlement was observed at 1073 K. The kinetic measurement in terms of Te penetration depth in the alloy samples gives an activation energy of 204 kJ/mol. Electron probe microanalysis confirmed the local enrichment of Te at grain boundaries. And clearly, the embrittlement was results from the intergranular diffusion and segregation of element Te.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement of a Ti-strengthened 250 grade maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, L.W.; Huang, W.B.; Li, Y.M.; Chen, C.

    1997-04-01

    Constant extension-rate tensile tests are performed to investigate the effects of strain rate and environmental hydrogen concentration on the tensile properties of various aged T-250 specimens. The 426 C (800 F) underaged specimens are very sensitive to strain rate; the 482 C (900 F) peak-aged specimens exhibit a reduced ductility under low strain rates; and the 593 C (1,100 F) overaged specimens are insensitive to strain rate when tested in air. The excellent resistance to embrittlement of the overaged specimens in gaseous hydrogen could be associated with the extensive formation of reverted austenite and the incoherent Ni{sub 3}Ti precipitates. The tensile-fractured surfaces of such specimens reveal a ductile dimple fracture. However, the peak-aged specimens are susceptible to gaseous hydrogen embrittlement, and the embrittled region shows a primary fracture mode of quasi-cleavage. The least resistant to hydrogen embrittlement of the underaged specimens is characterized by a more brittle fracture appearance, that is, intergranular fracture, under a low strain rate or in the gaseous hydrogen environment.

  14. Hydrogen transport and embrittlement for palladium coated vanadium-chromium-titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buxbaum, R.E.; Subramanian, R.; Park, J.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Vanadium based alloys have been identified as a leading candidate material for fusion first-wall blanket structure application because they exhibit favorable safety and environmental characteristics, good fabricability, potential for high performance and long-time operation lifetime in a fusion environment. As part of a study of the thermodynamics, kinetics and embrittlement properties of hydrogen in vanadium based alloys, experiments were conducted to determine the rate of hydrogen transport through the vanadium reference alloys, V-7.5Cr-15Ti and V-4Cr-4Ti, and to determine these alloys` hydrogen embrittlement, they were exposed to hydrogen pressures of 3 and 300 kPa (0.03--3 atm) at temperatures between 380 and 475 C. To facilitate hydrogen entry and egress, tubes of these alloys were coated with palladium on the inside and outside faces. Observed permeabilities were 0.015 to 0.065 {micro}moles/(m{sup 2}sPa{sup 0.5}) for the V-7.5Cr-15Ti alloy and 0.02 to 0.05 {micro}moles/m{sup 2}sPa{sup 0.5} for the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy depending on the quality of the coat and the operating temperature. At 1.7 atm hydrogen, V-7.5Cr-15Ti embrittled at temperatures below 380 C while V-4Cr-4Ti embrittled around 330 C.

  15. Evaluation of Hydrogen Embrittlement of SAFKEG 3940A Package in KAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.J.

    2003-12-10

    This report documents the evaluation of the potential for hydrogen embrittlement of the stainless steel of the inner containment vessel and the outer containment vessel components of the SAFKEG 3940A shipping package under transportation conditions and storage conditions in the K-Area Monitored Storage. The components are evaluated under a bounding scenario for hydrogen exposure.

  16. Evaluation of the Relative Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of ESR 4340 and Its Heat Treat Distortion Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    4340 Steel Heat treatment ESR Steel Helicopters...embrittlement suscepti- bility of remelted 4340 steel with ESR and VAR methods has been completed. The issue of ESR’s susceptibility to hydrogen...strength (above 260 Ksi) 4340 ESR steel is used in these applications because of 4340 ESR’s demonstrated supe- rior ballistic tolerance. Three

  17. Slow Strain Rate Testing for Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Alloy 718 in Substitute Ocean Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCoursiere, M. P.; Aidun, D. K.; Morrison, D. J.

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of near-peak-aged UNS N07718 (Alloy 718) was evaluated by performing slow strain rate tests at room temperature in air and substitute ocean water. Tests in substitute ocean water were accomplished in an environmental cell that enabled in situ cathodic charging under an applied potential of -1.1 V versus SCE. Some specimens were cathodically precharged for 4 or 16 weeks at the same potential in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl-distilled water solution at 50 °C. Unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water exhibited only moderate embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 20% compared to unprecharged specimens tested in air. However, precharged specimens exhibited significant embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 70%. Test environment (air or substitute ocean water with in situ charging) and precharge time (4 or 16 weeks) had little effect on the results of the precharged specimens. Fracture surfaces of precharged specimens were typical of hydrogen embrittlement and consisted of an outer brittle ring related to the region in which hydrogen infused during precharging, a finely dimpled transition zone probably related to the region where hydrogen was drawn in by dislocation transport, and a central highly dimpled ductile region. Fracture surfaces of unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water consisted of a finely dimpled outer ring and heavily dimpled central region typical of ductile fracture.

  18. Helium embrittlement model and program plan for weldability of ITER materials

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Tosten, M.H.; Rankin, D.T.; Cross, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents a refined model of how helium embrittles irradiated stainless steel during welding. The model was developed based on experimental observations drawn from experience at the Savannah River Site and from an extensive literature search. The model shows how helium content, stress, and temperature interact to produce embrittlement. The model takes into account defect structure, time, and gradients in stress, temperature and composition. The report also proposes an experimental program based on the refined helium embrittlement model. A parametric study of the effect of initial defect density on the resulting helium bubble distribution and weldability of tritium aged material is proposed to demonstrate the roll that defects play in embrittlement. This study should include samples charged using vastly different aging times to obtain equivalent helium contents. Additionally, studies to establish the minimal sample thickness and size are needed for extrapolation to real structural materials. The results of these studies should provide a technical basis for the use of tritium aged materials to predict the weldability of irradiated structures. Use of tritium charged and aged material would provide a cost effective approach to developing weld repair techniques for ITER components.

  19. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J.

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impurity precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.

  20. Role of thermal heating on the voltage induced insulator-metal transition in VO2.

    PubMed

    Zimmers, A; Aigouy, L; Mortier, M; Sharoni, A; Wang, Siming; West, K G; Ramirez, J G; Schuller, Ivan K

    2013-02-01

    We show that the main mechanism for the dc voltage or dc current induced insulator-metal transition in vanadium dioxide VO(2) is due to local Joule heating and not a purely electronic effect. This "tour de force" experiment was accomplished by using the fluorescence spectra of rare-earth doped micron sized particles as local temperature sensors. As the insulator-metal transition is induced by a dc voltage or dc current, the local temperature reaches the transition temperature indicating that Joule heating plays a predominant role. This has critical implications for the understanding of the dc voltage or dc current induced insulator-metal transition and has a direct impact on applications which use dc voltage or dc current to externally drive the transition.

  1. Copper-inducible transcription: regulation by metal- and oxidative stress-responsive pathways.

    PubMed

    Mattie, Michael D; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2004-02-01

    Although copper is an essential metal, it is capable of catalyzing the formation of reactive oxygen species that can cause intracellular oxidative damage. We investigated the hypothesis that metal- and oxidative stress-responsive signal transduction pathways mediate the cellular and molecular responses associated with copper exposure. Transient transfection assays using COS-7 cells and mouse metallothionein-I (MT-I) or rat NAD(P)H:oxidoreductase 1-based reporter genes demonstrate that copper activates transcription via metal and antioxidant response elements. Concomitant with copper exposures is a decrease in the level of total glutathione and an increase in oxidized glutathione. Depletion of glutathione, before copper exposure, increases metal- and oxidative stress-inducible transcription and cytotoxicity. Pretreatment with the reactive oxygen scavengers aspirin or vitamin E provides partial protection against copper toxicity and reduces inducible transcription. Experiments using signal transduction inhibitors and a metal transcription factor (MTF)-1 null cell line demonstrate that copper-inducible MT-I transcription is regulated by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and requires MTF-1. The results of these studies indicate that copper activates transcription through both metal- and oxidative stress-responsive signal transduction pathways.

  2. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A study of the mechanism of metal deposition by the laser-induced forward transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Jette, A. N.; Thompson, P.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique for transferring metal features from a film to a substrate is examined by using the one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation with a moving solid-melt boundary to model the heating, melting, and vaporization of the metal film by the laser. For typical LIFT conditions the calculations show that the back of the film (i.e., the part exposed to the laser) will reach the boiling point before the film melts through, which supports the qualitative picture that the LIFT process involves vapor-driven propulsion of metal from the film onto the target.

  4. Pressure-induced insulator-metal transition in EuMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, R.; Bousquet, E.; Cano, A.

    2017-08-01

    We study the influence of external pressure on the electronic and magnetic structure of EuMnO3 from first-principles calculations. We find a pressure-induced insulator-metal transition at which the magnetic order changes from A-type antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic with a strong interplay with Jahn-Teller distortions. In addition, we find that the non-centrosymmetric E *-type antiferromagnetic order can become nearly degenerate with the ferromagnetic ground state in the high-pressure metallic state. This situation can be exploited to promote a magnetically-driven realization of a non-centrosymmetric (ferroelectric-like) metal.

  5. About mechanisms of radiation-induced effect of nanostructurization of near-surface volumes of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms of the radiation-induced development of nanostructures in subsurface metal regions have been analyzed based on field-ion microscopy data. It is concluded that the modification of near-surface metal regions on a nanometer scale as a result of the interaction with Ar+ ion beams proceeds by several mechanisms. In particular, for a fluence of F = 1016 ion/cm2 (at an ion energy of E = 30 keV), the main contribution is due to the ion channeling. A tenfold increase in the ion fluence leads to prevailing deformation mechanism in nanostructure formation in the subsurface metal regions.

