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Sample records for metal induced embrittlement

  1. Embrittlement of Metal by Solute Segregation-Induced Amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.-P.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya; Yuan, Zaoshi; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lu, Gang; Duin, Adri C. T. van

    2010-04-16

    Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10{sup 6}-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics simulations provide the missing link. Namely, an order-of-magnitude reduction of grain-boundary shear strength due to amorphization, combined with tensile-strength reduction, allows the crack tip to always find an easy propagation path.

  2. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, R. P.; Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.; Frohmberg, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement refers to metals stressed while exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere. Tested in air, even after exposure to hydrogen under pressure, this effect is not observed on similar specimens. Much high purity hydrogen is prepared by evaporation of liquid hydrogen, and thus has low levels for potential impurities which could otherwise inhibit or poison the absorbent reactions that are involved. High strength steels and nickel-base allows are rated as showing extreme embrittlement; aluminum alloys and the austenitic stainless steels, as well as copper, have negligible susceptibility to this phenomenon. The cracking that occurs appears to be a surface phenomenon, is unlike that of internal hydrogen embrittlement.

  3. Metal induced embrittlement. Annual report, [March 1, 1989--February 28, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, R.G.

    1990-10-01

    This summarizes the progress made in this program from the start of the renewal on March 1, 1990, to date. The program is investigating the cause of embrittlement that results when certain solid metals and their alloys are exposed to other metals, usually in liquid form. The research is examining a number of factors that influence the degree of embrittlement and is also attempting to develop the basis for understanding the underlying cause of ernbrittlement. Accordingly, the program is a blend of theoretical and experimental approaches.

  4. Recent developments in liquid-metal embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews developments in liquid-metal embrittlement of the past 7 years including data on cyclic loading. Embrittlement by solid and liquid metals and by hydrogen has many common features, although the mechanism of embrittler transport differs. Fracture may occur in each type of embrittlement by environmentally assisted shear and by reduced cohesion; embrittlement under cyclic loading has been widely observed, with stress level, temperature, and substrate alloy composition and grain size being the major variables. The degree of embrittlement between any combination of environment (i.e. hydrogen, liquid metal, or solid metal) and substrate depends upon the strength of the interaction with the substrate, the kinetics of embrittler transport, the mutual solubility of embrittler and substrate, and a large number of test and microstructural conditions. A method of calculating the most significant of these variables and the strength of interaction was reviewed and predictions of embrittlement in previously untested couples were made.

  5. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190/sup 0/C and 525/sup 0/C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500/sup 0/C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel.

  6. Metal induced embrittlement. [Annual report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, R.G.

    1989-08-31

    This program has been directed at the nature and cause of the severe embrittlement and loss of load carrying, capability that occurs in certain solid metals in contact with some liquid metals. This three-year program began March 1, 1987, and, during its course, has involved a set of fracture mechanics experiments to explore the response of several alloy/liquid metal systems coupled with a more theoretical study consisting of atomic simulation of the crack tip separation process. Some of the information generated in this study is contained in papers published or submitted for publication and accompanying, this report. This report is an overview of information contained in these papers as well as information currently in preparation for publication.

  7. Origin of embrittlement in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Glenn R; Demetriou, Marios D; Launey, Maximilien E; Johnson, William L

    2016-09-13

    Owing to their glassy nature, metallic glasses demonstrate a toughness that is extremely sensitive to the frozen-in configurational state. This sensitivity gives rise to "annealing embrittlement," which is often severe and in many respects limits the technological advancement of these materials. Here, equilibrium configurations (i.e., "inherent states") of a metallic glass are established around the glass transition, and the configurational properties along with the plane-strain fracture toughness are evaluated to associate the intrinsic glass toughness with the inherent state properties and identify the fundamental origin of embrittlement. The established correlations reveal a one-to-one correspondence between toughness and shear modulus continuous over a broad range of inherent states, suggesting that annealing embrittlement is controlled almost solely by an increasing resistance to shear flow. This annealing embrittlement sensitivity is shown to vary substantially between metallic glass compositions, and appears to correlate well with the fragility of the metallic glass. PMID:27573817

  8. Origin of embrittlement in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Glenn R; Demetriou, Marios D; Launey, Maximilien E; Johnson, William L

    2016-09-13

    Owing to their glassy nature, metallic glasses demonstrate a toughness that is extremely sensitive to the frozen-in configurational state. This sensitivity gives rise to "annealing embrittlement," which is often severe and in many respects limits the technological advancement of these materials. Here, equilibrium configurations (i.e., "inherent states") of a metallic glass are established around the glass transition, and the configurational properties along with the plane-strain fracture toughness are evaluated to associate the intrinsic glass toughness with the inherent state properties and identify the fundamental origin of embrittlement. The established correlations reveal a one-to-one correspondence between toughness and shear modulus continuous over a broad range of inherent states, suggesting that annealing embrittlement is controlled almost solely by an increasing resistance to shear flow. This annealing embrittlement sensitivity is shown to vary substantially between metallic glass compositions, and appears to correlate well with the fragility of the metallic glass.

  9. Noble Metals Would Prevent Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    According to proposal, addition of small amounts of noble metals makes iron- and nickel-based alloys less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen. Metallurgists demonstrated adding 0.6 to 1.0 percent by weight of Pd or Pt eliminates stress/corrosion cracking in type 4130 steel. Proposal based on assumption that similar levels (0.5 to 1.0 weight percent) of same elements effective against hydrogen embrittlement.

  10. Critical Crystallization for Embrittlement in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketkaew, Jittisa; Liu, Ze; Chen, Wen; Schroers, Jan

    2015-12-01

    We studied the effect of crystallization on the embrittlement of bulk metallic glasses. Specifically, we measured fracture toughness for Zr44Ti11Cu10Ni10Be25 and Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 after annealing at various times to introduce controlled volume fraction of crystallization. We found that crystallization of up to ˜6 % by volume does not measurably affect fracture toughness. When exceeding ˜6 % , a dramatic drop in fracture toughness occurs; an additional 1% of crystallization reduces fracture toughness by 50%. Such a dramatic transition can be explained by the interaction among the crystals' stress fields in the amorphous matrix that becomes effective at ˜7 % crystallinity. Our findings of a critical crystallization for embrittlement of metallic glasses help in designing tough metallic glasses and their composites, as well as defining processing protocols for the unique thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses to avoid embrittlement.

  11. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  12. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  13. Liquid-metal embrittlement of refractory metals by molten plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Bergin, J.B.; McInturff, S.A.; Kuhn, B.A.

    1980-07-01

    Embrittlement by molten plutonium of the refractory metals and alloys W-25 wt % Re, tantalum, molybdenum, and Ta-10 wt % W was studied. At 900/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, the materials tested may be ranked in order of decreasing susceptibility to liquid-plutonium embrittlement as follows: molybdenum, W-25 wt % Re, Ta-10 wt % W, and tantalum. These materials exhibited a wide range in susceptibility. Embrittlement was found to exhibit a high degree of temperature and strain-rate dependence, and we present arguments that strongly support a stress-assisted, intergranular, liquid-metal corrosion mechanism. We also believe microstructure plays a key role in the extent of embrittlement. In the case of W-25 wt % Re, we have determined that a dealloying corrosion takes place in which rhenium is selectively withdrawn from the alloy.

  14. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  15. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  16. Failures in large gas turbines due to liquid-metal embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, D.W. . Turbo Products Division)

    1994-07-01

    The failures of three gas turbine components, attributed to liquid-metal embrittlement or solid-metal-induced embrittlement, are described. High temperatures inherent in the gas turbine can aggravate these phenomenon if the necessary conditions are present. Examples chosen include a power transmission shaft, flange bolts from a cooling steam line, and a turbine rotor bolt. The respective material couples involved are 17-4PH stainless steel-copper, AISI 4130-cadmium, and IN 718-cadmium. Each case includes information on the source of the aggressive material and relevant operating environment. The implications of the failures with regard to the general failure mechanism are briefly discussed.

  17. Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

  18. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B. W.; Brewer, L. N.

    2014-10-01

    This research examined the susceptibility of MA956 to liquid metal embrittlement using two experimental approaches. In both approaches, historical data on traditional steels was used to determine likely conditions to promote liquid metal embrittlement in lead and lead-bismuth eutectic environments. U-bend specimens of MA956 were found to be immune to liquid metal embrittlement after prolonged exposure to liquid lead. Similarly, slow strain rate testing of MA956 showed immunity to liquid metal embrittlement for both lead and lead-bismuth at temperatures of 328 °C and 150 °C respectively corresponding to the melting temperature of each embrittler individually. These results suggest that the same passive protective oxide layers that limit general corrosion and oxidation also prevent liquid metal embrittlement.

  19. Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Sabine; Kumar, Mukul; Somerday, Brian P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-10

    The feasibility of using 'grain-boundary engineering' techniques to reduce the susceptibility of a metallic material to intergranular embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen is examined. Using thermomechanical processing, the fraction of 'special' grain boundaries was increased from 46% to 75% (by length) in commercially pure nickel samples. In the presence of hydrogen concentrations between 1200 and 3400 appm, the high special fraction microstructure showed almost double the tensile ductility; also, the proportion of intergranular fracture was significantly lower and the J{sub c} fracture toughness values were some 20-30% higher in comparison with the low special fraction microstructure. We attribute the reduction in the severity of hydrogen-induced intergranular embrittlement to the higher fraction of special grain boundaries, where the degree of hydrogen segregation at these boundaries is reduced.

  20. Simulation of He embrittlement at grain boundaries in bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masatake

    2015-10-01

    To investigate what atomic properties largely determine vulnerability to He embrittlement at grain boundaries (GB) of bcc metals, we introduce a computational model composed of first principles density functional theory and a He segregation rate theory model. Predictive calculations of He embrittlement at the first wall of the future DEMO fusion concept reactor indicate that variation in the He embrittlement originated not only from He production rate related to neutron irradiation, but also from the He segregation energy at the GB that has a systematic trend in the periodic table.

  1. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  2. A New Venue Toward Predicting the Role of Hydrogen Embrittlement on Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Burak; Sahin, Ibrahim; Uzun, Alper; Canadinc, Demircan

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new crystal plasticity formulation to predict the role of hydrogen embrittlement on the mechanical behavior of metallic materials. Specifically, a series of experiments were carried out to monitor the role of hydrogen interstitial content on the uniaxial tensile deformation response of iron alloyed with hydrogen, and the classical Voce hardening scheme was modified to account for the shear stresses imposed on arrested dislocations due to the surrounding hydrogen interstitials. The proposed set of physically grounded crystal plasticity formulations successfully predicted the deformation response of iron in the presence of different degrees of hydrogen embrittlement. Moreover, the combined experimental and modeling effort presented herein opens a new venue for predicting the alterations in the performance of metallic materials, where the hydrogen embrittlement is unavoidable.

  3. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  4. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  5. Moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-04-01

    FeAl alloys {ge}24 at. %Al are H embrittled by both H2 gas and water vapor. This examines effect of H embrittlement by H2 gas and moisture-bearing air on tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance of two ordered FeAl intermetallic alloys (28, 36 at. % Al) and one disordered Fe-Al alloy (16 at. % Al). Susceptibility to embrittlement varies with both Al content and ordered state. Tensile ductility of disordered low Al alloy is not affected by moisture-bearing air, and fatigue crack growth resistance is affected only slightly by moisture. However, the higher Al alloys are severely embrittled by moisture-bearing air. Oxidation of Al with concurrent release of H2 is responsible for embrittlement of Fe3Al alloys. It is likely that the smaller amount of Al available for the oxidation reaction in the 16at. % alloy precludes such embrittling reactions. In contrast, H2 is found to be embrittling to all alloys in both cyclic and monotonic tests. Fractography shows that H2 preferentially attacks cleavage planes in these alloys. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance in an inert environment of the low Al disordered alloy is found to be much lower than that for the high Al alloys. Fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment can be expressed as superposed mechanical fatigue and corrosion-fatigue components. Fatigue crack growth tests in inert and embrittling environments are used to isolate corrosion fatigue of the crack growth rate in Fe-28at. %Al. The corrosion-fatigue component displays a frequency dependence: At lower frequencies, more time is available for penetration of H ahead of the crack tip. H transport in the Fe-Al alloys occurs primarily by dislocation-assisted transport, which allows for penetration depths of 10-100x the distance that can be achieved by bulk diffusion. An equation is developed for the corrosion-fatigue component of crack growth rate which includes stress intensity range and frequency dependence.

  6. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  7. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C.; Begley, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  8. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C. ); Begley, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  9. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  10. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1994-04-19

    Alloy FA-129 undergoes an increase in crack propagation rate and a loss of fracture toughness in moisture-bearing and hydrogen gas environments. A similar effect is seen on ductility of FA-129 in tensile tests. The embrittling effect in air is attributed to oxidation of aluminum in the alloy by water vapor to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrogen gas. Alloy FAP-Y, which is disordered and contains only 16 a%Al is embrittled by hydrogen gas in a manner similar to that of FA-129. However, laboratory air had little effect on the crack growth rates, fracture toughness, or tensile ductility. The lower aluminum content apparently is insufficient to induce the Al-H{sub 2}O reaction. TEM and SEM analyses of microstructure and fracture surfaces were consistent with the change in fracture toughness with order and environment. Testing at elevated temperatures reduces crack growth rates in FA-129, and increases fracture toughness and ductility. This is consistent with the well documented peak in hydrogen embrittlement in structural alloys at or near room temperature. Elevated temperature affects the degree of embrittlement in a complex manner, possibly changing the rates of several of the processes involved.

  11. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  12. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  13. Influence of thermal neutrons on embrittlement and hardening in weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovic, R.; Jordinson, C.

    1999-07-01

    The influence of thermal neutrons on embrittlement of a number of submerged arc weld metal steels has been studied in a series of experiments undertaken in a reactor which provided a highly thermalized flux spectrum with a ratio of thermal displacements per atom (dpa) (neutron energies <1 keV) to fast dpa (neutron energies >1 keV) of about two at an irradiation temperature of 240 °C. A statistical analysis set in a Bayes framework is presented for Charpy impact energy test data measured on the submerged arc weld metal specimens subjected to accelerated neutron irradiation for two different exposure periods. Prior to the accelerated irradiation, the specimens were subjected to neutron irradiation under surveillance conditions. The analysis presents models for changes of Charpy impact energy properties measured over a range of test temperatures extending from the lower to upper shelf energy levels, as a function of neutron irradiation dose. Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling was applied to obtain estimates of the posterior probability distributions of the model parameters. These parameters were then used to compute the ductile to brittle transition temperature shifts at the 40 J energy level in the Charpy impact energy against temperature curves. Using the results for the ductile to brittle transition temperature shifts, the effectiveness of the thermal neutrons can be estimated for submerged arc weld metal used in the construction of operating Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels.

  14. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey themore » empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.« less

  15. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson's ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a "mechanical probe" of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.

  16. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.

  17. Continuum Description of Atomistics for Nanomechanics of Grain Boundary Embrittlement in FCC Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-S.; Wang, C.-K.; Cha, M.-H.; Chew, H. B.

    2012-02-01

    A nonlinear field projection method has been developed to study nanometer scale mechanical properties of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline FCC metals [1]. The nonlinear field projection is based on the principle of virtual work, for virtual variations of atomic positions in equilibrium through nonlocal interatomic interactions such as EAM potential interaction, to get field-projected subatomic-resolution traction distributions on various grain boundaries. The analyses show that the field projected traction produces periodic concentrated compression sites on the grain boundary, which act as crack trapping or dislocation nucleation sites. The field projection was also used to assess the nanometer scale failure processes of Cu σ5 and σ9 grain boundaries doped with Pb. It was revealed that the most significant atomic rearrangement is dislocation emission which requires local GB slip, and some Pb locks the local GB slip and in turn, embrittles the GB. Reference: [1] C.-K. Wang, et al., 2011, MRS Proceedings, Vol. 1297, DOI: 10.1557/opl.2011.678.

  18. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  19. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  20. First principles assessment of ideal fracture energies of materials with mobile impurities: implications for hydrogen embrittlement of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, D.E.; Carter, Emily A. . E-mail: eac@chem.ucla.edu

    2004-09-20

    We propose that the ideal fracture energy of a material with mobile bulk impurities can be obtained within the framework of a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle. We show that such a definition has the advantage of initial and final states at equilibrium, connected by well-defined and measurable energetic quantities, which can also be calculated from first principles. Using this approach, we calculate the ideal fracture energy of metals (Fe and Al) in the presence of varying amounts of hydrogen, using periodic density functional theory. We find that the metal ideal fracture energy decreases almost linearly with increasing hydrogen coverage, dropping by {approx}45% at one-half monolayer of hydrogen, indicating a substantial reduction of metal crystal cohesion in the presence of hydrogen atoms and providing some insight into the cohesion-reduction mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in metals.

  1. Environmental embrittlement in ordered intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1992-12-31

    Ordered intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides possess many promising properties for elevated-temperature applications; however, poor fracture resistance and limited fabricability restrict their use as engineering material. Recent studies have shown that environmental embrittlement is a major cause of low ductility and brittle fracture in many ordered intermetallic alloys. There are two types of environmental embrittlement observed in intermetallic alloys. One is hydrogen-induced embrittlement occurring at ambient temperatures in air. The other is oxygen-induced embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In most cases, the embrittlements are due to a dynamic effect involving generation and penetration of embrittling agents (i.e., hydrogen or oxygen ) during testing. Diffusion of embrittling agents plays a dominant role in fracture of these intermetallic alloys. This chapter summarizes recent progress in understanding and reducing environmental embrittlement in these alloys.

  2. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  3. Nondestructive detection and measurement of hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Alex, Franklin; Byrne, Joseph Gerald

    1977-01-01

    A nondestructive system and method for the determination of the presence and extent of hydrogen embrittlement in metals, alloys, and other crystalline structures subject thereto. Positron annihilation characteristics of the positron-electron annihilation within the tested material provide unique energy distribution curves for each type of material tested at each respective stage of hydrogen embrittlement. Gamma radiation resulting from such annihilation events is detected and statistically summarized by appropriate instrumentation to reveal the variations of electron activity within the tested material caused by hydrogen embrittlement therein. Such data from controlled tests provides a direct indication of the relative stages of hydrogen embrittlement in the form of unique energy distribution curves which may be utilized as calibration curves for future comparison with field tests to give on-site indication of progressive stages of hydrogen embrittlement.

  4. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  5. Laser peening for reducing hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Zaleski, Tania M.; Chen, Hao-Lin; Hill, Michael R.; Liu, Kevin K.

    2010-05-25

    A laser peening process for the densification of metal surfaces and sub-layers and for changing surface chemical activities provides retardation of the up-take and penetration of atoms and molecules, particularly Hydrogen, which improves the lifetime of such laser peened metals. Penetration of hydrogen into metals initiates an embrittlement that leaves the material susceptible to cracking.

  6. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  7. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of V-Ti-Ni and V-Ni alloys in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Garner, F.A.; Pawel, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    Vanadium, V-1Ni, V-10Ti and V-10Ti-1Ni (at %) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels strongly elevated the ductile to brittle transition temperature. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces leads to strong increases in the density of the alloy.

  8. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  9. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  10. Liquid-metal-induced fracture mode of martensitic T91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.L.; Auger, T.; Johnson, Duane, Robertson, I.M.

    2012-04-04

    The liquid–metal-induced fracture mode of T91 martensitic steel was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure and crack network in specimens obtained from focused-ion beam machining at and immediately below the fracture surface. Contrary to previous claims of quasi-cleavage fracture, the dominant fracture mode is intergranular cracking at martensite laths and prior austenite grain boundaries. These fracture mode results clarify an outstanding issue in liquid–metal embrittlement of steels that generally occur in a heavily-deformed microstructure. Several cracks were arrested at intergranular carbides, suggesting a metallurgical strategy for impeding liquid–metal-induced crack propagation.

  11. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-01

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  12. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-21

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  13. A comparison of internal hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen environment embrittlement of X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.

    1999-12-01

    Hydrogen has been shown to degrade the mechanical properties of nickel-base alloys. This degradation occurs whether the material is in a hydrogen producing environment or if the material has dissolved hydrogen in the metal due to prior exposure to hydrogen. Materials behave differently under these two conditions. Therefore, the degradation due to hydrogen has been split into two categories, internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE). IHE may be defined as the embrittlement of a material that has been charged with hydrogen prior to testing or service while HEE may be defined by the embrittlement of a material in a hydrogen environment where the hydrogen may come from gaseous hydrogen or generated from a corrosion reaction. This work will compare IHE and HEE of fracture mechanics specimens. Different fugacities of hydrogen for HEE and hydrogen concentrations for IHE were examined for Alloy X-750, a nickel-base super alloy. The test results were analyzed and the role of hydrogen in IHE and HEE was evaluated. A model based on a critical grain boundary hydrogen concentration will be proposed to describe the behavior in both HEE and IHE conditions.

  14. Hydrogen-induced embrittlement wear of a high-strength, low-alloy steel in an acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.C.; Jiang, X.X.; Li, S.Z.

    1997-03-01

    Corrosive wear of a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) was examined in 0.02 mol/L sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solution at different polarized potentials and loads using a pin-on-disc wear device and a potentiostat. Morphologies of the wear tracks were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogen content in the surface or subsurface of wear tracks was determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Results showed the increased material removal with a negative of potential in the cathodically polarized range resulted from the synergistic effect of hydrogen-induced damage and mechanical wear from hydrogen evolution on the wear surface. Increases in wear loss with potential in the anodically polarized range resulted from synergism between anodic dissolution and wear.

  15. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  16. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural alloys. A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to hydrogen embrittlement of structural metals and alloys are reviewed. Particular note was taken of documents regarding hydrogen effects in rocket propulsion, aircraft propulsion and hydrogen energy systems, including storage and transfer systems.

  17. Embrittlement data base, version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water-reactor (LWR) pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials depends on many different factors such as flux, fluence, fluence spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Based on embrittlement predictions, decisions must be made concerning operating parameters and issues such as low-leakage-fuel management, possible life extension, and the need for annealing the pressure vessel. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules and test reactor experiments, comprising many different materials and different irradiation conditions, are needed to develop generally applicable damage prediction models that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Version 1 of the Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data resulting from merging version 2 of the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB). Fracture toughness data were also integrated into Version 1 of the EDB. For power reactor data, the current EDB lists the 1,029 Charpy transition-temperature shift data points, which include 321 from plates, 125 from forgoings, 115 from correlation monitor materials, 246 from welds, and 222 from heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials that were irradiated in 271 capsules from 101 commercial power reactors. For test reactor data, information is available for 1,308 different irradiated sets (352 from plates, 186 from forgoings, 303 from correlation monitor materials, 396 from welds and 71 from HAZs) and 268 different irradiated plus annealed data sets.

  18. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  19. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  20. Temperature dependence of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under low cycle fatigue in lead-bismuth eutectic at 160-450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Marmy, Pierre; Qin, Ling; Verlinden, Bert; Wevers, Martine; Seefeldt, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties of a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in a low oxygen concentration (LOC) lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) environment and in vacuum at 160-450 °C. The results show a clear fatigue endurance "trough" in LOC LBE, while no such a strong temperature dependence of the fatigue endurance is observed when the steel is tested in vacuum. The fractographic observations by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that ductile microdimples are prevalent on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum, whereas the fracture surfaces produced in LOC LBE at all the temperatures are characterized by quasi-cleavage. Interestingly, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), martensitic laths close to the fatigue crack walls or to the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to have transformed into very fine equiaxed subgrains. Nevertheless, such microstructural modifications do not happen to the specimens tested in LOC LBE at 160-450 °C. These interesting microstructural distinctions indicate that liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is able to occur throughout the fatigue crack propagation phase in the full range of the temperatures investigated, i.e. LME is not very sensitive to temperature during the fatigue crack propagation.

  1. Technique to Predict Ultraviolet Radiation Embrittlement of Polymers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the low-Earth-orbit environment, solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation embrittles polymer materials through bond breaking and crosslinking. This UV embrittlement increases the surface hardness of the polymer. Before the durability of polymer materials in the low- Earth-orbit environment can be predicted, the extent of UV embrittlement needs to be determined. However, traditional techniques for measuring the microhardness of materials cannot be employed to measure changes in the hardness of UV-embrittled surfaces because traditional techniques measure bulk hardness and are not sensitive enough to surface changes. A unique technique was used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to quantify polymer surface damage that had been induced by UV radiation. The technique uses an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure surface microhardness. An atomic force microscope measures the repulsive forces between the atoms in a microscopic cantilevered tip and the atoms on the surface of a sample. Typically, an atomic force microscope produces a topographic image of a surface by monitoring the movement of the tip over features of the surface. The force applied to the cantilevered tip, and the indention of the tip into the surface, can be measured. The relationship between force and distance of indentation, the quantity force/distance (newtons/meter), provides a measure of the surface hardness. Under identical operating conditions, direct comparisons of surface hardness values can be made.

  2. Corrosion and embrittlement of high-strength steel bridge wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaas, Garry Wayne

    Suspension bridge cable inspections have revealed severely corroded and broken wires in some main cables. Accelerated cyclic corrosion studies were conducted to assess the relative effect of corrosion on high-strength steel bridge wire. Galvanized and ungalvanized wire samples were corroded under various levels of sustained loads in a cabinet that cyclically applied an acidic salt spray, dry conditions, and 100% relative humidity at elevated temperature. Mass loss, hydrogen concentration, ultimate load, and elongation at failure were measured for corroded and uncorroded samples. Elongation measurements indicated a significant embrittlement of the wires that could not be explained only by the presence of absorbed hydrogen (hydrogen embrittlement). The main cause of reduction of wire elongation was found to be the surface irregularities induced by the corrosion process. The corrosion process in a high-strength steel wire was modeled and analyzed using finite element methods. Forty-one separate FEM tests were run and this data was compared to the experimental data. In addition, for the purpose of comparison, a previously developed hydrogen embrittlement model was analyzed and its validity was discussed in detail. SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces were taken and possible causes and mechanisms of fracture were suggested by observations of the fracture morphology. It was shown through this experimental and numerical research work that the geometry of the wire, determined by the amount of corrosion, pitting, and surface irregularities, controls the ultimate elongation of the wire sample, as also confirmed by the SEM analysis of the fracture surfaces. It was also shown that, using a generally accepted hydrogen embrittlement model, there is no evidence that hydrogen embrittlement is occurring, or at least that hydrogen evolution is not the controlling factor in the loss of wire's ductility.

  3. Ultrasonic evaluation of thermal embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, E.; Isobe, Y.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-08-01

    Potential application of ultrasonic test (UT) to characterization of thermal embrittlement of a duplex stainless steel (SUS329) was studied. After annealing the specimen at 800 C for times up to 10 hours, change in acoustic properties were measured with such parameters as amplitude and power spectrum of the bottom surface echo, and sound velocity in the specimen. In addition to UT, Charpy-impact tests, Vicker`s hardness tests and X-ray diffraction analysis were conducted. The results indicated that amplitude and power spectrum band width of the bottom surface echo were increased with annealing.

  4. Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    2000-04-01

    Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

  5. A Quantitative Concept of the Permeability to Hydrogen of Passivating Layers on a Metal at the Apex of the Crack in the Corrosion-induced Cracking of Constructional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marichev, Viktor A.

    1987-05-01

    A general theoretical and methodological approach to the determination of the role of the local anodic dissolution and hydrogen-induced embrittlement in the corrosion-induced cracking of various constructional materials is examined. The possibility of the quantitative estimation of the role of the hydrogen-induced embrittlement in the corrosion-induced cracking of high-strength steels and titanium, aluminium, magnesium, and zirconium alloys is demonstrated. A quantitative concept of the permeability of hydrogen of passivating layers on a metal at the apex of a crack, which has made it possible to determine quantitatively for the first time the relation between the critical concentration of hydrogen and the stress intensity coefficient in the hydrogen-induced embrittlement of steels and titanium and aluminium alloys, has been developed on the basis of several postulates. Two new methods for the investigation of the adsorption of hydrogen and anions at the apex of the crack in corrosion-induced cracking, based on this concept, are proposed. The bibliography includes 47 references.

  6. Metal-induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Bornhorst, Julia; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The model species, Caenorhabditis elegans, has been used as a tool to probe for mechanisms underlying numerous neurodegenerative diseases. This use has been exploited to study neurodegeneration induced by metals. The allure of the nematode comes from the ease of genetic manipulation, the ability to fluorescently label neuronal subtypes, and the relative simplicity of the nervous system. Notably, C. elegans have approximately 60–80% of human genes and contain genes involved in metal homeostasis and transport, allowing for the study of metal-induced degeneration in the nematode. This review discusses methods to assess degeneration as well as outlines techniques for genetic manipulation and presents a comprehensive survey of the existing literature on metal-induced degeneration studies in the worm. PMID:23730287

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  8. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin I Practical Aspects of the Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    Since aircraft design is tending toward all-metal construction, the strong heat-treatable light aluminum alloy, duralumin (a generic name for a class of heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si), is finding increasing application. Doubt has been expressed concerning the reliability and permanence of these materials. Information is given on the effect of corrosion on the tensile properties of 14-gauge sheet duralumin, heat treated by quenching in hot water after being heated for 15 minutes in a fused nitrate bath at 500 to 510 C. Intercrystalline corrosion and practical aspects of intercrystalline embrittlement are discussed with respect to duralumin.

  9. Metal induced gap states at alkali halide/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2004-10-01

    The electronic state of a KCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface was investigated using the Cl K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A pre-peak observed on the bulk edge onset of thin KCl films has a similar feature to the peak at a LiCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface, which originates from the metal induced gap state (MIGS). The present result indicates that the MIGS is formed universally at alkali halide/metal interfaces. The decay length of MIGS to an insulator differs from each other, mainly due to the difference in the band gap energy of alkali halide.

  10. Pressure-Induced Foaming of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Mukherjee, Manas; Jiménez, Catalina; Banhart, John

    2015-05-01

    Pressure-induced foaming (PIF) of metals is a foaming technique in which blowing agent free compacted metal powders are foamed. The method consists of heating hot-compacted metallic precursors to above their melting temperature under gas overpressure and foaming them by pressure release. This study focuses on PIF of Al99.7 and AlSi7 alloys under both air or Ar and overpressures up to 9 bar. In situ x-ray radioscopy allows us to follow the foaming process and to perform quantitative analyses of expansion, foam morphology, and coalescence rate. Mass spectrometry helps to identify hydrogen as the foaming gas. Adsorbates on the former powder particles are found to be the primary gas source. Various advantages of this new method are identified and discussed.

  11. Pressure-induced metallization of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,X.; Struzhkin, V.; Song, Y.; Goncharov, A.; Ahart, M.; Liu, Z.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2008-01-01

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH4), silane (SiH4), and germane (GeH4) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH4 undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27-30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization.

  12. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb Welds

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; C.K. Battige; N. Liwis; M.A. Penik; J. Kikel; A.J. Silvia; C.K. McDonald

    2001-03-18

    Nickel based alloys are often welded with argon/hydrogen shielding gas mixtures to minimize oxidation and improve weld quality. However, shielding gas mixtures with {ge} 1% hydrogen additions can result in hydrogen concentrations greater than 5 wt. ppm in the weld metal and reduce ductility via hydrogen embrittlement. For the conditions investigated, the degree of hydrogen embrittlement is highly variable between 5 and 14 wt. ppm. investigation of hydrogen embrittlement of EN82H GTAW welds via tensile testing, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that this variability is due to the inhomogeneous microstructure of the welds, the presence of recrystallized grains, and complex residual plastic strains. Specifically, research indicates that high residual strains and hydrogen trapping lower the ductility of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb weld metal when dissolved hydrogen concentrations are greater than 5 wt. ppm. The inhomogeneous microstructure contains columnar dendritic, cellular dendritic, and recrystallized grains. The decreased tensile ductility observed in embrittled samples is recovered by post weld heat treatments that decrease the bulk hydrogen concentration below 5 wt. ppm.

  13. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  14. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructural evolution of metals and alloys are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of crystal structure, neutron dose and temperature. The corresponding effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys are summarized, with particular attention on the phenomena of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. The prospects of developing improved high-performance structural materials with high resistance to radiation-induced property degradation are briefly discussed.

  15. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  16. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  17. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  18. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pulse-Plated Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Eggert D.; Von Bestenbostel, Wolfgang; Sebald, Torsten; Paronis, Georgios; Vanelli, Diego; Müller, Yves

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the European-funded project MultiHy (Multiscale modeling of hydrogen embrittlement in crystalline materials) is the development of multiscale models for hydrogen transport in complex microstructures. The validation and application of the models will be carried out by investigating the role of the microstructure in industrial problems involving hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of advanced materials. Pulse-plated nickel (PP-Ni) material, as used in various industrial applications, has shown a susceptibility to HE that may cause premature failure of a structure. Due to the nature of the pulse-plating process, H is incorporated into the microstructure of the material. This H may lead to crack initiation when combined with localized stress concentrations due to subsequent manufacturing steps, e.g., welding. This article provides an overview of experimental studies aimed at evaluating the influence of the microstructure on the susceptibility of PP-Ni to HE and, ultimately, at improving the plating process.

  19. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  20. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, R.G.; Dietzel, W.; Zhang, B.J.; Liu, W.J.; Tseng, M.K.; Atrens, A

    2004-09-20

    The age hardening, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu 7175 alloy were investigated experimentally. There were two peak-aged states during ageing. For ageing at 413 K, the strength of the second peak-aged state was slightly higher than that of the first one, whereas the SCC susceptibility was lower, indicating that it is possible to heat treat 7175 to high strength and simultaneously to have high SCC resistance. The SCC susceptibility increased with increasing Mg segregation at the grain boundaries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) increased with increased hydrogen charging and decreased with increasing ageing time for the same hydrogen charging conditions. Computer simulations were carried out of (a) the Mg grain boundary segregation using the embedded atom method and (b) the effect of Mg and H segregation on the grain boundary strength using a quasi-chemical approach. The simulations showed that (a) Mg grain boundary segregation in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is spontaneous, (b) Mg segregation decreases the grain boundary strength, and (c) H embrittles the grain boundary more seriously than does Mg. Therefore, the SCC mechanism of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is attributed to the combination of HE and Mg segregation induced grain boundary embrittlement.

  2. Hydrogen Effect against Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Kanezaki, Toshihiko; Mine, Yoji

    2010-10-01

    The well-known term “hydrogen embrittlement” (HE) expresses undesirable effects due to hydrogen such as loss of ductility, decreased fracture toughness, and degradation of fatigue properties of metals. However, this article shows, surprisingly, that hydrogen can have an effect against HE. A dramatic phenomenon was found in which charging a supersaturated level of hydrogen into specimens of austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316L drastically improved the fatigue crack growth resistance, rather than accelerating fatigue crack growth rates. Although this mysterious phenomenon has not previously been observed in the history of HE research, its mechanism can be understood as an interaction between hydrogen and dislocations. Hydrogen can play two roles in terms of dislocation mobility: pinning (or dragging) and enhancement of mobility. Competition between these two roles determines whether the resulting phenomenon is damaging or, unexpectedly, desirable. This finding will, not only be the crucial key factor to elucidate the mechanism of HE, but also be a trigger to review all existing theories on HE in which hydrogen is regarded as a dangerous culprit.

  3. Cryogenic mechanical properties and hydrogen embrittlement of SAF2205

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.Y.; Wang, A.C.; Yang, K.

    1997-06-01

    Mechanical properties and Internal Hydrogen Embrittlement (IHE) of an {alpha}+{gamma} duplex stainless steel have been conducted over the temperature range of 293-77K. The results showed that by lowering of testing temperature, the strength of the alloy increased obviously, but the elongation increased to 153K and decreased at lower temperature, while the area reduction decreased a little; at the same time, the H-induced loss of area reduction and elongation got the highest values at about 223K and decreased to almost zero at 77K. Analyses on microstructure indicated that the formation of martensite could occur during deformation and/or decreasing of temperature, which would result in some increase in strength and the temperature dependence of ductility of the alloy at low temperature. However, the IHE behavior of the alloy was found being dependent on both the formation of martensite and the diffusive ability of hydrogen.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  5. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  6. Metal/metal exothermic reactions induced by low velocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, D.L.; Davis, J.J.; Miller, P.J.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses experimental results from an effort conducted to discern the basic mechanism of reactions in porous metal/metal compositions under rapid plastic flow conditions. Small-scale impact tests were performed on various intermetallic mixtures: 3CuO + 2Al, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 2Al, Ni + Al, and 5Ti + 3Si. The addition of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) to the metal/metal mixtures has been demonstrated to affect the extent of the reactions. Real-time emissivity and species evolution measurements of the reacting materials were used to discern the chemical reactions occurring under rapid plastic flow conditions.

  7. Apparatus For Tests Of Embrittlement By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C.; Lycou, Peter P.

    1992-01-01

    Test apparatus exposes disk specimens to hydrogen in controlled, repeatable way simulating conditions in use. Disk specimen constitutes thin wall between pressure and vacuum chambers. Test proceeds until hydrogen weakens disk enough that it ruptures. Aluminum impact plate absorbs debris from ruptured disk. Apparatus replicates aspects of service environments relevant to embrittlement by hydrogen in such equipment as storage tanks, valves, and fluid-handling components containing hydrogen at high absolute or gauge pressure. Hydrogen inside permeates stressed material and produces gradient of concentration as hydrogen diffuses through material to low-pressure side.

  8. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  9. Nondestructive Technique To Assess Embrittlement In Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research at NASA Langley Research Center led to identification of nondestructive technique for detection of temper embrittlement in HY80 steel. Measures magnetoacoustic emission associated with reversible motion of domain walls at low magnetic fields. Of interest to engineers responsible for reliability and safety of various dynamically loaded and/or thermally cycled steel parts. Applications include testing of landing gears, naval vessels, and parts subjected to heat, such as those found in steam-pipe fittings, boilers, turbine rotors, and nuclear pressure vessels.

  10. Study to minimize hydrogen embrittlement of ultrahigh-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsea, S. T.; Fletcher, E. E.; Groeneveld, T. P.

    1967-01-01

    Hydrogen-stress cracking in high-strength steels is influenced by hydrogen content of the material and its hydrogen absorption tendency. Non-embrittling cleaning, pickling, and electroplating processes are being studied. Protection from this hydrogen embrittlement is important to the aerospace and aircraft industries.

