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Sample records for metal metal matrix

  1. Metal matrix composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krivov, G.A.; Beletsky, V.M.; Gribkov, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    High strength-weight properties, stiffness and fatigue resistance characteristics together with low sensitivity to stress concentration make metal matrix composites (MMC) rather promising for their use in structures. Metal matrix composites consist of a matrix (aluminum, magnesium, titanium and their alloys are the most frequently used) and reinforcers (carbon and boron fibers, high-strength steel wire, silicon carbide whiskers, etc.). This work considers various types of MMC and their applications in structures. The methods of structure production from metal matrix CM of aluminum-boron system with the help of machining, deformation, part joining by welding and riveting are given.

  2. Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Warren; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-02-01

    Metal matrix composites comprise a relatively wide range of materials defined by the metal matrix, reinforcement type, and reinforcement geometry. In the area of the matrix, most metallic systems have been explored for use in metal matrix composites, including Al, Be, Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, and Ag. By far, the largest usage is in aluminum matrix composites. From a reinforcement perspective, the materials used are typically ceramics since they provide a very desirable combination of stiffness, strength, and relatively low density. Candidate reinforcement materials include SiC, Al2O3, B4C, TiC, TiB2, graphite, and a number of other ceramics. In addition, there has been work on metallic materials as reinforcements, notably W and steel fibers. The morphology of the reinforcement material is another variable of importance in metal matrix composites. The three major classes of reinforcement morphology are continuous fiber, chopped fiber or whisker, and particulate. Typically, the selection of the reinforcement morphology is determined by the desired property/cost combination. Generally, continuous fiber reinforced MMCs provide the highest properties in the direction of the fiber orientation but are the most expensive. Chopped fiber and whisker reinforced materials can produce significant property improvements in the plane or direction of their orientation, at somewhat lower cost. Particulates provide a comparatively more moderate but isotropic increase in properties and are typically available at the lowest cost. By adding to the three variables of metallic matrix, reinforcement material, and reinforcement morphology the further options of reinforcement volume fraction, orientation, and matrix alloy composition and heat treatment, it is apparent that there is a very wide range of available material combinations and resultant properties. This paper will focus on how MMCs have been applied in specific application areas.

  3. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  4. Metal-matrix composites: Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Applications of metal matrix composites for air frames and jet engine components are discussed. The current state of the art in primary and secondary fabrication is presented. The present and projected costs were analyzed to determine the cost effectiveness of metal matrix composites. The various types of metal matrix composites and their characteristics are described.

  5. Metal Matrix Composites Directionally Solidified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Alicia Esther; Schvezov, Carlos Enrique

    The present work is focus on studying the dendritic solidification of metal matrix composites, MMCs, (using zinc-aluminum, ZA, alloys as matrix and the addition of SiC and Al2O3 particles). The compounds were obtained by as-cast solidification, under continuous stirring and in a second stage were directionally solidified in order to obtain different dendritic growth (columnar, equiaxed and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET)). The results in MMCs were compared with those obtained in directional solidification of ZA alloys, primarily with regard to structural parameters. The size and evolution of microstructure, according to the size of the MMCs particles and the variation of the thermal parameters was analyzing. In general it was found that the size of the microstructure (secondary dendritic spacing) decreases with the increase of particles in the matrix. When cooling rate increases, particle size decreases, and a higher cooling rate causes finer and more homogeneous dendrites Also, the segregation which was found in the matrix of the composites was significantly less than in the case of ZA alloys.

  6. Evaluation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of candidate metal-matrix composite materials for shuttle space radiators mounted to external structure are presented. The evaluation was specifically applicable to considerations of the manufacturing and properties of a potential space radiator. Two candidates, boron/aluminum and graphite/aluminum were obtained or made in various forms and tested in sufficient depth to allow selection of one of the two for future scale-up programs. The effort accomplished on this program verified that aluminum reinforced with boron was within the state-of-the-art in industry and possessed properties usable in the external skin areas available for shuttle radiators where re-entry temperatures will not exceed 800 F. It further demonstrated that graphite/aluminum has an apparently attractive future for space applications but requires extension development prior to scale-up.

  7. Characterization of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Chun, H. J.; Karalekas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed, adapted, and applied to the characterization of a metal matrix composite system, namely, silicon carbide/aluminim (SCS-2/6061 Al), and its constituents. The silicon carbide fiber was characterized by determining its modulus, strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The aluminum matrix was characterized thermomechanically up to 399 C (750 F) at two strain rates. The unidirectional SiC/Al composite was characterized mechanically under longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear loading up to 399 C (750 F). Isothermal and non-isothermal creep behavior was also measured. The applicability of a proposed set of multifactor thermoviscoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations and a computer code was investigated. Agreement between predictions and experimental results was shown in a few cases. The elastoplastic thermomechanical behavior of the composite was also described by a number of new analytical models developed or adapted for the material system studied. These models include the rule of mixtures, composite cylinder model with various thermoelastoplastic analyses and a model based on average field theory. In most cases satisfactory agreement was demonstrated between analytical predictions and experimental results for the cases of stress-strain behavior and thermal deformation behavior at different temperatures. In addition, some models yielded detailed three-dimensional stress distributions in the constituents within the composite.

  8. Metal-Matrix Composite Parts With Metal Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majkowski, T.; Kashalikar, U.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental fabrication process produces metal-matrix composite (MMC) parts with integral metal inserts. With inserts, MMC parts readily joined to similar parts by use of brazing, welding, or mechanical fasteners. Process conceived to make strong, lightweight components of structures erected in outer space. Also useful on Earth, in such automotive parts as rocker arms, cylinder liners, and pistons. Potential industrial applications include parts subjected to high stresses at high temperatures, as in power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment.

  9. Metal matrix composite structural panel construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.; Royster, D. M. (Inventor); Bales, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    Lightweight capped honeycomb stiffeners for use in fabricating metal or metal/matrix exterior structural panels on aerospace type vehicles and the process for fabricating same are disclosed. The stiffener stringers are formed in sheets, cut to the desired width and length and brazed in spaced relationship to a skin with the honeycomb material serving directly as the required lightweight stiffeners and not requiring separate metal encasement for the exposed honeycomb cells.

  10. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  11. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  12. Metal matrix composites microfracture: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Caruso, John J.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  13. Metal matrix composites microfracture - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, S. K.; Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  14. Unified Viscoplastic Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Robinson, D. N.; Bartolotta, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The need for unified constitutive models was recognized more than a decade ago in the results of phenomenological tests on monolithic metals that exhibited strong creep-plasticity interaction. Recently, metallic alloys have been combined to form high-temperature ductile/ductile composite materials, raising the natural question of whether these metallic composites exhibit the same phenomenological features as their monolithic constituents. This question is addressed in the context of a limited, yet definite (to illustrate creep/plasticity interaction) set of experimental data on the model metal matrix composite (MMC) system W/Kanthal. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a unified viscoplastic representation, extended for unidirectional composites and correlated to W/Kanthal, can accurately predict the observed longitudinal composite creep/plasticity interaction response and strain rate dependency. Finally, the predicted influence of fiber orientation on the creep response of W/Kanthal is illustrated.

  15. Liquid metal porous matrix sliding electrical contact: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, H.

    1973-01-01

    Concept utilizes porous metal or nonmetal matrix containing liquid metal in porous structure and confines liquid metal to contact area between rotor and brush by capillary forces. System may also be used to lubricate bearing systems.

  16. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, T. R. Chui, S. T.

    2014-04-14

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures.

  17. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, T. R.; Chui, S. T.

    2014-04-01

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures.

  18. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN

  19. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN

  20. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  1. Program For Analysis Of Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Mital, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is computer program used to simulate computationally nonlinear behavior of high-temperature metal-matrix composite structural components in specific applications, providing comprehensive analyses of thermal and mechanical performances. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Electrodialytic matrix isolation for metal cations.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hiroyama, Yuri; Nakamura, Koretaka; Koda, Takumi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Electrodialytic ion transfer was studied as a matrix isolation tool for heavy metal determinations. An ion transfer device (ITD) was used for the transfer of heavy metal cations. Under optimized flow rates applied voltage and receptor composition, heavy metal ions were quantitatively transferred at concentrations spanning µg L(-1) to mg L(-1). As long as the sample pH was acidic, there was no significant sample pH effect on the transfer efficiencies. Significant salt concentrations (>1 mM NaCl), however, decreased the transfer efficiency. This could be ameliorated (up to 5 mM NaCl) by transient instead of continuous sample introduction. The device was applied to the determination of Fe, Cu and Zn in equine and bovine serum; the reproducibility was better than conventional digestion method.

  3. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  4. Thermal expansion measurements of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Dries, Gregory A.

    1988-01-01

    The laser-interferometric-dilatometer system currently operational at NASA-Langley is described. The system, designed to characterize metal matrix composites, features high precision, automated data acquisition, and the ability to test a wide variety of specimen geometries over temperature ranges within 80-422 K. The paper presents typical thermal-expansion measurement data for a Gr/Al rod; Gr/Al and Gr/Mg unidirectional laminates; and a Gr/Mg (+ or -8)s laminate.

  5. Plasma Joining of Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-25

    effect, which may be preceded by Al4C3 formation, is apparently suppressed in matrix alloys containing reactive metal additions. All observations are...continuously by diffusion into the bulk of the liquid Al matrix, and the Al4C3 (s) formed is not a barrier for Si, Al and C transport. Assume a composite...0.104 versus 0.226), since Al4C3 is less stable at higher temperatures. It is also interesting to see that the F values for the same t values are

  6. Optimum interface properties for metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch (CTE) between the fiber and the matrix, high residual sresses exist in metal matrix composite systems upon cool down from processing temperature to room temperature. An interface material can be placed between the fiber and the matrix to reduce the high tensile residual stresses in the matrix. A computer program was written to minimize the residual stress in the matrix subject to the interface material properties. The decision variables are the interface modulus, thickness and thermal expansion coefficient. The properties of the interface material are optimized such that the average distortion energy in the matrix and the interface is minimized. As a result, the only active variable is the thermal expansion coefficient. The optimum modulus of the interface is always the minimum allowable value and the interface thickness is always the maximum allowable value, independent of the fiber/matrix system. The optimum interface thermal expansion coefficient is always between the values of the fiber and the matrix. Using this analysis, a survey of materials was conducted for use as fiber coatings in some specific composite systems.

  7. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  8. METal matrix composite ANalyzer (METCAN): Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript is intended to be a companion volume to the 'METCAN User's Manual' and the 'METAN Demonstration Manual.' The primary purpose of the manual is to give details pertaining to micromechanics and macromechanics equations of high temperature metal matrix composites that are programmed in the METCAN computer code. The subroutines which contain the programmed equations are also mentioned in order to facilitate any future changes or modifications that the user may intend to incorporate in the code. Assumptions and derivations leading to the micromechanics equations are briefly mentioned.

  9. Corrosion of Graphite Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Fig. 11 is the Pourbaix potentential-pH equilibrium diagram . As can be seen Zn(OH)2 will break down as the alkalinity of the solution becomes...04 - - -[ -1,4 1.4 -. t 123 4 , 8 0 I t 12 13 14 Fig. 11 The pH-potential equilibrium Pourbaix diagram for the system zinc-water, at 25C. [Ref.: M...AD-A234 322 (23 CORROSION OF GRAPHITE ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES Q APR 0 4199 1 by M.A. Buonanno, R.M. Latanision, L.H. Hihara and J.F. Chiang

  10. Metal matrix composites for aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of advanced aircraft propulsion systems have indicated that performance gains and operating costs are possible through the application of metal matrix composites. Compressor fan blades and turbine blades have been identified as components with high payoff potential as a result of these studies. This paper will present the current status of development of five candidate materials for such applications. Boron fiber/aluminum, boron fiber/titanium, and silicon carbide fiber/titanium composites are considered for lightweight compressor fan blades. Directionally solidified eutectic superalloy and tungsten wire/superalloy composites are considered for application to turbine blades for use temperatures to 1100 C (2000 F).

  11. Metal Matrix Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Jones, C. S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are attractive materials for aerospace applications because of their high specific strength, high specific stiffness, and lower thermal expansion coefficient. They are affordable since complex parts can be produced by low cost casting process. As a result there are many commercial and Department of Defense applications of MMCs today. This seminar will give an overview of MMCs and their state-of-the-art technology assessment. Topics to be covered are types of MMCs, fabrication methods, product forms, applications, and material selection issues for design and manufacture. Some examples of current and future aerospace applications will also be presented and discussed.

  12. Protective metal matrix coating with nanocomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    Experience of nanocrystalline chromium, titanium, silicon carbides and borides components application as nickel, zinc, chromium based electrodeposited composite coating is generalized. Electrodepositing conditions are determined. Structure and physicochemical properties of coatings, namely micro-hardness, adhesion to steel base, inherent stresses, heat resistance, corrosion currents, en-during quality, and their change during isothermal annealing are studied. As is shown, nanocomponents act as metal matrix modifier. Technological and economic feasibility study to evaluate expediency of replacing high priced nano-diamonds with nanocrystalline borides and carbides is undertaken.

  13. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Pindera, M-J.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model capable of predicting the thermomechanical response of continuously reinforced metal matrix composite laminates subjected to multiaxial loading was developed. A micromechanical model is used in conjunction with nonlinear lamination theory to determine inelastic laminae response. Matrix viscoplasticity, residual stresses, and damage to the fiber/matrix interfacial zone are explicitly included in the model. The representative cell of the micromechanical model is considered to be in a state of generalized plane strain, enabling a quasi two-dimensional analysis to be performed. Constant strain finite elements are formulated with elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. Interfacial debonding is incorporated into the model through interface elements based on the interfacial debonding theory originally presented by Needleman, and modified by Tvergaard. Nonlinear interfacial constitutive equations relate interfacial tractions to displacement discontinuities at the interface. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of an experimental program conducted on silicon carbide/titanium (SiC/Ti) unidirectional, (O4), and angle-ply, (+34)(sub s), tubular specimens. Multiaxial loading included increments of axial tension, compression, torque, and internal pressure. Loadings were chosen in an effort to distinguish inelastic deformation due to damage from matrix plasticity and separate time-dependent effects from time-independent effects. Results show that fiber/matrix debonding is nonuniform throughout the composite and is a major factor in the effective response. Also, significant creep behavior occurs at relatively low applied stress levels at room temperature.

  14. Ultra-Low Expansion Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    New York, 1970, p. 74. 47. Lement, B.S., Averbach, B.L. and Cohen, M., "The Dimensional Behavior of Invar," Transactions of the American Society of Metals , Vol...1971, p. 234. 52. Hunter, M.A., "Low Expansion Alloys," Metals Handbook, Vol. I, American Society of Metals , 1961, pp. 816-819. - 53. Zakharov, A.I

  15. Self-Healing Metals and Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2014-06-01

    Self-healing in inorganic materials is a relatively new area in materials science and engineering that draws inspiration from biological systems that can self-repair damage. This article reviews the preliminary attempts to impart self-healing behavior to metals. Several challenges yet exist in the development of metallic alloys that can self-repair damage, including surface bonding issues, such as liquid/solid contact angle (wetting) and oxidation, and practical issues, such as capillary pressure for delivery of a liquid metal to a damaged area or crack, and the overall mechanical properties of a composite system. Although the applied research approaches reviewed have obtained marginal success, the development of self-healing metallic systems has the potential to benefit a wide range of industrial applications and thus deserves greater investment in fundamental research.

  16. Development of Damped Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    DTIP FiLE COPY Applied Research Laboratory (Dto 00 CD Technical Report NO DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL...DEVELOPMENT OF DAMPED METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES FOR ADVANCED STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS by Clark A. Updike Ram B. Bhagat Technical Report No. TR 90-004 April 1990... Metal Matrix Composites for Advanced Structural Applications 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C.A. Updike, R. Bhagat 1 3a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE

  17. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  18. Intelligent processing for metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D. G.; Russell, E. S.; Wei, D. Y.; Pang, Y.

    Intelligent processing of materials (IPM) is a powerful processing concept which requires integration of process knowledge, analytical models, process sensors, and expert system based control technology. An IPM system to manufacture metal matrix composites (MMC) using inductively coupled plasma deposition is under development. Process knowledge is contained in a reduced-order process simulator, consisting of thermal, fluid flow, solid mechanics, and material kinetics models. A working deposit thermal model has been developed, while the solid mechanics and material kinetics models are under development. Future directions for IPM development are discussed, including integration with related MMC processing operations, and establishment of a control system in which expert system based control is used to replicate operator decision-making.

  19. Metal Matrix Composites for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kathleen R.; Wooten, John R.

    2000-01-01

    This document is from a presentation about the applications of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in rocket engines. Both NASA and the Air Force have goals which would reduce the costs and the weight of launching spacecraft. Charts show the engine weight distribution for both reuseable and expendable engine components. The presentation reviews the operating requirements for several components of the rocket engines. The next slide reviews the potential benefits of MMCs in general and in use as materials for Advanced Pressure Casting. The next slide reviews the drawbacks of MMCs. The reusable turbopump housing is selected to review for potential MMC application. The presentation reviews solutions for reusable turbopump materials, pointing out some of the issues. It also reviews the development of some of the materials.

  20. Arc spray fabrication of metal matrix composite monotape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, L. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Arc metal spraying is used to spray liquid metal onto an array of high strength fibers that were previously wound onto a large drum contained inside a controlled atmosphere chamber. This chamber is first evacuated to remove gaseous contaminants and then backfilled with a neutral gas up to atmospheric pressure. This process is used to produce a large size metal matrix composite monotape.

  1. Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans, Jim; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

  2. Biodegradable magnesium-hydroxyapatite metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank; Feyerabend, Frank; Maier, Petra; Fischer, Jens; Störmer, Michael; Blawert, Carsten; Dietzel, Wolfgang; Hort, Norbert

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that there is a high demand to design magnesium alloys with adjustable corrosion rates and suitable mechanical properties. An approach to this challenge might be the application of metal matrix composite (MMC) based on magnesium alloys. In this study, a MMC made of magnesium alloy AZ91D as a matrix and hydroxyapatite (HA) particles as reinforcements have been investigated in vitro for mechanical, corrosive and cytocompatible properties. The mechanical properties of the MMC-HA were adjustable by the choice of HA particle size and distribution. Corrosion tests revealed that HA particles stabilised the corrosion rate and exhibited more uniform corrosion attack in artificial sea water and cell solutions. The phase identification showed that all samples contained hcp-Mg, Mg(17)Al(12), and HA before and after immersion. After immersion in artificial sea water CaCO3 was found on MMC-HA surfaces, while no formation of CaCO3 was found after immersion in cell solutions with and without proteins. Co-cultivation of MMC-HA with human bone derived cells (HBDC), cells of an osteoblasts lineage (MG-63) and cells of a macrophage lineage (RAW264.7) revealed that RAW264.7, MG-63 and HBDC adhere, proliferate and survive on the corroding surfaces of MMC-HA. In summary, biodegradable MMC-HA are cytocompatible biomaterials with adjustable mechanical and corrosive properties.

  3. New extensions in the development of deformation processed metal-metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, T.W.; Gibson, E.D.

    1993-10-01

    Copper-Refractory metal composites have been under development for some time. The experience gained with these materials has been used as a starting point for investigations into other alloy systems. Deformation processing for the production of metal-metal matrix composites has been applied to titanium-yttrium, yttrium-niobium, copper-cobalt, aluminum-niobium and magnesium-refractory metal alloys. This process has been used to produce elevated strength material and also for the production of electrical capacitors.

  4. Experimental investigations on mechanical behavior of aluminium metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, A. M.; Kaleemulla, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    Today we are widely using aluminium based metal matrix composite for structural, aerospace, marine and automobile applications for its light weight, high strength and low production cost. The purpose of designing metal matrix composite is to add the desirable attributes of metals and ceramics to the base metal. In this study we developed aluminium metal matrix hybrid composite by reinforced Aluminium7075 alloy with silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide (alumina) by method of stir casting. This technique is less expensive and very effective. The Hardness test and Wear test were performed on the specimens which are prepared by stir casting techniques. The result reveals that the addition of silicon carbide and alumina particles in aluminium matrix improves the mechanical properties.

  5. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, James A.; Kattamis, Theodoulos; Chambers, Brent V.; Bond, Bruce E.; Varela, Raul H.

    1989-01-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  6. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  7. Solidification phenomena in metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cicco, Michael Peter

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticles in metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) were shown to act as catalysts for nucleation of solidification of the matrix alloy, as well as to alter the intermetallic phase formation. These phenomena were studied in zinc, aluminum, and magnesium alloys. In all alloys studied, a refinement of the microstructure was seen with the addition of the nanoparticles. Various types of nanoparticles were used and had varying degrees of refinement. In a zinc alloy, AC43A, SiC, TiC, and Al2O3 gamma nanoparticles were all found to refine the alloy. Thermal analysis of bulk samples showed the onset of solidification at reduced undercoolings, indicating nucleation catalysis. Nucleation of the primary phase was also observed by employing the droplet emulsion technique (DET). DET results showed that the secondary phase nucleation was also catalyzed by the nanoparticles. Exploiting the nucleation catalysis of the nanoparticles and the associated grain refinement, a semi-solid casting (SSC) process was demonstrated in AC43A + SiC nanocomposites. This novel process successfully incorporated the strength enhancement of MMNCs and the casting quality benefits of SSC. This process required no additional processing steps or material handling typical of existing SSC processes. The nucleation catalysis of the nanoparticles was sufficient to create semi-solid slurries appropriate for SSC. Nanoparticle induced nucleation catalysis was also examined in a common aluminum alloy, A356, using the DET. All nanoparticles catalyzed nucleation of the primary Al phase. However, undercoolings varied depending on the nanoparticle identity and average diameter. The variation in undercoolings generally agreed with a modified lattice disregistry theory and the free growth theory. For nanoparticles with a small lattice spacing mismatch with the Al phase, undercoolings approached the size dependent free growth limit. Binary alloys of magnesium and zinc showed significant strength and ductility

  8. Inelastic thermal buckling of metal matrix laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paley, M.; Aboudi, J. )

    1991-12-01

    A method is proposed for determining the critical temperature changes that cause inelastic thermal bifurcation buckling of metal matrix composite plates. The inelastic behavior of the metallic matrix is described by an elastic-viscoplastic temperature-dependent constitutive law; the fibers are allowed to be either elastic or elastic-viscoplastic material. The approach is based on the applied thermal load and the history-dependent instantaneous effective thermomechanical properties of metal matrix composites, which are established by a micromechanical analysis. The method is illustrated by the prediction of the inelastic thermal buckling of SiC/Ti metal matrix angle-ply laminated plates by employing the classical and first-order shear deformable laminated plate theories. 15 refs.

  9. Microstructure formation during solidification of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    The second symposium on solidification of metal matrix composites was organized at the TMS-ASM Materials Week in Chicago, in November 1992, to discuss the important issues in solidification of composites. In this collection of ten papers; several aspects of solidification of composites including nucleation, growth, heat flow, particle pushing, interface stability and segregation during solidification of metal matrix composites are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  10. Evaluation of waterjet-machined metal matrix composite tensile specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Smith, M.T.

    1986-04-01

    Four magnesium/boron carbide metal matrix composite (MMC) tensile specimens fabricated using the waterjet machining method were evaluated in order to determine the effects of the waterjet material removal process on the composite material surface structure and properties. These results were then compared with data from material conventionally machined. Results showed that while waterjet cutting produces a rough surface finish and does not meet specified dimensional tolerances, the technique appears to be suitable for sectioning and rough machining of metal matrix composites.

  11. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  12. Metal-Organic Frameworks to Metal/Metal Oxide Embedded Carbon Matrix: Synthesis, Characterization and Gas Sorption Properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiun-Jen; Chen, Ya-Ting; Raja, Duraisamy Senthil; Kang, Yu-Hao; Tseng, Pen-Chang; Lin, Chia-Her

    2015-08-19

    Three isostructural metal-organic frameworks, (MOFs), [Fe(OH)(1,4-NDC)] (1), [Al(OH)(1,4-NDC)] (2), and [In(OH)(1,4-NDC)] (3) have been synthesized hydrothermally by using 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylate (1,4-NDC) as a linker. The MOFs were characterized using various techniques and further used as precursor materials for the synthesis of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles inserted in a carbon matrix through a simple thermal conversion method. The newly synthesized carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and BET analysis. The results showed that the MOF-derived carbon composite materials maintained the morphology of the original MOF upon carbonization, and confirmed the insertion of metal/metal oxide particles in the carbon matrix.

  13. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Tim W.

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  14. Parametric Study Of A Ceramic-Fiber/Metal-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes computer-model parametric study of effects of degradation of constituent materials upon mechanical properties of ceramic-fiber/metal-matrix composite material. Contributes to understanding of weakening effects of large changes in temperature and mechanical stresses in fabrication and use. Concerned mainly with influences of in situ fiber and matrix properties upon behavior of composite. Particular attention given to influence of in situ matrix strength and influence of interphase degradation.

  15. Anisotropic Damage Mechanics Modeling in Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-15

    conducted on a titanium aluminide SiC-reinforced metal matrix composite. Center-cracked plates with laminate layups of (0/90) and (±45). were tested...Kattan, P. I., "Finite Strain Plasticity and Damage in Constitutive Modeling of Metals with Spin Tensors," Applied Mechanics Reviews, Vol. 45, No. 3...34Contractors Meeting on Mechanics of Materials," Dayton, Ohio, October 1991. Voyiadjis, G. Z., and Kattan, P. I., "Finite Strain Plasticity and Damage in

  16. Burn-Resistant, Strong Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Tayal, Moti J.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic particulate fillers increase the specific strengths and burn resistances of metals: This is the conclusion drawn by researchers at Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility. The researchers had theorized that the inclusion of ceramic particles in metal tools and other metal objects used in oxygen-rich atmospheres (e.g., in hyperbaric chambers and spacecraft) could reduce the risk of fire and the consequent injury or death of personnel. In such atmospheres, metal objects act as ignition sources, creating fire hazards. However, not all metals are equally hazardous: some are more burn-resistant than others are. It was the researchers purpose to identify a burn-resistant, high-specific-strength ceramic-particle/metal-matrix composite that could be used in oxygen-rich atmospheres. The researchers studied several metals. Nickel and cobalt alloys exhibit high burn resistances and are dense. The researchers next turned to ceramics, which they knew do not act as ignition sources. Unlike metals, ceramics are naturally burn-resistant. Unfortunately, they also exhibit low fracture toughnesses.

  17. Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) code: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M. R.; Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The User's Manual for the Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) program is presented. The code is capable of tailoring the fabrication process, constituent characteristics, and laminate parameters (individually or concurrently) for a wide variety of metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, to improve the performance and identify trends or behavior of MMC's under different thermo-mechanical loading conditions. This document is meant to serve as a guide in the use of the MMLT code. Detailed explanations of the composite mechanics and tailoring analysis are beyond the scope of this document, and may be found in the references. MMLT was developed by the Structural Mechanics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  18. Metal matrix composites from dynamic consolidation of powder mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.; Rabin, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    Mixtures of 2124 aluminum alloy and silicon carbide powders were dynamically consolidated using explosives. This process results in a fully dense product and has the potential of becoming an economical method of producing metal matrix composites, especially where undesirable reactions would normally occur between the metal and ceramic reinforcement. With the correct processing parameters, the aluminum powder plastically deforms to form a continuous matrix with minimum interaction with SiC. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite are presented. Numerical simulations were performed to better understand the consolidation process and determine test parameters difficult to obtain by experimentation. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Properties of particle phases for metal-matrix-composite design.

    PubMed

    Baron, C; Springer, H

    2017-06-01

    Successful metallurgical design of metal-matrix-composites relies on the knowledge of the intrinsic property profiles of the metal matrix and especially the compounds employed for particles, whiskers or fibres. In this work we compiled the key properties melting point, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young׳s modulus, density, hardness, Poisson׳s ratio and structure/space group from the widespread literature data for the most relevant compound types, i.e. borides, carbo-borides, carbides, oxides, nitrides and intermetallic phases.

  20. Surface functionalization of metal organic frameworks for mixed matrix membranes

    DOEpatents

    Albenze, Erik; Lartey, Michael; Li, Tao; Luebke, David R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Venna, Surendar R.