  6. Application Of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique In Investigation Of Historical Metal Threads

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Khedr, A.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2009-09-27

    Analysis of the composition of an object is a necessary step in the documentation of the properties of this object for estimating its condition. Also this is an important task for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the result of the application of the suggested treatments. There has been an important evolution in the methods used for analysis of metal threads since the second half of the twentieth century. Today, the main considerations of selecting a method are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal threads. In this study various historical metal threads collected from different museums were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal thread samples were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDX) which is reported in conservation field as the best method, to determine the chemical composition, and corrosion of investigated metal threads. The results show that all investigated metal threads in the present study are too dirty, strongly damaged and corroded with different types of corrosion products. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal threads. It is, in fact, very useful tool as a noninvasive method for analysis of historical metal threads. The first few laser shots are very useful for the investigation of the corrosion and dirt layer, while the following shots are very useful and effective for investigating the coating layer. Higher number of laser shots are very useful for the main

  7. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  8. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  9. Heavy-metal-induced reactive oxygen species: phytotoxicity and physicochemical changes in plants.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dumat, Camille; Nadeem, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the industrial revolution, anthropogenic activities have enhanced there distribution of many toxic heavy metals from the earth's crust to different environmental compartments. Environmental pollution by toxic heavy metals is increasing worldwide, and poses a rising threat to both the environment and to human health.Plants are exposed to heavy metals from various sources: mining and refining of ores, fertilizer and pesticide applications, battery chemicals, disposal of solid wastes(including sewage sludge), irrigation with wastewater, vehicular exhaust emissions and adjacent industrial activity.Heavy metals induce various morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants, either directly or indirectly, and cause various damaging effects. The most frequently documented and earliest consequence of heavy metal toxicity in plants cells is the overproduction of ROS. Unlike redox-active metals such as iron and copper, heavy metals (e.g, Pb, Cd, Ni, AI, Mn and Zn) cannot generate ROS directly by participating in biological redox reactions such as Haber Weiss/Fenton reactions. However, these metals induce ROS generation via different indirect mechanisms, such as stimulating the activity of NADPH oxidases, displacing essential cations from specific binding sites of enzymes and inhibiting enzymatic activities from their affinity for -SH groups on the enzyme.Under normal conditions, ROS play several essential roles in regulating the expression of different genes. Reactive oxygen species control numerous processes like the cell cycle, plant growth, abiotic stress responses, systemic signalling, programmed cell death, pathogen defence and development. Enhanced generation of these species from heavy metal toxicity deteriorates the intrinsic antioxidant defense system of cells, and causes oxidative stress. Cells with oxidative stress display various chemical,biological and physiological toxic symptoms as a result of the interaction between ROS and

  10. Metal induced inhalation exposure in urban population: A probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widziewicz, Kamila; Loska, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    The paper was aimed at assessing the health risk in the populations of three Silesian cities: Bielsko-Biała, Częstochowa and Katowice exposed to the inhalation intake of cadmium, nickel and arsenic present in airborne particulate matter. In order to establish how the exposure parameters affects risk a probabilistic risk assessment framework was used. The risk model was based on the results of the annual measurements of As, Cd and Ni concentrations in PM2.5 and the sets of data on the concentrations of those elements in PM10 collected by the Voivodship Inspectorate of Environmental Protection over 2012-2013 period. The risk was calculated as an incremental lifetime risk of cancer (ILCR) in particular age groups (infants, children, adults) following Monte Carlo approach. With the aim of depicting the effect the variability of exposure parameters exerts on the risk, the initial parameters of the risk model: metals concentrations, its infiltration into indoor environment, exposure duration, exposure frequency, lung deposition efficiency, daily lung ventilation and body weight were modeled as random variables. The distribution of inhalation cancer risk due to exposure to ambient metals concentrations was LN (1.80 × 10-6 ± 2.89 × 10-6) and LN (6.17 × 10-7 ± 1.08 × 10-6) for PM2.5 and PM10-bound metals respectively and did not exceed the permissible limit of the acceptable risk. The highest probability of contracting cancer was observed for Katowice residents exposed to PM2.5 - LN (2.01 × 10-6 ± 3.24 × 10-6). Across the tested age groups adults were approximately one order of magnitude at higher risk compared to infants. Sensitivity analysis showed that exposure duration (ED) and body weight (BW) were the two variables, which contributed the most to the ILCR.

  11. Laser-induced metallic nanograined thin films processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, Nicoleta E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Toadere, Florin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Hojbota, Calin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Tosa, Valer E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro

    2013-11-13

    A direct laser writing method for designing metallic nanograined thin films is presented. This method takes advantage of photon conversion within a chemical process localized at the focal point. A computer controlled positioning system allows the control of experimental parameters and spatial resolution of the pattern. Spectroscopic investigations reveal variable attenuation of the optical properties in UV-visible range and a spectral imaging processing algorithm simulated the functionality of these films in visible light. This could be an important step for obtaining neutral density attenuators.

  12. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing

  13. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  14. Environmental embrittlement of single crystal and thermomechanically processed B2-ordered iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, R.J.; Gee, K.A.; Heldt, L.A. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Environmental embrittlement contributes to the poor ductility of iron aluminides. Elongations in dry environments, such as vacuum or dry oxygen, are considerably greater than in air. Moisture in air is the source of the embrittlement and it is believed that the water vapor reacts with aluminum atoms at the crack tip to produce hydrogen, which then causes embrittlement. In order to expand the use of iron aluminides commercially, this poor room temperature ductility has to be overcome. This has been accomplished in part by alloying with chromium and by thermomechanical processing (T/M-P) schemes. In fact, significant increases in ductility in air have been reported for an alloy containing 5% Cr which had been warm rolled to produce a partially recrystallized microstructure. The effects of chromium are not well understood as of yet, but it has been postulated that the T/M-P effect is caused by the presence of the partially recrystallized microstructure, which reduces the environmental susceptibility by decreasing the number of transverse grain boundaries, thus reducing hydrogen penetration into the material. This argument assumes that grain boundaries have a large effect on embrittlement by controlling hydrogen ingress into the material. The objectives of this work are to determine the roles grain boundaries have in the environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides and in the T/M-P effect observed in these materials. Alloys of several compositions were thermomechanically processed, heat treated and then tensile tested in environments of dry oxygen and moist air. Single crystals containing 35% Al were also tested in oxygen and air.

  15. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core.

  16. Investigation of historical metal objects using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Ghoneim, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    Analysis of metal objects is a necessary step for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the application's result of the suggested treatments. The main considerations on selecting a method that can be used in investigation and analysis of metal objects are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal objects. In this study various historical metal objects collected from different museums and excavations in Egypt were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal objects were investigated by other methods such as Scanning Electron Microscope with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). This study confirms that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal objects. LIBS analysis can quickly provide information on the qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental content of different metal objects and their characterization and classification. It is practically non-destructive technique with the critical advantage of being applicable in situ, thereby avoiding sampling and sample preparations. It is can be dependable, satisfactory and effective method for low cost study of archaeological and historical metals. But we have to take into consideration that the corrosion of metal leads to material alteration and possible loss of certain metals in the form of soluble salts. Certain corrosion products are known to leach out of the object and therefore, their low content does not necessarily reflect the composition of the metal at the time of

  17. Apoptosis Induced by Metal Complexes and Interaction with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Sun; Barros, José Carlos Almeida

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis induced by rhodium II amidate, rhodium II propionate, cisplatin and interactions with dexamethaxone were studied on some human leukemia cell lines Raji, Jurkat and U937. Apoptosis was studied by flow cytometry, agarose gel electrophoresis and morphological analysis. Rhodium II propionate induced apoptosis in all the three cell lines, Rhodium II amidate, in the lymphoid cell lines Jurkat and Raji, and cisplatin, only in the Jurkat, a T lymphoid cell line. It has also been observed that the addition of dexamethasone enhances the apoptosis index only in U937, a monocytic line with a glucocorticoid receptor bearing. PMID:18476001

  18. Optical forces on metallic nanoparticles induced by a photonic nanojet.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xudong; Erni, Daniel; Hafner, Christian

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the optical forces acting on a metallic nanoparticle when the nanoparticle is introduced within a photonic nanojet (PNJ). Optical forces at resonance and off-resonance conditions of the microcylinder or nanoparticle are investigated. Under proper polarization conditions, the whispering gallery mode can be excited in the microcylinder, even at off resonance provided that scattering from the nanoparticle is strong enough. The optical forces are enhanced at resonance either of the single microcylinder or of the nanoparticle with respect to the forces under off-resonant illuminations. We found that the optical forces acting on the nanoparticle depend strongly on the dielectric permittivity of the nanoparticle, as well as on the intensity and the beam width of the PNJ. Hence, metallic sub-wavelength nanoparticle can be efficiently trapped by PNJs. Furthermore, the PNJ's attractive force can be simply changed to a repulsive force by varying the polarization of the incident beam. The changed sign of the force is related to the particle's polarizability and the excitation of localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticle.