  11. Segregation of alloying atoms at a tilt symmetric grain boundary in tungsten and their strengthening and embrittling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Wu; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Liu-Wei; Liu, Chang-Song; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the segregation behavior of alloying atoms (Sr, Th, In, Cd, Ag, Sc, Au, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, and Ti) near Σ3 (111) [11¯0] tilt symmetric grain boundary (GB) in tungsten and their effects on the intergranular embrittlement by performing first-principles calculations. The calculated segregation energies suggest that Ag, Au, Cd, In, Sc, Sr, Th, and Ti prefer to occupy the site in the mirror plane of the GB, while Cu, Cr, Mn, and Zn intend to locate at the first layer nearby the GB core. The calculated strengthening energies predict Sr, Th, In, Cd, Ag, Sc, Au, Ti, and Zn act as embrittlers while Cu, Cr, and Mn act as cohesion enhancers. The correlation of the alloying atom's metal radius with strengthening energy is strong enough to predict the strengthening and embrittling behavior of alloying atoms; that is, the alloying atom with larger metal radius than W acts as an embrittler and the one with smaller metal radius acts as a cohesion enhancer.

  12. Biomedical implications of heavy metals induced imbalances in redox systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  13. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals. PMID:25184144

  14. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  15. Investigation of Teflon FEP embrittlement on spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(TM) fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) is used on the exterior of spacecraft surfaces in the low earth orbit environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized Teflon(TM) FEP used in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provided evidence of the low earth orbit environments. Samples from the LDEF and HST were evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  16. Radiation annealing of radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2016-02-01

    Influence of neutron irradiation on RPV steel degradation are examined with reference to the possible reasons of the substantial experimental data scatter and furthermore - nonstandard (non-monotonous) and oscillatory embrittlement behavior. In our glance this phenomenon may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. We suppose that the main factor affecting steel anomalous embrittlement is fast neutron intensity (dose rate or flux), flux effect manifestation depends on state-of-the-art fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Data on radiation damage change including through the ex-service RPVs taking into account chemical factor, fast neutron fluence and neutron flux were obtained and analyzed. In our opinion controversy in the estimation on neutron flux on radiation degradation impact may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. Therefore flux effect manifestation depends on fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Moreover as a hypothesis we suppose that at some stages of irradiation damaged metal have to be partially restored by irradiation i.e. neutron bombardment. Nascent during irradiation structure undergo occurring once or periodically transformation in a direction both degradation and recovery of the initial properties. According to our hypothesis at some stage(s) of metal structure degradation neutron bombardment became recovering factor. As a result oscillation arise that in tern lead to enhanced data scatter.

  17. Embrittlement of MISSE 5 Polymers After 13 Months of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Aobo; Yi, Grace T.; Ashmead, Claire C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding space environment induced degradation of spacecraft materials is essential when designing durable and stable spacecraft components. As a result of space radiation, debris impacts, atomic oxygen interaction, and thermal cycling, the outer surfaces of space materials degrade when exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO). The objective of this study was to measure the embrittlement of 37 thin film polymers after LEO space exposure. The polymers were flown aboard the International Space Station and exposed to the LEO space environment as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 5 (MISSE 5). The samples were flown in a nadir-facing position for 13 months and were exposed to thermal cycling along with low doses of atomic oxygen, direct solar radiation and omnidirectional charged particle radiation. The samples were analyzed for space-induced embrittlement using a bend-test procedure in which the strain necessary to induce surface cracking was determined. Bend-testing was conducted using successively smaller mandrels to apply a surface strain to samples placed on a semi-suspended pliable platform. A pristine sample was also tested for each flight sample. Eighteen of the 37 flight samples experienced some degree of surface cracking during bend-testing, while none of the pristine samples experienced any degree of cracking. The results indicate that 49 percent of the MISSE 5 thin film polymers became embrittled in the space environment even though they were exposed to low doses (approx.2.75 krad (Si) dose through 127 mm Kapton) of ionizing radiation.

  18. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  19. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  20. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  1. Evaluation of the current status of hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.

    1981-12-01

    A review of recent studies on hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in steels shows there are several critical areas where data is either ambiguous, contradictory, or non-existent. A relationship exists between impurity segregation and hydrogen embrittlement effects but it is not known if the impurities sensitize a preferred crack path for hydrogen-induced failure or if impurity and hydrogen effects are additive. Furthermore, grain boundary impurities may enhance susceptibility through interactions with some environments. Some studies show that an increase in grain size increases susceptibility; at least one study shows an opposite effect. Recent work also shows that fracture initiates at different locations for external and internal hydrogen environments. How this influences susceptibility is unknown.

  2. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  3. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  4. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  5. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  6. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-04

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  7. Role of Oxidative Stress in Transformation Induced by Metal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Silva-Aguilar; Emilio, Rojas; Mahara, Valverde

    2011-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity. PMID:22191014

  8. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(registered trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene-propylene) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized FEP is used for the outer layer of thermal control blankets because of its low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. FEP is also preferred over other spacecraft polymers because of its relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its low atomic oxygen erosion yield, FEP has not been protected in the space environment. Recent, long term space exposures such as on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF, 5.8 years in space), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST, after 3.6 years in space) have provided evidence of LEO environmental degradation of FEP. These exposures provide unique opportunities for studying environmental degradation because of the long durations and the different conditions (such as differences in altitude) of the exposures. Samples of FEP from LDEF and from HST (retrieved during its first servicing mission) have been evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen. Micro-indenter results indicate that the surface hardness increased as the ratio of atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence decreased for the LDEF samples. FEP multilayer insulation (MLI) retrieved from HST provided evidence of severe embrittlement on solar facing surfaces. Micro-indenter measurements indicated higher surface hardness values for these samples than LDEF samples, but the solar exposures were higher. Cracks induced during bend testing were significantly deeper for the HST samples with the highest solar exposure than for LDEF samples with similar atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence ratios. If solar fluences are compared, the LDEF samples appear as damaged as HST samples, except that HST had deeper induced cracks. The results illustrate difficulties in comparing LEO exposed materials from

  9. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Itoh, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased. Comparing cluster IDs 2 and 6, embrittlement of high-Cu-bearing materials (<0.07 wt%) was larger than that of low-Cu-bearing (0.07 < wt.%) materials. This is attributed to irradiation-induced Cu-enriched clusters, as well as those that are irradiation-enhanced [4]. A similar feature is recognized for cluster IDs 5 and 8 in materials with a higher Ni content. A flux effect with a higher flux range was demonstrated for cluster ID 3 comprising MTR irradiation in a high flux region (≤1 × 1013 n/cm2/s) [44]. For cluster ID 10, classification is rendered based upon flux effect, where embrittlement is accelerated in high Cu-bearing materials irradiated at lower flux levels (less than 5 × 109 n/cm2·s). This is possibly due to increased thermal equilibrium vacancies [44,45]. Per all the above considerations, it was hence ascertained that data belonging to identical cluster ID

  10. Quantification of fatigue crack propagation of an austenitic stainless steel in mercury embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihito; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2012-12-01

    Liquid metals are expected to be used as nuclear materials, such as coolant for nuclear reactors and spallation targets for neutron sources, because of their good thermal conductivity and neutron production. However, in specific combinations, liquid metals have the potential to degrade structural integrity of solid metals because of Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME). In this study, the effect of mercury immersion on fatigue crack propagation rate in SUS316 was investigated through fatigue tests with a notched specimen under mercury immersion. FRActure Surface Topography Analysis (FRASTA) with the measurement of the notch opening distance was performed to estimate the fatigue crack growth rate in mercury. The results showed that the fatigue crack growth rate was slightly higher in mercury than that in the air in the low cycle fatigue region. This suggests that the crack propagation is accelerated by mercury immersion in high stress imposition regions.

  11. Microbe-induced changes in metal extractability from fly ash.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sadhna; Kumari, Babita; Singh, S N

    2008-04-01

    A low cost and eco-friendly technology to bioremediate toxic metals associated with fly ash dumps that contaminate ground and surface water in and around fly ash settling ponds, was investigated. The impact of augmentation of fly ash tolerant bacterial strains, isolated from Typha latifolia growing naturally on fly ash dumps, was studied for metal extractability. It was observed that most of the bacterial strains either induced the bioavailability of Fe, Zn and Ni or immobilized Pb, Cr, Cu, Cd in the fly ash. However, there were few exceptions also. In case of Ni, eight strains enhanced metal mobility, while others caused metal immobilization. The findings also suggest that metal solublization and immobilization are specific to bacterial strains. While induced bioavailability of metals by bacteria may be used to accelerate the phytoextraction of metals from fly ash by hyper accumulator plants, immobilization of metals can check their migration to water reservoirs and reduce the human suffering in affected areas. Thus, bacteria serve the dual purpose and may result in the microbe- assisted phytoremediation of contaminated sites.

  12. The influence of composition on environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of water vapor in air and hydrogen gas on the tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys have been studied at room temperature. Fe-28a% Al-5a% Cr alloys to which either Zr alone or Zr and C have been added and tested in controlled humidity air environments as well as in 1.3 atm hydrogen or oxygen gas and in vacuum. As with other Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, oxygen produces the lowest crack growth rates as well as the highest critical stress intensities and tensile ductility in each of the alloys tested. However, while Zr lowers crack growth rates in the Paris regime, there is no apparent beneficial effect on crack growth thresholds. Hydrogen gas also produces unusual results. While crack growth rates are very high in hydrogen in the Paris regime for all alloys, hydrogen only lowers the crack growth threshold relative to air in ternary Fe-28Al-5Cr; it does not lower the threshold in the Zr-containing alloys. It was found that decreased test frequency leads to increased crack growth rates in a Zr-containing alloy which points to a moisture-induced embrittlement mechanism responsible for the higher crack growth rates in air. Fracture path tends to be insensitive to environment for each alloy.

  13. Drug- and heavy metal--induced hyperpigmentation.

    PubMed

    Granstein, R D; Sober, A J

    1981-07-01

    Several categories of chemical and pharmacologic agents can cause alterations in cutaneous pigmentation, although the mechanisms differ and in several instances may be unknown. Fixed drug eruptions appear to have alteration of the basement membrane zone with incontinence of epidermal pigment as the mechanism of hyperpigmentation. Heavy metals produce increased pigmentation in part from deposition of metal particles and in part from an increase in epidermal melanin production. The antimalarials may bind to melanin. The phenothiazines and minocycline produce pigmentation from deposition of the drug. The mechanism, site, and nature of the pigment occurring with antineoplastic agents is not well understood, but the location is most likely predominantly epidermal. Clofazimine (Lamprene) alteration in pigmentation appears to result from deposition of the drug in subcutaneous fat.

  14. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-05-10

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  15. Platinum implantation into tantalum for protection against hydrogen embrittlement during corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensinger, W.; Flege, S.; Baba, K.

    2012-02-01

    Platinum is well known for its catalytic activity, even in small quantities. Among others, it catalyzes the recombination of hydrogen atoms to molecules and the desorption of the molecules from a surface. This favourable feature can be used to protect metals from detrimental hydrogen incorporation. This may take place in the case of tantalum when it corrodes in strong acids. Tantalum is a highly inert metal which can be used for devices and vessels for acid handling. When it is exposed to concentrated sulphuric acid, its corrosion rate is acceptably low. However, a side reaction may become problematic. When the metal is being dissolved, hydrogen is being formed at the metal surface at the same time. Being the smallest chemical element, hydrogen can easily diffuse into the metal lattice. There, is reacts to the metal hydride and may even form bubbles. By the phase change it creates pressure. The hydride is very brittle, and the metal can easily fail mechanically. In order to prevent catastrophic hydrogen embrittlement, small amounts of platinum were implanted into the surface of metallic tantalum and of tantalum coated with a protective oxide film. Depth profiles by secondary ion mass spectrometry showed that the platinum was located close to the surface; the implantation zone of the oxidized tantalum was considerably thicker than the one of the bare tantalum. Upon exposure to hot mineral acids, the untreated tantalum failed in mechanical tests due to embrittlement after short time, while the platinum-implanted one achieved considerably enhanced life-times. No difference was found between the bare and the oxide-coated tantalum.

  16. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found.

  17. Metal induced gap states at tetratetracontane/Cu interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, M.; Yoshikawa, G.; Saiki, K.; Arita, R.; Aoki, H.

    2006-03-01

    In order to search for states specific to organic-insulator/metal interfaces, we have studied atomically well-defined tetratetracontane(TTC)/Cu interface with the element-selective near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). An extra peak is observed below the bulk edge onset for thin TTC films on Cu. We regard the pre-peak as an evidence for the metal-induced gap states (MIGS) formed by the proximity to a metal. An ab initio electronic structure calculation supports the existence of the MIGS.

  18. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  19. Stress-Induced Phenomena in Metallization 8th International Workshop on Stress-Induced Phenomena in Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschech, Ehrenfried; Maex, Karen; Ho, Paul S.; Kawasaki, Hisao; Nakamura, Tomoji

    All papers were peer reviewed. This proceedings presents current research on issues related to stress-induced phenomena in on-chip metal interconnects and solder joints. Stresses arising in on-chip metal interconnects and surrounding dielectric materials due to thermal mismatch, electromigration, microstructure changes or process integration can lead to degradation and failure of microelectronic products. The implementation of low dielectric constant materials into the inlaid copper backend-of-line process has brought new challenges for process integration and reliability.

  20. Pressure-induced metallization of molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Zhang, Haidong; Goncharov, Alexander F; Lobanov, Sergey S; Kagayama, Tomoko; Sakata, Masafumi; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-07-18

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements of molybdenum disulfide MoS(2) are performed at pressures up to 81 GPa in diamond anvil cells. Above 20 GPa, we find discontinuous changes in Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns which provide evidence for isostructural phase transition from 2H(c) to 2H(a) modification through layer sliding previously predicted theoretically. This first-order transition, which is completed around 40 GPa, is characterized by a collapse in the c-lattice parameter and volume and also by changes in interlayer bonding. After the phase transition completion, MoS(2) becomes metallic. The reversibility of the phase transition is identified from all these techniques. PMID:25083660

  1. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  2. Pressure-induced superconductivity in europium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Debessai, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hamlin, J.J.; Bi, W.; Meng, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Schilling, J.S.

    2010-05-24

    Of the 52 known elemental superconductors among the 92 naturally occurring elements in the periodic table, fully 22 only become superconducting under sufficiently high pressure. In the rare-earth metals, the strong local magnetic moments originating from the 4f shell suppress superconductivity. For Eu, however, Johansson and Rosengren have suggested that sufficiently high pressures should promote one of its 4f electrons into the conduction band, changing Eu from a strongly magnetic (J=7/2) 4f{sup 7}-state into a weak Van Vleck paramagnetic (J=0) 4f{sup 6}-state, thus opening the door for superconductivity, as in Am (5f{sup 6}). We report that Eu becomes superconducting above 1.8 K for pressures exceeding 80 GPa, T{sub c} increasing linearly with pressure to 142 GPa at the rate +15 mK/GPa. Eu thus becomes the 53rd elemental superconductor in the periodic table. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies to 92 GPa at ambient temperature reveal four structural phase transitions.

  3. Nature of Pressure-induced Insulating States in Simple Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan; Hemley, Russell

    As experimentally established, all the alkali metals and heavy alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr and Ba) become progressively less conductive on compression, at least up to some critical limit over a broad pressure range. Of these metals, Li and Na clearly undergo pressure-induced metal-insulator transitions, which may also be called reverse Mott transitions. Here, using group theory arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that such transitions can be understood in terms of band representations introduced by Zak. The valence bands in the insulating states are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of semimetallic phases with flat surface states. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca). This research was supported by EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DESC0001057.

  4. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  5. Localised slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinised dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration of serpentinised ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure; however the extents of strain localisation and unstable frictional sliding are still under debate. Microstructural and mineralogical evidence from dunites of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides demonstrates that prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of large-grained olivine rich in magnetite inclusions. The epitaxial growth of comparatively Fe-poor prograde olivine on Fe-richer relics of primary olivine caused a high variability in Fe-content, even within single crystals. On a larger scale, the average Fe-content of olivine rises towards the vein edges, which reflects a decrease in the degree of initial serpentinisation towards the host rock. The former distribution of serpentine strongly influenced the mechanical response of the rock to the fluid production during deserpentinisation: The faulting caused by the associated dehydration embrittlement occurred along highly localized slip planes in the centres of the meta-serpentinite veins. Around these slip planes, the prograde olivine experienced significant grain size reduction, but very limited shear strain. The strain concentration on narrow faults, also documented by a sharp offset of chromite layers, and the brittle deformation of the surrounding olivine suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. This natural example of deserpentinisation-induced embrittlement illustrates that structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins have first-order controls on strain localisation and frictional sliding. While strain may be distributed during dehydration of a homogeneous serpentinite, as has been observed in recent experimental studies, it may become strongly localised in a heterogeneous rock volume where fluid pressure is locally increased along pre-existing veins. As most of the oceanic lithosphere

  6. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  7. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  8. Catalytic conjunctive cross-coupling enabled by metal-induced metallate rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Lovinger, Gabriel J; Edelstein, Emma K; Szymaniak, Adam A; Chierchia, Matteo P; Morken, James P

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal catalysis plays a central role in contemporary organic synthesis. Considering the tremendously broad array of transition metal-catalyzed transformations, it is remarkable that the underlying elementary reaction steps are relatively few in number. Here, we describe an alternative to the organometallic transmetallation step that is common in many metal-catalyzed reactions, such as Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. Specifically, we demonstrate that vinyl boronic ester ate complexes, prepared by combining organoboronates and organolithium reagents, engage in palladium-induced metallate rearrangement wherein 1,2-migration of an alkyl or aryl group from boron to the vinyl α-carbon occurs concomitantly with C-Pd σ-bond formation. This elementary reaction enables a powerful cross-coupling reaction in which a chiral Pd catalyst merges three simple starting materials-an organolithium, an organoboronic ester, and an organotriflate-into chiral organoboronic esters with high enantioselectivity.

  9. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of metal-induced side-effects.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Vera; Hudecek, Romuald; Stejskal, Jenny; Sterzl, Ivan

    2006-12-01

    Environmental factors are recognized as a cause of the increasing frequency of allergic and autoimmune diseases. In addition to external pollutants, metal ions released from dental restorations or from other body implants might trigger inflammation in susceptible subjects. In humans, genes governing metal-induced inflammation and autoimmunity are not yet known. In clinical praxis, metal-sensitive patients will present various symptoms ranging from oral mucosal changes and skin disease to excessive fatigue and autoimmune diseases. Since genetic markers of genetic susceptibility in man are not known, one has to rely on the phenototypic markers. Such biomarkers might be certain detoxification enzymes but also the presence of metal-specific memory cells in the blood. With the increasing use of metal implants in medicine and dentistry, it is important to have a proper tool for the diagnosis of metal allergy in susceptible subjects. After nickel, gold is now the second most common sensitizer. In addition to patch test, an in vitro blood test, an optimized commercially available lymphocyte transformation test (MELISA) is discussed. Both tests were used for the diagnosis of metal allergy in a selected group of 15 patients who suffered from clinical metal sensitivity in addition to other health problems. The concordance of the two tests was good but MELISA detected more metal allergies than patch test. The removal of incompatible dental material (RID) resulted in long-term health improvement in the majority of patients. We postulate that in vivo, metal ions activate T-cells, initiating systemic inflammation, which, through cytokines, affects the brain and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. We postulate that in vivo metal ions will activate T-cells starting systemic inflammation which, through cytokines affect the brain and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The treatment and rehabilitation of metal sensitive patients is based on a firm understanding and

  11. Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial-Free Steels

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    Interstitial-free (IF) steels are defined by their low amounts of solute interstitial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen. During secondary forming, strain can be localized at the grain boundaries of these steels, resulting in secondary cold work embrittlement (CWE).

  12. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  13. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  14. Wiring of metallized microtubules by electron beam-induced structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Köhler, J. Michael; Böhm, Konrad J.; Unger, Eberhard; Wagner, Thomas; Kirsch, Remo; Mertig, Michael; Pompe, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    Molecular electronics emerge as a possibility to continue the miniaturization of electronic circuits down to the lower nanometre scale. One significant challenge is the electrical connection of molecular devices by nanowires. We present here the realization of a new approach for the wiring of nanostructures by linking metallized microtubules (MTs) to prestructured microelectrodes. MTs (tube-like protein structures) were metallized and deposited on microstructured substrates. Electron beam-induced deposition was used for structuring connecting gold lines as nanoelectrodes, which wire a single MT to microelectrodes created by photolithography. Initial electrical measurements confirmed the suitability of the set-up for linking nanometre-scale structures to a measurement device. A metallized MT yielded a resistance below 50 icons/Journals/Common/Omega" ALT="Omega" ALIGN="TOP"/> over the length of 1 µm.

  15. Superconductivity of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in superconducting metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon is reviewed, mainly focusing on the results of the author’s group. After a brief introduction of an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV)-low-temperature (LT)-compatible electron transport measurement system, direct observation of the zero resistance state for the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface is described, which demonstrates the existence of a superconducting transition in this class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The measurement and analysis of the temperature dependence of the critical current density indicate that a surface atomic step works as a Josephson junction. This identification is further confirmed by LT-scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation of Josephson vortices trapped at atomic steps on the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface. These experiments reveal unique features of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon that may be utilized to explore novel superconductivity.

  16. Prevention by chelating agents of metal-induced developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Domingo, J L

    1995-01-01

    Chelating agents such as calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), 2,3-dimercaptopropanol (BAL), or D-penicillamine (D-PA) have been widely used for the past 4 decades as antidotes for the treatment of acute and chronic metal poisoning. In recent years, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonate (DMPS) and sodium 4,5-dihydroxybenzene-1,3-disulfonate (Tiron) have also shown to be effective to prevent against toxicity induced by a number of heavy metals. The purpose of the present article was to review the protective activity of various chelating agents against the embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of well-known developmental toxicants (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, uranium, and vanadium). DMSA and DMPS were found to be effective in alleviating arsenate- and arsenite-induced teratogenesis, whereas BAL afforded only some protection against arsenic-induced embryo/fetal toxicity. Also, DMSA, DMPS, and Tiopronin were effective in ameliorating methyl mercury-induced developmental toxicity. Although the embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of vanadate were significantly reduced by Tiron, no significant amelioration of uranium-induced embryotoxicity was observed after treatment with this chelator.

  17. Gravity- and strain-induced electric fields outside metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Opat, G. I.

    1992-05-01

    The gravity-induced electric field outside a metal object supported against gravity is predominantly due to its differential compression which arises in supporting its own weight. This Dessler-Michel-Rorschach-Trammell (DMRT) field, as it has come to be known, is expected to be proportional to the strain derivative of the work function of the surface. We report the results of an experiment designed to produce this effect with mechanically applied strain rather than with gravity. In essence, we have measured the strain-induced contact-potential variation between a metal surface of known strain gradient and an unstrained capacitive probe. We describe useful solutions to the problems faced in such an experiment, which were not adequately addressed by earlier workers. A knowledge of the DMRT field is of considerable importance to experiments designed to compare the gravitational acceleration of charged particles and antiparticles inside a metallic shield. Past experiments with electrons yielded results contrary to the then-expected DMRT field. We review and partially extend the theoretical background by drawing on later results based on the jellium model of metal surfaces. Our results for Cu and Au surfaces are consistent with jellium-based calculations which imply a DMRT field that is about an order of magnitude smaller and of opposite sign to the early estimates.

  18. Optics of metal nanoparticle aggregates with light induced motion.

    PubMed

    Drachev, Vladimir P; Perminov, Sergey V; Rautian, Sergey G

    2007-07-01

    Light-induced forces between metal nanoparticles change the geometry of the aggregates and affect their optical properties. Light absorption, scattering and scattering of a probe beam are numerically studied with Newton's equations and the coupled dipole equations for penta-particle aggregates. The relative changes in optical responses are large compared with the linear, low-intensity limit and relatively fast with nanosecond characteristic times. Time and intensity dependencies are shown to be sensitive to the initial potential of the aggregation forces.

  19. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  20. Electronic properties of metal-induced gap states formed at alkali-halide/metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2005-04-01

    The spatial distribution and site distribution of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are studied by thickness-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and by comparing the cation and anion-edge NEXAFS. The thickness-dependent NEXAFS shows that the decay length of MIGS depends on an alkali-halide rather than a metal, and it is larger for alkali-halides with smaller band gap energies. By comparing the Cl-edge and K-edge NEXAFS for KCl/Cu (001) , MIGS are found to be states localizing at anion sites.

  1. Metal-induced gap states in epitaxial organic-insulator/metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Arita, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Genki; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Ikeda, Susumu; Entani, Shiro; Nakai, Ikuyo; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Ohta, Toshiaki; Saiki, Koichiro; Aoki, Hideo

    2005-08-01

    We have shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the metal-induced gap states (MIGS) can exist in epitaxially grown organic insulator/metal interfaces. The experiment is done for alkane/Cu(001) with an element-selective near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), which exhibits a prepeak indicative of MIGS. An ab initio electronic structure calculation supports the existence of the MIGS. When the Cu substrate is replaced with Ni, an interface magnetism may be possible with a carrier doping.

  2. Weld induced base metal microfissuring in high temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lingenfelter, A.C.; Shoemaker, L.E.

    1984-06-22

    Three variables control the weld-induced, base-metal microfissuring sensitivity of Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Fe: thermal/mechanical history of the base material, chemical analysis of the base material, and the welding process used. Elements which tend to segregate to the grain boundaries such as B, C, and Zr, and to a lesser extent P, Si, S and Mg, increase the sensitivity. Welding processes listed from most to least severe in their tendency to produce microfissures are: gas metal arc - spray transfer, electron beam, gas metal arc - pulsed transfer, gas metal arc - short circuiting transfer, gas tungsten arc, submerged arc, and shielded metal arc. Microfissuring is always intergranular in nature. Coarse-grain size, whether arrived at by hot-working procedures or pre-weld annealing treatment, increases the sensitivity to microfissuring. Literature data and data for alloy 617 developed at Huntington Alloys suggest that microfissures, at least to 0.030 in. in length, do not affect the fatigue life, room-temperature tensile, and stress-rupture properties of a weldment.

  3. Metal ion-inducing metabolite accumulation in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, Muhammad; Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2008-09-29

    Plants face a number of biotic and abiotic environmental stress factors during growth. Among the abiotic factors, in particular, a great deal of attention has been paid to metals not only because of their increasing amounts in the environment due to rapid industrial development but also because of the variation of metal composition in soil. Cultivation of crops close to industrial areas or irrigation with contaminated water may result in both growth inhibition and tissue accumulation of metals. Brassica species are well known as metal accumulators and are being used for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. However, the metal tolerance mechanism in the plant still remains unclear. In order to investigate the metabolomic changes induced by metal ions in Brassica, plants were subjected to concentrations 50, 100, 250 and 500 mmol of copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in separate treatments. (1)H NMR and two-dimensional NMR spectra coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to investigate the metabolic change in Brassica rapa (var. Raapstelen). The (1)H-NMR analysis followed by the application of chemometric methods revealed a number of metabolic consequences. Among the metabolites that showed variation, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids conjugated with malates were found to be the discriminating metabolites as were primary metabolites like carbohydrates and amino acids. This study shows that the effects of Cu and Fe on plant metabolism were larger than those of Mn and that the metabolomic changes varied not only according to the type of metal but also according to its concentration.

  4. Observations of impact-induced molten metal-silicate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, Linda R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of molten mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-molybdenum (Mo) interactions produced by shock experiments provide insight into impact and differentiation processes involving metal-silicate partitioning. Analysis of fragments recovered from experiments (achieving MORB liquid shock pressures from 0.8 to 6 GPa) revealed significant changes in the composition of the MORB and Mo due to reaction of the silicate and metal liquids on a short time scale (less than 13 s). The FeO concentration of the shocked liquid decreases systematically with increasing pressure. In fact, the most highly shocked liquid (6 GPa) contains only 0.1 wt% FeO compared to an initial concentration of 9 wt% in the MORB. We infer from the presence of micrometer-sized Fe-, Si- and Mo-rich metallic spheres in the shocked glass that the Fe and Si oxides in the MORB were reduced in an estimated oxygen fugacity of 10(exp -17) bar and subsequently alloyed with the Mo. The in-situ reduction of FeO in the shocked molten basalt implies that shock-induced reduction of impact melt should be considered a viable mechanism for the formation of metallic phases. Similar metallic phases may form during impact accretion of planets and in impacted material found on the lunar surface and near terrestrial impact craters. In particular, the minute, isolated Fe particles found in lunar soils may have formed by such a process. Furthermore, the metallic spheres within the shocked glass have a globular texture similar to the textures of metallic spheroids from lunar samples and the estimated, slow cooling rate of less than or equal to 140 C/s for our spheres is consistent with the interpretation that the lunar spheroids formed by slow cooling within a melted target.

  5. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-08-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture.

  6. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture.

  7. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  8. Metal-Induced Gap States at Well Defined Alkali-Halide/Metal Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Arita, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Genki; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masao; Saiki, Koichiro; Koma, Atsushi; Aoki, Hideo

    2003-05-01

    In order to search for states specific to insulator/metal interfaces, we have studied epitaxially grown interfaces with element-selective near edge x-ray absorption fine structure. An extra peak is observed below the bulk edge onset for LiCl films on Cu and Ag substrates. The nature of chemical bonds as probed by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy remains unchanged, so we regard this as evidence for metal-induced gap states (MIGS) formed by the proximity to a metal, rather than local bonds at the interface. The dependence on the film thickness shows that the MIGS are as thin as one monolayer. An ab initio electronic structure calculation supports the existence of the MIGS that are strongly localized at the interface.

  9. Fisrt-principles calculations on metal-induced gap states at metal-semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohda, Y.; Tsuneyuki, S.

    2010-03-01

    Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are responsible for Fermi-level pinning for narrow-gap semiconductors such as Si and GaAs. First-principles calculations have demonstrated that MIGS are related to the tails of metal states penetrating into the semiconductor corresponding to Bloch states with wave vectors having an imaginary part. Thus, their existence is a consequence of intrinsic properties of the bulk semiconductor. In contrast, a removal of FLP has been reported experimentally at atomically controlled Al-Si(100) interfaces, suggesting that MIGS play a less dominant role in determining the interface properties. This inconsistency between experimental results and the accepted view of MIGS calls for a detailed theoretical investigation. Here, we report our recent progresses on MIGS at a few metal-semiconductor interfaces investigated by means of first-principles calculations.

  10. Metal-induced gap states at well defined alkali-halide/metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Arita, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Genki; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masao; Saiki, Koichiro; Koma, Atsushi; Aoki, Hideo

    2003-05-16

    In order to search for states specific to insulator/metal interfaces, we have studied epitaxially grown interfaces with element-selective near edge x-ray absorption fine structure. An extra peak is observed below the bulk edge onset for LiCl films on Cu and Ag substrates. The nature of chemical bonds as probed by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy remains unchanged, so we regard this as evidence for metal-induced gap states (MIGS) formed by the proximity to a metal, rather than local bonds at the interface. The dependence on the film thickness shows that the MIGS are as thin as one monolayer. An ab initio electronic structure calculation supports the existence of the MIGS that are strongly localized at the interface.

  11. Role of metal nanoparticles on porosification of silicon by metal induced etching (MIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Yogi, Priyanka; Yadav, Pooja; Mishra, Suryakant; Pandey, Haardik; Rai, Hari Mohan; Kumar, Vivek; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Porosification of silicon (Si) by metal induced etching (MIE) process has been studied here to understand the etching mechanism. The etching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of electron transfer from Si to metal ion (Ag+) and metal to H2O2. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the etching process has been investigated by studying the effect of AgNPs coverage on surface porosity. A quantitative analysis of SEM images, done using Image J, shows a direct correlation between AgNPs coverage and surface porosity after the porosification. Density of Si nanowires (NWs) also varies as a function of AgNPs fractional coverage which reasserts the fact that AgNPs governs the porosification process during MIE. The Raman and PL spectrum show the presence of Si NSs in the samples.

  12. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  13. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database - Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Subramani, Ranjit

    2008-03-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. "User-friendly" utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  14. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  15. Dental metal-induced innate reactivity in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Buskermolen, Jeroen K; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan; von Blomberg, B Mary E; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-12-25

    Gold, nickel, copper and mercury, i.e. four metals frequently used in dental applications, were explored for their capacity to induce innate immune activation in keratinocytes (KC). Due to their anatomical location the latter epithelial cells are key in primary local irritative responses of skin and mucosa. Fresh foreskin-derived keratinocytes and skin and gingiva KC cell lines were studied for IL-8 release as a most sensitive parameter for NF-kB activation. First, we verified that viral-defense mediating TLR3 is a key innate immune receptor in both skin- and mucosa derived keratinocytes. Second, we found that, in line with our earlier finding that ionized gold can mimic viral dsRNA in triggering TLR3, gold is very effective in KC activation. It would appear that epithelial TLR3 can play a key role in both skin- and mucosa localized irritation reactivities to gold. Subsequently we found that not only gold, but also nickel, copper and mercury salts can activate innate immune reactivity in keratinocytes, although the pathways involved remain unclear. Although current alloys have been optimized for minimal leakage of metal ions, secondary factors such as mechanical friction and acidity may still facilitate such leakage. Subsequently, these metal ions may create local irritation, itching and swelling by triggering innate immune reactions, potentially also facilitating the development of metal specific adaptive immunity.

  16. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  17. Study of aging and embrittlement of microalloyed steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, B.; Perez, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-10-01

    The aging of hooks, anchors, and other bent reinforcing steel bars in concrete structures are considered in modern international standards. Rebend test procedures have been designed in order to predict the aging embrittlement susceptibility by submerging bent reinforcing bar specimens in boiling water. Subsequently the bars are rebent or straightened in order to determine the loss of ductility or embrittlement of the aged material. The present work considers the influence of carbon, sulfur, and niobium on the performance of reinforcing bars in rebend tests of 300 heats of microalloyed steel bars with a variety of compositions. The microstructural evidence and the statistical results clearly indicate the strong influence of carbon and sulfur on rebend failure, while niobium-rich precipitates contribute to the hardening of the ferrite grains during aging.

  18. Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.S.

    1987-10-02

    A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO + H/sub 2/) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

  19. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  20. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO/sub 2/ along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar/sup +/ ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000/sup 0/C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450/sup 0/C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150/sup 0/C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures.

  1. Embrittlement Database from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance capsules of U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors and from experiments in material test reactors. The collected data are contained in either the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) or the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB). The EDB work includes verification of the quality of the EDB, provision for user-friendly software to access and process the data, exploration and/or confirmation of embrittlement prediction models, provision for rapid investigation of regulatory issues, and provision for the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards or regulatory guides. The EDB is designed for use with a personal computer. The data are collected into "raw data files." Traceability of all data is maintained by including complete references along with the page numbers. External data verification of the PR-EDB is the responsibility of the vendors, who were responsible for the insertion and testing of the materials in the surveillance capsules. Internal verification is accomplished by checking against references and checking for inconsistencies. Examples of information contained in the EDBs are: Charpy data, tensile data, reactor type, irradiation environments, fracture toughness data, instrumented Charpy data, pressure-temperature (P-T) data, chemistry data, and material history. The TR-EDB additionally has annealing Charpy data. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the test results from 269 Charpy capsules irradiated in 101 reactors. These results include 320 plate data points, 123 forging data points, 113 standard reference materials (SRMS) or correlation monitor (CM) points, 244 weld material data points, and 220 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) material data points. Similarly, the TR-EDB contains information for 290 SRM or CM points, 342 plate data points, 165 forging data points, 378 welds, and 55 HAZ materials. [copied from http://rsicc.ornl.gov/RelatedLinks.aspx?t=edb

  2. Investigation of gold embrittlement in connector solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine to what extent typical flight connector solder joints may be embrittled by the presence of gold. In addition to mapping of gold content in connector solder joints by an electron microprobe analyzer, metallographic examinations and mechanical tests (thermal shock, vibration, impact and tensile strength) were also conducted. A description of the specimens and tests, a discussion of the data, and some conclusions are presented.

  3. Pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ligang; Li, Quan; Corr, Serena A.; Meng, Yue; Park, Changyong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Ko, Changhyun; Wu, Junqiao; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2 based on synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Our isothermal compression experiments at room temperature and 383 K show that the room temperature monoclinic phase (M 1 ,P 21/c ) and the high-temperature rutile phase (R ,P 42/m n m ) of VO2 undergo phase transitions to a distorted M 1 monoclinic phase (M 1' ,P 21/c ) above 13.0 GPa and to an orthorhombic phase (CaCl2-like, P n n m ) above 13.7 GPa, respectively. Upon further compression, both high-pressure phases transform into a new phase (phase X ) above 34.3 and 38.3 GPa at room temperature and 383 K, respectively. The room temperature M 1 -M 1' phase transition structurally resembles the R -CaCl2 phase transition at 383 K, suggesting a second-order displacive type of transition. Contrary to previous studies, our electrical resistivity results, Raman measurements, as well as ab initio calculations indicate that the new phase X , rather than the M 1' phase, is responsible for the metallization under pressure. The metallization mechanism is discussed based on the proposed crystal structure.

  4. Inducibility of a molecular bioreporter system by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimowski, L.; Rayms-Keller, A.; Olson, K.E.; Yang, R.S.H.; Tessari, J.; Carlson, J.; Beaty, B.

    1996-02-01

    The authors have developed a molecular bioreporter model for detecting an invertebrate response to heavy metals in streams. The bioreporter system, pMt2-luc, utilizes a Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein promoter to regulate luciferase expression in stably transformed mosquito cells.The LucC5 clone, which was isolated from pMt2-luc transformed, hygromycin-resistant C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) cells, demonstrated a 12-fold increase in luciferase-specific activity 48 h after exposure to 13 ppm copper (Cu). In addition to Cu, exposure of LucC5 cells to 19 ppm lead (Pb) or 3 ppm mercury (Hg) for 48 h induced luciferase expression threefold and fourfold, respectively. Exposures of up to 30 ppm arsenic (As), 8 ppm cadmium (Cd), 7 ppm chromium (Cr), or 5 ppm nickel (Ni) had no effect on luciferase induction. LucC5 cells exposed to metal mixtures of 13 ppm Cu and 19 ppm Pb yielded an additive response with a 14-fold increase in luciferase expression. When organic chemicals such as phenol (3 ppm) were mixed with 13 ppm Cu, 19 ppm Pb, or 3 ppm Hg a significant reduction in luciferase activity was noted. Additionally, atomic absorption spectroscopy suggested that two of the metals, Cu and Pb, show marked differences in accumulation within the LucC5 cell line.