    2017-03-21

    Mixed Matrix Membrane (MMM) are composite membranes for gas separation and comprising a quantity of inorganic filler particles, in particular metal organic framework (MOF), dispersed throughout a polymer matrix comprising one or more polymers. This disclosure is directed to MOF functionalized through addition of a pendant functional group to the MOF, in order to improve interaction with a surrounding polymer matrix in a MMM. The improved interaction aids in avoiding defects in the MMM due to incompatible interfaces between the polymer matrix and the MOF particle, in turn increasing the mechanical and gas separation properties of the MMM. The disclosure is also directed to a MMM incorporating the surface functionalized MOF.

  1. Considerations concerning fatigue life of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, V. M.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1993-01-01

    Since metal matrix composites (MMC) are composed from two very distinct materials each having their own physical and mechanical properties, it is feasible that the fatigue resistance depends on the strength of the weaker constituent. Based on this assumption, isothermal fatigue lives of several MMC's were analyzed utilizing a fatigue life diagram approach. For each MMC, the fatigue life diagram was quantified using the mechanical properties of its constituents. The fatigue life regions controlled by fiber fracture and matrix were also quantitatively defined.

  2. Thermally-driven microfracture in high temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Microfracture (fiber/matrix fracture, interphase debonding and interply delamination) in high temperature metal matrix composites (HTMMC), subjected to thermal loading, is computationally simulated. Both unidirectional and crossply SiC/Ti15 composites are evaluated for microfracture driven by thermal loads, using multicell finite element models. Results indicate that under thermal loads alone, microfracture propagation is not as sensitive as it is under mechanical loads.

  3. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized is the progress achieved during the period September 16, 1987 to August 15, l988 on NASA Grant NAG1-724, Fracture Criteria for Discontinuously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites. Appended are copies of three manuscripts prepared under NASA funding during the performance period.

  4. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  5. Metal matrix composites: History, status, factors and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyriac, Ajith James

    The history, status, and future of metal matrix composites are presented by evaluating the progression of available literature through time. The trends that existed and issues that still prevail are discussed and a prediction of the future for MMCs is presented. The factors that govern the performance of metal matrix composites are also discussed. In many developed countries and in several developing countries there exists continued interest in MMCs. Researchers tried numerous combinations of matrices and reinforcements since work strictly on MMCs began in the 1950s. This led to developments for aerospace and defense applications, but resultant commercial applications were limited. The introduction of ceramic whiskers as reinforcement and the development of 'in-situ' eutectics in the 1960s aided high temperature applications in aircraft engines. In the late 1970s the automobile industries started to take MMCs seriously. In the last 20 years, MMCs evolved from laboratories to a class of materials with numerous applications and commercial markets. After the collapse of the Berlin Wall, prevailing order in the world changed drastically. This effect was evident in the progression of metal matrix composites. The internet connected the world like never before and tremendous information was available for researchers around the world. Globalization and the internet resulted in the transformation of the world to a more level playing field, and this effect is evident in the nature and source of research on metal matrix composites happening around the world.

  6. Joining and fabrication of metal-matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Wiant, H. R.; Bales, T. T.

    1975-01-01

    Manufacturing technology associated with developing fabrication processes to incorporate metal-matrix composites into flight hardware is studied. The joining of composite to itself and to titanium by innovative brazing, diffusion bonding, and adhesive bonding is examined. The effects of the fabrication processes on the material properties and their influence on the design of YF-12 wing panels are discussed.

  7. Time-dependent deformation of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element program called VISCOPAC was developed and used to conduct a micromechanics analysis of titanium metal matrix composites. The VISCOPAC program uses a modified Eisenberg-Yen thermo-viscoplastic constitutive model to predict matrix behavior under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The analysis incorporated temperature-dependent elastic properties in the fiber and temperature-dependent viscoplastic properties in the matrix. The material model was described and the necessary material constants were determined experimentally. Fiber-matrix interfacial behavior was analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model. The thermal residual stresses due to the fabrication cycle were predicted with a failed interface, The failed interface resulted in lower thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber. Stresses due to a uniform transverse load were calculated at two temperatures, room temperature and an elevated temperature of 650 C. At both temperatures, a large stress concentration was calculated when the interface had failed. The results indicate the importance of accuracy accounting for fiber-matrix interface failure and the need for a micromechanics-based analytical technique to understand and predict the behavior of titanium metal matrix composites.

  8. Technology Base Enhancement Program. Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-30

    DWA, Advanced Composites Materials Corporation (ACMC), Textron, 3M, Alcoa, Lanxide, and Ceramics Kingston Ceramiques (CKC). Table EX-l presents mnore...100% T&E ff43-4ZO~O Table EX-1. Domestic MMC Supply Capabilities -iv- I The MMC marketplace can be broken down into two distinct areas: continuously...between continuous and discontinuous MMCs are found in Table EX-2. - Property improvements Over Matrix by ɚX = Usualy Not or Neo Net Shape = improved

  9. Plasma Joining of Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    Al4C3 . 4~ 3* The reaction under consideration is: 3 SiC (s) + 4 Al (1) AI4 C3 (s) + 3 Si (dissolved in liquid Al) (1) The equilibrium activity of Si...matrix to form Al4C3 . Loss of SiC by such reaction is about 10% at 2300 K for in-plasma residence time of 10 second, if the rate limiting factor is the

  10. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of metal matrix composites is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in a three by three unit cell array of a SiC/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five fiber shapes that include a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of stresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis using the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes. In general, fiber dominated properties are not affected by fiber geometry and matrix dominated properties are only moderately affected.

  11. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of metal matrix composites is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in a three by three unit cell array of a SiC/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five fiber shapes that include a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of stresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis using the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes. In general, fiber dominated properties are not affected by fiber geometry and matrix dominated properties are only moderately affected.

  12. Thermo-mechanical response predictions for metal matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, J.; Hidde, J. S.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical micromechanical model is employed for prediction of the stress-strain response of metal matrix composite laminates subjected to thermomechanical loading. The predicted behavior of laminates is based upon knowledge of the thermomechanical response of the transversely isotropic, elastic fibers and the elastic-viscoplastic, work-hardening matrix. The method is applied to study the behavior of silicon carbide/titanium metal matrix composite laminates. The response of laminates is compared with that of unidirectional lamina. The results demonstrate the effect of cooling from a stress-free temperature and the mismatch of thermal and mechanical properties of the constituent phases on the laminate's subsequent mechanical response. Typical results are presented for a variety of laminates subjected to monotonic tension, monotonic shear and cyclic tensile/compressive loadings.

  13. Shape effects on nanoparticle engulfment for metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsoy, Istemi Baris; Li, Gang; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining a uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles and their structural integrity in metal matrix is a prominent obstacle to use the intrinsic properties of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) to the full extent. In this study, a potential way to overcome the scientific and technical barrier of nanoparticle dispersion in high performance lightweight MMNCs is presented. The goal is to identify the shape and size of Al2O3 nanoparticle for its optimal dispersion in Al matrix. Critical velocity of solidification is calculated numerically for spherical, cylindrical and disk-shaped nanoparticles using an analytical model which incorporates drag force, intermolecular force and inertia effect. The results show that it is possible to reduce the critical solidification velocity for nanoparticle capture by 6 times with proper shape modification.

  14. Metal matrix composite fuel for space radioisotope energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. R.; Ning, H.; Reece, M. J.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Stephenson, K.

    2013-02-01

    Radioisotope fuels produce heat that can be used for spacecraft thermal control or converted to electricity. They must retain integrity in the event of destruction or atmospheric entry of the parent spacecraft. Addition of a metal matrix to the actinide oxide could yield a more robust fuel form. Neodymium (III) oxide (Nd2O3) - niobium metal matrix composites were produced using Spark Plasma Sintering; Nd2O3 is a non-radioactive surrogate for americium (III) oxide (Am2O3). Two compositions, 70 and 50 wt% Nd2O3, were mechanically tested under equibiaxial (ring-on-ring) flexure according to ASTM C1499. The addition of the niobium matrix increased the mean flexural strength by a factor of about 2 compared to typical ceramic nuclear fuels, and significantly increased the Weibull modulus to over 20. These improved mechanical properties could result in reduced fuel dispersion in severe accidents and improved safety of space radioisotope power systems.

  15. Comparison Of Models Of Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents comparative review of four mathematical models of micromechanical behaviors of fiber/metal-matrix composite materials. Models differ in various details, all based on properties of fiber and matrix constituent materials, all involve square arrays of fibers continuous and parallel and all assume complete bonding between constituents. Computer programs implementing models used to predict properties and stress-vs.-strain behaviors of unidirectional- and cross-ply laminated composites made of boron fibers in aluminum matrices and silicon carbide fibers in titanium matrices. Stresses in fiber and matrix constituent materials also predicted.

  16. Corrosion Resistance of Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    fibers was found to reduce the corrosion rate by a factor of twenty in NaC1 solutions. Al4C3 hydrolysis was not observed on the time scale of the...on the anodic polarization behavior of the G/Al MMCs with A14C3 contents measured by gas chromatography. 2.1.1 Al4C3 at the Fiber-Matrix Interface The...and Al4C3 content were not as significant in affecting the passive current density as was the type of graphite fiber used in processing the

  17. Isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue behavior of a metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Mackay, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue resistance of a metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn (Ti-15-3) matrix reinforced by 33 vol pct continuous SiC fibers was investigated. The fibers were nominally oriented parallel to the specimen axis. Isothermal fatigue tests were performed in air at 300 and 550 C. The MMC had good isothermal fatigue resistance at low cyclic stress, with fatigue cracks initiating from fiber-matrix interfaces and foil laminations. At high cyclic stresses, stress relaxation in the matrix reduced isothermal composite fatigue resistance at 550 C. Nonisothermal fatigue loading substantially degraded composite fatigue resistnce. This degradation was produced by a thermomechanical fatigue damage mechanism associated with the fiber-matrix interfaces.

  18. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  19. Metallurgical Characterization of the Interfaces and the Damping Mechanisms in Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    in Metal Matrix Composites Contract No. N00014-84-C-0413 Submitted to Dr. Steve G. Fishman Office of Naval Research Mohan S. Misra Program Manager...Mechanisms in Metal Matrix Composites." 2.0 INTRODUCTION Metal matrix composites are candidate structural materials for space applications. Large structures...damping capacity of the structural material is a significant parameter. If metal matrix composites are to be used for space structures; their

  20. Casting of weldable graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites with built-in metallic inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Kashalikar, Uday; Majkowski, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    Technology innovations directed at the advanced development of a potentially low cost and weldable graphite/magnesium metal matrix composites (MMC) through near net shape pressure casting are described. These MMC components uniquely have built-in metallic inserts to provide an innovative approach for joining or connecting other MMC components through conventional joining techniques such as welding, brazing, mechanical fasteners, etc. Moreover, the metallic inserts trapped within the MMC components can be made to transfer the imposed load efficiently to the continuous graphite fiber reinforcement thus producing stronger, stiffer, and more reliable MMC components. The use of low pressure near net shape casting is economical compared to other MMC fabrication processes. These castable and potentially weldable MMC components can provide great payoffs in terms of high strength, high stiffness, low thermal expansion, lightweight, and easily joinable MMC components for several future NASA space structural, industrial, and commercial applications.

  1. Thermal expansion behavior of LDEF metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, T. D.; Steckel, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the thermal expansion stability of metal matrix composites (graphite/Al and graphite/Mg) will be presented. A sample from each category of metal matrix composites mounted on the leading and trailing edge was chosen for analysis of the temperature-time-thermal strain histories. Typical thermal expansion curves over the same range of temperature were selected at the beginning, mid, and end of the recording duration. The thermal expansion of selected post-flight LDEF samples were measured over the same range of temperature in the laboratory using a Michelson laser interferometer. The thermal strains were monitored concurrently with a laser interferometer and a mounted strain gage.

  2. Method of thermal strain hysteresis reduction in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dries, Gregory A. (Inventor); Tompkins, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for treating graphite reinforced metal matrix composites so as to eliminate thermal strain hysteresis and impart dimensional stability through a large thermal cycle. The method is applied to the composite post fabrication and is effective on metal matrix materials using graphite fibers manufactured by both the hot roll bonding and diffusion bonding techniques. The method consists of first heat treating the material in a solution anneal oven followed by a water quench and then subjecting the material to a cryogenic treatment in a cryogenic oven. This heat treatment and cryogenic stress reflief is effective in imparting a dimensional stability and reduced thermal strain hysteresis in the material over a -250.degree. F. to +250.degree. F. thermal cycle.

  3. Interface Characteristics and the Mechanical Properties of Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-28

    oxide were identified to most probably be y - A120 3 or the MgAI20 4 type spinel. Details are given in Appendix K. Summary -. The research reported ...Zecas aT Austit. INTERFACE CHARACTERISTICS AND THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES UTCMSE-87-3 Office of Naval Research Technical Report ...THIS PAGE (When Date Entered) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE I RE COSPLETIOR~BEFORE MPLETING FORM VI REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO., 3

  4. Interface Character of Aluminum-Graphite Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-23

    dt 01 , 1 hdf f - -1, -nl~ he results of the research described in this annual report can be summarized in terms of the experimental approaches used...Aluminum-Graphite Metal Matrix Composites The results of the research described in this annual report can be summarized in terms of the experimental... terms of the chemical state at the interface. 4. Transmission eloctron microscopy (TEM) measurement 2 of the phases present in the interface. 5. The

  5. Tensile and compressive test results for metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results of the mechanical behavior of two metal matrix composite systems at room temperature are presented. Ultimate stress, ultimate strain, Poisson's ratio, and initial Young's Modulus are documented for BORSIC/Aluminum in uniaxial tension and Boron/Aluminum in uniaxial tension and compression. Poisson's ratio is used for nonlinear stress-strain behavior. A comparison of compression results for B/Al as obtained from sandwich beam compression specimens and IITRI coupon compression specimens is presented.

  6. Finite element analysis of metal matrix composite blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isai Thamizh, R.; Velmurugan, R.; Jayagandhan, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, compressor rotor blade of a gas turbine engine has been analyzed for stress, maximum displacement and natural frequency using ANSYS software for determining its failure strength by simulating the actual service conditions. Static stress analysis and modal analysis have been carried out using Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which is currently used in compressor blade. The results are compared with those obtained using Ti matrix composites reinforced with SiC. The advantages of using metal matrix composites in the gas turbine compressor blades are investigated. From the analyses carried out, it seems that composite rotor blades have lesser mass, lesser tip displacement and lower maximum stress values.

  7. Acousto-ultrasonic decay in metal matrix composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-08-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) decay rates (UD) were measured in metal matrix composite (MMC) panels. The MMC panels had fiber architectures and cross-sectional thicknesses corresponding to those designed for aerospace turbine engine structures. The wavelength-to-thickness ratio produced by the combination of experimental frequency setting conditions and specimen geometry was found to be a key parameter for identifying optimum conditions for UD measurements. The ratio was shown to be a useful rule of thumb when applied to ceramic matrix composites (CMC)s and monolithic thermo-plastics.

  8. Acousto-ultrasonic decay in metal matrix composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) decay rates (UD) were measured in metal matrix composite (MMC) panels. The MMC panels had fiber architectures and cross-sectional thicknesses corresponding to those designed for aerospace turbine engine structures. The wavelength-to-thickness ratio produced by the combination of experimental frequency setting conditions and specimen geometry was found to be a key parameter for identifying optimum conditions for UD measurements. The ratio was shown to be a useful rule of thumb when applied to ceramic matrix composites (CMC)s and monolithic thermo-plastics.

  9. Simulation of Fatigue Behavior of High Temperature Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Mike T.; Singhal, Suren N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1996-01-01

    A generalized relatively new approach is described for the computational simulation of fatigue behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMCs). This theory is embedded in a specialty-purpose computer code. The effectiveness of the computer code to predict the fatigue behavior of HT-MMCs is demonstrated by applying it to a silicon-fiber/titanium-matrix HT-MMC. Comparative results are shown for mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical (in-phase and out-of-phase) fatigue, as well as the effects of oxidizing environments on fatigue life. These results show that the new approach reproduces available experimental data remarkably well.

  10. High temperature metal matrix composites for future aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    Research was conducted on metal matrix composites and intermetallic matrix composites to understand their behavior under anticipated future operating conditions envisioned for aerospace power and propulsion systems of the 21st century. Extremes in environmental conditions, high temperature, long operating lives, and cyclic conditions dictate that the test evaluations not only include laboratory testing, but simulated flight conditions. The various processing techniques employed to fabricate composites are discussed along with the basic research underway to understand the behavior of high temperature composites, and the relationship of this research to future aerospace systems.

  11. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in the insulating matrix. These nanocomposites have been characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as a function of the implantation dose. The experimental results are compared with a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport through the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by the metallic nanoparticles. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. We conclude in that the conductivity process is due only to percolation (when the conducting elements are in geometric contact) and that the contribution from tunneling conduction is negligible.

  12. Thermomechanical fatigue cracking in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G.; McMeeking, R. M.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for thermomechanical fatigue cracking in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites. Interfacial debonding is assumed to occur readily, allowing fibers to slide relative to the matrix resisted by a uniform shear stress. The fibers therefore bridge any matrix crack which develops. The crack bridging traction law is obtained, including the effect of thermal expansion mismatch between the fiber and the matrix and a temperature dependence of the frictional shear stress. Any combination of thermal and mechanical cycling is considered as long as the slip zone along the fiber increases in length monotonically during each increment of cycling. However, for clarity, the results are presented in terms of in-phase and out-of-phase cycling of the thermal and mechanical loads at the same frequency. For each case, the stress distributions in the bridging zone as well as the stress intensity factors at the crack tip are computed for relevant regimes of the thermal and mechanical loading conditions. Predictions are made of the matrix fatigue crack growth under combined thermal and mechanical loading conditions. It is found that when the thermal expansion coefficient of the fiber is less than that of the matrix, a significant increase in the crack growth rate results in out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue. On the other hand, there is decreased tendency for fibers to fail in this case. For in-phase thermomechanical fatigue, the crack growth rate is reduced but the stress in the fiber is larger than that due to mechanical loading alone, resulting in an increased tendency for fiber failure. The implications for life prediction for fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites are discussed.

  13. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Fratoni, Massimiliano; Terrani, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be

  14. Metal Ion Dependence of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Makaroff, Katherine; Paz, Nicholas; Aitha, Mahesh; Crowder, Michael W; Tierney, David L

    2015-06-16

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays crucial roles in disease-related physiologies and pathological processes in the human body. We report here solution studies of MMP-1, including characterization of a series of mutants designed to bind metal in either the catalytic site or the structural site (but not both). Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy of the mutants demonstrate the importance of the structural Zn(II) in maintaining both secondary and tertiary structure, while UV-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure show its presence influences the catalytic metal ion's coordination number. The mutants allow us to demonstrate convincingly the preparation of a mixed-metal analogue, Co(C)Zn(S)-MMP-1, with Zn(II) in the structural site and Co(II) in the catalytic site. Stopped-flow fluorescence of the native form, Zn(C)Zn(S)-MMP-1, and the mixed-metal Co(C)Zn(S)-MMP-1 analogue shows that the internal fluorescence of a nearby Trp residue is modulated with catalysis and can be used to monitor reactivity under a number of conditions, opening the door to substrate profiling.

  15. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  16. Dry sliding wear of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, Mohammed; Khan, A. R. Anwar

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an ever-increasing demand for enhancing mechanical properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMCs), which are finding wide applications in the field of aerospace, automobile, defence etc,. Among all available aluminium alloys, Al6061 is extensively used owing to its excellent wear resistance and ease of processing. Newer techniques of improving the hardness and wear resistance of Al6061 by dispersing an appropriate mixture of hard ceramic powder and whiskers in the aluminium alloy are gaining popularity. The conventional aluminium based composites possess only one type of reinforcements. Addition of hard reinforcements such as silicon carbide, alumina, titanium carbide, improves hardness, strength and wear resistance of the composites. However, these composites possessing hard reinforcement do posses several problems during their machining operation. AMCs reinforced with particles of Gr have been reported to be possessing better wear characteristics owing to the reduced wear because of formation of a thin layer of Gr particles, which prevents metal to metal contact of the sliding surfaces. Further, heat treatment has a profound influence on mechanical properties of heat treatable aluminium alloys and its composites. For a solutionising temperature of 5500C, solutionising duration of 1hr, ageing temperature of 1750C, quenching media and ageing duration significantly alters mechanical properties of both aluminium alloy and its composites. In the light of the above, the present paper aims at developing aluminium based hybrid metal matrix composites containing both silicon carbide and graphite and characterize their mechanical properties by subjecting it to heat treatment. Results indicate that increase of graphite content increases wear resistance of hybrid composites reinforced with constant SiC reinforcement. Further heat treatment has a profound influence on the wear resistance of the matrix alloy as well as its hybrid composites

  17. Corrosion behavior of a particulate metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.; Brunella, M.F.; Candiani, S.

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of a particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composite (MMC) with an Al 6061-T6 (UNS A96061, Al-Mg-Si) matrix and 10 vol% alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) particles was studied. The material was tested in different extrusion and forging conditions. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out in aerated and deaerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions with concentrations from 0.06 N up to saturation to study pitting corrosion initiation. Three-month immersion tests were performed in aerated solutions. Results showed pitting corrosion initiated in aerated solutions, even for the lower chloride concentration. No significant influence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles on corrosion susceptibility of the matrix was observed. However, corrosion attacks occurred preferentially in the vicinity of the reinforcing particles. Extrusion or forging treatment did not affect corrosion behavior of the composite material significantly.

  18. Diffusion analysis for two-phase metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Diffusion controlled filament matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite, where the filaments and matrix comprise a two phase binary alloy system, was mathematically modeled. The problem of a diffusion controlled, two phase moving interface by means of a one dimensional, variable grid, finite difference technique was analyzed. Concentration dependent diffusion coefficients and equilibrium solubility limits were used, and the change in filament diameter and compositional changes in the matrix were calculated as a function of exposure time at elevated temperatures. With the tungsten nickel (W-Ni) system as a model composite system, unidirectional composites containing from 0.06 to 0.44 initial filament volume fraction were modeled. Compositional changes in the matrix were calculated by superposition of the contributions from neighboring filaments. Alternate methods for determining compositional changes between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were also considered. The results show the relative importance of filament volume fraction, filament diameter, exposure temperature, and exposure time as they affect the rate and extent of filament matrix interaction.

  19. Corrosion protection of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.J.; Mansfeld, F.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion protection of aluminum metal-matrix composites (MMC) by anodizing treatments was investigated. Electrochemical behavior of MMC without protection also was investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to characterize the properties of protective surface layers. Materials studied were Al 6061/SiC, alloy A356/SiC, Al 2009/SiC, Al 2014/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with various reinforcement concentrations. The MMC had similar corrosion (E{sub corr}) and pitting (E{sub pit}) potentials as the matrix alloy. The cathodic current density for oxygen reduction in 0.5% N sodium chloride increased for Al 6061/SiC MMC with reinforcement concentration, which was attributed to electrochemically active interfaces between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. Anodizing and hot-water sealing were less effective for MMC than for the matrix aluminum alloys. The reinforcement particles produced a more porous structure of the anodized layer for MMC. Improved results were noted for dichromate sealing, where chromium (Cr{sup 6+}) in the pores of the outer oxide acted as an inhibitor. The effectiveness of corrosion protection methods decreased with increasing reinforcement concentration and was a function of the matrix alloy but not of the reinforcement material. The observed reduction in corrosion protection was believed to result from corrosion-susceptible interfaces formed between the reinforcement particles and the matrix.

  20. Fatigue damage criteria - Matrix, fibers and interfaces of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are projected for use in high temperature, stiffness critical parts that will be subjected to cyclic loadings. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four catagories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples. The emphasis is on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  1. Numerical analysis on thermal drilling of aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Maheshwaran, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    The work-material deformation is very large and both the tool and workpiece temperatures are high in thermal drilling. Modeling is a necessary tool to understand the material flow, temperatures, stress, and strains, which are difficult to measure experimentally during thermal drilling. The numerical analysis of thermal drilling process of aluminum metal matrix composite has been done in the present work. In this analysis the heat flux of different stages is calculated. The calculated heat flux is applied on the surface of work piece and thermal distribution is predicted in different stages during the thermal drilling process.

  2. Damage tolerance in discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, H.J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-11-01

    Properly designed discontinuously-reinforced MMCs have been projected by linear-elastic fracture mechanics to be competitive, on both cost and performance bases, with cross-plied graphite-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and continuously-reinforced MMCs. With respect to the latter, discontinuously-reinforced MMCs achieve considerable advantages in virtue of their lower-cost reinforcements and their fabricability by standard metal-working practices. Discontinuously reinforced MMC billets can also be produced through powder-blending and direct-spraying techniques. SiC short fibers, whiskers, and particulates are typical of the discontinuous reinforcements used in 2124 and 6061 aluminum matrices. 18 references.

  3. Emerging Applications of Ceramic and Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Divya; Ramolina, Dheeyana; Sandou, Sherleena

    2012-07-01

    Almost 500 papers were presented during the 43 sessions of the 27th Annual Cocoa Beach Conference & Exposition on Advanced Ceramics & Composites, which was organized by the Engineering Ceramics Division of the American Ceramic Society and sponsored by several federal agencies: NASA Glenn Research Center, the Army Research Office, the Department of Energy, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Many of these papers focused on composites, both ceramic and metal matrix, and discussed mechanical behavior, design, fibers/interfaces, processing, and applications. Potential applications under development include components for armor, nuclear energy, and automobiles. A few of these applications have reached commercialization.

  4. Pressurized Shell Molds For Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday K.; Lusignea, Richard N.; Cornie, James

    1993-01-01

    Balanced-pressure molds used to make parts in complex shapes from fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite materials. In single step, molding process makes parts in nearly final shapes; only minor finishing needed. Because molding pressure same on inside and outside, mold does not have to be especially strong and can be made of cheap, nonstructural material like glass or graphite. Fibers do not have to be cut to conform to molds. Method produces parts with high content of continuous fibers. Parts stiff but light in weight, and coefficients of thermal expansion adjusted. Parts resistant to mechanical and thermal fatigue superior to similar parts made by prior fabrication methods.

  5. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Computational procedures were developed for simulating the thermal and mechanical behaviors of high-temperature metal-matrix composites (HT-MMCs) in the following application areas: (1) the behavior of HT-MMCs from micromechanics to laminate, (2) the structural response of HT-MMCs' simple and complex structural components, (3) the HT-MMC microfracture, and (4) the tailoring of HT-MMCs' behavior for optimum specific performances. Representative results are presented from each area of application, illustrating the effectiveness of the computational procedures.

  6. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composite (HT MMC) in the following four broad areas: (1) behavior of HT MMC from micromechanics to laminate; (2) HT MMC structural response for simple and complex structural components; (3) HT MMC microfracture; and (4) tailoring of HT MMC behavior for optimum specific performance. Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the computational simulation procedures. Relevant reports are referenced for extended discussion regarding the specific area.

  7. Pressurized Shell Molds For Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday K.; Lusignea, Richard N.; Cornie, James

    1993-01-01

    Balanced-pressure molds used to make parts in complex shapes from fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite materials. In single step, molding process makes parts in nearly final shapes; only minor finishing needed. Because molding pressure same on inside and outside, mold does not have to be especially strong and can be made of cheap, nonstructural material like glass or graphite. Fibers do not have to be cut to conform to molds. Method produces parts with high content of continuous fibers. Parts stiff but light in weight, and coefficients of thermal expansion adjusted. Parts resistant to mechanical and thermal fatigue superior to similar parts made by prior fabrication methods.

  8. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  9. Thermal Fatigue Limitations of Continuous Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Arya, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    The potential structural benefits of unidirectional, continuous-fiber, metal matrix composites (MMC's) are legendary. When compared to their monolithic matrices, MMC's possess superior properties such as higher stiffness and tensile strength, and lower coefficient of thermal expansion in the direction of the reinforcing fibers. As an added bonus, the MMC density will be lower if the fibers are less dense than the matrix matErial they replace. The potential has been demonstrated unequivocally both analytically and experimentally, especially at ambient temperatures. Successes prompted heavily-funded National efforts within the United States (USAF and NASA) and elsewhere to extend the promise of MMC's into the temperature regime wherein creep, stress relaxation, oxidation, and thermal fatigue damage mechanisms lurk. This is the very regime for which alternative high-temperature materials are becoming mandatory, since further enhancement of state- of-the-art monolithic alloys is rapidly approaching a point of diminishing returns.