  19. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Bimonte, Marida; Barbulova, Ani; Arciello, Stefania; de Laurentiis, Francesco; Monoli, Irene; Hill, Jacqueline; Gibertoni, Simone; Colucci, Gabriella; Apone, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metals can cause several genotoxic effects on cells, including oxidative stress, DNA sequence breakage and protein modification. Among the body organs, skin is certainly the most exposed to heavy metal stress and thus the most damaged by the toxic effects that these chemicals cause. Moreover, heavy metals, in particular nickel, can induce the over-expression of collagenases (enzymes responsible for collagen degradation), leading to weakening of the skin extracellular matrix. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to protect their cells from heavy metal toxicity, including the synthesis of metal chelating proteins and peptides, such as metallothioneins and phytochelatins (PC), which capture the metals and prevent the damages on the cellular structures. To protect human skin cells from heavy metal toxicity, we developed a new cosmetic active ingredient from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) cultured stem cells. This product, besides its high content of antioxidant compounds, contained PC, effective in the protection of skin cells towards heavy metal toxicity. We have demonstrated that this new product preserves nuclear DNA integrity from heavy metal damages, by inducing genes responsible for DNA repair and protection, and neutralizes the effect of heavy metals on collagen degradation, by inhibiting collagenase expression and inducing the synthesis of new collagen. © 2011 Arterra Bioscience srl. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  20. Heavy metal and abiotic stress inducible metallothionein isoforms from Prosopis juliflora (SW) D.C. show differences in binding to heavy metals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Usha, B; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora is a tree species that grows well in heavy metal laden industrial sites and accumulates heavy metals. To understand the possible contribution of metallothioneins (MTs) in heavy metal accumulation in P. juliflora, we isolated and compared the metal binding ability of three different types of MTs (PjMT1-3). Glutathione S-transferase fusions of PjMTs (GSTMT1-3) were purified from Escherichia coli cells grown in the presence of 0.3 mM cadmium, copper or zinc. Analysis of metal bound fusion proteins using atomic absorption spectrometry showed that PjMT1 bound higher levels of all three heavy metals as compared to PjMT2 and PjMT3. A comparative analysis of the genomic regions (including promoter for all three PjMTs) is also presented. All three PjMTs are induced by H(2)O(2) and ABA applications. PjMT1 and PjMT2 are induced by copper and zinc respectively while PjMT3 is induced by copper, zinc and cadmium. Variation in induction of PjMTs in response to metal exposure and their differential binding to metals suggests that each MT has a specific role in P. juliflora. Of the three MTs analyzed, PjMT1 shows maximum heavy metal sequestration and is thus a potential candidate for use in heavy metal phytoremediation.

  1. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of astroloy and Udimet 700 (nickel-base) and V-57 (iron-base) superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Joyce, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity to hydrogen environment embrittlement of three superalloys was determined. Astroloy forgings were resistant to embrittlement during smooth tensile, notched tensile, and creep testing in 3.5-MN/sq m hydrogen over the range 23 to 760 C. The notched tensile strength of Udimet 700 bar stock in hydrogen at 23 C was only 50 percent of the baseline value in helium. Forgings of V-57 were not significantly embrittled by hydrogen during smooth tensile testing over the range 23 to 675 C; creep and rupture lives of V-57 were degraded by hydrogen. Postcreep tensile ductility of V-57 was reduced by 40 percent after creep exposure in hydrogen.

  2. Soluble transition metals mediate residual oil fly ash induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dreher, K L; Jaskot, R H; Lehmann, J R; Richards, J H; McGee, J K; Ghio, A J; Costa, D L

    1997-02-21

    Identification of constituents responsible for the pulmonary toxicity of fugitive combustion emission source particles may provide insight into the adverse health effects associated with exposure to these particles as well as ambient air particulate pollution. Herein, we describe results of studies conducted to identify constituents responsible for the acute lung injury induced by residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and to assess physical-chemical factors that influence the pulmonary toxicity of these constituents. Biochemical and cellular analyses performed on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from rats following intratracheal instillation of ROFA suspension demonstrated the presence of severe inflammation, an indicator of pulmonary injury, which included recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes into the airway. A leachate prepared from ROFA, containing predominantly Fe, Ni, V, Ca, Mg, and sulfate, produced similar lung injury to that induced by ROFA suspension. Depletion of Fe, Ni, and V from the ROFA leachate abrogated its pulmonary toxicity. Correspondingly, minimal lung injury was observed in animals exposed to saline-washed ROFA particles. A surrogate transition metal sulfate solution containing Fe, V, and Ni largely reproduced the lung injury induced by ROFA. Metal interactions and pH were found to influence the severity and kinetics of lung injury induced by ROFA and soluble transition metals. These findings provide direct evidence for the role of soluble transition metals in the pulmonary injury induced by the combustion emission source particulate, ROFA.

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss in small-scale metal industry in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, J D; Robinson, T; Acharya, A; Singh, D; Smith, M

    2014-10-01

    There has been no previous research to demonstrate the risk of noise-induced hearing loss in industry in Nepal. Limited research on occupational noise-induced hearing loss has been conducted within small-scale industry worldwide, despite it being a substantial and growing cause of deafness in the developing world. The study involved a cross-sectional audiometric assessment, with questionnaire-based examinations of noise and occupational history, and workplace noise level assessment. A total of 115 metal workers and 123 hotel workers (control subjects) were recruited. Noise-induced hearing loss prevalence was 30.4 per cent in metal workers and 4.1 per cent in hotel workers, with a significant odds ratio of 10.3. Except for age and time in occupation, none of the demographic factors were significant in predicting outcomes in regression analyses. When adjusted for this finding, and previous noise-exposed occupations, the odds ratio was 13.8. Workplace noise was significantly different between the groups, ranging from 65.3 to 84.7 dBA in metal worker sites, and from 51.4 to 68.6 dBA in the control sites. Metal workers appear to have a greater risk of noise-induced hearing loss than controls. Additional research on occupational noise-induced hearing loss in Nepal and small-scale industry globally is needed.

  4. Heavy Metal-induced Metallothionein Expression Is Regulated by Specific Protein Phosphatase 2A Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Ma, Lu; Bai, Qing; Zhu, Xiaonian; Zhang, Jinmiao; Wei, Qing; Li, Daochuan; Gao, Chen; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhengbao; Liu, Caixia; He, Zhini; Zeng, Xiaowen; Zhang, Aihua; Qu, Weidong; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Chen, Wen; Xiao, Yongmei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of metallothionein (MT) expression is involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification. To identify the key pathways that regulate metal-induced cytotoxicity, we investigate how phosphorylated metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) contributed to induction of MT expression. Immortal human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells) were treated with seven kinds of metals including cadmium chloride (CdCl2), zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), copper sulfate(CuSO4), lead acetate (PbAc), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2), and potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7). The MT expression was induced in a dose-response and time-dependent manner upon various metal treatments. A cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation was required for translocation of MTF-1 from cytoplasm to nucleus, leading to the up-regulation of MTs expression. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) participated in regulating MT expression through dephosphorylation of MTF-1. A loss-of-function screen revealed that the specific PP2A complexes containing PR110 were involved in metal-induced MT expression. Suppression of PP2A PR110 in HEK cells resulted in the persistent MTF-1 phosphorylation and the disturbance of MTF-1 nuclear translocation, which was concomitant with a significant decrease of MT expression and enhanced cytotoxicity in HEK cells. Notably, MTF-1 was found in complex with specific PP2A complexes containing the PR110 subunit upon metal exposure. Furthermore, we identify that the dephosphorylation of MTF-1 at residue Thr-254 is directly regulated by PP2A PR110 complexes and responsible for MTF-1 activation. Taken together, these findings delineate a novel pathway that determines cytotoxicity in response to metal treatments and provide new insight into the role of PP2A in cellular stress response. PMID:24962574

  5. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs.

  6. Investigation of metal contamination induced by a through silicon via reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Katagawa, Daisuke; Bandoh, Tsubasa; Mitsui, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated metal contamination induced by a through silicon via (TSV) reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) wafer including TSVs was bonded to a glass support substrate, and a TSV reveal process was performed by direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. Then, metal contamination near the SiO2/Si interface on the front side of the wafer was investigated by using a pulsed-MOS capacitor technique and measuring the effective generation lifetime and effective surface generation velocity before and after this TSV reveal process. The results of Zerbst analysis showed that the changes in average effective generation lifetime and average effective surface generation velocity were -5.4 and +4.2%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the effect of metal contamination induced by our TSV reveal process on circuit components is small.

  7. Thermally induced breakup of metallic nanowires: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Schnedlitz, Martin; Lasserus, Maximilian; Knez, Daniel; Hauser, Andreas W; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2017-04-05

    We present time-resolved transmission electron microscopy studies of the degradation of Au, Ag, Cu and Ni nanowires deposited on a heated support. The wires are grown under fully inert conditions in superfluid helium droplets and deposited onto amorphous carbon. The inherent stability of these pristine metal nanowires with diameters below 10 nm is investigated in the absence of any stabilizers, templates or solvents. The phenomenon of Rayleigh-breakup, a consequence of diffusion processes along the wire surfaces, is analysed in situ via scans over time and support temperature. Our experimental efforts are combined with simulations based on a novel model featuring a cellular automaton to emulate surface diffusion. Based on this model, correlations between the material parameters and actual breakup behaviour are studied.