  5. Dynamics of laser induced metal nanoparticle and pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, R. J. Kuhn, T.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2015-02-09

    Discontinuous metal films are converted into either almost round, isolated, and randomly distributed nanoparticles (NPs) or fringed patterns of alternate non transformed film and NPs by exposure to single pulses (20 ns pulse duration and 193 nm wavelength) of homogeneous or modulated laser beam intensity. The dynamics of NPs and pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the transmission and reflectivity of the sample upon homogeneous beam exposure and the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 in transmission configuration upon modulated beam exposure. The results show that laser irradiation induces melting of the metal either completely or at regions around intensity maxima sites for homogeneous and modulated beam exposure, respectively, within ≤10 ns. The aggregation and/or coalescence of the initially irregular metal nanostructures is triggered upon melting and continues after solidification (estimated to occur at ≤80 ns) for more than 1 μs. The present results demonstrate that real time transmission rather than reflectivity measurements is a valuable and easy-to-use tool for following the dynamics of NPs and pattern formation. They provide insights on the heat-driven processes occurring both in liquid and solid phases and allow controlling in-situ the process through the fluence. They also evidence that there is negligible lateral heat release in discontinuous films upon laser irradiation.

  6. Ultra-smooth metal surfaces generated by pressure-induced surface deformation of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logeeswaran, V. J.; Chan, M.-L.; Bayam, Y.; Saif Islam, M.; Horsley, D. A.; Li, X.; Wu, W.; Wang, S. Y.; Williams, R. S.

    2007-05-01

    We present a mechanical pressing technique for generating ultra-smooth surfaces on thin metal films by flattening the bumps, asperities, rough grains and spikes of a freshly vacuum deposited metal film. The method was implemented by varying the applied pressure from 100 MPa to 600 MPa on an e-beam evaporated silver film of thickness 1000 Å deposited on double-polished (100)-oriented silicon surfaces, resulting in a varying degree of film smoothness. The surface morphology of the thin film was studied using atomic force microscopy. Notably, at a pressure of ˜600 MPa an initial silver surface with 13-nm RMS roughness was plastically deformed and transformed to an ultra-flat plane with better than 0.1 nm RMS. Our demonstration with the e-beam evaporated silver thin film exhibits the potential for applications in decreasing the scattering-induced losses in optical metamaterials, plasmonic nanodevices and electrical shorts in molecular-scale electronic devices.

  7. Magnetic-field-induced superconductor-metal-insulator transitions in bismuth metal graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masatsugu; Suzuki, Itsuko S.; Lee, Robert; Walter, Jürgen

    2002-07-01

    Bismuth metal graphite (MG) has a unique layered structure where Bi nanoparticles are encapsulated between adjacent sheets of nanographites. The superconductivity below Tc (=2.48 K) is due to Bi nanoparticles. The Curie-like susceptibility below 30 K is due to conduction electrons localized near zigzag edges of nanographites. A magnetic-field-induced transition from metallic to semiconductorlike phase is observed in the in-plane resistivity ρa around Hc (~25 kOe) for both H⊥c and H||c (c: c axis). A negative magnetoresistance in ρa for H⊥c (040 kOe) suggest the occurrence of a two-dimensional weak-localization effect.

  8. Plasmon-induced hot carriers in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Jun G; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter

    2014-08-26

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. However, despite very significant experimental effort, a comprehensive theoretical description of the hot carrier generation process is still missing. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. In this model, the conduction electrons of the metal are described as free particles in a finite spherical potential well, and the plasmon-induced hot carrier production is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. Specifically, larger nanoparticle sizes and shorter lifetimes result in higher carrier production rates but smaller energies, and vice versa. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. The results presented here contribute to the basic understanding of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and provide insight for optimization of the process.

  9. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures.

  10. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effects of alloy modification were investigated. Results showed that T-111 contains a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss of ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. This appears to occur because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries and this also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; however, most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  11. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effect of alloy modification were investigated. Results show that T-111 possesses a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss in ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. It was found that this occurs because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries, which also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  12. Effects of Te on intergranular embrittlement of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongwei; Han, Fenfen; Jia, Yanyan; Li, Zhijun; Zhou, Xingtai

    2015-06-01

    Te was deposited on the surface of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy by thermal evaporation at 700 °C, and the effect of Te on the intergranular cracking behavior and the tensile properties of the alloy was investigated. The results show that the reaction products formed on the surface of the alloy, the diffusion depth of Te in the alloy, and the yield strength of the alloy attacked by Te at room temperature are not changed remarkably with Te content increasing, whereas the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the alloy is decreased distinctly. The primary surface reaction product are mainly composed of Ni3Te2, CrTe, and MoTe2, and the diffusion depth of Te in the alloys is about 50 μm. The intergranular embrittlement mechanism of the alloy induced by Te of is also discussed in this paper.

  13. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  14. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) (DuPont) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces for thermal control in the low-Earth orbit environment. Silverized or aluminized Teflon FEP is used for the outer layers of the thermal control blanket because of its high reflectance, low solar absorptance, and high thermal emittance. Teflon FEP is also desirable because, compared with other spacecraft polymers (such as Kapton), it has relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its comparably low atomic oxygen erosion yield, Teflon FEP has been used unprotected in the space environment. Samples of Teflon FEP from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (retrieved during its first servicing mission) were evaluated for solar-induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  15. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis.

  16. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  17. Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1997-06-01

    Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

  18. Fracture analysis of HFIR beam tube caused by radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    With an attempt to estimate the neutron beam tube embrittlement condition for the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), fracture mechanics calculations are carried out in this paper. The analysis provides some numerical result on how the tube has been structurally weakened. In this calculation, a lateral impact force is assumed. Numerical result is obtained on how much the critical crack size should be reduced if the beam tube has been subjected to an extended period of irradiation. It is also calculated that buckling strength of the tube is increased, not decreased, with irradiation.

  19. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  20. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  1. Phytochelatins inhibit the metal-induced aggregation of alpha-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yasuhisa; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Tsuji, Naoki; Bamba, Takeshi; Aso, Yoshikazu; Kudou, Motonori; Uchida, Yoshiki; Takagi, Masahiro; Harada, Kazuo; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2009-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are heavy-metal-binding peptides found in some eukaryotes. This study investigates the use of plant-derived PCs for the inhibition of metal-induced protein aggregation. The results of this study show that PCs inhibit zinc-induced alpha-crystallin aggregation, and suggest that PCs might be useful as anti-cataract agents.

  2. Magnetic-field induced superconductor-metal-insulator transitions in bismuth metal-graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masatsugu; Suzuki, Itsuko S.; Lee, Robert; Walter, Jürgen

    2002-03-01

    Bismuth-metal graphite (MG) has a unique layered structure where Bi nanoparticles are encapsulated in nanographites. The size of nanographite is on the same order as that of Bi nanographite. The observed superconductivity below Tc (= 2.48 K) and the Curie-like Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility below 30 K are related to the high density of states at the Fermi energy arising from edge states of nanographites.^1 A magnetic-field induced transition from metallic to semiconductor-like phase is observed in the in-plane resistivity ρa around Hc (≈ 25 kOe) for both H⊥c and H‖c (c: c axis). The suppression of the metallic phase by H is independent of the directions of H (H‖c and H⊥c) for Bi-MG, suggesting that the spin related effect is significant compared to the orbital effect. The Zeemann energy gSμ_BH at 25 kOe corresponds to a thermal energy k_BTH with TH = 1.7 K, where g = 2 and S = 1/2. The temperature TH is slightly lower than T_c. A negative magnetoresistance in ρa for H⊥c (040 kOe) suggest the occurrence of two-dimensional weak localization effect. ^1K. Wakabayashi, M. Fujita, H. Ajiki, and M. Sigrist, Phys. Rev. 59, 8271 (1999).

  3. High resistance to helium embrittlement in reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Kasada, R.; Morishita, K.; Sugano, R.; Hasegawa, A.; Abe, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsui, H.; Yoshida, N.; Wirth, B. D.; Rubia, T. D.

    2002-12-01

    Reduced activation martensitic steels (RAMSs) are the prime candidate structural material for the DEMO reactor and beyond where the material has been considered to suffer severe embrittlement caused by high-dose neutron irradiation and several thousands appm of transmutated helium. However, recent several works show high resistance to helium embrittlement of RAMS. Good performance of RAMS in the presence of rather high concentration of helium is considered to be due to high trapping capacity for helium atoms in the martensitic structure that consists of dislocations, lath boundaries, grain boundaries and carbide/matrix interfaces. To make clear the role of dislocations in trapping helium, thermal helium desorption spectra were measured for iron specimens annealed at different temperatures after cold work. A desorption peak, which increased its height with increasing dislocation density, was observed at around 550 °C, suggesting that dislocations trap helium atoms. A molecular dynamics simulation study for investigating the helium trapping behavior at helium-vacancy complexes suggests that helium is rather strongly bound to the complexes and increases the binding energy of vacancy to the complex, resulting in increasing stability of the complexes at elevated temperatures by reducing thermal emission of vacancies.

  4. Metal-induced gap states modeling of metal-Ge contacts with and without a silicon nitride ultrathin interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wager, John F.; Robertson, John

    2011-05-01

    Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) modeling is used to elucidate the lack of Fermi level pinning at metal-insulator-Ge interfaces. Energy band diagram assessment reveals the existence of two dipoles at the metal-insulator and the insulator-semiconductor interface. The metal-insulator dipole modulates the metal-insulator interface electron barrier and the voltage drop across the insulator but does not affect the barrier to electron transport across the metal-insulator-Ge interface. Rather, this electron transport barrier is established by the metal-semiconductor work function difference and the insulator-semiconductor dipole. Thus, the lack of Fermi level pinning at a metal-insulator-Ge interface is attributed to the fact that the electron transport barrier does not depend upon MIGS screening. A quantitative formulation of this metal-insulator-semiconductor interface MIGS-based model confirms the lack of Fermi level pinning. Furthermore, it indicates that care must be taken when assessing experimental barrier height- work function data since the slope parameter should only be evaluated for the range of metal work function in which the semiconductor is in depletion. This range of work function for which the semiconductor is in depletion is quite limited for the case of a narrow bandgap semiconductor, such as Ge.

  5. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  6. Shear Melting and High Temperature Embrittlement: Theory and Application to Machining Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  7. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability. PMID:25955055

  8. Defect-induced semiconductor to metal transition in graphene monoxide.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jungwook; Yun, Kyung-Han; Cho, Sung Beom; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-07-14

    This study investigates the influence of point defects on the geometric and electronic structure of graphene monoxide (GMO) via density functional theory calculations. In aspects of defect formation energy, GMOs with oxygen vacancies and bridge interstitial defects are more likely to form when compared to GMOs with defects such as carbon vacancies and hollow interstitial defects. It was also found that the oxygen vacancy or the hollow interstitial defect induces local tensile strain around the defective site and this strain increases the band gap energy of the defective GMO. In addition, the band gaps of GMO with carbon vacancies or bridge interstitial defects decreased mainly due to the dangling bonds, not due to the strain effect. It is noted that the dangling bond derived from the defects forms the defect-level in the band gap of GMO. The semiconductor to metal transition by the band gap change (0-0.7 eV) implies the possibility for band gap engineering of GMO by vacancies and interstitial defects. PMID:24886723

  9. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  10. Thermally Induced Deformation in Metallic Glass: the Activations and Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). The complete deformation processes consist of two stages: the activation (i.e. trigger, from initial minima to nearby saddle states on PEL), and relaxation (i.e. from saddle states to final minima on PEL). We show that the activation stages are triggered by local rearrangements of a small number of atoms, typically 5 atoms in average. Surprisingly, the individual triggers are invariant of the cooling history or elastic structure of the system. However, the organizations between different trigger centers can be varied and are related to the overall stability of the system. On the other hand, relaxation stages consist of two branches, a localized branch, and a cascade branch. While the localized branch is insensitive to the cooling history the system, the cascade branch is highly related with the processing conditions. In particular, for a faster quenched system, the cascade relaxation is found more prominent than in a slowly quenched system. The work is supported by Department of Energy.

  11. Defect-induced semiconductor to metal transition in graphene monoxide.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jungwook; Yun, Kyung-Han; Cho, Sung Beom; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-07-14

    This study investigates the influence of point defects on the geometric and electronic structure of graphene monoxide (GMO) via density functional theory calculations. In aspects of defect formation energy, GMOs with oxygen vacancies and bridge interstitial defects are more likely to form when compared to GMOs with defects such as carbon vacancies and hollow interstitial defects. It was also found that the oxygen vacancy or the hollow interstitial defect induces local tensile strain around the defective site and this strain increases the band gap energy of the defective GMO. In addition, the band gaps of GMO with carbon vacancies or bridge interstitial defects decreased mainly due to the dangling bonds, not due to the strain effect. It is noted that the dangling bond derived from the defects forms the defect-level in the band gap of GMO. The semiconductor to metal transition by the band gap change (0-0.7 eV) implies the possibility for band gap engineering of GMO by vacancies and interstitial defects.

  12. Mechanisms of barrier formation in schottky contacts: Metal-induced surface and interface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, Winfried

    1990-01-01

    Metal as well as nonmetal adatoms are generally inducing surface states and dipoles on semiconductor surfaces. Both effects may be understood in a bond picture, which describes adatom-substrate bonds in a surface-molecule model, and in the band picture, which considers the tailing of adatom electron wave functions into the semiconductor. These two approaches have in common a charge transfer between the adatoms and the substrate which may be modeled by the difference of their electronegativities. The same concept may be applied to metal-semiconductor contacts. In that energy range, where the metal conduction band overlaps the semiconductor band gap, metal electron wave functions are tailing into the semiconductor and a charge transfer occurs between the respective continuum of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and the metal. Deviations of barrier heights in Schottky contacts from what is predicted by that MIGS-and-electronegativity concept are attributed to fabrication-induced defects of donor type or interface strain.

  13. Mechanisms of barrier formation in schottky contacts: Metal-induced surface and interface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, Winfried

    1989-11-01

    Metal as well as nonmetal adatoms are generally inducing surface states and dipoles on semiconductor surfaces. Both effects may be understood in a bond picture, which describes adatom-substrate bonds in a surface-molecule model, and in the band picture, which considers the tailing of adatom electron wave functions into the semiconductor. These two approaches have in common a charge transfer between the adatoms and the substrate which may be modeled by the difference of their electronegativities. The same concept may be applied to metal-semiconductor contacts. In that energy range, where the metal conduction band overlaps the semiconductor band gap, metal electron wave functions are tailing into the semiconductor and a charge transfer occurs between the respective continuum of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and the metal. Deviations of barrier heights in Schottky contacts from what is predicted by that MIGS-and-electronegativity concept are attributed to fabrication-induced defects of donor type or interface strain.

  14. Atomistic Investigation of the Role of Grain Boundary Structure on Hydrogen Segregation and Embrittlement in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Kiran N.; Tschopp, Mark A.; Bhatia, Mehul A.; Rhodes, Nathan R.

    2013-03-01

    Material strengthening and embrittlement are controlled by complex intrinsic interactions between dislocations and hydrogen-induced defect structures that strongly alter the observed deformation mechanisms in materials. In this study, we reported molecular statics simulations at zero temperature for pure α-Fe with a single H atom at an interstitial and vacancy site, and two H atoms at an interstitial and vacancy site for each of the <100>, <110>, and <111> symmetric tilt grain boundary (STGB) systems. Simulation results show that the grain boundary (GB) system has a smaller effect than the type of H defect configuration (interstitial H, H-vacancy, interstitial 2H, and 2H-vacancy). For example, the segregation energy of hydrogen configurations as a function of distance is comparable between symmetric tilt GB systems. However, the segregation energy of the <100> STGB system with H at an interstitial site is 23 pct of the segregation energy of 2H at a similar interstitial site. This implies that there is a large binding energy associated with two interstitial H atoms in the GB. Thus, the energy gained by this H-H reaction is ~54 pct of the segregation energy of 2H in an interstitial site, creating a large driving force for H atoms to bind to each other within the GB. Moreover, the cohesive energy values of 125 STGBs were calculated for various local H concentrations. We found that as the GB energy approaches zero, the energy gained by trapping more hydrogen atoms is negligible and the GB can fail via cleavage. These results also show that there is a strong correlation between the GB character and the trapping limit (saturation limit) for hydrogen. Finally, we developed an atomistic modeling framework to address the probabilistic nature of H segregation and the consequent embrittlement of the GB. These insights are useful for improving ductility by reengineering the GB character of polycrystalline materials to alter the segregation and embrittlement behavior in α-Fe.

  15. Ab Initio Theory of Coherent Laser-Induced Magnetization in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berritta, Marco; Mondal, Ritwik; Carva, Karel; Oppeneer, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first materials specific ab initio theory of the magnetization induced by circularly polarized laser light in metals. Our calculations are based on nonlinear density matrix theory and include the effect of absorption. We show that the induced magnetization, commonly referred to as inverse Faraday effect, is strongly materials and frequency dependent, and demonstrate the existence of both spin and orbital induced magnetizations which exhibit a surprisingly different behavior. We show that for nonmagnetic metals (such as Cu, Au, Pd, Pt) and antiferromagnetic metals the induced magnetization is antisymmetric in the light's helicity, whereas for ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co, Ni, FePt) the imparted magnetization is only asymmetric in the helicity. We compute effective optomagnetic fields that correspond to the induced magnetizations and provide guidelines for achieving all-optical helicity-dependent switching.

  16. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; van Duin, Adri C. T.; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Kiwi, Miguel; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  17. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  18. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  19. The dual role of coherent twin boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Seita, Matteo; Hanson, John P; Gradečak, Silvija; Demkowicz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) causes engineering alloys to fracture unexpectedly, often at considerable economic or environmental cost. Inaccurate predictions of component lifetimes arise from inadequate understanding of how alloy microstructure affects HE. Here we investigate hydrogen-assisted fracture of a Ni-base superalloy and identify coherent twin boundaries (CTBs) as the microstructural features most susceptible to crack initiation. This is a surprising result considering the renowned beneficial effect of CTBs on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of many engineering alloys. Remarkably, we also find that CTBs are resistant to crack propagation, implying that hydrogen-assisted crack initiation and propagation are governed by distinct physical mechanisms in Ni-base alloys. This finding motivates a re-evaluation of current lifetime models in light of the dual role of CTBs. It also indicates new paths to designing materials with HE-resistant microstructures. PMID:25652438

  20. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-03-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  1. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  2. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  3. Fano response induced by the interference between localized plasmons and interface reflections in metal-insulator-metal waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Ju; Wang, Ling-Ling; Zhai, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The original Fano response induced by the interference between the localized plasmons and interface-reflected surface plasmon polaritons in a single metal-insulator-metal waveguide with two parallel separated metal strips is predicted theoretically through the coupled mode theory combined with the Fano function. The prominent asymmetric line shape resulting from the coupling between the discrete dipole resonance formed between metal strips and an interface-reflected-induced continuum is confirmed by the performed numerical simulations. The novel Fano spectrum is tuned easily by varying the length and coupling distance of metal strips. By introducing another separated metal strip, the outstanding double Fano behavior is obtained, and the corresponding underlying physics is illustrated. In particular, based on the performed refractive index sensing spectra, the high sensitivity of 855 nm/RIU and figure of merit up to 30 are achieved via the double Fano resonance. Undoubtedly, such ingenious structure may benefit the fabrications of nano-integrated plasmonic devices for optical switching and sensing.

  4. Microbially-induced Carbonate Precipitation for Immobilization of Toxic Metals.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepika; Qian, Xin-Yi; Pan, Xiangliang; Achal, Varenyam; Li, Qianwei; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and industrialization resulting from growing populations contribute to environmental pollution by toxic metals and radionuclides which pose a threat to the environment and to human health. To combat this threat, it is important to develop remediation technologies based on natural processes that are sustainable. In recent years, a biomineralization process involving ureolytic microorganisms that leads to calcium carbonate precipitation has been found to be effective in immobilizing toxic metal pollutants. The advantage of using ureolytic organisms for bioremediating metal pollution in soil is their ability to immobilize toxic metals efficiently by precipitation or coprecipitation, independent of metal valence state and toxicity and the redox potential. This review summarizes current understanding of the ability of ureolytic microorganisms for carbonate biomineralization and applications of this process for toxic metal bioremediation. Microbial metal carbonate precipitation may also be relevant to detoxification of contaminated process streams and effluents as well as the production of novel carbonate biominerals and biorecovery of metals and radionuclides that form insoluble carbonates.

  5. Defect distribution and Schottky barrier at metal/Ge interfaces: Role of metal-induced gap states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shogo; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    The defect distribution and Schottky barrier at metal/Ge interfaces were studied using first-principles calculation. It was shown that the defect density markedly increases around the interface owing to the stabilization caused by the hybridization of defect electronic states with metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and by the associated small elastic energy loss around the interface. By comparing the formation energies of various defects at a variety of metal/substrate interfaces, we showed that MIGS not only control the Schottky barrier but also promote a defect-density increase at most metal/semiconductor interfaces. Moreover, we showed that interface oxide layers block MIGS penetration into the Ge substrate and promote the observed breakdown of Fermi-level pinning.

  6. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  7. IN VIVO SEVERE CORROSION AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF RETRIEVED MODULAR BODY TITANIUM ALLOY HIP-IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Danieli C.; Urban, Robert M.; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  8. In vivo severe corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of retrieved modular body titanium alloy hip-implants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Danieli C; Urban, Robert M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity, and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination, and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  9. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy. PMID:26045211

  10. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy.

  11. Environmental hydrogen embrittlement of an alpha-beta titanium alloy - Effect of microstructure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.; Stein, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Study of environmental hydrogen embrittlement of a Ti-6 Al-4 alloy as a function of test displacement rate and of variations in alpha-beta microstructure. Embrittlement in low-pressure (about 1 atm) gaseous hydrogen was inversely dependent on test displacement rate and strongly dependent on microstructure. At a given displacement rate, microstructures having a continuous alpha-phase matrix were less severely embrittled than those having a continuous beta-phase matrix. Further, brittle fracture occurred in the former microstructures by transgranular cleavage and in the latter microstructures by intergranular separation. These observations are consistent with previous studies made on slow strain-rate embrittlement of hydrogen-charged titanium alloys and are explained in terms of relative hydrogen transport rates within the alpha-phase and beta-phase titanium.

  12. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  13. Evaluation of the environmentally induced fracture resistance of ductile nickel aluminide. Technical report number 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ricker, R.E.; Bertocci, U.; Fink, J.L.; Stoudt, M.R.

    1991-07-01

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and electrochemical experiments were performed in different aqueous solutions on ductile nickel aluminide, Ni{sub 3}Al+B, in order to evaluate the possibility of environmentally induced fracture of this material in neutral pH solutions as a result of hydrogen absorption. Two different processes were postulated that could lead to hydrogen absorption and embrittlement: (1) local acidification due to hydrolysis of the corrosion reaction products and (2) hydrogen reduction during the potential transient that accompanies film rupture and repair. Experiments were designed to evaluate each of these possibilities. First, slow strain rate tests were conducted in solutions with varying concentrations of metal ions and pH to determine the critical metal ion concentration and pH that result in hydrogen absorption and embrittlement of this material. Second, the potential transient that follows the mechanical rupture of the protective surface film in different solutions was measured and the minimum potential during the transient was compared to the potential that results in a hydrogen fugacity large enough to cause cracking. The results indicate that hydrogen reduction, absorption, and embrittlement are not to be expected in neutral solutions as a result of local acidification during crevice corrosion or film rupture during crack propagation or cyclic loading.

  14. Air pollution-related metals induce differential cytokine responses in bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Låg, M; Øvrevik, J; Totlandsdal, A I; Lilleaas, E M; Thormodsæter, A; Holme, J A; Schwarze, P E; Refsnes, M

    2016-10-01

    Different transition metals have been shown to induce inflammatory responses in lung. We have compared eight different metal ions with regard to cytokine responses, cytotoxicity and signalling mechanisms in a human lung epithelial cell model (BEAS-2B). Among the metal ions tested, there were large differences with respect to pro-inflammatory potential. Exposure to Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) induced CXCL8 and IL-6 release at concentrations below 100μM, and Mn(2+) and Ni(2+) at concentrations above 200μM. In contrast, VO4(3-), Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) did not induce any significant increase of these cytokines. An expression array of 20 inflammatory relevant genes also showed a marked up-regulation of CXCL10, IL-10, IL-13 and CSF2 by one or more of the metal ions. The most potent metals, Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) induced highest levels of oxidative activity, and ROS appeared to be central in their CXCL8 and IL-6 responses. Activation of the MAPK p38 seemed to be a critical mediator. However, the NF-κB pathway appeared predominately to be involved only in Zn(2+)- and As(3+)-induced CXCL8 and IL-6 responses. Thus, the most potent metals Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) seemed to induce a similar pattern for the cytokine responses, and with some exceptions, via similar signalling mechanisms.

  15. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  16. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed. PMID:26832524

  17. Structural modifications in biosynthetic melanins induced by metal ions.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, A; d'Ischia, M; Misuraca, G; Prota, G; Schultz, T M

    1988-02-17

    A number of transition metal ions with a wide distribution in biological systems, e.g., Cu2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, are shown to affect markedly the chemical properties of melanins formed by the tyrosinase-catalysed oxidation of dopa. Acid decarboxylation and permanganate degradation provide evidence that melanins prepared in the presence of metal ions contain a high content of carboxyl groups arising from the incorporation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DICA) into the pigment polymer. Naturally occurring melanins from cephalopod ink and B16 mouse melanoma were found to be much more similar to melanins prepared in the presence of metal ions than to standard melanins prepared in the absence of metal ions. These results suggest that the presence of carboxylated indole units in natural melanins is probably due to the intervention in the biochemical pathway of metal ions which, as recently shown, catalyse the formation of DICA versus 5,6-dihydroxyindole in the rearrangement of dopachrome. PMID:3124888

  18. Cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction in rainbow trout: Effects of binary and quaternary metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Veldhoen, Nik; Carew, Amanda C; Helbing, Caren C; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-03-01

    A functioning olfactory response is essential for fish to be able to undertake essential behaviors. The majority of work investigating the effects of metals on the olfactory response of fish has focused on single-metal exposures. In this study we exposed rainbow trout to cadmium, copper, nickel, zinc, or a mixture of these four metals at or below the current Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Measurement of olfactory acuity using an electro-olfactogram demonstrated that cadmium causes significant impairment of the entire olfactory system, while the other three metals or the mixture of all four metals did not. Binary mixtures with cadmium and each of the other metals demonstrated that nickel and zinc, but not copper, protect against cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction. Testing was done to determine if the protection from cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction could be explained by binding competition between cadmium and the other metals at the cell surface, or if the protection could be explained by an up-regulation of an intracellular detoxification pathway, namely metallothionein. This study is the first to measure the effects of binary and quaternary metal mixtures on the olfactory response of fish, something that will aid in future assessments of the effects of metals on the environment. PMID:26775207

  19. Cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction in rainbow trout: Effects of binary and quaternary metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Veldhoen, Nik; Carew, Amanda C; Helbing, Caren C; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-03-01

    A functioning olfactory response is essential for fish to be able to undertake essential behaviors. The majority of work investigating the effects of metals on the olfactory response of fish has focused on single-metal exposures. In this study we exposed rainbow trout to cadmium, copper, nickel, zinc, or a mixture of these four metals at or below the current Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Measurement of olfactory acuity using an electro-olfactogram demonstrated that cadmium causes significant impairment of the entire olfactory system, while the other three metals or the mixture of all four metals did not. Binary mixtures with cadmium and each of the other metals demonstrated that nickel and zinc, but not copper, protect against cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction. Testing was done to determine if the protection from cadmium-induced olfactory dysfunction could be explained by binding competition between cadmium and the other metals at the cell surface, or if the protection could be explained by an up-regulation of an intracellular detoxification pathway, namely metallothionein. This study is the first to measure the effects of binary and quaternary metal mixtures on the olfactory response of fish, something that will aid in future assessments of the effects of metals on the environment.

  20. A Continuum Theory for Shock Induced Heating of Metalized Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Keith; Chakravarthy, Sunada; Rumchik, Chad

    2009-06-01

    A well-developed continuum field theory for Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT) in granular explosive is generalized to account for the existence of an arbitrary number of condensed phases and a gas product phase. Formulation of the more generic theory is motivated by a desire to model both the low and high pressure impact response of metalized explosive for which the metal and explosive grains may have distinct average densities, velocities, temperatures, and sizes. The theory is consistent with the strong form of the dissipation inequality and allows for flexible partitioning of dissipation between phases. The theory is applied to inert impact of aluminized HMX in the limit of low gas pressure. Emphasis is placed on characterizing the spatial structure of planar deformation waves and its dependence on impact speed and initial metal mass fraction.

  1. Ultrafast electronic disorder in heat-induced structural deformations and phase transitions in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chunlei; Taylor, Antoinette J.

    2000-09-01

    Heat-induced structural deformations and phase transitions of gold and silver are studied using 1.55-eV, 120-fs ultrashort laser pulses. The dynamics of the heating process is monitored by measuring the time evolution of the dielectric constants following optical excitation. Intensity-dependent dielectric constants in silver and gold show similarities with the photon-energy-dependent dielectric constants, which is shown to indirectly map out the degree of heat-induced electronic disorder in these noble metals. This observation strongly suggests that the heat-induced structural deformations and phase transitions in metals are tied to the electronic disorder and band-structure collapse.

  2. Embrittlement of molybdenum-rhenium welds under low and high temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnikov, A. V.; Morito, F.; Danylenko, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of low- and high-temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile strength, microhardness, and fracture mode has been studied for a series of Mo-Re welds with various Re concentrations. Radiation-induced hardening and concurrent ductility reduction are the key after-effects of neutron exposure. Low-temperature irradiation usually leads to a very hard embrittlement. The hardening effect is rather limited and unstable because of the lack of ductility. Irradiated specimens fail by brittle intergranular or transgranular fracture. The damaging effect of neutrons is less pronounced after high-temperature irradiation. The hardening of the matrix is rather high, but irradiated specimens still keep residual plasticity. High-temperature irradiation intensifies homogeneous nucleation of Re-rich phases, and this effect equalises the difference in mechanical properties between the different weld zones. A characteristic ductility loss exposure temperature was found to separate the temperature fields of absolutely brittle and relatively ductile behaviour. It usually varies between 850 K and 1000 K depending on the alloy composition and irradiation conditions.

  3. Compositional Constraints on Dehydration Embrittlement in Serpentinized Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Zhang, J.; Green, H. W.

    2012-12-01

    Double seismic zones (DSZ) which have two parallel planes of seismicity separated by 15-40 km are a global feature of subduction zones in the 70-250 km depth range (Brudzinski et al., 2007). While the physical mechanism of lower plane seismicity is still controversial, the leading hypotheses currently are associated with dehydration of antigorite serpentine within the subducting mantle plate (Peacock, 2001; Jung et al., 2004). In this study, we are conducting high-pressure (1-3GPa), high-temperature (720-750 Celsius), deformation experiments on specimens of varying compositions of serpentine plus peridotite in our 4GPa Modified Griggs apparatus. Using samples composed of interlayered thin discs of antigorite and harzburgite, we find that dehydration embrittlement occurs down to less than ~30 vol % antigorite. Interlayered mineralogy was impractical at lower antigorite fractions so we prepared homogeneous mixtures of powders of the two rock types (35-75 μm grain-size) and "warm" pressed them to a coherent solid with little porosity. Subsequent deformation of these specimens extended the faulting regime to as little as ~8 vol % antigorite. In summary, we find that faulting occurs during dehydration in a wide range of serpentinized peridotite compositions but not during dehydration of nearly pure serpentinite nor nearly pure peridotite. We suggest that the lack of faulting in nearly pure peridotite is a consequence of too little H2O production and the lack of faulting in nearly pure serpentine is due to extensive crystal plasticity.

  4. Embrittlement in CN3MN Grade Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, Mertcan; Chumbley, Scott L.; Kalay, Yunus Eren

    2014-05-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels (SSS) are widely used in extreme environments such as off-shore oil wells, chemical and food processing equipment, and seawater systems due to their excellent corrosion resistance and superior toughness. The design of the corresponding heat treatment process is crucial to create better mechanical properties. In this respect, the short-term annealing behavior of CN3MN grade SSS was investigated by a combined study of Charpy impact tests, hardness measurements, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were heat treated at 1200 K (927 °C) for up to 16 minutes annealing time and their impact strengths and hardnesses were tested. The impact toughness was found to decrease to less than the half of the initial values while hardness stayed the same. Detailed fracture surface analyses revealed a ductile to brittle failure transition for relatively short annealing times. Brittle fracture occurred in both intergranular and transgranular modes. SEM and TEM indicated precipitation of nano-sized intermetallics, accounting for the intergranular embrittlement, along the grain boundaries with respect to annealing time. The transgranular fracture originated from linear defects seen to exist within the grains. Close observation of such defects revealed stacking-fault type imperfections, which lead to step-like cracking observed in microlength scales.

  5. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of PH 13-8 Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y. S.; Tsay, L. W.; Chiang, M. F.; Chen, C.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, notched tensile and fatigue crack growth tests in gaseous hydrogen were performed on PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel specimens at room temperature. These specimens were susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), but at different degrees, depending on the aging conditions or the microstructures of the alloys. In hydrogen, the accelerated fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) usually accompanied a reduced notched tensile strength (NTS) of the specimens, i.e., the faster the FCGR the lower the NTS. It was proposed that the same fracture mechanism could be applied to these two different types of specimens, regardless of the loading conditions. Rapid fatigue crack growth and high NTS loss were found in the H800 (426 °C under-aged) and H900 (482 °C peak-aged) specimens. The HE susceptibility of the steel was reduced by increasing the aging temperature above 593 °C, which was attributed to the increased amount of austenite in the structure. Extensive quasi-cleavage fracture was observed for the specimens that were deteriorated severely by HE.

  6. Chemical trend of pressure-induced metallization in alkaline earth hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sijia; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2010-09-02

    The pressure-induced metallization of alkaline earth hydrides was systematically investigated using ab initio methods. While BeH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} present different semimetallic phases, CaH{sub 2}, SrH{sub 2}, and BaH{sub 2} share the same metallic phase (P6/mmm). The metallization pressure shows an attractive decrease with each increment of metal radius, and this trend is well correlated with both the electronegativity of alkaline earth metals and the band gap of alkaline earth hydrides at ambient pressure. Our results are consistent with current experimental data, and the obtained trend has significant implications for designing and engineering metallic hydrides for energy applications.

  7. Charged and metallic molecular monolayers through surface-induced aromatic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimel, G.; Duhm, S.; Salzmann, I.; Gerlach, A.; Strozecka, A.; Niederhausen, J.; Bürker, C.; Hosokai, T.; Fernandez-Torrente, I.; Schulze, G.; Winkler, S.; Wilke, A.; Schlesinger, R.; Frisch, J.; Bröker, B.; Vollmer, A.; Detlefs, B.; Pflaum, J.; Kera, S.; Franke, K. J.; Ueno, N.; Pascual, J. I.; Schreiber, F.; Koch, N.

    2013-03-01

    Large π-conjugated molecules, when in contact with a metal surface, usually retain a finite electronic gap and, in this sense, stay semiconducting. In some cases, however, the metallic character of the underlying substrate is seen to extend onto the first molecular layer. Here, we develop a chemical rationale for this intriguing phenomenon. In many reported instances, we find that the conjugation length of the organic semiconductors increases significantly through the bonding of specific substituents to the metal surface and through the concomitant rehybridization of the entire backbone structure. The molecules at the interface are thus converted into different chemical species with a strongly reduced electronic gap. This mechanism of surface-induced aromatic stabilization helps molecules to overcome competing phenomena that tend to keep the metal Fermi level between their frontier orbitals. Our findings aid in the design of stable precursors for metallic molecular monolayers, and thus enable new routes for the chemical engineering of metal surfaces.

  8. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-01

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices.We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced

  9. X-ray Methods in High-Intensity Discharges and Metal-Halide Lamps: X-ray Induced Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, John J.; Lapatovich, Walter P.; Henins, Albert

    2011-12-09

    We describe the use of x-ray induced fluorescence to study metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps and to measure equilibrium vapor pressures of metal-halide salts. The physical principles of metal-halide lamps, relevant aspects of x-ray-atom interactions, the experimental method using synchrotron radiation, and x-ray induced fluorescence measurements relevant to metal-halide lamps are covered.