  10. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  11. Modeling of crack bridging in a unidirectional metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1992-01-01

    The effective fatigue crack driving force and crack opening profiles were determined analytically for fatigue tested unidirectional composite specimens exhibiting fiber bridging. The crack closure pressure due to bridging was modeled using two approaches: the fiber pressure model and the shear lag model. For both closure models, the Bueckner weight function method and the finite element method were used to calculate crack opening displacements and the crack driving force. The predicted near crack tip opening profile agreed well with the experimentally measured profiles for single edge notch SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite specimens. The numerically determined effective crack driving force, Delta K(eff), was calculated using both models to correlate the measure crack growth rate in the composite. The calculated Delta K(eff) from both models accounted for the crack bridging by showing a good agreement between the measured fatigue crack growth rates of the bridged composite and that of unreinforced, unbridged titanium matrix alloy specimens.

  12. In situ characterization of metal matrix composites processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, Gareth Torrey

    1999-11-01

    The high temperatures and pressures used for the processing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) can result in the bending and fracture of fibers, and the development of residual stresses in both the fibers and surrounding metal matrix. These phenomena adversely affect the properties of MMC's. Methods for their nondestructive measurement are therefore needed both to better understand the process induced damage mechanisms and to ensure that composites are not placed into service with unacceptable fiber damage and/or residual stresses. A fiber optic luminescence approach based upon the frequency shift of the R lines emission of doped sapphire fibers was used to determine the residual stresses in both Ti/Al2O3 and Ti/SiC composites. To investigate the significance of the creep relaxation effects, residual stresses were measured for sapphire fibers embedded in Ti-6Al-4V plates that had been cooled at different rates. The compressive stresses in the fiber are consistent with the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of sapphire being less than Ti-6Al-4V. A multiple concentric cylinder model was used to predict the residual stress state. The model results confirmed that the creep relaxation was induced responsible for the lower stress in the slowly cooled samples and suggest that cooling rate is important to control during processing. To test the notion of the use of a sapphire fiber as a 'witness to' the stress state in an MMC, a sapphire fiber was inserted into a Ti-6Al-4V coated SIGMA (SiC) fiber bundle prior to its consolidation. A generalized method of cells (GMC) model was used to develop a relationship between the stress state within the sapphire witness fiber and that of the surrounding Ti-6Al-4V matrix and the SIGMA fibers. Fiber fracture during the hot isostatic processing (HIP) consolidation of titanium matrix composite was measured using an in-situ acoustic emission approach. For process cycles in which pressure was applied prior to

  13. Condensation Dynamics on Mimicked Metal Matrix Hydrophobic Nanoparticle-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Viraj; Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Use of hydrophobic surfaces promotes condensation in the dropwise mode, which is significantly more efficient than the common filmwise mode. However, limited longevity of hydrophobic surface modifiers has prevented their wide spread use in industry. Recently, metal matrix composites (MMCs) having microscale hydrophobic heterogeneities dispersed in hydrophilic metal matrix have been proposed as durable and self-healing alternative to hydrophobic surface coatings interacting with deposited water droplets. While dispersion of hydrophobic microparticles in MMC is likely to lead to surface flooding during condensation, the effect of dispersion of hydrophobic nanoparticles (HNPs) with size comparable to water nuclei critical radii and spacing is not obvious. To this end, we fabricated highly ordered arrays of Teflon nanospheres on silicon substrates that mimic the top surface of the MMCs with dispersed HNPs. We used light and electron microscopy to observe breath figures resulting from condensation on these surfaces at varied degrees of subcooling. Here, we discuss the relation between the droplet size distribution, Teflon nanosphere diameter and spacing, and condensation mode. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  14. Metal-Matrix Composites Prepared by Paper-Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Claudia; Aneziris, Christos G.; Pranke, Katja

    2016-01-01

    In this work, metal-matrix composites were prepared via paper-manufacturing technology using metastable austenitic steel powder of type 16-7-3 (Cr-Mn-Ni in wt pct) and magnesia partially stabilized zirconia reinforcing particles. The influence of the process parameters on the paper web formation and the resulting properties of the MMCs were studied and solids retention of >90 wt pct was achieved. During filtration of the aqueous fiber-filler suspension, the steel particles were incorporated in the fiber network, and steel clusters were formed. Calendering had a positive influence on the porosity, bulk density, and tensile strength of the green paper sheets. Within this contribution, the debinding process for the metal-matrix paper sheets was in focus. A debinding rate of 0.5 K/min to 733 K (460 °C) with a dwell time of 90 minutes was sufficient to completely remove cellulose fibers. The sintered composites attained a tensile strength of up to 177 N/mm2 at a total porosity of 66 pct.

  15. Development of metal matrix composite gridlines for space photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudayyeh, Omar Kamal

    Space vehicles today are primarily powered by multi-junction photovoltaic cells due to their high efficiency and high radiation hardness in the space environment. While multi-junction solar cells provide high efficiency, microcracks develop in the crystalline semiconductor due to a variety of reasons, including: growth defects, film stress due to lattice constant mismatch, and external mechanical stresses introduced during shipping, installation, and operation. These microcracks have the tendency to propagate through the different layers of the semiconductor reaching the metal gridlines of the cell, resulting in electrically isolated areas from the busbar region, ultimately lowering the power output of the cell and potentially reducing the lifetime of the space mission. Pre-launch inspection are often expensive and difficult to perform, in which individual cells and entire modules must be replaced. In many cases, such microcracks are difficult to examine even with a thorough inspection. While repairs are possible pre-launch of the space vehicle, and even to some extent in low-to-earth missions, they are virtually impossible for deep space missions, therefore, efforts to mitigate the effects of these microcracks have substantial impact on the cell performance and overall success of the space mission. In this effort, we have investigated the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as mechanical reinforcement to the metal gridlines capable of bridging gaps generated in the underlying semiconductor while providing a redundant electrical conduction pathway. The carbon nanotubes are embedded in a silver matrix to create a metal matrix composite, which are later integrated onto commercial triple-junction solar cells.

  16. Isothermal fatigue mechanisms in Ti-based metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Bhaskar S.; Newaz, Golam M.

    1993-01-01

    Stress-controlled isothermal fatigue experiments were performed at room temperature (RT) and 548 C (in argon) on (0)8 SCS6/Ti 15-3 metal matrix composites (MMC's) with 15 and 41 volume percent SCS6 (SiC) fibers. The primary objectives were to evaluate the mechanical responses, and to obtain a clear understanding of the damage mechanisms leading to failure of the MMC's. The mechanical data indicated that strain ranges attained fairly constant values in the stress-controlled experiments at both RT and 538 C, and remained so for more than 85 percent of life. The fatigue data for MMC's with different volume fraction fibers showed that MMC life was controlled by the imposed strain range rather than the stress range. At RT, and at low and intermediate strain ranges, the dominant fatigue mechanism was matrix fatigue, and this was confirmed metallurgically from fractographic evidence as well as from observations of channel type dislocation structures in the matrix of fatigued MMC specimens. Reaction-zone cracks acted as important crack initiating sites at RT, with their role being to facilitate slip band formation and consequent matrix crack initiation through classical fatigue mechanisms. MMC life agreed with matrix life at the lower strain ranges, but was smaller than matrix life at higher strain ranges. Unlike the case of monotonic deformation, debonding damage was another major damage mechanism during fatigue at RT, and it increased for higher strain ranges. At high strain ranges at RT, fractography and metallography showed an absence of matrix cracks, but long lengths of debonds in the outer layers of the SCS6 fibers. Such debonding and consequent rubbing during fatigue is believed to have caused fiber damage and their failure at high strain ranges. Thus, whereas life was matrix dominated at low and intermediate strain ranges, it was fiber dominated at high strain ranges. At 538 C, the mean stain constantly increased (ratchetting) with the number of cycles. At high

  17. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, Jr., Joseph K.; Gensse, Chantal

    1993-01-01

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

  18. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  19. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  20. Solidification of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumanth, G. S.; Irons, G. A.

    1996-08-01

    The solidification behavior of ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is different from that of the bare matrix, not only because of the presence of the ceramic particles, but also due to their redistribution in the melt that results in nonhomogeneous thermophysical properties. The MMCs comprised of 10-to 15-μm SiC particles of varying volume fractions, dispersed uniformly in a modified aluminum A356 alloy by the melt stirring technique, were solidified unidirectionally in a thermocouple-instrumented cylindrical steel mold. The cooling rates were continually monitored by measuring temperatures at different depths in the melt, and the solidified MMCs were sectioned into disks and chemically analyzed for SiC volume fraction. The results point out that the cooling rate increased with increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. A small increase in the bulk SiC volume fraction of the cast MMC was observed due to particle settling during solidification. A one-dimensional enthalpy model of MMC solidification was formulated, wherein particle settling occurring in the solidifying matrix was coupled to the enthalpy equation by means of the Richardson-Zaki hindered settling correlation. A comparative study of simulations with experiments suggested that the thermal response of SiC particles used in this study was similar to that of single crystals, and their presence increased the effective thermal conductivity of the composite.

  1. Prediction of thermomechanical fatigue lives in metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Karayaka, Metin

    1992-07-01

    To identify the role of silicon carbide participate reinforcement on high-temperature thermomechanical fatigue behavior of Al 2xxx-T4, experiments have been conducted under thermomechanical out-of-phase and in-phase loading conditions. A general constitutive representation, based on Eshelby’s inclusion theory, is used for the determination of volumetric average stresses and strains under cyclic loading of the metal matrix composite. This constitutive representation is used with a life prediction model, based on the matrix stress-strain behavior, which predicts contributions of fatigue, creep, and environmental damages to failure under both isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue loading. In isothermal fatigue experiments at 200 °C and 300 °C, pure fatigue damage and creep damage are the dominant damage mechanisms in the short-life regime. In the long-life regime, however, the stress levels are too low to induce considerable creep damage; so, oxidation damage becomes dominant. When fatigue damage is dominant, the model predicts a decrease in life, based on strain range, with increasing volume fraction of reinforcement. Based on stress range, improved fatigue lives are predicted with increasing volume fraction of reinforcement. The reinforced alloy exhibits longer lives when compressive hydrostatic stresses in the matrix at the high-temperature end of the cycle reduce the creep damage.

  2. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  3. Physical properties about metal matrix FGM of molybdenum and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kouichi; Nishida, Shinichi

    1995-11-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) have been made trials to produce by a lot of fabrication processes such as the powder metallurgical method, the plasma spraying, the diffusion bonding, the physical vapor deposition method, the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) etc. In the most cases of these processes, dissimilar materials are combined or bonded directly. The various physical properties are discontinuous at the bonded interface of the dissimilar materials. In order to overcome the problem, functionally gradient materials (FGM) have been considered recently, and have attracted the authors. Its compositions are prepared so that physical properties continuously vary across the bond interface of the dissimilar metals. In this study, a FGM is produced by a new process based on HIP. Copper and molybdenum, which are distinct in the thermo-physical property to each other, are the constitutents for the FGM. This composition have been confirmed by absorbed electron and characteristics X-ray images of each mixed layer for FGM to be uniform or continuous. The following items have been investigated and compared with the linear law of mixture rule: Vickers hardness, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity at a one-dimensional non-steady state. Those physical properties have been identified to depend on the mixing ratios of copper and molybdenum. Pretty good agreements have been obtained between the experimental data and the calculated values according to the linear law of mixture rule.

  4. Leveraging metal matrix composites to reduce costs in space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nye, Ted; Claridge, Rex; Walker, Jim

    1994-01-01

    Advanced metal matrix composites may be one of the most promising technologies for reducing cost in structural components without compromise to strength or stiffness. A microlight 12.50 N (2.81 lb), two-axis, solar array drive assembly (SADA) was made for the Advanced Materials Applications to Space Structures (AMASS) Program flight experiment. The SADA had both its inner and outer axis housings fabricated from silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumimun. Two versions of the housings were made. The first was machined from a solid billet of material. The second was plaster cast to a near net shape that required minimal finish machining. Both manufacturing methods were compared upon completion. Results showed a cost savings with the cast housing was possible for quantities greater than one and probable for quantities greater than two. For quantities approaching ten, casting resulted in a reduction factor of almost three in the cost per part.

  5. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA'S Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several aluminum and copper based Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The presentation's goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's planned and on-going activities in MMC for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike and X-34 Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's reusable launch vehicle systems and space access vehicles. Advanced MMC processing techniques such as plasma spray, centrifugal casting, pressure infiltration casting will be discussed. Development of a novel 3D printing method for low cost production of composite preform, and functional gradient MMC to enhanced rocket engine's dimensional stability will be presented.

  6. The mechanical behavior of a hybrid metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zok, F.; Jansson, S.; Evans, A. G.; Nardone, V.

    1991-09-01

    The mechanical behavior of a unidirectionally reinforced hybrid metal matrix composite in two different states has been studied: one with a “weakly bonded” interface and the other with a “strong” interface. Similarities and contrasts in mechanical behavior have been related to the properties of the interface. The longitudinal tensile strength and the crack growth initiation resistance are found to be insensitive to the condition of the interface. However, the material with the “weak” interface exhibits extensive debonding, resulting in a steeply increasing resistance curve and a large work of rupture. Furthermore, the weak interface reduces the transverse and torsional strength of the composite. This study illustrates how the tailoring of interfacial properties can improve the mechanical performance of composites for certain structural applications.

  7. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA's Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Elam, S.

    2001-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's on-going activities in MMC components for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike engine and X-34's Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight, low cost, and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each of NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicles and space access vehicles. In order to fabricate structures from MMC, effective joining methods must be developed to join MMC to the same or to different monolithic alloys. Therefore, a qualitative assessment of MMC's welding and joining techniques will be outlined.

  8. Thermal expansion behavior of LDEF metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Tuyen D.; Steckel, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) metal matrix composite materials was studied by (1) analyzing the flight data that was recorded on orbit to determine the effects of orbital time and heating/cooling rates on the performance of the composite materials, and (2) characterizing and comparing the thermal expansion behavior of post-flight LDEF and lab-control samples. The flight data revealed that structures in space are subjected to nonuniform temperature distributions, and thermal conductivity of a material is an important factor in establishing a uniform temperature distribution and avoiding thermal distortion. The flight and laboratory data showed that both Gr/Al and Gr/Mg composites were stabilized after prolonged thermal cycling on orbit. However, Gr/Al composites showed more stable thermal expansion behavior than Gr/Mg composites and offer advantages for space structures particularly where very tight thermal stability requirements in addition to high material performance must be met.

  9. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of a SiC/Ti-15 metal matrix composite is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five different fiber shapes: a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of microstresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis for the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes and assess their potential benefits. No clear benefits result from different fiber shapes though there are some increases/decreases in isolated properties.

  10. Development of Metal Matrix Composites for NASA'S Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    The state-of-the-art development of several aluminum and copper based Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) for NASA's advanced propulsion systems will be presented. The presentation's goal is to provide an overview of NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's planned and on-going activities in MMC for advanced liquid rocket engines such as the X-33 vehicle's Aerospike and X-34 Fastrac engine. The focus will be on lightweight and environmental compatibility with oxygen and hydrogen of key MMC materials, within each NASA's new propulsion application, that will provide a high payoff for NASA's reusable launch vehicle systems and space access vehicles. Advanced MMC processing techniques such as plasma spray, centrifugal casting, pressure infiltration casting will be discussed. Development of a novel 3D printing method for low cost production of composite preform, and functional gradient MMC to enhanced rocket engine's dimensional stability will be presented.

  11. Screening of metal matrix composites using ultrasonic C-scans

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic C-scans can be used to find some types of defects in continuous fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites such as boron/aluminum composites. These defects are related to the fatigue behavior and fracture location of each inspected specimen. The C-scan technique determined the relative amount of defects in boron/aluminum composites. The defects were primarily identified as gaps in the fiber spacing. Those specimens with higher defect densities had shorter fatigue lives, lower fatigue endurance limits, and greater reductions in the elastic unloading modulus (that is, stiffness) because of fatigue cycling. This type of data could be used to set accept/reject levels for a composite panel based on C-scan indications. 8 refs.

  12. USE OF COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS IN PREPARING CERAMIC-MATRIX AND METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITE POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.

    2005-03-01

    A standard combustion-based approach typically used to synthesize nanosize oxide powders has been modified to prepare composite oxide-metal powders for subsequent densification via sintering or hot-pressing into ceramic- or metal-matrix composites. Copper and cerium nitrate salts were dissolved in the appropriate ratio in water and combined with glycine, then heated to cause autoignition. The ratio of glycine-to-total nitrate concentration was found to have the largest effect on the composition, agglomerate size, crystallite size, and dispersivity of phases in the powder product. After consolidation and sintering under reducing conditions, the resulting composite compact consists of a well-dispersed mixture of sub-micron size reinforcement particles in a fine-grained matrix.

  13. Centrifugal casting of metal matrix composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have excellent properties and low material costs, but high manufacturing costs. The primary difficulty in manufacturing MMCs is in forming a tight matrix/reinforcement bond. This dissertation investigates improving the matrix/reinforcement bond through the use of high centrifugal forces. High centrifugal forces promote fiber infiltration (or particle submergence), remove gas voids, and resist particle pushing by the solidification front. Several aluminum matrix MMC samples are formed at up to 2,660 g`s. The project involves: (1) design and construction of a rotating crucible capable of a 690 C, 2,600 g-force environment; (2) a finite differences heat transfer model using an unique technique (spreadsheet iteration) which has application to engineering teaching and simple modeling problems; (3) a bubble buoyancy/surface adhesion analysis to predict maximum surface voids or bubble cling in cast materials; (4) a fluid surface tension effects analysis evaluating particle submergence into a melt, and melt infiltration into a porous media such as a fiber form; (5) creation of samples and direct visual measurement of void sizes in agreement with bubble buoyancy/surface adhesion theory; (6) performance of tests and direct evidence supporting the developed particle submergence/porous media infiltration theories; and (7) creation of samples and direct measurement of material strength under subjection to bending stress. The final conclusion is that use of high centrifugal forces in MMC manufacturing has potential, however it is only useful for large diameter fibers or particles (on the order of 200 micron) and relatively high g-forces (on the order of 2,500 g`s).

  14. Development of a Precipitation-Strengthened Matrix for Non-quenchable Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Sorensen, Jim; Klier, Eric M.; Sanaty-Zadeh, Amirreza; Bayansan, Davaadorj; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in metal matrix composite-encapsulated ceramic armor show promise in lightweight armor technology. The system contains ceramic tiles, such as alumina, sandwiched between unreinforced aluminum or aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC), which has a better toughness compared to the ceramic tiles. The sandwich structures should not be quenched during the fabrication, as the large mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the ceramic tiles and the unreinforced aluminum or Al-MMC creates internal stresses high enough to fracture the ceramic tiles. However, slow cooling of most commercial alloys creates large precipitates making solute unavailable for the formation of fine precipitates during aging. Here, we develop a non-quenched, high-strength metal matrix utilizing dilute Al-Sc-Zr alloys. We demonstrate that the dilute Al-0.09 Sc-0.045 Zr at.% alloy and the same alloy containing 0-4 vol.% alumina short fibers do not result in precipitation upon slow cooling from a high temperature, and can thereafter be aged to increase their strength. They exhibit a moderate strength, but improved ductility and toughness as compared to common armor aluminum alloys, such as AA5083-H131, making them attractive as armor materials and hybrid armor systems.

  15. High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1999-01-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  16. High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1997-12-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  17. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  18. Modeling of crack bridging in a unidirectional metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1991-01-01

    The effective fatigue crack driving force and crack opening profiles were determined analytically for fatigue tested unidirectional composite specimens exhibiting fiber bridging. The crack closure pressure due to bridging was modeled using two approaches; the fiber pressure model and the shear lag model. For both closure models, the Bueckner weight function method and the finite element method were used to calculate crack opening displacements and the crack driving force. The predicted near crack tip opening profile agreed well with the experimentally measured profiles for single edge notch SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite specimens. The numerically determined effective crack driving force, Delta K(sup eff), was calculated using both models to correlate the measure crack growth rate in the composite. The calculated Delta K(sup eff) from both models accounted for the crack bridging by showing a good agreement between the measured fatigue crack growth rates of the bridged composite and that of unreinforced, unbridged titanium matrix alloy specimens.

  19. Prediction of high temperature metal matrix composite ply properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    The application of the finite element method (superelement technique) in conjunction with basic concepts from mechanics of materials theory is demonstrated to predict the thermomechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HTMMC). The simulated behavior is used as a basis to establish characteristic properties of a unidirectional composite idealized an as equivalent homogeneous material. The ply properties predicted include: thermal properties (thermal conductivities and thermal expansion coefficients) and mechanical properties (moduli and Poisson's ratio). These properties are compared with those predicted by a simplified, analytical composite micromechanics model. The predictive capabilities of the finite element method and the simplified model are illustrated through the simulation of the thermomechanical behavior of a P100-graphite/copper unidirectional composite at room temperature and near matrix melting temperature. The advantage of the finite element analysis approach is its ability to more precisely represent the composite local geometry and hence capture the subtle effects that are dependent on this. The closed form micromechanics model does a good job at representing the average behavior of the constituents to predict composite behavior.

  20. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  1. Heat exchanger and method of making. [bonding rocket chambers with a porous metal matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger of increased effectiveness is disclosed. A porous metal matrix is disposed in a metal chamber or between walls through which a heat-transfer fluid is directed. The porous metal matrix has internal bonds and is bonded to the chamber in order to remove all thermal contact resistance within the composite structure. Utilization of the invention in a rocket chamber is disclosed as a specific use. Also disclosed is a method of constructing the heat exchanger.

  2. Matrix isolation ESR and theoretical studies of metal phosphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Rebecca O.; Chandler, Graham S.; Davis, Jeffrey R.; McKinley, Allan J.

    2010-10-01

    The ZnP, Z67nP, CdP, C111dP, and C113dP radicals have been formed by laser ablation of the metal with GaP pressed into the metal surface, isolated in an inert neon matrix at 4.3 K and their electronic structure was established using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The following magnetic parameters were determined experimentally for ZnP/Z67nP, g⊥=1.9982(2), A⊥(P)=111(6) MHz, A⊥(Z67n)=160(2) MHz, and D=-29 988(3) MHz and estimates were made for the following ZnP/Z67nP magnetic parameters: g∥=1.9941(2), A∥(P)=-5(6) MHz, and A∥(Z67n)=180(50) MHz. The following magnetic parameters for CdP/C111dP/C113dP were determined experimentally: g⊥=1.9963(2), A⊥(P)=97(3) MHz, A⊥(C111d)=862(3) MHz, and A⊥(C113d)=902(3) MHz. Evidence for the formation of the MgP radical was also obtained and an approximate hyperfine coupling constant of A⊥(P)=157(6) MHz was determined. The low-lying electronic states of ZnP and MgP were also investigated using the multiconfigurational self-consistent field technique. Potential energy surfaces, binding energies, optimized bond lengths, energy separations, and dissociation energies have been determined. Both radicals are found to have Σ4- ground states with a leading configuration at re of 10σ211σ25π15π112σ1 for ZnP and 7σ28σ23π13π19σ1 for MgP. Significant mixing to this state is calculated for MgP.

  3. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  4. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  5. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  6. Iron oxide nanomatrix facilitating metal ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obena, Rofeamor P; Lin, Po-Chiao; Lu, Ying-Wei; Li, I-Che; del Mundo, Florian; Arco, Susan dR; Nuesca, Guillermo M; Lin, Chung-Chen; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2011-12-15

    The significance and epidemiological effects of metals to life necessitate the development of direct, efficient, and rapid method of analysis. Taking advantage of its simple, fast, and high-throughput features, we present a novel approach to metal ion detection by matrix-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (matrix@MNP)-assisted MALDI-MS. Utilizing 21 biologically and environmentally relevant metal ion solutions, the performance of core and matrix@MNP against conventional matrixes in MALDI-MS and laser desorption ionization (LDI) MS were systemically tested to evaluate the versatility of matrix@MNP as ionization element. The matrix@MNPs provided 20- to >100-fold enhancement on detection sensitivity of metal ions and unambiguous identification through characteristic isotope patterns and accurate mass (<5 ppm), which may be attributed to its multifunctional role as metal chelator, preconcentrator, absorber, and reservoir of energy. Together with the comparison on the ionization behaviors of various metals having different ionization potentials (IP), we formulated a metal ionization mechanism model, alluding to the role of exciton pooling in matrix@MNP-assisted MALDI-MS. Moreover, the detection of Cu in spiked tap water demonstrated the practicability of this new approach as an efficient and direct alternative tool for fast, sensitive, and accurate determination of trace metal ions in real samples.

  7. Elasto-plastic analysis of interface layers for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix in metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic fibers induces high thermal stresses in the matrix. Elasto-plastic analyses - with different degrees of simplification and modelization - show that an interface layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the tensile hoop stress in the matrix substantially.

  8. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  9. Fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Flom, Y.; Parker, B.H.; Chu, H.P.

    1989-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was a 12.7 mm thick extrusion of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with 40 v/o SiC particulates. Specimen configuration and test procedure conformed to ASTM E399 Standard for compact specimens. It was found that special procedures were necessary to obtain fatigue cracks of controlled lengths in the preparation of precracked specimens for the MMC material. Fatigue loading with both minimum and maximum loads in compression was used to start the precrack. The initial precracking would stop by self-arrest. Afterwards, the precrack could be safely extended to the desired length by additional cyclic tensile loading. Test results met practically all the E399 criteria for the calculation of plane strain fracture toughness of the material. A valid K{sub IC} value of the SiC/Al composite was established as K{sub IC} = 8.9 MPa square root of m. The threshold stress intensity under which crack would cease to grow in the material was estimated as delta K sub th = 2MPa square root of m for R = 0.09 using the fatigue precracking data. Fractographic examinations show that failure occurred by the micromechanism involved with plastic deformation although the specimens broke by brittle fracture. The effect of precracking by cyclic loading in compression on fracture toughness is included in the discussion.

  10. Material and structural studies of metal and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Serafini, T. T.; Johns, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites and design analysis methods for these materials are being developed because of the vast potential of composites for decreasing weight and/or increasing use temperature capability in aerospace systems. These composites have potential for use in airbreathing engine components as well as aeronautical and space vehicle structures. Refractory wire-superalloy composites for use up to 2200 F or more and metal-matrix composites for lower temperature applications such as aerospace structures and turbojet fan and compressor blades are under investigation and are discussed. The development of a number of resin systems, including the polyimides and polyphenylquinoxalines, is described and their potential for use at temperatures approaching 315 C (600 F) is indicated. Various molecular modifications that improve processability and/or increase thermal and oxidative resistance of the resins are also described. Structural analysis methods are discussed for determining the stresses and deformations in complex composite systems. Consideration is also given to residual stresses resulting from the curing process and to the foreign object damage problem in fan blade applications.

  11. Fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Parker, B. H.; Chu, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was a 12.7 mm thick extrusion of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with 40 v/o SiC particulates. Specimen configuration and test procedure conformed to ASTM E399 Standard for compact specimens. It was found that special procedures were necessary to obtain fatigue cracks of controlled lengths in the preparation of precracked specimens for the MMC material. Fatigue loading with both minimum and maximum loads in compression was used to start the precrack. The initial precracking would stop by self-arrest. Afterwards, the precrack could be safely extended to the desired length by additional cyclic tensile loading. Test results met practically all the E399 criteria for the calculation of plane strain fracture toughness of the material. A valid K sub IC value of the SiC/Al composite was established as K sub IC = 8.9 MPa square root of m. The threshold stress intensity under which crack would cease to grow in the material was estimated as delta K sub th = 2MPa square root of m for R = 0.09 using the fatigue precracking data. Fractographic examinations show that failure occurred by the micromechanism involved with plastic deformation although the specimens broke by brittle fracture. The effect of precracking by cyclic loading in compression on fracture toughness is included in the discussion.

  12. Fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Parker, B. H.; Chu, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate fracture toughness of SiC/Al metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was a 12.7 mm thick extrusion of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with 40 v/o SiC particulates. Specimen configuration and test procedure conformed to ASTM E399 Standard for compact specimens. It was found that special procedures were necessary to obtain fatigue cracks of controlled lengths in the preparation of precracked specimens for the MMC material. Fatigue loading with both minimum and maximum loads in compression was used to start the precrack. The initial precracking would stop by self-arrest. Afterwards, the precrack could be safely extended to the desired length by additional cyclic tensile loading. Test results met practically all the E399 criteria for the calculation of plane strain fracture toughness of the material. A valid K sub IC value of the SiC/Al composite was established as K sub IC = 8.9 MPa square root of m. The threshold stress intensity under which crack would cease to grow in the material was estimated as delta K sub th = 2MPa square root of m for R = 0.09 using the fatigue precracking data. Fractographic examinations show that failure occurred by the micromechanism involved with plastic deformation although the specimens broke by brittle fracture. The effect of precracking by cyclic loading in compression on fracture toughness is included in the discussion.

