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Sample records for metal ion solvation

  1. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-01-24

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  2. Reactions of Solvated Ions Final Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Taube, H.

    1962-09-24

    Brief summaries are presented on isotopic dilution studies on salts dissolved in CH{sub 3}OH, studies on metal and metal salts in solvents of the amine type, and studies on phosphato complexes of the pentammine Co(III) series. A list of papers published on reactions of solvated ions is included. (N.W.R.)

  3. Infrared Spectroscopy of Metal Ion Complexes: Models for Metal Ligand Interactions and Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Weakly bound complexes of the form M^+-Lx (M=Fe, Ni, Co, etc.; L=CO2, C2H2, H2O, benzene, N2) are prepared in supersonic molecular beams by laser vaporization in a pulsed-nozzle cluster source. These species are mass analyzed and size-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Clusters are photodissociated at infrared wavelengths with a Nd:YAG pumped infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser or with a tunable infrared free-electron laser. M^+-(CO2)x complexes absorb near the free CO2 asymmetric stretch near 2349 cm-1 but with an interesting size dependent variation in the resonances. Small clusters have blue-shifted resonances, while larger complexes have additional bands due to surface CO2 molecules not attached to the metal. M^+(C2H2)n complexes absorb near the C-H stretches in acetylene, but resonances in metal complexes are red-shifted with repect to the isolated molecule. Ni^+ and Co^+ complexes with acetylene undergo intracluster cyclization reactions to form cyclobutadiene. Transition metal water complexes are studied in the O-H stretch region, and partial rotational structure can be measured. M^+(benzene) and M^+(benzene)2 ions (M=V, Ti, Al) represent half-sandwich and sandwich species, whose spectra are measured near the free benzene modes. These new IR spectra and their assignments will be discussed as well as other new IR spectra for similar complexes.

  4. Reactivity of transition metal solvates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Boris D.

    1991-09-01

    Reactivity data are generalised for one of the most important classes of complexes, solvates, which are quantitatively nearly unstudied. Various approaches to studying and describing the reactivity are compared with respect to solvation of the reagents and the transition state. The specifics and mechanism of ligand substitution in pure and mixed organic solvents are found. The reactivity of simple (homoleptic) and mixed solvates toward macrocycles is examined in detail using porphyrins as an example. The kinetic method of indicator reactions is applied to porphyrins in order to study the state of transition metal salts in organic solvents and the stability of the coordination spheres of acidosalts (MXnn-2), acidosolvates (MX2Sn-2) and their transition states. The concentration dependence of the rate constant of an indicator reaction is demonstrated to be due to a change in the inner coordination sphere and a shift of equilibria between the various coordination complexes. The bibliography includes 38 references.

  5. Macroscopic model for solvated ion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-H.; Adelman, S. A.

    1980-02-01

    A macroscopic treatment of solvated ion dynamics is developed and applied to calculate the limiting (zero concentration) conductance of cations in several aprotic solvents. The theory is based on a coupled set of electrostatic and hydrodynamic equations for the density, flow, and polarization fields induced in the polar solvent by a moving ion. These equations, which are derived by the Mori projection technique, include crucial local solvent structure (ion solvation) effects through solvent compressibility, and local constitutive parameters. If solvent structure is suppressed, the equations reduce to those derived previously by Onsager and Hubbard [J. B. Hubbard and L. Onsager, J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4850 (1977)]. The macroscopic equations are approximately decoupled into electrostatic and hydrodynamic parts. The decoupled equations are solved assuming a step density, viscosity, and dielectric constant model for the local solvent structure and dynamics. This yields analytic expressions for the viscous, ζV, and dielectric ζD, contributions to the ion friction coefficient. These expressions generalize, respectively, the Stokes and Zwanzig results for the (slip) viscous and dielectric friction so as to account for ion solvation effects. The friction coefficients involve a desolvation function Δ which depends on the local structure (density) and dynamics of the solvent. The drag coefficient results reduce in form to those of Zwanzig (within a flow gradient correction factor of 2/3) and Stokes for both weak (Δ→1) and strong (Δ→0) ion-solvent interaction. For Δ→1 the true ionic radius Ri appears in the drag formulas while for Δ→0 a renormalized solvated ion radius σ=Ri+2Rs (where Rs=solvent molecule radius) appears. The theory is fit to experimental cation conductances in pyridine, acetone, and acetonitrile by representing Δ by a two parameter switching function. Agreement between the model and experiment is satisfactory for all three solvents. Moreover

  6. Interaction of metal cations with functionalised hydrocarbons in the gas phase: further experimental evidence for solvation of metal ions by the hydrocarbon chain.

    PubMed

    van Huizen, Nick A; Luider, Theo M; Jobst, Karl J; Terlouw, Johan K; Holmes, John L; Burgers, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Relative affinity measurements of monovalent metal ions (= Li(+), Cu(+) and Ag(+)) towards aliphatic amines, alcohols and methyl alkanoates (P) have been performed using the kinetic method on the dissociation of metal bound dimer ions of the type P(1)-M(+)-P(2). It was found that the cations' affinity towards long chain (≥C(4) chain length) n- and s-alkylamines, n-alkanols and methyl n- alkanoates was unexpectedly enhanced. This is attributed to a bidentate interaction of the metal ion with the amine, alcohol or ester functional group and the aliphatic chain, paralleling earlier observations on metal bound nitriles. Methyl substitution at the functional group (s-alkylamines compared with n-alkylamines) serves to strengthen only the N•••M(+) bond, and this can be rationalized by the larger proton affinities of s-alkylamines compared to n-alkylamines. This substitution, however, has no effect on the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. In contrast, methyl substitution remote from the functional group, as in iso-pentylamine, does lead to strengthening of the metal ion-hydrocarbon bond. The cuprous ion affinity of hexadecylamine, C(16)H(33)NH(2) was found to be as large as that for ethylenediamine (352 kJ mol(-1)), known to be a strong copper binding agent. It is argued that such a metal ion-hydrocarbon interaction does not occur in the metal bound dimers.

  7. Solvation of lithium ion in dimethoxyethane and propylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Solvation of the lithium ion (Li+) in dimethoxyethane (DME) and propylene carbonate (PC) is of scientific significance and urgency in the context of lithium-ion batteries. I report PM7-MD simulations on the composition of Li+ solvation shells (SH) in a few DME/PC mixtures. The equimolar mixture features preferential solvation by PC, in agreement with classical MD studies. However, one DME molecule is always present in the first SH, supplementing the cage formed by five PC molecules. As PC molecules get removed, DME gradually substitutes vacant places. In the PC-poor mixtures, an entire SH is populated by five DME molecules.

  8. Simulated solvation of organic ions: protonated methylamines in water nanodroplets. Convergence toward bulk properties and the absolute proton solvation enthalpy.

    PubMed

    Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2014-06-12

    We applied an alternative, purely theoretical route to estimate thermodynamical properties of organic ions in bulk solution. The method performs a large ensemble of simulations of ions solvated in water nanodroplets of different sizes, using a polarizable molecular dynamics approach. We consider protonated ammonia and methylamines, and K(+) for comparison, solvated in droplets of 50-1000 water molecules. The parameters of the model are assigned from high level quantum computations of small clusters. All the bulk phase results extrapolated from droplet simulations match, and confirm independently, the relative and absolute experiment-based ion solvation energies. Without using experiment-based parameters or assumptions, the results confirm independently the solvation enthalpy of the proton, as -270.3 ± 1.1 kcal mol(-1). The calculated relative solvation enthalpies of these ions are constant from small water clusters, where only the ionic headgroups are solvated, up to bulk solution. This agrees with experimental thermochemistry, that the relative solvation energies of alkylammonium ions by only four H2O molecules reproduce the relative bulk solvation energies, although the small clusters lack major bulk solvation factors. The droplet results also show a slow convergence of ion solvation properties toward their bulk limit, and predict that the stepwise solvation enthalpies of ion/water droplets are very close to those of pure neutral water droplets already after 50 water molecules. Both the ionic and neutral clusters approach the bulk condensation energy very gradually up to 10,000 water molecules, consistent with the macroscopic liquid drop model for pure water droplets. Compared to standard computational methods based on infinite periodic systems, our protocol represents a new purely theoretical approach to investigate the solvation properties of ions. It is applicable to the solvation of organic ions, which are pivotal in environmental, industrial, and

  9. Thermodynamic study of the binding of calcium and magnesium ions with myelin basic protein using the extended solvation theory.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, G Rezaei; Saboury, A A; Divsalar, A

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of myelin basic protein (MBP) from the bovine central nervous system with Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions, named as M2+, was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry at 27 degrees C in aqueous solution. The extended solvation model was used to reproduce the enthalpies of MBP+M2+ interactions. The solvation parameters recovered from the extended solvation model were attributed to the structural change of MBP due to the metal ion interaction. It was found that there is a set of two identical and noninteracting binding sites for Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions.

  10. Hydrated metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin K

    2007-01-01

    Studying metal ion solvation, especially hydration, in the gas phase has developed into a field that is dominated by a tight interaction between experiment and theory. Since the studied species carry charge, mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in all experiments. Whereas gas-phase coordination chemistry and reactions of bare metal ions are reasonably well understood, systems containing a larger number of solvent molecules are still difficult to understand. This review focuses on the rich chemistry of hydrated metal ions in the gas phase, covering coordination chemistry, charge separation in multiply charged systems, as well as intracluster and ion-molecule reactions. Key ideas of metal ion solvation in the gas phase are illustrated with rare-gas solvated metal ions.

  11. Extrapolating Single Organic Ion Solvation Thermochemistry from Simulated Water Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan P; Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2016-09-08

    We compute the ion/water interaction energies of methylated ammonium cations and alkylated carboxylate anions solvated in large nanodroplets of 10 000 water molecules using 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations and an all-atom polarizable force-field approach. Together with our earlier results concerning the solvation of these organic ions in nanodroplets whose molecular sizes range from 50 to 1000, these new data allow us to discuss the reliability of extrapolating absolute single-ion bulk solvation energies from small ion/water droplets using common power-law functions of cluster size. We show that reliable estimates of these energies can be extrapolated from a small data set comprising the results of three droplets whose sizes are between 100 and 1000 using a basic power-law function of droplet size. This agrees with an earlier conclusion drawn from a model built within the mean spherical framework and paves the road toward a theoretical protocol to systematically compute the solvation energies of complex organic ions.

  12. Rational design of ion force fields based on thermodynamic solvation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinek, Dominik; Mamatkulov, Shavkat I.; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-03-01

    problem is almost underdetermined, i.e., there is a whole set of degenerate parameters that equally well describe, e.g., chloride and bromide ions. (iii) For the heavy cations the problem is overdetermined, i.e., no combination of Lennard-Jones parameters is able to reproduce simultaneously energy and entropy of solvation. We discuss various possibilities to deal with these problems and finally present an optimized force field for the halide anions that reproduces the free energy and the entropy of solvation. For the alkali metal cations there is no unambiguous choice of parameters. Therefore, we give three different parameter sets for every ion with a small, intermediate, or large Lennard-Jones interaction strength, where the Lennard-Jones diameters are optimized to reproduce the solvation free energy. The ionic radius is reproduced with acceptable accuracy by this optimization strategy, meaning that the proposed force fields are reliable beyond the target observables (i.e., free energy and entropy of solvation).

  13. SISGR: Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Trulove, Paul C.; Foley, Matthew P.

    2012-09-30

    The solvation and phase behavior of the model battery electrolyte salt lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiCF3SO3) in commonly used organic solvents; ethylene carbonate (EC), gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), and propylene carbonate (PC) was explored. Data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were correlated to provide insight into the solvation states present within a sample mixture. Data from DSC analyses allowed the construction of phase diagrams for each solvent system. Raman spectroscopy enabled the determination of specific solvation states present within a solvent-salt mixture, and X-ray diffraction data provided exact information concerning the structure of a solvates that could be isolated Thermal analysis of the various solvent-salt mixtures revealed the phase behavior of the model electrolytes was strongly dependent on solvent symmetry. The point groups of the solvents were (in order from high to low symmetry): C2V for EC, CS for GBL, and C1 for PC(R). The low symmetry solvents exhibited a crystallinity gap that increased as solvent symmetry decreased; no gap was observed for EC-LiTf, while a crystallinity gap was observed spanning 0.15 to 0.3 mole fraction for GBL-LiTf, and 0.1 to 0.33 mole fraction for PC(R)-LiTf mixtures. Raman analysis demonstrated the dominance of aggregated species in almost all solvent compositions. The AGG and CIP solvates represent the majority of the species in solutions for the more concentrated mixtures, and only in very dilute compositions does the SSIP solvate exist in significant amounts. Thus, the poor charge transport characteristics of CIP and AGG account for the low conductivity and transport properties of LiTf and explain why is a poor choice as a source of Li+ ions in a Li-ion battery.

  14. Formation of solvated ions in the atmospheric interface of an electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Gitta; Takáts, Zoltán; Vékey, Károly

    2003-12-01

    A simple method capable of generating and investigating various solvent clusters and solvated ions was developed. The technique opens a door to studying these complexes on commercially available instruments. Formation of the desired solvated ion in the gas phase was achieved by introducing the appropriate volatile solvent vapour into the curtain gas stream. Capabilities of the technique are illustrated by generating alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal cations solvated by various volatile compounds such as water, methanol and acetonitrile. Depending on the ligands and on the experimental conditions, clusters of 2-100 molecules may be observed. Isotope labelling suggests that these are formed by a re-solvation process in the curtain gas region.

  15. Aqueous solvation dynamics at metal oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Tortschanoff, Andreas; van Mourik, Frank; Moser, Jacques-Edouard; Kornherr, Andreas; Chergui, Majed

    2006-04-20

    Broadband transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS), and anisotropy decay measurements were used to study the solvation dynamics in bulk water and interfacial water at ZrO(2) surfaces, using Eosin Y as a probe. The 3PEPS results show a multiexponential behavior with two subpicosecond components that are similar in bulk and interfacial water, while a third component of several picoseconds is significantly lengthened at the interface. The bandwidth correlation function from TA spectra exhibits the same behavior, and the TA spectra are well reproduced using the doorway-window picture with the time constants from PEPS. Our results suggest that interfacial water is restricted to a thickness of less than 5 A. Also the high-frequency collective dynamics of water does not seem to be affected by the interface. On the other hand, the increase of the third component may point to a slowing down of diffusional motion at the interface, although other effects, may play a role, which are discussed.

  16. Solvation!

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovic, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two closely related parts: theory development and coding of correlation effects in a model potential for solvation, and study of solvent effects on chemical reactions and processes. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method has been re-parameterized, using density functional theory (DFT), more specifically, the B3LYP functional. The DFT based EFP method includes short-range correlation effects; hence it is a first step in incorporating the treatment of correlation in the EFP solvation model. In addition, the gradient of the charge penetration term in the EFP model was derived and coded. The new method has been implemented in the electronic structure code GAMESS and is in use. Formulas for the dynamic dipole polarizability, C6 dispersion coefficient and dispersion energy were derived and coded as a part of a treatment of the dispersion interactions in the general solvation model, EFP2. Preliminary results are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical data. The DFT based EFP (EFP1/DFT) method was used in the study of microsolvation effects on the SN2 substitution reaction, between chloride and methyl bromide. Changes in the central barrier, for several lowest lying isomers of the systems with one, two, three and four waters, were studied using second order perturbation theory (MP2), DFT and mixed quantum mechanics (QM)/(EFP1/DFT) methods. EFP1/DFT is found to reproduce QM results with high accuracy, at just a fraction of the cost. Molecular structures and potential energy surfaces for IHI- • Arn (n=1-7) were studied using the MP2 method. Experimentally observed trends in the structural arrangement of the Ar atoms were explained through the analysis of the geometrical parameters and three-dimensional MP2 molecular electrostatic potentials.

  17. Solvated calcium ions in charged silica nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaud, Patrick A.; Coasne, Benoît; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.

    2012-08-01

    Hydroxyl surface density in porous silica drops down to nearly zero when the pH of the confined aqueous solution is greater than 10.5. To study such extreme conditions, we developed a model of slit silica nanopores where all the hydrogen atoms of the hydroxylated surface are removed and the negative charge of the resulting oxygen dangling bonds is compensated by Ca2+ counterions. We employed grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to address how the Ca2+ counterions affect the thermodynamics, structure, and dynamics of confined water. While most of the Ca2+ counterions arrange themselves according to the so-called "Stern layer," no diffuse layer is observed. The presence of Ca2+ counterions affects the pore filling for strong confinement where the surface effects are large. At full loading, no significant changes are observed in the layering of the first two adsorbed water layers compared to nanopores with fully hydroxylated surfaces. However, the water structure and water orientational ordering with respect to the surface is much more disturbed. Due to the super hydrophilicity of the Ca2+-silica nanopores, water dynamics is slowed down and vicinal water molecules stick to the pore surface over longer times than in the case of hydroxylated silica surfaces. These findings, which suggest the breakdown of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory, provide important information about the properties of nanoconfined electrolytes upon extreme conditions where the surface charge and ion concentration are large.

  18. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models.

  19. Controlled Formation and Vibrational Characterization of Large Solvated Ionic Clusters in Cryogenic Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garand, Etienne; Marsh, Brett; Voss, Jonathan; Duffy, Erin M.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental approach for the formation of solvated ionic clusters and their vibrational spectroscopy will be presented. This recently developed apparatus combines an electrospray ionization source, two temperature controlled cryogenic ion traps and a time-of-flight infrared photofragmentation spectrometer, to allow for a universal and controlled formation and characterization of solvent clusters around ionic core as well as product of ion-molecule reaction. Recent results on the spectroscopy of such solvated ions, will be presented and discussed. In particular, this talk will present the structural evolution of glycylglycine as a function of stepwise solvation, and show how the presence of just a few water can modify the geometry of this model peptide. I will also present results solvation of ion that do not form hydrogen bond or strongly interactions with the solvent.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of solvated hydrogen and hydroxide ions at aqueous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tarbuck, Teresa L; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2006-11-15

    Measuring the molecular properties of the surface of acidic and basic aqueous solutions is essential to understanding a wide range of important biological, chemical, and environmental processes on our planet. In the present studies, vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) is employed in combination with isotopic dilution experiments at the vapor/water interface to elucidate the interfacial water structure as the pH is varied with HCl and NaOH. In acidic solutions, solvated proton species are seen throughout the interfacial region, and they alter the hydrogen bonding between water molecules in ways that reflect their depth in the interfacial region. At the higher frequencies of the OH stretch region, there is spectral evidence for solvated proton species residing in the topmost layers of the interfacial region. As reported in previous VSF studies, more strongly bound solvated proton species are observed at lower OH stretching frequencies. The solvated proton species that have stronger hydrogen bonding are similar in structure to those found in bulk acid solutions and likely reside somewhat deeper in the interfacial region. There is also evidence of OH stretching from solvated protons and relatively strong hydrogen bonding in the solvation sphere that is similar to other solvated ions. In contrast, water molecules solvating OH(-) ions show relatively weak hydrogen bonding and significantly less interfacial order. VSF spectra are acquired under multiple polarizations to provide crucial information for the interpretation of the spectra and for the determination of interfacial structure.

  1. Ultrafast fluxional exchange dynamics in electrolyte solvation sheath of lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Hochan; Noh, Yohan; Kossowska, Dorota; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-03-01

    Lithium cation is the charge carrier in lithium-ion battery. Electrolyte solution in lithium-ion battery is usually based on mixed solvents consisting of polar carbonates with different aliphatic chains. Despite various experimental evidences indicating that lithium ion forms a rigid and stable solvation sheath through electrostatic interactions with polar carbonates, both the lithium solvation structure and more importantly fluctuation dynamics and functional role of carbonate solvent molecules have not been fully elucidated yet with femtosecond vibrational spectroscopic methods. Here we investigate the ultrafast carbonate solvent exchange dynamics around lithium ions in electrolyte solutions with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and find that the time constants of the formation and dissociation of lithium-ion...carbonate complex in solvation sheaths are on a picosecond timescale. We anticipate that such ultrafast microscopic fluxional processes in lithium-solvent complexes could provide an important clue to understanding macroscopic mobility of lithium cation in lithium-ion battery on a molecular level.

  2. Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics in the DFT + U formalism: Structure and energetics of solvated ferrous and ferric ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sit, P H L.; Cococcioni, Matteo; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2007-09-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We implemented a rotationally-invariant Hubbard U extension to density-functional theory in the Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics framework, with the goal of bringing the accuracy of the DFT + U approach to finite-temperature simulations, especially for liquids or solids containing transition-metal ions. First, we studied the effects on the Hubbard U on the static equilibrium structure of the hexaaqua ferrous and ferric ions, and the inner-sphere reorganization energy for the electron-transfer reaction between aqueous ferrous and ferric ions. It is found that the reorganization energy is increased, mostly as a result of the Fe–O distance elongation in the hexa-aqua ferrous ion. Second, we performed a first-principles molecular dynamics study of the solvation structure of the two aqueous ferrous and ferric ions. The Hubbard term is found to change the Fe–O radial distribution function for the ferrous ion, while having a negligible effect on the aqueous ferric ion. Moreover, the frequencies of vibrations between Fe and oxygen atoms in the first-solvation shell are shown to be unaffected by the Hubbard corrections for both ferrous and ferric ions.

  3. Structure of the hydrated and dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rubidium ions in solution.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Persson, Ingmar

    2004-05-31

    The structure of the hydrated and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rubidium ions in solution has been determined by means of large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies. The models of the hydrated and dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rubidium ions fitting the experimental data best are square antiprisms with Rb-O bond distances of 2.98(2) and 2.98(3) A, respectively. The EXAFS data show a significant asymmetry in the Rb-O bond distance distribution with C(3) values of 0.0076 and 0.015 A(3), respectively. No second hydration sphere is observed around the hydrated rubidium ion. The dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rubidium ion displays a Rb-O-S bond angle of ca. 130 degrees, which is typical for a medium hard electron acceptor such as rubidium.

  4. Solvation Energy of Ions in Polymers: Effects of Chain Length and Connectivity on Saturated Dipoles near Ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Nakamura, Issei

    2017-04-03

    We illustrate the effects of chain connectivity on the solvation energy of ions immersed in polymer liquids by developing a new coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. Our theory accounts for the dielectric response of the polymers through the connection of dipolar, monomeric units with nonlinear springs. In stark contrast to the standard Born solvation energy of ions, our results depend substantially on the chain length of the polymers. We also demonstrate the marked difference in the solvation energies of the ions immersed in non-polymeric particle mixtures, single-component polymers, polymer blends, and block copolymers. Thus, we suggest that the chain architecture of polymers is a key factor in ion solvation, whereas this feature is often inadequately considered in main theory and simulation literature. Our results are consistent with those predicted by previous coarse-grained mean-field theories when the dipole moment of the polymer compositions is relatively small. However, we also demonstrate that the strong ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions cause the chain-like association of the monomeric units, resulting in a qualitative discrepancy between the mean-field theory and simulation. Such a strong electrostatic correlation may reverse the dependence of the chain length on the solvation energy of the ions in the polymers.

  5. Multiply Reduced Oligofluorenes: Their Nature and Pairing with THF-Solvated Sodium Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qin; Zaikowski, Lori; Kaur, Parmeet; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Gelfond, Claudia; Miller, John R.

    2016-07-01

    Conjugated oligofluorenes are chemically reduced up to five charges in tetrahydrofuran solvent and confirmed with clear spectroscopic evidence. Stimulated by these experimental results, we have conducted a comprehensive computational study of the electronic structure and the solvation structure of representative oligofluorene anions with a focus on the pairing between sodium ions and these multianions. In addition, using density functional theory (DFT) methods and a solvation model of both explicit solvent molecules and implicit polarizable continuum, we first elucidate the structure of tightly solvated free sodium ions, and then explore the pairing of sodium ions either in contact with reduced oligofluorenes or as solvent-separated ion pairs. Computed time-dependent-DFT absorption spectra are compared with experiments to assign the dominant ion pairing structure for each multianion. Computed ion pair binding energies further support our assignment. Lastly, the availability of different length and reducing level of oligofluorenes enables us to investigate the effects of total charge and charge density on the binding with sodium ions, and our results suggest both factors play important roles in ion pairing for small molecules. However, as the oligofluorene size grows, its charge density determines the binding strength with the sodium ion.

  6. Multiply Reduced Oligofluorenes: Their Nature and Pairing with THF-Solvated Sodium Ions

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Qin; Zaikowski, Lori; Kaur, Parmeet; ...

    2016-07-01

    Conjugated oligofluorenes are chemically reduced up to five charges in tetrahydrofuran solvent and confirmed with clear spectroscopic evidence. Stimulated by these experimental results, we have conducted a comprehensive computational study of the electronic structure and the solvation structure of representative oligofluorene anions with a focus on the pairing between sodium ions and these multianions. In addition, using density functional theory (DFT) methods and a solvation model of both explicit solvent molecules and implicit polarizable continuum, we first elucidate the structure of tightly solvated free sodium ions, and then explore the pairing of sodium ions either in contact with reduced oligofluorenesmore » or as solvent-separated ion pairs. Computed time-dependent-DFT absorption spectra are compared with experiments to assign the dominant ion pairing structure for each multianion. Computed ion pair binding energies further support our assignment. Lastly, the availability of different length and reducing level of oligofluorenes enables us to investigate the effects of total charge and charge density on the binding with sodium ions, and our results suggest both factors play important roles in ion pairing for small molecules. However, as the oligofluorene size grows, its charge density determines the binding strength with the sodium ion.« less

  7. Solvation behavior of carbonate-based electrolytes in sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Cresce, Arthur V; Russell, Selena M; Borodin, Oleg; Allen, Joshua A; Schroeder, Marshall A; Dai, Michael; Peng, Jing; Gobet, Mallory P; Greenbaum, Steven G; Rogers, Reginald E; Xu, Kang

    2016-12-21

    Sodium ion batteries are on the cusp of being a commercially available technology. Compared to lithium ion batteries, sodium ion batteries can potentially offer an attractive dollar-per-kilowatt-hour value, though at the penalty of reduced energy density. As a materials system, sodium ion batteries present a unique opportunity to apply lessons learned in the study of electrolytes for lithium ion batteries; specifically, the behavior of the sodium ion in an organic carbonate solution and the relationship of ion solvation with electrode surface passivation. In this work the Li(+) and Na(+)-based solvates were characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, (17)O, (23)Na and pulse field gradient double-stimulated-echo pulse sequence nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and conductivity measurements. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrate that the Li(+) and Na(+) cations share a number of similar ion-solvent interaction trends, such as a preference in the gas and liquid phase for a solvation shell rich in cyclic carbonates over linear carbonates and fluorinated carbonates. However, quite different IR spectra due to the PF6(-) anion interactions with the Na(+) and Li(+) cations were observed and were rationalized with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations that were also used to examine the relative free energies of solvates using cluster - continuum models. Ion-solvent distances for Na(+) were longer than Li(+), and Na(+) had a greater tendency towards forming contact pairs compared to Li(+) in linear carbonate solvents. In tests of hard carbon Na-ion batteries, performance was not well correlated to Na(+) solvent preference, leading to the possibility that Na(+) solvent preference may play a reduced role in the passivation of anode surfaces and overall Na-ion battery performance.

  8. Scaling Atomic Partial Charges of Carbonate Solvents for Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Soto, Fernando A.; Balbuena, Perla B.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2016-10-21

    Lithium-ion solvation and diffusion properties in ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were studied by molecular simulation, experiments, and electronic structure calculations. Studies carried out in water provide a reference for interpretation. Classical molecular dynamics simulation results are compared to ab initio molecular dynamics to assess nonpolarizable force field parameters for solvation structure of the carbonate solvents. Quasi-chemical theory (QCT) was adapted to take advantage of fourfold occupancy of the near-neighbor solvation structure observed in simulations and used to calculate solvation free energies. The computed free energy for transfer of Li+ to PC from water, based on electronic structure calculations with cluster-QCT, agrees with the experimental value. The simulation-based direct-QCT results with scaled partial charges agree with the electronic structure-based QCT values. The computed Li+/PF6- transference numbers of 0.35/0.65 (EC) and 0.31/0.69 (PC) agree well with NMR experimental values of 0.31/0.69 (EC) and 0.34/0.66 (PC) and similar values obtained here with impedance spectroscopy. These combined results demonstrate that solvent partial charges can be scaled in systems dominated by strong electrostatic interactions to achieve trends in ion solvation and transport properties that are comparable to ab initio and experimental results. Thus, the results support the use of scaled partial charges in simple, nonpolarizable force fields in future studies of these electrolyte solutions.

  9. Scaling Atomic Partial Charges of Carbonate Solvents for Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Lithium-ion solvation and diffusion properties in ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were studied by molecular simulation, experiments, and electronic structure calculations. Studies carried out in water provide a reference for interpretation. Classical molecular dynamics simulation results are compared to ab initio molecular dynamics to assess nonpolarizable force field parameters for solvation structure of the carbonate solvents. Quasi-chemical theory (QCT) was adapted to take advantage of fourfold occupancy of the near-neighbor solvation structure observed in simulations and used to calculate solvation free energies. The computed free energy for transfer of Li+ to PC from water, based on electronic structuremore » calculations with cluster-QCT, agrees with the experimental value. The simulation-based direct-QCT results with scaled partial charges agree with the electronic structure-based QCT values. The computed Li+/PF6- transference numbers of 0.35/0.65 (EC) and 0.31/0.69 (PC) agree well with NMR experimental values of 0.31/0.69 (EC) and 0.34/0.66 (PC) and similar values obtained here with impedance spectroscopy. These combined results demonstrate that solvent partial charges can be scaled in systems dominated by strong electrostatic interactions to achieve trends in ion solvation and transport properties that are comparable to ab initio and experimental results. Thus, the results support the use of scaled partial charges in simple, nonpolarizable force fields in future studies of these electrolyte solutions.« less

  10. Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes from First-Principles and Classical Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Mitchell T.; Verners, Osvalds; Draeger, Erik W.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Lordi, Vincenzo; Pask, John E.

    2014-12-19

    We report that lithium-ion battery performance is strongly influenced by the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, which depends on the speed at which Li ions migrate across the cell and relates to their solvation structure. The choice of solvent can greatly impact both the solvation and diffusivity of Li ions. In this work, we used first-principles molecular dynamics to examine the solvation and diffusion of Li ions in the bulk organic solvents ethylene carbonate (EC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and a mixture of EC and EMC. We found that Li ions are solvated by either carbonyl or ether oxygen atoms of the solvents and sometimes by the PF $\\bar{6}$ anion. Li+ prefers a tetrahedrally coordinated first solvation shell regardless of which species are involved, with the specific preferred solvation structure dependent on the organic solvent. In addition, we calculated Li diffusion coefficients in each electrolyte, finding slightly larger diffusivities in the linear carbonate EMC compared to the cyclic carbonate EC. The magnitude of the diffusion coefficient correlates with the strength of Li+ solvation. Corresponding analysis for the PF $\\bar{6}$ anion shows greater diffusivity associated with a weakly bound, poorly defined first solvation shell. In conclusion, these results can be used to aid in the design of new electrolytes to improve Li-ion battery performance.

  11. Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes from First-Principles and Classical Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Ong, Mitchell T.; Verners, Osvalds; Draeger, Erik W.; ...

    2014-12-19

    We report that lithium-ion battery performance is strongly influenced by the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, which depends on the speed at which Li ions migrate across the cell and relates to their solvation structure. The choice of solvent can greatly impact both the solvation and diffusivity of Li ions. In this work, we used first-principles molecular dynamics to examine the solvation and diffusion of Li ions in the bulk organic solvents ethylene carbonate (EC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and a mixture of EC and EMC. We found that Li ions are solvated by either carbonyl or ether oxygen atoms of the solvents and sometimes by the PF more » $$\\bar{6}$$ anion. Li+ prefers a tetrahedrally coordinated first solvation shell regardless of which species are involved, with the specific preferred solvation structure dependent on the organic solvent. In addition, we calculated Li diffusion coefficients in each electrolyte, finding slightly larger diffusivities in the linear carbonate EMC compared to the cyclic carbonate EC. The magnitude of the diffusion coefficient correlates with the strength of Li+ solvation. Corresponding analysis for the PF $$\\bar{6}$$ anion shows greater diffusivity associated with a weakly bound, poorly defined first solvation shell. In conclusion, these results can be used to aid in the design of new electrolytes to improve Li-ion battery performance.« less

  12. Single-Ion Solvation Free Energies and the Normal Hydrogen Electrode Potential in Methanol, Acetonitrile, and Dimethyl Sulfoxide

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Casey P.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-01-01

    The division of thermodynamic solvation free energies of electrolytes into ionic constituents is conventionally accomplished by using the single-ion solvation free energy of one reference ion, conventionally the proton, to set the single-ion scales. Thus the determination of the free energy of solvation of the proton in various solvents is a fundamental issue of central importance in solution chemistry. In the present article, relative solvation free energies of ions and ion-solvent clusters in methanol, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been determined using a combination of experimental and theoretical gas-phase free energies of formation, solution-phase reduction potentials and acid dissociation constants, and gas-phase clustering free energies. Applying the cluster pair approximation to differences between these relative solvation free energies leads to values of −263.5, −260.2, and −273.3 kcal/mol for the absolute solvation free energy of the proton in methanol, acetonitrile, and DMSO, respectively. The final absolute proton solvation free energies are used to assign absolute values for the normal hydrogen electrode potential and the solvation free energies of other single ions in the above solvents. PMID:17214493

  13. Structural and thermodynamic properties of the CmIII ion solvated by water and methanol

    DOE PAGES

    Kelley, Morgan P.; Yang, Ping; Clark, Sue B.; ...

    2016-04-27

    The geometric and electronic structures of the 9-coordinate Cm3+ ion solvated with both water and methanol are systematically investigated in the gas phase at each possible solvent-shell composition and configuration using density functional theory and second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are employed to assess the effects of second and third solvent shells on the gas-phase structure. The ion–solvent dissociation energy for methanol is greater than that of water, potentially because of increased charge donation to the ion made possible by the electron-rich methyl group. Further, the ion–solvent dissociation energy and the ion–solvent distance are shown tomore » be dependent on the solvent-shell composition. Furthermore, this has implications for solvent exchange, which is generally the rate-limiting step in complexation reactions utilized in the separation of curium from complex metal mixtures that derive from the advanced nuclear fuel cycle.« less

  14. Electrolytes in a nanometer slab-confinement: ion-specific structure and solvation forces.

    PubMed

    Kalcher, Immanuel; Schulz, Julius C F; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2010-10-28

    We study the liquid structure and solvation forces of dense monovalent electrolytes (LiCl, NaCl, CsCl, and NaI) in a nanometer slab-confinement by explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, implicit-water Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theories. In order to consistently coarse-grain and to account for specific hydration effects in the implicit methods, realistic ion-ion and ion-surface pair potentials have been derived from infinite-dilution MD simulations. The electrolyte structure calculated from MC simulations is in good agreement with the corresponding MD simulations, thereby validating the coarse-graining approach. The agreement improves if a realistic, MD-derived dielectric constant is employed, which partially corrects for (water-mediated) many-body effects. Further analysis of the ionic structure and solvation pressure demonstrates that nonlocal extensions to PB (NPB) perform well for a wide parameter range when compared to MC simulations, whereas all local extensions mostly fail. A Barker-Henderson mapping of the ions onto a charged, asymmetric, and nonadditive binary hard-sphere mixture shows that the strength of structural correlations is strongly related to the magnitude and sign of the salt-specific nonadditivity. Furthermore, a grand canonical NPB analysis shows that the Donnan effect is dominated by steric correlations, whereas solvation forces and overcharging effects are mainly governed by ion-surface interactions. However, steric corrections to solvation forces are strongly repulsive for high concentrations and low surface charges, while overcharging can also be triggered by steric interactions in strongly correlated systems. Generally, we find that ion-surface and ion-ion correlations are strongly coupled and that coarse-grained methods should include both, the latter nonlocally and nonadditive (as given by our specific ionic diameters), when studying electrolytes in highly inhomogeneous situations.

  15. Ultrafast fluxional exchange dynamics in electrolyte solvation sheath of lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Hochan; Noh, Yohan; Kossowska, Dorota; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-03-08

    Lithium cation is the charge carrier in lithium-ion battery. Electrolyte solution in lithium-ion battery is usually based on mixed solvents consisting of polar carbonates with different aliphatic chains. Despite various experimental evidences indicating that lithium ion forms a rigid and stable solvation sheath through electrostatic interactions with polar carbonates, both the lithium solvation structure and more importantly fluctuation dynamics and functional role of carbonate solvent molecules have not been fully elucidated yet with femtosecond vibrational spectroscopic methods. Here we investigate the ultrafast carbonate solvent exchange dynamics around lithium ions in electrolyte solutions with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and find that the time constants of the formation and dissociation of lithium-ion···carbonate complex in solvation sheaths are on a picosecond timescale. We anticipate that such ultrafast microscopic fluxional processes in lithium-solvent complexes could provide an important clue to understanding macroscopic mobility of lithium cation in lithium-ion battery on a molecular level.

  16. Ultrafast fluxional exchange dynamics in electrolyte solvation sheath of lithium ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Hochan; Noh, Yohan; Kossowska, Dorota; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-01-01

    Lithium cation is the charge carrier in lithium-ion battery. Electrolyte solution in lithium-ion battery is usually based on mixed solvents consisting of polar carbonates with different aliphatic chains. Despite various experimental evidences indicating that lithium ion forms a rigid and stable solvation sheath through electrostatic interactions with polar carbonates, both the lithium solvation structure and more importantly fluctuation dynamics and functional role of carbonate solvent molecules have not been fully elucidated yet with femtosecond vibrational spectroscopic methods. Here we investigate the ultrafast carbonate solvent exchange dynamics around lithium ions in electrolyte solutions with coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and find that the time constants of the formation and dissociation of lithium-ion···carbonate complex in solvation sheaths are on a picosecond timescale. We anticipate that such ultrafast microscopic fluxional processes in lithium-solvent complexes could provide an important clue to understanding macroscopic mobility of lithium cation in lithium-ion battery on a molecular level. PMID:28272396

  17. Solvated ions as defects in liquid water: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwegler, Eric; Pham, Tuan Anh; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    Understanding the electronic properties of solvated ions is crucial in order to control and engineer aqueous electrolytes for a wide variety of emerging energy and environmental technologies, including photocatalytic water splitting. In this talk, we present a strategy to evaluate electronic energy levels of simple solvated ions in aqueous solutions, using a combination of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation. We considered CO32- , HCO3-,NO3-,NO2-ions and we show that by analogy to defects in semiconductors, these solvated ions may be classified as deep or shallow defects in liquid water. In particular CO32- and NO2-ions behave as shallow defects, while HCO3-and NO3-as deep ones. We also show that the inclusion of many-body corrections constitutes significant improvement over conventional density functional theory calculations, yielding satisfactory agreement with photoemission experiments. Part of this work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy at the LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. T.A.P acknowledge the support from the Lawrence Fellowship. Part of this work was supported by LDRD at ANL.

  18. Nanocalorimetry in mass spectrometry: a route to understanding ion and electron solvation.

    PubMed

    Donald, William A; Leib, Ryan D; O'Brien, Jeremy T; Holm, Anne I S; Williams, Evan R

    2008-11-25

    A gaseous nanocalorimetry approach is used to investigate effects of hydration and ion identity on the energy resulting from ion-electron recombination. Capture of a thermally generated electron by a hydrated multivalent ion results in either loss of a H atom accompanied by water loss or exclusively loss of water. The energy resulting from electron capture by the precursor is obtained from the extent of water loss. Results for large-size-selected clusters of Co(NH(3))(6)(H(2)O)(n3)(+) and Cu(H(2)O)(n2)(+) indicate that the ion in the cluster is reduced on electron capture. The trend in the data for Co(NH(3))(6)(H(2)O)(n3)(+) over the largest sizes (n >/= 50) can be fit to that predicted by the Born solvation model. This agreement indicates that the decrease in water loss for these larger clusters is predominantly due to ion solvation that can be accounted for by using a model with bulk properties. In contrast, results for Ca(H(2)O)(n2)(+) indicate that an ion-electron pair is formed when clusters with more than approximately 20 water molecules are reduced. For clusters with n = approximately 20-47, these results suggest that the electron is located near the surface, but a structural transition to a more highly solvated electron is indicated for n = 47-62 by the constant recombination energy. These results suggest that an estimate of the adiabatic electron affinity of water could be obtained from measurements of even larger clusters in which an electron is fully solvated.

  19. Metal Ions in Unusual Valency States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Robin M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses reactivity of metal ions with the primary products of water radiolysis, hyper-reduced metal ions, zero-valent metal ions, unstable divalent ions from the reduction of bivalent ions, hyper-oxidized metal ions, and metal complexes. (CS)

  20. Coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated lead(II) ions in solution and solid state.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingmar; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Lundberg, Daniel; Eriksson, Lars; Płaczek, Anna

    2011-02-07

    The coordination chemistry of lead(II) in the oxygen donor solvents water, dimethylsulfoxide (dmso, Me(2)SO), N,N-dimethylformamide (dmf), N,N-dimethylacetamide (dma), N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (dmpu), and 1,1,3,3-tetramethylurea (tmu), as well as in the sulfur donor solvent N,N-dimethylthioformamide (dmtf), has been investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and/or large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) in solution, and by single crystal X-ray diffraction and/or EXAFS of solid hydrates and solvates. Lead(II) may either form hemidirected complexes with large bond distance distribution and an apparent gap for excess electron density, or holodirected ones with a symmetric coordination sphere with normal bond distance distribution, depending on the strength of antibonding lead 6s/ligand np molecular orbital interactions and ligand-ligand interactions. The crystallographic data show that the solid lead(II) perchlorate and trifluoromethanesulfonate hydrate structures are hemidirected, while the solid lead(II) solvates of dma and dmpu have regular octahedral configuration with holodirected geometry and mean Pb-O bond distances in the range 2.50-2.52 Å. EXAFS data on the hydrated lead(II) ion in aqueous solution show broad bond distance distribution and a lack of inner-core multiple scattering contributions strongly indicating a hemidirected structure. The Pb-O bond distances found both by EXAFS and LAXS, 2.54(1) Å, point to a six-coordinate hydrated lead(II) ion in hemidirected fashion with an unevenly distributed electron density. The results obtained for the dmso solvated lead(II) ion in solution are ambiguous, but for the most part support a six-coordinate hemidirected complex. The mean Pb-O bond distances determined in dmf and dma solution by LAXS, 2.55(1) and 2.48(1) Å, respectively, indicate that in both solvate complexes lead(II) binds six solvent molecules with the former complex being hemidirected whereas the latter is holodirected. The

  1. The effects of charge transfer on the aqueous solvation of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-07-28

    Ab initio-based charge partitioning of ionic systems results in ions with non-integer charges. This charge-transfer (CT) effect alters both short- and long-range interactions. Until recently, the effects of CT have been mostly neglected in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The method presented in this paper for including charge transfer between ions and water is consistent with ab initio charge partitioning and does not add significant time to the simulation. The ions of sodium, potassium, and chloride are parameterized to reproduce dimer properties and aqueous structures. The average charges of the ions from MD simulations (0.900, 0.919, and -0.775 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively) are consistent with quantum calculations. The hydration free energies calculated for these ions are in agreement with experimental estimates, which shows that the interactions are described accurately. The ions also have diffusion constants in good agreement with experiment. Inclusion of CT results in interesting properties for the waters in the first solvation shell of the ions. For all ions studied, the first shell waters acquire a partial negative charge, due to the difference between water-water and water-ion charge-transfer amounts. CT also reduces asymmetry in the solvation shell of the chloride anion, which could have important consequences for the behavior of chloride near the air-water interface.