  8. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  9. Shear-banding Induced Indentation Size Effect in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Sun, B. A.; Zhao, L. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Shear-banding is commonly regarded as the “plasticity carrier” of metallic glasses (MGs), which usually causes severe strain localization and catastrophic failure if unhindered. However, through the use of the high-throughput dynamic nanoindentation technique, here we reveal that nano-scale shear-banding in different MGs evolves from a “distributed” fashion to a “localized” mode when the resultant plastic flow extends over a critical length scale. Consequently, a pronounced indentation size effect arises from the distributed shear-banding but vanishes when shear-banding becomes localized. Based on the critical length scales obtained for a variety of MGs, we unveil an intrinsic interplay between elasticity and fragility that governs the nanoscale plasticity transition in MGs. Our current findings provide a quantitative insight into the indentation size effect and transition mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity in MGs. PMID:27324835

  10. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  11. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  12. Laser induced inverse Landau damping in metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Martin E.; Castro, Alberto; Alonso, J. A.; Rubio, Angel

    2002-03-01

    We perform real space time-dependent density functional calculations to study the response of small metallic nanoparticles to femtosecond laser pulses. In particular, we analyze the role of screening effects for different laser pulse intensities and frequencies. Calculations are performed on sodium clusters using both the Jellium model and pseudopitentials Based on our results we predict that, if a pulse of sufficiently high intensity ( > 10^14 W/cm^2) excites a single-particle state of the nanoparticle, the response of the system involves both the single-particle- and the surface-plasmon states. We argue that this creation of plasmons from the decay of single-particle excitations, which can be viewed as the inverse of the well known Landau-damping effect, is related to the time-evolution of the screening of charge fluctuations.

  13. Transition metal-induced degradation of a pharmaceutical compound in reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinggang; He, Brian Lingfeng; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Yande; Kleintop, Brent; Raglione, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug degradation that occurs in HPLC analysis, during either sample preparation or chromatographic separation, can greatly impact method robustness and result accuracy. In this work, we report a case study of drug dimerization in HPLC analysis where proximate causes were attributed to either the LC columns or the HPLC instrument. Solution stress studies indicated that the same pseudo-dimeric degradants could also be formed rapidly when the compound was exposed to certain oxidative transition metal ions, such as Cu(II) and Fe(III). Two pseudo-dimeric degradants were isolated from transition metal stressed samples and their structures were elucidated. A degradation pathway was proposed, whereby the degradation was initiated through transition metal-induced single electron transfer oxidation. Further studies confirmed that the dimerization was induced by trace transition metals in the HPLC flow path, which could arise from either the stainless steel frits in the LC column or stainless steel tubing in the HPLC instrument. Various procedures to prevent transition metal-induced drug degradation were explored, and a general strategy to mitigate such risks is briefly discussed.

  14. Metal ion-induced lateral aggregation of filamentous viruses fd and M13.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jay X; Janmey, Paul A; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed comparison between calculations of inter-filament interactions based on Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental features of lateral aggregation of bacteriophages fd and M13 induced by a number of divalent metal ions. The general findings are consistent with the polyelectrolyte nature of the virus filaments and confirm that the solution electrostatics account for most of the experimental features observed. One particularly interesting discovery is resolubilization for bundles of either fd or M13 viruses when the concentration of the bundle-inducing metal ion Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) is increased to large (>100 mM) values. In the range of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations where large bundles of the virus filaments are formed, the optimal attractive interaction energy between the virus filaments is estimated to be on the order of 0.01 kT per net charge on the virus surface when a recent analytical prediction to the experimentally defined conditions of resolubilization is applied. We also observed qualitatively distinct behavior between the alkali-earth metal ions and the divalent transition metal ions in their action on the charged viruses. The understanding of metal ions-induced reversible aggregation based on solution electrostatics may lead to potential applications in molecular biology and medicine. PMID:12080143

  15. Laser-induced metal plasmas for pulsed laser deposition of metal-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaars, Erik; Colgan, James; Rajendiran, Sudha; Rossall, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal-oxide thin films, e.g. ZnO, MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2, are widely used in e.g. microelectronics, catalysts, photonics and displays. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is a plasma-based thin-film deposition technique that is highly versatile and fast, however it suffers from limitations in control of film quality due to a lack of fundamental understanding of the underlying physical processes. We present experimental and modelling studies of the initial phases of PLD: laser ablation and plume expansion. A 2D hydrodynamic code, POLLUX, is used to model the laser-solid interaction of a Zn ablation with a Nd:YAG laser. In this early phase of PLD, the plasma plume has temperatures of about 10 eV, is highly ionized, and travels with a velocity of about 10-100 km/sec away from the target. Subsequently, the plasma enters the plume expansion phase in which the plasma cools down and collision chemistry changes the composition of the plume. Time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy shows that Zn I and Zn II emission lines dominate the visible range of the light emission. Comparison with the Los Alamos plasma kinetics code ATOMIC shows an average temperature around 1 eV, indicating a significant drop in plasma temperature during the expansion phase. We acknowledge support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Grant EP/K018388/1.

  16. The GaN/noble metal interface: metal induced gap states and Schottky barrier heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Continenza, Alessandra; Satta, Guido; Massidda, Sandro; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2000-03-01

    We present ab-initio FLAPW (E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A.J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B 24), 864 (1981) calculations on N-terminated [001] ordered GaN/Ag and GaN/Au interfaces. Our results show that the density of gap states is appreciable in the interface semiconductor layer; however, the gap states are efficiently screened and become negligible already in the sub-interface layer. The gap states' decay length in the semiconductor side is about 2.0 ± 0.1 Å\\: and seems to be independent of the deposited metal, therefore being, to a good approximation, a bulk GaN property. Our estimated Schottky barrier heights for the GaN/noble-metal interfaces are both smaller than that of the GaN/Al barrier, showing a large dispersion in the values - which seems to exclude the possibility of a Fermi level pinning within the gap. Finally, we investigate the role of atomic positions and of different chemical species at the interface region in determining the final value of the potential line-up.

  17. Plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency in metallic nanoparticle-quantum dot hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatef, Ali; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Singh, Mahi R.

    2012-02-01

    We study the variation of the energy absorption rate in a hybrid semiconductor quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle system doped in a photonic crystal. The quantum dot is taken as a three-level V-configuration system and is driven by two applied fields (probe and control). We consider that one of the excitonic resonance frequencies is near to the plasmonic resonance frequency of the metallic nanoparticle, and is driven by the probe field. The other excitonic resonance frequency is far from both the plasmonic resonance frequency and the photonic bandgap edge, and is driven by the control field. In the absence of the photonic crystal we found that the system supports three excitonic-induced transparencies in the energy absorption spectrum of the metallic nanoparticle. We show that the photonic crystal allows us to manipulate the frequencies of such excitonic-induced transparencies and the amplitude of the energy absorption rate.

  18. Antimutagenic effect of crown ethers on heavy metal-induced sister chromatid exchanges.

    PubMed

    Cai, M Y; Arenaz, P

    1998-01-01

    Macrocyclic polyethers (crown ethers) are a family of compounds that possess the ability to complex with and transport metal ions across membranes. Because of their unique ionophoric characteristic, they have wide application in industry and research, chemistry and biology. In the current investigation the relationship between heavy metal mutagenesis and crown ether co-mutagenicity and/or antimutagenicity in mammalian cells has been examined using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as the cytogenetic end point. Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with lead or cadmium, with and without selected crown ethers. Several genotoxic end points, including SCEs were scored and statistically compared. We report here that most of the crown ethers studied had little or no influence on lead- or cadmium-induced SCEs or chromosome aberrations. On the other hand, the substituted crown ether dicyclohexyl 21-crown-7 significantly decreased both spontaneous and metal-induced SCE frequencies, suggesting that this crown ether may possess antimutagenic activity.

  19. Moderate bending strain induced semiconductor to metal transition in Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, M. Golam; Patil, Sunil R.; Anantram, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    A moderate amount of bending strains, ∼3% is found to be enough to induce the semiconductor-metal transition in Si nanowires of ∼4 nm diameter. The influence of bending on silicon nanowires of 1 nm to 4.3 nm diameter is investigated using molecular dynamics and quantum transport simulations. Local strains in nanowires are analyzed along with the effect of bending strain and nanowire diameter on electronic transport and the transmission energy gap. Interestingly, relatively wider nanowires are found to undergo semiconductor-metal transition at relatively lower bending strains. The effect of bending strain on electronic properties is then compared with the conventional way of straining, i.e. uniaxial, which shows that bending is a much more efficient way of straining to enhance the electronic transport and also to induce the semiconductor-metal transition in experimentally realizable Si nanowires.

  20. METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE. UP Kodavanti, MCJ Schladweiler, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, PA Evansky, ER Lappi, G Ross, JH Richards, and DL Costa. NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Ambient ...

  1. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  2. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  3. METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE. UP Kodavanti, MCJ Schladweiler, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, PA Evansky, ER Lappi, G Ross, JH Richards, and DL Costa. NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Ambient ...

  4. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  5. Structural coloration of metallic surfaces with micro/nano-structures induced by elliptical vibration texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Pan, Yayue; Guo, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Creating orderly periodic micro/nano-structures on metallic surfaces, or structural coloration, for control of surface apparent color and optical reflectivity has been an exciting research topic over the years. The direct applications of structural coloration include color marking, display devices, and invisibility cloak. This paper presents an efficient method to colorize metallic surfaces with periodic micro/nano-gratings using elliptical vibration texturing. When the tool vibration is coupled with a constant cutting velocity, controlled periodic ripples can be generated due to the overlapping tool trajectory. These periodic ripples with a wavelength near visible spectrum can act as micro-gratings to introduce iridescent colors. The proposed technique also provides a flexible method for color marking of metallic surfaces with arbitrary patterns and images by precise control of the spacing distance and orientation of induced micro/nano-ripples. Theoretical analysis and experimental results are given to demonstrate structural coloration of metals by a direct mechanical machining technique.