  10. Evaluation on the Effect of Composition on Radiation Hardening and Embrittlement in Model FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Edmondson, Philip; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Howard, Richard; Parish, Chad M.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-18

    This report details the findings of post-radiation mechanical testing and microstructural characterization performed on a series of model and commercial FeCrAl alloys to assist with the development of a cladding technology with enhanced accident tolerance. The samples investigated include model alloys with simple ferritic grain structure and two commercial alloys with minor solute additions. These samples were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to nominal doses of 7.0 dpa near or at Light Water Reactor (LWR) relevant temperatures (300-400 C). Characterization included a suite of techniques including small angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom probe tomography (APT), and transmission based electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical testing included tensile tests at room temperature on sub-sized tensile specimens. The goal of this work was to conduct detailed characterization and mechanical testing to begin establishing empirical and/or theoretical structure-property relationships for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement in the FeCrAl alloy class. Development of such relationships will provide insight on the performance of FeCrAl alloys in an irradiation environment and will enable further development of the alloy class for applications within a LWR environment. A particular focus was made on establishing trends, including composition and radiation dose. The report highlights in detail the pertinent findings based on this work. This report shows that radiation hardening in the alloys is primarily composition dependent due to the phase separation in the high-Cr FeCrAl alloys. Other radiation induced/enhanced microstructural features were less dependent on composition and when observed at low number densities, were not a significant contributor to the observed mechanical responses. Pre-existing microstructure in the alloys was found to be important, with grain boundaries and pre-existing dislocation

  11. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  12. Agriculturally Induced Heavy Metal Accumulation in Seyfe Lake, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bölükbaşı, Vildan; Akın, Beril Salman

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present 1-year study was to investigate the effect of heavy metals in synthetic fertilizers on water and sediment quality in the Seyfe Lake, where agricultural activity was the only anthropogenic source. Metal concentrations of five different types of synthetic fertilizers used in agricultural fields within the Seyfe Lake closed basin were as follows: Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd > As > Ni > Co. The annual average of heavy metal concentrations in the sediment samples were as follows: Zn > Pb > As > Cr > Ni > Cu > Cd > Co. Seyfe Lake sediment was classified as anthropogenically "highly polluted" in terms of the As and Zn concentrations at each sample station based on the sediment quality guidelines. Furthermore, the sediment could be classified as "moderately to highly polluted" in terms of the As concentration, based on the geo-accumulation index. PMID:26744023

  13. V3O5: Insulator-metal transition and electric-field-induced resistive-switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B.; Patlagan, L.; Chashka, K. B.; Makarov, C.; Reisner, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    V3O5 is one of the two vanadium oxides that exhibit insulator to metal transitions above room temperature. We report on the DC I-V characteristics of polycrystalline samples and single-crystals of V3O5 over a wide range of currents. For all samples self-heating induced hysteretic nonlinear conductivity followed at higher currents by onset of negative differential resistivity regime, and finally, at highest currents, by switching to the metallic state. Slow switching towards a partially transformed state with a prolonged memory is typical of polycrystalline samples. High currents applied in the metallic state of one of the single crystals affected the oxygen content of the material and even caused appearance and disappearance of a VO2 inclusion. Simple and reproducible I-V plots were obtained for a single crystal with the currents that barely induced the metallic state.

  14. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Ma, L. M.; Li, Y. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  15. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.G.

    1993-01-31

    Objective of this project is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. If neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress can be measured via changes in magnetic properties, this should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. This first-year report addresses the issue of using magnetic property changes to detect neutron embrittlement. The magnetic measurements were all done on irradiated specimens previously broken in two in a Charpy test to determine their embrittlement. The magnetic properties of the broken charpy specimens from D.C. Cook did not correlate well with fluence or embrittlement parameters, possible due to metallurgical reasons. correlation was better with Indian Point 2 specimens, with the nonlinear harmonic amplitudes showing the best correlation (R[sup 2][approximately]0.7). However, correlation was not good enough. It is recommended that tests be done on unbroken irradiated Charpy specimens, for which magnetic characterization data prior to irradiation is available, if possible.

  16. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental studies of hydrogen embrittlement of materials using both experimental observations and numerical simulations of the hydrogen/deformation interactions have been conducted. Our approach integrates mechanical property testing at the macro-scale, microstructural analyses and TEM observations of the deformation processes at the micro- and nano-scale, first-principles calculations of interfacial cohesion at the atomic scale, and finite element simulation and modeling at the micro- and macro-level. Focused Ion Beam machining in conjunction with Transmission Electron Microscopy were used to identify the salient micro-mechanisms of failure in the presence of hydrogen. Our analysis of low strength ferritic steels led to the discovery that “quasi-cleavage” is a dislocation plasticity controlled failure mode in agreement with the hydrogen enhanced plasticity mechanism. The microstructure underneath the fracture surface of 304 and 316 stainless steels was found to be significantly more complex than would have been predicted by the traditional models of fatigue. The general refinement of the microstructure that occurred near the fracture surface in the presence of hydrogen was such that one may argue that hydrogen stabilizes microstructural configurations to an extent not achievable in its absence. Finite element studies of hydrogen and deformation field similitude for cracks in real-life pipelines and laboratory fracture specimens yielded that the Single Edge Notch Tension specimen can be used to reliably study hydrogen material compatibility for pipeline structures. In addition, simulation of onset of crack propagation in low strength ferritic systems by void growth indicated that hydrogen can reduce the fracture toughness of the material by as much as 30%. Both experimental observations and numerical studies of hydrogen transport on hydrogen accumulations ahead of a crack tip yielded that dislocation transport can markedly enhance hydrogen populations which

  17. Role of thermal heating on the voltage induced insulator-metal transition in VO2.

    PubMed

    Zimmers, A; Aigouy, L; Mortier, M; Sharoni, A; Wang, Siming; West, K G; Ramirez, J G; Schuller, Ivan K

    2013-02-01

    We show that the main mechanism for the dc voltage or dc current induced insulator-metal transition in vanadium dioxide VO(2) is due to local Joule heating and not a purely electronic effect. This "tour de force" experiment was accomplished by using the fluorescence spectra of rare-earth doped micron sized particles as local temperature sensors. As the insulator-metal transition is induced by a dc voltage or dc current, the local temperature reaches the transition temperature indicating that Joule heating plays a predominant role. This has critical implications for the understanding of the dc voltage or dc current induced insulator-metal transition and has a direct impact on applications which use dc voltage or dc current to externally drive the transition. PMID:23414038

  18. Ultrafast Electronic Disorder in Heat-induced Structural Phase Transitions in Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Antoinette; Guo, Chunlei

    2000-03-01

    Heat-induced structural phase transitions of noble metals silver and gold are studied using 1.5 eV, 120 fs ultrashort laser pulses. The dynamics of heating process is monitored by measuring the time evolution of the dielectric constants following optical excitation, which shows behavior consistent with that reported previously. Fluence-dependent dielectric constants in silver and gold show similarities with the photon-energy-dependent dielectric constants, which in fact indirectly map out the degree of the heat-induced electronic disorder in noble metals. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the heat-induced structural phase transition in metal is in fact tied to the electronic disorder and band structure collapse.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  20. Possible role of metal ionophore against zinc induced cognitive dysfunction in D-galactose senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Kanchan; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Prakash, Atish

    2016-06-01

    Metal ionophores are considered as potential anti-dementia agents, and some are currently undergoing clinical trials. Many metals are known to accumulate and distribute abnormally in the aging brain. Alterations in zinc metal homeostasis in the glutaminergic synapse could contribute to ageing and the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of metal ionophores on long term administration of zinc in D-galactose induced senescent mice. The ageing model was established by combined administration of zinc and D-galactose to mice for 6 weeks. A novel metal ionophore, PBT-2 was given daily to zinc-induced d-galactose senescent mice. The cognitive behaviour of mice was monitored using the Morris Water Maze. The anti-oxidant status and amyloidogenic activity in the ageing mouse was measured by determining mito-oxidative parameters and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Systemic administration of both zinc and D-galactose significantly produced memory deficits, mito-oxidative damage, heightened acetylcholinesterase enzymatic activity and deposition of amyloid-β. Treatment with PBT-2 significantly improved behavioural deficits, biochemical profiles, cellular damage, and curbed the deposition of APP in zinc-induced senescent mice. These findings suggest that PBT-2, acting as a metal protein attenuating compound, may be helpful in the prevention of AD or alleviation of ageing. PMID:26923568

  1. Heavy-ion-induced electronic desorption of gas from metals.

    PubMed

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M Kireeff; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-02-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE_{e}/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering. PMID:17358950

  2. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  3. Apoptosis Induced by Metal Complexes and Interaction with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Sun; Barros, José Carlos Almeida

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis induced by rhodium II amidate, rhodium II propionate, cisplatin and interactions with dexamethaxone were studied on some human leukemia cell lines Raji, Jurkat and U937. Apoptosis was studied by flow cytometry, agarose gel electrophoresis and morphological analysis. Rhodium II propionate induced apoptosis in all the three cell lines, Rhodium II amidate, in the lymphoid cell lines Jurkat and Raji, and cisplatin, only in the Jurkat, a T lymphoid cell line. It has also been observed that the addition of dexamethasone enhances the apoptosis index only in U937, a monocytic line with a glucocorticoid receptor bearing. PMID:18476001

  4. Metal induced inhalation exposure in urban population: A probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widziewicz, Kamila; Loska, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    The paper was aimed at assessing the health risk in the populations of three Silesian cities: Bielsko-Biała, Częstochowa and Katowice exposed to the inhalation intake of cadmium, nickel and arsenic present in airborne particulate matter. In order to establish how the exposure parameters affects risk a probabilistic risk assessment framework was used. The risk model was based on the results of the annual measurements of As, Cd and Ni concentrations in PM2.5 and the sets of data on the concentrations of those elements in PM10 collected by the Voivodship Inspectorate of Environmental Protection over 2012-2013 period. The risk was calculated as an incremental lifetime risk of cancer (ILCR) in particular age groups (infants, children, adults) following Monte Carlo approach. With the aim of depicting the effect the variability of exposure parameters exerts on the risk, the initial parameters of the risk model: metals concentrations, its infiltration into indoor environment, exposure duration, exposure frequency, lung deposition efficiency, daily lung ventilation and body weight were modeled as random variables. The distribution of inhalation cancer risk due to exposure to ambient metals concentrations was LN (1.80 × 10-6 ± 2.89 × 10-6) and LN (6.17 × 10-7 ± 1.08 × 10-6) for PM2.5 and PM10-bound metals respectively and did not exceed the permissible limit of the acceptable risk. The highest probability of contracting cancer was observed for Katowice residents exposed to PM2.5 - LN (2.01 × 10-6 ± 3.24 × 10-6). Across the tested age groups adults were approximately one order of magnitude at higher risk compared to infants. Sensitivity analysis showed that exposure duration (ED) and body weight (BW) were the two variables, which contributed the most to the ILCR.

  5. Hydrogen-induced surface metallization of SrTiO3(001).

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M; Yukawa, R; Ozawa, K; Yamamoto, S; Hirahara, T; Hasegawa, S; Silly, M G; Sirotti, F; Matsuda, I

    2012-03-16

    Surface metallization of SrTiO3(001) by hydrogen adsorption is experimentally confirmed for the first time by photoemission spectroscopy and surface conductivity measurements. The metallic state is assigned to a quantized state in the space-charge layer induced by electron doping from hydrogen atoms. The measured two-dimensional (2D) conductivity is well above the 2D Ioffe-Regel limit indicating that the system is in a metallic conduction regime. The mean free path of the surface electron is estimated to be several nanometers at room temperature. PMID:22540498

  6. Cavitation-Induced Fracture Causes Nanocorrugations in Brittle Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, I.; Narasimhan, R.; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-01

    Brittle metallic glasses exhibit a unique and intriguing fracture morphology of periodic nanocorrugations whose spacing and amplitude are of the order of tens of nanometers. We show through continuum simulations that they fail by spontaneous and simultaneous cavitation within multiple weak zones arising due to intrinsic atomic density fluctuations ahead of a notch tip. Dynamic crack growth would then occur along curved but narrowly confined shear bands that link the growing cavities. This mechanism involves little dissipation and also explains the formation of nanocorrugations.

  7. Cavitation-Induced Fracture Causes Nanocorrugations in Brittle Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Narasimhan, R; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-22

    Brittle metallic glasses exhibit a unique and intriguing fracture morphology of periodic nanocorrugations whose spacing and amplitude are of the order of tens of nanometers. We show through continuum simulations that they fail by spontaneous and simultaneous cavitation within multiple weak zones arising due to intrinsic atomic density fluctuations ahead of a notch tip. Dynamic crack growth would then occur along curved but narrowly confined shear bands that link the growing cavities. This mechanism involves little dissipation and also explains the formation of nanocorrugations. PMID:27494475

  8. Laser-induced metallic nanograined thin films processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, Nicoleta E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Toadere, Florin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Hojbota, Calin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Tosa, Valer E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro

    2013-11-13

    A direct laser writing method for designing metallic nanograined thin films is presented. This method takes advantage of photon conversion within a chemical process localized at the focal point. A computer controlled positioning system allows the control of experimental parameters and spatial resolution of the pattern. Spectroscopic investigations reveal variable attenuation of the optical properties in UV-visible range and a spectral imaging processing algorithm simulated the functionality of these films in visible light. This could be an important step for obtaining neutral density attenuators.

  9. Application Of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique In Investigation Of Historical Metal Threads

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Khedr, A.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2009-09-27

    Analysis of the composition of an object is a necessary step in the documentation of the properties of this object for estimating its condition. Also this is an important task for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the result of the application of the suggested treatments. There has been an important evolution in the methods used for analysis of metal threads since the second half of the twentieth century. Today, the main considerations of selecting a method are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal threads. In this study various historical metal threads collected from different museums were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal thread samples were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDX) which is reported in conservation field as the best method, to determine the chemical composition, and corrosion of investigated metal threads. The results show that all investigated metal threads in the present study are too dirty, strongly damaged and corroded with different types of corrosion products. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal threads. It is, in fact, very useful tool as a noninvasive method for analysis of historical metal threads. The first few laser shots are very useful for the investigation of the corrosion and dirt layer, while the following shots are very useful and effective for investigating the coating layer. Higher number of laser shots are very useful for the main

  10. Heavy-metal-induced reactive oxygen species: phytotoxicity and physicochemical changes in plants.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dumat, Camille; Nadeem, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the industrial revolution, anthropogenic activities have enhanced there distribution of many toxic heavy metals from the earth's crust to different environmental compartments. Environmental pollution by toxic heavy metals is increasing worldwide, and poses a rising threat to both the environment and to human health.Plants are exposed to heavy metals from various sources: mining and refining of ores, fertilizer and pesticide applications, battery chemicals, disposal of solid wastes(including sewage sludge), irrigation with wastewater, vehicular exhaust emissions and adjacent industrial activity.Heavy metals induce various morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants, either directly or indirectly, and cause various damaging effects. The most frequently documented and earliest consequence of heavy metal toxicity in plants cells is the overproduction of ROS. Unlike redox-active metals such as iron and copper, heavy metals (e.g, Pb, Cd, Ni, AI, Mn and Zn) cannot generate ROS directly by participating in biological redox reactions such as Haber Weiss/Fenton reactions. However, these metals induce ROS generation via different indirect mechanisms, such as stimulating the activity of NADPH oxidases, displacing essential cations from specific binding sites of enzymes and inhibiting enzymatic activities from their affinity for -SH groups on the enzyme.Under normal conditions, ROS play several essential roles in regulating the expression of different genes. Reactive oxygen species control numerous processes like the cell cycle, plant growth, abiotic stress responses, systemic signalling, programmed cell death, pathogen defence and development. Enhanced generation of these species from heavy metal toxicity deteriorates the intrinsic antioxidant defense system of cells, and causes oxidative stress. Cells with oxidative stress display various chemical,biological and physiological toxic symptoms as a result of the interaction between ROS and

  11. Metal-induced decomposition of perchlorate in pressurized hot water.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Sakamoto, Takehiko; Tanabe, Takashi; Kasuya, Miu; Chino, Asako; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2012-10-01

    Decomposition of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) in pressurized hot water (PHW) was investigated. Although ClO(4)(-) demonstrated little reactivity in pure PHW up to 300°C, addition of zerovalent metals to the reaction system enhanced the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) to Cl(-) with an increasing order of activity of (no metal)≈Al < Cu < Zn < Ni < Fe: the addition of iron powder led to the most efficient decomposition of ClO(4)(-). When the iron powder was added to an aqueous ClO(4)(-) solution (104 μM) and the mixture was heated at 150°C, ClO(4)(-) concentration fell below 0.58 μM (58 μg L(-1), detection limit of ion chromatography) in 1 h, and Cl(-) was formed with the yield of 85% after 6 h. The decomposition was accompanied by transformation of the zerovalent iron to Fe(3)O(4). This method was successfully used in the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) in a water sample contaminated with this compound, following fireworks display at Albany, New York, USA.

  12. Metal-induced decomposition of perchlorate in pressurized hot water.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Sakamoto, Takehiko; Tanabe, Takashi; Kasuya, Miu; Chino, Asako; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2012-10-01

    Decomposition of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) in pressurized hot water (PHW) was investigated. Although ClO(4)(-) demonstrated little reactivity in pure PHW up to 300°C, addition of zerovalent metals to the reaction system enhanced the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) to Cl(-) with an increasing order of activity of (no metal)≈Al < Cu < Zn < Ni < Fe: the addition of iron powder led to the most efficient decomposition of ClO(4)(-). When the iron powder was added to an aqueous ClO(4)(-) solution (104 μM) and the mixture was heated at 150°C, ClO(4)(-) concentration fell below 0.58 μM (58 μg L(-1), detection limit of ion chromatography) in 1 h, and Cl(-) was formed with the yield of 85% after 6 h. The decomposition was accompanied by transformation of the zerovalent iron to Fe(3)O(4). This method was successfully used in the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) in a water sample contaminated with this compound, following fireworks display at Albany, New York, USA. PMID:22840541

  13. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  14. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  15. A study of the neutron irradiation effects on the susceptibility to embrittlement of A316L and T91 steels in lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapundjiev, D.; Al Mazouzi, A.; Van Dyck, S.

    2006-09-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the susceptibility to liquid metal embrittlement of two primary selected materials for MYRRHA project an accelerator driven system (ADS), was investigated by means of slow strain rate tests (SSRT). The latter were carried out at 200 °C in nitrogen and in liquid Pb-Bi at a strain rate of 5 × 10 -6 s -1. The small tensile specimens were irradiated at the BR-2 reactor in the MISTRAL irradiation rig at 200 °C for 3 reactor cycles to reach a dose of about 1.50 dpa. The SSR tests were carried out under poor and under dissolved oxygen conditions (˜1.5 × 10 -12 wt% dissolved oxygen) which at this temperature will favour formation of iron and chromium oxides. Although both materials differ in structure (fcc for A316L against bcc for T91), their flow behaviour in contact with liquid lead bismuth eutectic before and after irradiation is very similar. Under these testing conditions none of them was found susceptible to liquid metal embrittlement (LME).

  16. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin V : Results of Weather-Exposure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1929-01-01

    In a series of weather exposure tests of sheet duralumin, upon which accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory by the wet-and-dry corrosion method in a sodium chloride solution has already been carried out, a close parallelism between the results of the two kinds of tests was found to exist. The exposure tests showed that the lack of permanence of sheet duralumin is largely, if not entirely, due to corrosion. A corrosion attack of an intercrystalline nature is very largely responsible for the degree of embrittlement produced. The rate of embrittlement was greatly accelerated by a marine atmosphere and by the tropical climate. Variations in corrosion and embrittlement are noted in relation to heat treatment, cold working, and types of protective coatings.

  17. Embrittlement of nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base superalloys by exposure to hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Five nickel-base alloys (Inconel 718, Udimet 700, Rene 41, Hastelloy X, and TD-NiCr), one cobalt-base alloy (L-605), and an iron-base alloy (A-286) were exposed in hydrogen at 0.1 MN/sq m (15 psi) at several temperatures in the range from 430 to 980 C for as long as 1000 hours. These alloys were embrittled to varying degrees by such exposures in hydrogen. Embrittlement was found to be: (1) sensitive to strain rate, (2) reversible, (3) caused by large concentrations of absorbed hydrogen, and (4) not associated with any detectable microstructural changes in the alloys. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement.

  18. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium - A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sq m) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment.

  19. Temperature-Induced and Photo-Induced Phase Transition in a BistableMetal-Cyanide Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    Studies that are related to thermal-induced phase transition and photo-induced phase transition are important issues in the field of solid state science. Rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrate RbMn[Fe(CN)6], one of the Prussian blue analogs, is a suitable system for observing thermal-induced and photo-induced phase transitions since this compound is a mixed-valence compound that has a strong cooperativity due to the CN ligand bridges. Here, we describe the crystal structure, magnetic properties, thermal-induced phase transition, and photo-induced phase collapse and photomagnetic effect based on photo-induced phase transition of RbMn[Fe(CN)6].

  20. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs. PMID:26726416

  1. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs.

  2. Investigation of historical metal objects using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Ghoneim, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    Analysis of metal objects is a necessary step for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the application's result of the suggested treatments. The main considerations on selecting a method that can be used in investigation and analysis of metal objects are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal objects. In this study various historical metal objects collected from different museums and excavations in Egypt were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal objects were investigated by other methods such as Scanning Electron Microscope with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). This study confirms that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal objects. LIBS analysis can quickly provide information on the qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental content of different metal objects and their characterization and classification. It is practically non-destructive technique with the critical advantage of being applicable in situ, thereby avoiding sampling and sample preparations. It is can be dependable, satisfactory and effective method for low cost study of archaeological and historical metals. But we have to take into consideration that the corrosion of metal leads to material alteration and possible loss of certain metals in the form of soluble salts. Certain corrosion products are known to leach out of the object and therefore, their low content does not necessarily reflect the composition of the metal at the time of

  3. Heavy Metal-induced Metallothionein Expression Is Regulated by Specific Protein Phosphatase 2A Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Ma, Lu; Bai, Qing; Zhu, Xiaonian; Zhang, Jinmiao; Wei, Qing; Li, Daochuan; Gao, Chen; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhengbao; Liu, Caixia; He, Zhini; Zeng, Xiaowen; Zhang, Aihua; Qu, Weidong; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Chen, Wen; Xiao, Yongmei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of metallothionein (MT) expression is involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification. To identify the key pathways that regulate metal-induced cytotoxicity, we investigate how phosphorylated metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) contributed to induction of MT expression. Immortal human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells) were treated with seven kinds of metals including cadmium chloride (CdCl2), zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), copper sulfate(CuSO4), lead acetate (PbAc), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2), and potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7). The MT expression was induced in a dose-response and time-dependent manner upon various metal treatments. A cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation was required for translocation of MTF-1 from cytoplasm to nucleus, leading to the up-regulation of MTs expression. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) participated in regulating MT expression through dephosphorylation of MTF-1. A loss-of-function screen revealed that the specific PP2A complexes containing PR110 were involved in metal-induced MT expression. Suppression of PP2A PR110 in HEK cells resulted in the persistent MTF-1 phosphorylation and the disturbance of MTF-1 nuclear translocation, which was concomitant with a significant decrease of MT expression and enhanced cytotoxicity in HEK cells. Notably, MTF-1 was found in complex with specific PP2A complexes containing the PR110 subunit upon metal exposure. Furthermore, we identify that the dephosphorylation of MTF-1 at residue Thr-254 is directly regulated by PP2A PR110 complexes and responsible for MTF-1 activation. Taken together, these findings delineate a novel pathway that determines cytotoxicity in response to metal treatments and provide new insight into the role of PP2A in cellular stress response. PMID:24962574

  4. Metal mixture (As-Cd-Pb)-induced cell transformation is modulated by OLA1.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Baeza, Elia; Rojas, Emilio; Valverde, Mahara

    2016-07-01

    Environmental pollutants are complex mixtures in which metals are ubiquitous. Metal mixtures of arsenic, cadmium and lead are present in the occupational environment and generate health effects such as cardiovascular, renal and cancer diseases. Cell transformation induced by metal mixtures that depend on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell viability maintenance and avoidance of senescence was previously reported by our group. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of a Obg-like ATPase1 (OLA1) in the cell transformation of BALB/c 3T3 A31-1-1 clonal cells induced by a metal mixture (2 µM NaAsO2, 2 µM CdCl2 and 5 µM Pb(C2H3O2)2 3H2O) through ROS generation. The interest in OLA1 is justified because this protein has been proposed to be a negative regulator of the cellular antioxidant response. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown OLA1 before the initiation stage of the transformation assay. We evaluated (ROS) and OLA1 protein expression throughout the initiation and promotion stages of transformation. OLA1 knockdown modulated metal mixture-induced cell transformation more strongly when the metal mixture was an initiator stimulus than when it was a promoter. The ability of the metal mixture to initiate cell transformation was diminished by OLA1 knockdown, an effect that depended on intracellular ROS levels. The effect of OLA1 was synergistic with N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) co-treatment. Oxidative stress-associated transcription factors Egr1 and Smad were also down-regulated by the OLA1 knockdown, contributing to the rescue of metal mixture cell transformation. PMID:26984302

  5. Ion-induced spike effects on metal surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S. E.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Salford

    1999-01-01

    The effects of single Xe ion impacts on the surfaces of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Individual ion impacts produce surface craters with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. Calculation indicates that, when collision cascades occur near surfaces (within about 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause local melting, craters will occur. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. This would appear to indicate that, although the number of atoms in a spike is small and its duration short, it is reasonable to use macroscopic concepts such as vibrational temperature, melting and flow to describe spike effects.

  6. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  7. Shear-banding Induced Indentation Size Effect in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Sun, B. A.; Zhao, L. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Shear-banding is commonly regarded as the “plasticity carrier” of metallic glasses (MGs), which usually causes severe strain localization and catastrophic failure if unhindered. However, through the use of the high-throughput dynamic nanoindentation technique, here we reveal that nano-scale shear-banding in different MGs evolves from a “distributed” fashion to a “localized” mode when the resultant plastic flow extends over a critical length scale. Consequently, a pronounced indentation size effect arises from the distributed shear-banding but vanishes when shear-banding becomes localized. Based on the critical length scales obtained for a variety of MGs, we unveil an intrinsic interplay between elasticity and fragility that governs the nanoscale plasticity transition in MGs. Our current findings provide a quantitative insight into the indentation size effect and transition mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity in MGs.

  8. Shear-banding Induced Indentation Size Effect in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Sun, B. A.; Zhao, L. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Shear-banding is commonly regarded as the “plasticity carrier” of metallic glasses (MGs), which usually causes severe strain localization and catastrophic failure if unhindered. However, through the use of the high-throughput dynamic nanoindentation technique, here we reveal that nano-scale shear-banding in different MGs evolves from a “distributed” fashion to a “localized” mode when the resultant plastic flow extends over a critical length scale. Consequently, a pronounced indentation size effect arises from the distributed shear-banding but vanishes when shear-banding becomes localized. Based on the critical length scales obtained for a variety of MGs, we unveil an intrinsic interplay between elasticity and fragility that governs the nanoscale plasticity transition in MGs. Our current findings provide a quantitative insight into the indentation size effect and transition mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity in MGs. PMID:27324835

  9. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  10. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  11. The effects of composition on the environmental embrittlement of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews recent research on embrittlement of iron aluminides at room temperature brought about by exposure to moisture or hydrogen. The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of several Fe-28Al-5Cr alloys with small additions of Zr and C are described. It will be shown that fatigue crack growth behavior is dependent on composition, environment, humidity level, and frequency. Environments studied include vacuum, oxygen, hydrogen gas, and moist air. All cases of embrittlement are ultimately traceable to the interaction of hydrogen with the crack tip.

  12. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Bimonte, Marida; Barbulova, Ani; Arciello, Stefania; de Laurentiis, Francesco; Monoli, Irene; Hill, Jacqueline; Gibertoni, Simone; Colucci, Gabriella; Apone, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metals can cause several genotoxic effects on cells, including oxidative stress, DNA sequence breakage and protein modification. Among the body organs, skin is certainly the most exposed to heavy metal stress and thus the most damaged by the toxic effects that these chemicals cause. Moreover, heavy metals, in particular nickel, can induce the over-expression of collagenases (enzymes responsible for collagen degradation), leading to weakening of the skin extracellular matrix. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to protect their cells from heavy metal toxicity, including the synthesis of metal chelating proteins and peptides, such as metallothioneins and phytochelatins (PC), which capture the metals and prevent the damages on the cellular structures. To protect human skin cells from heavy metal toxicity, we developed a new cosmetic active ingredient from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) cultured stem cells. This product, besides its high content of antioxidant compounds, contained PC, effective in the protection of skin cells towards heavy metal toxicity. We have demonstrated that this new product preserves nuclear DNA integrity from heavy metal damages, by inducing genes responsible for DNA repair and protection, and neutralizes the effect of heavy metals on collagen degradation, by inhibiting collagenase expression and inducing the synthesis of new collagen.

  13. Heavy metal and abiotic stress inducible metallothionein isoforms from Prosopis juliflora (SW) D.C. show differences in binding to heavy metals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Usha, B; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora is a tree species that grows well in heavy metal laden industrial sites and accumulates heavy metals. To understand the possible contribution of metallothioneins (MTs) in heavy metal accumulation in P. juliflora, we isolated and compared the metal binding ability of three different types of MTs (PjMT1-3). Glutathione S-transferase fusions of PjMTs (GSTMT1-3) were purified from Escherichia coli cells grown in the presence of 0.3 mM cadmium, copper or zinc. Analysis of metal bound fusion proteins using atomic absorption spectrometry showed that PjMT1 bound higher levels of all three heavy metals as compared to PjMT2 and PjMT3. A comparative analysis of the genomic regions (including promoter for all three PjMTs) is also presented. All three PjMTs are induced by H(2)O(2) and ABA applications. PjMT1 and PjMT2 are induced by copper and zinc respectively while PjMT3 is induced by copper, zinc and cadmium. Variation in induction of PjMTs in response to metal exposure and their differential binding to metals suggests that each MT has a specific role in P. juliflora. Of the three MTs analyzed, PjMT1 shows maximum heavy metal sequestration and is thus a potential candidate for use in heavy metal phytoremediation.

  14. Influence of structural parameters on the tendency of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel steel to temper embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Zabusov, O.; Fedotova, S.; Frolov, A.; Saltykov, M.; Maltsev, D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the influence of structural parameters on the tendency of steels to reversible temper embrittlement was studied for assessment of performance properties of reactor pressure vessel steels with extended service life. It is shown that the growth of prior austenite grain size leads to an increase of the critical embrittlement temperature in the initial state. An embrittlement heat treatment at the temperature of maximum manifestation of temper embrittlement (480 °C) shifts critical embrittlement temperature to higher values due to the increase of the phosphorus concentration on grain boundaries. There is a correlation between phosphorus concentration on boundaries of primary austenite grains and the share of brittle intergranular fracture (that, in turn, depends on impact test temperature) in the fracture surfaces of the tested Charpy specimens.

  15. Transition metal-induced degradation of a pharmaceutical compound in reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinggang; He, Brian Lingfeng; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Yande; Kleintop, Brent; Raglione, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug degradation that occurs in HPLC analysis, during either sample preparation or chromatographic separation, can greatly impact method robustness and result accuracy. In this work, we report a case study of drug dimerization in HPLC analysis where proximate causes were attributed to either the LC columns or the HPLC instrument. Solution stress studies indicated that the same pseudo-dimeric degradants could also be formed rapidly when the compound was exposed to certain oxidative transition metal ions, such as Cu(II) and Fe(III). Two pseudo-dimeric degradants were isolated from transition metal stressed samples and their structures were elucidated. A degradation pathway was proposed, whereby the degradation was initiated through transition metal-induced single electron transfer oxidation. Further studies confirmed that the dimerization was induced by trace transition metals in the HPLC flow path, which could arise from either the stainless steel frits in the LC column or stainless steel tubing in the HPLC instrument. Various procedures to prevent transition metal-induced drug degradation were explored, and a general strategy to mitigate such risks is briefly discussed.

  16. Metal ion-induced lateral aggregation of filamentous viruses fd and M13.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jay X; Janmey, Paul A; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed comparison between calculations of inter-filament interactions based on Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental features of lateral aggregation of bacteriophages fd and M13 induced by a number of divalent metal ions. The general findings are consistent with the polyelectrolyte nature of the virus filaments and confirm that the solution electrostatics account for most of the experimental features observed. One particularly interesting discovery is resolubilization for bundles of either fd or M13 viruses when the concentration of the bundle-inducing metal ion Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) is increased to large (>100 mM) values. In the range of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentrations where large bundles of the virus filaments are formed, the optimal attractive interaction energy between the virus filaments is estimated to be on the order of 0.01 kT per net charge on the virus surface when a recent analytical prediction to the experimentally defined conditions of resolubilization is applied. We also observed qualitatively distinct behavior between the alkali-earth metal ions and the divalent transition metal ions in their action on the charged viruses. The understanding of metal ions-induced reversible aggregation based on solution electrostatics may lead to potential applications in molecular biology and medicine. PMID:12080143

  17. Ejection Regimes in Picosecond Laser-Induced Forward Transfer of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Ralph; Visser, Claas Willem; Römer, Gert-Willem; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao; Huis in't Veld, Bert

    2015-02-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a 3D direct-write method suitable for precision printing of various materials, including pure metals. To understand the ejection mechanism and thereby improve deposition, here we present visualizations of ejection events at high-spatial (submicrometer) and high-temporal resolutions, for picosecond LIFT of copper and gold films with a thickness 50 nm ≤d ≤400 nm . For increasing fluences, these visualizations reveals the fluence threshold below which no ejection is observed, followed by the release of a metal cap (i.e., a hemisphere-shaped droplet), the formation of an elongated jet, and the release of a metal spray. For each ejection regime, the driving mechanisms are analyzed, aided by a two-temperature model. Cap ejection is driven by relaxation of thermal stresses induced by laser-induced heating, whereas jet and spray ejections are vapor driven (as the metal film is partly vaporized). We introduce energy balances that provide the ejection velocity in qualitative agreement with our velocity measurements. The threshold fluences separating the ejection regimes are determined. In addition, the fluence threshold below which no ejection is observed is quantitatively described using a balance between the surface energy and the inertia of the (locally melted) film. In conclusion, the ejection type can now be controlled, which allows for improved deposition of pure metal droplets and sprays.

  18. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  19. Fatigue failure in metal bellows due to flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M.; Fargo, C. G.

    1969-01-01

    To prevent fatigue due to flow-induced vibrations in metal bellows connected to ducts carrying liquid hydrogen, a study was made which shows that the flexure lines are in general a function of the vibration coupling between the fluid and bellows structure, and the nature of the external environment.

  20. METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE. UP Kodavanti, MCJ Schladweiler, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, PA Evansky, ER Lappi, G Ross, JH Richards, and DL Costa. NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Ambient ...

  1. Metal-induced fluorescence properties of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous silver inverse opal platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Lee, Myung-Jin; Kim, Kisun; Hyun, Jerome K.; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the metal-induced fluorescence properties of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous silver inverse opal (IO) films. Electrochemically synthesized silver IO films with a micrometer cavity exhibited notable fluorescence enhancement at the silver frame, and a decrease in fluorescence lifetime. Numerical calculations supported the observations of a higher fluorescence efficiency at the frame than in the cavity.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  3. Spin-state transition induced half metallicity in a cobaltate from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Xuedong; Fan, Fengren; Li, Zhengwei; Wang, Hongbo; Wu, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Half metal is a promising spintronic material. Here, we explore, using first principles calculations, a spin-state transition induced half metallicity in a layered cobaltate via a physical or chemical pressure. Our exemplary first principles study shows that the layered cobaltate Sr2CoO3F would undergo a transition, under a pressure of 5.4 GPa, from a high-spin antiferromagnetic insulator to an intermediate-spin ferromagnetic half-metal. The former phase is associated with a superexchange in a Mott insulator, and the latter one is due to a broad band formation and a kinetic energy gain of the partially occupied eg orbital. Note that the above transition could also be induced by a chemical pressure via doping in (Sr1-xCax)2CoO3F (x > 0.3). This work suggests that a cobaltate would be of a particular interest if stabilized into an intermediate-spin state.

  4. Two nitrogen-containing ligands as inhibitors of metal-induced amyloid β-peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zhu, Shajun; Liu, Siyuan; Lu, Yapeng; Zhu, Li

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal interactions of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) with the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) are proposed to play an important role in the neuropathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Metal chelators are potential therapeutic agents for AD because they could sequester metals ions from Aβ aggregates and reverse the aggregation. In this study, two nitrogencontaining ligands, TACN and BPA, have been investigated as possible metal chelators in the therapy of Alzheimer's disease. The interactions between the chelators and Aβ40 aggregates are studied by turbidometry, thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), BCA protein assay, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results demonstrates that TACN and BPA are capable of both disrupting and preventing Zn(2+) or Cu(2+)-induced Aβ40 aggregation. Moreover, they can also suppress the production of H2O2 induced by Cu-Aβ40, associated with toxic oxidative stress in AD. PMID:23844690

  5. Investigation of metal contamination induced by a through silicon via reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Katagawa, Daisuke; Bandoh, Tsubasa; Mitsui, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated metal contamination induced by a through silicon via (TSV) reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) wafer including TSVs was bonded to a glass support substrate, and a TSV reveal process was performed by direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. Then, metal contamination near the SiO2/Si interface on the front side of the wafer was investigated by using a pulsed-MOS capacitor technique and measuring the effective generation lifetime and effective surface generation velocity before and after this TSV reveal process. The results of Zerbst analysis showed that the changes in average effective generation lifetime and average effective surface generation velocity were ‑5.4 and +4.2%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the effect of metal contamination induced by our TSV reveal process on circuit components is small.

  6. Investigation of metal contamination induced by a through silicon via reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Katagawa, Daisuke; Bandoh, Tsubasa; Mitsui, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated metal contamination induced by a through silicon via (TSV) reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) wafer including TSVs was bonded to a glass support substrate, and a TSV reveal process was performed by direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. Then, metal contamination near the SiO2/Si interface on the front side of the wafer was investigated by using a pulsed-MOS capacitor technique and measuring the effective generation lifetime and effective surface generation velocity before and after this TSV reveal process. The results of Zerbst analysis showed that the changes in average effective generation lifetime and average effective surface generation velocity were -5.4 and +4.2%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the effect of metal contamination induced by our TSV reveal process on circuit components is small.

  7. Plasmon-induced Hot Carriers in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter; LANP Team

    2015-03-01

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. Here we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. A. M. acknowledges financial support from the Welch foundation through the J. Evans Attwell-Welch Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of the Smalley Institute of Rice University (Grant No. L-C-004).

  8. Direct optical detection of current induced spin accumulation in metals by magnetization-induced second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabi, A.; Gu, Z.; Gorchon, J.; Yang, Y.; Finley, J.; Lee, O. J.; Raziq, H. A.; Salahuddin, S.; Bokor, J.

    2015-10-01

    Strong spin-orbit coupling in non-magnetic heavy metals has been shown to lead to large spin currents flowing transverse to a charge current in such a metal wire. This in turn leads to the buildup of a net spin accumulation at the lateral surfaces of the wire. Spin-orbit torque effects enable the use of the accumulated spins to exert useful magnetic torques on adjacent magnetic layers in spintronic devices. We report the direct detection of spin accumulation at the free surface of nonmagnetic metal films using magnetization-induced optical surface second harmonic generation. The technique is applied to probe the current induced surface spin accumulation in various heavy metals such as Pt, β-Ta, and Au with high sensitivity. The sensitivity of the technique enables us to measure the time dynamics on a sub-ns time scale of the spin accumulation arising from a short current pulse. The ability of optical surface second harmonic generation to probe interfaces suggests that this technique will also be useful for studying the dynamics of spin accumulation and transport across interfaces between non-magnetic and ferromagnetic materials, where spin-orbit torque effects are of considerable interest.