  2. Gas phase measurements of the stabilization and solvation of metal dications in clusters of ammonia and methanol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojing; Stace, Anthony J

    2013-06-20

    An experimental study has been undertaken of the ability of small numbers of either ammonia or methanol molecules (XH) to form stable solvated complexes with each of nine metal dications, M(2+). Complexes have been generated using a combination of the pick-up technique and electron impact ionization, and individual ions were monitored for evidence of metastability in the form of Coulomb fission or charge separation: [M(XH)n](2+) → [M(+)X](XH)n-m + H2X(+)(XH)m-2. Values have been assigned to a quantity ns, which is identified as the minimum number of molecules required to suppress the above reaction. These values were found to range from 3 for Sr(2+) complexed with methanol to 19 for Sn(2+) complexed with ammonia. Comparisons are made with results published previously for the same metal dications complexed with water (Chen, X.; Stace, A. J. Chem. Commun.2012, 10292), and for the most part, it is found that ions solvated with either ammonia or methanol are less stable than their water counterparts. To account for differences in stability, several criteria have been examined, and of those, the most satisfactory correlation is between ns and M(2+)-XH bond strength; the stronger the bond, the larger ns has to be in order for a complex to be stable. However, for complexes where ns is large, such as those involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and especially Sn(2+) and Pb(2+), it is proposed that the geometry adopted by solvent molecules also has a significant influence on proton transfer. By comparing the ease with which proton transfer occurs for the three protic solvents, water, ammonia, and methanol, it is possible to comment on metal ion acidity in nonaqueous solutions, for which condensed phase data are nonexistent; the results suggest that most of the nine metals would be stronger Lewis acids in ammonia than in water.

  3. The Solvation Structure of Lithium Ions in an Ether Based Electrolyte Solution from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Callsen, Martin; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Futera, Zdeněk; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Ikutaro

    2017-01-12

    The solvation and desolvation of the Li ion play a crucial role in the electrolytes of Li based secondary batteries, and their understanding at the microscopic level is of great importance. Oligoether (glyme) based electrolytes have attracted much attention as electrolytes used in Li based secondary batteries, such as Li-ion, Li-S, and Li-O2 batteries. However, the solvation structure of the Li ion in glyme based electrolytes has not been fully clarified yet. We present a computational study on the solvation structure of lithium ions in the mixture of triglyme and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide (LiTFSA) by means of molecular orbital and molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory. We found that, in the electrolyte solution composed of the equimolar mixture of triglyme and LiTFSA, lithium ions are solvated mainly by crown-ether-like curled triglyme molecules and in direct contact with an TFSA anion. We also found the aggregate formed with Li ion and TFSA anions and/or triglyme molecule(s) is equally stable, which has not been reported in the previous classical molecular dynamics simulations, suggesting that in reality a small fraction of Li ions form aggregates and they might have a significant impact on the Li ion transport. Our results demonstrate the importance of performing electronic structure based molecular dynamics of electrolyte solution to clarify the detailed solvation structure of the Li ion.

  4. Lithium ion solvation in room-temperature ionic liquids involving bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide anion studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsugi, Takushi; Fukuda, Shuhei; Fujimori, Takao; Fujii, Kenta; Kanzaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Munetaka; Ishiguro, Shin-Ichi

    2007-11-15

    The solvation structure of the lithium ion in room-temperature ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (EMI(+)TFSI(-)) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (BMP(+0TFSI(-)) has been studied by Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Raman spectra of EMI(+)TFSI(-) and BMP(+)TFSI(-) containing Li(+)TFSI(-) over the range 0.144-0.589 and 0.076-0.633 mol dm(-3), respectively, were measured at 298 K. A strong 744 cm-1 band of the free TFSI(-) ion in the bulk weakens with increasing concentration of the lithium ion, and it revealed by analyzing the intensity decrease that the two TFSI(-) ions bind to the metal ion. The lithium ion may be four-coordinated through the O atoms of two bidentate TFSI(-) ions. It has been established in our previous work that the TFSI(-) ion involves two conformers of C(1) (cis) and C(2) (trans) symmetries in equilibrium, and the dipole moment of the C(1) conformer is significantly larger than that of the C(2) conformer. On the basis of these facts, the geometries and SCF energies of possible solvate ion clusters [Li(C(1)-TFSI(-))(2)](-), [Li(C(1)-TFSI(-))(C(2)-TFSI(-))](-), and [Li(C(2)-TFSI(-))(2)](-) were examined using the theoretical DFT calculations. It is concluded that the C(1) conformer is more preferred to the C(2) conformer in the vicinity of the lithium ion.

  5. A Simple Model for Ion Solvation with Non Additive Cores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    constant of the solvent, _., the permittivity of free space, ri, the radius of the ion, and No, the Avogadro constant . 50 is equal to rs/k,, where rs is...the radius of the solvent (the effective radius) and the MSA polarization parameter, X is calculated from the dielectric constant of the pure solvent...1)2 j This expression may be simplified considerably when one considers the range of values typical for X•. For water whose dielectric constant is

  6. Wave-particle interactions in a resonant system of photons and ion-solvated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    We investigate a laser model for a resonant system of photons and ion cluster-solvated rotating water molecules in which ions in the cluster are identical and have very low, non-relativistic velocities and direction of motion parallel to a static electric field induced in a single direction. This model combines Dicke superradiation with wave-particle interaction. As the result, we find that the equations of motion of the system are expressed in terms of a conventional free electron laser system. This result leads to a mechanism for dynamical coherence, induced by collective instability in the wave-particle interaction.

  7. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged GlyGlyH+ ṡ (H2O)1-4 are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  8. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a

  9. Strategy using three layers of surface charge for computing solvation free energy of ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Kun

    2013-12-31

    Continuum solvent model is the common used strategy for computing the solvation free energy. However, the dielectric polarization from Gauss's law differs from that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. To mimic the dielectric polarization surrounding a solute in molecular dynamics simulations, the first-shell water molecule was modeled using a charge distribution of TIP4P molecule in a hard sphere. The dielectric polarization of the first-shell water was modeled as a pair of surface charge layers with a fixed distance between them, but with variable, equal, and opposite charge magnitudes that respond to the electric field on the first-shell water. The water outside the first shell water is treated as a bulk solvent, and the electric effect of the bulk solvent can be modeled as a surface charge. Based on this strategy, the analytical solution describing the solvation free energy of ions was derived, and the values of computed solvation free energy were compared to the values of experiments.

  10. Simulated Solvation of Organic Ions II: Study of Linear Alkylated Carboxylate Ions in Water Nanodrops and in Liquid Water. Propensity for Air/Water Interface and Convergence to Bulk Solvation Properties.

    PubMed

    Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2015-09-10

    We investigated the solvation of carboxylate ions from formate to hexanoate, in droplets of 50 to 1000 water molecules and neat water, by computations using standard molecular dynamics and sophisticated polarizable models. The carboxylate ions from methanoate to hexanoate show strong propensity for the air/water interface in small droplets. Only the ions larger than propanoate retain propensity for the interface in larger droplets, where their enthalpic stabilization by ion/water dispersion is reduced there by 3 kcal mol(-1) per CH2 group. This is compensated by entropy effects over +3.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1) per CH2 group. On the surface, the anionic headgroups are strongly oriented toward the aqueous core, while the hydrophobic alkyl chains are repelled into air and lose their structure-making effects. These results reproduce the structure-making effects of alkyl groups in solution, and suggest that the hydrocarbon chains of ionic headgroups and alkyl substituents solvate independently. Extrapolation to bulk solution using standard extrapolation schemes yields absolute carboxylate solvation energies. The results for formate and acetate yield a proton solvation enthalpy of about 270 kcal mol(-1), close to the experiment-based value. The largest carboxylate ions yield a value smaller by about 10 kcal mol(-1), which requires studies in much larger droplets.

  11. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  12. Structural and thermodynamic properties of the CmIII ion solvated by water and methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Morgan P.; Yang, Ping; Clark, Sue B.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2016-04-27

    The geometric and electronic structures of the 9-coordinate Cm3+ ion solvated with both water and methanol are systematically investigated in the gas phase at each possible solvent-shell composition and configuration using density functional theory and second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are employed to assess the effects of second and third solvent shells on the gas-phase structure. The ion–solvent dissociation energy for methanol is greater than that of water, potentially because of increased charge donation to the ion made possible by the electron-rich methyl group. Further, the ion–solvent dissociation energy and the ion–solvent distance are shown to be dependent on the solvent-shell composition. Furthermore, this has implications for solvent exchange, which is generally the rate-limiting step in complexation reactions utilized in the separation of curium from complex metal mixtures that derive from the advanced nuclear fuel cycle.

  13. Biodegradable Polycaprolactone as Ion Solvating Polymer for Solution-Processed Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Nils; Zimmermann, Johannes; Morfa, Anthony John; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of the biodegradable polymer polycaprolactone (PCL) as the ion solvating polymer in solution-processed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEC). We show that the inclusion of PCL in the active layer yields higher ionic conductivities and thus contributes to a rapid formation of the dynamic p-i-n junction and reduction of operating voltages. PCL shows no phase separation with the emitter polymer and reduces film roughness. The devices show light-emission at voltages as low as 3.2 V and lifetimes on the order of 30 h operating above 150 cd m−2 with turn-on times <20 s and current and luminous efficacies of 3.2 Cd A−1 and 1.5 lm W−1 respectively. PMID:27811991

  14. Biodegradable Polycaprolactone as Ion Solvating Polymer for Solution-Processed Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Nils; Zimmermann, Johannes; Morfa, Anthony John; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo

    2016-11-04

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of the biodegradable polymer polycaprolactone (PCL) as the ion solvating polymer in solution-processed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEC). We show that the inclusion of PCL in the active layer yields higher ionic conductivities and thus contributes to a rapid formation of the dynamic p-i-n junction and reduction of operating voltages. PCL shows no phase separation with the emitter polymer and reduces film roughness. The devices show light-emission at voltages as low as 3.2 V and lifetimes on the order of 30 h operating above 150 cd m(-)(2) with turn-on times <20 s and current and luminous efficacies of 3.2 Cd A(-1) and 1.5 lm W(-1) respectively.

  15. Biodegradable Polycaprolactone as Ion Solvating Polymer for Solution-Processed Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgensen, Nils; Zimmermann, Johannes; Morfa, Anthony John; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of the biodegradable polymer polycaprolactone (PCL) as the ion solvating polymer in solution-processed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEC). We show that the inclusion of PCL in the active layer yields higher ionic conductivities and thus contributes to a rapid formation of the dynamic p-i-n junction and reduction of operating voltages. PCL shows no phase separation with the emitter polymer and reduces film roughness. The devices show light-emission at voltages as low as 3.2 V and lifetimes on the order of 30 h operating above 150 cd m‑2 with turn-on times <20 s and current and luminous efficacies of 3.2 Cd A‑1 and 1.5 lm W‑1 respectively.

  16. Solvation Effects on Structure and Charge Distribution in Anionic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. Mathias

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of ions with solvent molecules modifies the properties of both solvent and solute. Solvation generally stabilizes compact charge distributions compared to more diffuse ones. In the most extreme cases, solvation will alter the very composition of the ion itself. We use infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions to probe how solvation affects the structures and charge distributions of metal-CO2 cluster anions. We gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding through Grant CHE-0845618 (for graduate student support) and for instrumentation funding through Grant PHY-1125844.

  17. Ionic force field optimization based on single-ion and ion-pair solvation properties: Going beyond standard mixing rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyta, Maria; Netz, Roland R.

    2012-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction with the SPC/E water model, we optimize ionic force-field parameters for seven different halide and alkali ions, considering a total of eight ion-pairs. Our strategy is based on simultaneous optimizing single-ion and ion-pair properties, i.e., we first fix ion-water parameters based on single-ion solvation free energies, and in a second step determine the cation-anion interaction parameters (traditionally given by mixing or combination rules) based on the Kirkwood-Buff theory without modification of the ion-water interaction parameters. In doing so, we have introduced scaling factors for the cation-anion Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction that quantify deviations from the standard mixing rules. For the rather size-symmetric salt solutions involving bromide and chloride ions, the standard mixing rules work fine. On the other hand, for the iodide and fluoride solutions, corresponding to the largest and smallest anion considered in this work, a rescaling of the mixing rules was necessary. For iodide, the experimental activities suggest more tightly bound ion pairing than given by the standard mixing rules, which is achieved in simulations by reducing the scaling factor of the cation-anion LJ energy. For fluoride, the situation is different and the simulations show too large attraction between fluoride and cations when compared with experimental data. For NaF, the situation can be rectified by increasing the cation-anion LJ energy. For KF, it proves necessary to increase the effective cation-anion Lennard-Jones diameter. The optimization strategy outlined in this work can be easily adapted to different kinds of ions.

  18. Interaction of metal ions with biomolecular ligands: how accurate are calculated free energies associated with metal ion complexation?

    PubMed

    Gutten, Ondrej; Beššeová, Ivana; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2011-10-20

    To address fundamental questions in bioinorganic chemistry, such as metal ion selectivity, accurate computational protocols for both the gas-phase association of metal-ligand complexes and solvation/desolvation energies of the species involved are needed. In this work, we attempt to critically evaluate the performance of the ab initio and DFT electronic structure methods available and recent solvation models in calculations of the energetics associated with metal ion complexation. On the example of five model complexes ([M(II)(CH(3)S)(H(2)O)](+), [M(II)(H(2)O)(2)(H(2)S)(NH(3))](2+), [M(II)(CH(3)S)(NH(3))(H(2)O)(CH(3)COO)], [M(II)(H(2)O)(3)(SH)(CH(3)COO)(Im)], [M(II)(H(2)S)(H(2)O)(CH(3)COO)(PhOH)(Im)](+) in typical coordination geometries) and four metal ions (Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+); representing open- and closed-shell and the first- and second-row transition metal elements), we provide reference values for the gas-phase complexation energies, as presumably obtained using the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ method, and compare them with cheaper methods, such as DFT and RI-MP2, that can be used for large-scale calculations. We also discuss two possible definitions of interaction energies underlying the theoretically predicted metal-ion selectivity and the effect of geometry optimization on these values. Finally, popular solvation models, such as COSMO-RS and SMD, are used to demonstrate whether quantum chemical calculations can provide the overall free enthalpy (ΔG) changes in the range of the expected experimental values for the model complexes or match the experimental stability constants in the case of three complexes for which the experimental data exist. The data presented highlight several intricacies in the theoretical predictions of the experimental stability constants: the covalent character of some metal-ligand bonds (e.g., Cu(II)-thiolate) causing larger errors in the gas-phase complexation energies, inaccuracies in the treatment of solvation of the

  19. Application of the Mean Spherical Approximation to Describe the Entropy of Solvation of Spherical Ions in Polar Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-15

    the radius of the ion, and No, the Avogadro constant . The dimensionless parameter, ýi, which depends on the solvent and the ion, is given by 4i = rs...of infinite dilution, the MSA requires only two parameters to describe the Gibbs solvation energy, namely, the dielectric constant of the pure...the temperature derivatives of both the dielectric constant of the solvent and the polarization parameter, k. According to the Wertheim equation

  20. Ab initio study of NMR shielding of alkali earth metal ions in water complexes and magnetic moments of alkali earth metal nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antušek, Andrej; Rodziewicz, Pawel; Keḑziera, Dariusz; Kaczmarek-Keḑziera, Anna; Jaszuński, Michał

    2013-11-01

    Ab initio calculations of NMR shielding constants of alkali earth metal ions in the series of water clusters are presented. The shielding constants for systems modeling the structure of the solvation layer of these ions are determined by adding to the coupled cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) results the calculated relativistic corrections. The relative magnitude of the dynamical effects, estimated for a typical solvated ion from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, is very small. The computed shielding constants are used next to obtain new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments of alkali earth metal nuclei.

  1. Reaction Rate Theory in Coordination Number Space: An Application to Ion Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-04-14

    Understanding reaction mechanisms in many chemical and biological processes require application of rare event theories. In these theories, an effective choice of a reaction coordinate to describe a reaction pathway is essential. To this end, we study ion solvation in water using molecular dynamics simulations and explore the utility of coordination number (n = number of water molecules in the first solvation shell) as the reaction coordinate. Here we compute the potential of mean force (W(n)) using umbrella sampling, predicting multiple metastable n-states for both cations and anions. We find with increasing ionic size, these states become more stable and structured for cations when compared to anions. We have extended transition state theory (TST) to calculate transition rates between n-states. TST overestimates the rate constant due to solvent-induced barrier recrossings that are not accounted for. We correct the TST rates by calculating transmission coefficients using the reactive flux method. This approach enables a new way of understanding rare events involving coordination complexes. We gratefully acknowledge Liem Dang and Panos Stinis for useful discussion. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. SR, CJM, and GKS were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. MDB was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales) Initiative, a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Influence of oxide particle network morphology on ion solvation and transport in "soggy sand" electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal K; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2010-05-27

    The role of oxide surface chemical composition and solvent on ion solvation and ion transport of "soggy sand" electrolytes are discussed here. A "soggy sand" electrolyte system comprising dispersions of hydrophilic/hydrophobic functionalized aerosil silica in lithium perchlorate-methoxy polyethylene glycol solution was employed for the study. Static and dynamic rheology measurements show formation of an attractive particle network in the case of the composite with unmodified aerosil silica (i.e., with surface silanol groups) as well as composites with hydrophobic alkane groups. While particle network in the composite with hydrophilic aerosil silica (unmodified) were due to hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic aerosil silica particles were held together via van der Waals forces. The network strength in the latter case (i.e., for hydrophobic composites) were weaker compared with the composite with unmodified aerosil silica. Both unmodified silica as well as hydrophobic silica composites displayed solid-like mechanical strength. No enhancement in ionic conductivity compared to the liquid electrolyte was observed in the case of the unmodified silica. This was attributed to the existence of a very strong particle network, which led to the "expulsion" of all conducting entities from the interfacial region between adjacent particles. The ionic conductivity for composites with hydrophobic aerosil particles displayed ionic conductivity dependent on the size of the hydrophobic chemical moiety. No spanning attractive particle network was observed for aerosil particles with surfaces modified with stronger hydrophilic groups (than silanol). The composite resembled a sol, and no percolation in ionic conductivity was observed.

  3. Solvation of Mg2+ ions in methanol-water mixtures: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicki, Marcin; Hawlicka, Ewa

    2012-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of MgCl2 solutions in methanol-water mixtures, over the whole range of the methanol mole fraction at room temperature have been performed. The methanol and water molecules have been modeled as flexible three-site bodies. Solvation of the magnesium ions has been discussed on the basis of the radial and angular distribution functions, the orientation of the solvent molecules and their geometrical arrangement in the coordination shells. Analysis of the H-bonds of the solvent molecules coordinated by Mg2+ has been based on a geometric criterion of the H-bond. Persistence of the primary and secondary shell has been estimated. In all studied solutions Mg2+ is six-coordinated and the solvent molecules form an octahedron. The antidipole orientation of the molecules favours the water molecules as H-donors in the first shell and the methanol molecules as H-acceptor in the second shell. Thus an excess of water and an excess of methanol has been observed in the first and the second shells of Mg2+. An exchange of the solvent molecules between the primary and secondary shells occur. The persistence of the second shell is longer than the shells of monovalent ions.

  4. Solvation structure and dynamics of Li+ ion in liquid water, methanol and ethanol: A comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yongping; Wang, Chunfeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; Ju, Shengui

    2014-03-01

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was performed on Li+ in water, methanol and ethanol. Structural and dynamical properties of Li+ were studied and compared with experimental data. Excellent agreement was obtained with the experimental data for the structure of the first solvation shell. The results show the Li+ has a more stable tetrahedral coordination in water and methanol than that in ethanol. The diffusion of water in its first solvation shell was rather slow. Compared to water and methanol, the ethanol in the first solvation shell diffuses slower. The decay of orientational profiles of the solvent molecules in the solvation shell shows slower relaxation for first and second rank correlations compared to bulk water and methanol. The decay of orientational correlations for solvation shell molecules shows faster relaxation compared to that of bulk ethanol. Spectral of bound solvent molecules are compared to those of the bulk. Reasonable agreement is obtained with experiments.

  5. Evaluation of ion mobility spectroscopy for determining charge-solvated versus salt-bridge structures of protonated trimers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Richard L; Williams, Evan R; Counterman, Anne E; Clemmer, David E

    2005-07-01

    The cross sections of five different protonated trimers consisting of two base molecules and trifluoroacetic acid were measured by using ion mobility spectrometry. The gas-phase basicities of these five base molecules span an 8-kcal/mol range. These cross sections are compared with those determined from candidate low-energy salt-bridge and charge-solvated structures identified by using molecular mechanics calculations using three different force fields: AMBER*, MMFF, and CHARMm. With AMBER*, the charge-solvated structures are all globular and the salt-bridge structures are all linear, whereas with CHARMm, these two forms of the protonated trimers can adopt either shape. Globular structures have smaller cross sections than linear structures. Conclusions about the structure of these protonated trimers are highly dependent on the force field used to generate low-energy candidate structures. With AMBER*, all of the trimers are consistent with salt-bridge structures, whereas with MMFF the measured cross sections are more consistent with charge-solvated structures, although the assignments are ambiguous for two of the protonated trimers. Conclusions based on structures generated by using CHARMm suggest a change in structure from charge-solvated to salt-bridge structures with increasing gas-phase basicity of the constituent bases, a result that is most consistent with structural conclusions based on blackbody infrared radiative dissociation experiments for these protonated trimers and theoretical calculations on the uncharged base-acid pairs.

  6. The vapor-liquid interface potential of (multi)polar fluids and its influence on ion solvation.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Lorand; Beu, Titus; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2013-04-21

    The interface between the vapor and liquid phase of quadrupolar-dipolar fluids is the seat of an electric interfacial potential whose influence on ion solvation and distribution is not yet fully understood. To obtain further microscopic insight into water specificity we first present extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations of a series of model liquids with variable molecular quadrupole moments that interpolates between SPC/E water and a purely dipolar liquid. We then pinpoint the essential role played by the competing multipolar contributions to the vapor-liquid and the solute-liquid interface potentials in determining an important ion-specific direct electrostatic contribution to the ionic solvation free energy for SPC/E water-dominated by the quadrupolar and dipolar parts-beyond the dominant polarization one. Our results show that the influence of the vapor-liquid interfacial potential on ion solvation is strongly reduced due to the strong partial cancellation brought about by the competing solute-liquid interface potential.

  7. Potassium ion surrounded by aromatic rings: molecular dynamics of the first solvation shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertí, Margarita; Aguilar, Antonio; Marques, Jorge M. C.

    2014-12-01

    We study the potassium ion in non-polar environments due to the interaction with aromatic rings, which is relevant to get insight on the selectivity of several biochemical processes. In concrete, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the first solvation shell of K+ surrounded by either benzene (Bz) or hexafluorobenzene (HFBz) molecules. The global intermolecular interaction for these clusters has been decomposed in Bz-Bz (or HFBz-HFBz) and in K+-Bz (or K+-HFBz) contributions, using a potential model based on different decompositions of the molecular polarizability of the solvent molecule (Bz or HFBz). For the molecular dynamics simulations, we used as starting geometries the low-energy structures of the K+-(Bz) n ( n = 3,4) and K+-(HFBz) n ( n = 8,9) clusters that were obtained in our previous global optimization studies [J.M.C. Marques, J.L. Llanio-Trujillo, M. Albertí, A. Aguilar, F. Pirani, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 4947 (2012); J.M.C. Marques, J.L. Llanio-Trujillo, M. Albertí, A. Aguilar, F. Pirani, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 8043 (2013)]; a total of 11 starting geometries were employed (including the 4 global minima): 4 (4) for K+-(Bz)3 (K+-(Bz)4) and 2 (1) for K+-(HFBz)8 (K+-(HFBz)9). We have found that all the K+-(Bz)3 local minimum structures isomerise to form the lowest-energy aggregate at T< 20 K. As for K+-(Bz)4, such kind of isomerisation is only observed at T> 90 K for two of the local minima; the highest-energy minimum, that corresponds to a K+-(Bz)4 structure with a Bz molecule placed in the second solvation shell, tends to dissociate before it can isomerise. In the case of K+-(HFBz)8 (or K+-(HFBz)9), the dissociation only occurs at higher temperatures, i.e., T = 260 K (or T = 210 K). By lowering the temperature of the simulation after the dissociation of K+-(HFBz)9, one observes the formation of the global minimum structure of K+-(HFBz)8.

  8. Readily Made Solvated Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Guerra-Millan, Francisco J.; Hugerat, Muhamad; Vazquez-Olavarrieta, Jorge L.; Basheer, Ahmad; Abu-Much, Riam

    2011-01-01

    The existence of solvated electrons has been known for a long time. Key methods for their production (i.e., photoionization of reducing ions, water radiolysis, and the reaction between H[middle dot] and OH[superscript -]) are unsuitable for most school laboratories. We describe a simple experiment to produce liquid ammonia and solvated electrons…

  9. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  10. Force field development for actinyl ions via quantum mechanical calculations: an approach to account for many body solvation effects.

    PubMed

    Rai, Neeraj; Tiwari, Surya P; Maginn, Edward J

    2012-09-06

    Advances in computational algorithms and methodologies make it possible to use highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations to develop force fields (pair-wise additive intermolecular potentials) for condensed phase simulations. Despite these advances, this approach faces numerous hurdles for the case of actinyl ions, AcO2(n+) (high-oxidation-state actinide dioxo cations), mainly due to the complex electronic structure resulting from an interplay of s, p, d, and f valence orbitals. Traditional methods use a pair of molecules (“dimer”) to generate a potential energy surface (PES) for force field parametrization based on the assumption that many body polarization effects are negligible. We show that this is a poor approximation for aqueous phase uranyl ions and present an alternative approach for the development of actinyl ion force fields that includes important many body solvation effects. Force fields are developed for the UO2(2+) ion with the SPC/Fw, TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P water models and are validated by carrying out detailed molecular simulations on the uranyl aqua ion, one of the most characterized actinide systems. It is shown that the force fields faithfully reproduce available experimental structural data and hydration free energies. Failure to account for solvation effects when generating PES leads to overbinding between UO2(2+) and water, resulting in incorrect hydration free energies and coordination numbers. A detailed analysis of arrangement of water molecules in the first and second solvation shell of UO2(2+) is presented. The use of a simple functional form involving the sum of Lennard-Jones + Coulomb potentials makes the new force field compatible with a large number of available molecular simulation engines and common force fields.

  11. Multiheteromacrocycles that Complex Metal Ions. Sixth Progress Report, 1 May 1979-30 April 1980

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cram, D. J.

    1980-01-15

    Objective is to design synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for their abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; number of binding sites; character of binding sites; and valences. During this period, hemispherands based on an aryloxy or cyclic urea unit, spherands based on aryloxyl units only, and their complexes with alkali metals and alkaline earths were investigated. An attempt to separate {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li by gel permeation chromatography of lithiospherium chloride failed. (DLC)

  12. Solvation structure of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) ions in acetonitrile: a combined EXAFS and XANES study.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Migliorati, Valentina

    2015-03-12

    The solvation structure of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) in acetonitrile has been determined by a combined approach using both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. For the former cation, an octahedral geometry of the acetonitrile solvate complex has been found with a Zn-N distance of 2.12(1) Å. For the Cu(2+) solvates the EXAFS technique has been found to be not able to provide a conclusive determination of the coordination numbers and polyhedral environment, while the analysis of the XANES spectra unambiguously shows the existence of an axially elongated square pyramidal coordination, ruling out the previously proposed octahedral Jahn-Teller (JT) distorted geometry. The Cu-N distances obtained are 2.00(1) and 2.28(2) Å for the equatorial and axial ligands, respectively, and the EXAFS and XANES techniques find values of the bond distances in good agreement. The XANES technique has proven to be extremely powerful in providing a reliable resolution of solution structure for dynamic ion complexes.

  13. Absolute solvation free energy of Li{sup +} and Na{sup +} ions in dimethyl sulfoxide solution: A theoretical ab initio and cluster-continuum model study

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, Eduard; Pliego, Josefredo R. Jr.

    2005-08-15

    The solvation of the lithium and sodium ions in dimethyl sulfoxide solution was theoretically investigated using ab initio calculations coupled with the hybrid cluster-continuum model, a quasichemical theory of solvation. We have investigated clusters of ions with up to five dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecules, and the bulk solvent was described by a dielectric continuum model. Our results show that the lithium and sodium ions have four and five DMSO molecules into the first coordination shell, and the calculated solvation free energies are -135.5 and -108.6 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. These data suggest a solvation free energy value of -273.2 kcal mol{sup -1} for the proton in dimethyl sulfoxide solution, a value that is more negative than the present uncertain experimental value. This and previous studies on the solvation of ions in water solution indicate that the tetraphenylarsonium tetraphenylborate assumption is flawed and the absolute value of the free energy of transfer of ions from water to DMSO solution is higher than the present experimental values.

  14. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  15. Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-01-20

    The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work.

  16. Mechanistic Enzyme Models: Pyridoxal and Metal Ions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, S. E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results are presented for experiments on the pyridoxal/metal ion model system. These experiments illustrate catalysis through Schiff's base formation between aldehydes/ketones and primary amines, catalysis by metal ions, and the predictable manner in which metal ions inhibit or catalyze reactions. (JN)

  17. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Nancy S.; Koval, Carl A.; Noble, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  18. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Wang, Bing; Lee, Chul Won; Guerra, Alfredo J; Giedroc, David P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-06-01

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies.

  19. Metal ion influence on eumelanin fluorescence and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Jens-Uwe; Birch, David J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Melanin has long been thought to have an unworkably weak and complex fluorescence, but here we study its intrinsic fluorescence in order to demonstrate how metal ions can be used to control the rate of formation, constituents and structure of eumelanin formed from the well-known laboratory auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effect on eumelanin absorption and fluorescence of a range of solvated metal ions is reported including Cu, Zn, Ni, Na and K. Monovalent cations and Zn have little effect, but the effect of transition metal cations can be considerable. For example, at pH 10, copper ions are shown to accelerate the onset of eumelanin formation, but not the rate of formation once it commences, and simplify the usual complex structure and intrinsic fluorescence of eumelanin in a way that is consistent with an increased abundance of 5,5-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The presence of a dominant 6 ns fluorescence decay time at 480 nm, when excited at 450 nm describes a distinct photophysical species, which we tentatively assign to small oligomers. Copper is well-known to normally quench fluorescence, but increasing amounts of copper surprisingly leads to an increase in the fluorescence decay time of eumelanin, while reducing the fluorescence intensity, suggesting copper modification of the excited state. Such results have bearing on diverse areas. The most accepted morphology for melanin is that of a graphite-like sheet structure, and one which readily binds metal ions, an interaction that is thought to have an important, though as yet unclear bearing on several areas of medicine including neurology. There is also increasing interest in bio-mimicry by preparing and labelling sheet structures with metal ions for new electronic and photonic materials.

  20. Enhanced Lithium Ion Transport in Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate-Supported Solvate Ionogel Electrolytes via Chemically Cross-linked Ethylene Oxide Pathways.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Anthony J; Panzer, Matthew J

    2017-02-02

    Lithium-ion solvate ionic liquids (SILs), consisting of complexed Li(+) cations and a weakly basic anion, represent an emergent class of nonvolatile liquid electrolytes suitable for lithium-based electrochemical energy storage. In this report, solid-state, flexible solvate ionogel electrolytes are synthesized via UV-initiated free radical polymerization/cross-linking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) in situ within the [Li(G4)][TFSI] electrolyte, which is formed by an equimolar mixture of lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and tetraglyme (G4). Ion diffusivity measurements reveal enhanced Li(+) diffusion in PEGDA-supported solvate ionogels, as compared to poly(methyl methacrylate)-supported gels that lack ethylene oxide chains. At 21 vol% PEGDA, a maximum Li(+) transport number of 0.58 and a room temperature ionic conductivity of 0.43 mS/cm have been achieved in a solvate ionogel electrolyte that exhibits an elastic modulus of 0.47 MPa. These results demonstrate the importance of polymer scaffold selection on solvate ionogel electrolyte performance for advanced lithium-based batteries.

  1. Multiheteromacrocycles that Complex Metal Ions. Ninth Progress Report (includes results of last three years), 1 May 1980 -- 30 April 1983

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cram, D. J.

    1982-09-15

    The overall objective of this research is to design, synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for the abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions, or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; numbers of binding sites; characters of binding sites; and valences. The hope is to synthesize new classes of compounds useful in the separation of metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters.

  2. Final progress report for linking ion solvation and lithium battery electrolyte properties

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Wesley

    2014-08-29

    The research objective of this proposal was to provide a detailed analysis of how solvent and anion structure govern the solvation state of Li+ cations in solvent-LiX mixtures and how this, in turn, dictates the electrolyte physicochemical and electrochemical properties which govern (in part) battery performance. Lithium battery electrolytes remain a poorly understood and hardly studied topic relative to the research devoted to battery electrodes. This is due to the fact that it is the electrodes which determine the energy (capacity) of the battery. The electrolyte, however, plays a crucial role in the practical energy density, power, low and/or high temperature performance, lifetime, safety, etc. which is achievable. The development within this project of a "looking glass" into the molecular interactions (i.e., solution structure) in bulk electrolytes through a synergistic experimental approach involving three research thrusts complements work by other researchers to optimize multi-solvent electrolytes and efforts to understand/control the electrode-electrolyte interfaces, thereby enabling the rational design of electrolytes for a wide variety of battery chemistries and applications (electrolytes-on-demand). The three research thrusts pursued include: (1) conduction of an in-depth analysis of the thermal phase behavior of diverse solvent-LiX mixtures, (2) exploration of the ionic association/solvate formation behavior of select LiX salts with a wide variety of solvents, and (3) linking structure to properties-determination of electrolyte physicochemical and electrochemical properties for comparison with the ionic association and phase behavior.

  3. Ionic size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel resulted from the nonuniform size-modified PNP equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yu; Tu, Bin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2014-05-01

    Ionic finite size can impose considerable effects to both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a solvated molecular system, such as the solvation energy, ionic concentration, and transport in a channel. As discussed in our former work [B. Lu and Y. C. Zhou, Biophys. J. 100, 2475 (2011)], a class of size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) models can be uniformly studied through the general nonuniform size-modified PNP (SMPNP) equations deduced from the extended free energy functional of Borukhov et al. [I. Borukhov, D. Andelman, and H. Orland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 435 (1997)] This work focuses on the nonuniform size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel for real biomolecular systems. The main contributions are: (1) we prove that for solvation energy calculation with nonuniform size effects (through equilibrium SMPNP simulation), there exists a simplified approximation formulation which is the same as the widely used one in PB community. This approximate form avoids integration over the whole domain and makes energy calculations convenient. (2) Numerical calculations show that ionic size effects tend to negate the solvation effects, which indicates that a higher molecular solvation energy (lower absolute value) is to be predicted when ionic size effects are considered. For both calculations on a protein and a DNA fragment systems in a 0.5M 1:1 ionic solution, a difference about 10 kcal/mol in solvation energies is found between the PB and the SMPNP predictions. Moreover, it is observed that the solvation energy decreases as ionic strength increases, which behavior is similar as those predicted by the traditional PB equation (without size effect) and by the uniform size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. (3) Nonequilibrium SMPNP simulations of ion permeation through a gramicidin A channel show that the ionic size effects lead to reduced ion current inside the channel compared with the results

  4. Designated drivers: the differing roles of divalent metal ions in surfactant adsorption at the oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ellen J; Beaman, Daniel K; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-12-17

    Divalent metal ions play numerous roles in biological, technological, and environmental systems. This study examines the role of a variety of ions, Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+), in the adsorption of sodium decanoate at the carbon tetrachloride-water interface. For all ions studied, the ions drive the adsorption of the surfactant to the interface. Using vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy and the carboxylic acid vibrational modes as a signature for metal ion binding, each metal salt is found to play a distinctly different role in the molecular characteristics of surfactant adsorption at the interface. Additional spectroscopic studies of the methyl and methylene vibrations are monitored to track the ordering of the alkyl chains when metal salts are added to solution. How the metal-surfactant binding impacts the surfactant structure, orientation, and solvation is explored. How these spectroscopic measurements compare with the degree of adsorption as measured by interfacial tension data is presented.

  5. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  6. Colloidal europium nanoparticles via a solvated metal atom dispersion approach and their surface enhanced Raman scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Urumese, Ancila; Jenjeti, Ramesh Naidu; Sampath, S; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2016-08-15

    Chemistry of lanthanide metals in their zerovalent state at the nanoscale remains unexplored due to the high chemical reactivity and difficulty in synthesizing nanoparticles by conventional reduction methods. In the present study, europium(0) nanoparticles, the most reactive of all the rare earth metals have been synthesized by solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) method using hexadecyl amine as the capping agent. The as-prepared europium nanoparticles show surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This lead to the investigation of its surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using visible light excitation source. The SERS activity of europium nanoparticles has been followed using 4-aminothiophenol and biologically important molecules such as hemoglobin and Cyt-c as the analytes. This is the first example of lanthanide metal nanoparticles as SERS substrate which can possibly be extended to other rare-earth metals. Since hemoglobin absorbs in the visible region, the use of visible light excitation source leads to surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS). The interaction of biomolecules with Eu(0) has been followed using FT-IR and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques. The results indicate that there is no major irreversible change in the structure of biomolecules upon interaction with europium nanoparticles.

  7. The role of correlation and solvation in ion interactions with B-DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Pabit, Suzette; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey; Baker, Nathan A.

    2016-01-19

    Ionic atmosphere around nucleic acids plays important roles in biological function. Large-scale explicit solvent simulations coupled to experimental assays such as anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS) can provide important insights into the structure and energetics of the ionic atmosphere but are time- and resource-intensive. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of classical density functional theory to model DNA-ion interactions and explore the balance between ion-DNA, ion-water, and ion-ion interactions. In particular, we compute the distribution of RbCl, SrCl2, and CoHexCl3 (cobalt hexammine chlo- ride) around a B-form DNA molecule. The accuracy of the DFT calculations was assessed by comparison between simulated and experimental ASAXS curves. As expected, these calculations revealed significant differences between the monovalent, divalent, and trivalent cations. About half of the DNA-bound Rb+ ions penetrate into the minor groove of the DNA and half adsorb on the DNA strands. The fraction of cations in the minor groove decreases for the larger Sr2+ ions and becomes zero for CoHex3+ ions, which all adsorb on the DNA strands. The distribution of CoHex3+ ions is mainly determined by Coulomb interactions, while ion-correlation forces play a central role in the monovalent Rb+ distribution and a combination of ion-correlation and hydration forces affect the Sr2+ distribution around DNA.

  8. Pulse radiolysis study of ion-species effects on the solvated electron in alkylammonium ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Takafumi; Asano, Akira; Yang, Jinfeng; Norizawa, Kimihiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Katoh, Ryuzi; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2009-12-01

    The spectra and kinetic behavior of solvated electrons (e sol-) in alkyl ammonium ionic liquids (ILs), i.e. N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (DEMMA-TFSI), N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DEMMA-BF 4), N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI), N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PP13-TFSI), N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (P13-TFSI), and N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (P14-TFSI) were investigated by the pulse radiolysis method. The e sol- in each of the ammonium ILs has an absorption peak at 1100 nm, with molar absorption coefficients of 1.5-2.3×10 4 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1. The e sol- decayed by first order with a rate constant of 1.4-6.4×10 6 s -1. The reaction rate constant of the solvated electron with pyrene (Py) was 1.5-3.5×10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 in the various ILs. These values were about one order of magnitude higher than the diffusion-controlled limits calculated from measured viscosities. The radiolytic yields ( G-value) of the e sol- were 0.8-1.7×10 -7 mol J -1. The formation rate constant of e sol- in DEMMA-TFSI was 3.9×10 10 s -1. The dry electron (e dry-) in DEMMA-TFSI reacts with Py with a rate constant of 7.9×10 11 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, three orders of magnitude higher than that of the e sol- reactions. The G-value of the e sol- in the picosecond time region is 1.2×10 -7 mol J -1. The capture of e dry- by scavengers was found to be very fast in ILs.

  9. The Role of Correlation and Solvation in Ion Interactions with B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sushko, Maria L.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The ionic atmospheres around nucleic acids play important roles in biological function. Large-scale explicit solvent simulations coupled to experimental assays such as anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering can provide important insights into the structure and energetics of such atmospheres but are time- and resource intensive. In this article, we use classical density functional theory to explore the balance among ion-DNA, ion-water, and ion-ion interactions in ionic atmospheres of RbCl, SrCl2, and CoHexCl3 (cobalt hexamine chloride) around a B-form DNA molecule. The accuracy of the classical density functional theory calculations was assessed by comparison between simulated and experimental anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering curves, demonstrating that an accurate model should take into account ion-ion correlation and ion hydration forces, DNA topology, and the discrete distribution of charges on the DNA backbone. As expected, these calculations revealed significant differences among monovalent, divalent, and trivalent cation distributions around DNA. Approximately half of the DNA-bound Rb+ ions penetrate into the minor groove of the DNA and half adsorb on the DNA backbone. The fraction of cations in the minor groove decreases for the larger Sr2+ ions and becomes zero for CoHex3+ ions, which all adsorb on the DNA backbone. The distribution of CoHex3+ ions is mainly determined by Coulomb and steric interactions, while ion-correlation forces play a central role in the monovalent Rb+ distribution and a combination of ion-correlation and hydration forces affect the Sr2+ distribution around DNA. This does not imply that correlations in CoHex solutions are weaker or stronger than for other ions. Steric inaccessibility of the grooves to large CoHex ions leads to their binding at the DNA surface. In this binding mode, first-order electrostatic interactions (Coulomb) dominate the overall binding energy as evidenced by low sensitivity of ionic distribution to the

  10. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  11. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  12. Computer simulations of helium-solvated ions: solid-like versus liquid-like defect structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, Stefano; Ancilotto, Francesco; Toigo, Flavio

    2007-03-01

    The local order around several alkali (Li^+ and Na^+) and alkali-earth (Be^+, Mg^+ and Ca^+) ions in ^4He clusters has been studied using ground-state path integral Monte Carlo simulations. We apply a criterion based on multipole dynamical correlations to discriminate between solid-like versus liquid-like behavior of the He solvent surrounding the impurity-ion. In agreement with existing experimental measurements in bulk helium, our findings suggest that Be^+ produces a solid-(``snowball'')-like structure, similarly to alkali ions and in contrast to heavier alkali-earth ones, for which a liquid-like environment is predicted.

  13. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands.