  6. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging `oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events.

  7. Electric current induced flow of liquid metals: Mechanism and substrate-surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.; Howarth, J.; Dutta, I.

    2014-01-28

    Long range, continuous flow of liquid metals occurs upon application of an electric current. Here, we report experimental results elucidating the mechanism of current-induced liquid metal flow, and its dependence on substrate surface condition. It is shown that the observed flow is diffusion-controlled, with the flow-rate depending linearly on applied current density, indicating that it is driven by electromigration. The effective charge number for liquid electromigration, Z*, of several pure metals, such as Al, Bi, Ga, Sn, and Pb, were deduced from the experimental results and were found to be close to the elemental valency. With the exception of liquid Pb, Z* for all liquid metals tested in this study were positive, indicating that: (i) electron wind contributes much less to Z* in liquid metals than in solids, and (ii) with a few exceptions, liquid metals generally flow in the direction of the electric current. On smooth substrates which are wetted well by the liquid metal, flow occurs in a thin, continuous stream. On rough surfaces which are poorly wetted, on the other hand, discrete beads of liquid form, with mass transport between adjacent beads occurring by surface diffusion on the substrate. A rationale for the role of substrate roughness in fostering this observed transition in flow mechanism is presented.

  8. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician–Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging ‘oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician–Silurian palaeobiological events. PMID:26305681

  9. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R A; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-08-25

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging 'oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events.

  10. Giant surface plasmon induced drag effect (SPIDEr) in metal nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I.

    2009-08-01

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface plasmon-induced drag effect (SPIDEr), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. Under realistic conditions, in nanowires, this giant SPIDEr generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to ~ 105 ~ 106 V/cm. The SPIDEr is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is ~ 20 THz. The giant SPIDEr opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  11. Giant surface-plasmon-induced drag effect in metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I

    2009-10-30

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface-plasmon-induced drag-effect rectification (SPIDER), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. In nanowires, this giant SPIDER generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to approximately 10(5)-10(6) V/cm. The giant SPIDER is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is approximately 20 THz. It opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  12. Giant Surface-Plasmon-Induced Drag Effect in Metal Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I.

    2009-10-01

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface-plasmon-induced drag-effect rectification (SPIDER), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. In nanowires, this giant SPIDER generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to ˜105-106V/cm. The giant SPIDER is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is ˜20THz. It opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  13. Laser-induced removal of organic contaminants from metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wen D.; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Q.; Low, Tohsiew

    1998-08-01

    Laser-induced removal of organic contaminants, such as grease and wax, on Cr substrate surfaces was studied. The laser cleaning efficiency was analyzed by an optical microscope and an Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the contaminants in the irradiated area can be effectively removed by pulsed laser irradiation and cleaning efficiency can be reached to 80% above under a certain cleaning condition without damage. The damage threshold of Cr substrates was obtained by numerical simulation, which is in good consistency with the experimental threshold.

  14. Interaction of laser-induced stress waves with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of high intensity laser induced stress waves on the hardness and tensile strength of 2024 and 7075 aluminum and on the fatigue properties of 7075 aluminum were investigated. Laser shocking increases the hardness of the underaged 2024-T351 but has little or no effect on the peak aged 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 or the overaged 7075-T73. The fretting fatigue life of fastener joints of 7075-T6 was increased by orders of magnitude by laser shocking the region around the fastener hole; the fatigue crack propagation rates were decreased by laser shocking.

  15. High stored energy of metallic glasses induced by high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Yang, Z. Z.; Ma, T.; Sun, Y. T.; Yin, Y. Y.; Gong, Y.; Gu, L.; Wen, P.; Zhu, P. W.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, X. H.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Modulating energy states of metallic glasses (MGs) is significant in understanding the nature of glasses and controlling their properties. In this study, we show that high stored energy can be achieved and preserved in bulk MGs by high pressure (HP) annealing, which is a controllable method to continuously alter the energy states of MGs. Contrary to the decrease in enthalpy by conventional annealing at ambient pressure, high stored energy can occur and be enhanced by increasing both annealing temperature and pressure. By using double aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the preserved high energy, which is attributed to the coupling effect of high pressure and high temperature, originates from the microstructural change that involves "negative flow units" with a higher atomic packing density compared to that of the elastic matrix of MGs. The results demonstrate that HP-annealing is an effective way to activate MGs into higher energy states, and it may assist in understanding the microstructural origin of high energy states in MGs.

  16. metal-induced energy transfer (MIET) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karedla, Narain V. S.; Isbaner, Sebastian; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Joerg; Chizhik, Anna M.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new concept for measuring distance values of single molecules from a surface with nanometer accuracy using the energy transfer from the excited molecule to surface plasmons of a metal film [1]. We measure the fluorescence lifetime of individual dye molecules deposited on a dielectric spacer as a function of a spacer thickness. By using our theoretical model [2], we convert the lifetime values into the axial distance of individual molecules. Similar to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), this allows emitters to be localized with nanometer accuracy, but in contrast to FRET the distance range at which efficient energy transfer takes place is an order of magnitude larger. Together with orientation measurements [3], one can potentially use smMIET to localize single emitters with a nanometer precision isotropically, which will facilitate intra- and intermolecular distance measurements in biomolecules and complexes, circumventing the requirement of the knowledge of mutual orientations between two dipole emitters which severely limits the quantification of such distances from a conventional single-pair FRET (spFRET) experiment. [1] Karedla, N., Chizhik, A.I., Gregor, I., Chizhik, A.M., Schulz, O., Enderlein, J., ChemPhysChem, 15, 705-711 (2014). [2] Enderlein J., Biophyical Journal, 78, 2151-8 (2000). [3] Karedla, N., Stein, S. C., Hähnel, D., Gregor, I., Chizhik, A., and Enderlein, J., Physical Review Letters, 115, 173002 (2015).

  17. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; ...

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  18. Effect of impurities on the proneness to temper embrittlement of heat resistant Cr-Mo-V steel

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, I.A.; Kark, G.S.; Pokusaeva, V.I.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the effect of most alloying elements which are traditionaly regarded as dangerous in low-alloy structural steels--sulfur, phosphorus, copper, arsenic, antimony, tin--on the proneness to temper embrittlement of steel 25Kh1M1F which is used for making large all-forged rotors of fixed and transport medium-pressure steam turbines. On the basis of the obtained results it may be concluded that from among the investigated alloying elements only phosphorus and antimony have a statistically significant effect on the proneness of fine-grained steel 25Kh1M1F to temper embrittlement, and the embrittling effect of phosphorus is much stronger than the embrittling effect of antimony.

  19. The effect of copper content and microstructure on the hydrogen embrittlement of AI-6Zn-2Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, D. A.; Thompson, A. W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1983-12-01

    Two commercially-processed Al-6Zn-2Mg alloys, 7050 and a “low copper” 7050, were tested for susceptibility to embrittlement by precharged hydrogen and by simultaneous cathodic charging and straining (SET procedure). Specimens were heat treated to underaged, peak-strength aged, and overaged conditions. In 7050, the peak strength and overaged conditions were not embrittled by hydrogen, though underaged material showed marked embrittlement. All microstructures tested for the low-copper alloy were embrittled. The results agree with the microstructural rationale established through earlier work on 7075 and 2124 aluminum alloys, particularly with respect to the susceptibility of underaged material to hydrogen. As in earlier work, the extent of dislocation transport of hydrogen, and local hydrogen accumulation at grain boundaries, evidently controlled the extent and degree of brittle fracture. These three important alloys can now be ranked in the order 7050, 2124, 7075 of increasing relative susceptibility to the onset of stress corrosion cracking.

  20. Direct optical detection of current induced spin accumulation in metals by magnetization-induced second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pattabi, A. Gu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Finley, J.; Lee, O. J.; Raziq, H. A.; Gorchon, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Bokor, J.

    2015-10-12

    Strong spin-orbit coupling in non-magnetic heavy metals has been shown to lead to large spin currents flowing transverse to a charge current in such a metal wire. This in turn leads to the buildup of a net spin accumulation at the lateral surfaces of the wire. Spin-orbit torque effects enable the use of the accumulated spins to exert useful magnetic torques on adjacent magnetic layers in spintronic devices. We report the direct detection of spin accumulation at the free surface of nonmagnetic metal films using magnetization-induced optical surface second harmonic generation. The technique is applied to probe the current induced surface spin accumulation in various heavy metals such as Pt, β-Ta, and Au with high sensitivity. The sensitivity of the technique enables us to measure the time dynamics on a sub-ns time scale of the spin accumulation arising from a short current pulse. The ability of optical surface second harmonic generation to probe interfaces suggests that this technique will also be useful for studying the dynamics of spin accumulation and transport across interfaces between non-magnetic and ferromagnetic materials, where spin-orbit torque effects are of considerable interest.

  1. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  2. Plasmon-induced Hot Carriers in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter; LANP Team

    2015-03-01

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. Here we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. A. M. acknowledges financial support from the Welch foundation through the J. Evans Attwell-Welch Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of the Smalley Institute of Rice University (Grant No. L-C-004).