  9. Direct optical detection of current induced spin accumulation in metals by magnetization-induced second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pattabi, A. Gu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Finley, J.; Lee, O. J.; Raziq, H. A.; Gorchon, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Bokor, J.

    2015-10-12

    Strong spin-orbit coupling in non-magnetic heavy metals has been shown to lead to large spin currents flowing transverse to a charge current in such a metal wire. This in turn leads to the buildup of a net spin accumulation at the lateral surfaces of the wire. Spin-orbit torque effects enable the use of the accumulated spins to exert useful magnetic torques on adjacent magnetic layers in spintronic devices. We report the direct detection of spin accumulation at the free surface of nonmagnetic metal films using magnetization-induced optical surface second harmonic generation. The technique is applied to probe the current induced surface spin accumulation in various heavy metals such as Pt, β-Ta, and Au with high sensitivity. The sensitivity of the technique enables us to measure the time dynamics on a sub-ns time scale of the spin accumulation arising from a short current pulse. The ability of optical surface second harmonic generation to probe interfaces suggests that this technique will also be useful for studying the dynamics of spin accumulation and transport across interfaces between non-magnetic and ferromagnetic materials, where spin-orbit torque effects are of considerable interest.

  10. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  11. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  12. Multifunctional 8-hydroxyquinoline-appended cyclodextrins as new inhibitors of metal-induced protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Valentina; Attanasio, Francesco; Puglisi, Antonino; Spencer, John; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Vecchio, Graziella

    2014-07-14

    Mounting evidence suggests a pivotal role of metal imbalances in protein misfolding and amyloid diseases. As such, metal ions represent a promising therapeutic target. In this context, the synthesis of chelators that also contain complementary functionalities to combat the multifactorial nature of neurodegenerative diseases is a highly topical issue. We report two new 8-hydroxyquinoline-appended cyclodextrins and highlight their multifunctional properties, including their Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding abilities, and capacity to act as antioxidants and metal-induced antiaggregants. In particular, the latter property has been applied in the development of an effective assay that exploits the formation of amyloid fibrils when β-lactoglobulin A is heated in the presence of metal ions.

  13. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  14. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions. PMID:26108369

  15. Metal-induced crystallization of a-Si thin films by nonvacuum treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Thin film polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) is of considerable interest today for microelectronics, flat panel displays, and photovoltaics. Low thermal budget solid-phase crystallization (SPC) of a-Si precursor films was achieved using surface treatments with metal-containing solutions. Two different treatment procedures were demonstrated. With these treatments, one based on a Pd solution and the other on a Ni solution, the SPC time at 600 C was reduced from 18 h to 10 min or less. This approach renders the usual vacuum deposition step used in metal-induced crystallization unnecessary. The authors find that the ultraviolet reflectance and Raman shift signals for the crystallized films are independent of whether the SPC-enhancing metal is applied by vacuum or solution. These characterization results do differ, however, with the metal applied.

  16. Nanomovement of azo polymers induced by metal tip enhanced near-field irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitobi, Hidekazu; Tanabe, Mamoru; Sekkat, Zouheir; Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-08-27

    Nanomovement of azo polymers induced by metal tip enhanced near-field illumination was studied. A protrusion with 47 nm full width at half maximum was induced with a resolution beyond the diffraction limit. At the top of the protrusion, an anisotropic movement occurs in a direction nearly parallel to the polarization of the incident light, and suggests the existence at the tip end of not only a longitudinal but also a lateral component of the electric field of light. The anisotropic photofluidity and the optical gradient force played important roles in the process of the light induced polymer movement.

  17. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging `oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events.

  18. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician–Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging ‘oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician–Silurian palaeobiological events. PMID:26305681

  19. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R A; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-08-25

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging 'oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events.

  20. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R A; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging 'oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events. PMID:26305681

  1. Electric current induced flow of liquid metals: Mechanism and substrate-surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.; Howarth, J.; Dutta, I.

    2014-01-28

    Long range, continuous flow of liquid metals occurs upon application of an electric current. Here, we report experimental results elucidating the mechanism of current-induced liquid metal flow, and its dependence on substrate surface condition. It is shown that the observed flow is diffusion-controlled, with the flow-rate depending linearly on applied current density, indicating that it is driven by electromigration. The effective charge number for liquid electromigration, Z*, of several pure metals, such as Al, Bi, Ga, Sn, and Pb, were deduced from the experimental results and were found to be close to the elemental valency. With the exception of liquid Pb, Z* for all liquid metals tested in this study were positive, indicating that: (i) electron wind contributes much less to Z* in liquid metals than in solids, and (ii) with a few exceptions, liquid metals generally flow in the direction of the electric current. On smooth substrates which are wetted well by the liquid metal, flow occurs in a thin, continuous stream. On rough surfaces which are poorly wetted, on the other hand, discrete beads of liquid form, with mass transport between adjacent beads occurring by surface diffusion on the substrate. A rationale for the role of substrate roughness in fostering this observed transition in flow mechanism is presented.

  2. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  3. Optimization of laccase production by two strains of Ganoderma lucidum using phenolic and metallic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Francisco; Papinutti, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst is a white rot fungus that is able to degrade the lignin component in wood. The ability of two strains of this species to produce the ligninolytic enzyme laccase was assessed. After the evaluation of induction with heavy metals and phenolic compounds, it was found that among the tested substances, copper and ferulic acid are the best laccase inducers. It was also observed that the two types of inducers (phenolic and metallic) produce different electrophoretic patterns of laccase activity. Optimized concentrations of inducers were obtained through a factorial design and the thermal stability of optimized supernatants was studied at a wide range of acidic pH. We found that the enzyme is more thermostable at higher pH values.

  4. Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting Using Metallic-Nanoparticle-Loaded Photocatalysts and Photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-18

    Visible- and near-infrared-light-driven water splitting, which splits water molecules to generate hydrogen and oxygen gases, is a significant subject in artificial photosynthesis with the goal of achieving a low-carbon society. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to studies on the development of a plasmon-induced water-splitting system responding to visible light. In this review, we categorized water-splitting systems as gold-nanoparticle-loaded semiconductor photocatalytic particles system and metallic-nanoparticles-loaded semiconductor photoelectrode systems, and introduce the latest studies according to these categories. Especially, we describe the studies that optimize a material or a structural design of metallic-nanoparticle-loaded semiconductor photoelectrodes and consider a whole water-splitting system, including a cathode design. Furthermore, we discuss important points when studying plasmon-induced water splitting, and we describe a methodology that enhances plasmon-induced water-splitting efficiency.

  5. Biological relevance and consequences of chemical- or metal-induced DNA cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Paustenbach, D.J.; Finley, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals are known to induce mutagenesis and/or carcinogenesis in mammals. Although disruption of cellular nuclear material resulting ultimately in mutagenesis/carcinogenesis can be accomplished by various mechanisms, the search for biomarkers of chemical-induced toxicity continues. This review focuses on the ability of certain metals or chemicals to bind to DNA in a cross-link fashion in whole animal as well as under in vitro conditions. The methodologies currently used to determine DNA cross-linking are described. The biological relevance of the presence of chemical- or metal-induced DNA cross-linking as a measure of carcinogenesis in humans is still under debate, as there is no clear correlation between the disease and the DNA cross-link reaction. 62 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Association rule mining of cellular responses induced by metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; France, Bryan; George, Saji; Rallo, Robert; Zhang, Haiyuan; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Bradley, Kenneth; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Relationships among fourteen different biological responses (including ten signaling pathway activities and four cytotoxicity effects) of murine macrophage (RAW264.7) and bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells exposed to six metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) were analyzed using both statistical and data mining approaches. Both the pathway activities and cytotoxicity effects were assessed using high-throughput screening (HTS) over an exposure period of up to 24 h and concentration range of 0.39-200 mg L(-1). HTS data were processed by outlier removal, normalization, and hit-identification (for significantly regulated cellular responses) to arrive at reliable multiparametric bioactivity profiles for the NPs. Association rule mining was then applied to the bioactivity profiles followed by a pruning process to remove redundant rules. The non-redundant association rules indicated that "significant regulation" of one or more cellular responses implies regulation of other (associated) cellular response types. Pairwise correlation analysis (via Pearson's χ(2) test) and self-organizing map clustering of the different cellular response types indicated consistency with the identified non-redundant association rules. Furthermore, in order to explore the potential use of association rules as a tool for data-driven hypothesis generation, specific pathway activity experiments were carried out for ZnO NPs. The experimental results confirmed the association rule identified for the p53 pathway and mitochondrial superoxide levels (via MitoSox reagent) and further revealed that blocking of the transcriptional activity of p53 lowered the MitoSox signal. The present approach of using association rule mining for data-driven hypothesis generation has important implications for streamlining multi-parameter HTS assays, improving the understanding of NP toxicity mechanisms, and selection of endpoints for the development of nanomaterial structure-activity relationships.

  7. Effect of Se partial pressure on intergranular embrittlement of a Pt-Rh-W alloy

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.L.; Keiser, J.R.; Heatherly, L.; Newsome, J.F.

    1981-07-01

    This note presents additional experimental results concerning the effect of P/sub Se/ on the degree of intergranular embrittlement and the extent of Se contamination at Pt +30 wt % Rh +8 wt % W Alloy (Pt-3008) grain boundaries. 8 refs.

  8. Intergranular diffusion and embrittlement of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy in Te vapor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongwei; Li, Zhijun; Leng, Bin; Zhang, Wenzhu; Han, Fenfen; Jia, Yanyan; Zhou, Xingtai

    2015-12-01

    Nickel and some nickel-base alloys are extremely sensitive to intergranular embrittlement and tellurium (Te) enhanced cracking, which should be concerned during their serving in molten salt reactors. Here, a systematic study about the effects of its temperature on the reaction products at its surface, the intergranular diffusion of Te in its body and its embrittlement for a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy contacting Te is reported. For exposed to Te vapor at high temperature (823-1073 K), the reaction products formed on the surface of the alloy were Ni3Te2, CrTe, and MoTe2, and the most serious embrittlement was observed at 1073 K. The kinetic measurement in terms of Te penetration depth in the alloy samples gives an activation energy of 204 kJ/mol. Electron probe microanalysis confirmed the local enrichment of Te at grain boundaries. And clearly, the embrittlement was results from the intergranular diffusion and segregation of element Te.

  9. Helium embrittlement model and program plan for weldability of ITER materials

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Tosten, M.H.; Rankin, D.T.; Cross, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents a refined model of how helium embrittles irradiated stainless steel during welding. The model was developed based on experimental observations drawn from experience at the Savannah River Site and from an extensive literature search. The model shows how helium content, stress, and temperature interact to produce embrittlement. The model takes into account defect structure, time, and gradients in stress, temperature and composition. The report also proposes an experimental program based on the refined helium embrittlement model. A parametric study of the effect of initial defect density on the resulting helium bubble distribution and weldability of tritium aged material is proposed to demonstrate the roll that defects play in embrittlement. This study should include samples charged using vastly different aging times to obtain equivalent helium contents. Additionally, studies to establish the minimal sample thickness and size are needed for extrapolation to real structural materials. The results of these studies should provide a technical basis for the use of tritium aged materials to predict the weldability of irradiated structures. Use of tritium charged and aged material would provide a cost effective approach to developing weld repair techniques for ITER components.

  10. Metallomics insights into the programmed cell death induced by metal-based anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Ying; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago, enormous research efforts have been dedicated to developing metal-based anticancer agents and to elucidating the mechanisms involved in the action of these compounds. Abnormal metabolism and the evasion of apoptosis are important hallmarks of malignant transformation, and the induction of apoptotic cell death has been considered to be a main pathway by which cytotoxic metal complexes combat cancer. However, many cancers have cellular defects involving the apoptotic machinery, which results in an acquired resistance to apoptotic cell death and therefore reduced chemotherapeutic effectiveness. Over the past decade, it has been revealed that a growing number of cell death pathways induced by metal complexes are not dependent on apoptosis. Metal complexes specifically triggering these alternative cell death pathways have been identified and explored as novel cancer treatment options. In this review, we discuss recent examples of metallomics studies on the different types of cell death induced by metal-based anticancer drugs, especially on the three major forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in mammalian cells: apoptosis, autophagy and regulated necrosis, also called necroptosis.

  11. Tight Junction Proteins and Oxidative Stress in Heavy Metals-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  12. Tight junction proteins and oxidative stress in heavy metals-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E ( α -tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals.

  13. Involvement of multiple transcription factors for metal-induced spy gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-01-20

    Bacteria are directly exposed to metals in environment. To maintain the intracellular metal homeostasis, Escherichia coli contain a number of gene regulation systems, each for response to a specific metal. A periplasmic protein Spy of E. coli was found to be induced upon short-exposure to copper ion in CpxAR-dependent manner. Transcription of the spy gene was also induced by long-exposure to zinc ion. This induction, however, depended on another two-component system BaeSR. Using DNase-I footprinting assay, we identified two BaeR-binding regions on the spy promoter with a direct repeat of the BaeR-box sequence, TCTNCANAA. The zinc-responsive BaeR-binding sites were separated from copper-responsive CpxR-binding site, implying that the spy promoter responds to two species of metal independently through different using sensor-response regulator systems. Since BaeSR-dependent zinc response requires longer time, the induction of spy gene transcription by external zinc may include multiple steps such as through sensing the zinc-induced envelope disorder by BaeSR.

  14. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J.

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impurity precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.

  15. Suppression of ionic liquid gate-induced metallization of SrTiO3(001) by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyang; Han, Wei; Jiang, Xin; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2013-10-01

    Ionic liquid gating of three terminal field effect transistor devices with channels formed from SrTiO3(001) single crystals induces a metallic state in the channel. We show that the metallization is strongly affected by the presence of oxygen gas introduced external to the device whereas argon and nitrogen have no effect. The suppression of the gating effect is consistent with electric field induced migration of oxygen that we model by oxygen-induced carrier annihilation.

  16. Carbon dioxide activation and reaction induced by electron transfer at an oxide-metal interface.

    PubMed

    Calaza, Florencia; Stiehler, Christian; Fujimori, Yuichi; Sterrer, Martin; Beeg, Sebastian; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Nilius, Niklas; Heyde, Markus; Parviainen, Teemu; Honkala, Karoliina; Häkkinen, Hannu; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-12

    A model system has been created to shuttle electrons through a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure to induce the formation of a CO2 anion radical from adsorbed gas-phase carbon dioxide that subsequently reacts to form an oxalate species. The process is completely reversible, and thus allows the elementary steps involved to be studied at the atomic level. The oxalate species at the MIM interface have been identified locally by scanning tunneling microscopy, chemically by IR spectroscopy, and their formation verified by density functional calculations.

  17. Hole-lattice Coupling and Photo-induced Insulator-metal Transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peihong; Yuan, Xun; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we will present a theory [PRB 88, 035119 (2013)] that is able to explain the photo-induced insulator-metal transition in VO2 and the related transient and multi-time-scale structural dynamics upon photo-excitation. Holes created by photo-excitation weaken the V-V bonds and eventually break V-V dimers in the M1 phase when the laser fluence reaches a critical value. The breaking of the V-V bonds in turn leads to an immediate electronic phase transition from an insulating to a metallic state while the crystal lattice remains monoclinic in shape.

  18. Pressure-induced insulator-to-metal transition in α-SnWO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Alexei; Anspoks, Andris; Kalinko, Aleksandr; Timoshenko, Janis; Kalendarev, Robert; Nataf, Lucie; Baudelet, François; Irifune, Tetsuo; Roy, Pascale

    2016-05-01

    In-situ high-pressure W L1 and L3 edges x-ray absorption and mid-infrared spectroscopies complemented by first-principles calculations suggest the existence of pressure- induced insulator-to-metal transition in α-SnWO4 in the range of 5-7 GPa. Its origin is explained by a symmetrization of metal-oxygen octahedra due to a strong interaction of Sn 5s, W 5d and O 2p states along the b-axis direction, leading to a collapse of the band gap.

  19. A study of ps-laser-induced-damage-threshold in hybrid metal-dielectric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škoda, Václav; Vanda, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced-damage-threshold of two types of metal-dielectric mirrors was tested using a laser apparatus working at 800 nm wavelength with 1 ps pulse length at 1 kHz repetition rate and in 106-on-1 test mode. Four sets of mirror samples with different layer system designs using a multilayer Ta2O5/SiO2 coating on silver or gold metal layer were manufactured. Both BK7 and fused silica substrate materials were used for manufacturing of samples. The measured damage thresholds at 45 deg incidence and P-polarization were compared with computed properties of layer system and used materials.

  20. Generalized Electron Counting in Determination of Metal-Induced Reconstruction of Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lixin; Wang, E. G.; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhang, S. B.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    Based on theoretical analysis, first-principles calculations, and experimental observations, we establish a generic guiding principle, embodied in generalized electron counting (GEC), that governs the surface reconstruction of compound semiconductors induced by different metal adsorbates. Within the GEC model, the adsorbates serve as an electron bath, donating or accepting the right number of electrons as the host surface chooses a specific reconstruction that obeys the classic electron-counting model. The predictive power of the GEC model is illustrated for a wide range of metal adsorbates.

  1. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Alam; Daud, Abdul Razak; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Kamil Othman, Norinsan; Saion, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose.

  2. Atmospheric thermometry for metallic surfaces by laser-induced second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedanekar, Niranjan R.; Yin, Huiqi; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1996-07-01

    To the best of our knowledge we report the first demonstration of surface thermometry using laser-induced second-harmonic generation (SHG) on a realistic metallic surface at atmospheric pressure. The surface is probed with a pulsed infrared laser beam and the SHG signal is monitored in reflection. For metallic silver, the SHG signal is found to be temperature dependent in the 25-120 degrees C range. The current accuracy of the method is +/-5 degrees C. Future work with platinum should permit the application of SHG thermometry to much higher surface temperatures.

  3. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  4. Carbon dioxide activation and reaction induced by electron transfer at an oxide-metal interface.

    PubMed

    Calaza, Florencia; Stiehler, Christian; Fujimori, Yuichi; Sterrer, Martin; Beeg, Sebastian; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Nilius, Niklas; Heyde, Markus; Parviainen, Teemu; Honkala, Karoliina; Häkkinen, Hannu; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-12

    A model system has been created to shuttle electrons through a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure to induce the formation of a CO2 anion radical from adsorbed gas-phase carbon dioxide that subsequently reacts to form an oxalate species. The process is completely reversible, and thus allows the elementary steps involved to be studied at the atomic level. The oxalate species at the MIM interface have been identified locally by scanning tunneling microscopy, chemically by IR spectroscopy, and their formation verified by density functional calculations. PMID:26012347

  5. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  6. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing

  7. Quantitative evaluation of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures in oxidized asphalt mixtures using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhe; Farace, Nicholas; Arnold, Jacob; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Towards developing a method capable to assess the efficiency of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures of oxidized asphalt binders towards their original, i.e., unaged values, three gyratory compacted specimens were manufactured with mixtures oven-aged for 36 hours at 135 °C. In addition, one gyratory compacted specimen manufactured using a short-term oven-aged mixture for two hours at 155 °C was used for control to simulate aging during plant production. Each of these four gyratory compacted specimens was then cut into two cylindrical specimen 5 cm thick for a total of six 36-hour oven-aged specimens and two short term aging specimens. Two specimens aged for 36 hours and the two short-term specimens were then tested using an acoustic emission approach to obtain base acoustic emission response of short-term and severely-aged specimens. The remaining four specimens oven-aged for 36 hours were then treated by spreading their top surface with rejuvenator in the amount of 10% of the binder by weight. These four specimens were then tested using the same acoustic emission approach after two, four, six, and eight weeks of dwell time. It was observed that the embrittlement temperatures of the short-term aged and severely oven-aged specimens were -25 °C and - 15 °C, respectively. It was also observed that after four weeks of dwell time, the rejuvenator-treated samples had recuperated the original embrittlement temperatures. In addition, it was also observed that the rejuvenator kept acting upon the binder after four weeks of dwell time; at eight weeks of dwell time, the specimens had an embrittlement temperature about one grade cooler than the embrittlement temperature corresponding to the short-term aged specimen.

  8. The role of metal ions in X-ray-induced photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, V; Gokhberg, K; Cederbaum, L S

    2016-03-01

    Metal centres in biomolecules are recognized as being particularly sensitive to radiation damage by X-ray photons. This results in such molecules being both susceptible to an effective X-ray-induced loss of function and problematic to study using X-ray diffraction methods, with reliable structures of the metal centres difficult to obtain. Despite the abundance of experimental evidence, the mechanistic details of radiation damage at metal centres are unclear. Here, using ab initio calculations, we show that the absorption of X-rays by microsolvated Mg(2+) results in a complicated chain of ultrafast electronic relaxation steps that comprise both intra- and intermolecular processes and last for a few hundred femtoseconds. At the end of this cascade the metal reverts to its original charge state, the immediate environment becomes multiply ionized and large concentrations of radicals and slow electrons build up in the metal's vicinity. We conclude that such cascades involving metal ions are essential to our understanding of radiation chemistry and radiation damage in biological environments.

  9. Hopping Conduction and Metallic behavior in 2D Silicon Surface States induced by an Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, JJ

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are essentially molten salts with a melting point below room temperature. When used as the gate dielectric of a transistor, carrier densities on the order of 1015 cm-2 can be achieved. These record high carrier densities are significantly higher than the maximum carrier density achievable with oxide dielectrics. The physical mechanism for inducing carriers to such a high carrier density is not well understood. Some groups have reported that the induced carriers are a result of electrostatic and electrochemical processes. Other groups have suggested that carriers induced with an IL may be entirely due to electrochemical reactions. Here we report on IL gated Si at carrier densities from 1011 cm-2 to 1013 cm-2. The experiment was designed to preferentially induce electrostatic carriers over electrochemical reactions. At low carrier densities, sample surface conductivity follows nearest neighbor hopping conduction. This form of conduction has also been observed in experiments where surface conductivity was induced by implanting Na + near the oxide surface interface. A surprising result of this work was that in some samples a 2D metallic state could be created on the surface of Si. The transition to metallic behavior occurred just below 1013 cm-2. High quality Si transistors with oxide dielectric materials observe critical carrier densities around 1011 cm-2. The critical carrier density observed in IL gated Si is the highest density reported to date. At carrier densities higher than 1013 cm-2 it was observed that the sample conductivity decreased with increasing carrier density. The behavior was unexpected and not fully understood. Both metallic and non metallic samples show a similar reduction in conductivity that is not thought to be due to sample degradation by the IL. The reduction in the sample conductivity at high carrier densities is thought to be due to surface roughness scattering. Similar behavior has been observed in other IL gated

  10. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Carcinogenesis Induced by Metals and Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Luch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In addition to a wide range of adverse effects on human health, toxic metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel can also promote carcinogenesis. The toxicological properties of these metals are partly related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can induce DNA damage and trigger redox-dependent transcription factors. The precise mechanisms that induce oxidative stress are not fully understood. Further, it is not yet known whether chronic exposures to low doses of arsenic, cadmium or other metals are sufficient to induce mutations in vivo, leading to DNA repair responses and/or tumorigenesis. Oxidative stress can also be induced by environmental xenobiotics, when certain metabolites are generated that lead to the continuous release of superoxide, as long as the capacity to reduce the resulting dions (quinones) into hydroquinones is maintained. However, the specific significance of superoxide-dependent pathways to carcinogenesis is often difficult to address, because formation of DNA adducts by mutagenic metabolites can occur in parallel. Here, we will review both mechanisms and toxicological consequences of oxidative stress triggered by metals and dietary or environmental pollutants in general. Besides causing DNA damage, ROS may further induce multiple intracellular signaling pathways, notably NF-κB, JNK/SAPK/p38, as well as Erk/MAPK. These signaling routes can lead to transcriptional induction of target genes that could promote proliferation or confer apoptosis resistance to exposed cells. The significance of these additional modes depends on tissue, cell-type and is often masked by alternate oncogenic mechanisms being activated in parallel. PMID:24281075

  11. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core.

  12. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of astroloy and Udimet 700 (nickel-base) and V-57 (iron-base) superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Joyce, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity to hydrogen environment embrittlement of three superalloys was determined. Astroloy forgings were resistant to embrittlement during smooth tensile, notched tensile, and creep testing in 3.5-MN/sq m hydrogen over the range 23 to 760 C. The notched tensile strength of Udimet 700 bar stock in hydrogen at 23 C was only 50 percent of the baseline value in helium. Forgings of V-57 were not significantly embrittled by hydrogen during smooth tensile testing over the range 23 to 675 C; creep and rupture lives of V-57 were degraded by hydrogen. Postcreep tensile ductility of V-57 was reduced by 40 percent after creep exposure in hydrogen.

  13. Impact of metal-induced degradation on the determination of pharmaceutical compound purity and a strategy for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Dotterer, Sally K; Forbes, Robert A; Hammill, Cynthia L

    2011-04-01

    Case studies are presented demonstrating how exposure to traces of transition metals such as copper and/or iron during sample preparation or analysis can impact the accuracy of purity analysis of pharmaceuticals. Some compounds, such as phenols and indoles, react with metals in the presence of oxygen to produce metal-induced oxidative decomposition products. Compounds susceptible to metal-induced decomposition can degrade following preparation for purity analysis leading to falsely high impurity results. Our work has shown even metals at levels below 0.1 ppm can negatively impact susceptible compounds. Falsely low results are also possible when the impurities themselves react with metals and degrade prior to analysis. Traces of metals in the HPLC mobile phase can lead to chromatographic artifacts, affecting the reproducibility of purity results. To understand and mitigate the impact of metal induced decomposition, a proactive strategy is presented. The pharmaceutical would first be tested for reactivity with specific transition metals in the sample solvent/diluents and in the HPLC mobile phase. If found to be reactive, alternative sample diluents and/or mobile phases with less reactive solvents or addition of a metal chelator would be explored. If unsuccessful, glassware cleaning or sample solution refrigeration could be investigated. By employing this strategy during method development, robust purity methods would be delivered to the quality control laboratories, preventing future problems from potential sporadic contamination of glassware with metals. PMID:21163601

  14. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  15. High spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Liu, Hai-Ying; Dai, Qiao-Feng; Wu, Li-Jun; Lan, Sheng; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M

    2012-01-16

    The high spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated experimentally and numerically. It is suggested that the redistribution of the electric field on metal surface caused by the initially formed low spatial frequency periodic structures plays a crucial role in the creation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The field intensity which is initially localized in the grooves becomes concentrated on the ridges in between the grooves when the depth of the grooves exceeds a critical value, leading to the ablation of the ridges in between the grooves and the formation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The proposed formation process is supported by both the numerical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain technique and the experimental results obtained on some metals such as stainless steel and nickel.

  16. Identification and counteraction of microbe-induced corrosion in metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.A.

    1986-11-01

    Biological attack of metallic systems is a longstanding problem that affects all structural materials in a variety of environment and systems. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, back-flushing, organic coatings, or thermal shock. The objective was to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, it has been recognized that corrosion caused by micro-organisms can occur even in very clean systems. This article gives guidelines for the identification and counteraction of microbe-induced corrosion in metallic systems.

  17. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal-insulator transition in VO2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-06-01

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO2 nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal-insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO2 nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  18. Ni-Nb-Sn Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Fabricated by Microwave-Induced Sintering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoqiang; Li, Song; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Cao, Ziping; Yoshikawa, Noboru; Sato, Motoyasu; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-07-01

    Using a gas-atomized Ni59.35Nb34.45Sn6.2 metallic glassy alloy powder blended with Sn powder of various contents, Ni-Nb-Sn bulk metallic glassy matrix composites were fabricated by a microwave (MW)-induced sintering process in a single-mode 2.45 GHz MW applicator in a separated magnetic field. The Ni59.35Nb34.45Sn6.2 glassy alloy powder and its mixed powders containing Sn particles could be heated well in the magnetic field. The addition of Sn particles promoted densification of the sintered Ni59.35Nb34.45Sn6.2 metallic glassy powder. Bulk samples without crystallization of the glassy matrix and with good bonding state among the particles were achieved at a sintering temperature of 833 K.

  19. Toxicology of choroid plexus: special reference to metal-induced neurotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W

    2001-01-01

    The chemical stability in the brain underlies normal human thinking, learning, and behavior. Compelling evidence demonstrates a definite capacity of the choroid plexus in sequestering toxic heavy metal and metalloid ions. As the integrity of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers, both structurally and functionally, is essential to brain chemical stability, the role of the choroid plexus in metal-induced neurotoxicities has become an important, yet under-investigated research area in neurotoxicology. Metals acting on the choroid plexus can be categorized into three major groups. A general choroid plexus toxicant can directly damage the choroid plexus structure such as mercury and cadmium. A selective choroid plexus toxicant may impair specific plexus regulatory pathways that are critical to brain development and function, rather than induce massive pathological alteration. The typical examples in this category include lead-induced alteration in transthyretin production and secretion as well as manganese interaction with iron in the choroid plexus. Furthermore, a sequestered choroid plexus toxicant, such as iron, silver, or gold, may be sequestered by the choroid plexus as an essential CNS defense mechanism. Our current knowledge on the toxicological aspect of choroid plexus research is still incomplete. Thus, the future research needs have been suggested to focus on the role of choroid plexus in early CNS development as affected by metal sequestration in this tissue, to explore how metal accumulation alters the capacity of the choroid plexus in regulation of certain essential elements involved in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases, and to better understand the blood-CSF barrier as a defense mechanism in overall CNS function.

  20. Metal-ceramic interfaces: Overlayer-induced reconstruction and magnetism of 4d transition-metal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Freeman, A.J.

    1995-02-15

    Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of metal-ceramic interfaces, M/MgO(001) (M=Pd, Rh, and Ru), have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. Ru and Rh monolayers are found to be able to retain large spin magnetic moments on MgO(001) (1.95 {mu}{sub B} and 1.21 {mu}{sub B} for Ru and Ph; respectively) -- indicating, in principle, the potential application of MgO(001) as a benign substrate for 4d monolayer magnetism. Significantly, according to our atomic-force determinations, the metal overlayers induce a sizable buckling reconstruction in the interfacial MgO layer, which enhances the M-MgO binding energy by 0.1 eV. The weak M-0 interaction is mainly via tail effects; however, it affects the density of states at the Fermi level for Pd/Mg0(001) significantly and completely eliminates the small magnetic moment of the free Pd monolaver (0.34{mu}{sub B}).

  1. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  2. Amorphization induced by focused ion beam milling in metallic and electronic materials.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yoon; Hong, Ki Jung; Shin, Kwang Soo

    2013-08-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling using high-energy gallium ions is widely used in the preparation of specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the energetic ion beam induces amorphization on the edge of specimens during milling, resulting in a mischievous influence on the clearness of high-quality transmission electron micrographs. In this work, the amorphization induced by the FIB milling was investigated by TEM for three kinds of materials, metallic materials in bulk shape, and semiconductive and electronic ceramic materials as a substrate for the deposition of thin films.

  3. Ambipolar Transport and Gate-Induced Superconductivity in Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijing; Suzuki, Ryuji; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2014-03-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are well known van der Waals layered materials that are easy to be exfoliated into atomically flat nano scale flakes. Owing to high efficiency of electrical double layer (EDL) dielectrics, thin flakes of TMDs have achieved high performance ambipolar transistor operation and established metallic states with high mobility, which are ideal for inducing superconductivity. Here, we report a comprehensive study of ambipolar transport behaviors in the EDL transistors (EDLTs) of MoS2, MoSe2 and MoTe2 thin flakes down to 2 K. In comparison, MoSe2 EDLT displayed a well-balanced ambipolar transistor operation while the other two showed opposite predominance in electron and hole accumulation, respectively. By modulation of carrier densities, the metal insulator transition (MIT) was observed in both electron and hole transport measurements. Particularly, superconducting transitions were reached after the formation of metallic states in the electron side. The phase diagram of transition temperature-carrier density was established and a dome-shaped structure was confirmed, revealing a universal feature of gate-induce superconductivity in layered band insulators. Present address: University of Groningen.

  4. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Steven O; Fan, Chun-Yang; Yeoman, Kim; Wakefield, John; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this study, we describe the development of an Nrf2-specific reporter gene assay that can be used to study the oxidative stress response in multiple cell types. Using five different cell lines, the Nrf2-activating potency of twenty metals was assessed across a range of concentrations. While ten of the metals tested (cadmium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, lead, mercury, silver, sodium arsenite and zinc) stimulated Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity in at least three of the engineered cell lines, only three (cadmium, copper and sodium arsenite) were active in all five cell lines. A comparison of metal-induced Nrf2 transcriptional activation revealed significant differences in the absolute magnitude of activation as well as the relative potencies between the cell lines tested. However, there was no direct correlation between activity and potency. Taken together, these results show that the capacity to stimulate Nrf2 activity and relative potencies of these test compounds are highly dependent on the cell type tested. Since oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the mode of action of many toxicological studies, this observation may inform the design of paradigms for toxicity testing for toxicant prioritization and characterization. PMID:21643505

  5. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  6. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  7. Soluble ions more than particulate cobalt-alloy implant debris induce monocyte costimulatory molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines critical to metal-induced lymphocyte reactivity.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Marco S; Pennekamp, Peter H; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua J; Hallab, Nadim J

    2010-06-15

    Aseptic osteolysis has been associated with excessive immune reactivity to particulate implant debris; however, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that underlie implant debris reactivity remain incompletely understood. Although particulate debris has been implicated as the major type of implant debris mediating macrophage-induced osteolysis, the degree to which metal ions affect a proinflammatory response (if at all) remains unknown. We hypothesized that both soluble and particulate metal implant debris will induce proinflammatory responses in human monocytes resulting in cytokine production and elevated expression of T cell costimulatory molecules, facilitating adaptive immune responses. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the response of a human monocyte cell line (THP-1), isolated primary human monocytes and PBMCs challenged with Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles and soluble cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, and nickel ions. Our results indicate that soluble cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum can induce monocyte up-regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, ICAM-1) in human monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, cobalt, molybdenum ions, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles similarly induce elevated secretion of IL-1beta, TNFalpha, and IL-6. Antibody blockade of CD80 and CD86, crucial secondary molecules for adaptive responses, abrogated lymphocyte reactivity to metal challenge in metal reactive subjects. Also the addition of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), (which indirectly blocks pro-IL-1beta and thus IL-1beta release), significantly reduced lymphocyte reactivity in metal-reactive subjects. Thus, both soluble and particulate metal implant debris induce monocyte/macrophage proinflammatory responses that are metal and individual specific. This suggests metal-induced up-regulation of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokine production is necessary to induce lymphocyte activation/proliferation to metal implant debris.

  8. Dynamics of metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films by rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yuanxun; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2015-12-07

    Though Ge crystallization has been widely studied, few works investigate metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films. For 2 nm Ge films in oxide matrix, crystallization becomes challenging due to easy oxidation and low mobility of Ge atoms. Introducing metal atoms may alleviate these problems, but the functions and the behaviours of metal atoms need to be clarified. This paper investigates the crystallization dynamics of a multilayer structure 1.9 nm Ge/0.5 nm Al/1.5 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The functions of metal atoms, like effective anti-oxidation, downshifting Raman peaks, and incapability to decrease crystallization temperature, are found and explained. The metal behaviours, such as inter-diffusion and defect generation, are supported with direct evidences, Al-Ge nanobicrystals, and Al cluster in Ge atoms. With these understandings, a two-step RTA process achieves high-quality 2 nm nanocrystal Ge films with Raman peak at 298 cm{sup −1} of FWHM 10.3 cm{sup −1} and atomic smooth interfaces.

  9. Dynamics of metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films by rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yuanxun; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2015-12-01

    Though Ge crystallization has been widely studied, few works investigate metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films. For 2 nm Ge films in oxide matrix, crystallization becomes challenging due to easy oxidation and low mobility of Ge atoms. Introducing metal atoms may alleviate these problems, but the functions and the behaviours of metal atoms need to be clarified. This paper investigates the crystallization dynamics of a multilayer structure 1.9 nm Ge/0.5 nm Al/1.5 nm Al2O3 under rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The functions of metal atoms, like effective anti-oxidation, downshifting Raman peaks, and incapability to decrease crystallization temperature, are found and explained. The metal behaviours, such as inter-diffusion and defect generation, are supported with direct evidences, Al-Ge nanobicrystals, and Al cluster in Ge atoms. With these understandings, a two-step RTA process achieves high-quality 2 nm nanocrystal Ge films with Raman peak at 298 cm-1 of FWHM 10.3 cm-1 and atomic smooth interfaces.

  10. Characteristics and mechanism of laser-induced surface damage initiated by metal contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuang; Sun, Mingying; Shi, Shuaixu; Li, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Ya-nan; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    In high power laser facility, contaminants on optics surfaces reduce damage resistance of optical elements and then decrease their lifetime. By damage test experiments, laser damage induced by typical metal particles such as stainless steel 304 is studied. Optics samples with metal particles of different sizes on surfaces are prepared artificially based on the file and sieve. Damage test is implemented in air using a 1-on-1 mode. Results show that damage morphology and mechanism caused by particulate contamination on the incident and exit surfaces are quite different. Contaminants on the incident surface absorb laser energy and generate high temperature plasma during laser irradiation which can ablate optical surface. Metal particles melt and then the molten nano-particles redeposit around the initial particles. Central region of the damaged area bears the same outline as the initial particle because of the shielding effect. However, particles on the exit surface absorb a mass of energy, generate plasma and splash lots of smaller particles, only a few of them redeposit at the particle coverage area on the exit surface. Most of the laser energy is deposited at the interface of the metal particle and the sample surface, and thus damage size on the exit surface is larger than that on the incident surface. The areas covered by the metal particle are strongly damaged. And the damage sites are more serious than that on the incident surface. Besides damage phenomenon also depends on coating and substrate materials.

  11. Wind-Turbine Gear-Box Roller-Bearing Premature-Failure Caused by Grain-Boundary Hydrogen Embrittlement: A Multi-physics Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Chenna, V.; Galgalikar, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.