  14. Interaction between a transition-metal fluoride and a transition-metal hydride: water-mediated hydrofluoric acid evolution following fluoride solvation.

    PubMed

    Chierotti, Michele R; Rossin, Andrea; Gobetto, Roberto; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2013-11-04

    The reaction between the nickel(II) PCP pincer fluoride complex ((tBu)PCP)Ni(F) [(tBu)PCP = 2,6-C6H3(CH2P(t)Bu2)2] and the tungsten(II) carbonyl hydride CpW(H)(CO)3 (Cp = η(5)-C5H5(-)) leads to hydrofluoric acid evolution and formation of the bimetallic isocarbonylic species [CpW(CO)2(μ-κ,C:κ,O-CO)···Ni((tBu)PCP)]. The process has been monitored through multinuclear ((19)F, (31)P{(1)H}, (1)H) variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, collecting (19)F T1 data values for a fluoride ligand bound to a transition metal. The extremely short relaxation time (minimum value of 13 ms at 193 K) is ascribed to the large chemical shift anisotropy of the Ni-F bond (688 ppm). The in-depth NMR analysis has revealed that the fluoride-hydride interaction is not direct but water-mediated, at odds with what was previously observed for the "hydride-hydride" case ((tBu)PCP)Ni(H)/CpW(H)(CO)3. Kinetic measurements have unveiled that the first step of the overall mechanism is thought to be solvation of the fluoride ligand (as a result of Ni-F···H2O hydrogen bonding), while further reaction of the solvated fluoride with CpW(H)(CO)3 is extremely slow and competes with the side reaction of fluoride replacement by a water molecule on the nickel center to form the [((tBu)PCP)Ni(H2O)](+) aquo species. Finally, density functional theory analysis of the solvation process through a discrete + continuum model has been accomplished, at the M06//6-31+G(d,p) level of theory, to support the mechanistic hypothesis.

  15. Anion Solvation in Carbonate Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2015-11-16

    With the correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. As of now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. As a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  16. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Solvation Scheme for Computing Free Energies of Reactions at Metal-Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Faheem, Muhammad; Heyden, Andreas

    2014-08-12

    We report the development of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) method for modeling chemical reactions at metal-water interfaces. This novel solvation scheme combines planewave density function theory (DFT), periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method (PEECM) calculations using Gaussian-type orbitals, and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a free energy description of a complex metal-water system. We derive a potential of mean force (PMF) of the reaction system within the QM/MM framework. A fixed-size, finite ensemble of MM conformations is used to permit precise evaluation of the PMF of QM coordinates and its gradient defined within this ensemble. Local conformations of adsorbed reaction moieties are optimized using sequential MD-sampling and QM-optimization steps. An approximate reaction coordinate is constructed using a number of interpolated states and the free energy difference between adjacent states is calculated using the QM/MM-FEP method. By avoiding on-the-fly QM calculations and by circumventing the challenges associated with statistical averaging during MD sampling, a computational speedup of multiple orders of magnitude is realized. The method is systematically validated against the results of ab initio QM calculations and demonstrated for C-C cleavage in double-dehydrogenated ethylene glycol on a Pt (111) model surface.

  17. Metal ion substrate inhibition of ferrochelatase.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gregory A; Sampson, Matthew P; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2008-08-29

    Ferrochelatase catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX to form heme. Robust kinetic analyses of the reaction mechanism are complicated by the instability of ferrous iron in aqueous solution, particularly at alkaline pH values. At pH 7.00 the half-life for spontaneous oxidation of ferrous ion is approximately 2 min in the absence of metal complexing additives, which is sufficient for direct comparisons of alternative metal ion substrates with iron. These analyses reveal that purified recombinant ferrochelatase from both murine and yeast sources inserts not only ferrous iron but also divalent cobalt, zinc, nickel, and copper into protoporphyrin IX to form the corresponding metalloporphyrins but with considerable mechanistic variability. Ferrous iron is the preferred metal ion substrate in terms of apparent k(cat) and is also the only metal ion substrate not subject to severe substrate inhibition. Substrate inhibition occurs in the order Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Co(2+) > Ni(2+) and can be alleviated by the addition of metal complexing agents such as beta-mercaptoethanol or imidazole to the reaction buffer. These data indicate the presence of two catalytically significant metal ion binding sites that may coordinately regulate a selective processivity for the various potential metal ion substrates.

  18. Solvents Polarity Governs Ion Interactions and Transport in a Solvated Room Temperature Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Naresh C; Van Aken, Katherine; Thompson, Matthew W; Tiet, Felix; Jiang, Dr. De-en; Cummings, Peter; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    We explore the influence of the solvent dipole moment on cation anion interactions and transport in 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl), [BMIM+][Tf2N ]. Free energy profiles derived from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show a correlation of the cation anion separation and the equilibrium depth of the potential of mean force with the dipole moment of the solvent. Correlations of the ion diffusivity with the dipole moment and the concentration of the solvent were further demonstrated by classical MD simulations. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments with deuterated solvents reveal a complex picture of nanophase separation into the ionic liquid-rich and solvent-rich phases. The experiment corroborates the trend of concentration- and dipole moment-dependent enhancement of ion mobility by the solvent, as suggested by the simulations. Despite the considerable structural complexity of ionic liquid solvent mixtures, we can rationalize and generalize the trends governing ionic transport in these complex electrolytes.

  19. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2017-02-08

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems.

  20. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems. PMID:28045509

  1. Solvents Polarity Governs Ion Interactions and Transport in a Solvated Room Temperature Ionic Liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Osti, Naresh C; Van Aken, Katherine; Thompson, Matthew W; ...

    2017-01-01

    We explore the influence of the solvent dipole moment on cation anion interactions and transport in 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl), [BMIM+][Tf2N ]. Free energy profiles derived from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show a correlation of the cation anion separation and the equilibrium depth of the potential of mean force with the dipole moment of the solvent. Correlations of the ion diffusivity with the dipole moment and the concentration of the solvent were further demonstrated by classical MD simulations. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments with deuterated solvents reveal a complex picture of nanophase separation into the ionic liquid-rich and solvent-rich phases. The experimentmore » corroborates the trend of concentration- and dipole moment-dependent enhancement of ion mobility by the solvent, as suggested by the simulations. Despite the considerable structural complexity of ionic liquid solvent mixtures, we can rationalize and generalize the trends governing ionic transport in these complex electrolytes.« less

  2. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  3. The XAS Model of the Copper(II)-Imidazole Complex Ion in Liquid Aqueous Solution: A Strongly Solvated Square Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    Copper K-edge EXAFS and MXAN analyses were combined to evaluate the structure of the copper(II)-imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution. Both methods converged to the same square pyramidal inner coordination sphere [Cu(Im)4Lax]2+, (Lax indeterminate) with four equatorial nitrogens at: EXAFS, 2.02±0.01 Å, and; MXAN, 1.99±0.03 Å. A short axial N/O scatterer, (Lax), was found at 2.12±0.02 (EXAFS) or 2.14±0.06 Å (MXAN). A second but very weak axial Cu-N/O interaction was found at 2.9±0.1 Å (EXAFS) or 3.0±0.1 Å (MXAN). In the MXAN fits, only a square pyramidal structural model successfully reproduced the doubled maximum of the rising K-edge XAS, specifically excluding an octahedral model. Both EXAFS and MXAN also found eight outlying oxygen scatterers at 4.2±0.3 Å that contributed significant intensity over the entire XAS energy range. Two prominent rising K-edge shoulders at 8987.1 eV and 8990.5 eV were found to reflect multiple scattering from the 3.0 Å axial scatterer and the imidazole rings, respectively. In the MXAN fits, the imidazole rings took in-plane rotationally staggered positions about copper. The combined (EXAFS and MXAN) model for the unconstrained cupric-imidazole complex ion in liquid aqueous solution is an axially elongated square pyramidal core, with a weak non-bonded interaction at the second axial coordination position and a solvation shell of eight nearest neighbor water molecules. This core square pyramidal motif has persisted through [Cu(H2O)5]2+, [Cu(NH3)4(NH3,H2O)]2+,1,2 and now [Cu(Im)4Lax)]2+, and appears to be the geometry preferred by unconstrained aqueous-phase Cu(II) complex ions. PMID:22316238

  4. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  5. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  6. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P.; Do, Trang N.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3.5 × 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  7. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2006-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  8. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  9. Solid state cathode materials for secondary magnesium-ion batteries that are compatible with magnesium metal anodes in water-free electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Adam J.; Bartlett, Bart M.

    2016-10-01

    With high elemental abundance, large volumetric capacity, and dendrite-free metal deposition, magnesium metal anodes offer promise in beyond-lithium-ion batteries. However, the increased charge density associated with the divalent magnesium-ion (Mg2+), relative to lithium-ion (Li+) hinders the ion-insertion and extraction processes within many materials and structures known for lithium-ion cathodes. As a result, many recent investigations incorporate known amounts of water within the electrolyte to provide temporary solvation of the Mg2+, improving diffusion kinetics. Unfortunately with the addition of water, compatibility with magnesium metal anodes disappears due to forming an ion-insulating passivating layer. In this short review, recent advances in solid state cathode materials for rechargeable magnesium-ion batteries are highlighted, with a focus on cathode materials that do not require water contaminated electrolyte solutions for ion insertion and extraction processes.

  10. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  11. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-15

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  12. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2004-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework; further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability; use molecule structure building software to generate large

  13. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Dixon, David A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2003-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM3) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: (1) further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group-metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM3 framework; (2) further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability; (3) use molecule structure building software to

  14. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Dixon, David A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2002-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM3) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the framework of MM3. (2) Further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability. (3

  15. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: • further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework • further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability • use molecule structure building software to generate

  16. Neutral transition metal hydrides as acids in hydrogen bonding and proton transfer: media polarity and specific solvation effects.

    PubMed

    Levina, Vladislava A; Filippov, Oleg A; Gutsul, Evgenii I; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Lledos, Agusti; Shubina, Elena S

    2010-08-18

    Structural, spectroscopic, and electronic features of weak hydrogen-bonded complexes of CpM(CO)(3)H (M = Mo (1a), W (1b)) hydrides with organic bases (phosphine oxides R(3)PO (R = n-C(8)H(17), NMe(2)), amines NMe(3), NEt(3), and pyridine) are determined experimentally (variable temperature IR) and computationally (DFT/M05). The intermediacy of these complexes in reversible proton transfer is shown, and the thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH degrees , DeltaS degrees ) of each reaction step are determined in hexane. Assignment of the product ion pair structure is made with the help of the frequency calculations. The solvent effects were studied experimentally using IR spectroscopy in CH(2)Cl(2), THF, and CH(3)CN and computationally using conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) calculations. This complementary approach reveals the particular importance of specific solvation for the hydrogen-bond formation step. The strength of the hydrogen bond between hydrides 1 and the model bases is similar to that of the M-H...X hydrogen bond between 1 and THF (X = O) or CH(3)CN (X = N) or between CH(2)Cl(2) and the same bases. The latter competitive weak interactions lower the activities of both the hydrides and the bases in the proton transfer reaction. In this way, these secondary effects shift the proton transfer equilibrium and lead to the counterintuitive hampering of proton transfer upon solvent change from hexane to moderately polar CH(2)Cl(2) or THF.

  17. Metal ion separations by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyves, J. de; San Miguel, E.R. de

    1999-06-01

    Carrier-mediated transport through supported liquid membranes is currently recognized as a potentially valuable technology for selective separation and concentration of toxic and valuable metal ions. In this paper, a review of the fundamental aspects concerning metal ion transport and the influencing factors are surveyed in terms of data modeling, membrane efficiency (permeability, selectivity, stability), and data acquisition and evaluation. An account of the information reviewed demonstrates the need for critical reflection on system performances in order to accomplish scaling up operations. On the same basis, an attempt to outline some future trends in the field is presented.

  18. Binding selectivity of dibenzo-18-crown-6 for alkali metal cations in aqueous solution: A density functional theory study using a continuum solvation model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) exhibits the binding selectivity for alkali metal cations in solution phase. In this study, we investigate the main forces that determine the binding selectivity of DB18C6 for the metal cations in aqueous solution using the density functional theory (DFT) and the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM). Results The bond dissociation free energies (BDFE) of DB18C6 complexes with alkali metal cations (M+-DB18C6, M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) in aqueous solution are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31 + G(d) level using the CPCM. It is found that the theoretical BDFE is the largest for K+-DB18C6 and decreases as the size of the metal cation gets larger or smaller than that of K+, which agrees well with previous experimental results. Conclusion The solvation energy of M+-DB18C6 in aqueous solution plays a key role in determining the binding selectivity of DB18C6. In particular, the non-electrostatic dispersion interaction between the solute and solvent, which depends strongly on the complex structure, is largely responsible for the different solvation energies of M+-DB18C6. This study shows that the implicit solvation model like the CPCM works reasonably well in predicting the binding selectivity of DB18C6 in aqueous solution. PMID:22873431

  19. Parameterization of highly charged metal ions using the 12-6-4 LJ-type nonbonded model in explicit water.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Song, Lin Frank; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-01-22

    Highly charged metal ions act as catalytic centers and structural elements in a broad range of chemical complexes. The nonbonded model for metal ions is extensively used in molecular simulations due to its simple form, computational speed, and transferability. We have proposed and parametrized a 12-6-4 LJ (Lennard-Jones)-type nonbonded model for divalent metal ions in previous work, which showed a marked improvement over the 12-6 LJ nonbonded model. In the present study, by treating the experimental hydration free energies and ion-oxygen distances of the first solvation shell as targets for our parametrization, we evaluated 12-6 LJ parameters for 18 M(III) and 6 M(IV) metal ions for three widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, and TIP4PEW). As expected, the interaction energy underestimation of the 12-6 LJ nonbonded model increases dramatically for the highly charged metal ions. We then parametrized the 12-6-4 LJ-type nonbonded model for these metal ions with the three water models. The final parameters reproduced the target values with good accuracy, which is consistent with our previous experience using this potential. Finally, tests were performed on a protein system, and the obtained results validate the transferability of these nonbonded model parameters.

  20. Effect of metal ions on positron annihilation characteristics in metal ion containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St. Clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of developing improved moisture-resistant epoxy resins, two different types of epoxy resins containing variable mole ratios of chromium ions per polymer repeat unit were developed. Positron annihilation characteristics have been investigated in these resins as a function of their metal ion content. In both cases, the presence of metal ions reduces the lifetime as well as the intensity of the long life component. The long life component intensity reduction is considerably more pronounced than the lifetime reduction. These results have been discussed in terms of increased unpaired electron density at Ps formation sites due to the presence of chromium ions in the matrix.

  1. Chitosan Hydrogel Structure Modulated by Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan (CS) has generated a great deal of interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. In the utilization of CS materials, hydrogel is a major and vital branch. CS has the ability to coordinate with many metal ions by a chelation mechanism. While most researchers focused on the applications of complexes between CS and metal ions, the complexes can also influence gelation process and structure of CS hydrogel. In the present work, such influence was studied with different metal ions, revealing two different kinds of mechanisms. Strong affinity between CS and metal ions leads to structural transition from orientation to multi-layers, while weak affinity leads to composite gel with in-situ formed inorganic particles. The study gave a better understanding of the gelation mechanism and provided strategies for the modulation of hydrogel morphology, which benefited the design of new CS-based materials with hierarchical structure and facilitated the utilization of polysaccharide resources. PMID:27777398

  2. Chitosan Hydrogel Structure Modulated by Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-10-01

    As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan (CS) has generated a great deal of interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. In the utilization of CS materials, hydrogel is a major and vital branch. CS has the ability to coordinate with many metal ions by a chelation mechanism. While most researchers focused on the applications of complexes between CS and metal ions, the complexes can also influence gelation process and structure of CS hydrogel. In the present work, such influence was studied with different metal ions, revealing two different kinds of mechanisms. Strong affinity between CS and metal ions leads to structural transition from orientation to multi-layers, while weak affinity leads to composite gel with in-situ formed inorganic particles. The study gave a better understanding of the gelation mechanism and provided strategies for the modulation of hydrogel morphology, which benefited the design of new CS-based materials with hierarchical structure and facilitated the utilization of polysaccharide resources.

  3. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  4. Alkali metal ion binding to amino acids versus their methyl esters: affinity trends and structural changes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jody M; Cerda, Blas A; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2002-03-15

    The relative alkali metal ion (M(+)) affinities (binding energies) between seventeen different amino acids (AA) and the corresponding methyl esters (AAOMe) were determined in the gas phase by the kinetic method based on the dissociation of AA-M(+)-AAOMe heterodimers (M=Li, Na, K, Cs). With the exception of proline, the Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) affinities of the other aliphatic amino acids increase in the order AAAAOMe is already observed for K(+). Proline binds more strongly than its methyl ester to all M(+) except Li(+). Ab initio calculations on the M(+) complexes of alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, proline, glycine methyl ester, alanine methyl ester, and proline methyl ester show that their energetically most favorable complexes result from charge solvation, except for proline which forms salt bridges. The most stable mode of charge solvation depends on the ligand (AA or AAOMe) and, for AA, it gradually changes with metal ion size. Esters chelate all M(+) ions through the amine and carbonyl groups. Amino acids coordinate Li(+) and Na(+) ions through the amine and carbonyl groups as well, but K(+) and Cs(+) ions are coordinated by the O atoms of the carboxyl group. Upon consideration of these differences in favored binding geometries, the theoretically derived relative M(+) affinities between aliphatic AA and AAOMe are in good overall agreement with the above given experimental trends. The majority of side chain functionalized amino acids studied show experimentally the affinity order AAions, which is consistent with charge solvation. Deviations are only observed with the most basic amino acids lysine and arginine, whose K(+) (for arginine) and Cs(+) complexes (for both) follow the affinity order AA>AAOMe. The latter ranking is attributed to salt bridge formation.

  5. Prediction of the pKa's of aqueous metal ion +2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Virgil E; Felmy, Andrew R; Dixon, David A

    2015-03-26

    Aqueous metal ions play an important role in many areas of chemistry. The acidities of [Be(H2O)4](2+), [M(H2O)6](2+), M = Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+), and [M(H2O)n](2+), M = Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), n = 7 and 8, complexes have been predicted using density functional theory, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory in the gas phase. pKa's in aqueous solution were predicted by using self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations with different solvation models. The most common binding motif of the majority of the metal +2 complexes is coordination number (CN) 6, with each hexaaquo cluster having reasonably high symmetry for the best arrangement of the water molecules in the first solvation shell. Be(2+) is tetracoordinated, but a second solvation shell of 8 waters is needed to predict the pKa. The Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) aquo clusters have a coordination number of 7 or 8 as found in terms of the energy of the reaction M(H2O)7(2+) + H2O → M(H2O)8(2+) and the pKa values. The calculated geometries are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The SCRF calculations with the conductor-like screening model (COSMO), and the conductor polarized continuum model (CPCM) using COSMO-RS radii, consistently agree best with experiment at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The CCSD(T) level provides the most accurate pKa's, and the MP2 level also provides reliable predictions. Our predictions were used to elucidate the properties of metal +2 ion complexes. The pKa predictions provide confirmation of the size of the first solvation shell sizes. The calculations show that it is still difficult to predict pKa's using this cluster/implicit solvent approach to better than 1 pKa unit.

  6. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  7. Parameterization of Highly Charged Metal Ions Using the 12-6-4 LJ-Type Nonbonded Model in Explicit Water

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Highly charged metal ions act as catalytic centers and structural elements in a broad range of chemical complexes. The nonbonded model for metal ions is extensively used in molecular simulations due to its simple form, computational speed, and transferability. We have proposed and parametrized a 12-6-4 LJ (Lennard-Jones)-type nonbonded model for divalent metal ions in previous work, which showed a marked improvement over the 12-6 LJ nonbonded model. In the present study, by treating the experimental hydration free energies and ion–oxygen distances of the first solvation shell as targets for our parametrization, we evaluated 12-6 LJ parameters for 18 M(III) and 6 M(IV) metal ions for three widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, and TIP4PEW). As expected, the interaction energy underestimation of the 12-6 LJ nonbonded model increases dramatically for the highly charged metal ions. We then parametrized the 12-6-4 LJ-type nonbonded model for these metal ions with the three water models. The final parameters reproduced the target values with good accuracy, which is consistent with our previous experience using this potential. Finally, tests were performed on a protein system, and the obtained results validate the transferability of these nonbonded model parameters. PMID:25145273

  8. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place.

  9. Femtosecond Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Solvated Transition-Metal Complexes: Deciphering the Interplay of Electronic and Structural Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Kim, Tae Kyu; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2011-04-21

    We present the first implementation of femtosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy as an ultrafast direct probe of the excited-state valence orbitals in solution-phase molecules. This method is applied to photoinduced spin crossover of [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+, where the ultrafast spinstate conversion of the metal ion, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation, is directly measured using the intrinsic spin-state selectivity of the soft X-ray L-edge transitions. Our results provide important experimental data concerning the mechanism of ultrafast spin-state conversion and subsequent electronic and structural dynamics, highlighting the potential of this technique to study ultrafast phenomena in the solution phase.

  10. Ion irradiation effects on metallic nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C.S.; Foran, G.J.; Cookson, D.J.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2008-04-02

    We have investigated structural and morphological properties of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) exposed to ion irradiation. NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy in combination with advanced synchrotron-based analytical techniques, in particular X-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. A number of different effects were observed depending on the irradiation conditions. At energies where nuclear stopping is predominant, structural disorder/amorphization followed by inverse Ostwald ripening/dissolution due to ion beam mixing was observed for Au and Cu NCs embedded in SiO{sub 2}. The ion-irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition in the NCs, which cannot be achieved in the corresponding bulk metals, was attributed to their initially higher structural energy as compared to bulk material and possibly preferential nucleation of the amorphous phase at the NC/SiO{sub 2} interface. At very high irradiation energies (swift heavy ion irradiation), where the energy loss is nearly entirely due to electronic stopping, a size-dependent shape transformation of the NCs from spheres to rod like shapes was apparent in Au NCs. Our preliminary results are in good agreement with considerations on melting of the NCs in the ion track as one mechanism involved in the shape transformation.

  11. Three-Dimensional Water Networks Solvating AN Excess Positive Charge: New Insights Into the Molecular Physics of Ion Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolke, Conrad T.; Fournier, Joseph; Weddle, Gary H.; Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris; Johnson, Mark

    2015-06-01

    In a recent effort our group investigated the vibrational mechanics of water using the cage of 20 water molecules surrounding an alkali ion as a paradigm system. The M+(H2O)20 clusters are well known "magic number" species (for the larger alkali metals) and are thought to form a pentagonal dodecahedral web encapsulating the ion. We are attracted to these systems because they are sufficiently large to display broad OH fundamental envelopes in a manner similar to that found in bulk water, but do so with a relatively small number of structurally distinct, three coordinated sites in a finite assembly that, although challenging, can be analyzed with electronic structure calculations in the context of a "supermolecule". We show how this arrangement can provide an ideal platform on which to unambiguously identify the spectral signatures of particular binding sites, information that is invoked to explain the bulk (and interface) spectrum of water but cannot be directly measured in bulk water. Although this behavior is most relevant to simulations of interfacial water, a future direction of this study will be gaining site-specific information for water in an extended two dimensional structure, and the elucidation of the paths of spectral diffusion associated with this arrangement. This unprecedented work will clarify a number of open questions regarding the site-specificity of ground and vibrationally excited state dynamics.

  12. Interplay of metal ions and urease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Flugga, Nicholas; Boer, Jodi L.; Mulrooney, Scott B.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Urease, the first enzyme to be crystallized, contains a dinuclear nickel metallocenter that catalyzes the decomposition of urea to produce ammonia, a reaction of great agricultural and medical importance. Several mechanisms of urease catalysis have been proposed on the basis of enzyme crystal structures, model complexes, and computational efforts, but the precise steps in catalysis and the requirement of nickel versus other metals remain unclear. Purified bacterial urease is partially activated via incubation with carbon dioxide plus nickel ions; however, in vitro activation also has been achieved with manganese and cobalt. In vivo activation of most ureases requires accessory proteins that function as nickel metallochaperones and GTP-dependent molecular chaperones or play other roles in the maturation process. In addition, some microorganisms control their levels of urease by metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20046957

  13. Fluorescence enhancement of photoswitchable metal ion sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Georgina; Heng, Sabrina; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-12-01

    Spiropyran-based fluorescence sensors are an ideal target for intracellular metal ion sensing, due to their biocompatibility, red emission frequency and photo-controlled reversible analyte binding for continuous signal monitoring. However, increasing the brightness of spiropyran-based sensors would extend their sensing capability for live-cell imaging. In this work we look to enhance the fluorescence of spiropyran-based sensors, by incorporating an additional fluorophore into the sensor design. We report a 5-membered monoazacrown bearing spiropyran with metal ion specificity, modified to incorporate the pyrene fluorophore. The effect of N-indole pyrene modification on the behavior of the spiropyran molecule is explored, with absorbance and fluorescence emission characterization. This first generation sensor provides an insight into fluorescence-enhancement of spiropyran molecules.

  14. Effects of metal ion adduction on the gas-phase conformations of protein ions.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Merenbloom, Samuel I; Williams, Evan R

    2013-11-01

    Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of α-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca(2+), is larger for the holo-form compared with the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution.

  15. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Metal assisted focused-ion beam nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannegulla, Akash; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Focused-ion beam milling is a versatile technique for maskless nanofabrication. However, the nonuniform ion beam profile and material redeposition tend to disfigure the surface morphology near the milling areas and degrade the fidelity of nanoscale pattern transfer, limiting the applicability of the technique. The ion-beam induced damage can deteriorate the performance of photonic devices and hinders the precision of template fabrication for nanoimprint lithography. To solve the issue, we present a metal assisted focused-ion beam (MAFIB) process in which a removable sacrificial aluminum layer is utilized to protect the working material. The new technique ensures smooth surfaces and fine milling edges; in addition, it permits direct formation of v-shaped grooves with tunable angles on dielectric substrates or metal films, silver for instance, which are rarely achieved by using traditional nanolithography followed by anisotropic etching processes. MAFIB was successfully demonstrated to directly create nanopatterns on different types of substrates with high fidelity and reproducibility. The technique provides the capability and flexibility necessary to fabricate nanophotonic devices and nanoimprint templates.

  17. On the Metal Ion Selectivity of Oxoacid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between metal chelate stability, ligand basicity, and metal ion acidity are reviewed and the general applicability is illustrated by linear correlations between aqueous stability constants and ligand pKa values for 35 metals with 26 ligands. The results confirm that most individual ligands of this type exhibit a stability ordering that correlates with the Lewis acidity of the metal ion. It is concluded that the general metal ion selectivity exhibited by liquid-liquid oxoacid extractants such as carboxylic acids, -diketones, and alkylphosphoric acids reflects the intrinsic affinity of the metal ion for the negative oxygen donor ligand.

  18. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  19. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-15

    An assembly for a commercial Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga{sup +} ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga{sup +} and Au{sup +} ion beams will be reported as well.

  20. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  1. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  2. Solvation structure around ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) in lithium halide solutions

    PubMed Central

    Josefsson, Ida; Eriksson, Susanna K.; Rensmo, Håkan; Odelius, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The solvation of the ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) ion ([Ru(bpy)3]2+) is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of lithium halide solutions in polar solvents. The anion distribution around the [Ru(bpy)3]2+ complex exhibits a strong solvent dependence. In aqueous solution, the iodide ion forms a solvent shared complex with [Ru(bpy)3]2+, but not in the other solvents. Between Cl– and [Ru(bpy)3]2+, the strong hydration of the chloride ion results in a solvent separated complex where more than one solvent molecule separates the anion from the metal center. Hence, tailored solvation properties in electrolytes is a route to influence ion-ion interactions and related electron transfer processes. PMID:26798838

  3. Rational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2000-09-30

    The discriminate bonding of metal ions is a challenge to the synthetic chemist and a phenomenon of considerable practical importance.1 An important feature of many technical applications is the specific or preferential binding of a single metal ion in the presence of many metals. Examples range from large-volume uses (e.g. ferric EDTA as a plant food, calcium complexing agents as water softeners or anticaking formulations) to very high technology applications (technetium complexation in radiopharmaceuticals, synthetic metalloenzymes). We are interested in efficient and discriminate binding of actinides for waste stream remediation. Actinides represent a major and long-lived contaminant in nuclear waste. While the separation of actinides from other radioactive components of waste, such as Sr and Cs, is relatively well established, the separation of actinides from each other and in complex solutions (e.g. those found in tank wastes) is not as well resolved. The challenge of designing metal-specific (actinide) ligands is facilitated by examples from nature. Bacteria synthesize Fe(III)-specific ligands, called siderophores, to sequester Fe(III) from the environment and return it to the cell. The similarities between Fe(III) and Pu(IV) (their charge-to-size ratios and acidity), make the siderophores prototypical for designing actinide-specific ligands. The chelating groups present in siderophores are usually hydroxamic acids and catecholamides. We have developed derivatives of these natural products which have improved properties. The catechol derivatives are the 2,3-dihydroxyterephthalamides (TAMs), and 3,4-dihydroxysulfonamides (SFAMs), and the hydroxamic acid derivatives are three isomers of hydroxypyridinones, 1,2- HOPO, 3,2-HOPO, and 3,4-HOPO. All of these ligands are attached to molecular backbones by amides and a very important feature of HOPO and CAM ligands is a strong hydrogen bonds formed between the amide proton and the adjacent phenolic oxygen in the metal

  4. Laser materials based on transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncorgé, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to review the spectroscopic properties of the main laser materials based on transition metal ions which lead to noticeable laser performance at room temperature and, for very few cases, because of unique properties, when they are operated at cryogenic temperatures. The description also includes the materials which are currently being used as saturable absorbers for passive-Q-switching of a variety of other near- and mid-infrared solid state lasers. A substantial part of the article is devoted first to the description of the energy levels and of the absorption and emission transitions of the transition metal ions in various types of environments by using the well-known Tanabe-Sugano diagrams. It is shown in particular how these diagrams can be used along with other theoretical considerations to understand and describe the spectroscopic properties of ions sitting in crystal field environments of near-octahedral or near-tetrahedral symmetry. The second part is then dedicated to the description (positions and intensities) of the main absorption and emission features which characterize the different types of materials.

  5. How do metal ions direct ribozyme folding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, Natalia A.; Thirumalai, D.

    2015-10-01

    Ribozymes, which carry out phosphoryl-transfer reactions, often require Mg2+ ions for catalytic activity. The correct folding of the active site and ribozyme tertiary structure is also regulated by metal ions in a manner that is not fully understood. Here we employ coarse-grained molecular simulations to show that individual structural elements of the group I ribozyme from the bacterium Azoarcus form spontaneously in the unfolded ribozyme even at very low Mg2+ concentrations, and are transiently stabilized by the coordination of Mg2+ ions to specific nucleotides. However, competition for scarce Mg2+ and topological constraints that arise from chain connectivity prevent the complete folding of the ribozyme. A much higher Mg2+ concentration is required for complete folding of the ribozyme and stabilization of the active site. When Mg2+ is replaced by Ca2+ the ribozyme folds, but the active site remains unstable. Our results suggest that group I ribozymes utilize the same interactions with specific metal ligands for both structural stability and chemical activity.

  6. Accumulation of metal ions by pectinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiana, S.; Deiana, L.; Palma, A.; Premoli, A.; Senette, C.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanisms which regulate the interactions of metal ions with partially methyl esterified linear polymers of α-1,4 linked D-galacturonic acid units (pectinates), well represented in the root inner and outer apoplasm, is of great relevance to understand the processes which control their accumulation at the soil-root interface as well as their mobilization by plant metabolites. Accumulation of a metal by pectinates can be affected by the presence of other metals so that competition or distribution could be expected depending on the similar or different affinity of the metal ions towards the binding sites, mainly represented by the carboxylate groups. In order to better understand the mechanism of accumulation in the apoplasm of several metal ions, the sorption of Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cr(III) by a Ca-polygalacturonate gel, used as model of the soil-root interface, with a degree of esterification of 18% (PGAE1) and 65% (PGAE2) was studied at pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 in the presence of CaCl2 2.5 mM.. The results show that sorption increases with increasing both the initial metal concentration and pH. A similar sorption trend was evidenced for Cu(II) and Pb(II) and for Zn(II) and Cd(II), indicating that the mechanism of sorption for these two ionic couples is quite different. As an example, at pH 6.0 and an initial metal concentration equal to 2.0 mM, the amount of Cu(II) and Pb(II) sorbed was about 1.98 mg-1 of PGAE1 while that of Cd(II) and Zn(II) was about 1.2 mg-1. Cr(III) showed a rather different sorption trend and a much higher amount (2.8 mg-1of PGAE1 at pH 6.0) was recorded. The higher affinity of Cr(III) for the polysaccharidic matrix is attributable to the formation of Cr(III) polynuclear species in solution, as shown by the distribution diagrams obtained through the MEDUSA software. On the basis of these findings, the following affinity towards the PGAE1 can be assessed: Cr(III) > Cu(II) ? Pb(II) > Zn (II) ? Cd

  7. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at −70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ≫ Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  8. Anion Solvation in Carbonate-Based Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    von Wald Cresce, Arthur; Gobet, Mallory; Borodin, Oleg; Peng, Jing; Russell, Selena M.; Wikner, Emily; Fu, Adele; Hu, Libo; Lee, Hung-Sui; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Greenbaum, Steven; Amine, Khalil; Xu, Kang

    2015-11-16

    The correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. Now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. Moreover, as a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  9. Anion Solvation in Carbonate-Based Electrolytes

    DOE PAGES

    von Wald Cresce, Arthur; Gobet, Mallory; Borodin, Oleg; ...

    2015-11-16

    The correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. Now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. Moreover, as a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate,more » PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.« less

  10. Photoionization and time-dependent stokes shift of coumarin 307 in soft matter: solvation and radical-ion pair recombination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam; Selvaraju, Chellappan; Ramamurthy, Perumal

    2011-09-22

    Photoionization, fluorescence time-dependent Stokes shift (TDSS), and rotational dynamics of coumarin 307 (C307) have been investigated in soft matter system such as micelles using time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Photoionization of C307 leads to the formation of coumarin radical cation and hydrated electron, which were characterized by their respective transient absorption. The photoionization yields are significantly higher in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle than in cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and neutral Triton X-100 (TX-100) micelles, indicating the influence of micellar surface charge on the efficient separation of radical cation-hydrated electron pair. The CTAB micelle favors the recombination of radical cation and hydrated electron leading to the formation of triplet state of C307, which causes a decrease in the photoionization yield. C307 exhibits TDSS in all micelles; the time evolution and the magnitude of the TDSS depend on nature of the micelle. In TX-100 micelles, the decay of the TDSS exhibits ultraslow component (165 ns) and is affected by the presence of electron scavengers. The ultraslow component in TX-100 micelle originates from the recombination of radical cation-hydrated electron, which results in the formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state; such formation of TICT state was not observed in SDS and CTAB micelles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where the radical-ion pair recombination dynamics is probed using TDSS in combination with time-resolved transient absorption studies. The activation energy for the solvent relaxation and radical-ion pair (solvent separated) recombination process was found to be 6.1 and 3.0 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Temperature effect on TDSS in TX-100 micelles confirmed the increase in the water hydration, and size of the micelle influences the relative contribution of the solvation and radical-ion pair

  11. Antifungal Properties of Electrically Generated Metallic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Berger, T. J.; Spadaro, J. A.; Bierman, Richard; Chapin, S. E.; Becker, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative investigation was undertaken to study the susceptibility of unicellular eucaryotic organisms (yeasts) to metallic cations generated by low levels of direct current. Results were characteristic of effects obtained previously using clinical and standard bacteria test organisms. The present study demonstrated that anodic silver (Ag+) at low direct currents had inhibitory and fungicidal properties. Broth dilution susceptibility tests were made on several species of Candida and one species of Torulopsis. Growth in all isolates was inhibited by concentrations of electrically generated silver ions between 0.5 and 4.7 μg/ml, and silver exhibited fungicidal properties at concentrations as low as 1.9 μg/ml. The inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations of electrically generated silver ions are lower than those reported for other silver compounds. Images PMID:1034467

  12. Infrared consequence spectroscopy of gaseous protonated and metal ion cationized complexes.

    PubMed

    Fridgen, Travis D

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the new and exciting techniques of infrared consequence spectroscopy (sometimes called action spectroscopy) of gaseous ions are reviewed. These techniques include vibrational predissociation spectroscopy and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and they typically complement one another in the systems studied and the information gained. In recent years infrared consequence spectroscopy has provided long-awaited direct evidence into the structures of gaseous ions from organometallic species to strong ionic hydrogen bonded structures to large biomolecules. Much is being learned with respect to the structures of ions without their stabilizing solvent which can be used to better understand the effect of solvent on their structures. This review mainly covers the topics with which the author has been directly involved in research: structures of proton-bound dimers, protonated amino acids and DNA bases, amino acid and DNA bases bound to metal ions and, more recently, solvated ionic complexes. It is hoped that this review reveals the impact that infrared consequence spectroscopy has had on the field of gaseous ion chemistry.

  13. A Study of the Hydration of the Alkali Metal Ions in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of the alkali metal ions in aqueous solution has been studied by large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and double difference infrared spectroscopy (DDIR). The structures of the dimethyl sulfoxide solvated alkali metal ions in solution have been determined to support the studies in aqueous solution. The results of the LAXS and DDIR measurements show that the sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium ions all are weakly hydrated with only a single shell of water molecules. The smaller lithium ion is more strongly hydrated, most probably with a second hydration shell present. The influence of the rubidium and cesium ions on the water structure was found to be very weak, and it was not possible to quantify this effect in a reliable way due to insufficient separation of the O–D stretching bands of partially deuterated water bound to these metal ions and the O–D stretching bands of the bulk water. Aqueous solutions of sodium, potassium and cesium iodide and cesium and lithium hydroxide have been studied by LAXS and M–O bond distances have been determined fairly accurately except for lithium. However, the number of water molecules binding to the alkali metal ions is very difficult to determine from the LAXS measurements as the number of distances and the temperature factor are strongly correlated. A thorough analysis of M–O bond distances in solid alkali metal compounds with ligands binding through oxygen has been made from available structure databases. There is relatively strong correlation between M–O bond distances and coordination numbers also for the alkali metal ions even though the M–O interactions are weak and the number of complexes of potassium, rubidium and cesium with well-defined coordination geometry is very small. The mean M–O bond distance in the hydrated sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium ions in aqueous solution have been determined to be 2.43(2), 2.81(1), 2.98(1) and 3.07(1) Å, which corresponds to six-, seven-, eight- and

  14. Yeast metallothionein function in metal ion detoxification.

    PubMed

    Ecker, D J; Butt, T R; Sternberg, E J; Neeper, M P; Debouck, C; Gorman, J A; Crooke, S T

    1986-12-25

    A genetic approach was taken to test the function of yeast metallothionein in metal ion detoxification. A yeast strain was constructed in which the metallothionein locus was deleted (cup1 delta). The cup1 delta strain was complemented with normal or mutant metallothionein genes under normal or constitutive regulatory control on high copy episomal plasmids. Metal resistance of the cup1 delta strain with and without the metallothionein-expressing vectors was analyzed. The normally regulated metallothionein gene conferred resistance only to copper (1000-fold); constitutively expressed metallothionein conferred resistance to both copper (500-fold) and cadmium (1000-fold), but not to mercury, zinc, silver, cobalt, nickel, gold, platinum, lanthanum, uranium, or tin. Two mutant versions of the metallothionein gene were constructed and tested for their ability to confer metal resistance in the cup1 delta background. The first had a deletion of a highly conserved amino acid sequence (Lys-Lys-Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser). The second was a hybrid gene consisting of the sequences coding for the first 20 amino acids of the yeast protein fused to the monkey metallothionein gene. Expression of these genes under the CUP1 promoter provided significant protection from copper, but none of the other metals tested. These results demonstrate that there is significant flexibility in the structural requirements for metallothionein to function in copper detoxification and that yeast metallothionein is also capable of detoxifying cadmium under conditions of constitutive expression.

  15. Metal-ion rescue revisited: biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4-P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure.

  16. Predicting relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria (Microtox{reg_sign}) using ion characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    The use of predictive effects models with metals has received little attention in toxicology. The purpose of this study was to predict the relative toxicity of individual metal ions and metal mixtures using ion characteristics. The concentration of metal resulting in a 50% reduction in light output (EC50) in marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) was determined for several metals using the Microtox{reg_sign} Toxicity Analyzer. Trends in metal toxicity were predicted by combining metal speciation calculations with empirical models based on metal ion characteristics. These trends were consistent for nine divalent metals (Ca{prime} Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) whether the media mimicked salt water (NaC, medium) or freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium). When expanding the study to include an additional 14 mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions, ion characteristics were still useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria. The prediction of nonadditive toxic effects using metal mixtures was also possible based on ion characteristics. Overall, models based on ion characteristics show much promise for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} assay.

  17. Behavior of metal ions in bioelectrochemical systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhihao; Chang, Dingming; Ma, Jingxing; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been focused on by many researchers to treat wastewater and recover energy or valuable chemicals from wastes. In BESs, metal ions play an important role in the conductivity of solution, reactors' internal resistance, power generation, chemical production and activity of microorganisms. Additionally, the metal ions are also involved in anodic or cathodic reaction processes directly or indirectly in BESs. This paper reviews the behavior of metal ions in BESs, including (1) increase of the conductivity of electrolyte and decrease of internal resistance, (2) transfer for desalination, (3) enhancement or inhibition of the biocatalysis in anode, (4) improvement of cathodic performance by metal ions through electron acceptance or catalysis in cathodic process and (5) behavior of metal ions on membranes. Moreover, the perspectives of BESs removing heavy metal ions in wastewater or solid waste are discussed to realize recovery, reduction and detoxification simultaneously.

  18. The spliceosome and its metal ions.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Samuel E

    2011-01-01

    The spliceosome is a massive complex of 5 RNAs and many proteins that associate to catalyze precursor messenger RNA splicing. The process of splicing involves two phosphoryl transfer reactions that result in intron excision and ligation of the flanking exons. Since it is required for normal protein production in eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression. Although high resolution structural views of the spliceosome do not yet exist, a growing body of evidence indicates that the spliceosome is a magnesium-dependent enzyme that utilizes catalytic metal ions to stabilize both transition states during the two phosphoryl transfer steps of splicing. A wealth of data also indicate that the core of the spliceosome is comprised of RNA, and suggest that the spliceosome may be a ribozyme. This chapter presents the evidence for metal ion catalysis by the spliceosome, draws comparisons to similar RNA enzymes, and discusses the future directions for research into the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing.

  19. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  20. Optical methods for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. N.; Bessmertnykh-Lemeune, A.; Guilard, R.; Averin, A. D.; Beletskaya, I. P.

    2014-03-01

    The review covers an important area of the modern chemistry, namely, the detection of heavy metal ions using optical molecular detectors. The role of this method in metal ion detection and the physicochemical grounds of operation of chemosensors are discussed, and examples of detection of most abundant heavy metal ions and synthetic approaches to molecular detectors are presented. The immobilization of molecular detectors on solid substrates for the design of analytical sensor devices is described. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  1. Production of solvated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. K.