  13. The t-matrix resistivity of liquid rare earth metals using pseudopotential

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Kamaldeep G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2015-06-24

    Present theoretical study of liquid metal resistivity of some trivalent (La,Ce,Gd) and divalent (Eu,Yb) rare earth metals using pseudopotential has been carried out employing Ziman’s weak scattering and transition matrix (t-matrix) approaches. Our computed results of liquid metal resistivity using t-matrix approach are better than resistivity computed using Ziman’s approach and are also in excellent agreement with experimental results and other theoretical findings. The present study confirms that for f-shell metals pseudopotential must be determined uniquely and t-matrix approach is more physical in comparison with Ziman’s nearly free electron approach. The present pseudopotential accounts s-p-d hybridization properly. Such success encourages us to study remaining liquid state properties of these metals.

  14. The t-matrix resistivity of liquid rare earth metals using pseudopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Kamaldeep G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2015-06-01

    Present theoretical study of liquid metal resistivity of some trivalent (La,Ce,Gd) and divalent (Eu,Yb) rare earth metals using pseudopotential has been carried out employing Ziman's weak scattering and transition matrix (t-matrix) approaches. Our computed results of liquid metal resistivity using t-matrix approach are better than resistivity computed using Ziman's approach and are also in excellent agreement with experimental results and other theoretical findings. The present study confirms that for f-shell metals pseudopotential must be determined uniquely and t-matrix approach is more physical in comparison with Ziman's nearly free electron approach. The present pseudopotential accounts s-p-d hybridization properly. Such success encourages us to study remaining liquid state properties of these metals.

  15. Effect of Turning Parameters on Aluminium Metal Matrix Composites -A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, B. S.; Pandey, Brajesh, Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Metal matrix composites have good mechanical properties as comparison to metals during various operations. Hence, different engineering applications started using MMC a very good choice in substituting metals. The paper provides a review on turning of strengthened aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMC) particularly reinforced particles. Also paper highlights the recent development of reinforced MMC from glass fiber reinforced polymers to present day hybrid and nano-composites. The paper is also showing the effect of different machining parameter on the response variables like surface roughness, tool wear rate, and material removal rate.

  16. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  17. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  18. Micromechanism Based Modeling of Structural Life in Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    6. AUTHOR(S) David H. Allen and Dimitris C. Lagoudas 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS F49620-94-1-0341 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AFOSR/NA 110 Duncan Avenue, Rm B115 Boiling AFB, DC 20332- 8050 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a. DISTRIBUTION...behavior; 4) modeling the effects of oxidation on the crack growth resistance of metals; and 5 ) the modeling of oxidation fronts in metals. In summary

  19. Inelastic response of metal matrix composites under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirzadeh, F.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    Elements of the analytical/experimental program to characterize the response of silicon carbide titanium (SCS-6/Ti-15-3) composite tubes under biaxial loading are outlined. The analytical program comprises prediction of initial yielding and subsequent inelastic response of unidirectional and angle-ply silicon carbide titanium tubes using a combined micromechanics approach and laminate analysis. The micromechanics approach is based on the method of cells model and has the capability of generating the effective thermomechanical response of metal matrix composites in the linear and inelastic region in the presence of temperature and time-dependent properties of the individual constituents and imperfect bonding on the initial yield surfaces and inelastic response of (0) and (+ or - 45)sub s SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates loaded by different combinations of stresses. The generated analytical predictions will be compared with the experimental results. The experimental program comprises generation of initial yield surfaces, subsequent stress-strain curves and determination of failure loads of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 tubes under selected loading conditions. The results of the analytical investigation are employed to define the actual loading paths for the experimental program. A brief overview of the experimental methodology is given. This includes the test capabilities of the Composite Mechanics Laboratory at the University of Virginia, the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite tubes secured from McDonnell Douglas Corporation, a text fixture specifically developed for combined axial-torsional loading, and the MTS combined axial-torsion loader that will be employed in the actual testing.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-04-12

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  3. Machinability of titanium metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramesh, Maryam

    Titanium metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs), as a new generation of materials, have various potential applications in aerospace and automotive industries. The presence of ceramic particles enhances the physical and mechanical properties of the alloy matrix. However, the hard and abrasive nature of these particles causes various issues in the field of their machinability. Severe tool wear and short tool life are the most important drawbacks of machining this class of materials. There is very limited work in the literature regarding the machinability of this class of materials especially in the area of tool life estimation and tool wear. By far, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools appear to be the best choice for machining MMCs from researchers' point of view. However, due to their high cost, economical alternatives are sought. Cubic boron nitride (CBN) inserts, as the second hardest available tools, show superior characteristics such as great wear resistance, high hardness at elevated temperatures, a low coefficient of friction and a high melting point. Yet, so far CBN tools have not been studied during machining of Ti-MMCs. In this study, a comprehensive study has been performed to explore the tool wear mechanisms of CBN inserts during turning of Ti-MMCs. The unique morphology of the worn faces of the tools was investigated for the first time, which led to new insights in the identification of chemical wear mechanisms during machining of Ti-MMCs. Utilizing the full tool life capacity of cutting tools is also very crucial, due to the considerable costs associated with suboptimal replacement of tools. This strongly motivates development of a reliable model for tool life estimation under any cutting conditions. In this study, a novel model based on the survival analysis methodology is developed to estimate the progressive states of tool wear under any cutting conditions during machining of Ti-MMCs. This statistical model takes into account the machining time in

  4. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  5. A New Type of Carbon Nanostructure Formed Within a Metal-Matrix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    during a reaction process in molten aluminum, copper, silver, and other metals. These materials developed by Third Millennium Metals, LLC are called...resolidification. The carbon incorporates into the metal matrix and has an effect on several of the properties of the material . We have performed a detailed...investigation of the structure and composition of several covetics using a variety of microscopy and spectroscopy techniques and found that the

  6. Development and fabrication of high strength alloy fibers for use in metal-metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, G. W.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal fiber reinforced superalloys are being considered for construction of critical components in turbine engines that operate at high temperature. The problems involved in fabricating refractory metal alloys into wire form in such a manner as to maximize their strength properties without developing excessive structural defects are described. The fundamental principles underlying the development of such alloy fibers are also briefly discussed. The progress made to date in developing tungsten, tantalum and columbium base alloys for fiber reinforcement is reported and future prospects for alloy fiber development considered.

  7. Blood metal levels and third trimester maternal plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).

    PubMed

    Au, Felicia; Bielecki, Agnieszka; Blais, Erica; Fisher, Mandy; Cakmak, Sabit; Basak, Ajoy; Gomes, James; Arbuckle, Tye E; Fraser, William D; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Prem

    2016-09-01

    While it is known that in utero exposure to environmental toxicants, namely heavy metals, can adversely affect the neonate, there remains a significant paucity of information on maternal biological changes specific to metal exposures during pregnancy. This study aims at identifying associations between maternal metal exposures and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that are known to be engaged in pregnancy process. Third trimester maternal plasma (n = 1533) from a pregnancy cohort (Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals Study, MIREC) were analyzed for MMP-1,-2,-7,-9 and -10 by affinity-based multiplex protein array analyses. Maternal metal concentrations (mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic and manganese) in 1st and 3rd trimesters exhibited strong correlations (p < 0.05). Multivariate regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) for the association between metal concentrations in quartiles and high (90%) and low (10%) maternal MMP levels. Significant (p < 0.05) metal exposure-related effects were observed with the different MMP isoform responses. MMP profiles were specific to the trimester at which the maternal blood metals were analyzed. Our findings suggest that the profiles of these MMP isoforms vary with the type of metal exposure, blood metal concentrations and the trimester at which metal levels were determined. These new findings on maternal metal-MMP relationships can guide future explorations on toxicity mechanisms relevant to metal exposure-mediated adverse birth outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Mechanical Behavior and Processing of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-21

    Table 3). The observed peaks were diffuse, confirming the presence of the T1 phase, as discussed by Rioja and Ludwiczak [69]. Table 3. Diffraction Angle...G.E. Thompson: Met. Sci. J., 1972, vol. 6, p. 167. 68. J.M. Silcock: J. Inst. Metals, 1959-1960, vol. 88, p. 357. 69. R.J. Rioja and E.A. Ludwiczak

  9. High Density Amorphous Metal Matrix Composites for Kinetic Energy Penetrators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-05

    Reznikov, A.E. Drbyshevskiy and V.L. Kopylov, Rus. Metall. Engl. Trans., 1, 115 (1981). 14. K.T. Hartwig, H. Zapata , A. Parasiris and S.N. Mathaudhu...in Powder Materials: Current Research and Practices, edited by F.D.S. Marquis, N.N. Thadhani and E.V. Barrera (TMS Publishing,Warrendale, PA, 2001

  10. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  11. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  12. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on Mechanical Properties of a Cast 6061 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Conference Proceedings, 1990 19. Lewandowski, J. J. et al., "Effects of Casting Conditions and Deformation Processing on A356 Aluminum and A356 -20 Vol...CAST 6061 ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE by Werner Fletcher Hoyt December 1993 Thesis Advisor: Terry R. McNelley Approved for public release...Security Classification) THE EFFECT OF THERMOMECHANICAL PROCESSING ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A CAST 6061 ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE 12. PERSONAL

  13. Durability of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, under contract F33615-83-C-3219, Project 2401, Work Unit 24010167, "Durability of Continuous Fiber Metal...determine the range of fatigue failure modes found by previous investigators. Testing performed under MCAIR IRAD had previously shown that failure modes... under tension loading. The fatigue sensitivity is the ratio of net stress in a notched specimen to that in an unnotched specimen at a given life

  14. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  15. The synthesis, compressive properties, and applications of metal matrix syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Luong, Dung D.

    2011-02-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foams are composites that incorporate hollow particles in a matrix, where enclosing porosity inside the thin shell of the particle leads to low density without large decreases in mechanical properties. Studies on Al, Mg, Pb, and Zn alloy matrix syntactic foams are available in the published literature. A large stress plateau region appears in the compressive stress-strain graphs of metal matrix syntactic foams. The height and length of stress plateau can be tailored by means of particle wall thickness, volume fraction, and size, and the total compressive energy absorption can be controlled. Metal matrix syntactic foams seem promising in various energy absorbing applications including automobile parts since their energy absorption capability per unit weight is better than other foams and lightweight materials.

  16. Infiltration Kinetics and Interfacial Bond Strength of Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    aniediby Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401. of contact, 1 1 this process may also be accompanied by Manuscript submitted October 31...indice, la, for the 4- tendency of liquid metal to form a mutual plane interface with the idealized porous substrate: 1, = ’rr 2 y(I/O - l) ( cos 6 + 1)1...circular cross section, PURE U-- rr~p d (hc- = 2rryl cos 0 - vroghc - 8rih c 30o- dt d ___________________ (1 ) - i (dhc)2 [21. I I i " -t -4 (r~ -dt

  17. Processing and property evaluation of metal matrix superconducting materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Appajosula S.

    1995-01-01

    Metal - superconductor (YBCO) systems have been prepared and characterized by resistivity, ac susceptibility and dc SQUID magnetic moment measurements. The silver composites showed superconducting transition for all the composites processed and the superconducting transition temperature tends to depend upon the concentration of the silver in the composite. Aluminum composites showed an unusual resistivity results with two transitions around 90 K and 120 K. The superconducting property of silver composites can be explained qualitatively in terms of the proximity theory that has been suggested for the low temperature superconductors.

  18. Thermophysical and Electrical Properties of Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    de if necessary and identify by block number) Aluminum matrix composiles, aluminum alloy matrix composites, copper matrix composites, electrical...the various com- posites of aluminum and aluminum alloy mar-tices, copper matrix, lead matrix, magnesium matrix, nickel and nickel alloy matrices...titanium and titanium alloy matrices, tungsten matrix, and zinc matrix. Most of the data are for aluminum DD j JAN 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV6 S IS

  19. Interfacial effects on the behavior of partially bonded metal matrix composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    A novel computational method developed at NASA-Lewis in order to predict the behavior of unidirectional composites has been used to explore the effects of partial debonding and fiber fracture on the behavior of room temperature and high temperature metal-matrix composites. Attention is presently given to the influence of disbonding, which occurs with fractured fibers, on the ply properties of metal-matrix composites with orthotropic fibers, in the case of a graphite fiber-reinforced copper-matrix composite. It is shown that, for small amounts of partial bonding on fractured fibers, composite material properties are not significantly affected.

  20. The Influence of Particle Shapes on Strength and Damage Properties of Metal Matrix Composites.

    PubMed

    Qing, Hai

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the distribution of particle shapes, locations and orientations on the mechanical behavior of the particle reinforced Metal-Matrix Composite (MMC) is studied through finite element (FE) method under different loading conditions in this investigation. The FE-model with multi-particle is generated through the random sequential adsorption algorithm, with the particles treated respectively as elastic-brittle circular, regular octagon and hexagon and square shape. Ductile failure in metal matrix, brittle fracture of particles and interface debonding are taken into account during the simulations. 2D cohesive element is applied to simulate the debonding behavior of interface. The damage models based on the stress triaxial indicator and maximum principal stress criterion are developed to simulate the ductile failure of metal matrix and brittle cracking of particles, respectively. Simulation results show that the interface debonding dominates the failure process under the loading, while the damage in particle grows at slowest rate compared with those in matrix and interface.

  1. Functional Metal Matrix Composites: Self-lubricating, Self-healing, and Nanocomposites-An Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorri Moghadam, Afsaneh; Schultz, Benjamin F.; Ferguson, J. B.; Omrani, Emad; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2014-06-01

    Many different types of advanced metal matrix composites are now available, some of which possess functional properties. Recent work on particle-reinforced, self-lubricating and self-healing metals and metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) synthesized by solidification synthesis is reviewed. Particle-based MMNCs have been developed by several modern processing tools based on either solid- or liquid-phase synthesis techniques that are claimed to exhibit exciting mechanical properties including improvements of modulus, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength. This article presents a brief and objective review of the work done over the last decade to identify the challenges and future opportunities in the area of functional nanocomposites. Increasing interest in lightweight materials has resulted in studies on hollow particle-filled metal matrix syntactic foams. Syntactic foams seem especially suitable for development with functional properties such as self-healing and self-lubrication. The metal matrix micro and nanocomposites, and syntactic foams having combinations of ultrahigh strength and wear resistance, self-lubricating, and/or self-healing properties can lead to increased energy efficiency, reliability, comfort of operation, reparability, and safety of vehicles. The focus of the present review is aluminum and magnesium matrix functional materials.

  2. Prediction of matrix fatigue crack initiation in notched SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillberry, B. M.; Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    Several lay-ups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composites were tested in either a center hole or a double edge notched geometry. At different cyclic strss levels, the number of cycles required to develop matrix fatigue cracks at the notches was recorded. A fatigue strat-life curve was developed for the Ti-15-3 matrix material. This modified parameter predicted the number of cycles required for matrix crack initiation at the notches. The predictions were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Thermal-mechanical fatigue test apparatus for metal matrix composites and joint attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, Leonard J.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    Two thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) test facilities were designed and developed, one to test tungsten fiber reinforced metal matrix composite specimens at temperature up to 1430C (2600F) and another to test composite/metal attachment bond joints at temperatures up to 760F (1400F). The TMF facility designed for testing tungsten fiber reinforced metal matrix composites permits test specimen temperature excursions from room temperature to 1430C (2600F) with controlled heating and loading rates. A strain-measuring device measures the strain in the test section of the specimen during each heating and cooling cycle with superimposed loads. Data is collected and recorded by a computer. The second facility is designed to test composite/metal attachment bond joints and to permit heating to a maximum temperature of 760C (1400F) within 10 min and cooling to 150C (300F) within 3 min. A computer controls specimen temperature and load cycling.

  4. Thermal-mechanical fatigue test apparatus for metal matrix composites and joint attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, L. J.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) test facilities were designed and developed, one to test tungsten fiber reinforced metal matrix composite specimens at temperature up to 1430C (2600F) and another to test composite/metal attachment bond joints at temperatures up to 760C (1400 F). The TMF facility designed for testing tungsten fiber reinforced metal matrix composites permits test specimen temperature excursions from room temperature to 1430C (2600F) with controlled heating and loading rates. A strain-measuring device measures the strain in the test section of the specimen during each heating and cooling cycle with superimposed loads. Data is collected and recorded by a computer. The second facility is designed to test composite/metal attachment bond joints and to permit heating to a maximum temperature of 760C (1400F) within 10 min and cooling to 150C (300F) within 3 min. A computer controls specimen temperature and load cycling.

  5. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  6. Persister cells, the biofilm matrix and tolerance to metal cations in biofilm and planktonic Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2005-07-01

    In this study, we examined Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 biofilm and planktonic cell susceptibility to metal cations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) required to eradicate 100% of the planktonic population (MBC 100), and the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) were determined using the MBEC trade mark-high throughput assay. Six metals - Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+) and Pb(2+)- were each tested at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 27 h of exposure to biofilm and planktonic cultures grown in rich or minimal media. With 2 or 4 h of exposure, biofilms were approximately 2-25 times more tolerant to killing by metal cations than the corresponding planktonic cultures. However, by 27 h of exposure, biofilm and planktonic bacteria were eradicated at approximately the same concentration in every instance. Viable cell counts evaluated at 2 and 27 h of exposure revealed that at high concentrations, most of the metals assayed had killed greater than 99.9% of biofilm and planktonic cell populations. The surviving cells were propogated in vitro and gave rise to biofilm and planktonic cultures with normal sensitivity to metals. Further, retention of copper by the biofilm matrix was investigated using the chelator sodium diethlydithiocarbamate. Formation of visible brown metal-chelates in biofilms treated with Cu(2+) suggests that the biofilm matrix may coordinate and sequester metal cations from the aqueous surroundings. Overall, our data suggest that both metal sequestration in the biofilm matrix and the presence of a small population of 'persister' cells may be contributing factors in the time-dependent tolerance of both planktonic cells and biofilms to high concentrations of metal cations.

  7. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  8. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  9. Heavy metals monitoring at a Mediterranean natural ecosystem of Central Italy. Trends in different environmental matrixes.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Luciano; Brusori, Barbara; Passarini, Fabrizio; Bernardi, Elena; Francaviglia, Rosa; Gataleta, Licia; Marchionni, Maria; Aromolo, Rita; Benedetti, Anna; Olivieri, Piera

    2004-04-01

    The study deals with the evaluation of the impact of heavy metal pollution on a Mediterranean natural ecosystem, and presents the results derived from a monitoring of heavy metals in different environmental matrixes (atmospheric dry depositions, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and stemflow of forest trees). Two sites in Castelporziano Presidential Estate (Rome), one internal and one near the sea-side, were chosen in order to assess the differences in pollutant load. Results showed that heavy metal contamination can arise from local anthropogenic activities, in particular road traffic, and long-range pollution, from industrial and artisan activities near Rome.

  10. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the effort by Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc. to redesign turbopump housing joints using metal matrix composite material and a toolless net-shape pressure infiltration casting technology. Topics covered include: advantage of metal matrix composites for propulsion components, baseline pump design and analysis, advanced toolless pressure infiltration casting process, subscale pump housing, preform splicing and joining for large components, and fullscale pump housing redesign.

  11. METCAN simulation of candidate metal matrix composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    1990-01-01

    The METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code is used to simulate the nonlinear behavior of select metal matrix composites in order to assess their potential for high temperature structural applications. Material properties for seven composites are generated at a fiber volume ratio of 0.33 for two bonding conditions (a perfect bond and a weak interphase case) at various temperatures. A comparison of the two bonding conditions studied shows a general reduction in value of all properties (except CTE) for the weak interphase case from the perfect bond case. However, in the weak interphase case, the residual stresses that develop are considerably less than those that form in the perfect bond case. Results of the computational simulation indicate that among the metal matrix composites examined, SiC/NiAl is the best candidate for high temperature applications at the given fiber volume ratio.

  12. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  13. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  14. Pendulum impact resistance of tungsten fiber/metal matrix composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The impact properties of copper, copper-10 nickel, and a superalloy matrix reinforced with tungsten fibers were studied. In most cases the following increased composite impact strength: increased fiber or matrix toughness, decreased fiber-matrix reaction, increased test temperature, hot working and heat treatment. Notch sensitivity was reduced by increasing fiber or matrix toughness. The effect of fiber content depended on the relative toughness of the fibers and matrix. Above 530 K a 60 volume per cent superalloy matrix composite had a greater impact strength than a turbine blade superalloy, whereas below 530 K a hot worked 56 volume per cent composite had a greater impact strength than the superalloy.

  15. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry of gas-phase peptide-metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortal, Ana R.; Hurtado, Paola; Martínez-Haya, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Cation attachment to a model peptide has been investigated in matrix-assisted laser desorption experiments. Angiotensin I (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu) is chosen as a system for study, and Cu2+ and K+ salts are used as cationizing agents. Three fundamentally different types of samples are investigated: (1) a crystalline sample of Ang I, metal salt and MALDI matrix, prepared with the conventional dried droplet method; (2) a solvent-free fine powder mixture of the same three compounds, and (3) a solution of the angiotensin and the metal salt in an ionic liquid matrix (a molten organic salt that acts as a MALDI active solvent). Effective protonation and cationization of the peptide are achieved with the three methods. The transition metal systematically provides more efficient cationization than the alkali metal. At sufficiently high concentration of the salt, the attachment of up to four copper cations to the angiotensin is observed in the MALDI spectrum. In contrast, only one K+ cation is efficiently bound to the peptide. For a given salt concentration, the highest degree of cationization is obtained in the laser desorption from the ionic liquid matrix. This is attributed to the efficient transfer of free metal cations to the desorption plume, where the complexation takes place.

  17. Metal matrix composite micromechanics: In-situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent efforts in computational mechanics methods for simulating the nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites have culminated in the implementation of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer code. In METCAN material nonlinearity is treated at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level where the current material model describes a time-temperature-stress dependency of the constituent properties in a material behavior space. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by virtue of composite micromechanics and macromechanics models. The behavior of metal matrix composites depends on fabrication process variables, in situ fiber and matrix properties, bonding between the fiber and matrix, and/or the properties of an interphase between the fiber and matrix. Specifically, the influence of in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation on the unidirectional composite stress-strain behavior is examined. These types of studies provide insight into micromechanical behavior that may be helpful in resolving discrepancies between experimentally observed composite behavior and predicted response.

  18. Method for alleviating thermal stress damage in laminates. [metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.; Orth, N. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method is provided for alleviating the stress damage in metallic matrix composites, such as laminated sheet or foil composites. Discontinuities are positively introduced into the interface between the layers so as to reduce the thermal stress produced by unequal expansion of the materials making up the composite. Although a number of discrete elements could be used to form one of the layers and thus carry out this purpose, the discontinuities are preferably produced by simply drilling holes in the metallic matrix layer or by forming grooves in a grid pattern in this layer.

  19. Metal matrix composite of an iron aluminide and ceramic particles and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schneibel, Joachim H.

    1997-01-01

    A metal matrix composite comprising an iron aluminide binder phase and a ceramic particulate phase such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide is made by heating a mixture of iron aluminide powder and particulates of one of the ceramics such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide in a alumina crucible at about 1450.degree. C. for about 15 minutes in an evacuated furnace and cooling the mixture to room temperature. The ceramic particulates comprise greater than 40 volume percent to about 99 volume percent of the metal matrix composite.

  20. Metal matrix composite of an iron aluminide and ceramic particles and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1997-06-10

    A metal matrix composite comprising an iron aluminide binder phase and a ceramic particulate phase such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide is made by heating a mixture of iron aluminide powder and particulates of one of the ceramics such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide in a alumina crucible at about 1,450 C for about 15 minutes in an evacuated furnace and cooling the mixture to room temperature. The ceramic particulates comprise greater than 40 volume percent to about 99 volume percent of the metal matrix composite.

  1. Metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) user's manual, version 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Gotsis, P. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) is a computer code developed at Lewis Research Center to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites. An updated version of the METCAN User's Manual is presented. The manual provides the user with a step by step outline of the procedure necessary to run METCAN. The preparation of the input file is demonstrated, and the output files are explained. The sample problems are presented to highlight various features of METCAN. An overview of the geometric conventions, micromechanical unit cell, and the nonlinear constitutive relationships is also provided.

  2. Combined-load buckling behavior of metal-matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Combined compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels with the consideration of transverse shear effects of the core. The sandwich panel is fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that the square panel has the highest combined load buckling strength, and that the buckling strength decreases sharply with the increases of both temperature and panel aspect ratio. The effect of layup (fiber orientation) on the buckling strength of the panels was studied in detail. The metal matrix composite sandwich panel was much more efficient than the sandwich panel with nonreinforced face sheets and had the same specific weight.

  3. Casting of Ashalloy metal matrix composites: 1994. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-05-01

    Research carried out so far has demonstrated that aluminum-fly ash composites, ``Ashalloy,`` containing up to 20 vol% fly ash may be synthesized by stir casting techniques. Composites containing still higher volume percent fly ash, up to 60 vol%, can be produced by pressure infiltration. A variety of shapes were cast from the slurry of molten aluminum alloy containing fly ash particles and it is now possible to explore application of Ashalloy composites in various industries. The potential advantages of Ashalloy composites lie in (a) a high value added use of coal fly ash, (b) saving energy by replacing metal with fly ash, (c) improving certain properties of the base alloy at a reduced cost, and (d) solving the disposal problem of fly ash. Fabrication of Ashalloy components may require both casting and deformation processing techniques, since Ashalloy can find applications in wrought components as well as in castings. In addition, machining will be frequently required to produce final dimensions, except in net shaped processing. The presence of hard and abrasive fly ash particles may cause serious problem of abrasive wear. Research efforts carried out to demonstrate abrasive wear behavior, machinability, and forgeability of Ashalloy composites are reported here.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of metal-matrix composite with fullerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, P. A.; Blanter, M. S.; Brazhkin, VV; Somenkov, VA; Filonenko, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Interaction of amorphous fullerite C60 with austenitic Fe-33.2 wt. % Ni alloy at pressures 0-8 GPa and temperatures 600-1100 °C was studied by neutron diffraction. The amorphous fullerite was obtained by ball milling and mixed with the powder of the crystalline alloy. The interaction at sintering led to the dissolution of carbon in fcc Fe-Ni solid solution and the formation of carbide (Fe, Ni)3C, but the Fe-Ni-C alloy did not undergo phase transformations and preserved the original fcc structure. As a result, the alloy hardened, we could also witness a clear barometric effect: at the pressure of 2 GPa the amount of the dissolved carbon and the microhardness turned out to be significantly higher than those at 8 GPa. During sintering amorphous fullerite is undergoing phase transitions and its microhardness is higher than the microhardness of the metal component. At high temperatures of interaction graphite appears. The presence of Fe-Ni alloy in the composite reduces the temperature of graphite formation in comparison with transformations in the pure amorphous fullerene.

  5. High-Temperature Fatigue of a Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. T.; Sanders, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    An aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) brake drum was tested in fatigue at room temperature and extreme service temperatures. At room temperature, the hybrid composite did not fail and exceeded estimated vehicle service times. At higher temperatures (62 and 73 pct of the matrix eutectic), fatigue of a hybrid particle/fiber MMC exhibited failure consistent with matrix overloading. Overaging of the A356 matrix coupled with progressive fracture of the SiC particles combined to create the matrix overload condition. No evidence of macro-fatigue crack initiation or growth was observed, and the matrix-particle interface appeared strong with no debonding, visible matrix phases, or porosity. An effective medium model was constructed to test the hypothesis that matrix overloading was the probable failure mode. The measured particle fracture rate was fit using realistic values of the SiC Weibull strength and modulus, which in turn predicted cycles to failure within the range observed in fatigue testing.