    2014-11-01

    To help overcome the problem of horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) gear-box roller-bearing premature-failure, the root causes of this failure are currently being investigated using mainly laboratory and field-test experimental approaches. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop complementary computational methods and tools which can provide additional insight into the problem at hand (and do so with a substantially shorter turn-around time). Toward that end, a multi-physics computational framework has been developed which combines: (a) quantum-mechanical calculations of the grain-boundary hydrogen-embrittlement phenomenon and hydrogen bulk/grain-boundary diffusion (the two phenomena currently believed to be the main contributors to the roller-bearing premature-failure); (b) atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo-based calculations of the hydrogen-induced embrittling effect ahead of the advancing crack-tip; and (c) a finite-element analysis of the damage progression in, and the final failure of a prototypical HAWT gear-box roller-bearing inner raceway. Within this approach, the key quantities which must be calculated using each computational methodology are identified, as well as the quantities which must be exchanged between different computational analyses. The work demonstrates that the application of the present multi-physics computational framework enables prediction of the expected life of the most failure-prone HAWT gear-box bearing elements.

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement of cathodically protected high-strength, low-alloy steels exposed to sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.J.; Kilgallon, P.J. . School of Industrial and Manufacturing Science)

    1994-08-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of two high-strength, low-alloy steels was studied in conditions typical of the marine environment. Double-cantilever beam specimens, heat-treated to produce the microstructure in the heat-affected zone of a weld, were tested in seawater containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at a range of cathodic protection potentials. The threshold stress intensities (K[sub th]) required to cause subcritical crack propagation were recorded. The concentration of H absorbed by the steel (C[sub 0]) was measured using a permeation technique and was shown to be higher at more cathodic potentials and significantly increased when SRB were present. An inverse relationship was established between log K[sub th] and C[sub 0] for sterile and biologically active environments. It was concluded that crack propagation occurred by a single HE mechanism, regardless of whether SRB were present. The bacteria were believed to increase sulfide concentration in the biofilm at the metal surface, which promoted increased C[sub 0].

  13. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  14. [Neural differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and application for metal-induced neural toxicity study].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yuki; Tobe, Takao; Hayami, Hideaki; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Ueda, Koji; Takada, Tatsuyuki; Kojima, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Metals are effectively used in biological systems under the strict regulation for exploiting their specific and broad reactivities. For example, manganese (Mn) can induce catecholamines-mediated oxidative biological damage in cooperation with iron (Fe) and/or copper (Cu). In children, the damage could induce developmental disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We hypothesize that infant neurons are more labile to metals than adult ones due to the prematured protection systems and sensitive differentiating cells. An experimental system reconstituting neural differentiation is expected to assess the influences of endogenous/exogenous factors including metals. In this study, we investigated an impact of Mn together with Fe and dopamine (DA) on neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The differentiation of mESCs was initiated by embryoid bodies (EBs) formation in the presence of all-trans retinoic acid, and then EBs were treated with Mn, Fe and/or DA. Then, the mRNA levels of neural differentiation marker genes (Nestin, Emx2, Mtap2, Th, Olig2 and Gfap) were examined using realtime RT-PCR analysis. Mn or DA alone reduced Mtap2, Th and Olig2 expression levels and increased Nestin. Moreover, combined treatment of Mn and DA also increased Nestin expression level. On the other hand, Fe alone reduced Mtap2, Th and Olig2 expression levels, and increased Emx2. Combined treatments of Fe with Mn or DA also tended to increase Emx2 expression level. These effects emerged at about 100 times less concentration than that inducing cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma. The present study showed that Mn inhibits neural development, and that our mESCs system can be a useful tool to elucidate the toxicity mechanism as well as to evaluate the effects of metals and chemicals on differentiating cells. PMID:24989467

  15. Electrically induced insulator to metal transition in epitaxial SmNiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Nikhil Dasgupta, Sandeepan; Datta, Suman; Joshi, Toyanath; Borisov, Pavel; Lederman, David

    2014-07-07

    We report on the electrically induced insulator to metal transition (IMT) in SmNiO{sub 3} thin films grown on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. The behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature suggests that the primary transport mechanism in the SmNiO{sub 3} insulating state is dominated by Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping (ES-VRH). Additionally, the magnetic transition in the insulating state of SmNiO{sub 3} modifies the characteristics of the ES-VRH transport. Systematic DC and pulsed current-voltage measurements indicate that current-induced joule heating is the fundamental mechanism driving the electrically induced IMT in SmNiO{sub 3}. These transport properties are explained in context of the IMT in SmNiO{sub 3} being related to the strong electron-lattice coupling.

  16. Current understanding of the effects of enviromental and irradiation variables on RPV embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Wirth, B.; Liu, C.L.

    1997-02-01

    Radiation enhanced diffusion at RPV operating temperatures around 290{degrees}C leads to the formation of various ultrafine scale hardening phases, including copper-rich and copper-catalyzed manganese-nickel rich precipitates. In addition, defect cluster or cluster-solute complexes, manifesting a range of thermal stability, develop under irradiation. These features contribute directly to hardening which in turn is related to embrittlement, manifested as shifts in Charpy V-notch transition temperature. Models based on the thermodynamics, kinetics and micromechanics of the embrittlement processes have been developed; these are broadly consistent with experiment and rationalize the highly synergistic effects of most important irradiation (temperature, flux, fluence) and metallurgical (copper, nickel, manganese, phosphorous and heat treatment) variables on both irradiation hardening and recovery during post-irradiation annealing. A number of open questions remain which can be addressed with a hierarchy of new theoretical and experimental tools.

  17. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of turbine disk alloys. [for space shuttle auxiliary power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Joyce, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Astroloy and V-57, two candidate turbine disk alloys for the auxiliary power unit (APU) of the space shuttle propulsion and power system were tested for their resistance to embrittlement in hydrogen environments. Samples of both these nickel-base alloys were subjected to notch and smooth tensile testing and to creep testing in hydrogen. The high resistance exhibited by Astroloy forgings to embrittlement by hydrogen is attributed to the microstructure produced by forging and also to the special heat treatment schedule. V-57 turbine disks successfully completed short-time performance testing in the experimental APU. The use of the Astroloy, however, would permit increasing turbine inlet temperature and the rotational speed beyond those possible with V-57.

  18. The effect of post-exposure heat treatment on the hydrogen embrittlement of high carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.J.; Sharp, R.M.

    1985-10-01

    High carbon steel wires were loaded in tension to 79% ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and cathodically charged with hydrogen. The times to failure by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) were statistically analyzed to obtain the minimum incubation time and the mean time to failure. Electrochemical measurements of the mobile hydrogen content showed that baking the wires for 2 h at 200 C was effective in reducing the lattice hydrogen concentration to the same level as in uncharged material. Baking dramatically increased the embrittlement susceptibility of the high carbon wire, however, reducing both the minimum incubation time and the mean time to failure. These unexpected findings are explained by the effect of temperature on reversible and irreversible hydrogen trapping. Baking this material is believed to release hydrogen from relatively low energy innocuous traps and allow it to concentrate in traps with higher interaction energies. Upon reloading, these sites act as significant stress concentrators, leading to more rapid failure.

  19. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  20. Effect of shot peening on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Ming-ming; Song, Xiao-long

    2016-06-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel was investigated by electrochemical hydrogen charging, slow strain rate tensile tests, and hydrogen permeation tests. Microstructure observation, microhardness, and X-ray diffraction residual stress studies were also conducted on the steel. The results show that the shot peening specimens exhibit a higher resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in comparison with the no shot peening (NSP) specimens under the same hydrogen-charging current density. In addition, SP treatment sharply decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and increases the subsurface hydrogen concentration. These findings are attributed to the changes in microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer by SP. Scanning electron microscope fractographs reveal that the fracture surface of the NSP specimen exhibits the intergranular and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture modes, whereas the SP specimen shows only the quasi-cleavage fractures under the same hydrogen charging conditions, implying that the SP treatment delays the onset of intergranular fracture.

  1. Thermal annealing as a method to predict results of high temperature irradiation embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.; Debarberis, L.; Hähner, P.; Gillemot, F.; Oszvald, F.

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess the validity of post-irradiation annealing as a method to predict results of high temperature irradiation a new analysis of experimental data has been performed revealing the combined influence of annealing temperature and impurities content on residual embrittlement after annealing. For 2CrMoV (WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel) steel with low contents of copper and phosphorus, the comparison of two embrittlement dependencies has been done: on irradiation temperature and post-irradiation annealing temperature. It is demonstrated that data for both the transition temperature shift after irradiation, ΔTk, and the residual transition temperature shift after post-irradiation annealing, ΔTres, fall within the same scatter band. A similarly close correlation is observed by comparison of yield strength increases after irradiation and after post-irradiation annealing.

  2. Exact matrix treatment of an osmotic ensemble model of adsorption and pressure induced structural transitions in metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Lawrence J; Manos, George

    2016-03-14

    Here we present an exactly treated quasi-one dimensional statistical mechanical osmotic ensemble model of pressure and adsorption induced breathing structural transformations of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The treatment uses a transfer matrix method. The model successfully reproduces the gas and pressure induced structural changes which are observed experimentally in MOFs. The model treatment presented here is a significant step towards analytical statistical mechanical treatments of flexible metal-organic frameworks.

  3. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species.

  4. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure (hydrogen embrittlement, protective coatings, composite materials, NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1,600 reference citations related to four problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period 1962-1976, the effort being largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the four problem areas: Hydrogen Embrittlement; Protective Coatings; Composite Materials; and Nondestructive Evaluation. An author index is included.

  5. Enhanced two-photon emission in coupled metal nanoparticles induced by conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhenping; Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between noble metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles and conjugated polymers as well as their one- and two-photon emission have been investigated. Ag and Au nanoparticles exhibited extraordinary quenching effects on the fluorescence of cationic poly(fluorinephenylene). The quenching efficiency by 37-nm Ag nanoparticles is ∼19 times more efficient than that by 13-nm Au nanoparticles, and 9-10 orders of magnitude more efficient than typical small molecule dye-quencher pairs. On the other hand, the cationic conjugated polymers induce the aggregate formation and plasmonic coupling of the metal nanoparticles, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy images and appearance of a new longitudinal plasmon band in the near-infrared region. The two-photon emissions of Ag and Au nanoparticles were found to be significantly enhanced upon addition of conjugated polymers, by a factor of 51-times and 9-times compared to the isolated nanoparticles for Ag and Au, respectively. These studies could be further extended to the applications of two-photon imaging and sensing of the analytes that can induce formation of metal nanoparticle aggregates, which have many advantages over the conventional one-photon counterparts.

  6. Measurement of interfacial toughness of metal film wire and polymer membrane through electricity induced buckling method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghua; Xie, Huimin; Lu, Jian; Chen, Pengwan; Zhang, Qingming

    2011-06-15

    Measurement of interfacial toughness of a metal film wire and a flexible substrate is a challenging issue for evaluating the interfacial bonding capacity of the film-wire/substrate systems. In this paper, an electricity induced buckling method is proposed to measure the interfacial toughness between a metal film wire and a polymer membrane, which does not use a pre-existing weak interface. This method relies on causing a buckling driven delamination of the metal film wire from the polymer membrane, by inducing a compressive stress due to electrification of the film wire. For a sort of structure formed by a constantan film wire and a polymer membrane, the current density range under which the buckling of the film wire will emerge is obtained from experiments. The average interfacial toughness of one typical sample is measured to be 31.6 J/m(2). According to the buckling topographies under different current densities, the interfacial toughness of the constantan film wire and the polymer substrate is found to vary from 10 J/m(2) to 60 J/m(2).

  7. Catalytic effect of transition metals on microwave-induced degradation of atrazine in mineral micropores.

    PubMed

    Hu, Erdan; Cheng, Hefa

    2014-06-15

    With their high catalytic activity for redox reactions, transition metal ions (Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)) were exchanged into the micropores of dealuminated Y zeolites to prepare effective microporous mineral sorbents for sorption and microwave-induced degradation of atrazine. Due to its ability to complex with atrazine, loading of copper greatly increased the sorption of atrazine. Atrazine sorption on iron-exchanged zeolites was also significantly enhanced, which was attributed to the hydrolysis of Fe(3+) polycations in mineral micropores and electrostatic interactions of protonated atrazine molecules with the negatively charged pore wall surface. Copper and iron species in the micropores also significantly accelerated degradation of the sorbed atrazine (and its degradation intermediates) under microwave irradiation. The catalytic effect was attributed to the easy reducibility and high oxidation activity of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) species stabilized in the micropores of the zeolites. It was postulated that the surface species of transition metals (monomeric Cu(2+), Cu(2+)-O-Cu(2+) complexes, FeO(+), and dinuclear Fe-O-Fe-like species) in the mineral micropores were thermally activated under microwave irradiation, and subsequently formed highly reactive sites catalyzing oxidative degradation of atrazine. The transition metal-exchanged zeolites, particularly the iron-exchanged ones, were relatively stable when leached under acidic conditions, which suggests that they are reusable in sorption and microwave-induced degradation. These findings offer valuable insights on designing of effective mineral sorbents that can selectively uptake atrazine from aqueous solutions and catalyze its degradation under microwave irradiation.

  8. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  9. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs.

  10. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium: A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sqm) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment. Further, it is shown that if hydrogen is the causal species, the effective hydrogen fugacity at the surface of titanium exposed to an aqueous chloride environment is equivalent to a molecular hydrogen pressure of approximately 10 N/sqm.

  11. Prediction of diffusion assisted hydrogen embrittlement failure in high strength martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Zikry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A stress assisted hydrogen diffusion transport model, a dislocation-density-based multiple-slip crystalline plasticity formulation, and an overlapping fracture method were used to investigate hydrogen diffusion and embrittlement in lath martensitic steels with distributions of M23C6 carbide precipitates. The formulation accounts for variant morphologies based on orientation relationships (ORs) that are uniquely inherent to lath martensitic microstructures. The interrelated effects of martensitic block and packet boundaries and carbide precipitates on hydrogen diffusion, hydrogen assisted crack nucleation and growth, are analyzed to characterize the competition between cleavage fracture and hydrogen diffusion assisted fracture along preferential microstructural fracture planes. Stresses along the three cleavage planes and the six hydrogen embrittlement fracture planes are monitored, such that crack nucleation and growth can nucleate along energetically favorable planes. High pressure gradients result in the accumulation of hydrogen, which embrittles martensite, and results in crack nucleation and growth along {110} planes. Cleavage fracture occurs along {100} planes when there is no significant hydrogen diffusion. The predictions indicate that hydrogen diffusion can suppress the emission and accumulation of dislocation density, and lead to fracture with low plastic strains.

  12. Laser induced forward transfer of metals by temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Klini, A; Loukakos, P A; Gray, D; Manousaki, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-07-21

    Temporally shaped, femtosecond laser pulses have been used for controlling the size and the morphology of micron-sized metallic structures obtained by using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique. We report the effect of pulse shaping on the size and morphology of the deposited structures of Au, Zn, Cr on a function of the pulse separation time ??t (from 0 to 10 ps) of double pulses of variable intensities generated by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The observed differences in size and morphology are correlated with the outcome of pump-probe experiments for the study of electron-phonon scattering dynamics and subsequent energy transfer processes to the bulk in the different metals employed. We propose that in metals with weak electron-lattice coupling, the electron ballistic motion and the resulting fast electron scattering at the film surface, as well as the internal electron thermalization process are crucial to the morphology and size of the transferred material. Therefore, temporal shaping within the corresponding time scales of these processes may be used for tailoring the features of the metallic structures obtained by LIFT.

  13. Pressure-Induced Metallization and Superconductivity in InP and InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyakutti, K.; Rejila, V.; Rajarajeswari, M.; Nirmala Louis, C.; Mahalakshmi, S.

    The electronic band structure, structural phase transition, metallization and superconducting transition of cubic zinc blende-type indium phosphide (InP) and indium nitride (InN), under pressure, are studied using TB-LMTO method. These indium compounds become metals and superconductors under high pressure but before that they undergo structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. The ground-state properties and band gap values are compared with the experimental and previous theoretical results. From our analysis, it is found that the metallization pressure increases with increase of lattice constant. The superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) of InP and InN are obtained as a function of pressure for both the ZnS and NaCl structures and these compounds are identified as pressure-induced superconductors. When pressure is increased Tc increases in both the normal (ZnS) and high pressure (NaCl) structures. The dependence of Tc on electron-phonon mass enhancement factor λ shows that InP and InN are electron-phonon mediated superconductors. The non-occurrence of metallization, phase transition and onset of superconductivity simultaneously in InP and InN are confirmed.

  14. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:26771600

  15. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  16. Disorder induced semiconductor to metal transition and modifications of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Fouran; Kumar, Vinod; Chaudhary, Babloo; Singh, R. G.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kapoor, A.

    2012-10-01

    This paper report on the disorder induced semiconductor to metal transition (SMT) and modifications of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin film. Disorder is induced using energetic ion irradiation. It eliminates the possibility of impurities induced transition. However, it is revealed that some critical concentration of defects is needed for inducing such kind of SMT at certain critical temperature. Above room temperature, the current-voltage characteristics in reverse bias attributes some interesting phenomenon, such as electric field induced charge transfer, charge trapping, and diffusion of defects. The transition is explained by the defects induced disorder and strain in ZnO crystallites created by high density of electronic excitations.

  17. The allosteric transition of GroEL induced by metal fluoride-ADP complexes.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Tomonao; Kikushima, Kenji; Makio, Tadashi; Arai, Munehito; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2003-05-23

    To understand the mechanism of a functionally important ATP-induced allosteric transition of GroEL, we have studied the effect of a series of metal fluoride-ADP complexes and vanadate-ADP on GroEL by kinetic fluorescence measurement of pyrene-labeled GroEL and by small-angle X-ray scattering measurement of wild-type GroEL. The metal fluorides and vanadate, complexed with ADP, are known to mimic the gamma-phosphate group of ATP, but they differ in geometry and size; it is expected that these compounds will be useful for investigating the strikingly high specificity of GroEL for ATP that enables the induction of the allosteric transition. The kinetic fluorescence measurement revealed that aluminium, beryllium, and gallium ions, when complexed with the fluoride ion and ADP, induced a biphasic fluorescence change of pyrenyl GroEL, while scandium and vanadate ions did not induce any kinetically observed change in fluorescence. The burst phase and the first phase of the fluorescence kinetics were reversible, while the second phase and subsequent changes were irreversible. The dependence of the burst-phase and the first-phase fluorescence changes on the ADP concentration indicated that the burst phase represents non-cooperative nucleotide binding to GroEL, and that the first phase represents the allosteric transition of GroEL. Both the amplitude and the rate constant of the first phase of the fluorescence kinetics were well understood in terms of a kinetic allosteric model, which is a combination of transition state theory and the Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model. From the kinetic allosteric model analysis, the relative free energy of the transition state in the metal fluoride-ADP-induced allosteric transition of GroEL was found to be larger than the corresponding free energy of the ATP-induced allosteric transition by more than 5.5kcal/mol. However, the X-ray scattering measurements indicated that the allosteric state induced by these metal fluoride-ADP complexes is

  18. Evidence of photo-induced dynamic competition of metallic and insulating phase in a layered manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Walko, Daonld A.; Li, Qing'an; Liu, Yaohua; Rosenkranz, Stephen; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-11-17

    We show evidence that the competition between the antiferromagetic metallic phase and the charge- and orbital-ordered insulating phase at the reentrant phase boundary of a layered manganite, LaSr2Mn2O7, can be manipulated using ultrafast optical excitation. The time-dependent evolution of the Jahn-Teller superlattice reflection, which indicates the formation of the charge and orbital order, was measured at different laser fluences. The laser-induced enhancement and reduction the Jahn-Teller reflection intensity shows a reversal of sign between earlier (~10 ns) and later (~150 ns) time delays during the relaxation after photo excitation. This effect is consistent with a scenario whereby the laser excitation modulates the local competition between the metallic and the insulating phases.

  19. Evidence of photo-induced dynamic competition of metallic and insulating phase in a layered manganite

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuelin; Walko, Daonld A.; Li, Qing'an; Liu, Yaohua; Rosenkranz, Stephen; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-11-17

    We show evidence that the competition between the antiferromagetic metallic phase and the charge- and orbital-ordered insulating phase at the reentrant phase boundary of a layered manganite, LaSr2Mn2O7, can be manipulated using ultrafast optical excitation. The time-dependent evolution of the Jahn-Teller superlattice reflection, which indicates the formation of the charge and orbital order, was measured at different laser fluences. The laser-induced enhancement and reduction the Jahn-Teller reflection intensity shows a reversal of sign between earlier (~10 ns) and later (~150 ns) time delays during the relaxation after photo excitation. This effect is consistent with a scenario whereby the laser excitationmore » modulates the local competition between the metallic and the insulating phases.« less

  20. Evidence of Photo-induced Dynamic Competition of Metallic and Insulating Phase in a Layered Manganite.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Li, Qing'an; Liu, Yaohua; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-12-16

    We show evidence that the competition between the antiferromagetic metallic phase and the charge- and orbital-ordered insulating phase at the reentrant phase boundary of a layered manganite, LaSr2Mn2O7, can be manipulated using ultrafast optical excitation. The time- dependent evolution of the Jahn-Teller superlattice reflection, which indicates the formation of the charge and orbital order, was measured at different laser fluences. The laser-induced enhancement and reduction the Jahn-Teller reflection intensity shows a reversal of sign between earlier (~10 ns) and later (~150 ns) time delays during the relaxation after photo excitation. This effect is consistent with a scenario whereby the laser excitation modulates the local competition between the metallic and the insulating phases.

  1. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics. PMID:27373740

  2. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose. PMID:24225302

  3. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale.

    PubMed

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics. PMID:27373740

  4. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V.

    2016-07-01

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics.

  5. Friction-induced ignition of metals in high-pressure oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, Len; Stoltzfus, Joel; Kazaroff, John

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented on friction-induced metal ignition (such as occurring as a result of the possible rubbing of oxygen-pressurized hydrostatic bearings and turbine blade tips) in a high-presure oxygen environment. Friction heating tests were carried out at oxygen pressures from 1 to 300 atm and surface speeds from 10 to 33 m/sec, using the NASA/White Sands Test Facility. Test results are presented on the rubbing of like material pairs spanning a wide range of burn factors and on that of dissimilar metal pairs having significantly different burn factors, indicating that the burn factor is a suitable index for rank ordering in ignition resistance for the most, but not all, materials.

  6. Reactive Gas Environment Induced Structural Modification of Noble-Transition Metal Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V.; Yang, L.; Yin, J.; Loukrakpam, R.; Shan, S.; Wanjala, B.; Luo, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Zhong, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Noble-transition metal (noble=Pt,Au; transition=Co,Ni,Cu) alloy particles with sizes of about 5 nm have been studied by in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction while subjected to oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) gas atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The different gas atmospheres do not affect substantially the random alloy, face-centered-cubic structure type of the particles but do affect the way the metal atoms pack together. In an O2 atmosphere, atoms get extra separated from each other, whereas, in an H2 atmosphere, they come closer together. The effect is substantial, amounting to 0.1 Å difference in the first neighbor atomic distances, and concurs with a dramatic change of the particle catalytic properties. It is argued that such reactive gas induced “expansion shrinking” is a common phenomenon that may be employed for the engineering of “smart” nanoparticles responding advantageously to envisaged gas environments.

  7. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  8. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  9. Vibration-induced Kondo tunneling through metal-organic complexes with even electron occupation number.

    PubMed

    Kikoin, K; Kiselev, M N; Wegewijs, M R

    2006-05-01

    We investigate transport through a mononuclear transition-metal complex with strong tunnel coupling to two electrodes. The ground state of this molecule is a singlet, while the first excited state is a triplet. We show that a modulation of the tunnel-barrier due to a molecular distortion which couples to the tunneling induces a Kondo-effect, provided the discrete vibrational energy compensates the singlet-triplet gap. We discuss the single-phonon and two-phonon-assisted cotunneling and possible experimental realization of the theory.

  10. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, Chiara; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  11. Shear-driven damage of ductile metals induced by indentation load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Xiao, Wenkang

    2015-08-01

    Although indentation does not induce apparent cracking in ductile materials, degradation of elastic stiffness of ductile metals has been found in micro-/macro- indentation tests. After comparing the predicted degradation by extended damaged-plasticity models with that measured by experimental testing, it is found that the softening caused by distortion of existing voids is inadequate to cause the notable degradation of elasticity. It is suggested that an independent damage-nucleation mechanism arising from shear deformation may exist. Although attractive in practical applications for its non-destructive nature, the damage-based indentation technique for estimating the fracture properties of ductile materials needs further investigation.

  12. Strain-induced semiconductor to metal transition in few-layer black phosphorus from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Weiwei; Li, Tongwei; Wang, Hui; Yong, Yongliang; Sun, Jinfeng

    2015-02-01

    Electronic structures of few-layer black phosphorus (BP) with biaxial strain are investigated by using methods based on density functional theory. The compressive strain can result in a semiconductor-metal transition (SMT) for few-layer BP, whereas the tensile strain only affects the band gaps. The critical compressive strain for the SMT is larger in the thinner 2D BP. The band structures and charge densities are calculated in order to provide imperative understanding on SMT. With the compressive strain, the energy of conduction bands moves down, which is induced by the structural change and is essential reason of SMT.

  13. Strain induced electronic structure changes in magnetic transition metal oxides thin films

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, G.; Chopdekar, R.V.; Suzuki, Y.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-07-08

    We show that the angular dependence of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is strongly sensitive to strain-induced electronic structure changes in magnetic transition metal oxides. We observe a pronounced dependence of the XMCD spectral shape on the experimental geometry as well as nonvanishing XMCD with distinct spectral features in transverse geometry in compressively strained MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} films. The angular dependent XMCD can be described as a sum over an isotropic and anisotropic contribution, the latter linearly proportional to the axial distortion due to strain. The XMCD spectra are well reproduced by atomic multiplet calculations.

  14. Mapping B(1)-induced eddy current effects near metallic structures in MR images: a comparison of simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Vashaee, S; Goora, F; Britton, M M; Newling, B; Balcom, B J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the presence of metallic structures is very common in medical and non-medical fields. Metallic structures cause MRI image distortions by three mechanisms: (1) static field distortion through magnetic susceptibility mismatch, (2) eddy currents induced by switched magnetic field gradients and (3) radio frequency (RF) induced eddy currents. Single point ramped imaging with T1 enhancement (SPRITE) MRI measurements are largely immune to susceptibility and gradient induced eddy current artifacts. As a result, one can isolate the effects of metal objects on the RF field. The RF field affects both the excitation and detection of the magnetic resonance (MR) signal. This is challenging with conventional MRI methods, which cannot readily separate the three effects. RF induced MRI artifacts were investigated experimentally at 2.4 T by analyzing image distortions surrounding two geometrically identical metallic strips of aluminum and lead. The strips were immersed in agar gel doped with contrast agent and imaged employing the conical SPRITE sequence. B1 mapping with pure phase encode SPRITE was employed to measure the B1 field around the strips of metal. The strip geometry was chosen to mimic metal electrodes employed in electrochemistry studies. Simulations are employed to investigate the RF field induced eddy currents in the two metallic strips. The RF simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results. Experimental and simulation results show that the metal has a pronounced effect on the B1 distribution and B1 amplitude in the surrounding space. The electrical conductivity of the metal has a minimal effect. PMID:25459883

  15. Mapping B1-induced eddy current effects near metallic structures in MR images: A comparison of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Goora, F.; Britton, M. M.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the presence of metallic structures is very common in medical and non-medical fields. Metallic structures cause MRI image distortions by three mechanisms: (1) static field distortion through magnetic susceptibility mismatch, (2) eddy currents induced by switched magnetic field gradients and (3) radio frequency (RF) induced eddy currents. Single point ramped imaging with T1 enhancement (SPRITE) MRI measurements are largely immune to susceptibility and gradient induced eddy current artifacts. As a result, one can isolate the effects of metal objects on the RF field. The RF field affects both the excitation and detection of the magnetic resonance (MR) signal. This is challenging with conventional MRI methods, which cannot readily separate the three effects. RF induced MRI artifacts were investigated experimentally at 2.4 T by analyzing image distortions surrounding two geometrically identical metallic strips of aluminum and lead. The strips were immersed in agar gel doped with contrast agent and imaged employing the conical SPRITE sequence. B1 mapping with pure phase encode SPRITE was employed to measure the B1 field around the strips of metal. The strip geometry was chosen to mimic metal electrodes employed in electrochemistry studies. Simulations are employed to investigate the RF field induced eddy currents in the two metallic strips. The RF simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results. Experimental and simulation results show that the metal has a pronounced effect on the B1 distribution and B1 amplitude in the surrounding space. The electrical conductivity of the metal has a minimal effect.

  16. The Composition of Metals Bound to Class III Metallothionein (Phytochelatin and Its Desglycyl Peptide) Induced by Various Metals in Root Cultures of Rubia tinctorum.

    PubMed Central

    Maitani, T.; Kubota, H.; Sato, K.; Yamada, T.

    1996-01-01

    The induction of phytochelatins (PCs) and their desglycyl peptides (both are referred to as class III metallothionein [CIIIMT]) by exposure to various metals (Ag+, As3+, As5+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ga3+, Hg2+, In3+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Pd2+, Se4+, and Zn2+) and the metal composition in the CIIIMTs were investigated in root cultures of Rubia tinctorum L. All of these metal species induced PCs to various degrees when analyzed by the postcolumn derivatization high-performance liquid chromatography method. The desglycyl peptides of PCs often were also present. However, only Ag, Cd, and Cu were bound to the CIIIMTs that they induced when analyzed by the high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry method. Cu was also bound to the CIIIMTs induced by Ag+, As3+, and Cd2+. After Ag+ exposure, an Fe peak that may be of Fe-CIIIMT was also observed. However, most of the metal species studied were not bound to the CIIIMTs that they induced. PMID:12226248

  17. Proximity-Induced Spin Polarization of Graphene in Contact with Half-Metallic Manganite.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Seiji; Majumdar, Sayani; Popov, Zakhar I; Avramov, Pavel V; Entani, Shiro; Hasegawa, Yuri; Yamada, Yoichi; Huhtinen, Hannu; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Sorokin, Pavel B; Yamauchi, Yasushi

    2016-08-23

    The role of proximity contact with magnetic oxides is of particular interest from the expectations of the induced spin polarization and weak interactions at the graphene/magnetic oxide interfaces, which would allow us to achieve efficient spin-polarized injection in graphene-based spintronic devices. A combined approach of topmost-surface-sensitive spectroscopy utilizing spin-polarized metastable He atoms and ab initio calculations provides us direct evidence for the magnetic proximity effect in the junctions of single-layer graphene and half-metallic manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO). It is successfully demonstrated that in the graphene/LSMO junctions a sizable spin polarization is induced at the Fermi level of graphene in parallel to the spin polarization direction of LSMO without giving rise to a significant modification in the π band structure. PMID:27438899

  18. Inherent safety phenomenon of fission-gas induced axial extrusion in oxide and metal fueled LMFBRs

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, K.J.; Kalimullah

    1985-01-01

    The current emphasis in LMFBR design is to develop reactor systems that contain as many features as possible to limit the severity of hypothetical accidents and provide the maximum time before corrective action is required while maintaining low capital costs. One feature is the possibility of fission-gas induced axial extrusion of the fuel within the intact cladding. The potential exists for this phenomenon to enable the reactor to withstand most accidents of the TOP variety, or at least provide an extended time for corrective action to be taken. Under transient conditions which produce a heating of the fuel above its nominal operating temperature, thermal expansion of the material axially produces a negative reactivity effect. This effect is presently considered in most accident analysis codes. The phenomenon of fission-gas induced axial extrusion has received renewed interest because of the consideration of metal alloys of uranium and plutonium for the fuel in some current reactor designs.

  19. Neural induced embryoid bodies present high levels of metals detected by x-ray microfluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, Mariana P.; Cardoso, Simone C.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2012-05-17

    Molecular mechanisms driving neural differentiation in human embryonic stem cells are not completely elucidated, specially, the role of atomic elements within this process. In this work, we described the distribution of trace elements in those stem cells growing as embryoid bodies by using synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence (SR-XRF). Naive and neural induced embryoid bodies derived from embryonic stem cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 {mu}m to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. We consistently detected metallic elements content raise on neural induced embryoid bodies, mimicking characteristic brain development. The use of SR-XRF reveals that human embryoid bodies exhibit self-organization at the atomic level, which is enhanced during neurogenesis triggered in vitro.

  20. Neural induced embryoid bodies present high levels of metals detected by x-ray microfluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, Mariana P.; Cardoso, Simone C.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2012-05-01

    Molecular mechanisms driving neural differentiation in human embryonic stem cells are not completely elucidated, specially, the role of atomic elements within this process. In this work, we described the distribution of trace elements in those stem cells growing as embryoid bodies by using synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence (SR-XRF). Naive and neural induced embryoid bodies derived from embryonic stem cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 μm to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. We consistently detected metallic elements content raise on neural induced embryoid bodies, mimicking characteristic brain development. The use of SR-XRF reveals that human embryoid bodies exhibit self-organization at the atomic level, which is enhanced during neurogenesis triggered in vitro.

  1. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-01-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa; an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2. PMID:27527241

  2. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-01-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa; an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2. PMID:27527241

  3. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-08-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2.

  4. Bleaching versus poling: Comparison of electric field induced phenomena in glasses and glass-metal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovskii, A. A.; Melehin, V. G.; Petrov, M. I.; Svirko, Yu. P.; Zhurikhina, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    By examining the electric field induced processes in glasses and glass-metal nanocomposites (GMN) we propose mechanism of the electric field assisted dissolution (EFAD) of metal nanoparticles in glass. We show that in both glass poling and EFAD processes, the strong (up to 1 V/nm) local electric field in the subanodic region is due to the presence of "slow" hydrogen ions bonded to nonbridging oxygen atoms in glass matrix. However, the origin of these hydrogen ions in glass and GMN is different. Specifically, when we apply the electric field to a virgin glass, the enrichment of the glass with hydrogen species takes place in the course of the poling. In GMN, the hydrogen ions have been incorporated into the glass matrix during metal nanoparticles formation via reduction in a metal by hydrogen, i.e., before the electric field was applied. The EFAD of metal nanoparticles resembles the electric field stimulated diffusion of metal film in glass (the important difference however is that in GMN, there is no direct contact of dissolving metal entity with anodic electrode). This similarity makes it possible to estimate the energy of thermal activated transition of silver atoms from a nanoparticle to glass matrix as ˜1.3 eV. Electroneutrality of the GMN requires emission of electrons from nanoparticles. Photoconductivity spectra of soda-lime glasses and the results of numerical calculations of band structure of fused silica, sodium disilicate and sodium-calcium-silicate glass enable us to evaluate the bandgap and the position of electron mobility edge in soda-lime glass. The evaluated values are ˜6 eV and ˜1.2 eV below vacuum level, respectively. The bent of the glass band structure in strong electric field permits a direct tunneling of Fermi electrons from silver nanoparticle (4.6 eV below the vacuum level) to the glass conductivity band. Evaluated in accordance with the Fowler-Nordheim equation the magnitude of electric field necessary to establish comparable electron

  5. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  6. Through metal binding, curcumin protects against lead- and cadmium-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates and against lead-induced tissue damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Sheril; Limson, Janice L; Dairam, Amichand; Watkins, Gareth M; Daya, Santy

    2004-02-01

    Curcumin, the major constituent of turmeric is a known, naturally occurring antioxidant. The present study examined the ability of this compound to protect against lead-induced damage to hippocampal cells of male Wistar rats, as well as lipid peroxidation induced by lead and cadmium in rat brain homogenate. The thiobarbituric assay (TBA) was used to measure the extent of lipid peroxidation induced by lead and cadmium in rat brain homogenate. The results show that curcumin significantly protects against lipid peroxidation induced by both these toxic metals. Coronal brain sections of rats injected intraperitoneally with lead acetate (20 mg/kg) in the presence and absence of curcumin (30 mg/kg) were compared microscopically to determine the extent of lead-induced damage to the cells in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, and to establish the capacity of curcumin to prevent such damage. Lead-induced damage to the neurons was significantly curtailed in the rats injected with curcumin. Possible chelation of lead and cadmium by curcumin as its mechanism of neuroprotection against such heavy metal insult to the brain was investigated using electrochemical, ultraviolet spectrophotometric and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The results of the study show that there is an interaction between curcumin and both cadmium and lead, with the possible formation of a complex between the metal and this ligand. These results imply that curcumin could be used therapeutically to chelate these toxic metals, thus potentially reducing their neurotoxicity and tissue damage.

  7. On the characteristics of ion implanted metallic surfaces inducing dropwise condensation of steam.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Michael H; Leipertz, Alfred; Fröba, Andreas P

    2010-04-20

    The present work provides new information on the characteristics of ion implanted metallic surfaces responsible for the adjustment of stable dropwise condensation (DWC) of steam. The results are based on condensation experiments and surface analyses via contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For studying possible influences of the base material and the implanted ion species, commercially pure titanium grade 1, aluminum alloy Al 6951, and stainless steel AISI 321 were treated with N(+), C(+), O(+), or Ar(+) using ion beam implantation technology. The studies suggest that chemically inhomogeneous surfaces are instrumental in inducing DWC. As this inhomogeneity is apparently caused by particulate precipitates bonded to the metal surface, the resulting nanoscale surface roughness may also influence the condensation form. On such surfaces nucleation mechanisms seem to be capable of maintaining DWC even when CA and SFE measurements indicate increased wettability. The precipitates are probably formed due to the supersaturation of ion implanted metal surfaces with doping elements. For high-alloyed materials like AISI 321 or Hastelloy C-276, oxidation stimulated by the condensation process obviously tends to produce similar surfaces suitable for DWC.