    1969-01-01

    Current research, both theoretical and experimental, relating to the production and kinetics of interactions of solvated electrons is reviewed. Particular attention is focused on solvated electrons generated by ionizing radiation in water, alcohols, and organic systems.

  2. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  3. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; García, J. A.; Mändl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernández, B.; Rodríguez, R. J.

    2012-11-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  4. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Solvation Energetics of Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Evan

    2002-03-01

    The gas phase offers a unique environment in which to study the intrinsic structure and reactivity of molecules and ions. The intrinsic structure of a wide range of biomolecules, ranging from individual amino acids to large biomolecule complexes has been investigated. From differences observed between the gas phase and solution phase behavior, one can infer the role of solvent. Hydrated ions can be easily generated by electrospray ionization and stored in the cell of a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer. Water binding energies can be determined using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD) and from these energies, structures can be inferred. For cationized valine, we show that the gas-phase complex exists as a charge-solvated structure. Addition of one water molecule does not change the structure or relative energy of this structure. However, the addition of three water molecules is sufficient to change valine in this complex into its solution phase zwitterionic structure. By studying such hydrated ions, one water molecule at a time, we hope that a detailed understanding of the role of water on biomolecule structure can be obtained.

  6. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Maria M.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-01

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006), 10.1529/biophysj.106.083667; M. M. Reif and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) and halide (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998), 10.1021/jp982638r; Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] = -1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol-1, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets LE, ME, and HE for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective ionic radius entering into the calculation of the correction terms is

  7. Spectroscopic detection of metals ions using a novel selective sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Domínguez, D.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Santillan, R.; Farfan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Colorimetric chemosensors are simple, economical and practical optical approach for detecting toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Ni2+, etc.) in the environment. In this work, we present a simple but highly specific organic compound 4-chloro-2-((E)-((E)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)allylidene)amino)phenol (L1) that acts as a colorimetric sensor for divalent metal ions in H2O. The mechanism of the interaction between L1 and various metal-ions has been established by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopic experiments that indicate favorable coordination of metal ions with L1 in different solvents. Experimental results indicate that the shape of the electronic transition band of L1 (receptor compound) changed after the interaction with divalent metal-ions, such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ in aqueous solution. We found that L1 have a considerable selectivity for Ni2+ ions, even in presence of other metals ions when mixtures of DMSO/H2O as are used as solvents. L1, which has been targeted for sensing transition metal ions, exhibits binding-induced color changes from yellow to pink observed even by the naked eye in presence of Ni2+ ions.

  8. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  9. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years.

  10. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-03

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  11. DNA as sensors and imaging agents for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2014-02-17

    Increasing interest in detecting metal ions in many chemical and biomedical fields has created demands for developing sensors and imaging agents for metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. This review covers recent progress in DNA-based sensors and imaging agents for metal ions. Through both combinatorial selection and rational design, a number of metal-ion-dependent DNAzymes and metal-ion-binding DNA structures that can selectively recognize specific metal ions have been obtained. By attachment of these DNA molecules with signal reporters such as fluorophores, chromophores, electrochemical tags, and Raman tags, a number of DNA-based sensors for both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions have been developed for fluorescent, colorimetric, electrochemical, and surface Raman detection. These sensors are highly sensitive (with a detection limit down to 11 ppt) and selective (with selectivity up to millions-fold) toward specific metal ions. In addition, through further development to simplify the operation, such as the use of "dipstick tests", portable fluorometers, computer-readable disks, and widely available glucose meters, these sensors have been applied for on-site and real-time environmental monitoring and point-of-care medical diagnostics. The use of these sensors for in situ cellular imaging has also been reported. The generality of the combinatorial selection to obtain DNAzymes for almost any metal ion in any oxidation state and the ease of modification of the DNA with different signal reporters make DNA an emerging and promising class of molecules for metal-ion sensing and imaging in many fields of applications.

  12. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  13. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  14. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  15. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine.

  16. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  17. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  18. Ion Beam Synthesis Of Metal - Silicon Carbide - Si Multilayer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, J. K. N.; Tsang, W. M.; Stritzker, B.; Wong, S. P.

    2003-08-01

    High doses of Ti, Ni, Mo, or W ions were implanted at elevated temperatures either conventionally or using a MEVVA ion source into ion beam synthesized Si/SiC/Si or SiC/Si layer structures in order to create metallic layers contacting the SiC. The depth distribution of metal atoms and the formation of silicide and carbide phases as well as the formation of cavities at the lower SiC/Si interface are studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). A brief survey of the effects ocurring in the ion beam metallization of SiC films is given and the benefit of using ion beams for metallization of thin films is elucidated.

  19. Metal ion sensing solution containing double crossover DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeongho; Dugasani, Sreekantha R.; Cho, Youngho; Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Min Ah; Lee, Taikjin; Jhon, Young Miin; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Jae Hun

    2015-07-01

    The current study describes metal ion sensing with double crossover DNAs (DX1 and DX2), artificially designed as a platform of doping. The sample for sensing is prepared by a facile annealing method to grow the DXs lattice on a silicon/silicon oxide. Adding and incubating metal ion solution with the sensor substrate into the micro-tube lead the optical property change. Photoluminescence (PL) is employed for detecting the concentration of metal ion in the specimen. We investigated PL emission for sensor application with the divalent copper. In the range from 400 to 650 nm, the PL features of samples provide significantly different peak positions with excitation and emission detection. Metal ions contribute to modify the optical characteristics of DX with structural and functional change, which results from the intercalation of them into hydrogen bonding positioned at the center of double helix. The PL intensity is decreased gradually after doping copper ion in the DX tile on the substrate.

  20. Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

  1. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  2. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  3. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  4. Improving the porosity and catalytic capacity of a zinc paddlewheel metal-organic framework (MOF) through metal-ion metathesis in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal fashion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Xiaoqing; Dai, Fangna; Zhang, Liangliang; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Daofeng

    2014-10-06

    Zinc paddlewheel metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) frequently exhibit low stability or complete collapse upon the removal of axial ligands. Hence, there are very few reports on gas adsorption of zinc paddlewheel MOFs. In this work, the N2 and H2 adsorption measurements were carried out for a zinc MOF (namely, SDU-1) based on two types of paddlewheel secondary building units (SBUs): [Zn2(COO)3] and [Zn2(COO)4]. Because of the existence of inherent surface instability upon removal of solvates in zinc paddlewheel SBU, SDU-1 possesses a very low surface area. Through metal-ion metathesis in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal fashion, the Zn(2+) ions in SDU-1 were exchanged by Cu(2+) ions to generate Cu-SDU-1. Through the measurements of gas adsorption and catalytic test, the porosity and catalytic capacity of Cu-SDU-1 have been improved significantly, compared to SDU-1.

  5. Rechargeable dual-metal-ion batteries for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hu-Rong; You, Ya; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Energy storage devices are more important today than any time before in human history due to the increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy. Rechargeable batteries are emerging as the most efficient energy storage technology for a wide range of portable devices, grids and electronic vehicles. Future generations of batteries are required to have high gravimetric and volumetric energy, high power density, low price, long cycle life, high safety and low self-discharge properties. However, it is quite challenging to achieve the above properties simultaneously in state-of-the-art single metal ion batteries (e.g. Li-ion batteries, Na-ion batteries and Mg-ion batteries). In this contribution, hybrid-ion batteries in which various metal ions simultaneously engage to store energy are shown to provide a new perspective towards advanced energy storage: by connecting the respective advantages of different metal ion batteries they have recently attracted widespread attention due to their novel performances. The properties of hybrid-ion batteries are not simply the superposition of the performances of single ion batteries. To enable a distinct description, we only focus on dual-metal-ion batteries in this article, for which the design and the benefits are briefly discussed. We enumerate some new results about dual-metal-ion batteries and demonstrate the mechanism for improving performance based on knowledge from the literature and experiments. Although the search for hybrid-ion batteries is still at an early age, we believe that this strategy would be an excellent choice for breaking the inherent disadvantages of single ion batteries in the near future.

  6. Metal ion levels: how can they help us?

    PubMed

    Griffin, William L

    2014-04-01

    Ion levels have been shown to reliably predict abnormal function of the bearing surface with increased wear, but ion levels should not be used alone as a trigger for when to proceed with revision surgery with metal-metal articulations. Risk stratification strategies help determine which patients should be monitored more closely with serial ion levels, cross-sectional imaging with a MARS MRI, or proceed on to revision. Based on the current data available, an ion level greater than 4.5 ppb (Cr or Co) may serve as a threshold for when abnormal wear is occurring, and is suggested as a trigger for a MARS MRI scan.

  7. Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

    1999-12-01

    Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

  8. Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-07-15

    The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium.

  9. Probing structural patterns of ion association and solvation in mixtures of imidazolium ionic liquids with acetonitrile by means of relative (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Bria, Marc; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2015-09-21

    Mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) with polar aprotic solvents in different combinations and under different conditions (concentration, temperature etc.) are used widely in electrochemistry. However, little is known about the key intermolecular interactions in such mixtures depending on the nature of the constituents and mixture composition. In order to systematically address the intermolecular interactions, the chemical shift variation of (1)H and (13)C nuclei has been followed in mixtures of imidazolium ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BmimBF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmimPF6), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BmimTfO) and 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BmimTFSI) with molecular solvent acetonitrile (AN) over the entire composition range at 300 K. The concept of relative chemical shift variation is proposed to assess the observed effects on a unified and unbiased scale. We have found that hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring hydrogen atoms and electronegative atoms of anions are stronger in BmimBF4 and BmimTfO ILs than those in BmimTFSI and BmimPF6. Hydrogen atom at position 2 of the imidazolium ring is substantially more sensitive to interionic hydrogen bonding than those at positions 4-5 in the case of BmimTfO and BmimTFSI ILs. These hydrogen bonds are disrupted upon dilution in AN due to ion dissociation which is more pronounced at high dilutions. Specific solvation interactions between AN molecules and IL cations are poorly manifested.

  10. Nucleic acid-metal ion interactions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions play a key role in nucleic acid structure and activity. Elucidation of the rules that govern the binding of metal ions is therefore an essential step for better understanding of the nucleic acid functions. This review is as an update to a preceding one (Metal Ions Biol. Syst., 1996, 32, 91-134), in which we offered a general view of metal ion interactions with mono-, di-, tri-, and oligonucleotides in the solid state, based on their crystal structures reported before 1994. In this chapter, we survey all the crystal structures of metal ion complexes with nucleotides involving oligonucleotides reported after 1994 and we have tried to uncover new characteristic metal bonding patterns for mononucleotides and oligonucleotides with A-RNA and A/B/Z-DNA fragments that form duplexes. We do not cover quadruplexes, duplexes with metal-mediated base-pairs, tRNAs, rRNAs in ribosome, ribozymes, and nucleic acid-drug and -protein complexes. Factors that affect metal binding to mononucleotides and oligonucleotide duplexes are also dealt with.

  11. Predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using ion characteristics: Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence assay

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships have been used to predict the relative toxicity of organic compounds. Although not as common, ion characteristics have also proven useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions. The purpose of this study was to determine if the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay was predictable using ion characteristics. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) were determined for 20 metals in a NaNO{sub 3} medium, which reflected freshwater speciation conditions, using the Microtox bacterial assay. The log of EC50 values was modeled using several ion characteristics, and Akaike`s Information Criterion was calculated to determine which ion characteristics provided the best fit. Whether modeling total ion or free ion EC50 values, the one variable which best modeled EC50s was the softness index, while a combination of {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r ({chi}{sub m} = electronegativity, r = Pauling ionic radius) and {vert_bar}log K{sub OH}{vert_bar} was the best two-variable model. Other variables, including {Delta}E{sub 0} and {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r (one-variable models) and (AN/{Delta}IP, {Delta}E{sub 0}) and ({chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r, Z{sup 2}/r) (two-variable models), also gave adequate fits. Modeling with speciated (free ion) versus unspeciated (total ion) EC50 values did not improve fits. Modeling mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions separately improved the models. The authors conclude that ion characteristics can be used to predict the relative toxicity of metal ions whether in freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium) or saltwater (NaCl medium) speciation conditions and that this approach can be applied to metal ions varying widely in both valence and binding tendencies.

  12. Ion plating seals microcracks or porous metal components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of ion plating process is given. Advantage of this process is that any plating metal or alloy can be selected, whereas, for conventional welding, material selection is limited by compatability.

  13. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  14. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  15. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges.

  16. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  17. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  18. An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

  19. Effect of organic solvents on Li+ ion solvation and transport in ionic liquid electrolytes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Borodin, Oleg; Smith, Grant D; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2015-02-19

    Molecular dynamics simulations of N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium (pyr13) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Ntf2) ionic liquid [pyr13][Ntf2] doped with [Li][Ntf2] salt and mixed with acetonitrile (AN) and ethylene carbonate (EC) organic solvents were conducted using polarizable force field. Structural and transport properties of ionic liquid electrolytes (ILEs) with 20 and 40 mol % of organic solvents have been investigated and compared to properties of neat ILEs. Addition of AN and EC solvents to ILEs resulted in the partial displacement of the Ntf2 anions from the Li(+) first coordination shell by EC and AN and shifting the Li-Ntf2 coordination from bidentate to monodentate. The presence of organic solvents in ILE has increased the ion mobility, with the largest effect observed for the Li(+) cation. The Li(+) conductivity has doubled with addition of 40 mol % of AN. The Li(+)-N(Ntf2) residence times were dramatically reduced with addition of solvents, indicating an increasing contribution from structural diffusion of the Li(+) cations.

  20. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected.

  1. An optical dosimeter for monitoring heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Regan, Fiona; Leamy, D.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ciaccheri, L.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an optochemical dosimeter for determining and discriminating nickel, copper, and cobalt ions in water that can be used as an early warning system for water pollution. An inexpensive fiber optic spectrophotometer monitors the sensor's spectral behavior under exposure to water solutions of heavy metal ions in the 1-10 mg/l concentration range. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method quantitatively determines the heavy metals and discriminates their type and combination.

  2. Frictional and morphological characteristics of ion plated soft, metallic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Buzek, B.

    1981-01-01

    Ion plated metallic films in contrast to films applied by other deposition techniques offer a lower friction coefficient, longer endurance lives and exhibit a gradual increase in friction coefficient after the film has been worn off. The friction coefficients of metallic films are affected by the degree of adherence, thickness and nucleation and growth characteristics during ion plating lead to a fine, continuous crystalline structure, which contributes to a lower friction coefficient.

  3. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements of Metal Ions Binding to Proteins.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Colette F; Carpenter, Margaret C; Croteau, Molly L; Wilcox, Dean E

    2016-01-01

    ITC measurements involving metal ions are susceptible to a number of competing reactions (oxidation, precipitation, and hydrolysis) and coupled reactions involving the buffer and protons. Stabilization and delivery of the metal ion as a well-defined and well-characterized complex with the buffer, or a specific ligand, can suppress undesired solution chemistry and, depending on the stability of the metal complex, allow accurate measurements of higher affinity protein-binding sites. This requires, however, knowledge of the thermodynamics of formation of the metal complex and accounting for its contribution to the experimentally measured values (KITC and ΔHITC) through a post hoc analysis that provides the condition-independent binding thermodynamics (K, ΔG(o), ΔH, ΔS, and ΔCP). This analysis also quantifies the number of protons that are displaced when the metal ion binds to the protein.

  4. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  5. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  6. Hematein chelates of unusual metal ions for tinctorial histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Smith, A A

    2010-02-01

    Hematoxylin is oxidized easily to hematein, an excellent stain for metal ions. If it already is bound to a substrate, the metal ion becomes a mordant linking the dye to the substrate. Metal ions added to hematein in solution are chelated by the hematein to form a lake. Most of these chelates stain animal tissues. They usually are bound to the tissue by a combination of hydrogen bonding of the hematein and ionic bonding of the metal ion. When binding of the lake to the tissue occurs by way of the metal ion, the metal ion is a mordant. Mordant staining often is specific. Chromium hematoxylin binds to strong acids; it can be made selective for protein-bound sulfonic acids. Zirconyl hematoxylin is selective for acidic mucins. Mucihematein can be made selective for all acidic mucins or for sulfomucins alone. Bismuth hematoxylin appears to be selective for the guanido group of arginine and there is some evidence that the bonding is covalent. Although it is not a histochemical stain, copper-chrome hematoxylin is an excellent stain for organelles with double membranes, i.e., mitochondria and nuclei.

  7. Implantation of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus ions into metals

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Gordeeva, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    The application of ion implantation for alloying offers a unique opportunity to modify the chemical composition, phase constitution, and microstructure of the surface layers of metals. The authors studied ion implantation of nitrogen and carbon into the surface layers of metallic targets. The phase composition of the implanted layers obtained on the Kh18N10T stainless steel, the refractory molybdenum alloy TsM-6, niobium, and nickel was determined according to the conventional method of recording the x-ray diffraction pattern of the specimens using monochromatic FeK/sub alpha/-radiation on a DRON-2,0 diffractometer. The targets were bombarded at room temperature in an ILU-3 ion accelerator. The implantation of metalloid ions was also conducted with the targets being bombarded with 100-keV phosphorus ions and 40-keV carbon ions.

  8. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  9. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, Maria M.; Huenenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-14

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006); M. M. Reif and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and halide (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998); Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}]=-1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol{sup -1}, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets L{sub E}, M{sub E}, and H{sub E} for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective

  10. ION EXCHANGE IN FUSED SALTS. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALKALI METAL AND ALKALINE EARTH IONS BETWEEN CHABAZITE AND FUSED LINO3, NANO3, AND KNO3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ION EXCHANGE, SALTS ), (*ALKALI METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*ALKALINE EARTH METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*NITRATES, ION EXCHANGE), SODIUM , CALCIUM, POTASSIUM...BARIUM, RUBIDIUM, CESIUM, LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, DISTRIBUTION, MINERALS, IONS

  11. Structural Metals in the Group I Intron: A Ribozyme with a Multiple Metal Ion Core

    SciTech Connect

    Stahley,M.; Adams, P.; Wang, J.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Angstroms of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function.

  12. Biomolecular electrostatics and solvation: a computational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pengyu; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G.; Schnieders, Michael J.; Marucho, Marcelo; Zhang, Jiajing; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of molecular interactions is essential for insight into biological systems at the molecular scale. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long-range nature and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and membrane lipids. In particular, robust models of electrostatic interactions are essential for understanding the solvation properties of biomolecules and the effects of solvation upon biomolecular folding, binding, enzyme catalysis, and dynamics. Electrostatics, therefore, are of central importance to understanding biomolecular structure and modeling interactions within and among biological molecules. This review discusses the solvation of biomolecules with a computational biophysics view towards describing the phenomenon. While our main focus lies on the computational aspect of the models, we provide an overview of the basic elements of biomolecular solvation (e.g., solvent structure, polarization, ion binding, and nonpolar behavior) in order to provide a background to understand the different types of solvation models. PMID:23217364

  13. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  14. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  15. Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ∼1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and π-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ∼107 Ω/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 Ω/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

  16. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  17. Neutralization by Metal Ions of the Toxicity of Sodium Selenide

    PubMed Central

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co2+ and Ni2+) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+) or weakly interact (Fe2+) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds. PMID:23342137

  18. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-01

    AuxAg1-x alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ˜45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar+ ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar+ ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of AuxAg1-x nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  19. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Bashar, Saima; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+})-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (C{sub s}) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (≤C{sub s}) and the nonspecific aggregates (>C{sub s}) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  20. Crystal structure of lead(II) acetylacetonate and the structure of the acetylacetone solvated lead(II) ion in solution studied by large-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Lyczko, Krzysztof; Narbutt, Jerzy; Paluchowska, Beata; Maurin, Jan K; Persson, Ingmar

    2006-09-07

    The crystal structure of bis(acetylacetonato)lead(II) and the structure of the acetylacetone solvated lead(II) ion in solution have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS), respectively. The acetylacetone is deprotonated and acts as a bidentate anionic ligand (acac-) in the solid Pb(acac)2 compound. The lead(II) ion binds four oxygen atoms strongly in a nearly flat pyramidal configuration with Pb-O bond lengths in the range 2.32-2.37 A, and additionally three oxygens from neighboring complexes at 3.01-3.26 A. Acetylacetone acts as a solvent (Hacac) at dissolution of lead(II) trifluoromethanesulfonate forming a pentasolvate with a mean Pb-O bond distance of 2.724(5) A. The 6s2 lone electron pair on the lead(II) ion becomes stereochemically active in the crystalline acetylacetonate complex, while it is inactive in the solvate in solution. The solution was also analysed using IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  1. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, G. Yu. Nikolaev, A. G.; Frolova, V. P.; Oks, E. M.

    2016-02-15

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  2. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  3. Ion-Plated Soft Metallic Films Reduce Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    Ion plating is ion-assisted or glow-discharge surface-deposition technique. In this process, ions or energetic atoms transfer energy, momentum, and charge to substrate and deposited surface film. Process controlled to modify physical characteristics of surface, subsurface chemical conditions, and surface and subsurface microstructures as well. Ion plating with such soft, thin metallic films as gold, silver, or lead has great potential for producing self-contained lubricating surfaces. Such films reduce friction, wear, and corrosion on sliding or rotating mechanical surfaces used in wide range of environments.

  4. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fenglian; Wang, Qi

    2011-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution has become one of the most serious environmental problems today. The treatment of heavy metals is of special concern due to their recalcitrance and persistence in the environment. In recent years, various methods for heavy metal removal from wastewater have been extensively studied. This paper reviews the current methods that have been used to treat heavy metal wastewater and evaluates these techniques. These technologies include chemical precipitation, ion-exchange, adsorption, membrane filtration, coagulation-flocculation, flotation and electrochemical methods. About 185 published studies (1988-2010) are reviewed in this paper. It is evident from the literature survey articles that ion-exchange, adsorption and membrane filtration are the most frequently studied for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater.

  5. Acylpyrazolones: Synthesis, self-assembly and lanthanide metal ion separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    The central hypothesis that nanoscale self-assemblies can provide excellent metal ion recognition has been substantiated by employing acylpyrazolones and trivalent lanthanide metal ions as model systems. Several novel acylpyrazolones and their amphiphilic analogs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Their lanthanide metal ion recognition efficacies have been demonstrated through baseline separations of a mixture of light, middle, and heavy lanthanide metal ions by employing them in the aqueous mobile phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with octadecylsilanized silica (ODS) as the stationary phase. The complex separation mechanism is influenced by the structures of acylpyrazolone and amphiphilic moieties, and spontaneous self-assembly of the ligand in the aqueous and on the stationary phases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the ligand self-assemblies in the aqueous phase in the absence and presence of lanthanide metal ions reveal spherical, dendritic, and linear (nanofibers, nanorods, and nanotubes) nanoscale structures. Such structures have also been observed when chloromethylated acylpyrazolones are stimulated to self-assemble by a base in nonaqueous solvents and when silica nanoparticles derivatized with them spontaneously self-assemble in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents.

  6. Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.

    2002-01-01

    A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

  7. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  8. Immunologic mechanisms in hypersensitivity reactions to metal ions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Büdinger, L; Hertl, M

    2000-02-01

    Metal ions such as Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, or Cr3+ are haptens with a high immunogenic potential, as contact dermatitis caused by ionic metals occurs in about 10-15% of the human population. Since alloys containing Ni2+, Co2+, and Cr3+ are components of implants in replacement surgery, dentures, orthodontic wires, and various other devices, adverse reactions to metal ions create serious problems in practical medicine as incompatibility reactions to metal-containing biomaterials. On the other hand, contact dermatitis to metal ions such as Ni2+ is a well-established model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of haptens by the immune system. Although many investigations have been performed to elucidate the molecular interactions causing contact hypersensitivity in man, many aspects remain to be clarified. This review will focus on the experimental data accumulated so far on the immunologic mechanisms responsible for the recognition of metal ions by T cells and eliciting adverse immune reactions causing contact dermatitis.

  9. Reducing hazardous heavy metal ions using mangium bark waste.

    PubMed

    Khabibi, Jauhar; Syafii, Wasrin; Sari, Rita Kartika

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of mangium bark and its biosorbent ability to reduce heavy metal ions in standard solutions and wastewater and to assess changes in bark characteristics after heavy metal absorption. The experiments were conducted to determine heavy metal absorption from solutions of heavy metals alone and in mixtures as well as from wastewater. The results show that mangium bark can absorb heavy metals. Absorption percentages and capacities from single heavy metal solutions showed that Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Pb(2+) > Hg(2+), while those from mixture solutions showed that Hg(2+) > Cu(2+) > Pb(2+) > Ni(2+). Wastewater from gold mining only contained Cu, with an absorption percentage and capacity of 42.87 % and 0.75 mg/g, respectively. The highest absorption percentage and capacity of 92.77 % and 5.18 mg/g, respectively, were found for Hg(2+) in a mixture solution and Cu(2+) in single-metal solution. The Cu(2+) absorption process in a single-metal solution changed the biosorbent characteristics of the mangium bark, yielding a decreased crystalline fraction; changed transmittance on hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl groups; and increased the presence of Cu. In conclusion, mangium bark biosorbent can reduce hazardous heavy metal ions in both standard solutions and wastewater.

  10. Preferential solvation of lithium cations and impacts on oxygen reduction in lithium–air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Dong; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Lee, Hung -Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2015-09-16

    The solvation of Li⁺ with eleven non-aqueous solvents commonly used as the electrolytes for Li batteries were studied. The solvation preferences of different solvents were compared by means of electrospray mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation. The relative strength of the solvent for the solvation of Li⁺ was determined. The Lewis acidity of the solvated Li⁺ cations was determined by the preferential solvation of the solvent in the solvation shell. The kinetics of the catalytic disproportionation of the O₂⁻ depends on the relative Lewis acidity of the solvated Li⁺ ion. The impact of the solvated Li⁺ cation on the O₂ redox reaction was also investigated.

  11. Preferential solvation of lithium cations and impacts on oxygen reduction in lithium–air batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Dong; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiao -Qing; ...

    2015-09-16

    The solvation of Li⁺ with eleven non-aqueous solvents commonly used as the electrolytes for Li batteries were studied. The solvation preferences of different solvents were compared by means of electrospray mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation. The relative strength of the solvent for the solvation of Li⁺ was determined. The Lewis acidity of the solvated Li⁺ cations was determined by the preferential solvation of the solvent in the solvation shell. The kinetics of the catalytic disproportionation of the O₂⁻ depends on the relative Lewis acidity of the solvated Li⁺ ion. The impact of the solvated Li⁺ cation on the O₂ redoxmore » reaction was also investigated.« less

  12. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  13. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  14. Ion exchange properties of novel hydrous metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrous metal oxide (HMO) materials are inorganic ion exchangers which have many desirable characteristics for catalyst support applications, including high cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capability, high surface area, ease of adjustment of acidity and basicity, bulk or thin film preparation, and similar chemistry for preparation of various transition metal oxides. Cation exchange capacity is engineered into these materials through the uniform incorporation of alkali cations via manipulation of alkoxide chemistry. Specific examples of the effects of Na stoichiometry and the addition of SiO{sub 2} to hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) on ion exchange behavior will be given. Acid titration and cationic metal precursor complex exchange will be used to characterize the ion exchange behavior of these novel materials.

  15. Reactions of fourth-period metal ions (Ca + - Zn + ) with O2: Metal-oxide ion bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Ellen R.; Elkind, J. L.; Clemmer, D. E.; Georgiadis, R.; Loh, S. K.; Aristov, N.; Sunderlin, L. S.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1990-08-01

    Reactions of Ca+, Zn+ and all first-row atomic transition metal ions with O2 are studied using guided ion beam techniques. While reactions of the ground states of Sc+, Ti+, and V+ are exothermic, the remaining metal ions react with O2 in endothermic processes. Analyses of these endothermic reactions provide new determinations of the M+-O bond energies for these eight elements. Source conditions are varied such that the contributions of excited states of the metal ions can be explicitly considered for Mn+, Co+, Ni+, and Cu+. Results (in eV) at 0 K are D0(Ca+-O)= 3.57±0.05, D0(Cr+-O)=3.72±0.12, D0(Mn+-O)=2.95±0.13, D0(Fe+-O)=3.53±0.06 (reported previously), D0(Co+-O)=3.32±0.06, D0(Ni+-O) =2.74±0.07, D0(Cu+-O)=1.62±0.15, and D0(Zn+-O)=1.65±0.12. These values along with literature data for neutral metal oxide bond energies and ionization energies are critically evaluated. Periodic trends in the ionic metal oxide bond energies are compared with those of the neutral metal oxides and those of other related molecules.

  16. Preferential Solvation of an Asymmetric Redox Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kee Sung; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Vijayakumar, M.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jianzhi; Persson, Kristin A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2016-12-15

    The fundamental correlations between inter-molecular interactions, solvation structure and functionality of electrolytes are in many cases unknown, particularly for multi-component liquid systems. In this work, we explore such correlations by investigating the complex interplay between solubility and solvation structure for the electrolyte system comprising N-(ferrocenylmethyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-ethylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonimide (Fc1N112-TFSI) dissolved in a ternary carbonate solvent mixture using combined NMR relaxation and computational analyses. Probing the evolution of the solvent-solvent, ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions with an increase in solute concentration provides a molecular level understanding of the solubility limit of the Fc1N112-TFSI system. An increase in solute con-centration leads to pronounced Fc1N112-TFSI contact-ion pair formation by diminishing solvent-solvent and ion-solvent type interactions. At the solubility limit, the precipitation of solute is initiated through agglomeration of contact-ion pairs due to overlapping solvation shells.

  17. Comet encke: meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R A; Aikin, A C

    1973-04-20

    Metal ions including 23(+) (Na(+)), 24(+) (Mg(+)) 28(+) (Si(+)), 39(+) (K(+)), 40(+) (Ca(+)), 45(+) (Sc(+)), 52(+) Cr(+)). 56(+) (Fe(+)), and 58(+) (Ni(+)) have been detected in the upper atmosphere during the period of the Beta Taurids meteor shower. The abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show, agreement in most instances with abundances in chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which, if it is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites.

  18. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metal ions including Na-40(+), Mg-24(+), Si-28(+), K-39(+), Ca-40(+), Sc-45(+), Cr-52(+), Fe-56(+), and Ni-58(+) were detected in the upper atmosphere during the beta Taurids meteor shower. Abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show agreement in most instances with chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites.

  19. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    2000-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  20. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  1. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, L.R.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-08-10

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions. 2 figs.

  2. Determination of metal ions in biological purification of waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, L.N.; Spiridonova, N.N.; Mandzhgaladze, I.D.

    1994-12-01

    Chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, and manganese were determined in active sludge extracted for utilization from sewage purification works in biological purification of waste waters. The measurements were carried out by the atomic absorption method and with Merck colorimetric kits for rapid determination of metal ions. The results obtained by the rapid colorimetric method agree fairly well with those obtained by the atomic absorption method, which makes it possible to recommend rapid colorimetric methods for routine analysis of biological objects for the content of ions of heavy metals.

  3. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions.

  4. Existence of efficient divalent metal ion-catalyzed and inefficient divalent metal ion-independent channels in reactions catalyzed by a hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing-Min; Zhou, De-Min; Takagi, Yasuomi; Kasai, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Atsushi; Baba, Tadashi; Taira, Kazunari

    2002-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme is generally accepted as a well characterized metalloenzyme. However, the precise nature of the interactions of the RNA with metal ions remains to be fully defined. Examination of metal ion-catalyzed hammerhead reactions at limited concentrations of metal ions is useful for evaluation of the role of metal ions, as demonstrated in this study. At concentrations of Mn2+ ions from 0.3 to 3 mM, addition of the ribozyme to the reaction mixture under single-turnover conditions enhances the reaction with the product reaching a fixed maximum level. Further addition of the ribozyme inhibits the reaction, demonstrating that a certain number of divalent metal ions is required for proper folding and also for catalysis. At extremely high concentrations, monovalent ions, such as Na+ ions, can also serve as cofactors in hammerhead ribozyme-catalyzed reactions. However, the catalytic efficiency of monovalent ions is extremely low and, thus, high concentrations are required. Furthermore, addition of monovalent ions to divalent metal ion-catalyzed hammerhead reactions inhibits the divalent metal ion-catalyzed reactions, suggesting that the more desirable divalent metal ion–ribozyme complexes are converted to less desirable monovalent metal ion–ribozyme complexes via removal of divalent metal ions, which serve as a structural support in the ribozyme complex. Even though two channels appear to exist, namely an efficient divalent metal ion-catalyzed channel and an inefficient monovalent metal ion-catalyzed channel, it is clear that, under physiological conditions, hammerhead ribozymes are metalloenzymes that act via the significantly more efficient divalent metal ion-dependent channel. Moreover, the observed kinetic data are consistent with Lilley’s and DeRose’s two-phase folding model that was based on ground state structure analyses. PMID:12034824

  5. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

  6. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  7. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  8. Metal ions and RNA folding: a highly charged topic with a dynamic future.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2005-04-01

    Metal ions are required to stabilize RNA tertiary structure and to begin the folding process. How different metal ions enable RNAs to fold depends on the electrostatic potential of the RNA and correlated fluctuations in the positions of the ions themselves. Theoretical models, fluorescence spectroscopy, small angle scattering and structural biology reveal that metal ions alter the RNA dynamics and folding transition states. Specifically coordinated divalent metal ions mediate conformational rearrangements within ribozyme active sites.

  9. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep K.; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Christen, Philipp

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  10. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  11. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  12. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  13. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L. D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D. F.; Monteiro, O. R.; Brown, I. G.

    2005-01-01

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30 keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014-1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  14. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  15. Ultrafast underdamped solvation: Agreement between computer simulation and various theories of solvation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Srabani; Bagchi, Biman

    1993-07-01

    A theoretical analysis of the three currently popular microscopic theories of solvation dynamics, namely, the dynamic mean spherical approximation (DMSA), the molecular hydrodynamic theory (MHT), and the memory function theory (MFT) is carried out. It is shown that in the underdamped limit of momentum relaxation, all three theories lead to nearly identical results when the translational motions of both the solute ion and the solvent molecules are neglected. In this limit, the theoretical prediction is in almost perfect agreement with the computer simulation results of solvation dynamics in the model Stockmayer liquid. However, the situation changes significantly in the presence of the translational motion of the solvent molecules. In this case, DMSA breaks down but the other two theories correctly predict the acceleration of solvation in agreement with the simulation results. We find that the translational motion of a light solute ion can play an important role in its own solvation. None of the existing theories describe this aspect. A generalization of the extended hydrodynamic theory is presented which, for the first time, includes the contribution of solute motion towards its own solvation dynamics. The extended theory gives excellent agreement with the simulations where solute motion is allowed. It is further shown that in the absence of translation, the memory function theory of Fried and Mukamel can be recovered from the hydrodynamic equations if the wave vector dependent dissipative kernel in the hydrodynamic description is replaced by its long wavelength value. We suggest a convenient memory kernel which is superior to the limiting forms used in earlier descriptions. We also present an alternate, quite general, statistical mechanical expression for the time dependent solvation energy of an ion. This expression has remarkable similarity with that for the translational dielectric friction on a moving ion.

  16. Internal energy effects on the solvation and reactivity of multiply charged biomolecules for electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. [Bovine ubiquitin

    SciTech Connect

    Light-Wahl, K.J.; Winger, B.E.; Rockwood, A.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Mild (capillary) interface conditions which do not completely desolvate the ions of proteins in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) may be required to probe the higher order structures and weak associations. For the small protein bovine ubiquitin, two ion distributions (unsolvated ions and unresolved solvated ions) were observed. The resolvable solvation for leucine-enkephalin with methanol and water shows that the use of countercurrent N{sub 2} flow at the capillary affects the solvation observed. 2 figs. (DLC)

  17. Internal energy effects on the solvation and reactivity of multiply charged biomolecules for electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Light-Wahl, K.J.; Winger, B.E.; Rockwood, A.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Mild (capillary) interface conditions which do not completely desolvate the ions of proteins in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) may be required to probe the higher order structures and weak associations. For the small protein bovine ubiquitin, two ion distributions (unsolvated ions and unresolved solvated ions) were observed. The resolvable solvation for leucine-enkephalin with methanol and water shows that the use of countercurrent N{sub 2} flow at the capillary affects the solvation observed. 2 figs. (DLC)

  18. Current and prospective applications of metal ion-protein binding.

    PubMed

    Ueda, E K M; Gout, P W; Morganti, L

    2003-02-21

    Since immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) was first introduced, several variants of this method and many other metal affinity-based techniques have been devised. IMAC quickly established itself as a highly reliable purification procedure, showing rapid expansion in the number of preparative and analytical applications while not remaining confined to protein separation. It was soon applied to protein refolding (matrix-assisted refolding), evaluation of protein folding status, protein surface topography studies and biosensor development. In this review, applications in protein processing are described of IMAC as well as other metal affinity-based technologies.

  19. Uptake of Metal Ions by Rhizopus arrhizus Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J. M.; Cooper, D. G.; Neufeld, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was found to absorb a variety of different metal cations and anions but did not absorb alkali metal ions. The amount of uptake of the cations was directly related to ionic radii of La3+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, UO22+, and Ag+. The uptake of all the cations is consistent with absorption of the metals by sites in the biomass containing phosphate, carboxylate, and other functional groups. The uptake of the molybdate and vanadate anions was strongly pH dependent, and it is proposed that the uptake mechanism involves electrostatic attraction to positively charged functional groups. PMID:16346521

  20. Principles Governing Metal Ion Selectivity in Ion Channel Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Carmay

    2014-03-01

    Our research interests are to (i) unravel the principles governing biological processes and use them to identify novel drug targets and guide drug design, and (ii) develop new methods for studying macromolecular interactions. This talk will provide an overview of our work in these two areas and an example of how our studies have helped to unravel the principles underlying the conversion of Ca2+-selective to Na+-selective channels. Ion selectivity of four-domain voltage-gated Ca2+(Cav) and sodium (Nav) channels, which is controlled by the selectivity filter (SF, the narrowest region of an open pore), is crucial for electrical signaling. Over billions of years of evolution, mutation of the Glu from domain II/III in the EEEE/DEEA SF of Ca2+-selective Cav channels to Lys made these channels Na+-selective. This talk will delineate the physical principles why Lys is sufficient for Na+/Ca2+selectivity and why the DEKA SF is more Na+-selective than the DKEA one.

  1. Quadrupole ion trap studies of the structure and reactivity of transition metal ion pair complexes

    PubMed

    Vachet; Callahan

    2000-03-01

    Ion pairs are common species observed in the electrospray mass spectra of transition metal coordination complexes. To understand the nature of these ion pairs, a systematic study of the gas-phase chemistry of these species using ion-molecule reactions and collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out. Ion pair complexes of the type MLnX+ (where M is Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II), L is 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-bipyridine, ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and X is Cl-, NO3-, acetylacetonate, ClO4-, acetate or SCN-) were studied. Ion-molecule reactions can distinguish whether the counterion in an ion pair is an inner- or outer-sphere ligand and can determine the coordination mode of the counterion. In addition, CID and ion-molecule reactions reveal some interesting chemistry of these complexes and unique coordination modes for some of the anions studied here were inferred from the ion-molecule reactions. For example, the thiocyanate ion is found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion in Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes, contrasting behavior typically observed in solution. Also, certain Co(II) and Fe(II) ion pair complexes undergo oxidation reactions in which species such as dioxygen and nitric oxide from the counterions ClO4- and NO3- are transferred to the Co(II) and Fe(II) complexes, showing the inherent affinity of these metals for these molecules. These complexes were also studied by ion-molecule reactions and CID. Dioxygen in complexes formed by CID is demonstrated to be bidentate, suggesting the formation of a peroxo ligand with concurrent oxidation of the metal.

  2. Host Materials for Transition-Metal Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    BeA1204 (Chrysoberyl, Cr:BeA204 - Alexandrite ) ..................... 90 15.1 Crystallographic Data on BeA 204 ............................ 9 0 15.2 X...Chrysoberyl, Cr:BeA1 2 04 = Alexandrite ) 15.1 Crystallographic Data on BeA204 Orthorhombic D 16 (Pnma), 62, Z = 4 Orthorhomb__ D2h Ion Site Symmetry x...Stimulated Emission from Alexandrite (BeAl 1204 :Cr 3 +) Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 8 (1978), 671. 2. C. F. Cline, R. C. Morris, M. Dutoit, and P. J

  3. Precipitation of alkylbenzene sulfonates with metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, J.M.; Matijevic, E.

    1980-10-01

    The precipitation domains of P-(1-methylnonyl)benzene sulfonate ions with Li/sup +/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Al/sup 3 +/, and La/sup 3 +/ and of Ca/sup 2 +/-P-(hexyloctyl)benzene sulfonate have been determined at constant pH and 25 C. The linear solubility boundaries reverse their slope at the critical micellar concentration of the surfactant. A semiquantitative interpretation of the data is offered. The properties of the solids formed also are described. 18 references.

  4. Neutralization by metal ions of the toxicity of sodium selenide.

    PubMed

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag⁺, Cd²⁺, Cu²⁺, Hg²⁺, Pb²⁺ and Zn²⁺), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co²⁺ and Ni²⁺) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, Mn²⁺) or weakly interact (Fe²⁺) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds.

  5. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  6. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  7. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  8. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  9. DFT solvation studies of carbohydrates: implicit and explicit solvation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solvents play a role in carbohydrate structure. Therefore, it is important to include solvation effects in calculations to allow a more realistic comparison with experimental data. A possible way to include solvation effects is to use implicit solvation models such as COSMO and PCM. Another avenu...

  10. Selective quenching of benzimidazole derivatives by Cu2+ metal ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, J.; Thanikachalam, V.; Jayamoorthy, K.; Sathishkumar, R.

    2012-11-01

    It is a very big challenge to develop a Cu2+ selective fluorescent sensor with the ability to exclude the interference of some metal ions such as Fe3+, Mg2+, Ag+, K+ and Na+. Herein, we report a fluorescence quenching of some benzimidazole derivatives (1-6) with Cu2+ metal ion. These benzimidazole derivatives have been shown to bind copper ions resulting in quenching of its fluorescence. The response to Cu2+ is rapid, selective and reversible upon addition of a copper chelator. These benzimidazole derivatives were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR mass and elemental analysis. XRD analysis was carried out for 1-(4-methylbenzyl)-2-p-tolyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole.

  11. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  12. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Wysocki, Joseph A.; Storms, Edmund K.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Behrens, Robert G.; Swanson, Lynwood W.; Bell, Anthony E.