  6. Mechanisms controlling fatigue damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Damage in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composite materials can be quite complex since there are a number of different constituents (fiber, matrix, and the fiber/matrix interface) that can fail. Multidirectional lay-ups have an even greater number of possible damage orientations and mechanisms. Based on the simplifying assumption of equivalent constituent strain states in the absence of damage, a strain based failure criteria may be applied to determine when and where initial damage will occur. Based on the relative strain to fatigue failure of the fiber and matrix, the possible damage mechanisms of an MMC can be grouped into three categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, and (3) self-similar damage growth. A fourth type of damage development, fiber/matrix interface failure, is dependent on the relative strength of the fiber/matrix interface and the matrix yield strength. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  7. Micromechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite including the effects of matrix viscoplasticity and evolving damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. H.; Jones, R. H.; Boyd, J. G.

    1994-03-01

    A THERMOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS of a metal matrix continuous fiber composite is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of matrix inelasticity and interface cracking. Due to these nonlinearities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modeled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modeled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a typical SiC-Ti composite at elevated temperature. Preliminary results indicate that rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for interface fracture, thus contributing to improved macroscopic ductility of the composite.

  8. Local stresses in metal matrix composites subjected to thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.; Shin, Donghee; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1990-01-01

    An elasticity solution has been used to analyze matrix stresses near the fiber/matrix interface in continuous fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composites, modeling the micromechanics in question in terms of a cylindrical fiber and cylindrical matrix sheath which is embedded in an orthotropic medium representing the composite. The model's predictions for lamina thermal and mechanical properties are applied to a laminate analysis determining ply-level stresses due to thermomechanical loading. A comparison is made between these results, which assume cylindrical symmetry, and the predictions yielded by a FEM model in which the fibers are arranged in a square array.

  9. Matrix infrared spectra and density functional calculations of transition metal hydrides and dihydrogen complexes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lester

    2004-02-20

    Metal hydrides are of considerable importance in chemical synthesis as intermediates in catalytic hydrogenation reactions. Transition metal atoms react with dihydrogen to produce metal dihydrides or dihydrogen complexes and these may be trapped in solid matrix samples for infrared spectroscopic study. The MH(2) or M(H(2)) molecules so formed react further to form higher MH(4), (H(2))MH(2), or M(H(2))(2), and MH(6), (H(2))(2)MH(2), or M(H(2))(3) hydrides or complexes depending on the metal. In this critical review these transition metal and dihydrogen reaction products are surveyed for Groups 3 though 12 and the contrasting behaviour in Groups 6 and 10 is discussed. Minimum energy structures and vibrational frequencies predicted by Density Functional Theory agree with the experimental results, strongly supporting the identification of novel binary transition metal hydride species, which the matrix-isolation method is well-suited to investigate. 104 references are cited.

  10. Combined thermal and bending fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  11. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  12. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  13. Symposium Review: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites at MS&T 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2014-06-01

    This article reflects on the presentations made during the Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science and Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) held in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) from October 27 to 31. The symposium had three sessions on metal matrix composites and one session on polymer matrix composites containing a total of 23 presentations. While the abstracts and full-text papers are available through databases, the discussion that took place during the symposium is often not captured in writing and gets immediately lost. We have tried to recap some of the discussion in this article and hope that it will supplement the information present in the proceedings. The strong themes in the symposium were porous composites, aluminum matrix composites, and nanocomposites. The development of processing methods was also of interest to the speakers and attendees.

  14. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Aslam, Muhammad Altaf, Khurram Shirazi, Irfan

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  15. Interfacial and capillary phenomena in solidification processing of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical and hydrodynamic aspects of wetting and interfacial phenomena during the solidification processing of metal-matrix composites are reviewed. Significant experimental results on fiber-matrix interactions and wetting under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions in composites of engineering interest have been compiled, based on a survey of the recent literature. Finally, certain aspects of wetting relevant to stir-casting and infiltration processing of composites are discussed.

  16. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, D. L.

    1993-04-01

    This final report summarizes research in the fatigue and fracture toughness of a large number of materials ranging from metallic and ceramic matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates to aluminum, titanium, and glass matrix composites reinforced with continuous fibers. The purpose of this report is to summarize and draw conclusions about the state of knowledge of fatigue and fracture mechanisms from the past several years of research sponsored mainly by ONR.

  17. Interfacial and capillary phenomena in solidification processing of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical and hydrodynamic aspects of wetting and interfacial phenomena during the solidification processing of metal-matrix composites are reviewed. Significant experimental results on fiber-matrix interactions and wetting under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions in composites of engineering interest have been compiled, based on a survey of the recent literature. Finally, certain aspects of wetting relevant to stir-casting and infiltration processing of composites are discussed.

  18. Short-fibre and particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.J.

    1989-08-01

    Short fibres, whiskers or particles of ceramic materials, e.g. silicon carbide and alumina, when dispersed in a more or less random manner in a metallic matrix can promote increases in stiffness and strength at ambient and elevated temperatures without imposing a weight penalty. The paper considers the available routes for the fabrication of such composites, e.g. by squeeze casting, spray forming, powder technologies and hot working etc. Influences of type and amount of reinforcement, matrix alloy selection and processing route on strength, creep and fatigue resistance are discussed. Comparisons are made with conventional metals and alloys, and polymers and metals reinforced with continuous fibres. Attention is drawn to the behaviour of these materials under compressive loading as well as to their thermal expansion and conductivity. The majority of the matrices considered are aluminium-based.

  19. Tribological properties of metal-matrix composite materials reinforced by superelastic hard carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, I. N.; Drozdova, E. I.; Chernogorova, O. P.; Blinov, V. M.; Ekimov, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-matrix composite materials (CMs) are synthesized from a mixture of a metal powder (Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al-based alloy) and fullerenes (10 wt %). The thermobaric synthesis conditions (700-1000°C, 5-8 GPa) ensure the collapse of fullerene molecules and their transformation into superelastic carbon phase particles with an indentation hardness H IT = 10-37 GPa, an elastic modulus E IT = 60-260 GPa, and an elastic recovery of >80% upon indentation. After reinforcing by superelastic hard carbon, the friction coefficient of CM decreases by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the friction coefficient of the matrix metal, and the abrasive wear resistance increases by a factor of 4-200. Superelastic hard carbon particles are a unique reinforcing material for an increase in the wear resistance and a simultaneous decrease in the friction coefficient of CM.

  20. Metal- and Polymer-Matrix Composites: Functional Lightweight Materials for High-Performance Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2014-06-01

    The special topic "Metal- and Polymer-Matrix Composites" is intended to capture the state of the art in the research and practice of functional composites. The current set of articles related to metal-matrix composites includes reviews on functionalities such as self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning capabilities; research results on a variety of aluminum-matrix composites; and investigations on advanced composites manufacturing methods. In addition, the processing and properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and adhesive bonding of laminated composites are discussed. The literature on functional metal-matrix composites is relatively scarce compared to functional polymer-matrix composites. The demand for lightweight composites in the transportation sector is fueling the rapid development in this field, which is captured in the current set of articles. The possibility of simultaneously tailoring several desired properties is attractive but very challenging, and it requires significant advancements in the science and technology of composite materials. The progress captured in the current set of articles shows promise for developing materials that seem capable of moving this field from laboratory-scale prototypes to actual industrial applications.

  1. Spartan Auxiliary Mount Panel (SPAM): A Metal Matrix Composite Honeycomb Panel for Space Flight Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Kenneth N.; Stevens, Edward J.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focus on the use of metal matrix composite (MMC) material option in spaceflight hardware applications. It addresses the important questions and issues such as: what is SPAM; why the use of MMC; design requirements and flexibility; qualification testing; and flight concerns.

  2. Spartan Auxiliary Mount Panel (SPAM): A Metal Matrix Composite Honeycomb Panel for Space Flight Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Kenneth N.; Stevens, Edward J.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focus on the use of metal matrix composite (MMC) material option in spaceflight hardware applications. It addresses the important questions and issues such as: what is SPAM; why the use of MMC; design requirements and flexibility; qualification testing; and flight concerns.

  3. Microstructure and morphological study of ball-milled metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afkham, Y.; Khosroshahi, R. Azari; Kheirifard, R.; Mousavian, R. Taherzadeh; Brabazon, D.

    2017-08-01

    Due to the difficulty of preparation and beneficial properties achievable, copper and iron matrix nanocomposites are materials for which fabrication via the powder metallurgy route is attracting increasing research interest. The presence of ceramic nanoparticles in their matrix can lead to considerable changes in the microstructure and morphology. The effects of the type of metallic matrix and ceramic nanoparticle on the distribution of nano reinforcements and the morphology of ball-milled composite powders were evaluated in this study. For this purpose, 25 wt % of Al2O3 and SiC nanoparticles were separately ball-milled in the presence of iron and copper metals. The SEM, FESEM, and XRD results indicated that as-received nanoparticles, which were agglomerated before milling, were partially separated and embedded in the matrix of both the metals after the initial stages of ball milling, while prolonged milling was not found to further affect the distribution of nanoparticles. It was also observed that the Al2O3 phase was not thermodynamically stable during ball milling with copper powders. Finally, it was found that the presence of nanoparticles considerably reduce the average size of metallic powder particles.

  4. Connection between diffusion coefficient and thermal conductivity of a metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimova, M. A.; Knyazeva, A. G.; Sevostianov, I.

    2017-02-01

    The paper discusses the calculation of the effective thermal and diffusion properties of metal matrix composites containing diamond particles. The effective properties are calculated using Maxwell homogenization scheme. We also establish cross-property connection between overall thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficient and illustrate it on example of Al\\diamond composites.

  5. Inelastic response of metal matrix composites under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Mirzadeh, F.; Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical predictions and experimental results were obtained for inelastic response of unidirectional and angle ply composite tubes subjected to axial and torsional loading. The composite material consist of silicon carbide fibers in a titanium alloy matrix. This material is known to be susceptible to fiber matrix interfacial damage. A method to distinguish between matrix yielding and fiber matrix interfacial damage is suggested. Biaxial tests were conducted on the two different layup configurations using an MTS Axial/Torsional load frame with a PC based data acquisition system. The experimentally determined elastic moduli of the SiC/Ti system are compared with those predicted by a micromechanics model. The test results indicate that fiber matrix interfacial damage occurs at relatively low load levels and is a local phenomenon. The micromechanics model used is the method of cells originally proposed by Aboudi. Finite element models using the ABACUS finite element program were used to study end effects and fixture specimen interactions. The results to date have shown good correlation between theory and experiment for response prior to damage initiation.

  6. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angleplied laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis (NLA) is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron fiber/aluminum matrix angleplied laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  7. A micromechanics-based strength prediction methodology for notched metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical micromechanics based strength prediction methodology was developed to predict failure of notched metal matrix composites. The stress-strain behavior and notched strength of two metal matrix composites, boron/aluminum (B/Al) and silicon-carbide/titanium (SCS-6/Ti-15-3), were predicted. The prediction methodology combines analytical techniques ranging from a three dimensional finite element analysis of a notched specimen to a micromechanical model of a single fiber. In the B/Al laminates, a fiber failure criteria based on the axial and shear stress in the fiber accurately predicted laminate failure for a variety of layups and notch-length to specimen-width ratios with both circular holes and sharp notches when matrix plasticity was included in the analysis. For the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates, a fiber failure based on the axial stress in the fiber correlated well with experimental results for static and post fatigue residual strengths when fiber matrix debonding and matrix cracking were included in the analysis. The micromechanics based strength prediction methodology offers a direct approach to strength prediction by modeling behavior and damage on a constituent level, thus, explicitly including matrix nonlinearity, fiber matrix debonding, and matrix cracking.

  8. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites: Processing, microstructure, and application as a kinetic energy penetrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandliker, Richard B.

    The development of alloys with high glass forming ability allows fabrication of bulk samples of amorphous metal. This capability makes these materials available for applications which require significant material thickness in all three dimensions. Superior mechanical properties and advantages in processing make metallic glass a choice candidate as a matrix material for composites. This study reports techniques for making composites by melt-infiltration casting using the alloy Zrsb{41.2}Tisb{13.8}Cusb{12.5}Nisb{10.0}Besb{22.5} (VitreloyspTM 1) as a matrix material. Composite rods 5 cm in length and 7 mm in diameter were made and found to have a nearly fully amorphous matrix; there was less than 3 volume percent crystallized matrix material. The samples were reinforced by continuous metal wires, tungsten powder, or silicon carbide particulate preforms. The most easily processed samples were made with uniaxially aligned tungsten and carbon steel continuous wire reinforcement; the majority of the analysis presented is of these samples. The measured porosity was typically less than 3%. The results also indicate necessary guidelines for developing processing techniques for large scale production, new reinforcement materials, and other metallic glass compositions. Analysis of the microstructure of the tungsten wire and steel wire reinforced composites was performed by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The most common phase in the crystallized matrix is most likely a Laves phase with the approximate formula Besb{12}Zrsb3TiNiCu. In tungsten-reinforced composites, a crystalline reaction layer 240 nm thick of tungsten nanocrystals in an amorphous matrix formed. In the steel reinforced composites, the reaction layer was primarily composed of a mixed metal carbide, mainly ZrC. One promising application of the metallic glass matrix composite is as a kinetic

  9. Silver metal nano-matrixes as high efficiency and versatile catalytic reactors for environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; Yi, Zhifeng; Tardy, Blaise; Merenda, Andrea; Des Ligneris, Elise; Dagastine, Ray R.; Kong, Lingxue

    2017-03-01

    Nano-porous metallic matrixes (NMMs) offer superior surface to volume ratios as well as enhanced optical, photonic, and electronic properties to bulk metallic materials. Such behaviours are correlated to the nano-scale inter-grain metal domains that favour the presence of electronic vacancies. In this work, continuous 3D NMMs were synthesized for the first time through a simple diffusion-reduction process whereby the aerogel matrix was functionalized with (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The surface energy of the silica monolith templates was tuned to improve the homogeneity of the reduction process while thiol functionalization facilitated the formation of a high density of seeding points for metal ions to reduce. The diameter of NMMs was between 2 and 1000 nm, corresponding to a silver loading between 1.23 and 41.16 at.%. A rates of catalytic degradation kinetics of these NMMS which is three orders of magnitude higher than those of the non-functionalized silver-silica structures. Furthermore, the enhancement in mechanical stability at nanoscale which was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy force measurements, electronic density and chemical inertness was assessed and critically correlated to their catalytic potential. This strategy opens up new avenues for design of complex architectures of either single or multi-metal alloy NMMs with enhanced surface properties for various applications.

  10. Silver metal nano-matrixes as high efficiency and versatile catalytic reactors for environmental remediation

    PubMed Central

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; Yi, Zhifeng; Tardy, Blaise; Merenda, Andrea; des Ligneris, Elise; Dagastine, Ray R.; Kong, Lingxue

    2017-01-01

    Nano-porous metallic matrixes (NMMs) offer superior surface to volume ratios as well as enhanced optical, photonic, and electronic properties to bulk metallic materials. Such behaviours are correlated to the nano-scale inter-grain metal domains that favour the presence of electronic vacancies. In this work, continuous 3D NMMs were synthesized for the first time through a simple diffusion-reduction process whereby the aerogel matrix was functionalized with (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The surface energy of the silica monolith templates was tuned to improve the homogeneity of the reduction process while thiol functionalization facilitated the formation of a high density of seeding points for metal ions to reduce. The diameter of NMMs was between 2 and 1000 nm, corresponding to a silver loading between 1.23 and 41.16 at.%. A rates of catalytic degradation kinetics of these NMMS which is three orders of magnitude higher than those of the non-functionalized silver-silica structures. Furthermore, the enhancement in mechanical stability at nanoscale which was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy force measurements, electronic density and chemical inertness was assessed and critically correlated to their catalytic potential. This strategy opens up new avenues for design of complex architectures of either single or multi-metal alloy NMMs with enhanced surface properties for various applications. PMID:28332602

  11. Recycling of ceramic particulate reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.C.; Murthy, C.S.C.; Kamath, R.; Vinai Babu, B.R.; Satish, B.M.; Girish, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    The aluminum matrix composites with ceramic dispersoids can be separated by the density difference concept. In the proposed work, composite scrap is recycled using an oil fired furnace. The scrap is melted in the furnace and temperature is maintained below 740 degree centigrade. Because of the density difference the lighter dispersoids will float and heavier dispersoids will settle down. The clean melt is separated be removing the floating and settled dispersoids, and then filtering using ceramic filters.

  12. Engineering Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites (Volume 3)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-10

    interface, particularly at areas where the interface has been weakened by particulate contamination. The high pressures that result cause the film to...pure aluminum matrix by pressure infiltration. Miniature tensile specimens of the SiC coated AGR/ composite were tested in-situ in the high voltage...minimizing their weaknesses. The points of particular interest are the attainment of high stiffness and strength under both monotonic and cyclic loading

  13. Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Daniels, D.L.; Serafini, T.T.; Di Carlo, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis focuses on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  14. Novel magnesium-nanofluorapatite metal matrix nanocomposite with improved biodegradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Fathi, M H; Meratian, M; Razavi, M

    2011-06-01

    Designing and preparation of magnesium alloys with adjustable biocorrosion rates in the human body and precipitation ability of bone-like apatite layer have been of interest recently. Application of metal matrix composites (MMC) based on magnesium alloys might be an approach to this challenge. The aim of this work was fabrication and evaluation of biocorrosion and bioactivity of a novel MMC made of magnesium alloy AZ91 as matrix and fluorapatite (FA) nano particles as reinforcement. Biodegradable Magnesium-nano fluorapatite metal matrix nanocomposite (AZ91-20FA) was made via a blending-pressing-sintering method. In vitro corrosion tests were performed for evaluation of biocorrosion behavior of produced AZ91-20FA nanocomposite. The results showed that the addition of FA nano particles to magnesium alloy can reduce not only the corrosion rate in a simulated body environment but also accelerate the formation of an apatite layer.

  15. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  16. Microyielding of core-shell crystal dendrites in a bulk-metallic-glass matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. -Wen; Qiao, Junwei; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; Lee, Wen -Jay; Scheel, Mario; Chuang, Chih -Pin; Liaw, Peter K.; Lo, Yu -Chieh; Zhang, Yong; Di Michiel, Marco

    2014-03-18

    In-situ synchrotron x-ray experiments have been used to follow the evolution of the diffraction peaks for crystalline dendrites embedded in a bulk metallic glass matrix subjected to a compressive loading-unloading cycle. We observe irreversible diffraction-peak splitting even though the load does not go beyond half of the bulk yield strength. The chemical analysis coupled with the transmission electron microscopy mapping suggests that the observed peak splitting originates from the chemical heterogeneity between the core (major peak) and the stiffer shell (minor peak) of the dendrites. A molecular dynamics model has been developed to compare the hkl-dependent microyielding of the bulk metallic-glass matrix composite. As a result, the complementary diffraction measurements and the simulation results suggest that the interfaces between the amorphous matrix and the (211) crystalline planes relax under prolonged load that causes a delay in the reload curve which ultimately catches up with the original path.

  17. Differential Die-Away Analysis for detection of 235U in metallic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Agrawal, Ashish; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Sinha, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Differential Die-Away Analysis is a powerful tool for detecting small quantity of fissile material even if it is shielded or placed in non-fissile matrix. The technique can be used to monitor and characterize fissile content for nuclear waste assay. In this paper, we have discussed the application of differential die away technique for detection of small quantity of fissile material in nuclear waste assay. Feasibility experiments to optimize various parameters have been carried out for detection of 235U in metallic matrix and reported in this paper. A minimum quantity of 1 g of 235U in 150 kg of metallic matrix has been detected in the experimental configuration being reported.

  18. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  19. Polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Serafini, T. T.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis is being focused on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  20. Concurrent tailoring of fabrication process and interphase layer to reduce residual stresses in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented to reduce the residual matrix stresses in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) by optimizing the fabrication process and interphase layer characteristics. The response of the fabricated MMC was simulated based on nonlinear micromechanics. Application cases include fabrication tailoring, interphase tailoring, and concurrent fabrication-interphase optimization. Two composite systems, silicon carbide/titanium and graphite/copper, are considered. Results illustrate the merits of each approach, indicate that concurrent fabrication/interphase optimization produces significant reductions in the matrix residual stresses and demonstrate the strong coupling between fabrication and interphase tailoring.

  1. The abrasive wear properties of Al-Mg-Si3N4 metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shou-Ren; Sun, Bin; Geng, Hao-Ran; Wang, Ying-Zi

    2006-10-01

    One kind of three-dimensional network structure, reinforced aluminum magnesium matrix composites, has been prepared by pressure-assisted and vacuum-driven infiltration technology. The composites interpenetrated with ceramic have higher wear resistance than the metal matrix owing to their special topology structure. The reinforcement volume fraction has a large effect on abrasive wear. The wear rate decreases with the increase of the volume fraction of reinforcement and increases with the increase of sliding time and applied load. The wear mechanism of the composites (abrasive wear) differs greatly from the matrix alloy (adhesive wear).

  2. Extracellular matrix assembly in extreme acidic eukaryotic biofilms and their possible implications in heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Angeles; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Martín-Uriz, Patxi San; Amils, Ricardo

    2008-07-30

    To evaluate the importance of the extracellular matrix in relation to heavy metal binding capacity in extreme acidic environments, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composition of 12 biofilms isolated from Río Tinto (SW, Spain) was analyzed. Each biofilm was composed mainly by one or two species of eukaryotes, although other microorganisms were present. EPS ranged from 130 to 439 mg g(-1) biofilm dry weight, representing between 15% and the 40% of the total biofilm dry weight (DW). Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found in the amount of total EPS extracted from biofilms dominated by the same organism at different sampling points. The amount of EPS varied among different biofilms collected from the same sampling location. Colloidal EPS ranged from 42 to 313 mg g(-1) dry weight; 10% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Capsular EPS ranged from 50 to 318 mg g(-1) dry weight; 5% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Seven of the 12 biofilms showed higher amounts of capsular than colloidal EPS (p<0.05). Total amount of EPS decreased when total cell numbers and pH increased. There was a positive correlation between EPS concentration and heavy metal concentration in the water. Observations by low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) revealed the mineral adsorption in the matrix of EPS and onto the cell walls. EPS in all biofilms were primarily composed of carbohydrates, heavy metals and humic acid, plus small quantities of proteins and DNA. After carbohydrates, heavy metals were the second main constituents of the extracellular matrix. Their total concentrations ranged from 3 to 32 mg g(-1) biofilm dry weight, reaching up to 16% of the total composition. In general, the heavy metal composition of the EPS extracted from the biofilms closely resembled the metal composition of the water from which the biofilms were collected.

  3. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  4. High-strain-rate behavior of metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guden, Mustafa

    Dynamic loading response is an important design parameter, which is critical in severe applications where impact loading occurs, but which has been little investigated to date for MMCs. Those MMCs which have been tested at high strain-rates so far have been diverse in terms of matrix alloy and reinforcement type, size and shape, making comparisons difficult. In this study, four different MMCs, SiC particulate and whisker reinforced, Alsb2Osb3 short and long fiber reinforced, representing currently available MMC groups, have been compression tested at quasi-static and high strain rates ({˜}10sp3\\ ssp{-1}). It has been shown that the strain rate sensitivity of the composite is very similar to that of the corresponding unreinforced alloy for the following composites: SiCsb{p}/2024 Al MMC, SiCsb{w}/2124-T6 Al MMC, Alsb2Osb3 (Saffil) short fiber reinforced Al-1.2wt%Cu in a direction normal to the Planar Random Fiber Plane, and Alsb2Osb3 (FP) long fiber reinforced Al-3wt%Li MMC tested in the transverse direction. In Alsb2Osb3 Saffil short fiber reinforced Al-1.2wt%Cu MMC tested in a direction parallel to the Planar Random Fiber Plane and FP-Alsb2Osb3 long fiber MMC in the longitudinal direction, the strain rate sensitivities of the flow stress or maximum stress were found to be higher than those of the monolithic alloy. The increased strain rate sensitivity in Saffil short fiber reinforced MMC was found to be a combined effect of matrix rate sensitivity and load carried by fiber until about 5% strains. The increased rate sensitivity of FP reinforced MMC in the longitudinal direction was due to the increased fiber buckling stress which scaled with matrix shear stress. Microscopic observations have shown that, in SiC whisker reinforced MMC, the failure was controlled by thermal softening and strain localization at high strain rates. In Saffil reinforced MMC, the reduced fiber fragment size at high strain rates and increased extent of matrix voiding were the dominant

  5. Light-weight, high-performance metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of a wide range of light-weight, high-performance aluminum powder metallurgy composites that combine both standard (6061 and 2124) and specialty matrix compositions (Al-Mg-Cu-Li and Al-Fe-Ce) with a wide variety of discontinuous reinforcements (Al2O3, B4C, and SiC). This paper reviews the fabrication and damage tolerance performance of these light-weight, high-performance composites. Particular attention is given to developing a general framework for understanding the interrelationship existing between microstructure, thermomechanical processing and ductility/fracture toughness behavior in these composite systems.

  6. Simulation of Damage Evolution in Discontinously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.; Hu, Shenyang Y.

    2009-08-01

    First, a phase-field model for elastic-plastic solids obeying von Mises yield criterion will be described. Then, this phase-field model will be extended to simulate the damage evolution due to nucleation and growth of voids in ductile matrix for discontinuously reinforced composites. The role of reinforcement morphology and the modulus effects leading to final failure all included in the simulations in an effort to make a parametric investigation. The advantages and disadvantages of such phase-field modeling approach in comparison to well established other continuum methods will be elucidated.

  7. Spray-forming monolithic aluminum alloy and metal matrix composite strip

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-10-01

    Spray forming with de Laval nozzles is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. Using this approach, aluminum alloys have been spray formed as strip, with technoeconomic advantages over conventional hot mill processing and continuous casting. The spray-formed strip had a flat profile, minimal porosity, high yield, and refined microstructure. In an adaptation to the technique, 6061 Al/SiC particulate-reinforced metal matrix composite strip was produced by codeposition of the phases.

  8. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  9. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  10. Analysis of thermomechanical fatigue of unidirectional titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirdamadi, M.; Johnson, W. S.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Castelli, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) data was generated for a Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn (Ti-15-3) material reinforced with SCS-6 silicon carbide fibers for both in-phase and out-of-phase thermomechanical cycling. Significant differences in failure mechanisms and fatigue life were noted for in-phase and out-of-phase testing. The purpose of the research is to apply a micromechanical model to the analysis of the data. The analysis predicts the stresses in the fiber and the matrix during the thermal and mechanical cycling by calculating both the thermal and mechanical stresses and their rate-dependent behavior. The rate-dependent behavior of the matrix was characterized and was used to calculate the constituent stresses in the composite. The predicted 0 degree fiber stress range was used to explain the composite failure. It was found that for a given condition, temperature, loading frequency, and time at temperature, the 0 degree fiber stress range may control the fatigue life of the unidirectional composite.

  11. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  12. Deformation and failure mechanisms in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, G.; Majumdar, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the key deformation mechanisms and their interaction leading to failure of both 0 degree and 90 degree Ti 15-3/SCS-6 laminae under monotonic loading. The experimental results suggest that inelastic deformation in the 0-degree lamina is dominated by plastic deformation and that in the 90-degree lamina is dominated by both fiber-matrix debonding and plasticity. The loading-unloading response, monitoring of Poisson's ratio and microscopy were utilized to identify the key deformation mechanisms. The sequence of deformation mechanisms leading to failure are identified for both the 0 and the 90-degree specimens. The threshold strains for plasticity or damage which are referred to as 'microdeformation' in the 0 deg and 90 deg laminae are approximately 0.004 and 0.002, respectively, at room temperature. These strain levels may be considered critical in initiation based structural design with these composites.

  13. Metal particles in a ceramic matrix--scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy characterization.

    PubMed

    Konopka, K

    2006-09-01

    This paper is concerned with ceramic matrix (Al(2)O(3)) composites with introduced metal particles (Ni, Fe). The composites were obtained via sintering of powders under very high pressure (2.5 GPa). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were chosen as the tools for the identification and description of the shape, size and distribution of the metal particles. The Al(2)O(3)-Ni composite contained agglomerates of the Ni particles surrounded by ceramic grains and nanometre-size Ni particles located inside the ceramic grains and at the ceramic grain boundaries. In the Al(2)O(3)-Fe composite, the Fe particles were mostly surrounded by ceramic grains. Moreover, holes left by the Fe particles were found. The high pressure used in the fabrication of the composites changed the shape of the metal and ceramic powder grains via plastic deformation.