  8. Characterizing multiple metal ion binding sites within a ribozyme by cadmium-induced EPR silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kisseleva, Natalia; Kraut, Stefanie; Jäschke, Andres; Schiemann, Olav

    2007-01-01

    In ribozyme catalysis, metal ions are generally known to make structural and∕or mechanistic contributions. The catalytic activity of a previously described Diels-Alderase ribozyme was found to depend on the concentration of divalent metal ions, and crystallographic data revealed multiple binding sites. Here, we elucidate the interactions of this ribozyme with divalent metal ions in solution using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese ion titrations revealed five high-affinity Mn2+ binding sites with an upper Kd of 0.6±0.2 μM. In order to characterize each binding site individually, EPR-silent Cd2+ ions were used to saturate the other binding sites. This cadmium-induced EPR silencing showed that the Mn2+ binding sites possess different affinities. In addition, these binding sites could be assigned to three different types, including innersphere, outersphere, and a Mn2+ dimer. Based on simulations, the Mn2+-Mn2+ distance within the dimer was found to be ∼6 Å, which is in good agreement with crystallographic data. The EPR-spectroscopic characterization reveals no structural changes upon addition of a Diels-Alder product, supporting the concept of a preorganized catalytic pocket in the Diels-Alder ribozyme and the structural role of these ions. PMID:19404418

  9. Laser-induced forward transfer for improving fine-line metallization in photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Aniorte, M. I.; Mouhamadou, B.; Alloncle, A. P.; Sarnet, T.; Delaporte, P.

    2016-06-01

    Grand challenges to create new front metallization techniques in photovoltaic focus considerable attention on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) approach. This alternative method aims to overcome the limitations of the well-established and mature screen-printing (SP) technique. Such limitations are for instance restrictions in the grid pattern design, high-temperature steps, and limited aspect ratio of the line contact (Poulain et al. in Appl Surf Sci 257:5241-5244, 2011). Although different new front contact metallization concepts have been studied, most of them require a second print step to increase the volume of the contact (Gao et al. in Proceedings of 25th EU PVSEC conference, 2010; Beaucarne and Schubert in Energy Proc 67:2-12, 2015; Lossen and Matusovsky in Energy Proc 67:156-162, 2015; Green in Phys E 14:65-70, 2002; Lennon et al. in Prog Photovolt Res Appl V21:1454-1468, 2012). As a result, it is desirable to find innovative metallization techniques to improve the cell efficiency without significantly increasing the cost. Although many challenges remain before to obtain high-quality, robust, and high-performance LIFT contact formation, it required a fully theoretical and experimental assessment. This paper presents the results of a study of the LIFT technique in picosecond regime and thick silver pastes to create high-quality conductive lines for photovoltaic applications.

  10. Fabricating micro embossments on the metal surface through spatially modulating laser-induced shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y. X.; Xuan, T.; Lian, Z. C.; Hua, X. J.; Fu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose one improved method to fabricate micro embossments on the metal surface through laser shock processing. One mapping layer with holes must be actively designed and produced on the metal surface, with which, laser-induced shock wave will be spatially modulated. Laser shock experiments were conducted. Then the surface morphologies, and metallographic microstructures were characterized. The forming process of the micro embossments was simulated with ABAQUS. The results show that under the spatially modulated shock loading, the surface material flows from the high-pressure zone to the low-pressure zone, which is responsible for forming the micro embossments. The shapes, sizes and arrangements of the micro embossments conform to those of the mapping holes. The hardnesses on the entire laser-shocked zones improve remarkably due to the plastic deformation at a high strain rate. The influences of the laser energy and mask pattern on the embossed structures are presented. Within certain limits, increasing laser energy is beneficial for making the embossment more convex. However, further excessively increasing the laser energy, the embossment will exhibit the height saturation due to the pressure rise within the closed mapping hole. The transverse sizes of the mapping holes also can influence the embossment heights significantly. Process parameters need to be chosen carefully to suppress the severe adiabatic compression of the gas within the mapping holes, and then avoid weakening the mechanical properties of the micro embossments. This method has a potential application in manufacturing protruded structures on the metal surface.

  11. Metal-induced gap states in ferroelectric capacitors and its relationship with complex band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquera, Javier; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    At metal-isulator interfaces, the metallic wave functions with an energy eigenvalue within the band gap decay exponentially inside the dielectric (metal-induced gap states, MIGS). These MIGS can be actually regarded as Bloch functions with an associated complex wave vector. Usually only real values of the wave vectors are discussed in text books, since infinite periodicity is assumed and, in that situation, wave functions growing exponentially in any direction would not be physically valid. However, localized wave functions with an exponential decay are indeed perfectly valid solution of the Schrodinger equation in the presence of defects, surfaces or interfaces. For this reason, properties of MIGS have been typically discussed in terms of the complex band structure of bulk materials. The probable dependence on the interface particulars has been rarely taken into account explicitly due to the difficulties to include them into the model or simulations. We aim to characterize from first-principles simulations the MIGS in realistic ferroelectric capacitors and their connection with the complex band structure of the ferroelectric material. We emphasize the influence of the real interface beyond the complex band structure of bulk materials. Financial support provided by MICINN Grant FIS2009-12721-C04-02, and by the European Union Grant No. CP-FP 228989-2 ``OxIDes''. Computer resources provided by the RES.

  12. Theoretical analysis of electromigration-induced failure of metallic thin films due to transgranular void propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Gungor, M.R.; Maroudas, D.

    1999-02-01

    Failure of metallic thin films driven by electromigration is among the most challenging materials reliability problems in microelectronics toward ultra-large-scale integration. One of the most serious failure mechanisms in thin films with bamboo grain structure is the propagation of transgranular voids, which may lead to open-circuit failure. In this article, a comprehensive theoretical analysis is presented of the complex nonlinear dynamics of transgranular voids in metallic thin films as determined by capillarity-driven surface diffusion coupled with drift induced by electromigration. Our analysis is based on self-consistent dynamical simulations of void morphological evolution and it is aided by the conclusions of an approximate linear stability theory. Our simulations emphasize that the strong dependence of surface diffusivity on void surface orientation, the strength of the applied electric field, and the void size play important roles in the dynamics of the voids. The simulations predict void faceting, formation of wedge-shaped voids due to facet selection, propagation of slit-like features emanating from void surfaces, open-circuit failure due to slit propagation, as well as appearance and disappearance of soliton-like features on void surfaces prior to failure. These predictions are in very good agreement with recent experimental observations during accelerated electromigration testing of unpassivated metallic films. The simulation results are used to establish conditions for the formation of various void morphological features and discuss their serious implications for interconnect reliability. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Metal Oleate Induced Etching and Growth of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, Nanorods, and Their Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nuri; Shim, Moonsub

    2016-08-24

    Unexpected etching of nanocrystals, nanorods, and their heterostructures by one of the most commonly used metal precursors, metal oleates, is reported. Zn oleate is shown to etch CdS nanorods anisotropically, where the length decreases without a significant change in the diameter. Sodium oleate enhances the etch rate, whereas oleic acid alone does not cause etching, indicating the importance of the countercation on the rate of oleate induced etching. Subsequent addition of Se precursors to the partially etched nanorods in Zn oleate solution can lead to epitaxial growth of CdSe particles rather than the expected ZnSe growth, despite an excess amount of Zn precursors being present. The composition of this epitaxial growth can be varied from CdSe to ZnSe, depending on the amount of excess oleic acid or the reaction temperature. Similar tuning of composition can be observed when starting with collinear CdSe/CdS/CdSe rod/rod/rod heterostructures and spherical CdS (or CdSe/CdS core/shell) nanocrystals. Conversion of collinear rod/rod/rod structures to barbells and interesting rod growth from nearly spherical particles among other structures can also result due to the initial etching effect of metal oleates. These observations have important implications on our understanding of nanocrystal heterostructure synthesis and open up new routes to varying the composition and morphology of these materials. PMID:27485673

  14. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J.; D'Angelo, Marie D.; Enriquez, Hanna B.; Silly, Mathieu G.

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  15. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization.

    PubMed

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J; D'angelo, Marie D; Enriquez, Hanna B; Silly, Mathieu G

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  16. Analysis of heavy metal aerosols on filters by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panne, U.; Neuhauser, R. E.; Theisen, M.; Fink, H.; Niessner, R.

    2001-06-01

    Particulate heavy metals can lead to severe toxic and carcinogenic effects in humans when inhaled in higher concentrations. For the development of a quasi-continuous emission monitor based on automatic filter sampling on a filter band, laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) was studied for analysis of heavy metal aerosols on quartz fiber filters. The system consists of a 19-inch laser and detector module connected to a miniaturized sensor head through fiber optics, allowing maximum flexibility of the set-up. Parameters for optimum time-resolved analysis, i.e. detection wavelength, timing and filter material, were established. The LIPS investigations were accompanied by a rigorous reference analysis based on total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis. The detection limits for heavy metals (Cd, Ni, As, Co, Mn, Sb, Cr, Tl, Sn, V, Cu and Pb) on filters varied between 0.01 and approximately 0.91 μg cm -2, corresponding to volume detection limits of 0.02-2.73 μg m -3. Analysis of filter samples from waste incineration demonstrated the potential of the LIPS approach. In combination with an echelle spectrometer, ambient samples from environmental monitoring could be characterized in much better detail, due to the improved detection limits and the superior spectral resolution, and spectral range of the echelle.

  17. Heavy Metal Detection in Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Hemispherical Spatial Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deshuo; Zhao, Nanjing; Ma, Mingjun; Wang, Yin; Hu, Li; Yu, Yang; Fang, Li; Liu, Wenqing

    2015-08-01

    Spatial confinement has great potential for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instruments after it has been proven that it has the ability to enhance the LIBS signal strength and repeatability. In order to achieve in-situ measurement of heavy metals in farmland soils by LIBS, a hemispherical spatial confinement device is designed and used to collect plasma spectra, in which the optical fibers directly collect the breakdown spectroscopy of the soil samples. This device could effectively increase the stability of the spectrum intensity of soil. It also has other advantages, such as ease of installation, and its small and compact size. The relationship between the spectrum intensity and the laser pulse energy is studied for this device. It is found that the breakdown threshold is 160 cm-2, and when the laser fluence increases to 250 J/cm2, the spectrum intensity reaches its maximum. Four different kinds of laser pulse energy were set up and in each case the limits of detection of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were calculated. The results show that when the laser pulse fluence was 2.12 GW/cm2, we obtained the smallest limits of detection of these heavy metals, which are all under 10 mg/kg. This device can satisfy the needs of heavy metal in-situ detection, and in the next step it will be integrated into a portable LIBS instrument.

  18. Distortion Pathways of Transition Metal Coordination Polyhedra Induced by Chelating Topology.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Santiago

    2015-12-23

    A continuous shape measures analysis of the coordination polyhedra of a host of transition metal complexes with bi- and multidentate ligands discloses the distortion pathway associated with each particular topology of the chelate rings formed. The basic parameter that controls the degree of distortion is the metal-donor atom bond distance that induces nonideal bond angles due to the rigidity of the ligands. Thus, the degree of distortion within each family of complexes depends on the atomic size, on which the high- or low-spin state has a large effect. Special attention is therefore paid to several spin-crossover systems and to the enhanced distortions that go along with the transition from low- to high-spin state affected by temperature, light, or pressure. Several families of complexes show deviations from the expected distortion pathways in the high-spin state that can be associated to the onset of intermolecular interactions such as secondary coordination of counterions or solvent molecules. Also, significant displacement of counterions in an extended solid may result from the changes in metal-ligand bond distances when ligands are involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonding. PMID:26575868

  19. Chemomechanical Origin of Hydrogen Trapping at Grain Boundaries in fcc Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Marchand, Daniel; McDowell, David L; Zhu, Ting; Song, Jun

    2016-02-19

    Hydrogen embrittlement of metals is widely observed, but its atomistic origins remain little understood and much debated. Combining a unique identification of interstitial sites through polyhedral tessellation and first-principles calculations, we study hydrogen adsorption at grain boundaries in a variety of face-centered cubic metals of Ni, Cu, γ-Fe, and Pd. We discover the chemomechanical origin of the variation of adsorption energetics for interstitial hydrogen at grain boundaries. A general chemomechanical formula is established to provide accurate assessments of hydrogen trapping and segregation energetics at grain boundaries, and it also offers direct explanations for certain experimental observations. The present study deepens our mechanistic understanding of the role of grain boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement and points to a viable path towards predictive microstructure engineering against hydrogen embrittlement in structural metals.

  20. Simplified process for leaching precious metals from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail

    2009-12-22

    The membrane electrode assemblies of fuel cells are recycled to recover the catalyst precious metals from the assemblies. The assemblies are cryogenically embrittled and pulverized to form a powder. The pulverized assemblies are then mixed with a surfactant to form a paste which is contacted with an acid solution to leach precious metals from the pulverized membranes.

  1. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  2. Pressure-induced polyamorphism in a main-group metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min; Lou, Hongbo; Tse, John S.; Liu, Hanyu; Pan, Yuanming; Takahama, Kazushi; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Shimizu, Katsuya; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of pressure-induced amorphous-to-amorphous transitions (AATs) in metallic glasses (MGs) has been a subject of intense research. Most AATs in MGs were found in lanthanide-based alloys and shown to originate from 4 f orbital delocalization. Recently, evidence of an unexpected AAT in the main-group Ca-Al MGs was reported without a satisfactory explanation. Here, based on the results of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations, the suggested AAT at 12-15 GPa in the C a72.7A l27.3 MG is confirmed. Contrary to the common belief that the coordinate of metallic glasses with close packing cannot be increased further, the coordination around Al atoms is found to increase suddenly at the transition as a consequence of atomic migration and the aggregation of Al atoms. This transition originates from pressure-enhanced bonding between Ca 3 d and Al 3 p orbitals and is confirmed by the good agreement on the predicted and measured electrical conductivities. The theoretical analysis not only uncovers a mechanism of pressure-induced AAT in main-group MGs, but it can be generalized to establish a different perspective to guide the understanding of transformation phenomena in compressed MGs.

  3. Heavy metal-induced differential gene expression of metallothionein in Javanese medaka, Oryzias javanicus.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seonock; Yum, Seungshic; Jung, Jee Hyun; Shim, Won Joon; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2006-01-01

    A metallothionein (MT) gene was isolated for the first time from Javanese medaka, Oryzias javanicus, which shows high adaptability from freshwater to seawater. The full-length cDNA of MT from O. javanicus (OjaMT) comprises 349 bp, excluding the poly(A)+ stretch, and codes for a total of 60 amino acids. The positions of cysteine residues are highly conserved. The pattern of OjaMT expression induced by six heavy metals was analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The level of hepatic OjaMT mRNA was increased in a dose-dependent manner by Ag, Cd, Cu, and Zn after 24 h of exposure. However, after Cr and Ni exposure, a significant decrease in OjaMT levels was observed. Cadmium-induced OjaMT expression was detectable in fishes as young as 3 months. After Cd exposure, OjaMT induction was prominent in intestine and liver and moderate in muscle and gill. OjaMT mRNA levels could represent a good biomarker for monitoring heavy metals in seawater. PMID:16967182

  4. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis.

  5. Prospective Study of Metal Fume-Induced Responses of Global Gene Expression Profiling in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Li; Kim, Jee Young; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Metal particulate inhalation causes pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Our previous results showed that systemic responses to short-term occupational welding-fume exposure could be assessed by microarray analyses in whole-blood total RNA sampled before and after exposure. To expand our understanding of the duration of particulate-induced gene expression changes, we conducted a study using a similar population 1 yr after the original study and extended our observations in the postexposure period. We recruited 15 individuals with welding fume exposure and 7 nonexposed individuals. Thirteen of the 22 individuals (9 in exposed group and 4 in nonexposed group) had been monitored in the previous study. Whole-blood total RNA was analyzed at 3 time points, including baseline, immediately following exposure (approximately 5 h after baseline), and 24 h after baseline, using cDNA microarray technology. We replicated the patterns of Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with response to stimulus, cell death, phosphorus metabolism, localization, and regulation of biological processes significantly enriched with altered genes in the nonsmoking exposed group. Most of the identified genes had opposite expression changes between the exposure and postexposure periods in nonsmoking welders. In addition, we found dose-dependent patterns that were affected by smoking status. In conclusion, short-term occupational exposure to metal particulates causes systemic responses in the peripheral blood. Furthermore, the acute particulate-induced effects on gene expression profiling were transient in nonsmoking welders, with most effects diminishing within 19 h following exposure. PMID:18951227

  6. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  7. Not All That Glitters Is Gold: Metal-Migration-Induced Degradation in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Konrad; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Mine, Nicolas; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Abate, Antonio; Saliba, Michael; Tress, Wolfgang; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-06-28

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have now achieved efficiencies in excess of 22%, but very little is known about their long-term stability under thermal stress. So far, stability reports have hinted at the importance of substituting the organic components, but little attention has been given to the metal contact. We investigated the stability of state-of-the-art PSCs with efficiencies exceeding 20%. Remarkably, we found that exposing PSCs to a temperature of 70 °C is enough to induce gold migration through the hole-transporting layer (HTL), spiro-MeOTAD, and into the perovskite material, which in turn severely affects the device performance metrics under working conditions. Importantly, we found that the main cause of irreversible degradation is not due to decomposition of the organic and hybrid perovskite layers. By introducing a Cr metal interlayer between the HTL and gold electrode, high-temperature-induced irreversible long-term losses are avoided. This key finding is essential in the quest for achieving high efficiency, long-term stable PSCs which, in order to be commercially viable, need to withstand hard thermal stress tests.

  8. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  9. 900 F embrittlement of alloy UNS N06625

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, V.W.M.; Doelling, R.

    1998-12-31

    Different impellers made of nickel base alloy UNS N06625 have failed after 5000 h and 15000 h in service at high temperatures ({approx_equal} 500 C, 932 F) in 1994. The impellers were used in petrochemical industries. The failures were induced by stress corrosion cracking and stress corrosion fatigue. Material of the impellers showed a high susceptibility to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion attack. Formation of a newly, not yet identified, super lattice within the nickel matrix has been discovered by transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the super lattice was caused by the service conditions, temperature and time. Based on these findings, influence of ageing time at 500 C (932 F) on the mechanical properties and the corrosion resistance of UNS N06625 was investigated. The specimen investigated showed strong differences in mechanical properties and corrosion behavior in standard corrosion test solutions, as well as a strong ageing dependence.

  10. Plasmonic effects on the laser-induced metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Davon W.; MacQuarrie, Evan R.; Nag, Joyeeta; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a strongly-correlated electron material with a well-known semiconducting to metallic phase transition that can be induced thermally, optically, or electrically. When switched to the high-temperature (T > 68°C) metallic phase, the greatest contrast in the optical properties occurs at wavelengths in the near-to-mid-infrared and beyond. In the visible to near-infrared, however, upon switching for wavelengths between ~500-1000 nm, VO2 transmits more light in the metallic phase. In this paper, we report studies of the effect of near-IR irradiation (785 nm) on lithographically prepared arrays of gold nanoparticles (NPs) covered with a thin film of VO2 and find that the presence of the NPs substantially lowers the laser threshold for low-power induction of the phase transition. Hybrid Au::VO2 structures were created by coating lithographically prepared arrays of gold nanoparticles (NPs) (diameters 140 and 200 nm, array spacing 450 nm) with 60 nm thick films of VO2 by pulsed laser deposition. Due to resonant absorption of the Au particle-plasmon resonance (PPR) at 785 nm, a temperature-dependent shift in the PPR can be generated by switching the VO2 from one phase to another. We have measured the switching behavior of VO2 and Au::VO2 structures using shuttered CW laser irradiation in order to study both optical and thermal mechanisms of the phase transition. Transient absorption measurements using a shuttered 785 nm pump laser corresponding to the PPR resonance of the Au NPs and 1550 nm CW probe show that the presence of the Au NPs lowers the threshold laser power required to induce the phase transition.

  11. Contaminant-induced changes to soil properties: From general overview to study of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Moshe, T.; Dror, I.; Yaron, B.; Berkowitz, B.

    2011-12-01

    A contemporary metapedogenetic process in which anthropogenic contaminants become an additional soil-forming factor is presented. Several examples that link contamination and modification of soil properties from the existing literature are reviewed. Also, recent experimental results that show possible soil property modifications as a result of application of metal oxide nanoparticles to natural soils are shown. Research results published in literature on chemical contaminant-soil interactions show that in some cases, irreversible changes to the soil matrix and properties may occur. In such cases, a pristine soil may become the parent material for a newly-formed soil. In contrast to natural processes over geological time scales, contaminant-induced soil modification occurs over much shorter time scales. In recent years, the effects of soil on the behavior and properties of nanoparticles released to the environment have been studied extensively. The behavior, transport and mobility of nanoparticles were shown to be strongly dependent on environmental conditions. However, little is known about the possible effects of nanoparticles on soil properties. In this study, two types of metal oxide nanoparticles, CuO and Fe3O4 were mixed with two types of soil and the effects of the nanoparticles on various soil properties were assessed. Metal oxide nanoparticles were previously shown to catalyze the oxidation of organic pollutants in aqueous suspensions, and they were therefore expected to induce changes in the organic material in the soil, especially upon addition of an oxidant. It was found that the nanoparticles did not change the total amount of organic materials in the soil or the total organic carbon in the soil extract; however, three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated changes in humic substances.

  12. Structural heterogeneity induced plasticity in bulk metallic glasses: From well-relaxed fragile glass to metal-like behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong; Bei, H.; Tong, Y.; Dmowski, W.; Gao, Y. F.

    2013-10-01

    To reveal the structural origin responsible for the sharp change of the fracture mode on the as-cast and thermally-relaxed status, we use nanomechanical testing to measure the stresses for the onset of plasticity of a metallic glass and develop a stochastic statistical model, which can be used to characterize structural heterogeneity (defect density and strength) inside the metallic glass. Our experiments and calculations found that, with increasing the structural relaxation, the defect density drops by two orders of magnitude. Correspondingly, the fracture of metallic glasses changes from a significantly plastic (metal-like) mode to an extremely brittle (fragile glass) one.

  13. Differential proinflammatory responses induced by diesel exhaust particles with contrasting PAH and metal content.

    PubMed

    Totlandsdal, Annike I; Låg, Marit; Lilleaas, Edel; Cassee, Flemming; Schwarze, Per

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to diesel engine exhaust particles (DEPs), representing a complex and variable mixture of components, has been linked with cellular production and release of several types of mediators related to pulmonary inflammation. A key challenge is to identify the specific components, which may be responsible for these effects. The aim of this study was to compare the proinflammatory potential of two DEP-samples with contrasting contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals. The DEP-samples were compared with respect to their ability to induce cytotoxicity, expression and release of proinflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-8), activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and expression of CYP1A1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. In addition, dithiothreitol and ascorbic acid assays were performed in order to examine the oxidative potential of the PM samples. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content was more potent with respect to cytotoxicity and expression and release of proinflammatory mediators, CYP1A1 and HO-1 expression and MAPK activation, than the DEP-sample with lower PAH and higher metal content. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content also possessed a greater oxidative potential. The present results indicate that the content of organic components may be determinant for the proinflammatory effects of DEP. The findings underscore the importance of considering the chemical composition of particulate matter-emissions, when evaluating the potential health impact and implementation of air pollution regulations. PMID:23900936

  14. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS) usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial) and HK-2 (epithelial proximal) cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-κb was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential. PMID:21371295

  15. Differential proinflammatory responses induced by diesel exhaust particles with contrasting PAH and metal content.

    PubMed

    Totlandsdal, Annike I; Låg, Marit; Lilleaas, Edel; Cassee, Flemming; Schwarze, Per

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to diesel engine exhaust particles (DEPs), representing a complex and variable mixture of components, has been linked with cellular production and release of several types of mediators related to pulmonary inflammation. A key challenge is to identify the specific components, which may be responsible for these effects. The aim of this study was to compare the proinflammatory potential of two DEP-samples with contrasting contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals. The DEP-samples were compared with respect to their ability to induce cytotoxicity, expression and release of proinflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-8), activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and expression of CYP1A1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. In addition, dithiothreitol and ascorbic acid assays were performed in order to examine the oxidative potential of the PM samples. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content was more potent with respect to cytotoxicity and expression and release of proinflammatory mediators, CYP1A1 and HO-1 expression and MAPK activation, than the DEP-sample with lower PAH and higher metal content. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content also possessed a greater oxidative potential. The present results indicate that the content of organic components may be determinant for the proinflammatory effects of DEP. The findings underscore the importance of considering the chemical composition of particulate matter-emissions, when evaluating the potential health impact and implementation of air pollution regulations.

  16. Basic Mechanics of DNA Methylation and the Unique Landscape of the DNA Methylome in Metal-Induced Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an intricate role in the regulation of gene expression and events that compromise the integrity of the methylome may potentially contribute to disease development. DNA methylation is a reversible and regulatory modification that elicits a cascade of events leading to chromatin condensation and gene silencing. In general, normal cells are characterized by gene-specific hypomethylation and global hypermethylation, while cancer cells portray a reverse profile to this norm. The unique methylome displayed in cancer cells is induced after exposure to carcinogenic metals such as nickel, arsenic, cadmium, and chromium (VI). These metals alter the DNA methylation profile by provoking both hyper- and hypomethylation events. The metal-stimulated deviations to the methylome are possible mechanisms for metal-induced carcinogenesis and may provide potential biomarkers for cancer detection. Development of therapies based on the cancer methylome requires further research including human studies that supply results with larger impact and higher human relevance. PMID:23844698

  17. Localization of metal-induced gap states at the metal-insulator interface: Origin of flux noise in SQUIDs and superconducting qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, SangKook; Lee, Dung-Hai; Louie, Steven G.; Clarke, John

    2009-10-10

    The origin of magnetic flux noise in Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices with a power spectrum scaling as 1/f (f is frequency) has been a puzzle for over 20 years. This noise limits the decoherence time of superconducting qubits. A consensus has emerged that the noise arises from fluctuating spins of localized electrons with an areal density of 5 x 10(17)m(-2). We show that, in the presence of potential disorder at the metal-insulator interface, some of the metal-induced gap states become localized and produce local moments. A modest level of disorder yields the observed areal density.

  18. The evaluation of tempered martensite embrittlement in 4130 steel by instrumented charpy V-notch testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia-Ebrahimi, F.; Krauss, G.

    1983-06-01

    Tempered martensite embrittlement (TME) was studied in vacuum-melted 4130 steel with either 0.002 or 0.02 wt pct P. TME was observed as a severe decrease in Charpy V-notch impact energy, from 46 ft-lb. at 200 °C to 35 ft-lb. at 300 °C in the low P alloy. The impact energy of the high P alloy was consistently lower than that of the low P alloy in all tempered conditions. Fracture was transgranular for all specimens; therefore, segregation of P to the prior austenitic grain boundaries was not a factor in the o°Currence of TME. Analysis of load-time curves obtained by instrumented Charpy testing revealed that the embrittlement is associated with a drop in the pre-maximum-load and post-unstable-fracture energies. In specimens tempered at 400 °C the deleterious effect of phosphorus on impact energy became pronounced, a result more consistent with classical temper embrittlement rather than TME. A constant decrease in pre-maximum-load energy due to phosphorus content was observed. The pre-maximum-load energy decreases with increasing tempering temperature in the range of 200 °C to 400 °C, a result explained by the change in work hardening rate. Carbon extraction replicas of polished and etched as-quenched specimens revealed the presence of Fe2MoC and/or Fe3C carbides retained after austenitizing. Ductile crack extension close to the notch root was related to the formation of fine micro voids at the retained carbides.

  19. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  1. An illustrative review to understand and manage metal-induced artifacts in musculoskeletal MRI: a primer and updates.

    PubMed

    Dillenseger, J P; Molière, S; Choquet, P; Goetz, C; Ehlinger, M; Bierry, G

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews and explains the basic physical principles of metal-induced MRI artifacts, describes simple ways to reduce them, and presents specific reduction solutions. Artifacts include signal loss, pile-up artifacts, geometric distortion, and failure of fat suppression. Their nature and origins are reviewed and explained though schematic representations that ease the understanding. Then, optimization of simple acquisition parameters is detailed. Lastly, dedicated sequences and options specifically developed to reduce metal artifacts (VAT, SEMAC, and MAVRIC) are explained.

  2. GeOx interfacial layer scavenging remotely induced by metal electrode in metal/HfO2/GeOx/Ge capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehoon; Jung, Yong Chan; Seong, Sejong; Lee, Sung Bo; Park, In-Sung; Ahn, Jinho

    2016-07-01

    The metal gate electrodes of Ni, W, and Pt have been investigated for their scavenging effect: a reduction of the GeOx interfacial layer (IL) between HfO2 dielectric and Ge substrate in metal/HfO2/GeOx/Ge capacitors. All the capacitors were fabricated using the same process except for the material used in the metal electrodes. Capacitance-voltage measurements, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy were conducted to confirm the scavenging of GeOx IL. Interestingly, these metals are observed to remotely scavenge the interfacial layer, reducing its thickness in the order of Ni, W, and then Pt. The capacitance equivalent thickness of these capacitors with Ni, W, and Pt electrodes are evaluated to be 2.7 nm, 3.0 nm, and 3.5 nm, and each final remnant physical thickness of GeOx IL layer is 1.1 nm 1.4 nm, and 1.9 nm, respectively. It is suggested that the scavenging effect induced by the metal electrodes is related to the concentration of oxygen vacancies generated by oxidation reaction at the metal/HfO2 interface.

  3. Edge-induced Schottky barrier modulation at metal contacts to exfoliated molybdenum disulfide flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouchi, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    Ultrathin two-dimensional semiconductors obtained from layered transition-metal dichalcogenides such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are promising for ultimately scaled transistors beyond Si. Although the shortening of the semiconductor channel is widely studied, the narrowing of the channel, which should also be important for scaling down the transistor, has been examined to a lesser degree thus far. In this study, the impact of narrowing on mechanically exfoliated MoS2 flakes was investigated according to the channel-width-dependent Schottky barrier heights at Cr/Au contacts. Narrower channels were found to possess a higher Schottky barrier height, which is ascribed to the edge-induced band bending in MoS2. The higher barrier heights degrade the transistor performance as a higher electrode-contact resistance. Theoretical analyses based on Poisson's equation showed that the edge-induced effect can be alleviated by a high dopant impurity concentration, but this strategy should be limited to channel widths of roughly 0.7 μm because of the impurity-induced charge-carrier mobility degradation. Therefore, proper termination of the dangling bonds at the edges should be necessary for aggressive scaling with layered semiconductors.

  4. Macronutrient and trace-metal geochemistry of an in situ iron-induced Southern Ocean bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, Russell; Bowie, Andrew; Croot, Peter; Pickmere, Stuart

    We have investigated the effect of iron supply and increased phytoplankton growth on the cycling of the macronutrients phosphate, nitrate and silicic acid as well as the micronutrients copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd). Nutrient levels were measured in situ in an iron-induced phytoplankton bloom at 61°S 140°E in the Southern Ocean Iron Release experiment (SOIREE). Nutrient ratios upon arrival at the study site indicate that much of the seasonal phytoplankton productivity was by iron-limited diatoms growing at low mean light levels. The addition of iron (Fe) induced a bloom that led to a draw-down in the macronutrients in ratios consistent with the growth of diatoms under iron-replete conditions. None of the bioutilised trace metals Cu, Ni, Zn or Cd showed any indication of co-limitation, with Fe, of phytoplankton growth. Zn concentrations did not decrease by algal uptake as expected. Cd was partitioned to the particulate phase indicating consumption by the algae. Cd was preferentially utilised with respect to P with a αCd/P=5.8. Interpretation of the Cd/Ca data from the sedimentary record using this higher induced αCd/P value would imply even higher Southern Ocean surface water P during the last glacial maximum.

  5. Comparative Effectivness of Metal Ions in Inducing Curvature of Primary Roots of Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Hasenstein, Karl Heinz; Evans, Michael L.; Stinemetz, Charles L.; Moore, Randy; Fondren, W. Mark; Koon, E. Colin; Higby, Mary A.; Smucker, Alvin J. M.

    1988-01-01

    We used five cultivars of Zea mays (Bear Hybrid WF9 * 38MS, B73 * Missouri 17, Yellow Dent, Merit, and Great Lakes Hybrid 422) to reinvestigate the specificity of metal ions for inducing root curvature. Of 17 cations tested, 6 (Al3+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) induced curvature. Roots curved away from Al3+, Ba2+, and Cd2+. Roots curved away from low (0.1 millimolar) concentrations of Cu2+ but toward higher (1-5 millimolar) concentrations. Roots initially curved away from Zn2+ but the direction of the subsequent curvature was unpredictable. In most cases, roots of all cultivars curved towards calcium. However, in some tests there was no response to calcium or even (especially in the cultivars Merit and B73 * Missouri 17) substantial curvature away from calcium. The results indicate that the induction of root curvature is not specific for calcium. The results are discussed relative to the possible role of calmodulin as a mediator of ion-induced root curvature. PMID:11538239

  6. Pressure-induced amorphous-to-amorphous configuration change in Ca-Al metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Lou, H. B.; Fang, Y. K.; Zeng, Q. S.; Lu, Y. H.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, Q. P.; Yang, K.; Yu, X. H.; Zheng, L.; Zhao, Y. D.; Chu, W. S.; Hu, T. D.; Wu, Z. Y.; Ahuja, R.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Pressure-induced amorphous-to-amorphous configuration changes in Ca-Al metallic glasses (MGs) were studied by performing in-situ room-temperature high-pressure x-ray diffraction up to about 40 GPa. Changes in compressibility at about 18 GPa, 15.5 GPa and 7.5 GPa during compression are detected in Ca80Al20, Ca72.7Al27.3, and Ca66.4Al33.6 MGs, respectively, whereas no clear change has been detected in the Ca50Al50 MG. The transfer of s electrons into d orbitals under pressure, reported for the pressure-induced phase transformations in pure polycrystalline Ca, is suggested to explain the observation of an amorphous-to-amorphous configuration change in this Ca-Al MG system. Results presented here show that the pressure induced amorphous-to-amorphous configuration is not limited to f electron-containing MGs. PMID:22530094

  7. Plasma-induced-damage of GaAs during etching of refractory metal contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Rieger, D.J.; Hafich, M.J.; Corless, R.F.; Vartuli, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    The effect of plasma-induced-damage on the majority carrier transport properties of GaAs has been studied by monitoring changes in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of thin conducting layers under various plasma conditions including etch conditions for refractory metal contacts. R{sub s} determined from transmission line measurements are used to evaluate plasma-induced-damage for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and reactive ion etch (RIE) conditions by varying the thickness of doped epitaxial layers. The authors speculate that plasma-induced-damage in the near surface region plays a major role in explaining the damage mechanism observed in this study. Very consistent trends have been observed where R{sub s} increases with increasing ECR and RIE dc-bias, increasing microwave power, and decreasing pressure, thus showing R{sub s} increases as either the ion energy or ion flux increases. The authors have also observed that R{sub s} is lower for samples exposed to the RIE than the ECR, possibly due to higher ion and electron densities generated in the ECR and higher pressures in the RIE. It has also been observed R{sub s} dependence on ECR plasma chemistry where, R{sub s} is lower in SF{sub 6}/Ar plasmas than Ar and N{sub 2} plasmas possibly related to interactions of F or S atoms with the GaAs surface. Moderate anneal temperatures (200 to 500{degrees}C) have shown significant R{sub s} recovery.

  8. Polyhydroxyfullerene binds cadmium ions and alleviates metal-induced oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2014-09-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by exposing cells to Cd (≤5 mg liter(-1)) in the absence or presence of PHF (≤500 mg liter(-1)) at different pHs (5.8 to 6.8). In the absence of Cd, PHF stimulated yeast growth up to 10.4%. Cd inhibited growth up to 79.7%, induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and promoted plasma membrane disruption in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. The negative effects of Cd on growth were attenuated by the presence of PHF, and maximum growth recovery (53.8%) was obtained at the highest PHF concentration and pH. The coexposure to Cd and PHF decreased ROS accumulation up to 36.7% and membrane disruption up to 30.7% in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. Two mechanisms helped to explain the role of PHF in alleviating Cd toxicity to yeasts: PHF decreased Cd-induced oxidative stress and bound significant amounts of Cd in the extracellular medium, reducing its bioavailability to the cells.

  9. Polyhydroxyfullerene Binds Cadmium Ions and Alleviates Metal-Induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by exposing cells to Cd (≤5 mg liter−1) in the absence or presence of PHF (≤500 mg liter−1) at different pHs (5.8 to 6.8). In the absence of Cd, PHF stimulated yeast growth up to 10.4%. Cd inhibited growth up to 79.7%, induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and promoted plasma membrane disruption in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. The negative effects of Cd on growth were attenuated by the presence of PHF, and maximum growth recovery (53.8%) was obtained at the highest PHF concentration and pH. The coexposure to Cd and PHF decreased ROS accumulation up to 36.7% and membrane disruption up to 30.7% in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. Two mechanisms helped to explain the role of PHF in alleviating Cd toxicity to yeasts: PHF decreased Cd-induced oxidative stress and bound significant amounts of Cd in the extracellular medium, reducing its bioavailability to the cells. PMID:25038095

  10. Comparative effectiveness of metal ions in inducing curvature of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.; Stinemetz, C. L.; Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; Koon, E. C.; Higby, M. A.; Smucker, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    We used five cultivars of Zea mays (Bear Hybrid WF9 * 38MS, B73 * Missouri 17, Yellow Dent, Merit, and Great Lakes Hybrid 422) to reinvestigate the specificity of metal ions for inducing root curvature. Of 17 cations tested, 6 (Al3+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) induced curvature. Roots curved away from Al3+, Ba2+, and Cd2+. Roots curved away from low (0.1 millimolar) concentrations of Cu2+ but toward higher (1-5 millimolar) concentrations. Roots initially curved away from Zn2+ but the direction of the subsequent curvature was unpredictable. In most cases, roots of all cultivars curved towards calcium. However, in some tests there was no response to calcium or even (especially in the cultivars Merit and B73 * Missouri 17) substantial curvature away from calcium. The results indicate that the induction of root curvature is not specific for calcium. The results are discussed relative to the possible role of calmodulin as a mediator of ion-induced root curvature.

  11. The embrittling/strengthening effects of hydrogen, boron, and phosphorus on a {Sigma}5 nickel grain boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Raynolds, J.E.; Geng, W.T.; Freeman, A.J.; Wu, R.; Geller, C.B.

    1999-07-01

    The embrittling/strengthening effects of hydrogen, boron, and phosphorus on a {Sigma}5(21O) [100]nickel grain boundary are investigated by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) formula. Optimized geometries for both the free surface and grain boundary systems are obtained by atomic force calculations. The results obtained show that hydrogen and phosphorus are embrittlers and that boron acts as a cohesion enhancer. An analysis of the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures indicates that atomic size and the bonding behavior of the impurity with the surrounding nickel atoms play important roles in determining its relative embrittling or cohesion enhancing behavior.