    1987-06-02

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

  13. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  14. Stable alkali metal ion intercalation compounds as optimized metal oxide nanowire cathodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Junwei; Su, Jie; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Shuo; Xu, Lin; Fang, Ruopian; Jiang, Hong; Zou, Xiaodong; Song, Bo; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-03-11

    Intercalation of ions in electrode materials has been explored to improve the rate capability in lithium batteries and supercapacitors, due to the enhanced diffusion of Li(+) or electrolyte cations. Here, we describe a synergistic effect between crystal structure and intercalated ion by experimental characterization and ab initio calculations, based on more than 20 nanomaterials: five typical cathode materials together with their alkali metal ion intercalation compounds A-M-O (A = Li, Na, K, Rb; M = V, Mo, Co, Mn, Fe-P). Our focus on nanowires is motivated by general enhancements afforded by nanoscale structures that better sustain lattice distortions associated with charge/discharge cycles. We show that preintercalation of alkali metal ions in V-O and Mo-O yields substantial improvement in the Li ion charge/discharge cycling and rate, compared to A-Co-O, A-Mn-O, and A-Fe-P-O. Diffraction and modeling studies reveal that preintercalation with K and Rb ions yields a more stable interlayer expansion, which prevents destructive collapse of layers and allow Li ions to diffuse more freely. This study demonstrates that appropriate alkali metal ion intercalation in admissible structure can overcome the limitation of cyclability as well as rate capability of cathode materials, besides, the preintercalation strategy provides an effective method to enlarge diffusion channel at the technical level, and more generally, it suggests that the optimized design of stable intercalation compounds could lead to substantial improvements for applications in energy storage.

  15. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  16. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  17. Photoelectron imaging and density-functional investigation of bismuth and lead anions solvated in ammonia clusters.

    PubMed

    Sobhy, Mohamed A; Casalenuovo, K; Reveles, J Ulises; Gupta, Ujjwal; Khanna, Shiv N; Castleman, A W

    2010-10-28

    We present the results of photoelectron velocity-map imaging experiments for the photodetachment of small negatively charged ammonia solvated Bi(n) and Pb(n) (n = 1, 2) clusters at 527 nm. The vertical detachment energies of the observed multiple electronic bands and their respective anisotropy parameters for the solvated Bi and Pb anions and clusters derived from the photoelectron images are reported. The electronic bands of Bi(NH(3))(n=1,2) are distinct from the Bi metal ion in exhibiting a perpendicular distribution whereas the electronic bands in Pb(NH(3))(n=1,2), unlike the Pb anion, show an isotropic distribution with respect to the laser polarization. Density-functional theory calculations with a generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential were performed on these clusters to determine their atomic and electronic structures. Calculated geometries show a dramatic change between anionic and neutral ammonia solvated Bi and Pb species. Anionic clusters exhibit van der Waals interactions between the hydrogen atoms of ammonia and the metal core, where it was determined that the negative charge is localized. Neutral clusters, on the other hand, present a covalent bond between the nitrogen atom of ammonia and the metal core. Calculated binding energies show an enhancement in the bonding of the (NH(3))(2) dimer in the presence of the anionic Bi(1,2)(-) and Pb(1,2)(-) metal ions. This is rationalized by the electrostatic interaction between the negative charged metal core and the hydrogen atoms of the ammonia molecule.

  18. ‘Pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harry; Sugand, Kapil; Ali, Ibrahim; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman who had undergone hybrid metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 8 years earlier underwent revision arthroplasty because of hip, groin and lateral thigh pain. The main differential was aseptic loosening; however, serum cobalt and chromium levels were normal. Multiple imaging modalities revealed a periprosthetic, cystic soft tissue mass adjacent to the proximal femur. A large ‘pseudotumour’ with proximal femoral invasion was found at revision arthroplasty. We report the first finding of a ‘pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing. PMID:25670783

  19. The Oil-Water Interface: Mapping the Solvation Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Richard C.; Wu, Kai; Iedema, Martin J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Cowin, James P.

    2009-01-06

    Ions moving across the oil water interface are strongly impacted by the continuous changes in solvation. The solvation potential for Cs+ is directly measured as they approach the oil-water interface (“oil” = 3-methylpentane), from 0.4 to 4 nm away. The oil-water interfaces are created at 40K using molecular beam epitaxy and a softlanding ion beam, with pre-placed ions. The solvation potential slope was determined at each distance by balancing it against an increasing electrostatic potential made by increasing the number of imbedded ions at that distance, and monitoring the resulting ion motion. The potential approaches the Born model for greater than z>0.4nm, and shows the predicted reduction of the polarizability at z<0.4nm.

  20. Calculation of electron affinities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and solvation energies of their radical anion.

    PubMed

    Betowski, Leon D; Enlow, Mark; Riddick, Lee; Aue, Donald H

    2006-11-30

    Electron affinities (EAs) and free energies for electron attachment (DeltaGo(a,298K)) have been directly calculated for 45 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related molecules by a variety of theoretical methods, with standard regression errors of about 0.07 eV (mean unsigned error = 0.05 eV) at the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) level and larger errors with HF or MP2 methods or using Koopmans' Theorem. Comparison of gas-phase free energies with solution-phase reduction potentials provides a measure of solvation energy differences between the radical anion and neutral PAH. A simple Born-charging model approximates the solvation effects on the radical anions, leading to a good correlation with experimental solvation energy differences. This is used to estimate unknown or questionable EAs from reduction potentials. Two independent methods are used to predict DeltaGo(a,298K) values: (1) based upon DFT methods, or (2) based upon reduction potentials and the Born model. They suggest reassignments or a resolution of conflicting experimental EAs for nearly one-half (17 of 38) of the PAH molecules for which experimental EAs have been reported. For the antiaromatic molecules, 1,3,5-tri-tert-butylpentalene and the dithia-substituted cyclobutadiene 1, the reduction potentials lead to estimated EAs close to those expected from DFT calculations and provide a basis for the prediction of the EAs and reduction potentials of pentalene and cyclobutadiene. The Born model has been used to relate the electrostatic solvation energies of PAH and hydrocarbon radical anions, and spherical halide anions, alkali metal cations, and ammonium ions to effective ionic radii from DFT electron-density envelopes. The Born model used for PAHs has been successfully extended here to quantitatively explain the solvation energy of the C60 radical anion.

  1. Development of a four-zone carousel process packed with metal ion-imprinted polymer for continuous separation of copper ions from manganese ions, cobalt ions, and the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution used as eluent.

    PubMed

    Jo, Se-Hee; Park, Chanhun; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Dukjoon; Mun, Sungyong

    2011-08-19

    A three-zone carousel process, in which Cu(II)-imprinted polymer (Cu-MIP) and a buffer solution were employed as adsorbent and eluent respectively, has been developed previously for continuous separation of Cu²⁺ (product) from Mn²⁺ and Co²⁺ (impurities). Although this process was reported to be successful in the aforementioned separation task, the way of using a buffer solution as eluent made it inevitable that the product stream included the buffer-related metal ions (i.e., the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution) as well as copper ions. For a more perfect recovery of copper ions, it would be necessary to improve the previous carousel process such that it can remove the buffer-related metal ions from copper ions while maintaining the previous function of separating copper ions from the other 2 impure heavy-metal ions. This improvement was made in this study by proposing a four-zone carousel process based on the following strategy: (1) the addition of one more zone for performing the two-step re-equilibration tasks and (2) the use of water as the eluent of the washing step in the separation zone. The operating conditions of such a proposed process were determined on the basis of the data from a series of single-column experiments. Under the determined operating conditions, 3 runs of carousel experiments were carried out. The results of these experiments revealed that the feed-loading time was a key parameter affecting the performance of the proposed process. Consequently, the continuous separation of copper ions from both the impure heavy-metal ions and the buffer-related metal ions could be achieved with a purity of 91.9% and a yield of 92.8% by using the proposed carousel process based on a properly chosen feed-loading time.

  2. Liquid metal alloy ion sources—An alternative for focussed ion beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Lothar; Mazarov, Paul; Bruchhaus, Lars; Gierak, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Today, Focused Ion Beam (FIB) processing is nearly exclusively based on gallium Liquid Metal Ion Sources (LMIS). But, many applications in the μm- or nm range could benefit from ion species other than gallium: local ion implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam synthesis, or Focused Ion Beam Lithography (IBL). Therefore, Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Sources (LMAIS) represent a promising alternative to expand the remarkable application fields for FIB. Especially, the IBL process shows potential advantages over, e.g., electron beam or other lithography techniques: direct, resistless, and three-dimensional patterning, enabling a simultaneous in-situ process control by cross-sectioning and inspection. Taking additionally into account that the used ion species influences significantly the physical and chemical nature of the resulting nanostructures—in particular, the electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanic properties leading to a large potential application area which can be tuned by choosing a well suited LMAIS. Nearly half of the elements of the periodic table are recently available in the FIB technology as a result of continuous research in this area during the last forty years. Key features of a LMAIS are long life-time, high brightness, and stable ion current. Recent developments could make these sources feasible for nano patterning issues as an alternative technology more in research than in industry. The authors will review existing LMAIS, LMIS other than Ga, and binary and ternary alloys. These physical properties as well as the fabrication technology and prospective domains for modern FIB applications will similarly be reviewed. Other emerging ion sources will be also presented and their performances discussed.

  3. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Magudapathy, P. Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-24

    Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ∼45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar{sup +} ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  4. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  5. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

    2011-06-06

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  6. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

  7. Low energy ion beam assisted growth of metal multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Junjie

    Vapor deposited metal multilayers have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years because they offer extraordinary strength, hardness, heat resistance, and unexpected new properties like high reflectivity and spin-dependent conductivity. The giant magnetoresistance effects discovered in Fe/Cr artificial superstructures in 1988 stimulated a large number of studies on the electronic transport properties of spintronic materials because of their important applications in highly sensitive magnetic sensors, nonvolatile random access memories, and the data storage industry in general. Magnetic multilayers allow exploitation of unique micromagnetic, magnetooptic, and magnetoelectronic phenomena that cannot be realized using conventional materials. For example, if ferromagnetic layers (such as CoFe) with a thicknesses of 5-7 nm are separated by a non-magnetic spacer (such as Cu or AlOx) of an appropriate thickness (1-3 nm), they can exhibit large changes in their electrical resistance when a magnetic field is applied. These changes are caused mainly by spin-dependent conduction electron scattering at magnetic multilayer interfaces. Many experimental and theoretical works have sought to promote a basic understanding of the effect of atomic structure in thin film multilayers upon spin dependent transport. It has been found that interfacial imperfections, such as interfacial roughness and interlayer mixing, dramatically reduce the properties exploited for spintronic applications. A combination of computer modeling and experiments has been used to discover more effective ways to control the interfacial structures of metal multilayers. Earlier atomic simulations had indicated that it is very important to control adatom energy during deposition in order to improve interface properties. Based on these ideas, this dissertation has investigated the effects of low energy ion assistance during metal multilayer deposition. Using molecular dynamics modeling, the effects of ion

  8. Ion Implantation Effects on the Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapsir, Andrie Setiawan

    1988-12-01

    In this thesis, the effects of ion implantation on metal-semiconductor interfaces are studied. Hydrogen ions have been used as the implanted species. The implantation is carried out on Al/n-Si Schottky contacts. Electrical characterizations, deep level transient spectroscopy measurements, and the ^{15}N hydrogen profiling technique have been used to study the effects of ion implantation. It is demonstrated that the defect centers in the depletion region created by hydrogen implantation have more likely negative or possibly neutral signatures, rather than a positive signature as has been previously speculated. These negatively charged centers compensate for the positive donor resulting in a widening of the depletion region and reduction in the capacitance of the metal-semiconductor contacts. The tendency of hydrogen to passivate its own damage which results in the recovery of electronic transport across the metal-semiconductor junction upon low temperature heat treatment is also demonstrated. In connection with the behavior of hydrogen in silicon, in the second part of this thesis, detailed theoretical calculations on the hydrogen passivation of defects in silicon are carried out. A particular type of defect, namely, a substitutional sulfur in silicon, is chosen and is studied using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO/3) molecular orbital method. It is found that the sulfur center can be passivated using one or two hydrogen atoms. The calculations indicate that the most stable positions of the hydrogen atoms are between the sulfur and its silicon neighbors. The hydrogens bond to the nearest silicon atoms and only weakly interact with the sulfur. Thermochemistry considerations predict that a single hydrogen passivates the sulfur center, provided these centers are in abundance in the silicon. Hydrogen ion implantation has also been carried out on Schottky contacts having a large difference in metal work function, Ti/p-Si and Pt

  9. Polymer filtration systems for dilute metal ion recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a metal recovery system that meets the global treatment demands for all kinds of industrial and metal-processing streams. The Polymer Filtration (PF) System--a process that is easily operated and robust--offers metal-finishing businesses a convenient and inexpensive way to recover and recycle metal ions in-house, thus reducing materials costs, waste removal costs, and industrial liability. As a valuable economic and environmental asset, the PF System has been named a winner of a 1995 R and D 100 Award. These awards are presented annually by R and D Magazine to the one hundred most significant technical innovations of the year. The PF System is based on the use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers and on advanced ultrafiltration membranes. Customers for this technology will receive new soluble polymers, especially formulated for their waste stream, and the complete PF processing unit: a reaction reservoir, pumps, plumbing, controls, and the advanced ultrafiltration membranes, all in a skid mounted frame. Metal-bearing waste water is treated in the reaction reservoir, where the polymer binds with the metal ions under balanced acid/base conditions. The reservoir fluid is then pumped through the ultrafiltration system--a cartridge packed with ultrafiltration membranes shaped in hollow fibers. As the fluid travels inside the fiber, water and other small molecules--simple salts such as calcium and sodium, for example--pass through the porous membrane walls of the fibers and are discharged through the outlet as permeate. The polymer-bound metal, which is too large to pass through the pores, is both purified and concentrated inside the hollow fibers and is returned to the fluid reservoir for further waste water treatment.

  10. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, D. L.; Giedd, R. E.; Wang, Y. Q.; Glass, G. A.

    1999-06-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the "mixing" effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 Å thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

  11. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  12. Effect of ion implantation on the tribology of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, John G; Hussain, Azad; Williams, Paul; Nevelos, Jim; Shelton, Julia C

    2004-12-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation (which considerably hardens the surface of the bearing) may represent one possible method of reducing the wear of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip bearings. Currently there are no ion-implanted MOM bearings used clinically. Therefore a physiological hip simulator test was undertaken using standard test conditions, and the results compared to previous studies using the same methods. N2-ion implantation of high carbon cast Co-Cr-Mo-on-Co-Cr-Mo hip prostheses increased wear by 2-fold during the aggressive running-in phase compared to untreated bearing surfaces, plus showing no wear reductions during steady-state conditions. Although 2 specimens were considered in the current study, it would appear that ion implantation has no clinical benefit for MOM.

  13. Reduction of the copper ion to its metal and clusters in alcoholic media: A radiation chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, G. R.

    2005-10-01

    Reduction of Cu 2+ ions with and without I - as a ligand was studied in N 2-purged alcoholic solutions by pulse radiolysis. In the absence of iodide ion, the initial rate constant for e -sol reaction with Cu 2+ was determined following the decay of solvated electrons in different alcohols; kbimol values are in the range of 0.8-1.1×10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1. In the presence of 10 -3 mol dm -3 KI, the respective kbimol remained almost same. Generally, on reduction, Cu(II) ion changes to Cu(I) ion initially and later it produces metallic copper (Cu°), and the stability of these intermediates depends on the conditions of the matrix. In the presence of I -, Copper ions such as Cu(II) or Cu(I) ions get reduced to metallic copper (Cu°) having initial absorption around 740 and below 400 nm. Later, at 100 μs time after the electron pulse, it gets transformed into a nanoparticle with an absorption band at 580 nm. Such formation of copper nanoparticle was observed only in 2-propanolic medium in the presence of iodide ions. During γ-radiolysis of N 2-purged 1.5×10 -4 CuSO 4 solutions in 2-propanol, reddish pink colored copper nanoparticles were formed, which are quite similar to those reported earlier in aqueous solution. But, in the presence of I - (2-propanolic solutions), such phenomenon was not noticed on γ-radiolysis. Interestingly, the formation of copper nanoparticle was observed also in the reactions of copper (II) ions with alcohol radicals formed during γ-radiolysis in N 2O-purged system, where e -sol were scavenged by N 2O. The nanoparticles generated both in N 2 and N 2O-purged alcoholic systems, viz. methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol, were found to be oxygen sensitive. The contradictory results from pulse and γ-radiolysis studies in the presence and absence of iodide ions are explained to account for the nanoparticle generation.

  14. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrationsin an urban estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limite...

  15. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  16. Ab Initio Calculations Applied to Problems in Metal Ion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations can provide accurate spectroscopic data (such as molecular structures) vibrational frequencies, binding energies, etc.) that have been very useful in explaining trends in experimental data and in identifying incorrect experimental measurements. In addition, ab initio calculations. have given considerable insight into the many interactions that make the chemistry of transition metal systems so diverse. In this review we focus on cases where calculations and experiment have been used to solve interesting chemical problems involving metal ions. The examples include cases where theory was used to differentiate between disparate experimental values and cases where theory was used to explain unexpected experimental results.

  17. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  18. Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.

    1987-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

  19. Photoelectric properties in metal ion modified DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Atul; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Jang Ah Kim; Kim; Sung Ha Park; Taesung Kim

    2015-08-01

    Due to specific or as designed self-assembly, DNA nanostructures gaining popularity in various nanoscale electronic applications. Herein, a novel divalent metal ion-DNA complex known as M-DNA have been investigated for its photoelectric characteristics. The increased conductivity of M-DNA thin films is attributed to the metal ion electrical and optical properties. The gate voltage effect along with illumination on the conductivity of M-DNA demonstrates that M-DNA can be used as an active element of a field-effect transistor. The Zn DNA shows maximum conductivity of 300μS/cm at 480 nm light illumination suggest that M-DNA can be utilized in nano-opto-electronics and bio-sensing applications.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of metal ion-induced protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Herr, Andrew B; Conrady, Deborah G

    2011-01-01

    A large number of biological systems are regulated by metal ion-induced protein assembly. This phenomenon can play a critical role in governing protein function and triggering downstream biological responses. We discuss the basic thermodynamic principles of linked equilibria that pertain to metal ion-induced dimerization and describe experimental approaches useful for studying such systems. The most informative techniques for studying these systems are sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation, although a wide range of other spectroscopic, chromatographic, or qualitative approaches can provide a wealth of useful information. These experimental procedures are illustrated with examples from two systems currently under study: zinc-induced assembly of a staphylococcal protein responsible for intercellular adhesion in bacterial biofilms and calcium-induced dimerization of a human nucleotidase.

  1. Metal Ions: Supporting Actors in the Playbook of Small Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Buck, Alexander E.; McDowell, Sarah E.; Walter, Nils G.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1980s, several small RNA motifs capable of chemical catalysis have been discovered. These small ribozymes, composed of between approximately 40 and 200 nucleotides, have been found to play vital roles in the replication of subviral and viral pathogens, gene regulation in prokaryotes, and have recently been discovered in noncoding eukaryotic RNAs. All of the known natural small ribozymes – the hairpin, hammerhead, hepatitis delta virus, Varkud satellite, and glmS ribozymes – catalyze the same self-cleavage reaction as RNAse A, resulting in two products, one bearing a 2′–3′ cyclic phosphate and the other a 5′-hydroxyl group. Although originally thought to be obligate metalloenzymes like the group I and II self-splicing introns, the small ribozymes are now known to support catalysis in a wide variety of cations that appear to be only indirectly involved in catalysis. Nevertheless, under physiologic conditions, metal ions are essential for the proper folding and function of the small ribozymes, the most effective of these being magnesium. Metal ions contribute to catalysis in the small ribozymes primarily by stabilizing the catalytically active conformation, but in some cases also by activating RNA functional groups for catalysis, directly participating in catalytic acid-base chemistry, and perhaps by neutralizing the developing negative charge of the transition state. Although interactions between the small ribozymes and cations are relatively nonspecific, ribozyme activity is quite sensitive to the types and concentrations of metal ions present in solution, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between cellular metal ion homeostasis and cation requirements of catalytic RNAs, and perhaps RNA in general. PMID:22010272

  2. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  3. Superhydrogels of nanotubes capable of capturing heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly regulated by hydrogen bonds was successfully achieved in the system of lithocholic acid (LCA) mixed with three organic amines, ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA), in aqueous solutions. The mixtures of DEA/LCA exhibit supergelation capability and the hydrogels consist of plenty of network nanotubes with uniform diameters of about 60 nm determined by cryogenic TEM. Interestingly, the sample with the same concentration in a system of EA and LCA is a birefringent solution, in which spherical vesicles and can be transformed into nanotubes as the amount of LCA increases. The formation of hydrogels could be driven by the delicate balance of diverse noncovalent interactions, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, steric effects, van der Waals forces, and mainly hydrogen bonds. The mechanism of self-assembly from spherical bilayer vesicles into nanotubes was proposed. The dried hydrogels with nanotubes were explored to exhibit the excellent capability for capturing heavy-metal ions, for example, Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+). The superhydrogels of nanotubes from the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators mainly regulated by hydrogen bonds used for the removal of heavy-metal ions is simple, green, and high efficiency, and provide a strategic approach to removing heavy-metal ions from industrial sewage.

  4. The role of transition metal ions chemistry on multiphase chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Monod, A.; Chaumerliac, N.

    2003-04-01

    A modelling study of the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry is presented. First, new developments of the Model of Multiphase Cloud Chemistry (M2C2) are described: the transition metal ions reactivity and variable photolysis in the aqueous phase. Secondly, three summertime scenarios describing urban, remote and marine conditions are simulated. First, comparisons between results from M2C2 and from CAPRAM2.3 models for the same scenarios (Herrmann et al., 2000) show a good agreement between the two models with respect to their different chemical mechanisms. Secondly, chemical regimes in cloud are analysed to understand the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry. This study focuses on HOx chemistry, which afterwards influences the sulphur and the VOCs chemistry in droplets. The ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III) exhibits a diurnal variation with values in agreement with the few measurements of Fe speciation available. In the polluted case, sensitivity tests with and without TMI chemistry, show an enhancement of OH concentration in the aqueous phase when TMI chemistry is considered. This implies a more important oxidation of VOCs in droplets, which produces the HO2 radical, the hydrogen peroxide precursor. In fact, the HO2 radical is mainly converted into hydrogen peroxide by reactions between HO2/O2- radicals with Fe(II). This production of hydrogen peroxide leads to a rapid conversion of S(IV) into S(VI) at the beginning of the simulation.

  5. Measuring and Imaging Metal Ions With Fluorescence-Based Biosensors: Speciation, Selectivity, Kinetics, and Other Issues.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard B; Fierke, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence-based biosensors have shown themselves to be a powerful tool for the study of a variety of chemical species in biological systems, notably including metal ions. This chapter provides an overview of several important issues in using such sensors to study metallobiochemistry. These issues include selectivity for the analyte over potential interferents, including those that do not themselves induce a signal, the different forms in which metal ions are found (speciation), the utility of metal ion buffers, and the importance of kinetics in studying metal ion binding reactions. Finally, the chapter briefly discusses some of the issues in understanding whole-organism distribution of metal ions and its control.

  6. Ion-exchange behavior of alkali metals on treated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, G.; Hata, W.Y.; Tolan, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The ion-exchange behavior of trace quantities of the alkali-metal ions sodium and cesium, on activated carbon impregnated with zirconium phosphate (referred to here as ZrP), was studied. Impregnated carbon had twice as much ion-exchange activity as unimpregnated, oxidized carbon, and 10 times as much as commercial activated carbons. The distribution coefficient of sodium increased with increasing pH; the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased with increasing pH. Sodium and cesium were separated with an electrolytic solution of 0.1 M HCl. Preliminary studies indicated that 0.2 M potassium and cesium can also be separated. Distribution coefficients of the supported ZrP were determined by the elution technique and agreed within 20% of the values for pure ZrP calculated from the literature.

  7. Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

  8. Plasmonics for the study of metal ion-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    The study of metal-protein interactions is an expanding field of research investigated by bioinorganic chemists as it has wide applications in biological systems. Very recently, it has been reported that it is possible to study metal-protein interactions by immobilizing biomolecules on metal surfaces and applying experimental approaches based on plasmonics which have usually been used to investigate protein-protein interactions. This is possible because the electronic structure of metals generates plasmons whose properties can be exploited to obtain information from biomolecules that interact not only with other molecules but also with ions in solution. One major challenge of such approaches is to immobilize the protein to be studied on a metal surface with preserved native structure. This review reports and discusses all the works that deal with such an expanding new field of application of plasmonics with specific attention to surface plasmon resonance, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks of such approaches in comparison with other experimental techniques traditionally used to study metal-protein interactions.

  9. Molecular designs for controlling the local environments around metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah A; Borovik, A S

    2015-08-18

    -oxyl radical. We therefore probed the amount of spin density on the oxido ligand of our complexes using EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with oxygen-17 labeling. Our findings showed that there is a significant amount of spin on the oxido ligand, yet the M-oxo bonds are best described as highly covalent and there is no indication that an oxyl radical is formed. These results offer the intriguing possibility that high-spin M-oxo complexes are involved in O-O bond formation in biology. Ligand redesign to incorporate H-bond accepting units (sulfonamido groups) simultaneously provided a metal ion binding pocket, adjacent H-bond acceptors, and an auxiliary binding site for a second metal ion. These properties allowed us to isolate a series of heterobimetallic complexes of Fe(III) and Mn(III) in which a group II metal ion was coordinated within the secondary coordination sphere. Examination of the influence of the second metal ion on the electron transfer properties of the primary metal center revealed unexpected similarities between Ca(II) and Sr(II) ions, a result with relevance to the OEC. In addition, the presence of a second metal ion was found to prevent intramolecular oxidation of the ligand with an O atom transfer reagent.

  10. Structures and physical properties of gaseous metal cationized biological ions.

    PubMed

    Burt, Michael B; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-01-01

    Metal chelation can alter the activity of free biomolecules by modifying their structures or stabilizing higher energy tautomers. In recent years, mass spectrometric techniques have been used to investigate the effects of metal complexation with proteins, nucleobases and nucleotides, where small conformational changes can have significant physiological consequences. In particular, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool for determining the structure and reactivity of gas-phase ions. Unlike other mass spectrometric approaches, this method is able to directly resolve structural isomers using characteristic vibrational signatures. Other activation and dissociation methods, such as blackbody infrared radiative dissociation or collision-induced dissociation can also reveal information about the thermochemistry and dissociative pathways of these biological ions. This information can then be used to provide information about the structures of the ionic complexes under study. In this article, we review the use of gas-phase techniques in characterizing metal-bound biomolecules. Particular attention will be given to our own contributions, which detail the ability of metal cations to disrupt nucleobase pairs, direct the self-assembly of nucleobase clusters and stabilize non-canonical isomers of amino acids.

  11. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  12. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  13. Measurement of binding constants of poly(ethylenimine) with metal ions and metal chelates in aqueous media by ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, R.S.; Chen, M.N.

    1996-06-01

    Equilibrium constants for the binding of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with metal ions and metal chelates of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid in the aqueous sulfate solutions were determined by batch ultrafiltration (UF) in the pH range of 3.0--3.8. The average coordination number of PEI groups interacting with one metal ion and metal chelate was also obtained by varying the initial concentration ratio of PEI to metal ion. A simple chemical equilibrium model proposed in this work enabled the authors to satisfactorily predict the rejection coefficient of UF of metal ions and metal chelates in the presence of PEI. Also, the effect of the formation of soluble hydroxy complexes of metal chelates on their retention was emphasized.

  14. MRI findings following metal on metal hip arthroplasty and their relationship with metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ciara M; Bergin, Karen M; Kelly, Gabrielle E; McCoy, Gerry F; Ryan, Anthony G; Quinlan, John F

    2014-08-01

    Following the global recall of all ASR metal on metal hip products, our aim was to correlate MRI findings with acetabular inclination angles and metal ion levels in patients with these implants. Both cobalt and chromium levels were significantly higher in the presence of a periprosthetic fluid collection. There was no association between the presence of a periprosthetic mass, bone marrow oedema, trochanteric bursitis or greater levels of abductor muscle destruction for cobalt or chromium. There was no association between the level of periprosthetic tissue reaction and the acetabular inclination angle with any of the pathologies identified on MRI. The relationship between MRI pathology, metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles in patients with ASR implants remains unclear adding to the complexity of managing patients.

  15. Sputtering of metals at ion-electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Yu. V.; Korshunov, S. N.; Skorlupkin, I. D.

    2014-02-01

    It has been found that, in contrast to the commonly accepted opinion, simultaneous irradiation by 15-keV Ar+ ions and 2.5-keV electrons at temperatures above 0.5 T m ( T m is the melting temperature) induces much larger sputtering of metallic copper, nickel, and steel than irradiation only by Ar+ ions. The effect increases with the temperature. At T = 0.7 T m, the sputtering coefficients in the case of ion-electron irradiation are more than twice as large as the sputtering coefficients in the case of irradiation by Ar+ ions. The experiments on the sublimation of copper show that the sublimation rate in the case of the heating of a sample by an electron beam is higher than that in the case of heating in an electric vacuum oven. The revealed effects are explained by the electron-induced excitation of adatoms (atoms stuck over the surface, which appear owing to ion bombardment). Excited adatoms have a smaller binding energy with the surface and are sputtered more easily.

  16. Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1998-06-01

    The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all of these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils ({approx} 20--50 nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localized flow--i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO{sub 2} layers have indicated that pulsed localized flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO{sub 2}--a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within {approx} 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

  17. Optical metal-organic framework sensor for selective discrimination of some toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Shahat, Ahmed; Hassan, Hassan M A; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2013-09-02

    This paper reports the development of a facile and effective approach, based on the use of Zr-based metal-organic frameworks (UiO-66) sensor with micropores geometry, shape and particle morphology for the visual detection and removal of ultra-traces of some toxic metal ions such as Bi(III), Zn(II), Pb(II), Hg(II) and Cd(II). UiO-66 was used as selective carriers for accommodating hydrophobic chromophore probes such as dithizone (DZ) without coupling agent for sensitive and selective discrimination of trace level of toxic analytes. The developed UiO-66 sensor was utilized for the detection of ultra-traces of some toxic metal ions with the naked eye. The new sensor displays high sensitivity and selectivity of a wide range of detectable metals analytes up to 10(-10) mol dm(-3) in solution, in a rapid analyte uptake response (seconds). The developed sensor is stable, cost effective, easy to prepare, and would be useful for rapid detection and removal of ultra-traces of toxic metal ions in water samples.

  18. Zero-point energy effects in anion solvation shells.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2014-05-21

    By comparing classical and quantum-mechanical (path-integral-based) molecular simulations of solvated halide anions X(-) [X = F, Cl, Br and I], we identify an ion-specific quantum contribution to anion-water hydrogen-bond dynamics; this effect has not been identified in previous simulation studies. For anions such as fluoride, which strongly bind water molecules in the first solvation shell, quantum simulations exhibit hydrogen-bond dynamics nearly 40% faster than the corresponding classical results, whereas those anions which form a weakly bound solvation shell, such as iodide, exhibit a quantum effect of around 10%. This observation can be rationalized by considering the different zero-point energy (ZPE) of the water vibrational modes in the first solvation shell; for strongly binding anions, the ZPE of bound water molecules is larger, giving rise to faster dynamics in quantum simulations. These results are consistent with experimental investigations of anion-bound water vibrational and reorientational motion.

  19. Molecular Designs for Controlling the Local Environments around Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sarah A.; Borovik, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    of an Mn–oxyl radical. We therefore probed the amount of spin density on the oxido ligand of our complexes using EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with oxygen-17 labeling. Our findings showed that there is a significant amount of spin on the oxido ligand, yet the M–oxo bonds are best described as highly covalent and there is no indication that an oxyl radical is formed. These results offer the intriguing possibility that high spin M–oxo complexes are involved in O–O bond formation in biology. Ligand redesign to incorporate H-bond accepting units (sulfonamido groups) simultaneously provided a metal ion binding pocket, adjacent H-bond acceptors, and an auxiliary binding site for a second metal ion. These properties allowed us to isolate a series of heterobimetallic complexes of FeIII and MnIII in which a group II metal ion was coordinated within the secondary coordination sphere. Examination of the influence of the second metal ion on the electron transfer properties of the primary metal center revealed unexpected similarities between CaII and SrII ions—a result with relevance to the OEC. In addition, the presence of a second metal ion was found to prevent intramolecular oxidation of the ligand with an O-atom transfer reagent. PMID:26181849

  20. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter β(σ) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA.

  1. Barcoded materials based on photoluminescent hybrid system of lanthanide ions-doped metal organic framework and silica via ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2016-04-15

    A multicolored photoluminescent hybrid system based on lanthanide ions-doped metal organic frameworks/silica composite host has potential in display and barcode applications. By controlling the stoichiometry of the lanthanides via cation exchange, proportional various lanthanide ions are successfully introduced into metal organic frameworks, whose emission intensity is correspondingly proportional to its amount. The resulting luminescent barcodes depend on the lanthanide ions ratios and compositions. Subsequently, the lanthanide ions located in the channels of metal organic frameworks are protected from any interaction with the environment after the modification of silica on the surface. The optical and thermal stability of the hybrid materials are improved for technological application.

  2. The electron-transfer based interaction between transition metal ions and photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs): a platform for metal ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Liao, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zou, Mingjian; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2013-12-15

    The electron-transfer based quenching effect of commonly encountered transition metal ions on the photoluminescence of grapheme quantum dots (GQDs) was for the first time investigated, and was found to be associated with electron configuration of the individual metal ion. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the metal ion chelator, can competitively interact with metal ions to recover the quenched photoluminescence of GQDs. Basically, metal ions with empty or completely filled d orbits could not quench the photoluminescence of GQDs, but this quenching effect was observed for the metal ions with partly filled d orbits. Based on the quenching-recovering strategy, a simple optical metal sensing platform was established by taking Ni(2+) as an example. Using the nickel ion-specific chelating reagent, dimethylglyoxime (DMG), to replace EDTA, a detection limit of 4.1 μM was obtained in standard solution. This proposed strategy does not need further functionalization of GQDs, facilitating the application for simple, fast and cost-effective screening of metal ions.

  3. [Metal ions restrain the elimination of 4-tert-octylphenol by delta-MnO2].

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Li; Mou, Hua-Qian

    2013-06-01

    The effect of metal ions on elimination of 4-t-OP by synthetic delta-MnO2 suspension at pH 4.0 was studied. Experiments indicated that the removal of 4-t-OP by delta-MnO2 achieved 100% at reaction time of 150 min. However, the removal of 4-t-OP by delta-MnO2 was restrained when metal ions were added, and the higher concentration of metal ion was, the stronger the inhibition produced. Additionally, there were apparent differences among the inhibitory effect of the tested metal ions. Firstly, Pb2+ and Mn2+ had the strongest effect at pH 4.0, followed by the transition metal ions, then the alkaline earth ions, while the alkali metal ions had little influence on the removal of 4-t-OP by delta-MnO2. Also comparing the adsorption results of metal ions by delta-MnO2, Pb2+ showed the greatest attraction with delta-MnO2, and among the other metal ions, transition metal ions were adsorbed a little more strongly on delta-MnO2 than alkaline earth metal ions. Consequences showed that the inhibitory effects of metal ions were due to their occupying reactive sites on delta-MnO2 surface, which competed with 4-t-OP. Moreover, the dissimilar suppressions were contributed by the different adsorption capacities, surface structure change of MnO2 and the difference of free metal ion percentage in solution as well as metal ions radii.

  4. Selected metal ions protect Bacillus subtilis biofilms from erosion.

    PubMed

    Grumbein, S; Opitz, M; Lieleg, O

    2014-08-01

    Many problems caused by bacterial biofilms can be traced back to their high resilience towards chemical perturbations and their extraordinary sturdiness towards mechanical forces. However, the molecular mechanisms that link the mechanical properties of a biofilm with the ability of bacteria to survive in different chemical environments remain enigmatic. Here, we study the erosion stability of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) biofilms in the presence of different chemical environments. We find that these biofilms can utilize the absorption of certain metal ions such as Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Al(3+) into the biofilm matrix to avoid erosion by shear forces. Interestingly, many of these metal ions are toxic for planktonic B. subtilis bacteria. However, their toxic activity is suppressed when the ions are absorbed into the biofilm matrix. Our experiments clearly demonstrate that the biofilm matrix has to fulfill a dual function, i.e. regulating both the mechanical properties of the biofilm and providing a selective barrier towards toxic chemicals.

  5. Electron trapping in polar-solvated zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Eric H

    2005-11-03

    Of current interest in our laboratory is the nature of photoinduced processes in the cavities of zeolites completely submerged in polar solvents, or polar-solvated zeolites (PSZ). The present study addresses the nature of electron trapping in PSZ with emphasis on the zeolites NaX and NaY. Free electrons were generated by two-photon, pulsed-laser excitation of either pyrene or naphthalene included in zeolite cavities. Trapped electrons were monitored by diffuse transmittance, transient absorption spectroscopy at visible wavelengths. In anhydrous alcohols, electron trapping by Na(4)(4+) ion clusters was observed in both NaX and NaY. The resulting trapped electrons decayed over the course of tens of milliseconds. No evidence for alcohol-solvated electrons was found. More varied results were observed in solvents containing water. In NaX submerged in CH(3)OH containing 5% or higher water, species having microsecond lifetimes characteristic of solvated electrons were observed. By contrast, a 2 h exposure of NaY to 95/5 CH(3)OH/H(2)O had no effect on electron trapping relative to anhydrous CH(3)OH. The difference between NaX and NaY was explained by how fast water migrates into the sodalite cage. Prolonged exposure to water at room temperature or exposure to water at elevated temperatures was necessary to place water in the sodalite cages of NaY and deactivate Na(4)(4+) as an electron trap. Additional studies in NaY revealed that solvent clusters eventually become lower energy traps than Na(4)(4+) as the water content in methanol increases. In acetonitrile-water mixtures, electron trapping by Na(4)(4+) was eliminated and no equivalent species characteristic of solvated electrons in methanol-water mixtures was observed. This result was explained by the formation of low energy solvated electrons which cannot be observed in the visible region of the spectrum. Measurements of the rate of O(2) quenching in anhydrous solvents revealed rate constants for the quenching of ion

  6. Extraordinary rates of transition metal ion-mediated ribozyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2006-01-01

    In pre-steady-state, fast-quench kinetic analysis, the tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozyme “RzB” cleaves its substrate RNA with maximal measured k obs values of ∼3000 min−1 in 1 mM Mn2+ and ∼780 min−1 in 1 mM Mg2+ at 37°C (pH 7.4). Apparent pKa for the catalytic general base is ∼7.8–8.5, independent of the corresponding metal hydrate pKa, suggesting potential involvement of a nucleobase as general base as suggested previously from nucleobase substitution studies. The pH-rate profile is bell-shaped for Cd2+, for which the general catalytic acid has a pKa of 7.3 ± 0.1. Simulations of the pH-rate relation suggest a pKa for the general catalytic acid to be ∼9.5 in Mn2+ and >9.5 in Mg2+. The acid pKa's follow the trend in the pKa of the hydrated metal ions but are displaced by ∼1–2 pH units in the presence of Cd2+ and Mn2+. One possible explanation for this trend is direct metal ion coordination with a nucleobase, which then acts as general acid. PMID:16912216

  7. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  8. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2002-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  9. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  10. Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Bentonite Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Su, Guojun; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Wen

    2016-08-01

    A series of bentonite nanocomposites have been synthesized by modifying bentonite with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and the common complexing agents, complexone (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, EDTA) or mercaptocomplexant (2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, MBT). These adsorbents are used to remove heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+),Co(2+)). The Bent-CTMAB-MBT adsorbed metal ions are higher than Bent-CTMAB-EDTA under the same ion concentration in AAS. Compared with the single ion system, the adsorption of the mixed ion system of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) had decreased differently. In the mixed system, the adsorption of Mn(2+) is significantly lower, but the adsorption of Cu(2+) was highest. The adsorption sequence of these four metal ions was Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mn(2+), and the selective adsorption was closely related to the hydration energy of heavy metal ions. We could remove more metal ions in different stages with the adsorption sequence.

  11. The first solvation shell of magnesium ion in a model protein environment with formate, water, and X-NH3, H2S, imidazole, formaldehyde, and chloride as ligands: an Ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Deerfield, D W; Fox, D J; Head-Gordon, M; Hiskey, R G; Pedersen, L G

    1995-03-01

    The first coordination shell of an Mg(II) ion in a model protein environment is studied. Complexes containing a model carboxylate, an Mg(II) ion, various ligands (NH3, H2S, imidazole, and formaldehyde) and water of hydration about the divalent metal ion were geometry optimized. We find that for complexes with the same coordination number, the unidentate carboxylate-Mg(II) ion is greater than 10 kcal mol-1 more stable than the bidentate orientation. Imidazole was found to be the most stable ligand, followed in order by NH3, formaldehyde, H2O, and H2S.

  12. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  13. Transition metal dissolution, ion migration, electrocatalytic reduction and capacity loss in Lithium-ion full cells

    DOE PAGES

    Gilbert, James A.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Abraham, Daniel P.

    2017-01-05

    Continuous operation of full cells with layered transition metal (TM) oxide positive electrodes (NCM523) leads to dissolution of TM ions and their migration and incorporation into the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) of the graphite-based negative electrode. These processes correlate with cell capacity fade and accelerate markedly as the upper cutoff voltage (UCV) exceeds 4.30 V. At voltages ≥ 4.4 V there is enhanced fracture of the oxide during cycling that creates new surfaces and causes increased solvent oxidation and TM dissolution. Despite this deterioration, cell capacity fade still mainly results from lithium loss in the negative electrode SEI. Among TMs,more » Mn content in the SEI shows a better correlation with cell capacity loss than Co and Ni contents. As Mn ions become incorporated into the SEI, the kinetics of lithium trapping change from power to linear at the higher UCVs, indicating a large effect of these ions on SEI growth and implicating (electro)catalytic reactions. Lastly, we estimate that each MnII ion deposited in the SEI causes trapping of ~102 additional Li+ ions thereby hastening the depletion of cyclable lithium ions. Using these results, we sketch a mechanism for cell capacity fade, emphasizing the conceptual picture over the chemical detail.« less

  14. High current metal ion implantation to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. X.; Gao, K. Y.

    1999-06-10

    High current metal-ion implantation by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was conducted to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides. It was found that C54-TiSi{sub 2}, ZrSi{sub 2}, NiSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} layers on Si wafers with good electric properties could be obtained directly after implantation. In comparison, the formation of some other silicides like {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, tetragonal-WSi{sub 2} and tetragonal-MoSi{sub 2} required an additional post-annealing to improve their crystallinity and thus their electric properties. Interestingly, the NiSi{sub 2} layers of superior electric properties were obtained at a selected Ni-ion current density of 35 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. At this current, a beam heating raised the Si wafer to a specific temperature of 380 deg. C, at which the size difference between NiSi{sub 2} and Si lattices was nil. The resistivity of the NiSi{sub 2} layers so obtained was much lower than that of the Ni-disilicide formed by solid-state reaction at >750 deg. C. The formation mechanism of the above metal-silicides and the associated electric properties will also be discussed.