  14. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  15. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  16. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  17. Processing of Hybrid Structures Consisting of Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) With Metallic Reinforcement of Steel or Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    titanium - and steel-based metals, high specific stiffness, high specific strength , tailorable coefficient of thermal...to titanium and steel- based metals, high specific stiffuess, high specific strength , tailorable coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and high ...hollow, periodic cellular structures are of interest due to their very high stiffness to weight ratio and high damage tolerance (e.g., very high

  18. Laser-induced thermal characterization of nano Ag metal dispersed ceramic alumina matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Sajan D.; Anapara, Aji A.; Warrier, K. G. K.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we report the measurements of thermal diffusivity of nano Ag metal dispersed ceramic alumina matrix sintered at different temperatures using laser induced non-destructive photoacoustic technique. Measurements of thermal diffusivity also have been carried out on specimens with various concentration of nano metal. Analysis of the data is done on the basis of one-dimensional model of Rosencwaig and Gersho. The present measurements on the thermal diffusivity of nano metal dispersed ceramic alumina shows that porosity has a great influence on the heat transport and the thermal diffusivity value. The present analysis also shows that the inclusion of nano metal into ceramic matrix increases its interconnectivity and hence the thermal diffusivity value. The present study on the samples sintered at different temperature shows that the porosity of the ceramics varies considerably with the change in sintering temperature. The results are interpreted in terms of phonon assisted heat transfer mechanism and the exclusion of pores with the increase in sintering temperature.

  19. Production and mechanical properties of Al-SiC metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvanis, K.; Fasnakis, D.; Maropoulos, A.; Papanikolaou, S.

    2016-11-01

    The usage of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composites is constantly increasing in the last years due to their unique properties such as light weight, high strength, high specific modulus, high fatigue strength, high hardness and low density. Al-SiC composites of various carbide compositions were produced using a centrifugal casting machine. The mechanical properties, tensile and compression strength, hardness and drop-weight impact strength were studied in order to determine the optimum carbide % in the metal matrix composites. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure-property correlation. It was observed that the tensile and the compressive strength of the composites increased as the proportion of silicon carbide became higher in the composites. Also with increasing proportion of silicon carbide in the composite, the material became harder and appeared to have smaller values for total displacement and total energy during impact testing.

  20. Experimental Research on Ultrasonic Vibration Milling Metal Matrix Composites SiCp/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G. F.; Zhao, B.; Xiang, D. H.; Zhao, M. L.

    2011-01-17

    Although particle reinforced metal matrix composites possess excellent physical properties, its machining performance is rather bad because of its specific structure. It is difficult to obtain good cutting effect by traditional machining method. So machining has become the bottleneck which strictly restricts its industry application. This paper mainly focuses on both wear characteristics of different tool materials and material removal mechanism in ultrasonic milling high volume fraction particle reinforced metal matrix composites SiCp/Al. An acoustic device for ultrasonic vibration milling was developed to introduce the ultrasonic vibration into the traditional machining process. Through the contrast experiment of traditional milling and ultrasonic vibration milling SiCp/Al, the mechanism of tool wear and characteristics of surface topography were analyzed. The experimental results showed that the surface integrity and tool life in the ultrasonic vibration milling SiCp/Al were improved.

  1. Strengthening and grain refinement in an Al-6061 metal matrix composite through intense plastic straining

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, R.Z.; Islamgaliev, R.K.; Kuzmina, N.F.; Li, Y.; Langdon, T.G.

    1998-12-04

    Intense plastic straining techniques such as torsion straining and equal channel angular (ECA) pressing are processing procedures which may be used to make beneficial changes in the properties of materials through a substantial refinement in the microstructure. Although intense plastic straining procedures have been used for grain refinement in numerous experiments reported over the last decade, there appears to have been no investigations in which these procedures were used with metal matrix composites. The present paper describes a series of experiments in which torsion straining and ECA pressing were applied to an Al-6061 metal matrix composite reinforced with 10 volume % of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates. As will be demonstrated, intense plastic straining has the potential for both reducing the grain size of the composite to the submicrometer level and increasing the strength at room temperature by a factor in the range of {approximately}2 to {approximately}3.

  2. A Study on 3-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Aluminium 8011 / Graphite Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha Shankar, B.; Anil, K. C.; Patil, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Metals and alloys have found their vital role in many applications like structural, corrosive, tribological, etc., in engineering environment. The alloys/composites having high strength to low weight ratio have gained attention of many researchers recently. In this work, graphite reinforced Aluminium 8011 metal matrix composite was prepared by conventional stir casting route, by varying the weight % of reinforcement. Uniform distribution of Graphite in matrix alloy was confirmed by optical micrographs. Prepared composite specimens were subjected to 3-body abrasive testing by varying applied load and time, the silica particles of 400 grit size were used as abrasive particles. It was observed that with the increase of weight% of Graphite the wear resistance of composite was also increasing and on comparison it was found that reinforced composite gives good wear resistance than base alloy.

  3. Superelement methods in high temperature metal matrix composites. Final Report; M.S. Thesis, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trowbridge, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A study into fiber fracture and debonding in metal matrix composites is conducted using the finite element method. The superelement finite element technique was used to model a metal matrix composite under various loading condition and with varying degrees of fiber debonding. The use of superelement saved many man hours by allowing for alteration of only the primary superelement to manipulate partial bonding for the entire model. The composite's material properties were calculated and the effects of fiber debonding on these properties were noted. The internal stress state of the composite while under various loads was also studied. Special interest was devoted to the change in stress state as a result of increasing fiber debonding.

  4. Tribo-evaluation of iron based metal matrix nanocomposites for heavy duty applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pallav; Kumar, Devendra; Parkash, Om; Jha, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    The present paper reports dry sliding wear behavior of Iron based Metal Matrix Nanocomposites (MMNCs). Specimens were synthesized by ball milling followed by compaction and sintering in an argon atmosphere. Dry sliding wear behavior of undoped and doped Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix nanocomposite system was evaluated respectively. It was found that due to the reactive sintering between iron and alumina particles a nano iron aluminate phase (FeAl2O4) forms as a result of which the various structural and mechanical properties were found to improve. The results so obtained are critically analyzed and discussed to illustrate the interaction of various process parameters involved. It is expected that the results of the present work will be beneficial in developing quality MMNC products for heavy duty applications.

  5. Fusion and friction stir welding of aluminum-metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storjohann, D.; Barabash, O. M.; David, S. A.; Sklad, P. S.; Bloom, E. E.; Babu, S. S.

    2005-11-01

    Microstructure evolutions and degradations of aluminum-metal-matrix composites during fusion welding were studied and compared with thermodynamic calculations. In fusion welds of Al2O3-reinforced composites, the decomposition of Al2O3 was observed. In fusion welds of SiC whisker-reinforced composites, the decomposition of SiC to Al4C3+Si by reaction with molten aluminum occurred. These phenomena led to unacceptable fusion welds in aluminum metal-matrix composites. Successful welds were produced in the same composites by friction stir welding (FSW). Significant reorientation of SiC whiskers close to the boundary of the dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was observed. The small hardening in the dynamically recrystallized region was attributed to the presence of dislocation tangles in between SiC whiskers.

  6. Compressive and shear buckling analysis of metal matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1993-01-01

    Combined inplane compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels using the Raleigh-Ritz minimum energy method with a consideration of transverse shear effect of the sandwich core. The sandwich panels were fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that slightly slender (along unidirectional compressive loading axis) rectangular sandwich panels have the most desirable stiffness-to-weight ratios for aerospace structural applications; the degradation of buckling strength of sandwich panels with rising temperature is faster in shear than in compression; and the fiber orientation of the face sheets for optimum combined-load buckling strength of sandwich panels is a strong function of both loading condition and panel aspect ratio. Under the same specific weight and panel aspect ratio, a sandwich panel with metal matrix composite face sheets has much higher buckling strength than one having monolithic face sheets.

  7. Creep of Refractory Fibers and Modeling of Metal and Ceramic Matrix Composite Creep Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Our concentration during this research was on the following subprograms. (1) Ultra high vacuum creep tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires, temperature range from 1100 K to 1500 K, creep time of 1 to 500 hours. (2) High temperature vacuum tensile tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires. (3) Air and vacuum tensile creep tests on polycrystalline and single crystal alumina fibers, such as alumina-mullite Nextel fiber, yttrium aluminum ganet (YAG) and Saphikon, temperature range from 1150 K to 1470 K, creep time of 2 to 200 hours. (4) Microstructural evaluation of crept fibers, TEM study on the crept metal wires, SEM study on the fracture surface of ceramic fibers. (5) Metal Matrix Composite creep models, based on the fiber creep properties and fiber-matrix interface zone formation.

  8. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  9. Reinforcement Size Dependence of Load Bearing Capacity in Ultrafine-Grained Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hanry; Jiang, Lin; Balog, Martin; Krizik, Peter; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2017-09-01

    The length-scale effects on the load bearing capacity of reinforcement particles in an ultrafine-grained metal matrix composite (MMC) were studied, paying particular attention to the nanoscale effects. We observed that the nanoparticles provide the MMCs with a higher strength but a lower stiffness compared to equivalent materials reinforced with submicron particles. The reduction in stiffness is attributed to ineffective load transfer of the local stresses to the small and equiaxed nanoparticles.

  10. Reinforcement Size Dependence of Load Bearing Capacity in Ultrafine-Grained Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hanry; Jiang, Lin; Balog, Martin; Krizik, Peter; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2017-07-01

    The length-scale effects on the load bearing capacity of reinforcement particles in an ultrafine-grained metal matrix composite (MMC) were studied, paying particular attention to the nanoscale effects. We observed that the nanoparticles provide the MMCs with a higher strength but a lower stiffness compared to equivalent materials reinforced with submicron particles. The reduction in stiffness is attributed to ineffective load transfer of the local stresses to the small and equiaxed nanoparticles.

  11. Predicting Mechanical Properties of Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams Reinforced with Ceramic Spheres

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    reinforced with Al2O3 spheres of various sizes, size ranges, and wall thickness to sphere diameter ratios show good agreement. Introduction Metal matrix...treatments reinforced with Al2O3 spheres of various sizes, size ranges, and wall thickness to sphere diameter ratios show good agreement. 15. SUBJECT...longitudinally and not laterally (i.e. no barreling: ) until all hollow reinforcements are crushed. Assuming the wall thickness of the hollow

  12. Superelement methods applications to micromechanics of high temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptation of the superelement finite-element method for micromechanics of continuous fiber high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) is described. The method is used to predict the thermomechanical behavior of P100-graphite/copper composites using MSC/NASTRAN and it is also used to validate those predicted by using an in-house computer program designed to perform micromechanics for HT-MMC. Typical results presented in the paper include unidirectional composite thermal properties, mechanical properties, and microstresses.

  13. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-10-01

    In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

  14. Stress concentration at a notch tip in unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Shojiro; Osamura, Kozo; Tokinori, Kenji; Nakatani, Mitsuhisa; Yamatsuta, Koji

    1991-09-01

    A method to calculate static stress concentration factors in the fibers at the tip of a rectangular notch in unidirectional metal matrix composites was presented based on the shear lag analysis for a two-dimensional (2-D) model. By using this method, the influences of matrix yielding, width and size of notch, and size of specimen on the stress concentration factors were described. Furthermore, this method was applied successfully to describe the load-COD curve and tensile strength of notched-boron/aluminum and alumina/aluminum composites.

  15. Action of Cryogenic chill on Mechanical properties of Nickel alloy Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. K. Anil; Ananthaprasad, M. G.; GopalaKrishna, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the area of material science engineering, metallurgists may be at the forefront of new technologies, developing metals for new applications, or involved in the traditional manufacture. By doing so it is possible for metallurgist to apply their knowledge of metals to solve complex problems and looking for ways to improve the mechanical properties of the materials. Therefore, an investigation in the present research was made to fabricate and evaluate the microstructure and mechanical properties of composites developed using cryogenically cooled copper chills, consisting of nickel alloy matrix and garnet particles as the reinforcement. The reinforcement being added ranges from 3 to 12 wt.% in steps of 3%. A stir casting process was used to fabricate the nickel base matrix alloy fused with garnet reinforcement particle. The matrix alloy was melted in a casting furnace at around 1350°C, the garnet particulates which was preheated to 600°C, was introduced evenly into the molten metal alloy. An arrangement was made at one end of the mould by placing copper chill blocks of varying thickness brazed with MS hallow block in which liquid nitrogen was circulated for cryogenic effect. After solidification, the composite materials thus synthesized were examined for microstructural and mechanical properties as per ASTM standards.

  16. Model Determined for Predicting Fatigue Lives of Metal Matrix Composites Under Mean Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine components invariably are subjected to mean stresses over and above the cyclic loads. In monolithic materials, it has been observed that tensile mean stresses are detrimental and compressive mean stresses are beneficial to fatigue life in comparison to a base of zero mean stress. Several mean stress models exist for monolithic metals, but each differ quantitatively in the extent to which detrimental or beneficial effects are ascribed. There have been limited attempts to apply these models to metal matrix composites. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, several mean stress models--the Smith-Watson- Topper, Walker, Normalized Goodman, and Soderberg models--were examined for applicability to this class of composite materials. The Soderberg approach, which normalizes the mean stress to a 0.02-percent yield strength, was shown to best represent the effect of mean stresses over the range covered. The other models varied significantly in their predictability and often failed to predict the composite behavior at very high tensile mean stresses. This work is the first to systematically demonstrate the influence of mean stresses on metal matrix composites and model their effects. Attention also was given to fatigue-cracking mechanisms in the Ti-15-3 matrix and to micromechanics analyses of mean stress effects.

  17. Model Determined for Predicting Fatigue Lives of Metal Matrix Composites Under Mean Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine components invariably are subjected to mean stresses over and above the cyclic loads. In monolithic materials, it has been observed that tensile mean stresses are detrimental and compressive mean stresses are beneficial to fatigue life in comparison to a base of zero mean stress. Several mean stress models exist for monolithic metals, but each differ quantitatively in the extent to which detrimental or beneficial effects are ascribed. There have been limited attempts to apply these models to metal matrix composites. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, several mean stress models--the Smith-Watson- Topper, Walker, Normalized Goodman, and Soderberg models--were examined for applicability to this class of composite materials. The Soderberg approach, which normalizes the mean stress to a 0.02-percent yield strength, was shown to best represent the effect of mean stresses over the range covered. The other models varied significantly in their predictability and often failed to predict the composite behavior at very high tensile mean stresses. This work is the first to systematically demonstrate the influence of mean stresses on metal matrix composites and model their effects. Attention also was given to fatigue-cracking mechanisms in the Ti-15-3 matrix and to micromechanics analyses of mean stress effects.

  18. Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Electroplating. A Review on Technology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchentrunk, R.

    In this paper selected results of research and development achieved in the Messerschmitt Bölkow Blohm (MBB) Central Laboratory (today part of EADS) within the last four decades will be presented. The focus will concentrate on investigations in the aerospace industry, mainly the production of structures consisting of fibre reinforced metals. By embedding high strength filaments (for example boron fibres) in a ductile metallic matrix (electrodeposited copper, nickel or aluminium) composite materials with excellent strength and stiffness can be produced. By this — on a pilot plant scale — cylindrical metal matrix composite structures have been fabricated and tested and lightweight pressure vessels for future space application (mainly for long time missions) have been produced. The materials, electrolytes, processes and equipment for fabrication and testing of these structures will be presented in detail and the advantages and limitations of the applied processes will be discussed. Beside of this application the technology of electroplating has been used at MBB for the fabrication of dispersion hardened coatings by embedding micro- as well as nano-sized particles in various matrix materials.

  19. Interfacial characteristics for brazing of aluminum matrix composites with Al-12Si filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1997-12-01

    Discussions concerning the interfacial reactions and characterizations in brazing aluminum matrix composites are documented in this study. Joints of alumina particulate reinforced 6061 aluminum matrix composites were made using an Al-12 (wt pct) Si filler metal by vacuum brazing. The resulted maximum bonding strengths were 75.4, 81.5, and 71.8 MPa for 10, 15, and 20 vol pct alumina reinforcement, respectively. The microstructural examinations revealed that the bonding strength was strictly related to the reinforced alumina particles and the reaction products presented at the joint interfaces. During brazing, Mg segregated at the joining interface and alumina/6061 Al interface. Further, reactions between alumina and 6061 Al matrix resulted in the formation of Mg-rich phases, such as MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgO, near the joining interface and the alumina reinforcement. The Si in the filler material penetrated into the metal matrix composites (MMCs) matrix and segregated at the alumina/6061 Al interfaces. This phenomenon can be confirmed by a joint between two alumina bulk specimens.

  20. Parametric studies to determine the effect of compliant layers on metal matrix composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.; Brown, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Computational simulation studies are conducted to identify compliant layers to reduce matrix stresses which result from the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and the large temperature range over which the current metal matrix composites will be used. The present study includes variations of compliant layers and their properties to determine their influence on unidirectional composite and constituent response. Two simulation methods are used for these studies. The first approach is based on a three-dimensional linear finite element analysis of a 9 fiber unidirectional composite system. The second approach is a micromechanics based nonlinear computer code developed to determine the behavior of metal matrix composite system for thermal and mechanical loads. The results show that an effective compliant layer for the SCS 6 (SiC)/Ti-24Al-11Nb (Ti3Al + Nb) and SCS 6 (SiC)/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al (Ti-15-3) composite systems should have modulus 15 percent that of the matrix and a coefficient of thermal expansion of the compliant layer roughly equal to that of the composite system without the CL. The matrix stress in the longitudinal and the transverse tangent (loop) direction are tensile for the Ti3Al + Nb and Ti-15-3 composite systems upon cool down from fabrication. The fiber longitudinal stress is compressive from fabrication cool down. Addition of a recommended compliant layer will result in a reduction in the composite modulus.

  1. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  2. Concurrent micromechanical tailoring and fabrication process optimization for metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M.; Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented to minimize the residual matrix stresses in metal matrix composites. Fabrication parameters such as temperature and consolidation pressure are optimized concurrently with the characteristics (i.e., modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, strength, and interphase thickness) of a fiber-matrix interphase. By including the interphase properties in the fabrication process, lower residual stresses are achievable. Results for an ultra-high modulus graphite (P100)/copper composite show a reduction of 21 percent for the maximum matrix microstress when optimizing the fabrication process alone. Concurrent optimization of the fabrication process and interphase properties show a 41 percent decrease in the maximum microstress. Therefore, this optimization method demonstrates the capability of reducing residual microstresses by altering the temperature and consolidation pressure histories and tailoring the interphase properties for an improved composite material. In addition, the results indicate that the consolidation pressures are the most important fabrication parameters, and the coefficient of thermal expansion is the most critical interphase property.

  3. Combined micromechanical and fabrication process optimization for metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M.; Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented to minimize the residual matrix stresses in metal matrix composites. Fabrication parameters such as temperature and consolidation pressure are optimized concurrently with the characteristics (i.e., modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, strength, and interphase thickness) of a fiber-matrix interphase. By including the interphase properties in the fabrication process, lower residual stresses are achievable. Results for an ultra-high modulus graphite (P100)/copper composite show a reduction of 21 percent for the maximum matrix microstress when optimizing the fabrication process alone. Concurrent optimization of the fabrication process and interphase properties show a 41 percent decrease in the maximum microstress. Therefore, this optimization method demonstrates the capability of reducing residual microstresses by altering the temperature and consolidation pressure histories and tailoring the interphase properties for an improved composite material. In addition, the results indicate that the consolidation pressures are the most important fabrication parameters, and the coefficient of thermal expansion is the most critical interphase property.

  4. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  5. Role of interfacial and matrix creep during thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, I.

    2000-03-14

    A uni-dimensional micro-mechanical model for thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites is developed. The model treats the fiber and matrix as thermo-elastic and thermo-elasto-plastic-creeping solids, respectively, and allows the operation of multiple matrix creep mechanisms at various stages of deformation through the use of unified creep laws. It also incorporates the effect of interfacial sliding by an interface-diffusion-controlled diffusional creep mechanism proposed earlier (Funn and Dutta, Acta mater., 1999, 47, 149). The results of thermal cycling simulations based on a graphite fiber reinforced pure aluminum-matrix composite were compared with experimental data on a P100 graphite-6061 Al composite. The model successfully captured all the important features of the observed heating/cooling rate dependence, strain hysteresis, residual permanent strain at the end of a cycle, as well as both intrusion and protrusion of the fiber-ends relative to the matrix at the completion of cycling. The analysis showed that the dominant deformation mechanism operative in the matrix changes continually during thermal cycling due to continuous stress and temperature revision. Based on these results, a framework for the construction of a transient deformation mechanism map for thermal excursions of continuous fiber composites is proposed.

  6. Processing, microstructure, and mechanical behavior of cast magnesium metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, A.

    1995-09-01

    Magnesium metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been receiving attention in recent years as an attractive choice for aerospace and automotive applications because of their low density and superior specific properties. This article presents a liquid mixing and casting process that can be used to produce SiC particulate-reinforced magnesium metal matrix composites via conventional foundry processes. Microstructural features, such as SiC particle distribution, grain refinement, and particle/matrix interfacial reactions of the cast magnesium matrix composites, are investigated, and the effects of solidification-process parameters and matrix alloys (pure Mg and Mg-9 pct Al-1 pct Zn alloy AZ91) on the microstructure are established. The results of this work suggest that in the solidification processing of MMCs, it is important to optimize the process parameters both to avoid excessive interfacial reactions and simultaneously achieve wetting, so that a good particle distribution and interfacial bonding are obtained. The tensile properties, strain hardening, and fracture behavior of the AZ91/SiC composites are also studied and the results are compared with those of the unreinforced AZ91 alloy. The strengthening mechanisms for AZ91/SiC composite, based on the proposed SiC particle/matrix interaction during deformation, are used to explain the increased yield strength and elastic modulus of the composite over the magnesium matrix alloy. The low ductility found in the composites is due to the early appearance of localized damages, such as particle cracking, matrix cracking, and occasionally interface debonding, in the fracture process of the composite.

  7. A lithium-rich composite metal oxide used as a SALDI-MS matrix for the determination of small biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Ze; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Xin, Yue-Long; Bai, Yu; Zhou, Heng-Hui; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2014-12-18

    A lithium-rich composite metal oxide was evaluated as a novel matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The low background interference and lithium-rich feature made it a highly efficient matrix for the analysis of small molecules with high reproducibility, sensitivity and strong salt tolerance.

  8. Metals Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory information about the metals sector (NAICS 331 & 332), including NESHAPs for metal coatings, effluent guidelines for metal products, combustion compliance assistance, and information about foundry sand recycling.

  9. Metal aminoboranes

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  10. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric information (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.

  11. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; ...

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric informationmore » (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.« less

  12. The Effect of Matrix Composition on the Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams during Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kádár, Csilla; Máthis, Kristián; Knapek, Michal; Chmelík, František

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the matrix material on the deformation and failure mechanisms in metal matrix syntactic foams was investigated in this study. Samples with commercially pure Al (Al) and Al-12 wt % Si (AlSi12) eutectic aluminum matrix, reinforced by hollow ceramic spheres, were compressed at room temperature. Concurrently, the acoustic emission response and the strain field development on the surface were monitored in-situ. The results indicate that the plastic deformation of the cell walls is the governing mechanism in the early stage of straining for both types of foams. At large stresses, deformation bands form both in the Al and AlSi12 foam. In Al foam, cell walls collapse in a large volume. In contrast, the AlSi12 foam is more brittle; therefore, the fracture of precipitates and the crushing of the matrix take place within a distinctive deformation band, along with an occurrence of a significant stress drop. The onset stress of ceramic sphere failure was shown to be not influenced by the matrix material. The in-situ methods provided complementary data which further support these results. PMID:28772556

  13. Experimental and Computational Study of Interphase Properties and Mechanics in Titanium Metal Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    properties of this region 3 depend directly upon the chemical, mechanical and thermodynamic nature of the bonding process between the matrix and the fiber...Experimental and Computational Study of Interphase Properties and Mechanics in Titanium Metal Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures Final Report...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Experimental and Computational Study of Interphase Properties and Sb. GRANT NUMBER Mechanics in Titanium Metal

  14. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Metal matrix composites for propulsion components offer high performance and affordability, resulting in low weight and cost. The following sections in this viewgraph presentation describe the pressure infiltration casting of a metal matrix composite LOX turbopump housing: 1) Baseline Pump Design and Stress Analysis; 2) Tool-less Advanced Pressure Infiltration Casting Process; 3) Preform Splicing and Joining for Large Components such as Pump Housing; 4) Fullscale Pump Housing Redesign.

  15. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  16. Study of Carbon Nanotubes in Cu-Cr Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Puneet; Munroe, Norman

    2012-11-01

    A novel metal matrix composite (MMC), Cu-Cr-MWCNT (copper-chromium-multiwalled carbon nanotube), was manufactured using a powder metallurgy technique. Cu-Cr alloy is widely adopted for contacts in vacuum circuit breakers. MWCNT was incorporated in an effort to enhance electrical conductivity and decrease the usage of Cr as strategic metal. Optimized milling conditions and sintering profiles were utilized to minimize any significant damage to the MWCNTs but yet provide homogeneous distribution of all constituents. Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the crystal structure orientation, microstructure, and morphology, respectively, of the composite. Raman peak shift and intensity ratios assessed the stresses induced and the degree of disorder of MWCNTs in the composite. TEM indicated carbide and oxide formations in the composite. SEM images revealed the presence of MWCNTs within the metal matrix. The corrosion resistances of the composite with and without MWCNTs was determined by cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (ASTM F 2129-08) in phosphate buffer saline solution at 37 °C.

  17. Compressive Properties of Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams in Free and Constrained Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbulov, Imre Norbert; Májlinger, Kornél

    2014-06-01

    Metal matrix syntactic foam (MMSF) blocks were produced by an inert gas-assisted pressure infiltration technique. MMSFs are advanced hollow sphere reinforced-composite materials having promising application in the fields of aviation, transport, and automotive engineering, as well as in civil engineering. The produced blocks were investigated in free and constrained compression modes, and besides the characteristic mechanical properties, their deformation mechanisms and failure modes were studied. In the tests, the chemical composition of the matrix material, the size of the reinforcing ceramic hollow spheres, the applied heat treatment, and the compression mode were considered as investigation parameters. The monitored mechanical properties were the compressive strength, the fracture strain, the structural stiffness, the fracture energy, and the overall absorbed energy. These characteristics were strongly influenced by the test parameters. By the proper selection of the matrix and the reinforcement and by proper design, the mechanical properties of the MMSFs can be effectively tailored for specific and given applications.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  19. A unique set of micromechanics equations for high temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A unique set of micromechanic equations is presented for high temperature metal matrix composites. The set includes expressions to predict mechanical properties, thermal properties and constituent microstresses for the unidirectional fiber reinforced ply. The equations are derived based on a mechanics of materials formulation assuming a square array unit cell model of a single fiber, surrounding matrix and an interphase to account for the chemical reaction which commonly occurs between fiber and matrix. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to perform a preliminary validation of the equations. Excellent agreement between properties predicted using the micromechanics equations and properties simulated by the finite element analyses are demonstrated. Implementation of the micromechanics equations as part of an integrated computational capability for nonlinear structural analysis of high temperature multilayered fiber composites is illustrated.

  20. Preliminary investigation of acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of metal-matrix composite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Lerch, Brad A.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustoultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed on a series of (0)8, (90)8, (+/-30)2s, (+/-60)2s, (0/90)2s, and (90/0)2s tensile specimens composed of eight laminated layers of continuous, SiC-fiber-reinforced Ti-15-3 matrix. The frequency spectrum was dominated by frequencies of longitudinal wave resonance through the thickness of the specimen at the sending transducer; signal propagation from the sender to the receiver was by shear waves. The magnitude of the frequency spectrum of the AU signal was used for calculating a stress-wave factor (SWF) based upon integrating the spectral distribution function. The SWF was sensitive to fiber-matrix debonding caused by mechanical strain and also to unconstrained thermal cycling. Damage in this metal-matrix composite structure due to tensile loading or thermal cycling was detected by this change in the magnitude of the frequency spectrum.