  12. Determination of trace metals using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in insoluble organic materials obtained from pyrolysis of plastics waste.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammad N; Gondal, Mohammad A; Nasr, Mohammed M

    2009-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the detection of trace elements in non-degradable part of plastics known as insoluble organic material, obtained from thermal and catalytic degradation of plastics. LIBS signal intensity for each metal measured in the test sample was unique and different. The capability of this technique is demonstrated by analyzing various trace metals present inside plastics and also compared with ICP results. The metal concentration (ppm) measured with LIBS and verified by ICP for Ag (901), Al (522), Fe (231), Co (628), V (275), Ni (558), Pb (325), Mn (167) and Cd (378) are higher than permissible safe limits.

  13. Determination of trace metals using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in insoluble organic materials obtained from pyrolysis of plastics waste.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammad N; Gondal, Mohammad A; Nasr, Mohammed M

    2009-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the detection of trace elements in non-degradable part of plastics known as insoluble organic material, obtained from thermal and catalytic degradation of plastics. LIBS signal intensity for each metal measured in the test sample was unique and different. The capability of this technique is demonstrated by analyzing various trace metals present inside plastics and also compared with ICP results. The metal concentration (ppm) measured with LIBS and verified by ICP for Ag (901), Al (522), Fe (231), Co (628), V (275), Ni (558), Pb (325), Mn (167) and Cd (378) are higher than permissible safe limits. PMID:19421698

  14. Metal-Induced Stabilization and Activation of Plasmid Replication Initiator RepB

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, Lorena; Sanz, Marta; Menéndez, Margarita; del Solar, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of plasmid rolling circle replication (RCR) is catalyzed by a plasmid-encoded Rep protein that performs a Tyr- and metal-dependent site-specific cleavage of one DNA strand within the double-strand origin (dso) of replication. The crystal structure of RepB, the initiator protein of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, constitutes the first example of a Rep protein structure from RCR plasmids. It forms a toroidal homohexameric ring where each RepB protomer consists of two domains: the C-terminal domain involved in oligomerization and the N-terminal domain containing the DNA-binding and endonuclease activities. Binding of Mn2+ to the active site is essential for the catalytic activity of RepB. In this work, we have studied the effects of metal binding on the structure and thermostability of full-length hexameric RepB and each of its separate domains by using different biophysical approaches. The analysis of the temperature-induced changes in RepB shows that the first thermal transition, which occurs at a range of temperatures physiologically relevant for the pMV158 pneumococcal host, represents an irreversible conformational change that affects the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein, which becomes prone to self-associate. This transition, which is also shown to result in loss of DNA binding capacity and catalytic activity of RepB, is confined to its N-terminal domain. Mn2+ protects the protein from undergoing this detrimental conformational change and the observed protection correlates well with the high-affinity binding of the cation to the active site, as substituting one of the metal-ligands at this site impairs both the protein affinity for Mn2+and the Mn2+-driven thermostabilization effect. The level of catalytic activity of the protein, especially in the case of full-length RepB, cannot be explained based only on the high-affinity binding of Mn2+ at the active site and suggests the existence of additional, lower-affinity metal binding site

  15. Adsorbate-Induced Anchoring Transitions of Liquid Crystals on Surfaces Presenting Metal Salts with Mixed Anions

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jacob T.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    We report that metal salts composed of mixtures of anions of differing coordination strength can be used to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of adsorbate-induced anchoring transitions of liquid crystals (LCs) supported on surfaces decorated with the metal salts. Specifically, the dynamics of anchoring transitions triggered by the adsorbate dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on surfaces of aluminum (III) salts were analyzed within the framework of a model for mass transport to reveal that the sensitivity of a nitrile-containing nematic LC to DMMP increased from 250 parts-per- billion (ppb) to 25 ppb when the composition of the (counter) anion was changed from 100% perchlorate to 90% nitrate and 10% perchlorate (by mole percent). To provide insight into these observations, Polarization-Modulation Infrared Reflectance-Absorbance Spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was used to show that the intensity of the absorption band in the IR spectrum corresponding to the coordinated state of the nitrile group (but not the position of the peak) decreased with increase in mole fraction of the strongly coordinating anion (nitrate) in the anion mixture, thus suggesting that the addition of the strongly coordinating anion decreased the number of coordination interactions (per unit area of the interface) but not the strength of the individual coordination interactions between the metal cation and the LC. We also measured the incorporation of the nitrate anion into the metal salt to decrease the effect of humidity on the dynamic response of the LC to DMMP, a result that is consistent with weaker interactions between the nitrate anion and water as compared to the perchlorate anion and water. Finally, the bidentate anion acetylacetonate was measured to cause a similar increase in sensitivity to DMMP when mixed with perchlorate in a 1:1 ratio (the resulting sensitivity of the system to DMMP was 100 ppb). Overall, these results suggest that tailoring the identity of the anion represents a

  16. Antioxidant effect of vitamin E treatment on some heavy metals-induced renal and testicular injuries in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Atef M.

    2010-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals in water, air and soil are global problems that are a growing threat to humanity. Heavy metals are widely distributed in the environment and some of them occur in food, water, air and tissues even in the absence of occupational exposure. The antioxidant and protective influences of vitamin E on a mixture of some heavy metals (Pb, Hg, Cd and Cu)-induced oxidative stress and renal and testicular injuries were evaluated in male mice. Exposure of mice to these heavy metals in drinking water for seven weeks resulted in statistical increases of plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid concentrations. The levels of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutases (SOD) in kidney and testis tissues were significantly declined. Moreover, the histopathological evaluation of kidney and testis showed severe changes in mice treated with these heavy metals. Administration of vitamin E protected the kidney and testis of mice exposed to heavy metals as evidenced by appearance of normal histological structures, insignificant changes in the values of plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid, and the levels of kidney GSH and SOD, while the levels of testis GSH and SOD were notably decreased. These data suggest that the administration of vitamin E protects against heavy metals-induced renal and testicular oxidative stress and injuries. PMID:23961105

  17. Correlation of photobleaching, oxidation and metal induced fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Kiyoshi; Maclean, James L.; Liu, Biwu; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Juewen

    2013-03-01

    Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In our effort to elucidate the quenching mechanism, we studied a total of eight AgNCs prepared by different hairpin DNA sequences; they showed different sensitivity to Hg2+, and DNA with a larger cytosine loop size produced more sensitive AgNCs. In all the cases, samples strongly quenched by Hg2+ were also more easily photobleached. Light of shorter wavelengths bleached AgNCs more potently, and photobleached samples can be recovered by NaBH4. Strong fluorescence quenching was also observed with high redox potential metal ions such as Ag+, Au3+, Cu2+ and Hg2+, but not with low redox potential ions. Such metal induced quenching cannot be recovered by NaBH4. Electronic absorption and mass spectrometry studies offered further insights into the oxidation reaction. Our results correlate many important experimental observations and will fuel the further growth of this field.Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In

  18. Effects of binary mixtures of inducers (toluene analogs) and of metals on bioluminescence induction of a recombinant bioreporter strain.

    PubMed

    Kong, In Chul

    2014-10-13

    This paper investigated the effects of binary mixtures of bioluminescence inducers (toluene, xylene isomers, m-toluate) and of metals (Cu, Cd, As(III), As(V), and Cr) on bioluminescence activity of recombinant (Pm-lux) strain KG1206. Different responses and sensitivities were observed depending on the types and concentrations of mixtures of inducers or metals. In the case of inducer mixtures, antagonistic and synergistic modes of action were observed, whereas metal mixtures showed all three modes of action. Antagonistic mode of action was most common for mixtures of indirect inducers, which showed bioluminescence ranging from 29% to 62% of theoretically expected effects (P(E)). On the other hand, synergistic mode of action was observed for mixtures of direct and indirect inducers, which showed bioluminescence between 141% and 243% of P(E). In the case of binary metal mixtures, bioluminescence activities were ranged from 62% to 75% and 113% to 164% of P(E) for antagonistic and synergistic modes of action, respectively (p-values 0.0001-0.038). Therefore, mixture effects could not be generalized since they were dependent on both the types and concentrations of chemicals, suggesting that biomonitoring may constitute a better strategy by investigating types and concentrations of mixture pollutants at contaminated sites.

  19. Effect of silicon resistivity on its porosification using metal induced chemical etching: morphology and photoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Sahu, Gayatri; Kumar, Vivek; Sahoo, P. K.; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    The structure and light-emitting properties of porous Si nanowires (Si NWs) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching (MIE) process on two different Si substrates of different resistivities have been investigated here. The surface morphological studies have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy. It is observed that porous Si containing well aligned Si NWs is formed from high resistivity (1-20 Ωcm) Si wafer, whereas interconnected pores or cheese-like structures are formed from low resistivity (0.2 Ωcm) Si wafers after MIE. An explanation for the different porosification processes has been proposed based on the initial doping level, where number of dopants seems to be playing an important role in the etching process. Visible photoluminescence (PL) has been observed from all the porous Si samples, that are attributed due to quantum confinement effect.

  20. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  1. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  2. Adiabatic spin-transfer-torque-induced domain wall creep in a magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttagupta, S.; Fukami, S.; Zhang, C.; Sato, H.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of elastic interfaces is a general field of interest in statistical physics, where magnetic domain wall has served as a prototypical example. Domain wall `creep’ under the action of sub-threshold driving forces with thermal activation is known to be described by a scaling law with a certain universality class, which represents the mechanism of the interaction of domain walls with the applied forces over the disorder of the system. Here we show different universality classes depending on the driving forces, magnetic field or spin-polarized current, in a metallic system, which have hitherto been seen only in a magnetic semiconductor. We reveal that an adiabatic spin-transfer torque plays a major role in determining the universality class of current-induced creep, which does not depend on the intricacies of material disorder. Our results shed light on the physics of the creep motion of domain walls and other elastic systems.

  3. Hydroxylation of a metal-supported hexagonal boron nitride monolayer by oxygen induced water dissociation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufeng; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxylated hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets exhibit potential application in nanocomposites and functional surface coating. Our first-principles calculations reveal possible hydroxylation of a h-BN monolayer on a Ni substrate by surface O adatom induced spontaneous dissociation of water molecules. Here one H atom is split from a water molecule by bonding with the O adatom on the B atom and the resulting O-H radical then bonds with an adjacent B atom, which leads to two hydroxyl groups formed on h-BN/Ni. Hydroxylation slightly influences the electronic properties of a Ni-supported h-BN layer. Similar water dissociation and hydroxylation can occur on the surface of O functionalized h-BN/Cu depending on the O adsorption configuration. Metal substrates play an important catalytic role in enhancing the chemical reactivity of O adatoms on h-BN with water molecules through transferring additional charges to them. PMID:26051363

  4. Pressure induced Ag2Te polymorphs in conjunction with topological non trivial to metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Oganov, A. R.; Feng, W. X.; Yao, Y. G.; Zhang, S. J.; Yu, X. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Yu, R. C.; Jin, C. Q.; Dai, X.; Fang, Z.; Zhao, Y. S.

    2016-08-01

    Silver telluride (Ag2Te) is well known as superionic conductor and topological insulator with polymorphs. Pressure induced three phase transitions in Ag2Te have been reported in previous. Here, we experimentally identified high pressure phase above 13 GPa of Ag2Te by using high pressure synchrotron x ray diffraction method in combination with evolutionary crystal structure prediction, showing it crystallizes into a monoclinic structure of space group C2/m with lattice parameters a = 6.081Å, b = 5.744Å, c = 6.797 Å, β = 105.53°. The electronic properties measurements of Ag2Te reveal that the topologically non-trivial semiconducting phase I and semimetallic phase II previously predicated by theory transformed into bulk metals for high pressure phases in consistent with the first principles calculations.

  5. Insulator to Metal Transition in WO3 Induced by Electrolyte Gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Xiang; Pereiro, Juan; Strle, Jure; Bollinger, Anthony; Bozovic, Ivan; Litombe, Nick; Dubuis, Guy; Pavuna, Davor

    2014-03-01

    We have modified the transport properties of thin WO3 films by the electric field effect using ionic liquids and solid electrolytes. Atomically flat films were prepared on different substrates by RF sputtering. The huge electric field that is generated in the double-layer induces an extraordinarily large change of the mobile charge carrier density in the sample. The sheet resistance of the gated film drops by more than 10 orders of magnitude at the lowest temperature, and a clear insulator-to-metal transition is observed. The thickness dependence has been studied and the mechanism of doping by electrolyte gating will be discussed. X.L. was supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy. I.B. and A.B. were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Control of the micrometric scale morphology of silicon nanowires through ion irradiation-induced metal dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Savio, R.; Repetto, L.; Guida, P.; Angeli, E.; Firpo, G.; Volpe, A.; Ierardi, V.; Valbusa, U.

    2016-08-01

    We propose ion-induced dewetting of Au thin films as a mechanism to modify and control the morphology of Si nanowires formed through metal-assisted chemical etching. We show that the patterns formed upon irradiation resemble those typical of dewetting phenomena, with a characteristic length in the nanometer range. Irradiated Au films are then used as a template for the fabrication of Si nanowires, and we show that a long-range order exists also in etched substrates, although at much longer length scales in the micrometer range. Investigation of the optical properties reveals that the Si nanowires emit broadband photoluminescence peaked at 700 nm. The proposed synthesis method allows tuning the morphological features of the nanowire bundles at the nanoscale without affecting the optical properties. This approach can be exploited for the engineering of nanowires-based devices where the morphological features become important.

  7. Strong coupling among semiconductor quantum dots induced by a metal nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), we investigate the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in an SQD-MNP coupled system. We propose a quantum transformation method to strongly reveal the exciton energy shift and the modified decay rate of SQD as well as the coupling among SQDs. To obtain these parameters, a simple system composed of an SQD, an MNP, and a weak signal light is designed. Furthermore, we consider a model to demonstrate the coupling of two SQDs mediated by SPP field under two cases. It is shown that two SQDs can be entangled in the presence of MNP. A high concurrence can be achieved, which is the best evidence that the coupling among SQDs induced by SPP field in MNP. This scheme may have the potential applications in all-optical plasmon-enhanced nanoscale devices. PMID:22297024

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-03-18

    The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus.

  9. Current-induced spin polarization on metal surfaces probed by spin-polarized positron beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H. J.; Yamamoto, S.; Fukaya, Y.; Maekawa, M.; Li, H.; Kawasuso, A.; Seki, T.; Saitoh, E.; Takanashi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Current-induced spin polarization (CISP) on the outermost surfaces of Au, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ta, and W nanoscaled films were studied using a spin-polarized positron beam. The Au and Cu surfaces showed no significant CISP. In contrast, the Pt, Pd, Ta, and W films exhibited large CISP (3~15% per input charge current of 105 A/cm2) and the CISP of Ta and W were opposite to those of Pt and Pd. The sign of the CISP obeys the same rule in spin Hall effect suggesting that the spin-orbit coupling is mainly responsible for the CISP. The magnitude of the CISP is explained by the Rashba-Edelstein mechanism rather than the diffusive spin Hall effect. This settles a controversy, that which of these two mechanisms dominates the large CISP on metal surfaces. PMID:24776781

  10. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  11. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Shailendra K. Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-28

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  12. Light-induced metal-like surface of silicon photonic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Grillanda, Stefano; Morichetti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The surface of a material may exhibit physical phenomena that do not occur in the bulk of the material itself. For this reason, the behaviour of nanoscale devices is expected to be conditioned, or even dominated, by the nature of their surface. Here, we show that in silicon photonic nanowaveguides, massive surface carrier generation is induced by light travelling in the waveguide, because of natural surface-state absorption at the core/cladding interface. At the typical light intensity used in linear applications, this effect makes the surface of the waveguide behave as a metal-like frame. A twofold impact is observed on the waveguide performance: the surface electric conductivity dominates over that of bulk silicon and an additional optical absorption mechanism arises, that we named surface free-carrier absorption. These results, applying to generic semiconductor photonic technologies, unveil the real picture of optical nanowaveguides that needs to be considered in the design of any integrated optoelectronic device. PMID:26359202

  13. Origin of photoluminescence from silicon nanowires prepared by metal induced etching (MIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Shailendra K. Rai, Hari. M.; Late, Ravikiran; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    In this present study the origin of luminescence from silicon nanowires (SiNws) has been studied. SiNWs are fabricated on Si substrate by metal induced chemical etching (MIE). Here it is found that the band gap of SiNWs is higher than the gap of luminescent states in SiNWs which leads to the effect of Si=O bond. The band gap is estimated from diffuse reflectance analysis. Here we observe that band gap can be tailored depending on size (quantum confinement) but photoluminescence (PL) from all the sample is found to be fixed at 1.91 eV. This study is important for the understanding of origin of photoluminescence.

  14. Classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency with a metal-superconductor hybrid metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Kurter, Cihan; Tassin, Philippe; Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Zhuravel, Alexander P; Ustinov, Alexey V; Anlage, Steven M; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2011-07-22

    Metamaterials are engineered materials composed of small electrical circuits producing novel interactions with electromagnetic waves. Recently, a new class of metamaterials has been created to mimic the behavior of media displaying electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Here we introduce a planar EIT metamaterial that creates a very large loss contrast between the dark and radiative resonators by employing a superconducting Nb film in the dark element and a normal-metal Au film in the radiative element. Below the critical temperature of Nb, the resistance contrast opens up a transparency window along with a large enhancement in group delay, enabling a significant slowdown of waves. We further demonstrate precise control of the EIT response through changes in the superfluid density. Such tunable metamaterials may be useful for telecommunication because of their large delay-bandwidth products.

  15. Analysis of a link of embrittlement mechanisms and neutron flux effect as applied to reactor pressure vessel materials of WWER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Pirogova, N. E.; Brumovsky, M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on embrittlement of WWER RPV materials is analyzed for cases when different radiation defects prevail. Data bases on the ductile-brittle transition temperature shifts obtained in the surveillance specimens programs and the research programs are used. The material embrittlement mechanisms for which the flux effect is practically absent and for which the flux effect is remarkable are determined. For case when the phosphorus segregation mechanism dominates the theoretical justification of the absence of the flux effect is performed on the basis of the theory of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  16. Characterization of lead induced metal-phytochelatin complexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Christian; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of Pb and induction of phytochelatin synthesis were observed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon Pb(II) exposure. Our aim was to examine whether Pb(II) is bound by phytochelatins (PCs) in C. reinhardtii and to examine formed complexes for their stoichiometry and composition. Metal-phytochelatin (Me-PC) complexes induced by Pb were isolated by size-exclusion chromatography in 13 collected fractions, which were analyzed for their PC and metal content by high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A recovery of more than 90% of Pb from standard Pb-PC₂ complexes within the total volume of the size-exclusion column indicated the adequacy of the method for Pb-PC(n) complex separation and characterization. Phytochelatins were detected mainly in a molecular weight ranging from 1,000 to 5,300 daltons (Da), indicating the formation of complexes with various stoichiometries. Approximately 72% of total PC₂ eluted in the range from 1,000 to 1,600 Da, and 80% of total PC₃ eluted in the molecular weight range from 1,600 to 2,300 Da. The distribution of Cu, Zn, and Pb showed that more than 70% of these metals were associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions. Copper, zinc, and lead were also observed in PC-containing fractions, suggesting the formation of various Me-PC complexes. The results of the present study indicate that the role of PCs in Pb detoxification is minor, because only 13% of total Pb was associated with PCs. PMID:21898554

  17. Characterization of lead induced metal-phytochelatin complexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Christian; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of Pb and induction of phytochelatin synthesis were observed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon Pb(II) exposure. Our aim was to examine whether Pb(II) is bound by phytochelatins (PCs) in C. reinhardtii and to examine formed complexes for their stoichiometry and composition. Metal-phytochelatin (Me-PC) complexes induced by Pb were isolated by size-exclusion chromatography in 13 collected fractions, which were analyzed for their PC and metal content by high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A recovery of more than 90% of Pb from standard Pb-PC₂ complexes within the total volume of the size-exclusion column indicated the adequacy of the method for Pb-PC(n) complex separation and characterization. Phytochelatins were detected mainly in a molecular weight ranging from 1,000 to 5,300 daltons (Da), indicating the formation of complexes with various stoichiometries. Approximately 72% of total PC₂ eluted in the range from 1,000 to 1,600 Da, and 80% of total PC₃ eluted in the molecular weight range from 1,600 to 2,300 Da. The distribution of Cu, Zn, and Pb showed that more than 70% of these metals were associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions. Copper, zinc, and lead were also observed in PC-containing fractions, suggesting the formation of various Me-PC complexes. The results of the present study indicate that the role of PCs in Pb detoxification is minor, because only 13% of total Pb was associated with PCs.

  18. Vanadium exposure induces olfactory dysfunction in an animal model of metal neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates chronic environmental exposure to transition metals may play a role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Chronic inhalation exposure to welding fumes containing metal mixtures may be associated with development of PD. A significant amount of vanadium is present in welding fumes, as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and incorporation of vanadium in the production of high strength steel has become more common. Despite the increased vanadium use in recent years, the neurotoxicological effects of this metal are not well characterized. Recently, we demonstrated that V2O5 induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase C delta (PKCδ)-dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Since anosmia (inability to perceive odors) and non-motor deficits are considered to be early symptoms of neurological diseases, in the present study, we examined the effect of V2O5 on the olfactory bulb in animal models. To mimic the inhalation exposure, we intranasally administered C57 black mice a low-dose of 182μg of V2O5 three times a week for one month, and behavioral, neurochemical and biochemical studies were performed. Our results revealed a significant decrease in olfactory bulb weights, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and increases in astroglia of the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb in the treatment groups relative to vehicle controls. Neurochemical changes were accompanied by impaired olfaction and locomotion. These findings suggest that nasal exposure to V2O5 adversely affects olfactory bulbs, resulting in neurobehavioral and neurochemical impairments. These results expand our understanding of vanadium neurotoxicity in environmentally-linked neurological conditions.

  19. Metal-Organic Coordination Network Thin Film by Surface-Induced Assembly.

    PubMed

    Laokroekkiat, Salinthip; Hara, Mitsuo; Nagano, Shusaku; Nagao, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    The growth of metal-organic coordination network thin films on surfaces has been pursued extensively and intensively to manipulate the molecular arrangement. For this study, the oriented multilayer thin films based on porphyrinic nanoarchitecture were synthesized toward metal-organic coordination networks using surface-induced assembly (SIA). Nanoscale molecular thin films were prepared at room temperature using cobalt(II) ion and porphyrin building blocks as precursors. Stepwise growth with a highly uniform layer was characterized using UV-vis, AFM, IR, and XPS studies. The grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray reflectivity results remarkably suggested a periodic structure in in-plane direction with constant and high mass density (ca. 1.5 g/cm(3)) throughout the multilayer formation. We propose that orientation of the porphyrin macrocycle plane with a hexagonal packed model by single anchoring mode was tilted approximately 60° with respect to the surface substrate. It is noteworthy that the well-organized structure of porphyrin-based macrocyclic framework on the amine-terminated surface substrate can be achieved efficiently using a simple SIA approach under mild synthetic conditions. The synthesized thin film provides a different structure from that obtained using bulk synthesis. This result suggests that the SIA technique can control not only the film thickness but also the structural arrangement on the surface. This report of our research provides insight into the ordered porphyrin-based metal-organic coordination network thin films, which opens up opportunities for exploration of unique thin film materials for diverse applications.

  20. Defect-Induced Optoelectronic Response in Single-layer Group-VI Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Philippe K.

    The ever-evolving symbiosis between mankind and nanoelectronics-driven technology pushes the limits of its constituent materials, largely due to the dominance of undesirable hetero-interfacial physiochemical behavior at the few-nanometer length scale, which dominates over bulk material characteristics. Driven by such instabilities, research into two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals-layered materials (e.g. graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), boron nitride), which have characteristically inert surface chemistry, has virtually exploded over the past few years. The discovery of an indirect- to direct-gap conversion in semiconducting group-VI TMDCs (e.g. MoS2) upon thinning to a single atomic layer provided the critical link between metallic and insulating 2D materials. While proof-of-concept demonstrations of single-layer TMDC-based devices for visible-range photodetection, light-emission and solar energy conversion have showed promising results, the exciting qualities are downplayed by poorly-understood defectinduced photocarrier traps, limiting the best-achieved external quantum efficiencies to approximately ~1%. This thesis explores the behavior of defects in atomically-thin TMDC layers in response to optical stimuli using a combination of steady-state photoluminescence, reflectance and Raman spectroscopy at room-temperature. By systematically varying the defect density using plasma-irradiation techniques, an unprecedented room-temperature defect-induced monolayer PL feature was discovered. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy correlated the defect-induced PL with plasma-generation of sulfur vacancy defects while reflectance measurements indicate defect-induced sub-bandgap light absorption. Excitation intensity-dependent PL measurements and exciton rate modeling further help elucidate the origin of the defect-induced PL response and highlights the role of non-radiative recombination on exciton conversion processes. The results in this

  1. Temper and neutron irradiation embrittlement in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels for pressure vessels of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.; Fukaya, K.; Kodaira, T.; Oku, T.

    1984-09-01

    A 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel is a promising candidate material for structural components of the pressure vessel of the experimental very high temperature gascooled reactor (VHTR) in Japan. Since the service temperature of such components is expected to be about 400/sup 0/C, the behavior of the temper and neutron irradiation embrittlements in these chromium-molybdenum steels should be confirmed from the viewpoint of structural integrity. The experimental verification on the degree of the embrittlement due to thermal aging, including the effect of applied stress and neutron irradiation, is described. Steel containing substantial amounts (about 100 ppm) of phosphorus atoms, which are believed to cause the temper embrittlement, showed that applied stress enhanced the embrittlement due to thermal aging. Embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation appears to be minimal in the case of the material containing <1000 ppm of copper as impurity with neutrons irradiated at about 400/sup 0/C.

  2. High pressure phase-transformation induced texture evolution and strengthening in zirconium metal: Experiment and modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; et al

    2015-07-28

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can bemore » attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.« less

  3. Detection of carcinogenic metals in kidney stones using ultraviolet laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmed Asaad I; Gondal, Mohammed A; Shemis, Mohamed; Khan, Irfan S

    2015-03-10

    The UV single-pulsed (SP) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was developed to detect the carcinogenic metals in human kidney stones extracted through the surgical operation. A neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet laser operating at 266 nm wavelength and 20 Hz repetition rate along with a spectrometer interfaced with an intensified CCD (ICCD) was applied for spectral analysis of kidney stones. The ICCD camera shutter was synchronized with the laser-trigger pulse and the effect of laser energy and delay time on LIBS signal intensity was investigated. The experimental parameters were optimized to obtain the LIBS plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Laser energy was varied from 25 to 50 mJ in order to enhance the LIBS signal intensity and attain the best signal to noise ratio. The parametric dependence studies were important to improve the limit of detection of trace amounts of toxic elements present inside stones. The carcinogenic metals detected in kidney stones were chromium, cadmium, lead, zinc, phosphate, and vanadium. The results achieved from LIBS system were also compared with the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis and the concentration detected with both techniques was in very good agreement. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) for SP-LIBS system were also studied and their dependence on incident laser energy and delay time was investigated as well. PMID:25968393

  4. Investigation of the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets induced by random surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.; Bourasseau, E.; Filippini, G.

    2016-07-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets of tin induced by random surface fluctuations. The static regime is analyzed by simulating sheets of different thicknesses, and the dynamic fragmentation is ensured by applying along the longitudinal direction of a sheet an instantaneous expansion velocity per initial unit length (expansion rate) with values ranging from 1 × 109 to 3 × 1010 s-1. The simulations show that the static/dynamic fragmentation becomes possible when the fluctuations of the upper and lower surfaces of the sheets can either overlap or make the local volume density of the system go down below a critical value. These two mechanisms cause locally in the sheet the random nucleation of pores of void, on a timescale that exponentially increases with the sheet thickness. Afterwards, the pores develop following distinct stages of growth, coalescence, and percolation, and later in time aggregates of liquid metal are formed. The simulations also show that the fragmentation of static sheets is characterized by relatively mono-dispersed surface and volume distributions of the pores and aggregates, respectively, whereas in extreme conditions of dynamic fragmentation (expansion rate typically in the range of 1 × 1010 s-1), the distributions are rather poly-dispersed and obey a power law decay with surface (volume). A model derived from the simulations suggests that both dynamic and static regimes of fragmentation are similar for expansion rates below typically 1 × 107 s-1.

  5. Etching of fused silica fiber by metallic laser-induced backside wet etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, Cs.; Kiss, B.; Kopniczky, J.; Hopp, B.

    2013-08-01

    The tip of multimode fused silica fiber (core diameter: 550 μm) was etched by metallic laser-induced backside wet etching (M-LIBWE) method. Frequency doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 532 nm; τFWHM = 8 ns) was used as laser source. The laser beam was coupled into the fiber by a fused silica lens with a focal length of 1500 mm. The other tip of the fiber was dipped into liquid gallium metallic absorber. The etching threshold fluence was measured to be 475 mJ/cm2, while the highest fluence, which resulted etching without breaking the fiber, was 1060 mJ/cm2. The progress of etching was followed by optical microscopy, and the etch rate was measured to be between 20 and 37 nm/pulse depending on the applied laser energy. The surface morphologies of the etched tips were studied by scanning electron microscopy. A possible application of the structured fibers was also tested.

  6. Detection of carcinogenic metals in kidney stones using ultraviolet laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmed Asaad I; Gondal, Mohammed A; Shemis, Mohamed; Khan, Irfan S

    2015-03-10

    The UV single-pulsed (SP) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was developed to detect the carcinogenic metals in human kidney stones extracted through the surgical operation. A neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet laser operating at 266 nm wavelength and 20 Hz repetition rate along with a spectrometer interfaced with an intensified CCD (ICCD) was applied for spectral analysis of kidney stones. The ICCD camera shutter was synchronized with the laser-trigger pulse and the effect of laser energy and delay time on LIBS signal intensity was investigated. The experimental parameters were optimized to obtain the LIBS plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Laser energy was varied from 25 to 50 mJ in order to enhance the LIBS signal intensity and attain the best signal to noise ratio. The parametric dependence studies were important to improve the limit of detection of trace amounts of toxic elements present inside stones. The carcinogenic metals detected in kidney stones were chromium, cadmium, lead, zinc, phosphate, and vanadium. The results achieved from LIBS system were also compared with the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis and the concentration detected with both techniques was in very good agreement. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) for SP-LIBS system were also studied and their dependence on incident laser energy and delay time was investigated as well.

  7. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  8. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  9. Metal-insulator transition induced in CaVO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Man; Laverock, Jude; Chen, Bo; Smith, Kevin E.; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lu Jiwei

    2013-04-07

    Stoichiometric CaVO{sub 3} (CVO) thin films of various thicknesses were grown on single crystal SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) (001) substrates using a pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. The CVO films were capped with a 2.5 nm STO layer. We observed a temperature driven metal-insulator transition (MIT) in CVO films with thicknesses below 4 nm that was not observed in either thick CVO films or STO films. The emergence of this MIT can be attributed to the reduction in effective bandwidth due to a crossover from a three-dimensional metal to a two-dimensional insulator. The insulating phase was only induced with a drive current below 0.1 {mu}A. X-ray absorption measurements indicated different electronic structures for thick and very thin films of CVO. Compared with the thick film ({approx}60 nm), thin films of CVO (2-4 nm) were more two-dimensional with the V charge state closer to V{sup 4+}.

  10. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  11. Optically induced metal-to-dielectric transition in Epsilon-Near-Zero metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kaipurath, R. M.; Pietrzyk, M.; Caspani, L.; Roger, T.; Clerici, M.; Rizza, C.; Ciattoni, A.; Di Falco, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon-Near-Zero materials exhibit a transition in the real part of the dielectric permittivity from positive to negative value as a function of wavelength. Here we study metal-dielectric layered metamaterials in the homogenised regime (each layer has strongly subwavelength thickness) with zero real part of the permittivity in the near-infrared region. By optically pumping the metamaterial we experimentally show that close to the Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) wavelength the permittivity exhibits a marked transition from metallic (negative permittivity) to dielectric (positive permittivity) as a function of the optical power. Remarkably, this transition is linear as a function of pump power and occurs on time scales of the order of the 100 fs pump pulse that need not be tuned to a specific wavelength. The linearity of the permittivity increase allows us to express the response of the metamaterial in terms of a standard third order optical nonlinearity: this shows a clear inversion of the roles of the real and imaginary parts in crossing the ENZ wavelength, further supporting an optically induced change in the physical behaviour of the metamaterial. PMID:27292270

  12. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  13. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-11-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts.

  14. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  15. High pressure phase-transformation induced texture evolution and strengthening in zirconium metal: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-07-28

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.

  16. Heavy Metals and Metalloids as Autophagy Inducing Agents: Focus on Cadmium and Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Roberto; Roccheri, Maria Carmela

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, research on the autophagic process has greatly increased, invading the fields of biology and medicine. Several markers of the autophagic process have been discovered and various strategies have been reported studying this molecular process in different biological systems in both physiological and stress conditions. Furthermore, mechanisms of metalloid- or heavy metal-induced toxicity continue to be of interest given the ubiquitous nature and distribution of these contaminants in the environment where they often play the role of pollutants of numerous organisms. The aim of this review is a critical analysis and correlation of knowledge of autophagic mechanisms studied under stress for the most common arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) compounds. In this review we report data obtained in different experimental models for each compound, highlighting similarities and/or differences in the activation of autophagic processes. A more detailed discussion will concern the activation of autophagy in Cd-exposed sea urchin embryo since it is a suitable model system that is very sensitive to environmental stress, and Cd is one of the most studied heavy metal inductors of stress and modulator of different factors such as: protein kinase and phosphatase, caspases, mitochondria, heat shock proteins, metallothioneins, transcription factors, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24710492

  17. Optically induced metal-to-dielectric transition in Epsilon-Near-Zero metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaipurath, R. M.; Pietrzyk, M.; Caspani, L.; Roger, T.; Clerici, M.; Rizza, C.; Ciattoni, A.; di Falco, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-06-01

    Epsilon-Near-Zero materials exhibit a transition in the real part of the dielectric permittivity from positive to negative value as a function of wavelength. Here we study metal-dielectric layered metamaterials in the homogenised regime (each layer has strongly subwavelength thickness) with zero real part of the permittivity in the near-infrared region. By optically pumping the metamaterial we experimentally show that close to the Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) wavelength the permittivity exhibits a marked transition from metallic (negative permittivity) to dielectric (positive permittivity) as a function of the optical power. Remarkably, this transition is linear as a function of pump power and occurs on time scales of the order of the 100 fs pump pulse that need not be tuned to a specific wavelength. The linearity of the permittivity increase allows us to express the response of the metamaterial in terms of a standard third order optical nonlinearity: this shows a clear inversion of the roles of the real and imaginary parts in crossing the ENZ wavelength, further supporting an optically induced change in the physical behaviour of the metamaterial.

  18. Optically induced metal-to-dielectric transition in Epsilon-Near-Zero metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kaipurath, R M; Pietrzyk, M; Caspani, L; Roger, T; Clerici, M; Rizza, C; Ciattoni, A; Di Falco, A; Faccio, D

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon-Near-Zero materials exhibit a transition in the real part of the dielectric permittivity from positive to negative value as a function of wavelength. Here we study metal-dielectric layered metamaterials in the homogenised regime (each layer has strongly subwavelength thickness) with zero real part of the permittivity in the near-infrared region. By optically pumping the metamaterial we experimentally show that close to the Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) wavelength the permittivity exhibits a marked transition from metallic (negative permittivity) to dielectric (positive permittivity) as a function of the optical power. Remarkably, this transition is linear as a function of pump power and occurs on time scales of the order of the 100 fs pump pulse that need not be tuned to a specific wavelength. The linearity of the permittivity increase allows us to express the response of the metamaterial in terms of a standard third order optical nonlinearity: this shows a clear inversion of the roles of the real and imaginary parts in crossing the ENZ wavelength, further supporting an optically induced change in the physical behaviour of the metamaterial. PMID:27292270

  19. Structural characterization of nanostructures grown by Ni metal induced lateral crystallization of amorphous-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radnóczi, G. Z.; Dodony, E.; Battistig, G.; Vouroutzis, N.; Kavouras, P.; Stoemenos, J.; Frangis, N.; Kovács, A.; Pécz, B.

    2016-02-01

    The nickel metal induced lateral crystallization of amorphous silicon is studied by transmission electron microscopy in the range of temperatures from 413 to 521 °C. The structural characteristics of the whiskers grown at 413 °C are compared to the grains grown at 600 °C, where both Metal Induced Lateral Crystallization (MILC) and Solid Phase Crystallization (SPC) are involved. At 413 °C, long whiskers are formed at any crystallographic direction almost free of defects. In contrary, whiskers grown by MILC around 600 °C are crystallized along the ⟨111⟩ directions. These differences are attributed to the low crystallization rate and suppression of the SPC process. The activation energy of the pure MILC was measured in the order of 2 eV. The effect of Ni on the crystallization rate is studied by in-situ heating experiments inside the microscope. The role of contamination that can inhibit MILC is discussed. The cases of MILC process under limited Ni and unlimited Ni source were studied and compared to in-situ annealing experiments. The crystallization rate is strongly influenced by the neighbouring Ni sources; this long-range interaction is attributed to the requirement of a critical Ni concentration in amorphous silicon before the initiation of the MILC process. The long-range interaction can enhance crystallization along a certain direction. The transition from MILC to SPC and the change of the crystallization mode due to the lack of Ni are discussed. The beneficial effect of long annealing at 413 °C is also discussed.

  20. Laser-Induced Fabrication of Metallic Interlayers and Patterns in Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Gaddy, Gregory A. (Inventor); Koplitz, Brent D. (Inventor); Simpson, Steven M. (Inventor); Lynch, Michael F. (Inventor); Ruffner, Samuel C. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Self-metallizing polyimide films are created by doping polyamic acid solutions with metallic ions and solubilizing agents. Upon creating a film, the film is exposed to coherent light for a specific time and then cured. The resulting film has been found to have a metallic surface layer and a metallic subsurface layer (interlayer). The layer separating the metallic layer has a uniform dispersion of small metal particulates within the polymer. The layer below the interlayer has larger metal particulates uniformly distributed within the polymer. By varying the intensity or time of exposure to the coherent light, three-dimensional control of metal formation within the film is provided.