  15. Metal-organic frameworks for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shan; Deng, Hexiang

    2015-03-15

    Porous materials have been widely used in batteries and supercapacitors attribute to their large internal surface area (usually 100–1000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and porosity that can favor the electrochemical reaction, interfacial charge transport, and provide short diffusion paths for ions. As a new type of porous crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received huge attention in the past decade due to their unique properties, i.e. huge surface area (up to 7000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), high porosity, low density, controllable structure and tunable pore size. A wide range of applications including gas separation, storage, catalysis, and drug delivery benefit from the recent fast development of MOFs. However, their potential in electrochemical energy storage has not been fully revealed. Herein, the present mini review appraises recent and significant development of MOFs and MOF-derived materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, to give a glimpse into these potential applications of MOFs. - Graphical abstract: MOFs with large surface area and high porosity can offer more reaction sites and charge carriers diffusion path. Thus MOFs are used as cathode, anode, electrolyte, matrix and precursor materials for lithium ion battery, and also as electrode and precursor materials for supercapacitors. - Highlights: • MOFs have potential in electrochemical area due to their high porosity and diversity. • We summarized and compared works on MOFs for lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. • We pointed out critical challenges and provided possible solutions for future study.

  16. Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, S.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

  17. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  18. Correlation between the limiting pH of metal ion solubility and total metal concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Apak, R.; Hizal, J.; Ustaer, C.

    1999-03-15

    As an alternative to species distribution diagrams (pM vs pH curves in aqueous solution) drawn for a fixed total metal concentration, this work has developed simple linear models for correlating the limiting pH of metal ion solubility -- in equilibrium with the least soluble amorphous metal hydroxide solid phase -- to the total metal concentration. Thus adsorptive metal removal processes in complex systems can be better designed once the limiting pH of heavy metal solubility (i.e., pH{sup *}) in such a complex environment can be envisaged by simple linear equations. pH{sup *} vs pM{sub t} (M{sub t} = total metal concentration that can exist in aqueous solution in equilibrium with M(OH){sub 2(s)}) linear curves for uranyl-hydroxide, uranyl-carbonate-hydroxide, and mercuric-chloride-hydroxide simple and mixed-ligand systems and cupric-carbonate-hydroxide complexes in equilibrium with mixed hydroxide solid phases may enable the experimental chemist to distinguish true adsorption (e.g., onto hydrous oxide sorbents) from bulk precipitation removal of the metal and to interpret some anomalous metal fixation data -- usually attributed to pure adsorption in the literature -- with precipitation if the pM{sub t} at the studied pH is lower than that tolerated by pH{sup *} vs pM{sub t} curves. This easily predictable pH{sup *} corresponding to a given pM{sub t} may aid the design of desorptive mobilization experiments for certain metals as well as their adsorptive removal with the purpose of simulating metal adsorption and desorption cycles in real complex environments with changing groundwater pH.

  19. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  20. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  1. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  2. Thin Metallic Films from Solvated Metal Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-14

    Departamento de Quimica , Universidad de Concepcion, Cassilla 3-:, c oncepcion, Chile. -I{ - ~ *~.’JS*~M 4 .~4\\ 821 19 the gold particles were negatively...0.095-0.0162 30 black yes 25 Benzene 0.0063 0 black no - Toluene 0.0084-0.0085 black yes - DMSO 0.0191 00 brown yes 9 H2 0 0.0147 1 black no determined...THF (190 ml) were codeposited over a 1.5 n period. The matrix was brown -red in color at the beginning of the codeposition and darker at the end. The

  3. The two faces of metal ions: From implants rejection to tissue repair/regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniel M; Santos, Susana G; Lamghari, Meriem; Barbosa, Mário A

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm of metallic ions as exclusive toxic agents is changing. During the last 60 years, knowledge about toxicological and immunological reactions to metal particles and ions has advanced considerably. Hip prostheses, namely metal-on-metal bearings, have prompted studies about excessive and prolonged exposure to prosthetic debris. In that context, the interactions of metal particles and ions with cells and tissues are mostly harmful, inducing immune responses that lead to osteolysis and implant failure. However, in the last decade, new strategies to promote immunomodulation and healing have emerged based on the unique properties of metallic ions. The atom-size and charge enable ions to interact with key macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids) that affect cellular function. Moreover, these agents are inexpensive, stable and can be integrated in biomaterials, which may open new avenues for a novel generation of medical devices. Herein, orthopedic devices are discussed as models for adverse responses to metal ions, and debated together with the potential to use metal ions-based therapies, thus bridging the gap between unmet clinical needs and cutting-edge research. In summary, this review addresses the two "faces" of metallic ions, from pathological responses to innovative research strategies that use metal ions for regenerative medicine.

  4. Mechanism of beta-purothionin antimicrobial peptide inhibition by metal ions: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Oard, Svetlana; Karki, Bijaya

    2006-04-20

    Wheat beta-purothionin is a highly potent antimicrobial peptide which, however, is inactivated by metal ions. The key structural properties and mechanisms of inhibition of beta-purothionin were investigated for the first time using unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water. A series of simulations were performed to determine effects of temperature and the metal ions. Analyses of the unconstrained simulations allowed the experimentally unavailable structural and dynamic details to be unambiguously examined. The global fold and the alpha1 helix of beta-purothionin are thermally stable and not affected by metal ions. In contrast, the alpha2 helix unfolds with shift of temperature from 300 K and in the presence of metal ions. The network of conserved residues including Arg30 and Lys5 is sensitive to environmental changes and triggers unfolding. Loop regions display high flexibility and elevated dynamics, but are affected by metal ions. Our study provides insights into the mechanism of metal ion-based inhibition.

  5. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  6. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  7. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-20

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater.

  8. State promotion and neutralization оf ions near metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    When a multiply charged ion with charge Z approaches the metal surface, a dipole is formed by the multiply charged ion and the charge induced in the metal. The states for such a dipole are promoted into continuum with decreasing ion-surface distance and cross the states formed from metal atom. The model proposed explains the dominant population of deep bound states in collisions considered.

  9. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  10. Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

    1992-12-31

    The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

  11. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  12. Surface oxidation of metals by oxygen ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alov, Nikolai V.

    2007-03-01

    Surface oxidation of molybdenum, tungsten, niobium and tantalum by low-energy oxygen ion beams is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxygen ion bombardment of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces leads to the formation of thin oxide films containing metals in oxidation states 4+, 5+ and 6+. At the initial stage of irradiation, rapid surface oxidation of molybdenum and tungsten was observed. At higher fluences the oxidation reaches saturation and the surface composition remains almost unchanged with increasing fluence. Oxygen ion bombardment of niobium and tantalum surfaces leads to the formation of thin oxide films containing niobium and tantalum in oxidation states 2+, 4+ and 5+. At the initial stage of irradiation, again rapid surface oxidation of niobium and tantalum was observed. At higher fluences the population of Nb2+ and Nb4+, Ta2+ and Ta4+ reaches a maximum and then begins to decrease. The population of Nb5+ and Ta5+ continues to increase and finally the entire oxide films consists of only Nb5+ and Ta5+, respectively.

  13. Conductance, a contrivance to explore ion association and solvation behavior of an ionic liquid (tetrabutylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate) in acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, 1,3-dioxolane, and their binaries.

    PubMed

    Ekka, Deepak; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2012-09-27

    Precise measurements on electrical conductance (Λ) of solutions of an ionic liquid (IL) tetrabutylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile (ACN), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and 1,3-dioxolane (1,3-DO) and their binary mixtures have been reported at 298.15 K. The conductance data have been analyzed by the Fuoss conductance equation (1978) in terms of the limiting molar conductance (Λ(o)), the association constant (K(A)), and the association diameter (R) for ion-pair formation. The Walden product is obtained and discussed. However, the deviation of the conductometric curves (Λ versus √c) from linearity for the electrolyte in THF and 1,3-DO and their binary mixtures indicated triple-ion formation and therefore the corresponding conductance data have been analyzed by the Fuoss–Kraus theory of triple ions. The limiting ionic conductances (λ(o)(±)) have been estimated from the appropriate division of the limiting molar conductivity value of tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate [Bu(4)NBPh(4)] as the “reference electrolyte” method along with a numerical evaluation of ion-pair and triple-ion formation constants (K(P) ≈ K(A) and K(T)). The results have been discussed in terms of solvent properties and configurational theory. Ionic association in the limiting molar conductances as well as the single-ion conductivity values have been determined for the electrolyte in the solvent media.

  14. Adsorption of metal ions by pecan shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adsorption effectiveness of pecan shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in removing metal ions (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) commonly found in municipal and industrial wastewater. Pecan shells were activated by phosphoric acid, steam or carbon dioxide activation methods. Metal ion adsorption of shell-based GACs was compared to the metal ion adsorption of a commercial carbon, namely, Calgon's Filtrasorb 200. Adsorption experiments were conducted using solutions containing all three metal ions in order to investigate the competitive effects of the metal ions as would occur in contaminated wastewater. The results obtained from this study showed that acid-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more lead ion and zinc ion than any of the other carbons, especially at carbon doses of 0.2-1.0%. However, steam-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more copper ion than the other carbons, particularly using carbon doses above 0.2%. In general, Filtrasorb 200 and carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were poor metal ion adsorbents. The results indicate that acid- and steam-activated pecan shell-based GACs are effective metal ion adsorbents and can potentially replace typical coal-based GACs in treatment of metal contaminated wastewater.

  15. Use of Divalent Metal Ions in the DNA Cleavage Reaction of Human Type II Topoisomerases†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Burch, Amber M.; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    All type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions in order to cleave and ligate DNA. In order to further elucidate the mechanistic basis for these critical enzyme-mediated events, the role of the metal ion in the DNA cleavage reaction of human topoisomerase IIβ was characterized and compared to that of topoisomerase IIα. The present study utilized divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with DNA cleavage substrates that substituted a sulfur atom for the 3′-bridging oxygen or the non-bridging oxygens of the scissile phosphate. Based on time courses of DNA cleavage, cation titrations, and metal ion mixing experiments, we propose the following model for the use of divalent metal ions by human type II topoisomerases. First, both enzymes employ a two-metal-ion mechanism to support DNA cleavage. Second, an interaction between one divalent metal ion and the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate greatly enhances enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage, most likely by stabilizing the leaving 3′-oxygen. Third, there is an important interaction between a divalent second metal ion and a non-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate that stimulates DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIβ. If this interaction exists in topoisomerase IIα, its effects on DNA cleavage are equivocal. This last aspect of the model highlights a difference in metal ion utilization during DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. PMID:19222228

  16. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  18. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  19. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation.

  20. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF MEASUREMENTS: Liquid-metal ion emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, M. D.

    1983-05-01

    This article describes and discusses the fundamental laws of ion emission from liquid-metal tips in a strong electric field. The widespread views of a liquid-metal emitter as being the smoothed tip of a Taylor cone are examined critically. The instability of a liquid metal in an electric field is discussed, and in line with this, an alternative concept is given of a sharp-tipped electrohydrodynamic emitter. The prospects for applying liquid-metal ion emitters are noted.

  1. Solvated dissipative electro-elastic network model of hydrated proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-10-28

    Elastic network models coarse grain proteins into a network of residue beads connected by springs. We add dissipative dynamics to this mechanical system by applying overdamped Langevin equations of motion to normal-mode vibrations of the network. In addition, the network is made heterogeneous and softened at the protein surface by accounting for hydration of the ionized residues. Solvation changes the network Hessian in two ways. Diagonal solvation terms soften the spring constants and off-diagonal dipole-dipole terms correlate displacements of the ionized residues. The model is used to formulate the response functions of the electrostatic potential and electric field appearing in theories of redox reactions and spectroscopy. We also formulate the dielectric response of the protein and find that solvation of the surface ionized residues leads to a slow relaxation peak in the dielectric loss spectrum, about two orders of magnitude slower than the main peak of protein relaxation. Finally, the solvated network is used to formulate the allosteric response of the protein to ion binding. The global thermodynamics of ion binding is not strongly affected by the network solvation, but it dramatically enhances conformational changes in response to placing a charge at the active site of the protein.

  2. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  3. Rational design of metal ion sequestering agents. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.

    1998-06-01

    'This project addresses fundamental issues and requirements in developing hazardous metal ion separation technologies needed in the treatment and disposal of radioactive and chemical toxic waste. It encompasses the synthesis of new agents, followed by their characterization and evaluation, with the aim to optimize their metal ion sequestering properties for use in applied technologies. This research is focused on the following key areas: (1) basic design and synthesis of new metal ion specific sequestering ligands; (2) structural and thermodynamic investigations of these ligands and their complexes formed with the targeted metal ions; and (3) development of sequestering agents and their incorporation into systems designed to be prototypes of inexpensive and highly effective materials for hazardous metal ion decontamination. Basic studies of the sequestration of relevant toxic metals are required in order to develop processes that will treat effluents sufficiently well to allow direct release into the environment and minimize the production of secondary wastes.'

  4. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  5. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  6. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  8. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robinson, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  9. Controlled Segmentation of Metal Nanowire Array by Block Copolymer Lithography and Reversible Ion Loading.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jeong Ho; Cha, Seung Keun; Kim, Ye Chan; Yun, Taeyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Jin, Hyeong Min; Lee, Jae Eun; Jeon, Hyun Uk; Kim, So Youn; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2017-02-20

    Spatial arrangement of 1D nanomaterials may offer enormous opportunities for advanced electronics and photonics. Moreover, morphological complexity and chemical diversity in the nanoscale components may lead to unique properties that are hardly anticipated in randomly distributed homogeneous nanostructures. Here, controlled chemical segmentation of metal nanowire arrays using block copolymer lithography and subsequent reversible metal ion loading are demonstrated. To impose chemical heterogeneity in the nanowires generated by block copolymer lithography, reversible ion loading method highly specific for one particular polymer block is introduced. Reversibility of the metal ion loading enables area-selective localized replacement of metal ions in the self-assembled patterns and creates segmented metal nanowire arrays with different metallic components. Further integration of this method with shear aligning process produces high aligned segmented metal nanowire array with desired local chemical compositions.

  10. Heterogeneous behavior of metalloproteins toward metal ion binding and selectivity: insights from molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Prerana; Chandravanshi, Monika; Mandal, Suraj Kumar; Srivastava, Ambuj; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-07-01

    About one-third of the existing proteins require metal ions as cofactors for their catalytic activities and structural complexities. While many of them bind only to a specific metal, others bind to multiple (different) metal ions. However, the exact mechanism of their metal preference has not been deduced to clarity. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate whether a cognate metal (bound to the structure) can be replaced with other similar metal ions. We have chosen seven different proteins (phospholipase A2, sucrose phosphatase, pyrazinamidase, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), plastocyanin, monoclonal anti-CD4 antibody Q425, and synaptotagmin 1 C2B domain) bound to seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+), respectively). In total, 49 MD simulations each of 50 ns were performed and each trajectory was analyzed independently. Results demonstrate that in some cases, cognate metal ions can be exchanged with similar metal ions. On the contrary, some proteins show binding affinity specifically to their cognate metal ions. Surprisingly, two proteins CDO and plastocyanin which are known to bind Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), respectively, do not exhibit binding affinity to any metal ion. Furthermore, the study reveals that in some cases, the active site topology remains rigid even without cognate metals, whereas, some require them for their active site stability. Thus, it will be interesting to experimentally verify the accuracy of these observations obtained computationally. Moreover, the study can help in designing novel active sites for proteins to sequester metal ions particularly of toxic nature.

  11. Highly charged Ar{sup q+} ions interacting with metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jijin; Zhang Jian; Gu Jiangang; Luo Xianwen; Hu Bitao

    2009-12-15

    Using computer simulation, alternative methods of the interaction of highly charged ions Ar{sup q+} with metals (Au, Ag) are used and verified in the present work. Based on the classical over-barrier model, we discussed the promotion loss and peeling off processes. The simulated total potential electron yields agree well with the experiment data in incident energy ranging from 100 eV to 5 keV and all charge states of Ar{sup q+}. Based on the TRIM code, we obtain the side-feeding rate as well as the motion and charge transfer of HCI below the surface. Some results, including the array of KL{sup x} x-ray satellite lines, the respective contribution of autoionization, and side-feeding to inner shells, and the filling rates and lifetime of inner shells for Ar agree well with experiment or theory.

  12. Highly Emissive Transition Metal Ion Doped Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Santanu; Srivastava, Bhupendra B.; Sarma, D. D.; Pradhan, Narayan

    2011-07-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals (d-dots), specifically ones not containing heavy metal ions, have the potential to become a class of mainstream emissive materials. Mn- and Cu-doped ZnSe or ZnS d-dots can cover an emission window similar to that of the current workhorse of intrinsic quantum dot (q-dots) emitters, CdSe nanocrystals. We synthesized high quality stable Cu doped ZnSe in nonpolar as well as polar solvent. The emission intensity of these doped nanocrystals is found stable for months under UV irradiation, after different multifunctional ligand which is important for any biological detection. We have also synthesized the stable Mn doped ZnS in nonpolar solvent more than 50% QY.. The doped nanocrystals are characterized by TEM, XRD, EPR and ICP analysis.

  13. Photoluminescence properties of Jahn-Teller transition-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates the influence of electron-phonon coupling associated with E ⊗e and T ⊗e Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in different transition-metal (TM) ions on de-excitation phenomena through nonradiative multiphonon relaxation, i.e., photoluminescence (PL) quenching. We developed a configurational curve model which is able to predict from the absorption spectrum whether a given JT-TM ion is PL or quenched. The prediction is made on the basis of an adapted Dexter-Klick-Russell parameter for JT systems, defined in terms of spectroscopic parameters through ΛJT=αΔeabs/Eabs, where Δeabs refers to the splitting of the parent octahedral Eg states by the JT distortion in E ⊗e (α =3/4) or T ⊗e (α =1/4), and Eabs is the energy of the first absorption band involving electronic transition between Eg and T2g. We show that PL in any JT-TM ion occurs whenever ΛJT<0.1 or is quenched if ΛJT>0.2. This result is noteworthy since it allows us to establish structural requirements for the JT-TM ion and the host crystal to be PL. Although PL properties of materials containing TM ions depend on a variety of structural factors such as the electronic configuration, the site symmetry, and the crystal field produced by neighboring atoms, the present model achieves this goal through a simple spectroscopic parameter: ΛJT. In this work we correlated the PL properties of different sixfold-coordinated JT systems such as Ti3+, Cu2+, Mn3+, Cr2+, Fe2+, Co3+, and Ni3+ in halides and oxides with ΛJT obtained from their respective absorption spectra. From this analysis we conclude that depending on the nature of the JT coupling and its strength, PL is either strongly favored or quenched in T ⊗e while it is mostly quenched in E ⊗e systems due to the larger JT distortion.

  14. The Role of Metals in the Reaction Catalyzed by Metal-Ion-Independent Bacillary RNase

    PubMed Central

    Ulyanova, Vera; Zelenikhin, Pavel; Kolpakov, Alexey; Blokhin, Dmitriy; Müller, Dieter; Klochkov, Vladimir; Ilinskaya, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes of intestinal microbiota are the key agents that affect functional activity of the body as they directly interact with epithelial and immune cells. Several species of the Bacillus genus, like Bacillus pumilus, a common producer of extracellular RNase binase, can populate the intestinal microbiome as a colonizing organism. Without involving metal ions as cofactors, binase depolymerizes RNA by cleaving the 3′,5′-phosphodiester bond and generates 2′,3′-cyclic guanosine phosphates in the first stage of a catalytic reaction. Maintained in the reaction mixture for more than one hour, such messengers can affect the human intestinal microflora and the human body. In the present study, we found that the rate of 2′,3′-cGMP was growing in the presence of transition metals that stabilized the RNA structure. At the same time, transition metal ions only marginally reduced the amount of 2′,3′-cGMP, blocking binase recognition sites of guanine at N7 of nucleophilic purine bases. PMID:28096759

  15. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  16. Refined Dummy Atom Model of Mg(2+) by Simple Parameter Screening Strategy with Revised Experimental Solvation Free Energy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Feng, Wei; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-12-28

    Metal ions play an important role in the catalysis of metalloenzymes. To investigate metalloenzymes via molecular modeling, a set of accurate force field parameters for metal ions is highly imperative. To extend its application range and improve the performance, the dummy atom model of metal ions was refined through a simple parameter screening strategy using the Mg(2+) ion as an example. Using the AMBER ff03 force field with the TIP3P model, the refined model accurately reproduced the experimental geometric and thermodynamic properties of Mg(2+). Compared with point charge models and previous dummy atom models, the refined dummy atom model yields an enhanced performance for producing reliable ATP/GTP-Mg(2+)-protein conformations in three metalloenzyme systems with single or double metal centers. Similar to other unbounded models, the refined model failed to reproduce the Mg-Mg distance and favored a monodentate binding of carboxylate groups, and these drawbacks needed to be considered with care. The outperformance of the refined model is mainly attributed to the use of a revised (more accurate) experimental solvation free energy and a suitable free energy correction protocol. This work provides a parameter screening strategy that can be readily applied to refine the dummy atom models for metal ions.

  17. Kinetic and equilibrium metal-ion-binding behaviour reflected in a metal-ion-dependent antigenic determinant in bovine prothrombin. Comparison with bovine prothrombin fragment 1.

    PubMed Central

    Madar, D A; Hall, T J; Hiskey, R G; Koehler, K A

    1981-01-01

    Rabbit anti-(bovine prothrombin fragment 1) antibodies were fractionated by using fragment-1 affinity chromatography in the absence of metal ions, and showed an absolute requirement for the presence of metal ions in their interactions with bovine fragment 1 or prothrombin. These antibodies were employed to evaluate both the rate constants for a protein conformation change and the equilibrium metal-ion binding to isolated bovine fragment 1 and intact prothrombin. The close similarity of the rates obtained for the conformation change in fragment 1 and those observed in prothrombin indicated that the same process is involved in both proteins and that the non-fragment-1 region of the prothrombin has essentially no effect on this process in the fragment-1 region. Equilibrium metal-ion-binding studies indicate that the details of the metal-ion-binding process in fragment 1 and prothrombin are essentially the same. We conclude that the metal-ion-binding behaviour of the fragment-1 domain of intact prothrombin is identical with that of isolated fragment 1. PMID:6171251

  18. Topological and spatial aspects of the hydration of solutes of extreme solvation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Dan L.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    1999-10-01

    The hydration of charged Lennard-Jones spheres by simple point charge water is considered. Molecular dynamics and expanded ensemble simulations were used to compare the hydration structures surrounding solutes with extreme solvation entropy. The variations in the solvation entropy were analyzed in terms of changes in the spatial and topological structure of the hydration shells. The solvation entropy was found to be maximal for solutes that can replace water molecules in the hydrogen-bond network. Further, using a Kirkwood-type factorization, the solvation entropy was expanded as a sum over the partial n-body distribution functions. The two-body solute-water contribution to the solvation entropy was found to exceed the full solvation entropy for solutes with low charge, whereas the converse is true for the other solutes. This is consistent with the idea that water-water correlations are enhanced by solvation of, for example, noble gases, whereas they are disrupted by solvation of ions. Further, the orientational and radial parts of the two-body solute-water entropy were calculated as functions of the charge of the solute. The orientational part has a single maximum, whereas the radial part maintains the bimodal form of the full solvation entropy.

  19. Metal Ions Removal Using Nano Oxide Pyrolox™ Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gładysz-Płaska, A.; Skwarek, E.; Budnyak, T. M.; Kołodyńska, D.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the use of Pyrolox™ containing manganese nano oxides used for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions. Their concentrations were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrometer SpectrAA 240 FS (Varian) as well as UV-vis method. For this purpose the static kinetic and equilibrium studies were carried out using the batch technique. The effect of solution pH, shaking time, initial metal ion concentrations, sorbent dosage, and temperature was investigated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the sorption isotherm models proposed by Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich. The kinetic results showed that the pseudo second order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. The results indicate that adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions is strongly dependent on pH. The value of pH 4-7 was optimal adsorption. The time to reach the equilibrium was found to be 24 h, and after this time, the sorption percentage reached about 70%. Kinetics of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and U(VI) adsorption on the adsorbent can be described by the pseudo second order rate equation. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements for adsorbent characterization were performed. Characteristic points of the double layer determined for the studied Pyrolox™ sample in 0.001 mol/dm3 NaCl solution are pHPZC = 4 and pHIEP < 2.

  20. Metal Ions Removal Using Nano Oxide Pyrolox™ Material.

    PubMed

    Gładysz-Płaska, A; Skwarek, E; Budnyak, T M; Kołodyńska, D

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the use of Pyrolox™ containing manganese nano oxides used for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions. Their concentrations were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrometer SpectrAA 240 FS (Varian) as well as UV-vis method. For this purpose the static kinetic and equilibrium studies were carried out using the batch technique. The effect of solution pH, shaking time, initial metal ion concentrations, sorbent dosage, and temperature was investigated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the sorption isotherm models proposed by Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich. The kinetic results showed that the pseudo second order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. The results indicate that adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions is strongly dependent on pH. The value of pH 4-7 was optimal adsorption. The time to reach the equilibrium was found to be 24 h, and after this time, the sorption percentage reached about 70%. Kinetics of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and U(VI) adsorption on the adsorbent can be described by the pseudo second order rate equation. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements for adsorbent characterization were performed. Characteristic points of the double layer determined for the studied Pyrolox™ sample in 0.001 mol/dm(3) NaCl solution are pHPZC = 4 and pHIEP < 2.

  1. Influence of metal ion complexation on the metastable fragmentation of DNA hexamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, Andreas; Bald, Ilko; Flosadóttir, Helga D.; Ómarsson, Benedikt; Lafosse, Anne; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2014-06-01

    Here, we study the metastable decay of 5'-d(TTGCTT) in the presence of 0-6 alkaline metal ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+) and 0-3 alkaline earth metal ions (Mg2+ and Ca2 +), which replace the corresponding number of protons in the oligonucleotide. We find that all ions studied here stabilize the oligonucleotide with respect to simple 3'-C-O backbone cleavage, but at the same time these metal ions promote a central oligonucleotide deletion accompanied by a concomitant recombination of the terminal d(TT) groups. We find that the quenching of the 3'-C-O backbone cleavage is not ion specific, since it is due to the removal of the phosphate protons upon replacement with the respective metal ions. The central nucleotide deletion competes with the 3'-C-O backbone cleavage channels and is thus promoted through the replacement of the exchangeable protons against metal ions. However, with increasing positive charge density of the metal ions the yield of the central nucleotide deletion further increases. We attribute this effect to the necessity of sufficient proximity of the terminal d(TT) group to allow for their recombination on this reaction path. Hence, the formation of a reactive conformer is mediated by the metal ions.

  2. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  3. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  4. Analysis of Supercritical-Extracted Chelated Metal Ions From Mixed Organic-Inorganic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Organic and inorganic contaminants of an environmental sample are analyzed by the same GC-MS instrument by adding an oxidizing agent to the sample to oxidize metal or metal compounds to form metal ions. The metal ions are converted to chelate complexes and the chelate complexes are extracted into a supercritical fluid such as CO2. The metal chelate extract after flowing through a restrictor tube is directly injected into the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer, preferably containing a refractory metal filament such as rhenium to fragment the complex to release metal ions which are detected. This provides a fast, economical method for the analysis of metal contaminants in a sample and can be automated. An organic extract of the sample in conventional or supercritical fluid solvents can be detected in the same mass spectrometer, preferably after separation in a supercritical fluid chromatograph.

  5. Solvation structure of the halides from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antalek, Matthew; Pace, Elisabetta; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Chillemi, Giovanni; Benfatto, Maurizio; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional models for the aqueous solvation structures of chloride, bromide, and iodide are reported. K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and Minuit X-ray absorption near edge (MXAN) analyses found well-defined single shell solvation spheres for bromide and iodide. However, dissolved chloride proved structurally distinct, with two solvation shells needed to explain its strikingly different X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. Final solvation models were as follows: iodide, 8 water molecules at 3.60 ± 0.13 Å and bromide, 8 water molecules at 3.40 ± 0.14 Å, while chloride solvation included 7 water molecules at 3.15 ± 0.10 Å, and a second shell of 7 water molecules at 4.14 ± 0.30 Å. Each of the three derived solvation shells is approximately uniformly disposed about the halides, with no global asymmetry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations simulating the chloride XANES spectra following from alternative solvation spheres revealed surprising sensitivity of the electronic state to 6-, 7-, or 8-coordination, implying a strongly bounded phase space for the correct structure during an MXAN fit. MXAN analysis further showed that the asymmetric solvation predicted from molecular dynamics simulations using halide polarization can play no significant part in bulk solvation. Classical molecular dynamics used to explore chloride solvation found a 7-water solvation shell at 3.12 (-0.04/+0.3) Å, supporting the experimental result. These experiments provide the first fully three-dimensional structures presenting to atomic resolution the aqueous solvation spheres of the larger halide ions.

  6. Application of the Mean Spherical Approximation to Describe the Gibbs Solvation Energies of Monovalent Monoatomic Ions in Non-Aqueous Solvents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-09

    through hydrogen bonding . A plot of AG0Oth against AGO is shown for the Cl- ion data in Figure 4. Agreement tr, htrex between the theoretical estimate and...SOLVENTS by L. Blum* and W.R. Fawcett* Prepared for Publication in the Journal of Physical Chemistry *Department of Physics, POB AT, Faculty of Natural ...the excess ionic properties depend on a single scaling, Debye-like parameter is still retained by this approximation. The equations for the most

  7. Post-synthesis addition of transition metal ions and lanthanide ions to the surface of anatase titanium (IV) dioxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasanthiran, Choumini

    Solar energy utilization is an attractive option for new energy technology and economic development. Our research is the formulation of catalyst materials for solar production of hydrogen from water. Titanium(IV) oxide has been explored for water splitting; however, a major challenge is that titanium(IV) oxide can only absorb UV light. Visible light absorption can be increased by metal ion or anion doping by creating interband states. Most dopant protocols lead to deposition of dopant ions throughout the solid, and interfacial deposition has received very little attention. We have developed a method to selectively attach transition metal ions and lanthanide ions on the surface of titanium(IV) oxide nanorods using metal chlorides as precursors. The present study demonstrates that Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu (II), Eu(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Er(III) were coordinated to the surface of oleic acid capped TiO2 nanorods (NRs) by post-synthesis method without any phase or morphology transformation. Metal ion loading could be carefully controlled, and we show a titration curve for addition of transition metal ions and Eu(III) to the nanorod surface. The materials were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, XPS and powder X-ray diffraction. X-ray photoelectron spectra were obtained for a series of M-TiO2 samples in which transition metal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) ions are directly attached to the surface of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. Further, we report sequential, quantitative loading of transition metal ions (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) to the surface of rod-shape anatase TiO2 nanocrystals in bimetallic combinations (6C2 = 15). TEM, PXRD, UV-Vis, XPS and elemental analysis characterization show that bimetallic combinations were synthesized successfully.

  8. Metal-clad optical waveguide fluorescence device for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Zoppi, Angela; Lascialfari, Luisa; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We developed Hg-sensing chips by decorating the external surface of metal-clad optical waveguides with a monolayer of Hg-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. The emission properties of the original water-soluble form of the molecule were previously found to be selectively quenched in the presence of Hg ions. The fabricated samples were tested with optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy by putting them in contact with a 5-μM water solution of Hg ions and recording the emission spectra versus incubation time. The estimate of the limit of detection was 150 nM. A preliminary evaluation of the selectivity of the structure was also performed by using Cd as possible interfering analytes.

  9. A fluorometric paper-based sensor array for the discrimination of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Li, Hui; Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Duan, Chun-Feng; Guan, Ya-Feng; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-04-15

    A fluorometric paper-based sensor array has been developed for the sensitive and convenient determination of seven heavy-metal ions at their wastewater discharge standard concentrations. Combining with nine cross-reactive BODIPY fluorescent indicators and array technologies-based pattern-recognition, we have obtained the discrimination capability of seven different heavy-metal ions at their wastewater discharge standard concentrations. After the immobilization of indicators and the enrichment of analytes, identification of the heavy-metal ions was readily acquired using a standard chemometric approach. Clear differentiation among heavy-metal ions as a function of concentration was also achieved, even down to 10(-7)M. A semi-quantitative estimation of the heavy-metal ion concentration was obtained by comparing color changes with a set of known concentrations. The sensor array was tentatively investigated in spiked tap water and sea water, and showed possible feasibility for real sample testing.

  10. An artificial tongue fluorescent sensor array for identification and quantitation of various heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang; Ren, Changliang; Teoh, Chai Lean; Peng, Juanjuan; Gadre, Shubhankar Haribhau; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Chi-Lik Ken; Chang, Young-Tae

    2014-09-02

    Herein, a small-molecule fluorescent sensor array for rapid identification of seven heavy metal ions was designed and synthesized, with its sensing mechanism mimicking that of a tongue. The photoinduced electron transfer and intramolecular charge transfer mechanism result in combinatorial interactions between sensor array and heavy metal ions, which lead to diversified fluorescence wavelength shifts and emission intensity changes. Upon principle component analysis (PCA), this result renders clear identification of each heavy metal ion on a 3D spatial dispersion graph. Further exploration provides a concentration-dependent pattern, allowing both qualitative and quantitative measurements of heavy metal ions. On the basis of this information, a "safe-zone" concept was proposed, which provides rapid exclusion of versatile hazardous species from clean water samples based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure standards. This type of small-molecule fluorescent sensor array could open a new avenue for multiple heavy metal ion detection and simplified water quality analysis.

  11. Protein-responsive assemblies from catechol-metal ion supramolecular coordination.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C; Chen, J; Yu, S; Chang, Y; Mao, J; Xu, Y; Luo, W; Zeng, B; Dai, L

    2015-03-21

    Supramolecular self-assembly driven by catechol-metal ion coordination has gained great success in the fabrication of functional materials including adhesives, capsules, coatings and hydrogels. However, this route has encountered a great challenge in the construction of nanoarchitectures in the absence of removable templates, because of the uncontrollable crosslinking of catechol-metal ion coordination. Herein, we show that a supramolecular approach, combining both catechol-metal ion coordination and polymer self-assembly together, can organize polymers into hybrid nanoassemblies ranging from solid particles, homogeneous vesicles to Janus vesicles. Without the introduction of a specific binding ligand or complicated molecular design, these assemblies can totally disassemble in response to proteins. UV/vis absorption, fluorescence quenching and recovery investigations have confirmed that proteins can seize metal ions from the hybrid nanoassemblies, thus causing the degradation of catechol-metal ion coordination networks.

  12. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.; Shi, W.

    1998-04-01

    Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and chromium ions in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of four heavy metals are 29.3 mg/g (Cu{sup 2+}), 30.73 mg/g (Zn{sup 2+}), 42.18 mg/g (Cd{sup 2+}), and 25.07 mg/g (Cr{sup 3+}), respectively. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks affected the adsorption of metal ions; the finer size of particles showed better adsorption to the ions. Temperature also plays an interesting role in the adsorption of different metal ions. Copper, zinc, and cadmium exhibited lower adsorption on sunflower stalks at higher temperature, while chromium showed the opposite phenomenon. The adsorption rates of copper, cadmium, and chromium are quite rapid. Within 60 min of operation about 60--80% of these ions were removed from the solutions.

  13. Metal ion transport quantified by ICP-MS in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Julio A Landero; Stiner, Cory A; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L; Heiny, Judith A

    2016-02-03

    The use of ICP-MS to measure metal ion content in biological tissues offers a highly sensitive means to study metal-dependent physiological processes. Here we describe the application of ICP-MS to measure membrane transport of Rb and K ions by the Na,K-ATPase in mouse skeletal muscles and human red blood cells. The ICP-MS method provides greater precision and statistical power than possible with conventional tracer flux methods. The method is widely applicable to studies of other metal ion transporters and metal-dependent processes in a range of cell types and conditions.

  14. Metal ion transport quantified by ICP-MS in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Stiner, Cory A.; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Heiny, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of ICP-MS to measure metal ion content in biological tissues offers a highly sensitive means to study metal-dependent physiological processes. Here we describe the application of ICP-MS to measure membrane transport of Rb and K ions by the Na,K-ATPase in mouse skeletal muscles and human red blood cells. The ICP-MS method provides greater precision and statistical power than possible with conventional tracer flux methods. The method is widely applicable to studies of other metal ion transporters and metal-dependent processes in a range of cell types and conditions. PMID:26838181

  15. Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition

    DOEpatents

    Zuhr, Raymond A.; Holland, Orin W.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

  16. Metal nanocrystal/metal-organic framework core/shell nanostructure from selective self-assembly induced by localization of metal ion precursors on nanocrystal surface.

    PubMed

    Ohhashi, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Matsuyama, Tetsuhiro; Takashima, Yohei; Nawafune, Hidemi; Minami, Hideto; Akamatsu, Kensuke

    2015-08-01

    Metal nanocrystal/metal-organic framework core/shell nanostructures have been constructed using metal ion-trapped nanocrystals as scaffolds through a selective self-assembly of framework components on the nanocrystal surfaces. The resulting nanostructures exhibit unique catalytic activity toward nitrophenol analogs.

  17. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL(1) and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL(2) derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML((1-2)2) have been synthesized, where M=Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mnmetal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu>Mn>Ni>Co>Zn.

  18. Thio Effects and an Unconventional Metal Ion Rescue in the Genomic HDV Ribozyme§

    PubMed Central

    Thaplyal, Pallavi; Ganguly, Abir; Golden, Barbara L.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Metal ion and nucleobase catalysis are important for ribozyme mechanism, but the extent to which they cooperate is unclear. A crystal structure of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme suggested that the pro-RP oxygen at the scissile phosphate directly coordinates a catalytic Mg2+ ion and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the amine of the general acid C75. Prior studies on the genomic HDV ribozyme, however, showed neither a thio effect nor metal ion rescue using Mn2+. Here, we combine experiment and theory to explore phosphorothioate substitutions at the scissile phosphate. We report significant thio effects at the scissile phosphate and metal ion rescue with Cd2+. Reaction profiles with an SP-phosphorothioate substitution are indistinguishable from those of the unmodified substrate in the presence of Mg2+ or Cd2+, supporting that the pro-SP oxygen does not coordinate metal ions. The RP-phosphorothioate substitution, however, exhibits biphasic kinetics, with the fast-reacting phase displaying a thio effect of up to 5-fold effect and the slow-reacting phase displaying a thio effect of ~1,000-fold. Moreover, the fast- and slow-reacting phases give metal ion rescues in Cd2+ of up to 10- and 330-fold, respectively. The metal ion rescues are unconventional in that they arise from Cd2+ inhibiting the oxo substrate but not the RP substrate. This metal ion rescue suggests a direct interaction of the catalytic metal ion with the pro-RP oxygen, in line with experiments on the antigenomic HDV ribozyme. Experiments without divalent ions, with mutants that interfere with Mg2+ binding, or with C75 deleted suggest that the pro-RP oxygen plays at most a redundant role in positioning C75. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) studies indicate that the metal ion contributes to catalysis by interacting with both the pro-RP oxygen and the nucleophilic 2’- hydroxyl, supporting the experimental findings. PMID:24001219

  19. Multiple metal ions drive DNA association by PvuII endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Conlan, Lori H; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2002-12-17

    Restriction enzymes serve as important model systems for understanding the role of metal ions in phosphodiester hydrolysis. To this end, a number of laboratories have reported dramatic differences between the metal ion-dependent and metal ion-independent DNA binding behaviors of these systems. In an effort to illuminate the underlying mechanistic details which give rise to these differences, we have quantitatively dissected these equilibrium behaviors into component association and dissociation rates for the representative PvuII endonuclease and use these data to assess the stoichiometry of metal ion involvement in the binding process. The dependence of PvuII cognate DNA on Ca(II) concentration binding appears to be cooperative, exhibiting half-saturation at 0.6 mM metal ion and yielding an n(H) of 3.5 +/- 0.2 per enzyme homodimer. Using both nitrocellulose filter binding and fluorescence assays, we observe that the cognate DNA dissociation rate (k(-)(1) or k(off)) is very slow (10(-)(3) s(-)(1)) and exhibits a shallow dependence on metal ion concentration. DNA trap cleavage experiments with Mg(II) confirm the general irreversibility of DNA binding relative to cleavage, even at low metal ion concentrations. More dramatically, the association rate (k(1) or k(on)) also appears to be cooperative, increasing more than 100-fold between 0.2 and 10 mM Ca(II), with an optimum value of 2.7 x 10(7) M(-)(1) s (-)(1). Hill analysis of the metal ion dependence of k(on) indicates an n(H) of 3.6 +/- 0.2 per enzyme dimer. This value is consistent with the involvement in DNA association of two metal ions per subunit active site, a result which lends new strength to arguments for two-metal ion mechanisms in restriction enzymes.

  20. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  1. Importance of diffuse metal ion binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-01-01

    RNAs are highly charged polyanionic molecules. RNA structure and function are strongly correlated with the ionic condition of the solution. The primary focus of this article is on the role of diffusive ions in RNA folding. Due to the long-range nature of electrostatic interactions, the diffuse ions can contribute significantly to RNA structural stability and folding kinetics. We present an overview of the experimental findings as well as the theoretical developments on the diffuse ion effects in RNA folding. This review places heavy emphasis on the effect of magnesium ions. Magnesium ions play a highly efficient role in stabilizing RNA tertiary structures and promoting tertiary structural folding. The highly efficient role goes beyond the mean-field effect such as the ionic strength. In addition to the effects of specific ion binding and ion dehydration, ion-ion correlation for the diffuse ions can contribute to the efficient role of the multivalent ions such as the magnesium ions in RNA folding.

  2. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  3. The effect of metal ions on the photophysical and photochemical property of phenylthio bromo metal phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sujuan; Shen, Pingping; Ma, Dongdong; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Tiantian; Chen, Kuizhi; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    Phthalocyanines have attracted great attention because of their applications in material science including electro-optical devices, electrochromic display, and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. In addition, the Pcs exhibit great flexibility of chemical structure modification enabled by either peripheral substituents or metal ions co-ordination to central cavity of highly conjugated tetrapyrrolic macrocycles. However, because of the hydrophobic nature of the phthalocyanine ring, Pcs have strong tendency to aggregate in solution, which limited their applications. To overcome this problem, the introduction of dendritic wedge to peripheral positions of phthalocyanines can prevent the formation of aggregation to some extent. The preparation procedure involved the modification of the zinc (II) and magnesium (II) phthalocyanines with peripherally dendritic substitutions. The photophysical and photochemical properties of dendritic phthalocyanines were studied by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Compared with the magnesium (II) phthalocyanine, the intensity of Q band of zinc (II) phthalocyanine was increased but no obviously position changes was observed. Furthermore, the zinc (II) phthalocyanine exhibited relatively higher fluorescence intensity than the magnesium (II) phthalocyanine. The fluorescence quantum yield and lifetimes of magnesium (II) phthalocyanine was clearly longer than that of zinc (II) phthalocyanine. As the better photosensitizer, the zinc (II) phthalocyanine has higher singlet oxygen quantum yield owning superior performance. This results indicated that the singlet oxygen quantum yield would be effected by the nature of metal ions.