  1. A unique set of micromechanics equations for high-temperature metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    A unique set of micromechanic equations is presented for high-temperature metal matrix composites. The set includes expressions to predict mechanical properties, thermal properties and constituent microstresses for the unidirectional fiber reinforced ply. The equations are derived based on a mechanics of materials formulation assuming a square array unit cell model of a single fiber, surrounding matrix and an interphase to account for the chemical reaction which commonly occurs between fiber and matrix. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to perform a preliminary validation of the equations. Excellent agreement between properties predicted using the micromechanics equations and properties simulated by the finite element analyses are demonstrated. Implementation of the micromechanics equations as part of an integrated computational capability for nonlinear structural analysis of high temperature multilayered fiber composites is illustrated.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-08-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  3. Models for predicting damage evolution in metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; Hurtado, L.D.; Helms, K.L.E.

    1995-03-01

    A thermomechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite (MMC) subjected to cyclic loading is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of processing induced residual thermal stresses, matrix inelasticity, and interface cracking. Due to these complexities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modelled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modelled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a four-ply unidirectional SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium composite under high temperature isothermal mechanical fatigue. Results indicate rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for damage propagation, thus contributing to improved ductility of the composite. Results also indicate that the model may be useful for inclusion in life prediction methodologies for MMC`s.

  4. Dislocation fiber interactions in short fiber reinforced metal matrix composites during creep and during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Eggeler, G.F.; Earthman, J.C.

    1997-12-22

    Short fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (SFR MMCs) are attractive engineering materials because they exhibit increased strength and wear resistance as compared to the fiber free matrix materials. For example, an aluminum alloy containing 15 volume percent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers with average dimensions of 200 {micro}m length and 3 {micro}m diameter exhibits an improved creep strength with respect to the fiber free matrix. In addition to extended periods of isothermal and static creep loading high temperature components are subjected to temperature changes which are associated with thermal stresses. Thermal cycles can be due to start up and shut down events and can also be a consequence of anisothermal operating conditions. In short fiber reinforced aluminum alloys, in the stress and temperature range of interest, dislocation creep governs the deformation behavior of the MMC`s metallic matrix. It is therefore interesting to discuss the role of dislocations during creep and during thermal cycling of SFR MMCs. In the present paper the authors describe some basic dislocation mechanisms near the fiber/matrix-interface (FMI) of SFR MMCs. They first consider dislocation structures which are associated with the processing of SFR MMCs. Then dislocation processes which are associated with (1) static isothermal creep and (2) thermal cycling are discussed. Common and distinct features of the associated dislocation structures in the matrix zone near the FMI are highlighted. The authors then use the insight they have gained to qualitatively understand the role of dislocations in the macroscopic response of a SFR MMC under more complex load profiles.

  5. Joining of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites via reactive metal penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Mark Rico

    The processing and properties of ceramic and ceramic matrix composite components have improved to the point that they are now candidates for use in a variety of structural applications at high temperature. However, the lack of effective joining techniques limits further application of these materials. In an effort to remove this limitation a joining process based on the reactive metal penetration process used to make bulk metal/ceramic composites has been developed to join ceramics. This joining technique offers the potential to bond refractory components at reduced temperature, thus alleviating some of the limitations of traditional ceramic joining processes. Several experiments joining alumina and SiCf/SiC composite have been carried out at temperatures of 1100--1200°C. The results of these experiments show that processing ceramic joints with composite interlayers at these temperatures is possible, and may be technologically significant if a number of interesting processing and microstructural difficulties can be successfully overcome.

  6. Emerging Development in Al-Alloy Recycling for Nontraditional Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabeeh, Bakr Mohamed

    Growing demands for new emerging materials are aimed at introducing nontraditional processes. However, Direct metal oxidation, DIMOX, as applied to Al-alloys recycling has prompted production processes to be more cost efficient. Aluminum alloy scrap is heated to different temperatures, 950°C, 1000°C, and 1050°C for various holding times (15 to 90 minutes) and then poured into metallic molds. The formation of hybrid composite is introduced by alloying elements additions (α -Fe, and Si). Ceramic alumina phase with intermetallic fibers or whiskers are established in an aluminum matrix. Functionally gradient materials, FGM, are also produced after prolonged holding time (90 min. at 1050°C). Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy EDX is utilized for microstructural characterization. 3-point tests are applied on another group of samples. The application of DIMOX on recycled Al-alloy with the addition of alloying elements has a dominant effect on composite microstructure.

  7. Influence of fiber architecture on the elastic an d inelastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This three part paper focuses on the effect of fiber architecture (i.e., shape and distribution) on the elastic and inelastic response of metal matrix composites. The first part provides an annotative survey of the literature, presented as a historical perspective, dealing with the effects of fiber shape and distribution on the response of advanced polymeric matrix and metal matrix composites. Previous investigations dealing with both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites are included. A summary of the state-of-the-art will assist in defining new directions in this quickly reviving area of research. The second part outlines a recently developed analytical micromechanics model that is particularly well suited for studying the influence of these effects on the response of metal matrix composites. This micromechanics model, referred to as the generalized method of cells (GMC), is capable of predicting the overall, inelastic behavior of unidirectional, multi-phased composites given the properties of the constituents. In particular, the model is sufficiently general to predict the response of unidirectional composites reinforced by either continuous or discontinuous fibers with different inclusion shapes and spatial arrangements in the presence of either perfect or imperfect interfaces and/or interfacial layers. Recent developments regarding this promising model, as well as directions for future enhancements of the model's predictive capability, are included. Finally, the third pan provides qualitative results generated using GMC for a representative titanium matix composite system, SCS-6/TlMETAL 21S. Results are presented that correctly demonstrate the relative effects of fiber arrangement and shape on the longitudinal and transverse stress-strain and creep response, with both strong and weak fiber/matrix interfacial bonds. The fiber arrangements include square, square diagonal, hexagonal and rectangular periodic arrays, as well as a random array. The

  8. A differential CDM model for fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxial, isothermal, continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for fatigue of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element is presented. The model is phenomenological, stress based, and assumes a single scalar internal damage variable, the evolution of which is anisotropic. The development of the fatigue damage model, (i.e., evolutionary law) is based on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, a static fracture surface, and a normalized stress amplitude function. The anisotropy of these surfaces and function, and therefore the model, is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. This transversely isotropic model is shown, when taken to it's isotropic limit, to directly simplify to a previously developed and validated isotropic fatigue continuum damage model. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation in attempting to characterize a class of composite materials, and (2) the capability of the formulation in predicting anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Also, specific material parameters representing an initial characterization of the composite system SiC/Ti 15-3 and the matrix material (Ti 15-3) are reported.

  9. A Unified Model for the Prediction of Yield Strength in Particulate-Reinforced Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, F. A.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Lightweighting in the transportation industry is today recognized as one of the most important strategies to improve fuel efficiency and reduce anthropogenic climate-changing, environment-damaging, and human death-causing emissions. However, the structural applications of lightweight alloys are often limited by some inherent deficiencies such as low stiffness, high wear rate and inferior strength. These properties could be effectively enhanced by the addition of stronger and stiffer reinforcements, especially nano-sized particles, into metal matrix to form composites. In most cases three common strengthening mechanisms (load-bearing effect, mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion, and Orowan strengthening) have been considered to predict the yield strength of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs). This study was aimed at developing a unified model by taking into account the matrix grain size and porosity (which is unavoidable in the materials processing such as casting and powder metallurgy) in the prediction of the yield strength of MMNCs. The Zener pinning effect of grain boundaries by the nano-sized particles has also been integrated. The model was validated using the experimental data of magnesium- and titanium-based nanocomposites containing different types of nano-sized particles (namely, Al2O3, Y2O3, and carbon nanotubes). The predicted results were observed to be in good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. PMID:28793496

  10. A Unified Model for the Prediction of Yield Strength in Particulate-Reinforced Metal Matrix Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mirza, F A; Chen, D L

    2015-08-10

    Lightweighting in the transportation industry is today recognized as one of the most important strategies to improve fuel efficiency and reduce anthropogenic climate-changing, environment-damaging, and human death-causing emissions. However, the structural applications of lightweight alloys are often limited by some inherent deficiencies such as low stiffness, high wear rate and inferior strength. These properties could be effectively enhanced by the addition of stronger and stiffer reinforcements, especially nano-sized particles, into metal matrix to form composites. In most cases three common strengthening mechanisms (load-bearing effect, mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion, and Orowan strengthening) have been considered to predict the yield strength of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs). This study was aimed at developing a unified model by taking into account the matrix grain size and porosity (which is unavoidable in the materials processing such as casting and powder metallurgy) in the prediction of the yield strength of MMNCs. The Zener pinning effect of grain boundaries by the nano-sized particles has also been integrated. The model was validated using the experimental data of magnesium- and titanium-based nanocomposites containing different types of nano-sized particles (namely, Al₂O₃, Y₂O₃, and carbon nanotubes). The predicted results were observed to be in good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  11. Elaboration of metal matrix composites from thixotropic alloy slurries using a new magnetohydrodynamic caster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivès, Charles

    1993-06-01

    The working principle and the peculiarities of a new electromagnetic rheocaster, which is based on the use of rotating permanent magnets and which allows the production of intense three-dimensional (3-D) multiphase flows in solidifying semisolid alloy slurries and metal matrix composites, are described. This process can be applied to the direct continuous casting of billets, tubes, and slabs and is characterized by very low electric power consumption. Local measurement techniques are applied to the study of the evolution of non-Newtonian magnetohydrodynamic multiphase flow phenomena with the rotational speed of the inductor, the solid fraction of the aluminum alloy matrix, and the size and volume percent of SiC particles. An order of magnitude analysis of the various forces acting on the suspended crystals and SiC particles is given. The Theological behavior of electromagnetically rheocast ferrous metals, simulated by a lead-tin alloy, is also investigated. Satisfactory results concerning the microstructure of solidified aluminum slurries and aluminum matrix composites (homogeneity, crystal shape, grain size, fraction of primary solid, and distribution of SiC particles) were obtained. A discussion is presented relating the metallurgical findings to the heat and three-phase flow measurements.

  12. Microyielding of core-shell crystal dendrites in a bulk-metallic-glass matrix composite

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, E. -Wen; Qiao, Junwei; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; ...

    2014-03-18

    In-situ synchrotron x-ray experiments have been used to follow the evolution of the diffraction peaks for crystalline dendrites embedded in a bulk metallic glass matrix subjected to a compressive loading-unloading cycle. We observe irreversible diffraction-peak splitting even though the load does not go beyond half of the bulk yield strength. The chemical analysis coupled with the transmission electron microscopy mapping suggests that the observed peak splitting originates from the chemical heterogeneity between the core (major peak) and the stiffer shell (minor peak) of the dendrites. A molecular dynamics model has been developed to compare the hkl-dependent microyielding of the bulkmore » metallic-glass matrix composite. As a result, the complementary diffraction measurements and the simulation results suggest that the interfaces between the amorphous matrix and the (211) crystalline planes relax under prolonged load that causes a delay in the reload curve which ultimately catches up with the original path.« less

  13. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  14. Tribological and mechanical characterization of Al-Ni-SiC metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kumar, V.; Dileep, B. P.; Vital, H. R.

    2017-07-01

    Aluminium being light weight metal used widely in many engineering applications. It's being a highly ductile material in its purest form also limits its applications in load carrying members. Addition of alloying elements like nickel and silicon carbide can make aluminium a better material for many applications. In this work aluminium metal matrix composite is prepared by adding nickel powder of 30 microns4% and silicon carbide of 45 microns in 2,4,6and 8% by weight of matrix material. Composite was prepared by using a powder metallurgy (PM) at room temperature compaction. The compaction load was optimized to 15tonns for successful fabrication of green specimen; these green specimens were sintered in a furnace to 5400 temperatures and furnace cooled. It was found that reinforcement of nickel and silicon carbide significantly improved the mechanical properties of the composite; hardness is improved by 35% in that compaction load. Wear rate of the composite is reduced from 200 micrometers to 50 micrometers for 5000 meters of track length at a load of 5N. The prepared composite also shown a uniform distribution of reinforcement particle in the matrix material under micro structural studies.

  15. Active metal-matrix composites with embedded smart materials by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the development of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. Composites created through this process experience temperatures as low as 25 °C during fabrication, in contrast to current metal-matrix fabrication processes which require temperatures of 500 °C and above. UAM thus provides unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make these materials and components attractive. This research focuses on developing UAM composites with aluminum matrices and embedded shape memory NiTi, magnetostrictive Galfenol, and electroactive PVDF phases. The research on these composites will focus on: (i) electrical insulation between NiTi and Al phases for strain sensors, investigation and modeling of NiTi-Al composites as tunable stiffness materials and thermally invariant structures based on the shape memory effect; (ii) process development and composite testing for Galfenol-Al composites; and (iii) development of PVDF-Al composites for embedded sensing applications. We demonstrate a method to electrically insulate embedded materials from the UAM matrix, the ability create composites containing up to 22.3% NiTi, and their resulting dimensional stability and thermal actuation characteristics. Also demonstrated is Galfenol-Al composite magnetic actuation of up to 54 μ(see manuscript), and creation of a PVDF-Al composite sensor.

  16. X-ray tomography investigation of intensive sheared Al–SiC metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    De Giovanni, Mario; Warnett, Jason M.; Williams, Mark A.; Haribabu, Nadendla; Srirangam, Prakash

    2015-12-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was used to characterise three dimensional internal structure of Al–SiC metal matrix composites. The alloy composite was prepared by casting method with the application of intensive shearing to uniformly disperse SiC particles in the matrix. Visualisation of SiC clusters as well as porosity distribution were evaluated and compared with non-shearing samples. Results showed that the average particle size as well as agglomerate size is smaller in sheared sample compared to conventional cast samples. Further, it was observed that the volume fraction of porosity was reduced by 50% compared to conventional casting, confirming that the intensive shearing helps in deagglomeration of particle clusters and decrease in porosity of Al–SiC metal matrix composites. - Highlights: • XCT was used to visualise 3D internal structure of Al-SiC MMC. • Al-SiC MMC was prepared by casting with the application of intensive shearing. • SiC particles and porosity distribution were evaluated. • Results show shearing deagglomerates particle clusters and reduces porosity in MMC.

  17. Toxicity to Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida of a metal mixture applied to soil directly or via an organic matrix.

    PubMed

    Natal-da-Luz, T; Ojeda, G; Pratas, J; Van Gestel, C A M; Sousa, J P

    2011-09-01

    Regulatory limits for chemicals and ecological risk assessment are usually based on the effects of single compounds, not taking into account mixture effects. The ecotoxicity of metal-contaminated sludge may, however, not only be due to its metal content. Both the sludge matrix and the presence of other toxicants may mitigate or promote metal toxicity. To test this assumption, the toxicity of soils recently amended with an industrial sludge predominantly contaminated with chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc and soils freshly spiked with the same mixture of metals was evaluated through earthworm (Eisenia andrei) and collembolan (Folsomia candida) reproduction tests. The sludge was less toxic than the spiked metal mixture for E. andrei but more toxic for F. candida. Results obtained for the earthworms suggest a decrease in metal bioavailability promoted by the high organic matter content of the sludge. The higher toxicity of the sludge for F. candida was probably due to the additive toxic effect of other pollutants.

  18. Thermal analysis on Al7075/Al2O3 metal matrix composites fabricated by stir casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, S.; Shajin, S.; Gnanavel, C.

    2017-03-01

    Metal matrix Composites (MMC’s) have evoked a keen interest in recent times for various applications in aerospace, renewable energy and automotive industries due to their superior strength, low cost, easy availability and high temperature resistance [1]. The crack and propagation occurs in conventional materials without any appreciable indication in a short span. Hence composite materials are preferred nowadays to overcome this problem [2]. The process of metal matrix composites (MMC’s) is to unite the enviable attributes of metals and ceramics. The Stir casting method is used for producing aluminium metal matrix composites (AMC’s). A key challenge of the process is to spread the ceramic particles to achieve a defect free microstructure [2]. By carefully selecting stir casting processing specification, such as stirring time, temperature of the melt and blade angle, the desired microstructure can be obtained. The focus of this work is to develop a high strength particulate strengthen aluminium metal matrix composites, and Al7075 was selected which can offer high strength without much disturbing ductility of metal matrix [4]. The composites will be examined using standard metallurgical and mechanical tests. The cast composites are analysed to Laser flash analysis (LFA) to determine Thermal conductivity [5]. Also changes in microstructure are determined by using SEM analysis.

  19. Metal Matrix Composites Deposition in Twin Wire Arc Spraying Utilizing an External Powder Injection Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Hagen, L.; Nellesen, J.

    2014-01-01

    The powder injection parameters, the location of the injection port, as well as the metal matrix composites are important features, which determine the deposition efficiency and embedding behavior of hard materials in the surrounding matrix of the twin wire arc-spraying process. This study investigates the applicability of external powder injection and aims to determine whether the powder injection parameters, the location, and the material combination (composition of the matrix as well as hard material) need to be specifically tailored. Therefore, the position of the injection port in relation to the arc zone was altered along the spraying axis and perpendicular to the arc. The axial position of the injection port determines the thermal activation of the injected powder. An injection behind the arc, close to the nozzle outlet, seems to enhance the thermal activation. The optimal injection positions of different hard materials in combination with zinc-, nickel- and iron-based matrices were found to be closer to the arc zone utilizing a high-speed camera system. The powder size, the mass of the particle, the carrier gas flow, and the electric insulation of the hard material affect the perpendicular position of the radial injection port. These findings show that the local powder injection, the wetting behavior of particles in the realm of the molten pool as well as the atomization behavior of the molten pool all affect the embedding behavior of the hard material in the surrounded metallic matrix. Hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation and EDX analysis along transition zones were utilized to estimate the bonding strength. The observation of a diffusion zone indicates a strong metallurgical bonding for boron carbides embedded in steel matrix.

  20. A static analysis of metal matrix composite spur gear by three-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, N.; Vijayarangan, S.

    1993-03-01

    A number of engineering components have recently been made using metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, due to their overwhelming advantages, such as light weight high strength, higher dimensional stability and minimal attack by environment, when compared with polymer-based composite materials, even though the cost of MMCs are very high. Power transmission gears are one such area able to make use of MMC materials. Here an attempt is made to study and compare the performance of gears made of MMC materials with that of conventional steel material gears. It may be concluded from this study that MMC materials are highly suitable for making gears that are to transmit even fairly large power.

  1. Unified constitutive model development for metal matrix composites at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    Structural alloys used in high temperature applications exhibit complex thermomechanical behavior that is time dependent and hereditary. Recent attention is being focused on metal matrix composite materials for high temperature applications where they exhibit all the complexities of conventional alloys and their strong anisotropy adds further complexities. Here, a proven constitutive model for isotropic materials in which the inelastic strain rate and internal state are expressible as gradients of a dissipation potential is taken to depend on invariants that reflect local transverse isotropy. Applications illustrate the capability of the theory of representing the time dependent, hereditary, anisotropic behavior typical of these materials at high temperature.

  2. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites - A computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with nonlinear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  3. Corrosion protection of Al alloys and Al-based metal-matrix composites by chemical passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Lin, S.; Sim, S.; Shih, H.

    1989-08-01

    Chemical passivation by immersion of aluminium alloys and aluminium 6061/ silicon carbide and aluminium 6061/graphite metal-matrix composites in cerium chloride solution produces very corrosion-resistant surfaces. Aluminium 6061 and aluminium 7075-T6 that had been immersed in 1000 ppm cerium chloride for one week did not suffer from pitting corrosion during immersion in acerated 0.5 N NaCl for three weeks. For aluminium 7075-T7l3 some improvement of the corrosion resistance was also achieved, but to a much lesser extent. Chemical passivation in cerium chloride was also successful for aluminium/silicon carbide and Allgraphite.

  4. High speed turning of metal matrix composites with tools of different material and geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, A.; Iuliano, L.; Tagliaferri, V.

    1995-08-01

    Metal matrix composites are manufactured in a variety of grades and forms, but machining is usually necessary to obtain finished engineering components. The presence of the bard reinforcing ceramic makes these materials difficult for conventional machining and a severe tool wear can occur. This paper describes high speed turning tests performed on a 2024 Al alloy and on composites SiC2009 Al alloy with 15% whiskers and 20% particles employing tools of different materials and geometry. The effect of the tool material, tool geometry and cooling on the cut surface quality are described. The morphology of machined surfaces, their sections and profiles were examined by SEM and EDAX analyses were performed.

  5. Simulation of metal matrix composite solidification in the presence of cooled fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. K.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2008-09-01

    Metal matrix composite (MMC) has been well known for its superior material properties compared with traditional composite. A new method is introduced to improve the properties of MMC in the sense that the ends of the reinforcement phase of the composite are allowed to extend out of the mold and cooled by a heat sink in order to promote the rate of heat transfer through the fibers and promote the formation of primary alpha phase around the reinforcement. This paper presents the experimental results obtained from the foundry in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and some numerical simulation results of the solidification process in the cast mold.

  6. Fracture Morphology and Local Deformation Characteristics in the Metallic Glass Matrix Composite Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Sun, X. H.; Hao, G. J.; Guo, Z. X.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, J. P.; Sui, M. L.; Qiao, J. W.

    2017-04-01

    Fracture and deformation characteristics of the Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite have been studied by the tensile test and the in situ TEM tension test. Typically, the composite exhibits the high strength and considerable plasticity. Microscopically, it was found that shear deformation zone formed at the crack tip in glass phase, which can bring about quick propagation of shear bands. However, the plastic deformation zone nearby the crack tip in dendrites will postpone or retard the crack extension by dislocations. The attributions of micro-deformations to mechanical properties of composites were discussed.

  7. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  8. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  9. Structure-performance maps of polymeric, metal, and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tsu-Wei; Yang, Jenn-Ming

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive analytical studies of the thermo-elastic properties of unidirectional laminated composites, as well as two-dimensional and three-dimensional textile structural composites with polymeric, metal, and ceramic matrices. Some comparisons of the theoretical predictions with experimental data have been made. By the construction of the structure-performance maps, the effective composite properties based upon various reinforcement forms and fiber and matrix combinations can be easily assessed. The uniqueness of various textile structural reinforcements also has been demonstrated. These comprehensive performance maps can provide the data base necessary for material selections and guidance for future investigations of advanced composites.

  10. The effect of simulated space thermal environment on damping capacity of metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Ouellet, L.; Nikanpour, Darius; Lo, J.

    2003-09-01

    Damping capacity is one of important parameters that engineers need to consider when they select materials for space structure applications. The materials studied in this paper are high performance SiC particulate reinforced aluminum and Al2O3 woven fabric reinforced aluminum composites. Changes in damping capacity of the materials in simulated space thermal environment were studied using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA). Comparing to the conventional aluminum alloy, the composites have significantly higher damping capacity. The experiment demonstrated that thermal cycling to sub-ambient temperature can significantly affects the damping capacity of metal matrix composites. The long-term effects of space thermal cycling on the composites were also discussed.

  11. Machining parameters optimization during machining of Al/5 wt% alumina metal matrix composite by fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Arindam; Patil, Pravin

    2017-06-01

    This experimental work presents the study of machining parameters of Ytterbium fiber laser during machining of 5 mm thick Aluminium/5wt%Alumina-MMC (Metal Matrix Composite). Response surface methodology (RSM) is used to achieve the optimization i.e. minimize hole tapering and maximize Material Removal Rate (MRR). A mathematical model has been developed and ANOVA has been done for correlating the interactive and higher-order influences of Ytterbium fiber laser machining parameters (laser power, modulation frequency, gas pressure, wait time, pulse width) on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and hole tapering during machining process.

  12. MS&T'13 Symposium Preview: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2013-08-01

    The Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science & Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) conference is planned to provide a platform to researchers working on various aspects of composite materials and capture the state of the art in this area. The dialogue among leading researchers is expected to provide insight into the future of this field and identify the future directions in terms of research, development, and applications of composite materials. In the 2 day program, the symposium includes 34 presentations, including 10 invited presentations. The contributions have come from 16 different countries including USA, Mexico, Switzerland, India, Egypt, and Singapore.

  13. Concurrent material-fabrication optimization of metal-matrix laminates under thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Morel, M. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is developed to tailor fabrication and material parameters of metal-matrix laminates for maximum loading capacity under thermomechanical loads. The stresses during the thermomechanical response are minimized subject to failure constrains and bounds on the laminate properties. The thermomechanical response of the laminate is simulated using nonlinear composite mechanics. Evaluations of the method on a graphite/copper symmetric cross-ply laminate were performed. The cross-ply laminate required different optimum fabrication procedures than a unidirectional composite. Also, the consideration of the thermomechanical cycle had a significant effect on the predicted optimal process.

  14. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  15. Prediction of damage evolution in continuous fiber metal matrix composites subjected to fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.; Helms, K.; Lagoudas, D.

    1995-08-01

    A life prediction model is being developed by the authors for application to metal matrix composites (MMC`s). The systems under study are continuous silicon carbide fibers imbedded in titanium matrix. The model utilizes a computationally based framework based on thermodynamics and continuum mechanics, and accounts for matrix inelasticity, damage evolution, and environmental degradation due to oxidation. The computational model utilizes the finite element method, and an evolutionary analysis of a unit cell is accomplished via a time stepping algorithm. The computational scheme accounts for damage growth such as fiber-matrix debonding, surface cracking, and matrix cracking via the inclusion of cohesive zone elements in the unit cell. These elements are located based on experimental evidence also obtained by the authors. The current paper outlines the formulation utilized by the authors to solve this problem, and recent results are discussed. Specifically, results are given for a four-ply unidirectional composite subjected to cyclic fatigue loading at 650{degrees}C both in air and inert gas. The effects of oxidation on the life of the composite are predicted with the model, and the results are compared to limited experimental results.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Particle Segregation During Centrifugal Casting of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, B.; Litwin, J.

    2012-04-01

    When a metal matrix composite undergoes centrifugal casting, the velocity, deceleration, displacement, and segregation of its particles are modeled according to changes in the centrifugal radius, as well as by variations in the molten metal viscosity as the temperature decreases during the cooling process. A cast aluminum alloy A356 reinforced by 10 V% of silicon carbide particles (SiC), with a median diameter of 12 μm, was used to conduct the experiments, and a mathematical modeling showed that the particles' volume fraction on the outer casting face varied according to whether the viscosity of the liquid metal used was constant or variable. If variations in viscosity during the cooling process are taken into account, then the volume fraction of the particles for a given time of centrifugation changes on the outer casting face, while it increases if the viscosity was constant. Modeling the particle segregation with variable viscosity produces results that are closer to those obtained with experiments than is the case when a constant viscosity is used. In fact, the higher the initial pouring and mold temperatures, the higher the effect of the viscosity variation on particle segregation.

  17. Trivalent metal ions based on inorganic compounds with in vitro inhibitory activity of matrix metalloproteinase 13.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hanyu; Qin, Yuan; Zhong, Weilong; Li, Cong; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Yehua

    2016-10-01

    Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) inhibitors have attracted considerable attention in recent years and have been developed as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases, including cancer. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can be inhibited by a multitude of compounds, including hydroxamic acids. Studies have shown that materials and compounds containing trivalent metal ions, particularly potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) (K3[Fe(CN)6]), exhibit cdMMP-13 inhibitory potential with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.3μM. The target protein was obtained by refolding the recombinant histidine-tagged cdMMP-13 using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The secondary structures of the refolded cdMMP-13 with or without metal ions were further analyzed via circular dichroism and the results indicate that upon binding with metal ions, an altered structure with increased domain stability was obtained. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments demonstrated that K3[Fe(CN)6]is able to bind to MMP-13 and endothelial cell tube formation tests provide further evidence for this interaction to exhibit anti-angiogenesis potential. To the best of our knowledge, no previous report of an inorganic compound featuring a MMP-13 inhibitory activity has ever been reported in the literature. Our results demonstrate that K3[Fe(CN)6] is useful as a new effective and specific inhibitor for cdMMP-13 which may be of great potential for future drug screening applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron) Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zemtsova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3) pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based) materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology. PMID:24695459

  19. The process of nanostructuring of metal (iron) matrix in composite materials for directional control of the mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zemtsova, Elena; Yurchuk, Denis; Smirnov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3) pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1-50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type "frame in the frame" that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based) materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  20. Nondestructive characterization of two-phase metal-matrix materials. Final report, Jun 88-Oct 91

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, K.