  3. On onsagers principle, dislocation motion and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Mcnitt, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    Onsager's reciprocal relationships from the linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics are applied to hydrogen - dislocation interactions. Existing experimental evidence shows that dislocation motion causes localized hydrogen accumulation; thus, from the Onsager principle, localized hydrogen accumulations will affect dislocation motion and therefore the properties of metals and alloys exposed to hydrogen environments.

  4. Effect of residual austenite on the tendency of incompletely aged maraging steels to embrittlement during slow deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kardonskii, V.M.; Gorbunova, N.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigate the high-strength maraging steels (HSMS) N17K10V10MT and N18V10V10MT by cyclic heat treatment and heating to temperatures of the dual-phase (alpha + gamma)-region. Embrittlement during the slow loading of incompletely aged HSMS with titanium can be reduced when approximately 20% of residual austenite is obtained in them. Maraging steel containing residual austenite in the initial state does not tend toward this type of embrittlement.

  5. Effect of heat treatment on grain-boundary chemistry and susceptibility to embrittlement in two low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, W. R.; Paterson, P. J. K.; Pollock, W. J.

    Grain-boundary concentrations of segregants and matrix-hardness levels are measured as a function of heat treatment in a temper embrittled Ni-Cr-P steel and in hydrogen embrittled D6ac steel. The results are interpreted in terms of the possible metallurgical and thermodynamic processes taking place during tempering and ageing of the steels. The susceptibility of D6ac steel to stress-corrosion cracking is related to the degree of impurity segregation at the grain boundary.

  6. Effects of mechanical-bending and process-induced stresses on metal effective work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Chu, Min; Huang, Anping; Thompson, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Effective work function (EWF) change is investigated under both externally-applied mechanical stresses and process-induced stresses. Four-point wafer bending and ring bending techniques are used to generate uniaxial and biaxial mechanical stresses, respectively. For the process-induced stresses, bowing technique and charge pumping method are used for stress characterization and interface state measurement. It was found that higher stress presents in devices with thinner metal gate, regardless the thermal treatment cycle. EWF decreases under both tensile and compressive stress was observed due to the increase of defect activation energy lowering induced donor-like interface states.

  7. Nanomovement of azo polymers induced by metal tip enhanced near-field irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitobi, Hidekazu; Tanabe, Mamoru; Sekkat, Zouheir; Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-08-27

    Nanomovement of azo polymers induced by metal tip enhanced near-field illumination was studied. A protrusion with 47 nm full width at half maximum was induced with a resolution beyond the diffraction limit. At the top of the protrusion, an anisotropic movement occurs in a direction nearly parallel to the polarization of the incident light, and suggests the existence at the tip end of not only a longitudinal but also a lateral component of the electric field of light. The anisotropic photofluidity and the optical gradient force played important roles in the process of the light induced polymer movement.

  8. Light-induced structural phase behaviour of metal nanoparticle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plech, A.; Kotaidis, V.; Wulff, M.; Dahmen, C.; von Plessen, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the structural dynamics of gold nanoparticles induced by femtosecond light excitation. Structure evolution in both embedded particles (glass matrix or liquid water suspension) and quasi-free particles adsorbed on a solid surface is analyzed. By use of stroboscopic laser pump- x-ray probe techniques the structural relaxations have been resolved on the 100 ps time scale at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Several methods including powder scattering, liquid scattering and small angle scattering serve to resolve microscopic and mesoscopic length scales of the composite system. The thermal response includes the heating, lattice melting, explosive solvent evaporation and solvent cooling subsequent to the laser flash excitation. Nonthermal effects are observed with femtosecond excitation. They are attributed to ablation from the particle and particle explosion at strong nonequilibrium conditions. The observations can form a complete picture of the energy dissipation and phase transitions involved in nanoscale composites.

  9. Ion-induced nanopattern propagation on metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, Tomáš; Veselý, Martin; Čapek, Pavel; Král, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the formation of ion-induced patterns on single-crystalline Ni(001) bombarded with a 20 -keV Ga+ ion beam. For near normal ion incidence isotropic roughness forms on the surface. By moving to grazing incidence this pattern gradually transforms into a pronounced ripple pattern with wave vector perpendicular to the ion beam. By using an in situ scanning electron microscope we were able to analyze the real-time dynamics of the pattern formation process and evaluate the direction and velocity of the net in-plane morphology propagation for different angles of ion incidence. We compare the experimental results to the predictions of the classical theory for the pattern formation.

  10. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  11. Optimization of laccase production by two strains of Ganoderma lucidum using phenolic and metallic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Francisco; Papinutti, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst is a white rot fungus that is able to degrade the lignin component in wood. The ability of two strains of this species to produce the ligninolytic enzyme laccase was assessed. After the evaluation of induction with heavy metals and phenolic compounds, it was found that among the tested substances, copper and ferulic acid are the best laccase inducers. It was also observed that the two types of inducers (phenolic and metallic) produce different electrophoretic patterns of laccase activity. Optimized concentrations of inducers were obtained through a factorial design and the thermal stability of optimized supernatants was studied at a wide range of acidic pH. We found that the enzyme is more thermostable at higher pH values. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  13. Indentation-induced plasticity of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilleodden, Erica Thea

    In this dissertation, the results from an experimental and computational study of the nanoindentation response of various metal systems is presented, relating microstructural length-scale to anomalous behavior associated with the initiation and evolution of plasticity. In the cases of coarse-grained structures and epitaxial films, a discrete transition from Hertzian elastic load-displacement behavior is observed at near-theoretical shear stresses, implying that plasticity is initiated by dislocation nucleation. Discrete load-displacement response is also observed during quasi-constant stress experiments and is discussed in terms of "jerky" dislocation motion. At larger displacements the hardness is observed to decrease with increasing displacement. This widely observed indentation size effect is explained, in part, by a strain gradient plasticity law developed by Nix and Gao; at shallow depths an increased dislocation density can lead to an increase in the flow resistance of a material, as described by the Taylor relation. However, such a strain-gradient model maintains a continuum framework and cannot be expected to explain discrete load-displacement behavior observed at the nanometer scale. Furthermore, when the indentation is confined to very small displacements the dependence on dislocation density can be the opposite; an elevated density of dislocation sources can provide an easy mechanism for plasticity at relatively small loads. In contrast to the behavior observed in coarse-grained structures and epitaxial films, indentation into fine-grained films result in initially soft behavior followed by immediate hardening. Rationale for such behavior has been based on the availability of dislocation sources at the grain boundary for initiating plasticity, followed by a Hall-Petch type strengthening mechanism that overwhelms the strain gradient effects. It is also shown that the competition between dislocation nucleation and activation of pre-existing dislocations is

  14. Involvement of multiple transcription factors for metal-induced spy gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-01-20

    Bacteria are directly exposed to metals in environment. To maintain the intracellular metal homeostasis, Escherichia coli contain a number of gene regulation systems, each for response to a specific metal. A periplasmic protein Spy of E. coli was found to be induced upon short-exposure to copper ion in CpxAR-dependent manner. Transcription of the spy gene was also induced by long-exposure to zinc ion. This induction, however, depended on another two-component system BaeSR. Using DNase-I footprinting assay, we identified two BaeR-binding regions on the spy promoter with a direct repeat of the BaeR-box sequence, TCTNCANAA. The zinc-responsive BaeR-binding sites were separated from copper-responsive CpxR-binding site, implying that the spy promoter responds to two species of metal independently through different using sensor-response regulator systems. Since BaeSR-dependent zinc response requires longer time, the induction of spy gene transcription by external zinc may include multiple steps such as through sensing the zinc-induced envelope disorder by BaeSR.

  15. Tailoring transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by photon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Kai -Yang; Fang, Liang; Ye, Rong; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M.; Lin, Feng; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-10-18

    Controlled synthesis of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides with earth-abundant elements have attracted significant interest because of their wide applications, for example as battery electrode materials or electrocatalysts for fuel generation. Here, we report the tuning of the structure of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by controlling chemical reactions using an unfocused laser to irradiate the precursor solution. A Nd:YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 nm or 1064 nm was used. The Ni2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ ion-containing aqueous solution undergoes photo-induced reactions and produces hollow metal-oxide nanospheres (Ni0.18Mn0.45Co0.37Ox) or core–shell metal hydroxide nanoflowers ([Ni0.15Mn0.15Co0.7(OH)2](NO3)0.2•H2O), depending on the laser wavelengths. We propose two reaction pathways, either by photo-induced redox reaction or hydrolysis reaction, which are responsible for the formation of distinct nanostructures. As a result, the study of photon-induced materials growth shines light on the rational design of complex nanostructures with advanced functionalities.

  16. Tailoring transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Kai -Yang; Fang, Liang; Ye, Rong; ...

    2016-10-18

    Controlled synthesis of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides with earth-abundant elements have attracted significant interest because of their wide applications, for example as battery electrode materials or electrocatalysts for fuel generation. Here, we report the tuning of the structure of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by controlling chemical reactions using an unfocused laser to irradiate the precursor solution. A Nd:YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 nm or 1064 nm was used. The Ni2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ ion-containing aqueous solution undergoes photo-induced reactions and produces hollow metal-oxide nanospheres (Ni0.18Mn0.45Co0.37Ox) or core–shell metal hydroxide nanoflowers ([Ni0.15Mn0.15Co0.7(OH)2](NO3)0.2•H2O), depending on the laser wavelengths. We propose twomore » reaction pathways, either by photo-induced redox reaction or hydrolysis reaction, which are responsible for the formation of distinct nanostructures. As a result, the study of photon-induced materials growth shines light on the rational design of complex nanostructures with advanced functionalities.« less

  17. Tight Junction Proteins and Oxidative Stress in Heavy Metals-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  18. Tight junction proteins and oxidative stress in heavy metals-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E ( α -tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals.