  4. Metal ions in biological catalysis: from enzyme databases to general principles.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Bertini, Ivano; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Holliday, Gemma L; Thornton, Janet M

    2008-11-01

    We analysed the roles and distribution of metal ions in enzymatic catalysis using available public databases and our new resource Metal-MACiE (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/Metal_MACiE/home.html). In Metal-MACiE, a database of metal-based reaction mechanisms, 116 entries covering 21% of the metal-dependent enzymes and 70% of the types of enzyme-catalysed chemical transformations are annotated according to metal function. We used Metal-MACiE to assess the functions performed by metals in biological catalysis and the relative frequencies of different metals in different roles, which can be related to their individual chemical properties and availability in the environment. The overall picture emerging from the overview of Metal-MACiE is that redox-inert metal ions are used in enzymes to stabilize negative charges and to activate substrates by virtue of their Lewis acid properties, whereas redox-active metal ions can be used both as Lewis acids and as redox centres. Magnesium and zinc are by far the most common ions of the first type, while calcium is relatively less used. Magnesium, however, is most often bound to phosphate groups of substrates and interacts with the enzyme only transiently, whereas the other metals are stably bound to the enzyme. The most common metal of the second type is iron, which is prevalent in the catalysis of redox reactions, followed by manganese, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and nickel. The control of the reactivity of redox-active metal ions may involve their association with organic cofactors to form stable units. This occurs sometimes for iron and nickel, and quite often for cobalt and molybdenum.

  5. The Interchangeability of Plasma and Whole Blood Metal Ion Measurement in the Monitoring of Metal on Metal Hips

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ibrahim A.; Rogers, Joanne; King, Amanda Christina; Clutton, Juliet; Winson, Daniel; John, Alun

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and twenty six paired samples of plasma and whole blood were measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique for metal ions analysis to determine a relationship between them. There was a significant difference between the mean plasma and whole blood concentrations of both cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) (p < 0.0001 for both Co and Cr). The mean ratio between plasma and whole blood Cr and Co was 1.56 (range: 0.39–3.85) and 1.54 (range: 0.64–18.26), respectively, but Bland and Altman analysis illustrated that this relationship was not universal throughout the range of concentrations. There was higher variability at high concentrations for both ions. We conclude that both these concentrations should not be used interchangeably and conversion factors are unreliable due to concentration dependent variability. PMID:26798516

  6. Humic colloid-borne natural polyvalent metal ions: dissociation experiment.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, H; Rabung, Th; Ngo Manh, T; Kim, J I; Beck, H P

    2002-07-01

    The natural association nature of the humic colloid-borne trace elements is investigated. Rare earth elements (REE) Th and U are chosen as naturally occurring representatives and chemical homologues for actinides of different oxidation states present in nuclear waste. Tri- and tetravalent elements in two investigated Gorleben groundwaters (Gohy-532 and -2227) almost exclusively occur as humic or fulvic colloid-borne species. Their desorption behavior from colloids is examined in the unperturbed groundwater (pH approximately 8) under anaerobic conditions (Ar/1% CO2) by addition of a chelating cation exchanger resin. Particularly, the dissociation process of naturally occurring Eu(III) in the groundwater is compared with the Eu(III) desorption from its humate complex prepared with purified Aldrich humic acid in a buffered aqueous solution at pH approximately 8. The Eu(III) dissociation from the groundwater colloids is found to be considerably slower than found for the humate complex synthesized in the laboratory. This suggests that under natural aquatic conditions the Eu(III) binding in colloids is chemically different from the simple humate complexation as observed in the laboratory experiment. The colloid characterization bythe size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) indicates that natural colloid-borne trace elements are found predominantly in colloids of larger size (>15 nm in size), while Eu(III) in its humate complex is found mainly in colloids of hydrodynamic diameters <5 nm. The slower desorption kinetics and the larger colloid size suggest that the polyvalent metal ion binding in natural humic colloids is associated to polynucleation with other co-present trace metal ions. Radiotracer experiments reveal that isotopic equilibria with the naturally colloid-borne trace elements are not attained within a period of more than 100 days, indicating irreversible binding of at least a part of colloid-borne polyvalent trace

  7. Application of Sargassum biomass to remove heavy metal ions from synthetic multi-metal solutions and urban storm water runoff.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Teo, Ting Ting; Balasubramanian, R; Joshi, Umid Man

    2009-05-30

    The ability of Sargassum sp. to biosorb four metal ions, namely lead, copper, zinc, and manganese from a synthetic multi-solute system and real storm water runoff has been investigated for the first time. Experiments on synthetic multi-solute systems revealed that Sargassum performed well in the biosorption of all four metal ions, with preference towards Pb, followed by Cu, Zn, and Mn. The solution pH strongly affected the metal biosorption, with pH 6 being identified as the optimal condition for achieving maximum biosorption. Experiments at different biosorbent dosages revealed that good biosorption capacity as well as high metal removal efficiency was observed at 3g/L. The biosorption kinetics was found to be fast with equilibrium being attained within 50 min. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, Sargassum exhibited maximum uptakes of 214, 67.5, 24.2 and 20.2mg/g for lead, copper, zinc, and manganese, respectively in single-solute systems. In multi-metal systems, strong competition between four metal ions in terms of occupancy binding sites was observed, and Sargassum showed preference in the order of Pb>Cu>Zn>Mn. The application of Sargassum to remove four heavy metal ions in real storm water runoff revealed that the biomass was capable of removing the heavy metal ions. However, the biosorption performance was slightly lower compared to that of synthetic metal solutions. Several factors were responsible for this difference, and the most important factor is the presence of other contaminants such as anions, organics, and other trace metals in the runoff.

  8. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  9. Impact of Protein-Metal Ion Interactions on the Crystallization of Silk Fibroin Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Lu, Qiang; Kaplan, David; Cebe, Peggy

    2009-03-01

    Proteins can easily form bonds with a variety of metal ions, which provides many unique biological functions for the protein structures, and therefore controls the overall structural transformation of proteins. We use advanced thermal analysis methods such as temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry and quasi-isothermal TMDSC, combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, to investigate the protein-metallic ion interactions in Bombyx mori silk fibroin proteins. Silk samples were mixed with different metal ions (Ca^2+, K^+, Ma^2+, Na^+, Cu^2+, Mn^2+) with different mass ratios, and compared with the physical conditions in the silkworm gland. Results show that all metallic ions can directly affect the crystallization behavior and glass transition of silk fibroin. However, different ions tend to have different structural impact, including their role as plasticizer or anti-plasticizer. Detailed studies reveal important information allowing us better to understand the natural silk spinning and crystallization process.

  10. Computational scheme for the prediction of metal ion binding by a soil fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Mathuthu, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The dissociation and metal ion binding properties of a soil fulvic acid have been characterized. Information thus gained was used to compensate for salt and site heterogeneity effects in metal ion complexation by the fulvic acid. An earlier computational scheme has been modified by incorporating an additional step which improves the accuracy of metal ion speciation estimates. An algorithm is employed for the prediction of metal ion binding by organic acid constituents of natural waters (once the organic acid is characterized in terms of functional group identity and abundance). The approach discussed here, currently used with a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, is conceptually envisaged to be compatible with computer programs available for ion binding by inorganic ligands in natural waters.

  11. Sugar-metal ion interactions: the complicated coordination structures of cesium ion with D-ribose and myo-inositol.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haijian; Xue, Junhui; Wen, Xiaodong; Li, Weihong; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Bu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2013-11-18

    The novel cesium chloride-D-ribose complex (CsCl·C5H10O5; Cs-R) and cesium chloride-myo-inositol complex (CsCl·C6H12O6; Cs-I) have been synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction and FTIR, FIR, THz, and Raman spectroscopy. Cs(+) is eight-coordinated to three chloride ions, O1 and O2 from one D-ribose molecule, O1 from another D-ribose molecule, and O4 and O5 from the third D-ribose molecule in Cs-R. For one D-ribose molecule, the oxygen atom O1 in the ring is coordinated to two cesium ions as an oxygen bridge, O2 is cocoordinated with O1 to one of the two cesium ions, and O4 and O5 are coordinated to the third cesium ion, respectively. O3 does not coordinate to metal ions and only takes part in forming hydrogen bonds. One chloride ion is connected to three cesium ions. Thus, a complicated structure of Cs-D-ribose forms. For Cs-I, Cs(+) is 10-coordinated to three chloride ions, O1 and O2 from one myo-inositol molecule, O3 and O4 from another myo-inositol molecule, O5 and O6 from the third myo-inositol molecule, and O6 from the fourth myo-inositol molecule. One metal ion is connected to four ligands, and one myo-inositol is coordinated to four Cs(+) ions, which is also a complicated coordination structure. Crystal structure results, FTIR, FIR, THz, and Raman spectra provide detailed information on the structure and coordination of hydroxyl groups to metal ions in the cesium chloride-D-ribose and cesium chloride-myo-inositol complexes.

  12. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  13. Metal ion specificities for folding and cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Jennifer L.; Canny, Marella D.; Azimi, Ehsan; Pardi, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various metal ions on cleavage activity and global folding have been studied in the extended Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to probe global folding as a function of various monovalent and divalent metal ions in this ribozyme. The divalent metals ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have a relatively small variation (less than sixfold) in their ability to globally fold the hammerhead ribozyme, which contrasts with the very large difference (>10,000-fold) in apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions in single-turnover kinetic experiments. There is still a very large range (>4600-fold) in the apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions measured in high salt (2 M NaCl) conditions where the ribozyme is globally folded. These results demonstrate that the identity of the divalent metal ion has little effect on global folding of the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme, whereas it has a very large effect on the cleavage kinetics. Mechanisms by which the identity of the divalent metal ion can have such a large effect on cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme are discussed. PMID:18755844

  14. Virulence modulation of Candida albicans biofilms by metal ions commonly released from orthodontic devices.

    PubMed

    Ronsani, Maiara Medeiros; Mores Rymovicz, Alinne Ulbrich; Meira, Thiago Martins; Trindade Grégio, Ana Maria; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Ribeiro Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The installation of metal devices leads to an increase in the salivary concentration of metal ions and in the growth of salivary Candida spp. However, the relationship between released metal ions and Candida virulence has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether metal ions affect fungal virulence. We prepared culture media containing Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Co(2+) or a mixture of these metal ions at concentrations similar to those released in saliva of orthodontic patients. Biofilms of Candida albicans SC5314 were grown for 72 h and their biomasses were determined. The supernatants were analyzed for secretory aspartyl protease (SAP) and hemolysin activities. To verify changes in virulence following treatment with metals, proteolytic and hemolytic activities were converted into specific activities. The results revealed that all ions, except Co(2+), caused increases in biofilm biomass. In addition, Ni(2+) caused an increase in SAP activity and Fe(3+) reduced hemolytic activity. However, the SAP and hemolysin activities in the presence of the mixture of ions did not differ from those of control. These results indicate that metal ions released during the degradation of orthodontic appliances can modulate virulence factors in C. albicans biofilms.

  15. Radiographically undetectable periprosthetic osteolysis with ASR implants: the implication of blood metal ions.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Filippo; Banci, Lorenzo; Favilla, Sara; Maglione, Daniela; Aliprandi, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Patients with ASR implants (resurfacing and large-diameter (XL) metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty), even if asymptomatic and with a stable prosthesis, may present extremely high blood metal ion levels. We report on a consecutive series of fourteen ASR revisions, focusing on osteolysis and their radiographic correspondence and their correlation with blood metal ion levels. At revision, seven hips revealed severe periacetabular osteolysis which was radiographically undetectable in six and asymptomatic in five. Seven hips with no acetabular osteolysis had significantly lower serum Cr and Co ion concentrations (respectively 25.2, 41.1 μg/l) compared to the seven hips with severe acetabular bone loss (respectively 70.1, 147.0 μg/l). Elevated blood metal ion levels should be considered as a warning of undetectable and ongoing periprosthetic osteolysis in asymptomatic patients with ASR prosthesis.

  16. Structures and energetics of complexation of metal ions with ammonia, water, and benzene: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Neela, Y Indra; Narahari Sastry, G

    2016-04-30

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP level to investigate the strength and nature of interactions of ammonia (NH3 ), water (H2 O), and benzene (C6 H6 ) with various metal ions and validated with the available experimental results. For all the considered metal ions, a preference for C6 H6 is observed for dicationic ions whereas the monocationic ions prefer to bind with NH3 . Density Functional Theory-Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (DFT-SAPT) analysis has been employed at PBE0AC/def2-TZVP level on these complexes (closed shell), to understand the various energy terms contributing to binding energy (BE). The DFT-SAPT result shows that for the metal ion complexes with H2 O electrostatic component is the major contributor to the BE whereas, for C6 H6 complexes polarization component is dominant, except in the case of alkali metal ion complexes. However, in case of NH3 complexes, electrostatic component is dominant for s-block metal ions, whereas, for the d and p-block metal ion complexes both electrostatic and polarization components are important. The geometry (M(+) -N and M(+) -O distance for NH3 and H2 O complexes respectively, and cation-π distance for C6 H6 complexes) for the alkali and alkaline earth metal ion complexes increases down the group. Natural population analysis performed on NH3 , H2 O, and C6 H6 complexes shows that the charge transfer to metal ions is higher in case of C6 H6 complexes.

  17. A Model for Fast Ion Emission from Metal Deuterides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Peter

    2000-03-01

    There have been numerous claims during the past ten years of the observation of a variety of anomalies in metal deuterides. One such anomaly involves the emission of fast (MeV) alpha from PdD as reported by G. Chambers and colleagues at NRL in the early 1990s. A related effect is the emission of a variety of low mass fast ions from TiD reported by groups led by G. Chambers and by F. E. Cecil (Colorado School of Mines) et al(F. E. Cecil, H. Liu, D. Beddingfield and C. S. Galovich, in Anomalous Nuclear Effects in Deuterium/Solid Systems, AIP Conf. Proc.) 228, p. 383 (1990).. We have recently examined a theoretical model for this effect. We propose a second order off-resonant reaction in which fusion reactions are coupled to optical phonons, and then the optical phonon excitation is dipole-coupled to nuclear ionization. Such a model gives reaction products and energies which appear to be in agreement with experiment.

  18. Interaction between ATP, metal ions, glycine, and several minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishpon, J.; Ohara, P. J.; Lawless, J. G.; Lahav, N.

    1982-01-01

    Interactions between ATP, glycine and montmorillonite and kaolinite clay minerals in the presence of various metal cations are investigated. The adsorption of adenine nucleotides on clays and Al(OH)3 was measured as a function of pH, and glycine condensation was followed in the presence of ATP, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and either kaolinite or montmorillonite. The amounts of ATP and ADP adsorbed are found to decrease with increasing Ph, and to be considerably enhanced in experiments with Mg(2+)- and Zn(2+)-montmorillonite with respect to Na(+)-montmorillonite. The effects of divalent cations are less marked in kaolinite. Results for Al(OH)3 show the importance of adsorption at clay platelet edges at high pH. The decomposition of ATP during drying at high temperature is observed to be inhibited by small amounts of clay, vacuum, or Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) ions, and to be accompanied by peptide formation in the presence of glycine. Results suggest the importance of Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) in chemical evolution.

  19. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  20. Toxicity of metallic ions and oxides to rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Labedzka, M.; Gulyas, H.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of soluble compounds and oxides of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V, and Zn on oxidative metabolism and membrane integrity of rabbit alveolar macrophages were studied by 24-hr in vitro exposure. Oxidative metabolism induced by phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan was measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and by chemiluminescence in the presence of luminol. Membrane integrity was estimated by extracellular LDH activity. Metallic ions and oxides inhibited the release of active oxygen species. Cd(II), As(III), and V(V) were the most toxic elements as measured by all investigated parameters. Cu(II) decreased O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and chemiluminescence effectively but H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and membrane integrity less. Chemiluminescence was decreased strongly by Hg(II) while O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release were depressed moderately. Zn(II) and Sb(III) compounds caused medium toxicity and the tested Sn, Ni, and Pb compounds showed only faint toxic effects.

  1. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  2. A closure relation to molecular theory of solvation for macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobryn, Alexander E.; Gusarov, Sergey; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-10-01

    We propose a closure to the integral equations of molecular theory of solvation, particularly suitable for polar and charged macromolecules in electrolyte solution. This includes such systems as oligomeric polyelectrolytes at a finite concentration in aqueous and various non-aqueous solutions, as well as drug-like compounds in solution. The new closure by Kobryn, Gusarov, and Kovalenko (KGK closure) imposes the mean spherical approximation (MSA) almost everywhere in the solvation shell but levels out the density distribution function to zero (with the continuity at joint boundaries) inside the repulsive core and in the spatial regions of strong density depletion emerging due to molecular associative interactions. Similarly to MSA, the KGK closure reduces the problem to a linear equation for the direct correlation function which is predefined analytically on most of the solvation shells and has to be determined numerically on a relatively small (three-dimensional) domain of strong depletion, typically within the repulsive core. The KGK closure leads to the solvation free energy in the form of the Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functional. We first test the performance of the KGK closure coupled to the reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equations on the examples of Lennard-Jones liquids, polar and nonpolar molecular solvents, including water, and aqueous solutions of simple ions. The solvation structure, solvation chemical potential, and compressibility obtained from RISM with the KGK closure favorably compare to the results of the hypernetted chain (HNC) and Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) closures, including their combination with the GF solvation free energy. We then use the KGK closure coupled to RISM to obtain the solvation structure and thermodynamics of oligomeric polyelectrolytes and drug-like compounds at a finite concentration in electrolyte solution, for which no convergence is obtained with other closures. For comparison, we calculate their solvation

  3. In vitro corrosion behaviour and metallic ion release of different prosthodontic alloys.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Sánchez, L A; Espías, A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    The corrosion resistance for six metallic alloys often used in clinical dentistry, was evaluated by measuring their polarisation resistance in an artificial saliva environment. The critical current density (icr), the passive current density (ip), the corrosion potential (Ecorr) and the critical pitting potential (Ecp), were studied. Metallic ion release from the different alloys was analysed in a saliva environment at 37 degrees C. The nickel-chromium alloy exhibited important corrosion and a high quantity of ions was released. The titanium presented a low value of ion release and a good corrosion resistance due to the passive film on the metal surface. The high gold content alloy provided the best corrosion resistance.

  4. New optical properties of MgO after MeV metal ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. L.; Ila, D.; Williams, E. K.; Sarkisov, S. S.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.

    1999-06-01

    The implantation of metal ions into single crystals of MgO(100) followed by thermal annealing leads to an increase in absorption of ultra violet and visible light. Metal ions of Au, Sn, Ag, Cu and Ti were implanted at a depth of a few thousand Angstroms followed by thermal annealing. MgO samples implanted with He and Si ions at greater depths were used to study the optical effects and thermal annealing of radiation damage. The influence of bombardment fluence and heat treatment on the size of the metal clusters and on the fraction of atoms in clusters were measured using absorption photospectrometry.

  5. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  6. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrations in an urban estuary.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G; Burgess, Robert M; Coull, Brent; Shine, James P

    2016-05-01

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limited, due to underexplored techniques for measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. In this work, we performed statistical analyses on a large dataset containing repeated measurements of free ion concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd, the most commonly measured metals in seawater, at five inshore locations in Boston Harbor, previously collected using an in-situ equilibrium-based multi-metal free ion sampler, the 'Gellyfish'. We examined correlations among these five metals by season, and evaluated effects of 10 biogeochemical variables on free ion concentrations over time and location through multivariate regressions. We also explored potential clustering among the five metals through a principal component analysis. We found significant correlations among metals, with varying patterns over season. Our regression results suggest that instead of dissolved metals, pH, salinity, temperature and rainfall were the most significant determinants of free metal ion concentrations. For example, a one-unit decrease in pH was associated with a 2.2 (Cd) to 99 (Cu) times increase in free ion concentrations. This work is among the first to reveal key contributors to spatiotemporal variations in free ion concentrations, and demonstrated the usefulness of the Gellyfish sampler in routine sampling of free ions within metal mixtures and in generating data for statistical analyses.

  7. Studying metal ion-protein interactions: electronic absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, Liliana; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Metal ions play a wide range of important functional roles in biology, and they often serve as cofactors in enzymes. Some of the metal ions that are essential for life are strongly associated with proteins, forming obligate metalloproteins, while others may bind to proteins with relatively low affinity. The spectroscopic tools presented in this chapter are suitable to study metal ion-protein interactions. Metal sites in proteins are usually low symmetry centers that differentially absorb left and right circularly polarized light. The combination of electronic absorption and circular dichroism (CD) in the UV-visible region allows the characterization of electronic transitions associated with the metal-protein complex, yielding information on the geometry and nature of the metal-ligand interactions. For paramagnetic metal centers in proteins, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a powerful tool that provides information on the chemical environment around the unpaired electron(s), as it relates to the electronic structure and geometry of the metal-protein complex. EPR can also probe interactions between the electron spin and nuclear spins in the vicinity, yielding valuable information on some metal-ligand interactions. This chapter describes each spectroscopic technique and it provides the necessary information to design and implement the study of metal ion-protein interactions by electronic absorption, CD, and EPR.

  8. The two distinctive metal ion binding domains of the wheat metallothionein Ec-1.

    PubMed

    Peroza, Estevão A; Kaabi, Ali Al; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Freisinger, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Metallothioneins are small cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role, among others, in the homeostasis of essential metal ions such as Zn(II) and Cu(I). Recently, we could show that wheat E(c)-1 is coordinating its six Zn(II) ions in form of metal-thiolate clusters analogously to the vertebrate metallothioneins. Specifically, two Zn(II) ions are bound in the N-terminal and four in the C-terminal domain. In the following, we will present evidence for the relative independence of the two domains from each other with respect to their metal ion binding abilities, and uncover three intriguing peculiarities of the protein. Firstly, one Zn(II) ion of the N-terminal domain is relative resistant to complete replacement with Cd(II) indicating the presence of a Zn(II)-binding site with increased stability. Secondly, the C-terminal domain is able to coordinate an additional fifth metal ion, though with reduced affinity, which went undetected so far. Finally, reconstitution of apoE(c)-1 with an excess of Zn(II) shows a certain amount of sub-stoichiometrically metal-loaded species. The possible relevance of these finding for the proposed biological functions of wheat E(c)-1 will be discussed. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on both, the full-length and the truncated protein, provide final evidence for His participation in metal ion binding.

  9. Visualizing metal ions in cells: an overview of analytical techniques, approaches, and probes

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Qin, Yan; Palmer, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying the amount and defining the location of metal ions in cells and organisms are critical steps in understanding metal homeostasis and how dyshomeostasis causes or is a consequence of disease. A number of recent advances have been made in the development and application of analytical methods to visualize metal ions in biological specimens. Here, we briefly summarize these advances before focusing in more depth on probes for examining transition metals in living cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:22521452

  10. Biosorption of heavy metal ions to brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1998-10-01

    A fundamental study of the application of brown algae to the aqueous-phase separation of toxic heavy metals was carried out. The biosorption characteristics of cadmium and lead ions were determined with brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida. A metal binding model proposed by the authors was used for the description of metal binding data. The results showed that the biosorption of bivalent metal ions to brown algae was due to bivalent binding to carboxylic groups on alginic acid in brown algae.

  11. Effect of Metal Ions on the Formation of Trichloronitromethane during Chlorination of Catechol and Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Gan, Guojuan; Mei, Rongwu; Qiu, Lin; Hong, Huachang; Wang, Qingjun; Mazumder, Asit; Wu, Shikai; Pan, Xiangliang; Liang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Catechol, nitrite, and dissolved metals are ubiquitous in source drinking water. Catechol and nitrite have been identified as precursors for halonitromethanes (HNMs), but the effect of metal ions on HNM formation during chlorination remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of metal ions (Fe, Ti, Al) on the formation of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) (the most representative HNM species in disinfected water) on chlorinating catechol and nitrite. Trichloronitromethane was extracted by methyl tert-butyl ether and detected by gas chromatography. The results show that metal ions promoted the formation of TCNM and that the enhancement efficiency followed the order of Fe > Ti > Al. Trichloronitromethane formation increased greatly within 2 h, and a basic condition (pH 8-9) favored TCNM formation more than acidic or neutral conditions. The conjoint effect of the metal-ion mixtures was shown to be similar to that of the single metal ion having the highest promoting effect on TCNM formation. Our results strongly suggest that metal ions play a significant role in enhancing TCNM formation.

  12. Method and apparatus for providing negative ions of actinide-metal hexafluorides

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.; Reinhardt, Paul W.; Garrett, William R.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a novel method and a novel generator, or source, for providing gaseous negative ions of selected metal hexafluorides. The method is summarized as follows: in an evacuated zone, reacting gaseous fluorine with an actinide-metal body selected from the group consisting of uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium to convert at least part of the metal to the hexafluoride state, thus producing gaseous negatively charged metal-hexafluoride ions in the evacuated zone, and applying an electric field to the zone to remove the ions therefrom. The ion source comprises a chamber defining a reaction zone; means for evacuating the zone; an actinide-metal body in the zone, the metal being uranium, plutonium, neptunium, or americium; means for contacting the body with gaseous fluorine to convert at least a part thereof to the hexafluoride state; and means for applying an electric field to the evacuated zone to extract gaseous, negatively charged metal-hexafluoride ions therefrom. The invention provides unique advantages over conventional surface-ionization techniques for producing such ions.

  13. Effects of Alkali Metal Ion Cationization on Fragmentation Pathways of Triazole-Epothilone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiyan; Luo, Guoan; Chen, Yue; Kong, Xianglei

    2012-06-01

    The collisionally activated dissociation mass spectra of the protonated and alkali metal cationized ions of a triazole-epothilone analogue were studied in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The fragmentation pathway of the protonated ion was characterized by the loss of the unit of C3H4O3. However, another fragmentation pathway with the loss of C3H2O2 was identified for the complex ions with Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The branching ratio of the second pathway increases with the increment of the size of alkali metal ions. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method show the difference in the binding position of the proton and the metal ions. With the increase of the radii of the metal ions, progressive changes in the macrocycle of the compound are induced, which cause the corresponding change in their fragmentation pathways. It has also been found that the interaction energy between the compound and the metal ion decreases with increase in the size of the latter. This is consistent with the experimental results, which show that cesiated complexes readily eject Cs+ when subject to collisions.

  14. Hybrid gas-metal co-implantation with a modified vacuum arc ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M.; Yushkov, G.Y.; Evans, P.J.; Oztarhan, A.; Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Liu, F.; MacGill, R.A.; Monteiro, O.R.; Wang, Z.

    1996-08-01

    Energetic beams of mixed metal and gaseous ion species can be generated with a vacuum arc ion source by adding gas to the arc discharge region. This could be an important tool for ion implantation research by providing a method for forming buried layers of mixed composition such as e.g. metal oxides and nitrides. In work to date, we have formed a number of mixed metal-gas ion beams including Ti+N, Pt+N, Al+O, and Zr+O. The particle current fractions of the metal-gas ion components in the beam ranged from 100% metallic to about 80% gaseous, depending on operational parameters. We have used this new variant of the vacuum arc ion source to carry out some exploratory studies of the effect of Al+O and Zr+O co-implantation on tribology of stainless steel. Here we describe the ion source modifications, species and charge state of the hybrid beams produced, and results of preliminary studies of surface modification of stainless steel by co-implantation of mixed Al/O or Zr/O ion beams. 5 figs, 21 refs.

  15. Flecainide acetate acetic acid solvates.

    PubMed

    Veldre, Kaspars; Actiņs, Andris; Eglite, Zane

    2011-02-01

    Flecainide acetate forms acetic acid solvates with 0.5 and 2 acetic acid molecules. Powder X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric, infrared, and potentiometric titration were used to determine the composition of solvates. Flecainide acetate hemisolvate with acetic acid decomposes to form a new crystalline form of flecainide acetate. This form is less stable than the already known polymorphic form at all temperatures, and it is formed due to kinetic reasons. Both flecainide acetate nonsolvated and flecainide acetate hemisolvate forms crystallize in monoclinic crystals, but flecainide triacetate forms triclinic crystals. Solvate formation was not observed when flecainide base was treated with formic acid, propanoic acid, and butanoic acid. Only nonsolvated flecainide salts were obtained in these experiments.

  16. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  17. Heterogeneous processes affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands: Reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Cetin

    2007-04-01

    The development of models to accurately simulate metal ion transport through saturated systems under variable chemical conditions, e.g., in systems containing organic ligands (L) such as natural organic matter (NOM), has two essential aspects: (1) establishing the ability to simulate metal ion sorption to aquifer solids over a range of metal/ligand ratios; and (2) to incorporate this ability to simulate metal speciation over a range in chemical conditions (e.g., pH, ligand activity) into mass transport models. Modeling approaches to evaluate metal ion sorption and transport in the presence of NOM include: (1) isotherm-based transport models, and (2) multicomponent (MC) transport models. The accuracy of transport models depends on how well the chemical interactions affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands (e.g., metal/ligand complexation) are described in transport equations. The isotherm-based transport models often fail to accurately describe metal ion transport in the presence of NOM since these models treat NOM as a single solute despite the fact that NOM is a multicomponent mixture of subcomponents with different chemical and polyfunctional behavior. On the other hand, the calculations presented in this study suggest that a multicomponent reactive transport model, in conjunction with a mechanistic modeling approach for the description of metal ion binding by NOM in a manner conducive to the application of surface complexation modeling (SCM), can effectively be used as an important predictive tool in simulating metal ion sorption and transport under variable chemical conditions in the presence of NOM.

  18. Towards Accurate Microscopic Calculation of Solvation Entropies: Extending the Restraint Release Approach to Studies of Solvation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nidhi; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the solvation entropies is a major conceptual and practical challenge. On the one hand, it is interesting to quantify the factors that are responsible for the solvation entropies in solutions, while on the other, it is essential to be able to assess the contributions of the solvation entropies to the binding free energies and related properties. In fact, the solvation entropies are neglected in almost all the studies of the binding entropies. The main problem is that widely used approaches, such as the quasiharmonic (QH) approximation do not provide reliable results particularly, in cases of shallow potential and multidimensional surfaces while brute force evaluations of the entropic effects by simulating temperature dependence of the free energy converges very slowly. This paper addresses the above issue by starting with an analysis of the factors that are responsible for the negative solvation entropy of ions, showing that it is not due to the change in the solvent vibration modes or to the solvent force constant but to the changes in the solvent configurational space upon change in the solute charges. We begin by clarifying that when one deals with aqueous solutions, it is easy to evaluate the corresponding entropic effect by the Langevin dipole(LD) treatment. However, in this work we are interested in developing a general microscopic tool that can be used to study similar effects in the proteins. To this end, we explore the ability of our restraint release (RR) approach to evaluate the solvation entropy. We start this analysis by reviewing the foundation of this approach and in particular, the requirements of minimizing the enthalpy contribution to the RR free energy. We then establish that our approach is not a specialized harmonic treatment but a rather powerful approach. Moving to the main topic of this work, we demonstrate that the RR approach provides quantitative results for the solvation entropies of monovalent and divalent ions and

  19. IRMPD Spectroscopy of Metalated Flavins: Structure and Bonding of Lumiflavin Complexes with Alkali and Coinage Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Pablo; Günther, Alan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Dopfer, Otto

    2016-10-01

    Flavins are a fundamental class of biomolecules, whose photochemical properties strongly depend on their environment and their redox and metalation state. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass selected isolated metal-lumiflavin ionic complexes (M+LF) are analyzed in the fingerprint range (800-1830 cm-1) to determine the bonding of lumiflavin with alkali (M=Li, Na, K, Cs) and coinage (M=Cu, Ag) metal ions. The complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source coupled to an ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the IR free electron laser FELIX. Vibrational and isomer assignments of the IRMPD spectra are accomplished by comparison to quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level, yielding structure, binding energy, bonding mechanism, and spectral properties of the complexes. The most stable binding sites identified in the experiments involve metal bonding to the oxygen atoms of the two available CO groups of LF. Hence, CO stretching frequencies are a sensitive indicator of both the metal binding site and the metal bond strength. More than one isomer is observed for M=Li, Na, and K, and the preferred CO binding site changes with the size of the alkali ion. For Cs+LF only one isomer is identified although the energies of the two most stable structures differ by less than 7 kJ/mol. While the M+-LF bonds for alkali ions are mainly based on electrostatic forces, substantial covalent contributions lead to stronger bonds for the coinage metal ions. Comparison between lumiflavin and lumichrome reveals substantial differences in the metal binding motifs and interactions due to the different flavin structures.

  20. Adsorptions of some heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by acrylamide/maleic acid hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Saraydin, D.; Karadag, E.; Gueven, O.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, acrylamide-maleic acid (AAm/MA) hydrogels in the form of rod have been prepared by {gamma}-radiation. They have been used for adsorption of some heavy metal ions such as uranium, iron, and copper. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of maleic acid and irradiated at 3.73 kGy, maximum and minimum swellings in the aqueous solutions of the heavy metal ions have been observed with water (1480%) and the aqueous solution of iron(III) nitrate (410%), respectively. Diffusions of water and heavy metal ions onto hydrogels have been found to be of the non-Fickian type of diffusion. In experiments of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption has been found. One gram of AAa/MA hydrogels sorbed 14-86 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl acetate, 14-90 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl nitrate, 16-39 mg iron ions from solutions of iron(IV) nitrate, and 28-81 mg copper ions from solutions of copper acetate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any heavy metals ions.

  1. Photo-Induced Spin-State Conversion in Solvated Transition Metal Complexes Probed via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-04-30

    Solution-phase photoinduced low-spin to high-spin conversion in the FeII polypyridyl complex [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+ (where tren(py)3 is tris(2-pyridylmethyliminoethyl)amine) has been studied via picosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy. Following 1A1 --> 1MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excitation at 560 nm, changes in the iron L2- and L3-edges were observed concomitant with formation of the transient high-spin 5T2 state. Charge-transfer multiplet calculations coupled with data acquired on low-spin and high-spin model complexes revealed a reduction in ligand field splitting of 1 eV in the high-spin state relative to the singlet ground state. A significant reduction in orbital overlap between the central Fe-3d and the ligand N-2p orbitals was directly observed, consistent with the expected ca. 0.2 Angstrom increase in Fe-N bond length upon formation of the high-spin state. The overall occupancy of the Fe-3d orbitals remains constant upon spin crossover, suggesting that the reduction in sigma-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of pi-back-bonding in the metal-ligand interactions. These results demonstrate the feasibility and unique potential of time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study ultrafast reactions in the liquid phase by directly probing the valence orbitals of first-row metals as well as lighter elements during the course of photochemical transformations.

  2. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyan, Igor E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-28

    steered by effective solvation forces allows huge outer time steps up to tens of picoseconds without affecting the equilibrium and conformational properties, and thus provides a 100- to 500-fold effective speedup in comparison to conventional MD with explicit solvent. With the statistical-mechanical 3D-RISM-KH account for effective solvation forces, the method provides efficient sampling of biomolecular processes with slow and/or rare solvation events such as conformational transitions of hydrated alanine dipeptide with the mean life times ranging from 30 ps up to 10 ns for “flip-flop” conformations, and is particularly beneficial for biomolecular systems with exchange and localization of solvent and ions, ligand binding, and molecular recognition.

  3. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-01

    steered by effective solvation forces allows huge outer time steps up to tens of picoseconds without affecting the equilibrium and conformational properties, and thus provides a 100- to 500-fold effective speedup in comparison to conventional MD with explicit solvent. With the statistical-mechanical 3D-RISM-KH account for effective solvation forces, the method provides efficient sampling of biomolecular processes with slow and/or rare solvation events such as conformational transitions of hydrated alanine dipeptide with the mean life times ranging from 30 ps up to 10 ns for "flip-flop" conformations, and is particularly beneficial for biomolecular systems with exchange and localization of solvent and ions, ligand binding, and molecular recognition.

  4. Metal ion catalyzed hydrolysis of ethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, J; Cleland, W W; Hengge, A C

    2003-01-01

    15N isotope effects in the nitro group and 18O isotope effects in the phenolic oxygen have been measured for the hydrolysis of ethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate catalyzed by several metal ions. Co(III)-cyclen at pH 7, 50 degrees C, gave an 15N isotope effect of 0.12% and an 18O one of 2.23%, showing that P-O cleavage is rate limiting and the bond is approximately 50% broken in the transition state. The active catalyst is a dimer and the substrate is presumably coordinated to the open site of one Co(III), and is attacked by hydroxide coordinated to the other Co(III). Co(III)-tacn under the same conditions shows a similar 15N isotope effect (0.13%), but a smaller 18O one (0.8%). Zn(II)-cyclen at pH 8.5, 80 degrees C, gave an 15N isotope effect of 0.05% and an 18O one of 0.95%, suggesting an earlier transition state. The catalyst in this case is monomeric, and thus the substrate is coordinated to one position and attacked by a cis-coordinated hydroxide. Eu(III) at pH 6.5, 50 degrees C, shows a very large 15N isotope effect of 0.34% and a 1.6% 18O isotope effect. The large 15N isotope effect argues for a late transition state or Eu(III) interaction with the nitro group, and was also seen in Eu(III)-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate.

  5. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2005-06-01

    In vitro selection for DNAzymes that are catalytically active with UO22+ ions as the metal cofactor has been completed. The 10th generation pool of DNA was cloned and sequenced. A total of 84 clones were sequenced and placed into families based on sequence alignments. Selected members of each family were 5-labeled with 32P and amplified using PCR. Activity assays were conducted using the isotopically labeled DNAzymes in order to determine which sequences were the most active. The secondary structures of the two most active sequences, called Clone 13 and Clone 39, were determined using the computer program Mfold. A cleavage rate of approximately 1 min-1 in the presence of 10 uM UO22+ was observed for both clones. Clone 39 was determined to be the best candidate for truncation to create a trans-cleaving DNAzyme, based on its secondary structure. An enzyme strand, called 39E, and a substrate strand, called 39DS, were designed by truncating the cis-cleaving DNAzyme. An alternative enzyme strand, called 39Ec, was also assayed with the 39DS substrate. This strand was designed so that the two binding arms were perfectly complimentary, unlike 39E, which formed three mismatched base pairs with 39DS. Both 39E and 39Ec were found to be active, with a rate of approximately 1 min-1 in the presence of 10 uM UO22+. A preliminary UO22+ binding curve was obtained for the 39Ec/39DS trans-cleaving system. The enzyme is active with UO22+ concentrations as low as 1 nM. Based on the preliminary binding curve data, the apparent UO22+ binding constant is approximately 330 nM, and kmax is approximately 1 min-1.

  6. Role of Divalent Metal Ions in Atypical Nonlinear Plasma Protein Binding Behavior of Tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi Shankar Prasad; Mukker, Jatinder Kaur; Deitchman, Amelia N; Drescher, Stephanie K; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    In typical nonlinear plasma protein binding (PPB) behavior, the free fraction increases with increasing total concentrations. In contrast, when a drug exhibits atypical nonlinear PPB behavior, the free fraction decreases with increasing total concentrations. Tigecycline, a novel glycylcycline, exhibits atypical nonlinear PPB behavior, but the mechanism of such behavior is currently unknown. Because tigecycline can form complexes with metal ions, an interaction between metal ion, tigecycline, and plasma proteins was hypothesized but not further investigated. The current work explores the role of metal ions in the atypical nonlinear PPB behavior of tigecycline and proposes a plausible mechanism of atypical nonlinear PPB behavior. The addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid resulted in 10- to 30-fold higher unbound fractions, and the atypical behavior was nullified. The saturation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid chelation, by addition of excessive divalent metal ions, such as calcium and magnesium, led to the return of the atypical nonlinear PPB behavior. Different possible mechanisms were evaluated by simulation, and a plausible mechanism was proposed.

  7. Colorimetric chemosensor for multi-signaling detection of metal ions using pyrrole based Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Udhayakumari, Duraisamy; Velmathi, Sivan

    2014-03-25

    Pyrrole based Schiff bases act as a highly sensitive probe for metal ions in aqueous medium. Both receptors R1 and R2 are sensitive towards Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+) and Cr(3+) among the other metal ions. The sensing ability of the receptors are investigated via colorimetric, optical and emission spectroscopic studies. The binding stoichiometries of R1 and R2 with metal ions have been determined as 2:1 by using Job's plot. The colorimetric receptors exhibited high sensitivity with a low detection limit of μM levels. In the presence of metal ions both receptors shows fluorescence quenching. This might be due to the photo induced electron transfer mechanism. The quenching constant was further determined using Stern-Volmer plot.

  8. Factorial experimental design for recovering heavy metals from sludge with ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, I Hsien; Kuan, Yu-Chung; Chern, Jia-Ming

    2006-12-01

    Wastewaters containing heavy metals are usually treated by chemical precipitation method in Taiwan. This method can remove heavy metals form wastewaters efficiently, but the resultant heavy metal sludge is classified as hazardous solid waste and becomes another environmental problem. If we can remove heavy metals from sludge, it becomes non-hazardous waste and the treatment cost can be greatly reduced. This study aims at using ion-exchange resin to remove heavy metals such as copper, zinc, cadmium, and chromium from sludge generated by a PCB manufacturing plant. Factorial experimental design methodology was used to study the heavy metal removal efficiency. The total metal concentrations in the sludge, resin, and solution phases were measured respectively after 30 min reaction with varying leaching agents (citric acid and nitric acid); ion-exchange resins (Amberlite IRC-718 and IR-120), and temperatures (50 and 70 degrees C). The experimental results and statistical analysis show that a stronger leaching acid and a higher temperature both favor lower heavy metal residues in the sludge. Two-factors and even three-factor interaction effects on the heavy metal sorption in the resin phase are not negligible. The ion-exchange resin plays an important role in the sludge extraction or metal recovery. Empirical regression models were also obtained and used to predict the heavy metal profiles with satisfactory results.

  9. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  10. Tuning the chemical selectivity of SWNT-FETs for detection of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Forzani, Erica S; Li, Xiulan; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian; Zhang, Ruth; Amlani, Islamshah; Tsui, Raymond; Nagahara, Larry A

    2006-11-01

    A method to functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a field-effect transistor (FET) device for the selective detection of heavy-metal ions is presented. In this method, peptide-modified polymers were electrochemically deposited onto SWNTs and the selective detection of metal ions was demonstrated by choosing appropriate peptide sequences. The signal transduction mechanism of the peptide-modified SWNT-FETs has also been studied.

  11. Metal ions as cofactors for aggregation of therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neeraj; Mitra, Kalyan; Kumar, Dinesh; Roy, Raja

    2012-05-21

    The effects of multivalent metal ions (Cu(2+)/Zn(2+)/Al(3+)) on the aggregation of salmon calcitonin (sCT)--a therapeutic peptide used worldwide in the treatment of osteoporosis and Paget's disease--have been studied in vitro using NMR (both solution state and solid state), TEM, ThT-fluorescence, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Overall, the various results indicated that the metal-ions-induced conformational transitions in the peptide--mostly toward the β-sheet--facilitate the aggregation of sCT in solution. First, the solution NMR has been used to check the interaction between the peptide and the metal ions. Following this, the formation and characterization of calcitonin aggregates has been performed using TEM, solid state NMR, and FT-IR spectroscopy. The TEM and ThT-fluorescence results revealed that the sCT peptide incubated with Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions (in aqueous environment) forms globular aggregates, while that with Al(3+) ions forms fibrils. The solid state NMR and FT-IR studies revealed the presence of a substantial amount of β-sheet content in sCT aggregates (formed in the presence of these metal ions) compared to the monomeric sCT, indicating that the metal binding is concomitant with conformational changes. The present study becomes crucial while prescribing this drug peptide under physio-pathological conditions associated with an abnormal accumulation of metal ions (Cu(2+)/Zn(2+)/Al(3+)) in the body (i.e., abnormal metal ion homeostasis).