  19. Tailoring Transition-Metal Hydroxides and Oxides by Photon-Induced Reactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Fang, Liang; Ye, Rong; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M; Lin, Feng; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-11-07

    Controlled synthesis of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides with earth-abundant elements have attracted significant interest because of their wide applications, for example as battery electrode materials or electrocatalysts for fuel generation. Here, we report the tuning of the structure of transition-metal hydroxides and oxides by controlling chemical reactions using an unfocused laser to irradiate the precursor solution. A Nd:YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 nm or 1064 nm was used. The Ni(2+) , Mn(2+) , and Co(2+) ion-containing aqueous solution undergoes photo-induced reactions and produces hollow metal-oxide nanospheres (Ni0.18 Mn0.45 Co0.37 Ox ) or core-shell metal hydroxide nanoflowers ([Ni0.15 Mn0.15 Co0.7 (OH)2 ](NO3 )0.2 ⋅H2 O), depending on the laser wavelengths. We propose two reaction pathways, either by photo-induced redox reaction or hydrolysis reaction, which are responsible for the formation of distinct nanostructures. The study of photon-induced materials growth shines light on the rational design of complex nanostructures with advanced functionalities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  1. Hydrogen embrittlement in a magnesium grain boundary: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Motohiro; Nishihara, Daiki; Mabuchi, Mamoru; Chino, Yasumasa

    2012-02-29

    First-principles fully relaxed tensile and shear test simulations were performed on Σ10(1124)/[1100] tilt Mg grain boundary (GB) models, with and without H segregation, to investigate mechanisms of H embrittlement of Mg. Strengthening as a result of covalent-like characteristics of Mg-H bonds prevailed over weakening of Mg-Mg bonds resulting from charge transfer; as a result, an H atom strengthened the GB. In addition, because the strong Mg-H bonds suppressed macroscopic GB fracture, elongation to failure was not reduced by H segregation. However, the resistance to GB shearing was increased by H segregation. It is therefore suggested that H segregation enhances crack growth at the GB, because dislocation emission from the crack tip is suppressed, resulting in H embrittlement of Mg.

  2. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of turbine disk alloys. [for space shuttle auxiliary power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Joyce, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Astroloy and V-57, two candidate turbine disk alloys for the auxiliary power unit (APU) of the space shuttle propulsion and power system were tested for their resistance to embrittlement in hydrogen environments. Samples of both these nickel-base alloys were subjected to notch and smooth tensile testing and to creep testing in hydrogen. The high resistance exhibited by Astroloy forgings to embrittlement by hydrogen is attributed to the microstructure produced by forging and also to the special heat treatment schedule. V-57 turbine disks successfully completed short-time performance testing in the experimental APU. The use of the Astroloy, however, would permit increasing turbine inlet temperature and the rotational speed beyond those possible with V-57.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy in a fluoride solution (0.2% APF) has been investigated by means of a tensile test (after immersion) and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Upon immersion, the tensile strength of the alloy decreased to the critical stress level of martensite transformation. Hydrogen desorption of the immersed specimens appeared with a peak at around 500 degrees C. The amount of absorbed hydrogen in the alloy ranged from 100 to 1000 mass ppm when immersed in the fluoride solution for 2 to 24 h. The immersion in the fluoride solution led to the degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement. The results of the present study imply that one reason that Ti and its alloys fracture in the oral cavity is the fact that hydrogen is absorbed in a fluoride solution, such as prophylactic agents.

  4. Effect of shot peening on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Ming-ming; Song, Xiao-long

    2016-06-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel was investigated by electrochemical hydrogen charging, slow strain rate tensile tests, and hydrogen permeation tests. Microstructure observation, microhardness, and X-ray diffraction residual stress studies were also conducted on the steel. The results show that the shot peening specimens exhibit a higher resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in comparison with the no shot peening (NSP) specimens under the same hydrogen-charging current density. In addition, SP treatment sharply decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and increases the subsurface hydrogen concentration. These findings are attributed to the changes in microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer by SP. Scanning electron microscope fractographs reveal that the fracture surface of the NSP specimen exhibits the intergranular and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture modes, whereas the SP specimen shows only the quasi-cleavage fractures under the same hydrogen charging conditions, implying that the SP treatment delays the onset of intergranular fracture.

  5. Relationship of the hydrogen embrittlement of constructional materials in corrosion fatigue to loading asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Marichev, V.A.; Shipilov, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the influence of loading asymmetry on the tendency of construction materials toward hydrogen embrittlement in corrosion fatigue. The influence of cathodic polarization on the kinetics of crack growth in corrosion fatigue of SP-33oh high-speed steel (32Kh3NMFA) and VMD 10 magnesium alloy was investigated. The tests were made at room temperature in corrosive solutions of CrO/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ for the SP-33oh steel and of Cr/sub 3/ and NaOH for the VMD 10 alloy. Relationships were determined for the critical range of stress intensity factors to loading asymmetry. It was established that the leading role of hydrogen embrittlement in the development of corrosion fatigue cracks does not eliminate the possibility of other mechanisms of crack growth.

  6. Current understanding of the effects of enviromental and irradiation variables on RPV embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Wirth, B.; Liu, C.L.

    1997-02-01

    Radiation enhanced diffusion at RPV operating temperatures around 290{degrees}C leads to the formation of various ultrafine scale hardening phases, including copper-rich and copper-catalyzed manganese-nickel rich precipitates. In addition, defect cluster or cluster-solute complexes, manifesting a range of thermal stability, develop under irradiation. These features contribute directly to hardening which in turn is related to embrittlement, manifested as shifts in Charpy V-notch transition temperature. Models based on the thermodynamics, kinetics and micromechanics of the embrittlement processes have been developed; these are broadly consistent with experiment and rationalize the highly synergistic effects of most important irradiation (temperature, flux, fluence) and metallurgical (copper, nickel, manganese, phosphorous and heat treatment) variables on both irradiation hardening and recovery during post-irradiation annealing. A number of open questions remain which can be addressed with a hierarchy of new theoretical and experimental tools.

  7. Heavy metal chelator TPEN attenuates fura-2 fluorescence changes induced by cadmium, mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Masato; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Mitsuya

    2016-06-01

    Stimulation with heavy metals is known to induce calcium (Ca(2+)) mobilization in many cell types. Interference with the measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by the heavy metals in cells loaded with Ca(2+) indicator fura-2 is an ongoing problem. In this study, we analyzed the effect of heavy metals on the fura-2 fluorescence ratio in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by using TPEN, a specific cell-permeable heavy metal chelator. Manganese chloride (30-300 µM) did not cause significant changes in the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. A high concentration (300 µM) of lead acetate induced a slight elevation in the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. In contrast, stimulation with cadmium chloride, mercury chloride or MeHg (3-30 µM) elicited an apparent elevation of the fura-2 fluorescence ratio in a dose-dependent manner. In cells stimulated with 10 or 30 µM cadmium chloride, the addition of TPEN decreased the elevated fura-2 fluorescence ratio to basal levels. In cells stimulated with mercury or MeHg, the addition of TPEN significantly decreased the elevation of the fura-2 fluorescence ratio induced by lower concentrations (10 µM) of mercury or MeHg, but not by higher concentrations (30 µM). Pretreatment with Ca(2+) channel blockers, such as verapamil, 2-APB or lanthanum chloride, resulted in different effects on the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. Our study provides a characterization of the effects of several heavy metals on the mobilization of divalent cations and the toxicity of heavy metals to neuronal cells.

  8. Surface modification of metal and metal coated nanoparticles to induce clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, M. H.; Glembocki, O. J.; Geng, S.; Prokes, S. M.; Garces, N.; Caldwell, J. D.

    2010-08-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for the detection of submonolayer coverage of gold or silver surfaces. The magnitude of the effect and the spectral wavelength of the peak depend on the metal nanoparticles used and its geometry. In this paper we show that the use of chemicals that bind to gold or silver can lead to the clustering of nanoparticles. We used well defined Au nanoparticles in our experiments and add cysteamine to solutions containing the nanoparticles. The plasmonic response of the nanoparticles is measured by transmission Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. We observed significant changes to the SPR spectra that are characteristics of close coupled nanoparticles. The time evolution of these changes indicates the formation of gold nanoparticles clusters. The SERS response of these clustered nanoparticles is observed to red shift from the designed peak wavelength in the green to the red. In addition, the placement of these clusters on dielectric surfaces shifts the SPR even more into the red. The experimental results are supported by calculations of the electromagnetic fields using finite difference methods.

  9. Preparation of metal nitrides via laser induced photolytic decomposition of metal-amides

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, C.K.; Maricq, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    Irradiation of {l_brace}[(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Si]{sub 2}N{r_brace}{sub 3}Y, Zr[N(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}]{sub 4}, and Nb[N(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}]{sub 4} by the 1.064 {micro}m line of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser results in the decomposition of Zr[N(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}]{sub 4} and Nb[N(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}]{sub 4} while {l_brace}[(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Si]{sub 2}N{r_brace}{sub 3}Y remains unaffected. The decomposition is photolytic and is accompanied by a visible emission tracing the path of the incident beam. The decomposition products form corresponding carbide/nitrides on pyrolysis in vacuum and nitrides on pyrolysis in an ammonia atmosphere. The spectroscopic investigation of the visible emission, and the pyrolysis of the decomposition products to metal nitrides is described.

  10. Heavy Metals Induce Iron Deficiency Responses at Different Hierarchic and Regulatory Levels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In plants, the excess of several heavy metals mimics iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis, indicating a disturbance in Fe homeostasis. To examine the level at which heavy metals interfere with Fe deficiency responses, we carried out an in-depth characterization of Fe-related physiological, regulatory, and morphological responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to heavy metals. Enhanced zinc (Zn) uptake closely mimicked Fe deficiency by leading to low chlorophyll but high ferric-chelate reductase activity and coumarin release. These responses were not caused by Zn-inhibited Fe uptake via IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER (IRT1). Instead, Zn simulated the transcriptional response of typical Fe-regulated genes, indicating that Zn affects Fe homeostasis at the level of Fe sensing. Excess supplies of cobalt and nickel altered root traits in a different way from Fe deficiency, inducing only transient Fe deficiency responses, which were characterized by a lack of induction of the ethylene pathway. Cadmium showed a rather inconsistent influence on Fe deficiency responses at multiple levels. By contrast, manganese evoked weak Fe deficiency responses in wild-type plants but strongly exacerbated chlorosis in irt1 plants, indicating that manganese antagonized Fe mainly at the level of transport. These results show that the investigated heavy metals modulate Fe deficiency responses at different hierarchic and regulatory levels and that the interaction of metals with physiological and morphological Fe deficiency responses is uncoupled. Thus, this study not only emphasizes the importance of assessing heavy metal toxicities at multiple levels but also provides a new perspective on how Fe deficiency contributes to the toxic action of individual heavy metals. PMID:28500270

  11. Divalent Metal Ions Enhance DOPAL-induced Oligomerization of Alpha-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patricia; Gross, Daniel; Cooney, Adele; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) features profound striatal dopamine depletion and Lewy bodies containing abundant precipitated alpha-synuclein. Mechanisms linking alpha-synucleinopathy with the death of dopamine neurons remain incompletely understood. One such link may be 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). All of the intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine passes through DOPAL, which is toxic. DOPAL also potently oligomerizes alpha-synuclein and alpha-synuclein oligomers are thought to be pathogenic in PD. Another implicated factor in PD pathogenesis is metal ions, and alpha-synuclein contains binding sites for these ions. In this study we tested whether divalent metal ions augment DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein in cell-free system and in PC12 cells conditionally over-expressing alpha-synuclein. Incubation with divalent metal ions augmented DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein (Cu2+>Fe2+>Mn2+), whereas monovalent Cu1+ and trivalent Fe3+ were without effect. Other dopamine metabolites, dopamine itself, and metal ions alone or in combination with dopamine, also had no effect. Antioxidant treatment with ascorbic acid and divalent cation chelation with EDTA attenuated the augmentation by Cu2+ of DOPAL-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization. Incubation of PC12 cells with L-DOPA markedly increased intracellular DOPAL content and promoted alpha-synuclein dimerization. Co-incubation with Cu2+ amplified (p=0.01), while monoamine oxidase inhibition prevented, L-DOPA-related dimerization of alpha-synuclein (p=0.01). We conclude that divalent metal ions augment DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein. Drugs that interfere with this interaction might constitute a novel approach for future treatment or prevention approaches. PMID:24670480

  12. Divalent metal ions enhance DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patricia; Gross, Daniel; Cooney, Adele; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2014-05-21

    Parkinson disease (PD) features profound striatal dopamine depletion and Lewy bodies containing abundant precipitated alpha-synuclein. Mechanisms linking alpha-synucleinopathy with the death of dopamine neurons remain incompletely understood. One such link may be 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). All of the intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine passes through DOPAL, which is toxic. DOPAL also potently oligomerizes alpha-synuclein and alpha-synuclein oligomers are thought to be pathogenic in PD. Another implicated factor in PD pathogenesis is metal ions, and alpha-synuclein contains binding sites for these ions. In this study we tested whether divalent metal ions augment DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein in cell-free system and in PC12 cells conditionally over-expressing alpha-synuclein. Incubation with divalent metal ions augmented DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein (Cu(2+)>Fe(2+)>Mn(2+)), whereas monovalent Cu(1+) and trivalent Fe(3+) were without effect. Other dopamine metabolites, dopamine itself, and metal ions alone or in combination with dopamine, also had no effect. Antioxidant treatment with ascorbic acid and divalent cation chelation with EDTA attenuated the augmentation by Cu(2+) of DOPAL-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization. Incubation of PC12 cells with L-DOPA markedly increased intracellular DOPAL content and promoted alpha-synuclein dimerization. Co-incubation with Cu(2+) amplified (p=0.01), while monoamine oxidase inhibition prevented, L-DOPA-related dimerization of alpha-synuclein (p=0.01). We conclude that divalent metal ions augment DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein. Drugs that interfere with this interaction might constitute a novel approach for future treatment or prevention approaches.

  13. Pressure-Induced Metallization of the Mott Insulator MnO

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J R; Aracne, C M; Jackson, D D; Weir, S T; Malba, V; Baker, P A; Vohra, Y K

    2004-01-12

    High-pressure electrical conductivity experiments have been performed on the Mott insulator MnO to a maximum pressure of 106 GPa. We observe a steady decrease in resistivity to 90 GPa, followed by a large, rapid decrease by a factor of 10{sup 5} between 90 and 106 GPa. Temperature cycling the sample at 87 and 106 GPa shows insulating and metallic behavior at these pressures, respectively. Our observations provide strong evidence for a pressure-induced Mott insulator-to-metal transition with an accompanying magnetic collapse beginning at 90 GPa.

  14. Enhancement of anomalous Nernst effects in metallic multilayers free from proximity-induced magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Kikkawa, Takashi; Seki, Takeshi; Oyake, Takafumi; Shiomi, Junichiro; Qiu, Zhiyong; Takanashi, Koki; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-09-01

    The anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) has been investigated in alternately stacked multilayer films comprising paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals. We found that the ANE is enhanced by increasing the number of the paramagnet/ferromagnet interfaces and keeping the total thickness of the films constant, and that the enhancement appears even in the absence of magnetic proximity effects; similar behavior was observed not only in Pt/Fe multilayers but also in Au/Fe and Cu/Fe multilayers free from proximity ferromagnetism. This universal enhancement of the ANE in metallic multilayers suggests the presence of unconventional interface-induced thermoelectric conversion in the Fe films attached to the paramagnets.

  15. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  16. Metal-enhanced chemiluminescence: Radiating plasmons generated from chemically induced electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Aslan, Kadir; Malyn, Stuart N.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2006-04-01

    In this letter, we report the observation of metal-enhanced chemiluminescence. Silver Island films, in close proximity to chemiluminescence species, can significantly enhance luminescence intensities; a 20-fold increase in chemiluminescence intensity was observed as compared to an identical control sample containing no silver. This suggests the use of silver nanostructures in the chemiluminescence-based immunoassays used in the biosciences today, to improve signal and therefore analyte detectability. In addition, this finding suggests that surface plasmons can be directly excited by chemically induced electronically excited luminophores, a significant finding toward our understanding of fluorophore-metal interactions and the generation of surface plasmons.

  17. Laser-induced actuation of individual microsize liquid metal droplets on an open solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Chunqing; Dou, Guangbin; Tian, Yanhong; Yang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The actuation of microsize liquid metal droplets on an open solid surface with laser offset heating is reported in this work. The process allows the droplets to move towards the laser beam center. The analysis of the actuations showed that the droplets were predominantly driven by the thermally induced wettability alteration on the solid; in contrast, Marangoni flow and vapor recoil weakened the motion of the droplets. This indicates that a localized thermal gradient was the driving force for droplet motion and suggests that it may be an alternative actuation technique in manipulating liquid metal droplets for microsystems.

  18. Generalized Electron Counting in Determination of Metal-Induced Reconstruction of Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lixin; Wang, E. G.; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhang, S. B.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    Based on theoretical analysis, first-principles calculations, and experimental observations, we establish a generic guiding principle, embodied in generalized electron counting (GEC), that governs the surface reconstruction of compound semiconductors induced by different metal adsorbates. Within the GEC model, the adsorbates serve as an electron bath, donating or accepting the right number of electrons as the host surface chooses a specific reconstruction that obeys the classic electron-counting model. The predictive power of the GEC model is illustrated for a wide range of metal adsorbates.

  19. Observations on the deformation-induced beta internal friction peak in bcc metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    During a study of the effects of electron irradiation on the tungsten alpha mechanism, internal friction data were obtained. The data indicate that the mechanism underlying the beta peak does not possess the relaxation parameters generally associated with a simple dislocation process. The significance of the experimental results in the light of beta observations in other metals is discussed. It is suggested that the beta peaks in deformed bcc metals are the anelastic result of the thermally-activated relaxation of deformation-induced imperfections.

  20. Metal release in metallothioneins induced by nitric oxide: X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Casero, Elena; Martín-Gago, José A; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2004-12-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins that include metal ions in thiolate clusters. The capability of metallothioneins to bind different metals has suggested their use as biosensors for different elements. We study here the interaction of nitric oxide with rat liver MTs by using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. We univocally show that the presence of NO induces the release of Zn atoms from the MT structure to the solution. Zn ions transform in the presence of NO from a tetrahedral four-fold coordinated environment in the MT into a regular octahedral six-fold coordinated state, with interatomic distances compatible with those of Zn solvated in water.