  12. A comprehensive platform to investigate protein-metal ion interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; Albishri, Hassan M; Abd El-Hady, Deia; Redweik, Sabine; El Deeb, Sami; Wätzig, Hermann

    2015-03-25

    In this work, the behavior of several metal ions with different globular proteins was investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Screening was conducted by applying a proper rinsing protocol developed by our group. The use of 0.1M EDTA in the rinsing solution successfully desorbs metal ions from the capillary wall. The mobility ratio was used to evaluate the precision of the method. Excellent precision for repeated runs was achieved for different protein metal ion interactions (RSD% of 0.05-1.0%). Run times were less than 6 min for all of the investigated interactions. The method has been successfully applied for the interaction study of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Pd(2+), Ir(3+), Ru(3+), Rh(3+), Pt(2+), Pt(4+), Os(3+), Au(3+), Au(+), Ag(+), Cu(1+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+), V(3+), MoO4(2-) and SeO3(2-) with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and myoglobin. Different interaction values were obtained for most of the tested metal ions even for that in the same metal group. Results were discussed and compared in view of metal and semimetal group's interaction behavior with the tested proteins. The calculated normalized difference of mobility ratios for each protein-metal ion interaction and its sign (positive and negative) has been successfully used to detect the interaction and estimate further coordination of the bound metal ion, respectively. The comprehensive platform summarizes all the obtained interaction results, and is valuable for any future protein-metal ion investigation.

  13. Differentiating between fluorescence-quenching metal ions with polyfluorophore sensors built on a DNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Tan, Samuel S; Kim, Su Jeong; Kool, Eric T

    2011-03-02

    A common problem in detecting metal ions with fluorescentchemosensors is the emission-suppressing effects of fluorescence-quenching metal ions. This quenching tendency makes it difficult to design sensors with turn-on signal, and differentiate between several metal ions that may yield a strong quenching response. To address these challenges, we investigate a new sensor design strategy, incorporating fluorophores and metal ligands as DNA base replacements in DNA-like oligomers, for generating a broader range of responses for quenching metal ions. The modular molecular design enabled rapid synthesis and discovery of sensors from libraries on PEG-polystyrene beads. Using this approach, water-soluble sensors 1-5 were identified as strong responders to a set of eight typically quenching metal ions (Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Ag(+), Cr(3+), and Fe(3+)). They were synthesized and characterized for sensing responses in solution. Cross-screening with the full set of metal ions showed that they have a wide variety of responses, including emission enhancements and red- and blue-shifts. The diversity of sensor responses allows as few as two sensors (1 and 2) to be used together to successfully differentiate these eight metals. As a test, a set of unknown metal ion solutions in blind studies were also successfully identified based on the response pattern of the sensors. The modular nature of the sensor design strategy suggests a broadly applicable approach to finding sensors for differentiating many different cations by pattern-based recognition, simply by varying the sequence and composition of ligands and fluorophores on a DNA synthesizer.

  14. Systematic Design of a Metal Ion Biosensor: A Multi-Objective Optimization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    With the recent industrial expansion, heavy metals and other pollutants have increasingly contaminated our living surroundings. Heavy metals, being non-degradable, tend to accumulate in the food chain, resulting in potentially damaging toxicity to organisms. Thus, techniques to detect metal ions have gradually begun to receive attention. Recent progress in research on synthetic biology offers an alternative means for metal ion detection via the help of promoter elements derived from microorganisms. To make the design easier, it is necessary to develop a systemic design method for evaluating and selecting adequate components to achieve a desired detection performance. A multi-objective (MO) H2/H∞ performance criterion is derived here for design specifications of a metal ion biosensor to achieve the H2 optimal matching of a desired input/output (I/O) response and simultaneous H∞ optimal filtering of intrinsic parameter fluctuations and external cellular noise. According to the two design specifications, a Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is employed to interpolate several local linear stochastic systems to approximate the nonlinear stochastic metal ion biosensor system so that the multi-objective H2/H∞ design of the metal ion biosensor can be solved by an associated linear matrix inequality (LMI)-constrained multi-objective (MO) design problem. The analysis and design of a metal ion biosensor with optimal I/O response matching and optimal noise filtering ability then can be achieved by solving the multi-objective problem under a set of LMIs. Moreover, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA)-based library search method is employed to find adequate components from corresponding libraries to solve LMI-constrained MO H2/H∞ design problems. It is a useful tool for the design of metal ion biosensors, particularly regarding the tradeoffs between the design factors under consideration. PMID:27832110

  15. Systematic Design of a Metal Ion Biosensor: A Multi-Objective Optimization Approach.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    With the recent industrial expansion, heavy metals and other pollutants have increasingly contaminated our living surroundings. Heavy metals, being non-degradable, tend to accumulate in the food chain, resulting in potentially damaging toxicity to organisms. Thus, techniques to detect metal ions have gradually begun to receive attention. Recent progress in research on synthetic biology offers an alternative means for metal ion detection via the help of promoter elements derived from microorganisms. To make the design easier, it is necessary to develop a systemic design method for evaluating and selecting adequate components to achieve a desired detection performance. A multi-objective (MO) H2/H∞ performance criterion is derived here for design specifications of a metal ion biosensor to achieve the H2 optimal matching of a desired input/output (I/O) response and simultaneous H∞ optimal filtering of intrinsic parameter fluctuations and external cellular noise. According to the two design specifications, a Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is employed to interpolate several local linear stochastic systems to approximate the nonlinear stochastic metal ion biosensor system so that the multi-objective H2/H∞ design of the metal ion biosensor can be solved by an associated linear matrix inequality (LMI)-constrained multi-objective (MO) design problem. The analysis and design of a metal ion biosensor with optimal I/O response matching and optimal noise filtering ability then can be achieved by solving the multi-objective problem under a set of LMIs. Moreover, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA)-based library search method is employed to find adequate components from corresponding libraries to solve LMI-constrained MO H2/H∞ design problems. It is a useful tool for the design of metal ion biosensors, particularly regarding the tradeoffs between the design factors under consideration.

  16. Alkali metal ion catalysis and inhibition in nucleophilic displacement reactions at phosphorus centers: ethyl and methyl paraoxon and ethyl and methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Um, Ik-Hwan; Shin, Young-Hee; Lee, Seung-Eun; Yang, Kiyull; Buncel, Erwin

    2008-02-01

    We report on the ethanolysis of the P=O and P=S compounds ethyl and methyl paraoxon (1a and 1b) and ethyl and methyl parathion (2a and 2b). Plots of spectrophotometrically measured rate constants, kobsd versus [MOEt], the alkali ethoxide concentration, show distinct upward and downward curvatures, pointing to the importance of ion-pairing phenomena and a differential reactivity of free ions and ion pairs. Three types of reactivity and selectivity patterns have been discerned: (1) For the P=O compounds 1a and 1b, LiOEt > NaOEt > KOEt > EtO-; (2) for the P=S compound 2a, KOEt > EtO- > NaOEt > LiOEt; (3) for P=S, 2b, 18C6-crown-complexed KOEt > KOEt = EtO(-) > NaOEt > LiOEt. These selectivity patterns are characteristic of both catalysis and inhibition by alkali-metal cations depending on the nature of the electrophilic center, P=O vs P=S, and the metal cation. Ground-state (GS) vs transition-state (TS) stabilization energies shed light on the catalytic and inhibitory tendencies. The unprecedented catalytic behavior of crowned-K(+) for the reaction of 2b is noteworthy. Modeling reveals an extreme steric interaction for the reaction of 2a with crowned-K(+), which is responsible for the absence of catalysis in this system. Overall, P=O exhibits greater reactivity than P=S, increasing from 50- to 60-fold with free EtO(-) and up to 2000-fold with LiOEt, reflecting an intrinsic P=O vs P=S reactivity difference (thio effect). The origin of reactivity and selectivity differences in these systems is discussed on the basis of competing electrostatic effects and solvational requirements as function of anionic electric field strength and cation size (Eisenman's theory).

  17. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  18. Interactions between metal ions and carbohydrates. The coordination behavior of neutral erythritol to lanthanum and erbium ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Wang, Yalei; Zhang, Shiwei; Weng, Shifu; Zhao, Kui; Wu, Jinguang

    2005-12-30

    Lanthanide ions and erythritol form metal-alditol complexes with various structures. Lanthanum nitrate and erbium chloride coordinate to erythritol to give new coordination structures. The lanthanum nitrate-erythritol complex (LaEN), 2La(NO3)3.C4H10O(4).8H2O, La3+ exhibits the coordination number of 11 (namely 11 polar atoms bound to one lanthanum) and is 11-coordinated to two hydroxyl groups from one erythritol molecule, six oxygen atoms from three nitrate ions and three water molecules. One erythritol molecule is coordinated to two La3+ ions and links the two metal ions together. The ratio of M:L is 2:1. The erbium chloride-erythritol complex (ErE), ErCl2.C4H9O(4).2C2H5OH was obtained from ErCl3 and erythritol in aqueous ethanol solution and the structure shows that deprotonation reaction occurs in the reaction process. The Er3+ cation is 8-coordinated with three hydroxyl groups of one erythritol molecule, two hydroxyl groups from another erythritol molecule, two ethanol molecules, and one chloride ion. Erythritol provides its three hydroxyl groups to one erbium cation and two hydroxyl groups to another erbium cation, that is, one hydroxyl group is coordinated to two metal ions and therefore loses its hydrogen atom and becomes a oxygen bridge. Another chloride ion is hydrogen bonded in the structure. The results indicate the complexity of metal-sugar coordination.

  19. Solvation and electrostatic model for specific electrolyte adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Nita; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    1997-07-01

    A solvation and electrostatic model has been developed for estimating electrolyte adsorption from physical and chemical properties of the system, consistent with the triple-layer model. The model is calibrated on experimental surface titration data for ten oxides and hydroxides in ten electrolytes over a range of ionic strengths from 0.001 M-2.9 M (Sahai and Sverjensky, 1997a). The model assumes the presence of a single type of surface site, >SOH. It is proposed that for a 1:1 electrolyte of the type M +L -, the logarithms of the adsorption constants ( Ks,M +and Ks,L -) representing the equilibria > SO- + Maq+ = > SO- - M+and> SOH2+ + Laq- = > SOH2+ - L- contain contributions from an ion-intrinsic component and a solvation component. According to Born solvation theory, log Ks,M + and log Ks, L - can be linearly correlated with inverse dielectric constant of the k-th mineral ( 1/ɛ k) resulting in the equations log K s,M + = - δω M +/2.303 RT1/ɛ k + log Kii,M+″and log K s,L - = - δω L -/2.303 RT1/ɛ k + log K ii,L +″ The ion-intrinsic part (log Kii ″) is a linear function of the inverse electrostatic radius ( 1/r e,j ) of the j-th aqueous ion, where, in general, j = M + or L -. The interfacial solvation coefficient ( Δ, Ω j) associated with the solvation component is linearly related to the inverse effective radius ( 1/R e,j ) of the adsorbed ion and to the charge ( Zj) on the ion. The model is consistent with surface protonation constants ( Ks,1and Ks,2) calculated from experimental points of zero charge and values of ΔpK predicted from the Pauling bond-strength per unit bond-length ( s/r >S-OH) of the bulk mineral (Sahai and Sverjensky, 1997a), site-densities ( Ns) from isotopic-exchange data, and outer-layer capacitance (C 2) equal to 0.2 F m -2. As a first approximation, we also find an empirical trend between capacitance (C 1) of the inner-layer and 1/(r e,ML·ω ML) where re,ML is the electrostatic radius and ω ML is the solvation coefficient of

  20. Viscosity and Solvation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  1. Effects of metal ions on the catalytic degradation of dicofol by cellulase.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Zihan; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-07-01

    A new technique whereby cellulase immobilized on aminated silica was applied to catalyze the degradation of dicofol, an organochlorine pesticide. In order to evaluate the performance of free and immobilized cellulase, experiments were carried out to measure the degradation efficiency. The Michaelis constant, Km, of the reaction catalyzed by immobilized cellulase was 9.16 mg/L, and the maximum reaction rate, Vmax, was 0.40 mg/L/min, while that of free cellulase was Km=8.18 mg/L, and Vmax=0.79 mg/L/min, respectively. The kinetic constants of catalytic degradation were calculated to estimate substrate affinity. Considering that metal ions may affect enzyme activity, the effects of different metal ions on the catalytic degradation efficiency were explored. The results showed that the substrate affinity decreased after immobilization. Monovalent metal ions had no effect on the reaction, while divalent metal ions had either positive or inhibitory effects, including activation by Mn2+, reversible competition with Cd2+, and irreversible inhibition by Pb2+. Ca2+ promoted the catalytic degradation of dicofol at low concentrations, but inhibited it at high concentrations. Compared with free cellulase, immobilized cellulase was affected less by metal ions. This work provided a basis for further studies on the co-occurrence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and heavy metal ions in the environment.

  2. Silicon Quantum Dot-Based Fluorescence Turn-On Metal Ion Sensors in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam; Lee, Hsin-Lung; Yadav, Kanchan; Lin, King-Chuen; Lin, Yih-Tyng; Chang, A H H

    2016-09-14

    Multiple sensor systems are designed by varying aza-crown ether moiety in silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) for detecting individual Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Mn(2+) metal ions with significant selectivity and sensitivity. The detection limit of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Mn(2+) can reach 1.81, 3.15, and 0.47 μM, respectively. Upon excitation of the SiQDs which are coordinated with aza-crown ethers, the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) takes place from aza-crown ether moiety to the valence band of SiQDs core such that the reduced probability of electron-hole recombination may diminish the subsequent fluorescence. The fluorescence suppression caused by such PET effect will be relieved after selective metal ion is added. The charge-electron binding force between the metal ion and aza-crown ether hinders the PET and thereby restores the fluorescence of SiQDs. The design of sensor system is based on the fluorescence "turn-on" of SiQDs while in search of the appropriate metal ion. For practical application, the sensing capabilities of metal ions in the live cells are performed and the confocal image results reveal their promising applicability as an effective and nontoxic metal ion sensor.

  3. Application of immobilized metal ion chelate complexes as pseudocation exchange adsorbents for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Zachariou, M; Hearn, M T

    1996-01-09

    The interactions of horse muscle myoglobin (MYO), tuna heart cytochrome c (CYT), and hen egg white lysozyme (LYS) with three different immobilized metal ion affinity (IMAC) adsorbents involving the chelated complexes of the hard Lewis metal ions Al3+, Ca2+, Fe3+, and Yb3+ and the borderline Lewis metal ion Cu2+ have been investigated in the presence of low- and high-ionic strength buffers and at two different pH values. In contrast to the selectivity behavior noted with buffers of high ionic strength, with low-ionic strength buffers, these three proteins interact with the hard metal ion IMAC adsorbents in a manner more characteristic of cation exchange behavior, although in contrast to the cation exchange chromatography of these proteins, as the pH value of the elution buffer was increased, the retention also increased. The selectivity differences observed under these conditions appear to be due to the formation of hydrolytic complexes of these immobilized metal ion chelate systems involving a change in the coordination geometry of the im-M(n+)-chelate at higher pH values. The experimental observations have been evaluated in terms of the effective charge on the immobilized metal ion chelate complex and the charge characteristics of the specific proteins.

  4. Self-propelled droplets for extracting rare-earth metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ban, Takahiko; Tani, Kentaro; Nakata, Hiroki; Okano, Yasunori

    2014-09-07

    We have developed self-propelled droplets having the abilities to detect a chemical gradient, to move toward a higher concentration of a specific metal ion (particularly the dysprosium ion), and to extract it. Such abilities rely on the high surface activity of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) in response to pH and the affinity of DEHPA for the dysprosium ion. We used two external stimuli as chemical signals to control droplet motion: a pH signal to induce motility and metal ions to induce directional sensing. The oil droplets loaded with DEHPA spontaneously move around beyond the threshold of pH even in a homogeneous pH field. In the presence of a gel block containing metal ions, the droplets show directional sensing and their motility is biased toward higher concentrations. The metal ions investigated can be arranged in decreasing order of directional sensing as Dy(3+)≫ Nd(3+) > Y(3+) > Gd(3+). Furthermore, the analysis of components by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer reveals that the metal ions can be extracted from the environmental media to the interiors of the droplets. This system may offer alternative self-propelled nano/microscale machines to bubble thrust engines powered by asymmetrical catalysts.

  5. Polyrhodanine modified anodic aluminum oxide membrane for heavy metal ions removal.

    PubMed

    Song, Jooyoung; Oh, Hyuntaek; Kong, Hyeyoung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2011-03-15

    Polyrhodanine was immobilized onto the inner surface of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane via vapor deposition polymerization method. The polyrhodanine modified membrane was applied to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solution because polyrhodanine could be coordinated with specific metal ions. Several parameters such as initial metal concentration, contact time and metal species were evaluated systematically for uptake efficiencies of the fabricated membrane under continuous flow condition. Adsorption isotherms of Hg(II) ion on the AAO-polyrhodanine membrane were analyzed with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) ion on the membrane was obeyed by a pseudo-second order equation, indicating the chemical adsorption. The maximum removal capacity of Hg(II) ion onto the fabricated membrane was measured to be 4.2 mmol/g polymer. The AAO-polyrhodanine membrane had also remarkable uptake performance toward Ag(I) and Pb(II) ions. Furthermore, the polyrhodanine modified membrane could be recycled after recovery process. These results demonstrated that the polyrhodanine modified AAO membrane provided potential applications for removing the hazardous heavy metal ions from wastewater.

  6. Metal ions affecting the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Some metals, such as copper and manganese, are essential to life and play irreplaceable roles in, e.g., the functioning of important enzyme systems. Other metals are xenobiotics, i.e., they have no useful role in human physiology and, even worse, as in the case of lead, may be toxic even at trace levels of exposure. Even those metals that are essential, however, have the potential to turn harmful at very high levels of exposure, a reflection of a very basic tenet of toxicology--"the dose makes the poison." Toxic metal exposure may lead to serious risks to human health. As a result of the extensive use of toxic metals and their compounds in industry and consumer products, these agents have been widely disseminated in the environment. Because metals are not biodegradable, they can persist in the environment and produce a variety of adverse effects. Exposure to metals can lead to damage in a variety of organ systems and, in some cases, metals also have the potential to be carcinogenic. Even though the importance of metals as environmental health hazards is now widely appreciated, the specific mechanisms by which metals produce their adverse effects have yet to be fully elucidated. The unifying factor in determining toxicity and carcinogenicity for most metals is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Metal-mediated formation of free radicals causes various modifications to nucleic acids, enhanced lipid peroxidation, and altered calcium and sulfhydryl homeostasis. Whilst copper, chromium, and cobalt undergo redox-cycling reactions, for metals such as cadmium and nickel the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This chapter attempts to show that the toxic effects of different metallic compounds may be manifested in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The knowledge of health effects due to metal exposure is necessary for practising physicians, and should be assessed by inquiring

  7. Production of multicharged metal ion beams on the first stage of tandem-type ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, Shogo Nagaya, Tomoki; Nishiokada, Takuya; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    Multicharged metal ion beams are required to be applied in a wide range of fields. We aim at synthesizing iron-endohedral fullerene by transporting iron ion beams from the first stage into the fullerene plasma in the second stage of the tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). We developed new evaporators by using a direct ohmic heating method and a radiation heating method from solid state pure metal materials. We investigate their properties in the test chamber and produce iron ions on the first stage of the tandem-type ECRIS. As a result, we were successful in extracting Fe{sup +} ion beams from the first stage and introducing Fe{sup +} ion beams to the second stage. We will try synthesizing iron-endohedral fullerene on the tandem-type ECRIS by using these evaporators.

  8. The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.; Duyvesteyn, S.; Sreenivasarao, K.

    1995-12-31

    Toxic metals entering surface or ground water from sources such as metal finishing shop spills and abandoned mines can pose a significant threat to public health and the environment. Ion flotation and similar foam separation techniques show great promise for treating dilute, metal-contaminated solutions, and could also be used to treat effluents from many minerals and metallurgical processing operations prior to discharge. In ion flotation, an appropriate collector is added to the solution to form hydrophobic complexes with the metal ions. These metal-bearing species are then removed by flotation, usually with trace addition of a frother to stabilize the foam. In an effort to better understand the underlying scientific and engineering principles that determine the performance of ion flotation, the removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been studied using laboratory scale flotation columns in batch mode. The effects of the superficial air velocity, solution and froth height, nature of the collector, collector:metal-ion ratio, ionic strength and several frothers at low concentrations on the flotation kinetics are reported. Finally, results are presented on methods that might allow regeneration of collector and recovery of by-product metal from the foam product.

  9. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-yi; Xu, Yun-fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-da; Wang, Hao-an; Wang, Wen-bo; Meng, Fan-guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-peng

    2015-02-24

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members.

  10. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-Yi; Xu, Yun-Fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-Da; Wang, Hao-An; Wang, Wen-Bo; Meng, Fan-Guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-02-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members.

  11. Ion selectivity of crown ethers investigated by UV and IR spectroscopy in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kusaka, Ryoji; Haino, Takeharu; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-04-26

    Electronic and vibrational spectra of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) and benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6) complexes with alkali metal ions, M(+)•B15C5 and M(+)•B18C6 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), are measured using UV photodissociation (UVPD) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. We determine the structure of conformers with the aid of density functional theory calculations. In the Na(+)•B15C5 and K(+)•B18C6 complexes, the crown ethers open the most and hold the metal ions at the center of the ether ring, demonstrating an optimum matching in size between the cavity of the crown ethers and the metal ions. For smaller ions, the crown ethers deform the ether ring to decrease the distance and increase the interaction between the metal ions and oxygen atoms; the metal ions are completely surrounded by the ether ring. In the case of larger ions, the metal ions are too large to enter the crown cavity and are positioned on it, leaving one of its sides open for further solvation. Thermochemistry data calculated on the basis of the stable conformers of the complexes suggest that the ion selectivity of crown ethers is controlled primarily by the enthalpy change for the complex formation in solution, which depends strongly on the complex structure.

  12. Metal ion induced FRET OFF-ON in tren/dansyl-appended rhodamine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Sangwoon; Park, Noejung; Kim, Jong Seung

    2008-01-17

    A series of new fluorescent probes bearing tren-spaced rhodamine B and dansyl groups have been synthesized. Compound 1 exhibits selective changes in the absorption and the emission spectra toward Cu2+ ion over miscellaneous metal cations. Among 1-3, 1 shows the best FRET efficiency through dansyl emission to rhodamine absorption for the Cu2+ ion.

  13. GaBi alloy liquid metal ion source for microelectronics research.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, L; Pilz, W; Ganetsos, Th; Forbes, R G; Akhmadaliev, Ch

    2007-09-01

    A GaBi alloy liquid metal ion source has been studied. From an analysis of the source mass spectra as a function of emission current, a mechanism is suggested for the production of single- and double-charged ions. There is good agreement with the results of Swanson's investigations of a pure Bi source.

  14. Binding stoichiometry in sorption of divalent metal ions: a theoretical analysis based on the ion-exchange model.

    PubMed

    Plazinski, Wojciech; Rudzinski, Władysław

    2010-04-01

    Two stoichiometric assumptions have been compared for describing divalent metal ion binding by protonated sorbent/biosorbent. The first one corresponds to the classical model in which each metal ion (M) binds to two binding sites (X) forming a single MX(2) complex while the second one, proposed by Schiewer and Volesky and used for description of biosorption equilibria, assumes the existence of M(1/2)X complexes. Mathematical expressions corresponding to both these models have been developed by applying the ion-exchange model and methods of statistical thermodynamics. The M(1/2)X model appears to be nonphysical because it does not take into account the basic fact that two sites binding one metal ion must be neighboring. On the other hand, this latter assumption is the part of the MX(2) model which has been shown using Nitta's approach. Nevertheless, equations associated with the M(1/2)X model can be successfully used for description of the experimental data as they can simulate quite well the behavior predicted by the MX(2) model. This is especially true when considering the range of relatively high metal concentrations in the bulk solution and significant degree of surface heterogeneity characteristic of the sorbent surface.

  15. Chromatographic separation of certain metal ions using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium-sulfonate mixed bed ion-exchanger.

    PubMed

    Lasheen, Y F; Seliman, A F; Abdel-Rassoul, A A

    2006-12-15

    The separation behaviour of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+) and Ni(2+) on bifunctional quaternary ammonium-sulfonate mixed ion-exchangers (Dionex, IonPac CS5 and CG5) was studied using different eluents including solutions of oxalic acid, potassium oxalate, sodium oxalate and ammonium oxalate. Separated metal ions were followed by using 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) as post-colouring complex. The retention factors of different ions proved to be dependent on the pH, concentration, nature of each complexing agent, and to less extent on eluent flow rate. The retention behaviour and separation mechanism of complexed metal analytes are discussed in the light of the stability of metal complexes and the ligand complexing ability of used eluent. Comparison between various mobile phases is evaluated, and both sodium and potassium oxalate can be used successfully for simultaneous separation of studied metals with good resolution within short elution periods. The method can be used in different applications including analysis of bottled water from different resources.

  16. Property enchancement of polyimide films by way of the incorporation of lanthanide metal ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Lanthanide metal ions were incorporated into the polyimide derived from 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) and 1,3-bis(aminophenoxy) benzene (APB) in an attempt to produce molecular level metal-polymer composites. The lanthanide series of metal ions (including aluminum, scandium, and yttrium) provide discrete and stable metal ions in the 3+ oxidation state. Throughout the series there is a uniform variation in ionic size ranging from 50 pm for aluminum to a maximum of 103.4 pm for cerium and gradually decreasing again to 84.8 pm for lutetium. The high charge-to-size ratio for these ions as well as the ability to obtain large coordination numbers makes them excellent candidates for interacting with the polymer substructure. The distinct lack of solubility of simple lanthanide salts such as the acetates and halides has made it difficult to obtain metal ions distributed in the polymer framework as discrete ions or metal complexes rather than microcomposites of metal clusters. (Lanthanum nitrates are quite soluble, but the presence of the strongly oxidizing nitrate ion leads to serious degradation of the polymer upon thermal curing. This work was successful at extending the range of soluble metals salts by using chelating agents derived from the beta-diketones dipivaloylmethane, dibenzoylmethane, trifluoroacetylacetone, and hexafluoroacetylacetone. Metal acetates which are insoluble in dimethylacetamide dissolve readily in the presence of the diketones. Addition of the polyimide yields a homogeneous resin which is then cast into a clear film. Upon curing clear films were obtained with the dibenzoylmethane and trifluoroacetylacetone ligands. The dipavaloylmethane precipitates the metal during the film casting process, and hexafluoroacetylacetone gives cured films which are deformed and brittle. These clear films are being evaluated for the effect of the metal ions on the coefficient of thermal expansion, resistance to atomic oxygen, and on

  17. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  18. Effect of surface modification of microfiltration membrane on capture of toxic heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Madaeni, Sayed Siavash; Heidary, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    A novel complexing membrane containing 8-hydroxyquinoline groups was used for the removal of heavy metal ions (Cd2+ and Ni2+) from aqueous solution. The functionalized membranes were characterized by FTIR-ATR, SEM and EDAX for the presence of functional groups, the physical structure of the membranes and the analysis of the particles deposited on the membrane, respectively. The influence of 8-hydroxyquinoline concentration, feed concentration, pH and temperature of the solution on capture capability was studied. The modified membrane showed a higher affinity to Cd2+ cations than to Ni2+. The metal ion rejection was increased with an increase in concentration of 8-hydroxyquinoline from 0.5 to 2.0 wt%. However at a ligand concentration higher than 2.0 wt%, no significant change was observed in the metal rejection. The experimental results revealed that the metal rejection was decreased with an increase in metal ion concentration in the feed. Moreover the rejection depended on feed pH and is higher for elevated pH. By changing the temperature in the range of 23-28 degrees C, no considerable effect on metal rejection was observed. However, a higher temperature resulted in a decline in metal rejection. For filtration of a mixture of the two metal ions, the retention was similar to that of the single cations, i.e. Cd > Ni but with smaller absolute rejections.

  19. Removal of selected metal ions from aqueous solution using modified corncobs.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, T; Seo, C W; Marshall, W E

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this study was to convert corncobs to metal ion adsorbents for wastewater treatment. Ground corncobs were modified with either 0.6 M citric acid (CA) or 1.0 M phosphoric acid (PA) to help improve their natural adsorption capacity. The effect of a combination of wash and modification treatment was tested for corncob adsorption efficiency with five different metal ions (cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc) individually or in a mixed solution containing each metal at a 20 mM concentration. Results were compared to those of commercial resins Amberlite IRC-718, Amberlite 200, Duolite GT-73 and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Modified corncobs showed the same adsorption efficiency as Duolite GT-73 for cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc ions and had greater adsorption than CMC for nickel and zinc ions. For mixed metals, the modified corncobs exhibited the same adsorption efficiency as Duolite GT-73 for cadmium and copper ions and the same or higher adsorption than Amberlite IRC-718 for lead ions. Adsorption capacities of modified samples were compared to those of Amberlite IRC-718, Amberlite 200 and Duolite GT-73. Commercial resins generally had higher adsorption capacities than modified corncobs. However, the adsorption capacity of modified corncobs for copper and lead ions was equivalent to Duolite GT-73, but was lower than for Amberlite IRC-718 or Amberlite 200. Depending on the specific metal ion and the presence or absence of other metal ions, chemically modified corncobs were at least equivalent in adsorption properties to all of the commercial cation exchange resins examined in this study.

  20. Label-free histamine detection with nanofluidic diodes through metal ion displacement mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Duznovic, Ivana; Nasir, Saima; Mafe, Salvador; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We design and characterize a nanofluidic device for the label-free specific detection of histamine neurotransmitter based on a metal ion displacement mechanism. The sensor consists of an asymmetric polymer nanopore fabricated via ion track-etching technique. The nanopore sensor surface having metal-nitrilotriacetic (NTA-Ni(2+)) chelates is obtained by covalent coupling of native carboxylic acid groups with Nα,Nα-bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine (BCML), followed by exposure to Ni(2+) ion solution. The BCML immobilization and subsequent Ni(2+) ion complexation with NTA moieties change the surface charge concentration, which has a significant impact on the current-voltage (I-V) curve after chemical modification of the nanopore. The sensing mechanism is based on the displacement of the metal ion from the NTA-Ni(2+) chelates. When the modified pore is exposed to histamine solution, the Ni(2+) ion in NTA-Ni(2+) chelate recognizes histamine through a metal ion coordination displacement process and formation of stable Ni-histamine complexes, leading to the regeneration of metal-free NTA groups on the pore surface, as shown in the current-voltage characteristics. Nanomolar concentrations of the histamine in the working electrolyte can be detected. On the contrary, other neurotransmitters such as glycine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and dopamine do not provoke significant changes in the nanopore electronic signal due to their inability to displace the metal ion and form a stable complex with Ni(2+) ion. The nanofluidic sensor exhibits high sensitivity, specificity and reusability towards histamine detection and can then be used to monitor the concentration of biological important neurotransmitters.

  1. Strong cation···π interactions promote the capture of metal ions within metal-seamed nanocapsule.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Harshita; Jin, Ping; Teat, Simon J; Barnes, Charles L; Dalgarno, Scott J; Atwood, Jerry L

    2014-12-10

    Thallium ions are transported to the interior of gallium-seamed pyrogallol[4]arene nanocapsules. In comparison to the capture of Cs ions, the extent of which depends on the type and position of the anion employed in the cesium salt, the enhanced strength of Tl···π vs Cs···π interactions facilitates permanent entrapment of Tl(+) ions on the capsule interior. "Stitching-up" the capsule seam with a tertiary metal (Zn, Rb, or K) affords new trimetallic nanocapsules in solid state.

  2. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  3. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  4. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates. Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  5. Ion-induced nanopattern propagation on metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, Tomáš; Veselý, Martin; Čapek, Pavel; Král, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the formation of ion-induced patterns on single-crystalline Ni(001) bombarded with a 20 -keV Ga+ ion beam. For near normal ion incidence isotropic roughness forms on the surface. By moving to grazing incidence this pattern gradually transforms into a pronounced ripple pattern with wave vector perpendicular to the ion beam. By using an in situ scanning electron microscope we were able to analyze the real-time dynamics of the pattern formation process and evaluate the direction and velocity of the net in-plane morphology propagation for different angles of ion incidence. We compare the experimental results to the predictions of the classical theory for the pattern formation.

  6. Control of redox reactivity of flavin and pterin coenzymes by metal ion coordination and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kojima, Takahiko

    2008-03-01

    The electron-transfer activities of flavin and pterin coenzymes can be fine-tuned by coordination of metal ions, protonation and hydrogen bonding. Formation of hydrogen bonds with a hydrogen-bond receptor in metal-flavin complexes is made possible depending on the type of coordination bond that can leave the hydrogen-bonding sites. The electron-transfer catalytic functions of flavin and pterin coenzymes are described by showing a number of examples of both thermal and photochemical redox reactions, which proceed by controlling the electron-transfer reactivity of coenzymes with metal ion binding, protonation and hydrogen bonding.

  7. Nuclear quantum effects on adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Gu, Bing; Heine, Thomas; Jakowski, Jacek; Garashchuk, Sophya

    2017-02-01

    The nuclear quantum effects on the zero-point energy (ZPE), influencing adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions, are examined using normal mode analysis of ab initio electronic structure results for complexes with 17 metal cations. The lightest metallic nuclei, Li and Be, are found to be the most 'quantum'. The largest selectivity in adsorption is predicted for Cu, Ni and Co ions. Analysis of the nuclear wavepacket dynamics on the ground state electronic potential energy surfaces (PES) performed for complexes of Li+ and Cu+2 with H2/D2/HD shows that the PES anharmonicity changes the ZPE by up to 9%.

  8. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  9. Sub-millimeter Spectroscopy of Astrophysically Important Molecules and Ions: Metal Hydrides, Halides, and Cyanides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Flory, M. A.; Halfen, D. T.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of SOFIA, Herschel, and SAFIR, new wavelength regions will become routinely accessible for astronomical spectroscopy, particularly at submm frequencies (0.5-1.1 THz). Molecular emission dominates the spectra of dense interstellar gas at these wavelengths. Because heterodyne detectors are major instruments of these missions, accurate knowledge of transition frequencies is crucial for their success. The Ziurys spectroscopy laboratory has been focusing on the measurement of the pure rotational transitions of astrophysically important molecules in the sub-mm regime. Of particular interest have been metal hydride species and their ions, as well as metal halides and cyanides. A new avenue of study has included metal bearing molecular ions.

  10. Colorimetric photonic hydrogel aptasensor for the screening of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bao-Fen; Zhao, Yuan-Jin; Cheng, Yao; Li, Ting-Ting; Xie, Zhuo-Ying; Zhao, Xiang-Wei; Gu, Zhong-Ze

    2012-09-28

    We have developed a robust method for the visual detection of heavy metal ions (such as Hg(2+) and Pb(2+)) by using aptamer-functionalized colloidal photonic crystal hydrogel (CPCH) films. The CPCHs were derived from a colloidal crystal array of monodisperse silica nanoparticles, which were polymerized within the polyacrylamide hydrogel. The heavy metal ion-responsive aptamers were then cross-linked in the hydrogel network. During detection, the specific binding of heavy metal ions and cross-linked single-stranded aptamers in the hydrogel network caused the hydrogel to shrink, which was detected as a corresponding blue shift in the Bragg diffraction peak position of the CPCHs. The shift value could be used to estimate, quantitatively, the amount of the target ion. It was demonstrated that our CPCH aptasensor could screen a wide concentration range of heavy metal ions with high selectivity and reversibility. In addition, these aptasensors could be rehydrated from dried gels for storage and aptamer protection. It is anticipated that our technology may also be used in the screening of a broad range of metal ions in food, drugs and the environment.

  11. Effects of lability of metal complex on free ion measurement using DMT.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Temminghoff, Erwin J M

    2010-04-01

    Very low concentrations of free metal ion in natural samples can be measured using the Donnan membrane technique (DMT) based on ion transport kinetics. In this paper, the possible effects of slow dissociation of metal complexes on the interpretation of kinetic DMT are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The expressions of the lability parameter, Lgrangian , were derived for DMT. Analysis of new experimental studies using synthetic solution containing NTA as the ligand and Cu(2+) ions shows that when the ionic strength is low (metals. By comparing the fraction of labile species measured using other dynamic sensors (DGT, GIME) in several freshwaters, it is concluded that in most waters ion transport in DMT is controlled by diffusion in the membrane. Only in very soft waters (<0.7 mM Ca+Mg), the dissociation rate of natural metal complex may influence ion transport in DMT. In this case, neglecting this effect may lead to an underestimation of the free metal ion concentration measured.

  12. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae.

  13. Crystal structures of Bacillus alkaline phytase in complex with divalent metal ions and inositol hexasulfate.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi-Fang; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lai, Hui-Lin; Cheng, Ya-Shan; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Ma, Yanhe; Chen, Chun-Chi; Yang, Chii-Shen; Cheng, Kuo-Joan; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Guo, Rey-Ting; Liu, Je-Ruei

    2011-06-03

    Alkaline phytases from Bacillus species, which hydrolyze phytate to less phosphorylated myo-inositols and inorganic phosphate, have great potential as additives to animal feed. The thermostability and neutral optimum pH of Bacillus phytase are attributed largely to the presence of calcium ions. Nonetheless, no report has demonstrated directly how the metal ions coordinate phytase and its substrate to facilitate the catalytic reaction. In this study, the interactions between a phytate analog (myo-inositol hexasulfate) and divalent metal ions in Bacillus subtilis phytase were revealed by the crystal structure at 1.25 Å resolution. We found all, except the first, sulfates on the substrate analog have direct or indirect interactions with amino acid residues in the enzyme active site. The structures also unraveled two active site-associated metal ions that were not explored in earlier studies. Significantly, one metal ion could be crucial to substrate binding. In addition, binding of the fourth sulfate of the substrate analog to the active site appears to be stronger than that of the others. These results indicate that alkaline phytase starts by cleaving the fourth phosphate, instead of the third or the sixth that were proposed earlier. Our high-resolution, structural representation of Bacillus phytase in complex with a substrate analog and divalent metal ions provides new insight into the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phytases in general.

  14. Predicting relative toxicity and interactions of divalent metal ions: Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence assay

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.C.; McCloskey, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Both relative toxicity and interactions between paired metal ions were predicted with least-squares linear regression and various ion characteristics. Microtox{reg_sign} 15 min EC50s (expressed as free ion) for Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Mg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were most effectively modeled with the constant for the first hydrolysis (K{sub H} for M{sup n+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} MOH{sup a{minus}1} + H{sup +}) although other ion characteristics were also significant in regression models. The {vert_bar}log K{sub H}{vert_bar} is correlated with metal ion affinity to intermediate ligands such as many biochemical functional groups with O donor atoms. Further, ordination of metals according to ion characteristics, e.g., {vert_bar}log K{sub H}{vert_bar} facilitated prediction of paired metal interactions. Pairing metals with strong tendencies to complex with intermediate or soft ligands such as those with O or S donor atoms resulted in strong interactions.

  15. Metal ion interaction with cosubstrate in self-splicing of group I introns.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, A S; Pettersson, E; Sjöberg, B M; Strömberg, R

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism for self-splicing of the group I intron in the pre-mRNA from the nrdB gene in bacteriophage T4 has been investigated using 2'-amino- 2'-deoxyguanosine or guanosine as cosubstrates in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+and Zn2+. The results show that a divalent metal ion interacts with the cosubstrate and thereby influences the efficiency of catalysis in the first step of splicing. This suggests the existence of a metal ion that catalyses the nucleophilic attack of the cosubstrate. Of particular significance is that the transesterification reactions of the first step of splicing with 2'-amino-2'-deoxyguanosine as cosubstrate are more efficient in mixtures containing either Mn2+or Zn2+together with Mg2+than with only magnesium ions present. The experiments in metal ion mixtures show that two (or more) metal ions are crucial for the self-splicing of group I introns and suggest the possibility that more than one of these have a direct catalytic role. A working model for a two-metal-ion mechanism in the transesterification steps is suggested. PMID:9016608

  16. Determination of new Cu+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ Lennard-Jones ion parameters in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Torras, Juan; Alemán, Carlos

    2013-09-12

    We present new Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for Cu(+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) ion-acetonitrile interactions. The adjustment of ion parameters is made to reproduce simultaneously experimental solvation free energy and structural properties, namely ion-N distance and coordination numbers. Initially, the methodology has been validated deriving parameters for well-studied Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in acetonitrile being compared with experimental and theoretical data. The transferability of parameters is checked by the calculation of thermodynamic and structural properties with three different acetonitrile models. The results obtained for transition metal ions show an overall agreement with reference values. The solvation free energy calculated with new LJ trained parameters using a six-site acetonitrile model, and two older three- and six-site acetonitrile models presents, respectively, percent differences of 0.4, 4.8, and 7.3% when compared with experimental values.

  17. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses. PMID:24212283

  18. Gettering of transition metals by cavities in silicon formed by helium ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.A.; Myers, S.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    We have recently completed studies which quantitatively characterize the ability of nanometer-size cavities formed by He ion implantation to getter detrimental metal impurities in Si. Cavity microstructures formed in Si by ion implantation of He and subsequent annealing have been found to capture metal impurities by two mechanisms: (1) chemisorption on internal walls at low concentrations and (2) silicide precipitation at concentrations exceeding the solid solubility. Experiments utilizing ion-beam analysis, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry were performed to quantitatively characterize the gettering effects and to determine the free energies associated with the chemisorbed metal atoms as a function of temperature. Mathematical models utilizing these results have been developed to predict gettering behavior.

  19. Intercalation of Coordinatively Unsaturated Fe(III) Ion within Interpenetrated Metal-Organic Framework MOF-5.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Burns, Thomas; Greer, Samuel M; Kobera, Libor; Stoian, Sebastian A; Korobkov, Ilia; Hill, Stephen; Bryce, David L; Woo, Tom K; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-01

    Coordinatively unsaturated Fe(III) metal sites were successfully incorporated into the iconic MOF-5 framework. This new structure, Fe(III) -iMOF-5, is the first example of an interpenetrated MOF linked through intercalated metal ions. Structural characterization was performed with single-crystal and powder XRD, followed by extensive analysis by spectroscopic methods and solid-state NMR, which reveals the paramagnetic ion through its interaction with the framework. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the intercalated ions were indeed Fe(III) , whereas DFT calculations were employed to ascertain the unique pentacoordinate architecture around the Fe(III) ion. Interestingly, this is also the first crystallographic evidence of pentacoordinate Zn(II) within the MOF-5 SBU. This new MOF structure displays the potential for metal-site addition as a framework connector, thus creating further opportunity for the innovative development of new MOF materials.

  20. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-11-11

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.