    1991-12-01

    The major goal of this program is to study methods for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of two-phase metal-matrix composites such as discontinuous SiC-reinforced aluminum alloys. The methods to be studied are based on the physical nonlinear elastic behavior of solids and utilized measurements of the elastic as well as the accoustoelastic constants. The objectives are to establish both experimentally and theoretically relationships between those parameters which can be measured nondestructively and the percentages of second phase in two-phase systems. Mechanical properties of these systems are derived from the presence of reinforcement second phase in the matrix. The research accomplished during contract No. DAAL03-88-K-0096 of the Army Research Office program is documented in details in 4 theses (1 - 4) and 8 papers (5 - 12). Abstracts of these theses and reprints or preprints of these papers are attached in appendix A.

  1. Strain intensity factor approach for predicting the strength of continuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A method was previously developed to predict the fracture toughness (stress intensity factor at failure) of composites in terms of the elastic constants and the tensile failing strain of the fibers. The method was applied to boron/aluminum composites made with various proportions of 0 to + or - 45 deg plies. Predicted values of fracture toughness were in gross error because widespread yielding of the aluminum matrix made the compliance very nonlinear. An alternate method was developed to predict the strain intensity factor at failure rather than the stress intensity factor because the singular strain field was not affected by yielding as much as the stress field. Strengths of specimens containing crack-like slits were calculated from predicted failing strains using uniaxial stress-strain curves. Predicted strengths were in good agreement with experimental values, even for the very nonlinear laminates that contained only + or - 45 deg plies. This approach should be valid for other metal matrix composites that have continuous fibers.

  2. Recrystallization in SiC particulate reinforced 6061 aluminium metal matrix composites following low strain deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Munroe, P.R.; Bandyopadhyay, S. . School of Materials Science and Engineering); Mouritz, A.P. . Materials Research Lab.)

    1994-04-01

    Aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) are envisaged as candidate materials for the aerospace and automotive industries because of their low density, high stiffness, and strength. While the studies have examined the recrystallization behavior of MMCs deformed by large amounts of cold work, little work has been done on the behavior of the matrix microstructure during annealing following lower amounts (i.e.< 10% reduction) of deformation. The work presented in this paper examines the effect of small amounts of deformation in compression on the recovery and recrystallization behavior of MMCs, in two aluminium-based composites (6xxx series) reinforced with either 3 [mu]m or 20 [mu]m diameter SiC particulates.

  3. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  4. Plasticity-improved Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing martensite phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.F.; Wei, B.C.; Wang, Y.R.; Li, W.H.; Cheung, T.L.; Shek, C.H.

    2005-08-01

    Zr{sub 48.5}Cu{sub 46.5}Al{sub 5} bulk metallic glass matrix composites with diameters of 3 and 4 mm were produced through water-cooled copper mold casting. Micrometer-sized bcc based B2 structured CuZr phase containing martensite plate, together with some densely distributed nanocrystalline Zr{sub 2}Cu and plate-like Cu{sub 10}Zr{sub 7} compound, was found embedded in a glassy matrix. The microstructure formation strongly depends on the composition and cooling rate. Room temperature compression tests reveal significant strain hardening and plastic strains of 7.7% and 6.4% before failure are obtained for the 3-mm- and 4-mm-diam samples, respectively. The formation of the martensite phase is proposed to contribute to the strain hardening and plastic deformation of the materials.

  5. Plasticity-improved Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing martensite phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Wei, B. C.; Wang, Y. R.; Li, W. H.; Cheung, T. L.; Shek, C. H.

    2005-08-01

    Zr48.5Cu46.5Al5 bulk metallic glass matrix composites with diameters of 3 and 4mm were produced through water-cooled copper mold casting. Micrometer-sized bcc based B2 structured CuZr phase containing martensite plate, together with some densely distributed nanocrystalline Zr2Cu and plate-like Cu10Zr7 compound, was found embedded in a glassy matrix. The microstructure formation strongly depends on the composition and cooling rate. Room temperature compression tests reveal significant strain hardening and plastic strains of 7.7% and 6.4% before failure are obtained for the 3-mm- and 4-mm-diam samples, respectively. The formation of the martensite phase is proposed to contribute to the strain hardening and plastic deformation of the materials.

  6. Electrochemical Behavior of Al-B₄C Metal Matrix Composites in NaCl Solution.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu-Mei; Chen, X-Grant

    2015-09-21

    Aluminum based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the automotive, aerospace and nuclear industries. One of the main challenges using Al-based MMCs is the influence of the reinforcement particles on the corrosion resistance. In the present study, the corrosion behavior of Al-B₄C MMCs in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the composites decreased when increasing the B₄C volume fraction. Al-B₄C composite was susceptible to pitting corrosion and two types of pits were observed on the composite surface. The corrosion mechanism of the composite in the NaCl solution was primarily controlled by oxygen diffusion in the solution. In addition, the galvanic couples that formed between Al matrix and B₄C particles could also be responsible for the lower corrosion resistance of the composites.

  7. Finite element applications to explore the effects of partial bonding on metal matrix composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Trowbridge, D.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanics of materials approach (definition of E, G, Nu, and Alpha) and the finite element method are used to explore the effects of partial bonding and fiber fracture on the behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites. Composite ply properties are calculated for various degrees of disbonding to evaluate the sensitivity of these properties to the presence of fiber/matrix disbonding and fiber fracture. The mechanics of materials approach allows for the determination of the basic ply material properties needed for design/analysis of composites. The finite element method provides the necessary structural response (forces and displacements) for the mechanics of materials equations. Results show that disbonding of fractured fibers affect only E sub (111) and alpha sub (111) significantly.

  8. In situ measurement of the reinforcement modulus in a metal matrix composite by acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Canumalla, S.; Gordon, G.A.; Pangborn, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical properties of metal-matrix composites have been observed to be a strong function of the content of non-fiber inclusions. Shot particles, with the nominal composition of the reinforcement, have been found to crack prematurely, thus representing prefer-red failure initiation sites under mechanical and thermal fatigue of discontinuous, alumina-silicate fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites. To better understand the differences between the responses of the shot and fibers to loading, the Young`s modulus of the shot is measured and compared to that of the fibers. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to nondestructively measure the modulus of the shot in situ, and the fiber modulus is obtained from the previously measured composite response. The shot, with a modulus of 131.5 GPa, has a Young`s modulus that is approximately 40% lower than that of the fibers. The influence of this on the composite response will be discussed.

  9. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  10. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Naik, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    A macro-micromechanics analysis was formulated to determine the matrix and fiber behavior near the notch tip in a center-notched metal matrix composite. Results are presented for a boron/aluminum monolayer. The macro-level analysis models the entire notched specimen using a three dimensional finite element program which uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to model the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The micro-behavior is analyzed using a Discrete Fiber-Matrix (DFM) model containing one fabric and the surrounding matrix. The dimensions of the DFM model were determined by the ply thickness and the fiber volume fraction and corresponded to the size of the notch-tip element in the macro-level analysis. The boundary conditions applied to the DFM model were determined from the macro-level analysis. Stress components within the DFM model were calculated and stress distributions are presented along selected planes and surfaces within the DFM model, including the fiber-matrix interface. Yielding in the matrix was examined at the notch tip in both the macro- and micro-level analyses. The DFM model predicted higher stresses (24 percent) in the fiber compared to the global analysis. In the notch-tip element, the interface stresses indicated that a multi-axial criterion may be required to predict interfacial failure. The DFM analysis predicted yielding to initiate in the notch-tip element at a stress level 28 percent lower than predicted by the global analysis.

  11. Thermoelastic response of metal matrix composites with large-diameter fibers subjected to thermal gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    A new micromechanical theory is presented for the response of heterogeneous metal matrix composites subjected to thermal gradients. In contrast to existing micromechanical theories that utilize classical homogenization schemes in the course of calculating microscopic and macroscopic field quantities, in the present approach the actual microstructural details are explicitly coupled with the macrostructure of the composite. Examples are offered that illustrate limitations of the classical homogenization approach in predicting the response of thin-walled metal matrix composites with large-diameter fibers when subjected to thermal gradients. These examples include composites with a finite number of fibers in the thickness direction that may be uniformly or nonuniformly spaced, thus admitting so-called functionally gradient composites. The results illustrate that the classical approach of decoupling micromechanical and macromechanical analyses in the presence of a finite number of large-diameter fibers, finite dimensions of the composite, and temperature gradient may produce excessively conservative estimates for macroscopic field quantities, while both underestimating and overestimating the local fluctuations of the microscopic quantities in different regions of the composite. Also demonstrated is the usefulness of the present approach in generating favorable stress distributions in the presence of thermal gradients by appropriately tailoring the internal microstructure details of the composite.

  12. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  13. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  14. Production of metal matrix composite mirrors for tank fire control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Alan L.; Ulph, Eric, Sr.

    1992-09-01

    The first production lot of 50 units of metal matrix composite mirrors for the Leopard I tank fire control system was recently completed by Optical Corporation of America (OCA), Garden Grove, California. The mirror substrates were finish machined from forgings of Optical Grade SXATM metal matrix composite manufactured by Advanced Composite Materials Corporation (ACMC), Greer, South Carolina. Use of forgings rather than hot pressed billet yields more efficient use of material and reduces machining time, resulting in lower cost. The mirrors were fabricated by a process sequence of machining, thermal stabilization, electroless nickel plating, polishing, and coating with a high efficiency, laser damage-resistant optical coating. The mirrors are used in the fire control system for a day channel (direct view) and near infrared (CCD), a muzzle reference system laser transceiver, a laser range finder, and an infrared thermal imaging system. SXA composite was chosen over competitive mirror materials (glass and beryllium) because of its high specific strength and stiffness, good stability, and moderate machining cost. The mirrors exhibit excellent stability and optical performance. Field trials of prototype mirrors in fire control systems have proven successful.

  15. Performance and modeling of active metal-matrix composites manufactured by ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. The primary benefit of UAM over other metal-matrix fabrication processes is the low process temperatures, as low as 25 °C. UAM thus provides unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make these materials and components attractive. The objective of this research is to develop UAM composites with aluminum matrices and embedded shape memory NiTi, magnetostrictive Galfenol (FeGa), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) phases. The paper is focused on the thermally induced strain response and stiffness behavior of NiTi-Al composites, the actuation properties of FeGa-Al composites, and the embedded sensing capabilities of PVDF-Al composites. We observe up to a 10% increase over room temperature stiffness for NiTi-Al composites and a magnetomechanical response in the FeGa-Al composite up to 52.4 μɛ. The response of the PVDF-Al composite to harmonic loads is observed over a frequency range of 10 to 1000 Hz.

  16. Metal-insulator transition in disordered systems from the one-body density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Resta, Raffaele; Souza, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    The insulating state of matter can be probed by means of a ground state geometrical marker, which is closely related to the modern theory of polarization (based on a Berry phase). In the present work we show that this marker can be applied to determine the metal-insulator transition in disordered systems. In particular, for noninteracting systems the geometrical marker can be obtained from the configurational average of the norm-squared one-body density matrix, which can be calculated within open as well as periodic boundary conditions. This is in sharp contrast to a classification based on the static conductivity, which is only sensible within periodic boundary conditions. We exemplify the method by considering a simple lattice model, known to have a metal-insulator transition as a function of the disorder strength, and demonstrate that the transition point can be obtained accurately from the one-body density matrix. The approach has a general ab initio formulation and could in principle be applied to realistic disordered materials by standard electronic structure methods.

  17. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  18. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  19. Metal inks

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  20. Effects of fiber and interfacial layer architectures on the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    Examined here is the effect of fiber and interfacial layer morphologies on thermal fields in metal matrix composites (MMCs). A micromechanics model based on an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder configuration is used to calculate thermal stress fields in MMCs subjected to spatially uniform temperature changes. The fiber is modelled as a layered material with isotropic or orthotropic elastic layers, whereas the surrounding matrix, including interfacial layers, is treated as a strain-hardening, elastoplastic, von Mises solid with temperature-dependent parameters. The solution to the boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder under the prescribed thermal loading is obtained using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation originally developed for stress analysis of multilayered elastic media. Examples are provided that illustrate how the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber and the use of multiple compliant layers at the fiber/matrix interface affect the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites during fabrication cool-down.

  1. Effect of fiber spacing on interfacial damage in a metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, Rebecca A.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and the location of cracking in a Ti-V-Cr-Al-Sn/SiC composite (Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn, in wt pct, reinforced by 33 vol pct of continuous unidirectional SCS-6SiC fibers) before and after unconstrained thermal cycling were investigated. The material was subjected to 10,000 thermal cycles between 300 and 550 C and samples were examined for cracks in the fiber, the matrix, and the fiber-matrix interface, using a back-scattered SEM. The Ti-based metal matrix composite was found to have a substantial amount of interfacial damage in the form of radial cracks, which formed first in the C-rich coating of the SiC fiber and then in the fiber-matrix reaction zone. The cracking was related to the fiber distribution, with consistently more cracking found between the more closely-spaced fibers within a given row, and more radial cracking in the outside fiber rows.

  2. The influence of microstructure on the tensile behavior of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, Michael J.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between tensile properties and microstructure of a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy, 2009 was examined. The alloy was investigated both unreinforced and reinforced with 15 v/o SiC whiskers or 15 v/o SiC particulate to form a discontinuous metal matrix composite (MMC). The materials were investigated in the as-fabricated condition and in three different hot-rolled sheet thicknesses of 6.35, 3.18, and 1.8 mm. Image analysis was used to characterize the morphology of the reinforcements and their distributions within the matrix alloy. Fractographic examinations revealed that failure was associated with the presence of microstructural inhomogeneities which were related to both the matrix alloy and to the reinforcement. The results from these observations together with the matrix tensile data were used to predict the strengths and moduli of the MMC's using relatively simple models. The whisker MMC could be modeled as a short fiber composite and an attempt was made to model the particulate MMC as a dispersion/dislocation hardened alloy.

  3. On the role of particle cracking in flow and fracture of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brockenbrough, J.R. ); Zok, F.W. . Materials Dept.)

    1995-01-01

    The flow response of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites is studied using finite element methods. Unit cells containing either intact or cracked particles in a power law hardening matrix are used to determine the corresponding asymptotic flow strengths. The effects of the hardening exponent and the elastic mismatch between the particles and the matrix on the flow response are examined. For comparison, the flow response of power law hardening solids containing penny-shaped cracks is also evaluated. The latter results are found to be in reasonable agreement with those corresponding to composites that contain low volume fractions of cracked particles. The asymptotic results are used to develop a one-dimensional constitutive law for composites which undergo progressive damage during tensile straining. This law is used to evaluate the strain at the onset of plastic instability. It is proposed that the instability strain be used as a measure of tensile ductility when the particle content is low and the particles are uniformly distributed through the matrix.

  4. Mechanical Behaviour of Alumina Silicon Carbide Reinforced Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghu Ram, K. S.; Sweanney Bandi, Sharon Rose; Sivarama Krishna, Ch.

    2017-08-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of hardness and impact strength of Aluminum Al2O3SiC particulate reinforced Composites. These AMCs with multiple reinforcement (hybrid MMCs) are finding increased applications in aerospace, automobile, space, underwater and transportation applications. An effort is made to enhance the Hardness, flexural strength and Impact properties of AMCs by reinforcing Aluminum matrix with Varying Proportion of small particles of Al2O3SiC by stir casting method. Aluminum alloy matrix varying proportions of Al2O3SiC particulates were fabricated. The microstructure, hardness and impact strength properties of the fabricated AMCs were analyzed. The optical microstructure study revealed the homogeneous dispersion of Al2O3SiC particles in the matrix. Based on the results obtained from the Hardness and Impact of the metal matrix composites it is observed that, the hardness and impact strength increases with increase in the amount of reinforcement content.

  5. Methodologies for predicting the thermomechanical fatigue life of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, R.W.; Nicholas, T.

    1996-12-31

    Parameters and models to correlate the cycles to failure of a unidirectional metal matrix composite (SCS-6/Timetal 21S) undergoing thermal and mechanical loading are examined. Three different cycle types are considered: out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF), in-phase TMF, and isothermal fatigue. A single parameter based on either the fiber of matrix behavior is shown not to correlate the cycles to failure of all the data. Two prediction methods are presented that assume that life may be dependent on at least two fatigue damage mechanisms and therefore consist of two terms. The first method, the linear life fraction model, shows that by using the response of the constituents, the life of these different cycle types are better correlated using two simple empirical relationships: one describing the fatigue damage in the matrix and the other fiber-dominated damage. The second method, the dominant damage model, is more complex but additionally brings in the effect of the environment. This latter method improves the predictions of the effects of the maximum temperature, temperature range, and frequency, especially under out-of-phase TMF and isothermal fatigue. The steady-state response of the constituents is determined using a 1-D micromechanics model with viscoplasticity. The residual stresses due to the CTE mismatch between the fiber and matrix during processing are included in the analysis.

  6. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  7. Bond-valence model for metal cluster compounds. II. Matrix effect.

    PubMed

    Levi, Elena; Aurbach, Doron; Isnard, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    The bond-valence model was commonly considered as inappropriate to metal cluster compounds, but recently it was shown that the model provides unique information on the lattice strains and stabilization mechanisms in (TM)6-chalcohalides, Mx(TM)6Ly (TM = transition metal, L = the chalcogen and/or halogen ligands; M = counter-cation). The previous study was mainly devoted to the non-uniform distribution of the anion valences (bond-valence sums) around clusters. This and the previous paper are focused on two additional phenomena: (i) a steric conflict between counter-cations and the cluster-ligand framework resulting in `common' lattice strains [previous paper: Levi et al. (2013). Acta Cryst. B69, 419-425], and (ii) steric conflict between the small (TM)6-cluster and the large coordination polyhedron around the cluster or so-called matrix effect (this paper). It was shown that both phenomena can be well described by changes in the bond-valence parameters. This paper demonstrates that the matrix effect results in high strains in the TM-L bonds in most of the (TM)6-chalcohalides (TM = Nb, Mo, W and Re). In spite of this, the violations for the total TM valence are minimal, because the cluster stretching is fully or partially compensated by compression of the TM-L bonds. As a result, the influence of the matrix effect on the material stability is rather positive: it decreases the volume of the structural units and in many cases ensures a more favorable distribution of the bond valences around TM atoms, stabilizing the cluster compound.

  8. METAL PHTHALOCYANINES

    DOEpatents

    Frigerio, N.A.

    1962-03-27

    A process is given for preparing heavy metal phthalocyanines, sulfonated or not. The process comprises mixing an inorganic metal salt with dimethyl formamide or methyl sulfoxide; separating the metal complex formed from the solution; mixing the complex with an equimolar amount of sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, or beryllium sulfonated or unsulfonated phthalocyanine whereby heavy-metal phthalocyanine crystals are formed; and separating the crystals from the solution. Uranyl, thorium, lead, hafnium, and lanthanide rare earth phthalocyanines can be produced by the process. (AEC)

  9. Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction...Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction Ralph P. I. Adler and Daniel J. Snoha...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and

  10. Production of ceramic nanoparticles through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and their introduction into a metallic matrix to form metal matrix composites (MMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuechterlein, Jacob

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) is a self-sustaining combustion reaction of reactant powders typically in the form of compacted pellets to form a desired product species. The reactants are ignited in one or more locations by several different techniques. After ignition the reaction travels as a wave through the pellet exothermically converting the reactants into products as it propagates. In this case the products are formed as discrete ceramic particles of TiC, Al2O3 and SiC. The goal of this research was to reduce the size of the particles formed by this technique from a diameter of 1-5μm to less than 100nm with the goal of then incorporating these nanoparticles as reinforcements in Al metal matrix composites. To accomplish this, many different SHS principles were studied and their associated variables were changed to reduce the combustion temperature of each reacting system. Several of these systems were investigated and discarded for a number of reasons such as: low ignition or high combustion temperatures, dangerous reaction conditions, or undesirable product densities and morphologies. The systems chosen exhibited low material costs, low combustion temperatures, and a wide range of stabilities when lowering the reaction temperature. The reacting systems pursued were based around the aluminothermic reduction of TiO2 in the presence of carbon to form TiC and Al2O 3. The combustion temperature of this reaction was reduced from 2053ºC to less than 1100ºC, which had a corresponding effect on the particle size of the products, reducing the average diameter of the particles to less than 100nm. This was accomplished by providing high heating rates, controlling the green density and adding diluents to the reaction such as Al, TiC, SiC or Al2O3. Cooling experiments were also investigated, but the cooling rate was found to have no effect on the particle size.

  11. Shock-loading response of 6061-T6 aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchio, K.S.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to systematically study the influence of peak-shock pressure and second-phase reinforcement on the structure/property response of shock-loaded 6061-T6 Al, used as a baseline for comparison, showed no increased shock hardening compared to the unshocked material deformed to an equivalent strain. The reload stress-strain response of the shock-loaded 6061-T6 Al-alumina composites exhibit a lower reload yield strength than the flow stress of the starting composites. The degrees of strength loss was found to increase with increasing shock pressure. Wavespeed measurements of shock-prestrained specimens showed no degradation compared to unshocked specimens, indicating that particle cracking had not occurred under shock. This result was supported by optical metallography, which did not reveal cracked particles or particle decohesion in the shock-prestrained samples. The reload stress-strain response of the shock-prestrained composites, after resolutionizing and T6 reaging, showed that the composites recovered their full as-received preshock stress-strain responses. This result supports the finding that degradation in reload strength was attributable to matrix microstructural changes resulting from the shock. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the shock-loaded microstructures revealed that the matrix regions adjacent to the particle/matrix interface had undergone significant recovery and partial recrystallization resulting from the shock. This type of near-interface substructure is in stark contrast to the heavily dislocated near-interface dislocation substructure of the as-received composites. The loss of dislocation density (i.e., strain hardening) in the near-interface matrix region, resulting from the shock, highlights the importance of the thermally introduced dislocation substructure changes in establishing the strength of metal-matrix composites (MMCs).

  12. Nanoceramic -Metal Matrix Composites by In-Situ Pyrolysis of Organic Precursors in a Liquid Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshan; Surappa, M. K.; Ahn, Dongjoon; Raj, Rishi

    2008-12-01

    We show the feasibility of introducing a dispersion of a refractory ceramic phase into metals by stirring a powder of an organic polymer into a magnesium melt and having it convert into a ceramic within the melt by in-situ pyrolysis of the polymer. The pyrolysis is a highly reactive process, accompanied by the evolution of hydrogen, which disperses the ceramic phase into nanoscale constituents. In the present experiments, a polysilazane-based precursor, which is known to yield an amorphous ceramic constituted from silicon, carbon, and nitrogen, was used. Five weight percent of the precursor (which has a nominal ceramic yield of 75 to 85 wt pct) produced a twofold increase in the room-temperature yield strength and reduced the steady-state strain rate at 450 °C by one to two orders of magnitude, relative to pure magnesium. This polymer-based in-situ process (PIP) for processing metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is likely to have great generality, because many different kinds of organic precursors, for producing oxide, carbides, nitrides, and borides, are commercially available. Also, the process would permit the addition of large volume fractions of the ceramic, enabling the nanostructural design, and production of MMCs with a wide range of mechanical properties, meant especially for high-temperature applications. An important and noteworthy feature of the present process, which distinguishes it from other methods, is that all the constituents of the ceramic phase are built into the organic molecules of the precursor ( e.g., polysilazanes contain silicon, carbon, and nitrogen); therefore, a reaction between the polymer and the host metal is not required to produce the dispersion of the refractory phase.

  13. Quantifying thermomechanical fatigue of light-metal-matrix composites by mechanical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño-Morelli, E.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews recent progress in understanding the stress-relaxation mechanisms in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermomechanical fatigue. Mechanical loss, dynamic shear modulus, and permanent torsional-strain measurements have been performed with forced oscillations during thermal cycling. A transient mechanical-loss maximum, which is absent in the monolithic material, appears during cooling. It has been attributed to the development of plastic zones around the reinforcements by dislocation generation and motion, which result from the differential thermal contraction of the matrix and reinforcement. This damping maximum is strongly dependent on both measurement and material parameters. The reversible shear-modulus evolution during thermal cycling suggests that no interfacial debonding occurs. In unalloyed matrices, extended thermal-stress-induced pleasicity occurs, leading to a plateau in the shear modulus, which is recovered at low temperatures by plastic-zone overlapping and matrix strain hardening. Simultaneously measured strain-temperature loops exhibit both reversible and permanent plasticity during thermal cycling (strain ratcheting).

  14. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  15. Tensile-strength characterization of a metal-matrix composite with circular holes. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rattray, J.

    1991-12-01

    Static tensile testing conducted at room temperature and 650 C shows notch sensitivity for a quasi-isotropic lay-up of a titanium alloy metal matrix composite. The specific material used was SCS-6/Beta 21S. Some unnotched specimens were tested and then the diameter-to-width ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.4. The room temperature unnotched strength is 840 MPa, and the strength falls to less than half this value at 650 C. The off-axis plies of the (0, + or - 45, 90)s lay-up exhibit debonding of the fibers from the matrix at only ten percent of failure stress. This debonding is shown with acetate replicas and acoustic emission. By modeling the debonded plies with the Halpin-Tsai equations, a modulus is calculated for the debonded material which correlates very well with the experimental modulus. A fiber dominated failure exists at both temperatures, but the fiber pullout exists only at 650 C. Etching away the matrix from the 0 fibers showed a small area near the hole where fibers were damaged. The size of this damage zone correlated very well with the critical distance for the Whitney-Nuismer Point Stress failure prediction method.

  16. Influence of engineered interfaces on residual stresses and mechanical response in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the inherent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between fiber and matrix within metal and intermetallic matrix composite systems, high residual stresses can develop under various thermal loading conditions. These conditions include cooling from processing temperature to room temperature as well as subsequent thermal cycling. As a result of these stresses, within certain composite systems, radial, circumferential, and/or longitudinal cracks have been observed to form at the fiber matrix interface region. A number of potential solutions for reducing this thermally induced residual stress field have been proposed recently. Examples of some potential solutions are high CTE fibers, fiber preheating, thermal anneal treatments, and an engineered interface. Here the focus is on designing an interface (by using a compensating/compliant layer concept) to reduce or eliminate the thermal residual stress field and, therefore, the initiation and propagation of cracks developed during thermal loading. Furthermore, the impact of the engineered interface on the composite's mechanical response when subjected to isothermal mechanical load histories is examined.

  17. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Peter J.; Jolly, Brian C.

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB2 particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b) a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.

  18. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-09-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    DOEpatents

    Travelli, A.

    1985-10-25

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  20. Effect of reinforcement type and porosity on strength of metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. G.; Lal, Achchhe; Menghani, J. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, experimental investigation and the numerical analysis are carried out for strength analysis of A356 alloy matrix composites reinforced with alumina, fly ash and hybrid particle composites. The combined strengthening effect of load bearing, Hall-Petch, Orowan, coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and elastic modulus mismatch is studied for predicting accurate uniaxial stress-strain behavior of A356 based alloy matrix composite. The unit cell micromechanical approach and nine noded isoparametric finite element analysis (FEA) is used to investigate the yield failure load by considering material defect of porosity as fabrication errors in particulate composite. The Ramberg-Osgood approach is considered for the linear and nonlinear relationship between stress and strain of A356 based metal matrix composites containing different amounts of fly ash and alumina reinforcing particles. A numerical analysis of material porosity on the stress strain behavior of the composite is performed. The literature and experimental results exhibit the validity of this model and confirm the importance of the fly ash as the cheapest and low density reinforcement obtained as a waste by product in thermal power plants.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement of PCM melting in 2D horizontal elliptical tube using metallic porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourabian, Mahmoud; Farhadi, Mousa; Rabienataj Darzi, Ahmad Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the melting process of ice as a phase-change material (PCM) saturated with a nickel-steel porous matrix inside a horizontal elliptical tube is investigated. Due to the low thermal conductivity of the PCM, it is motivated to augment the heat transfer performance of the system simultaneously by finding an optimum value of the aspect ratio and impregnating a metallic porous matrix into the base PCM. The lattice Boltzmann method with a double distribution function formulated based on the enthalpy method, is applied at the representative elementary volume scale under the local thermal equilibrium assumption between the PCM and porous matrix in the composite. While reducing or increasing the aspect ratio of the circular tubes leads to the expedited melting, the 90° inclination of each elliptical tube in the case of the pure PCM melting does not affect the melting rate. With the reduction in the porosity, the effective thermal conductivity and melting rate in all tubes promoted. Although the natural convection is fully suppressed due to the significant flow blockage in the porous structure, the melting rates are generally increased in all cases.

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    DOEpatents

    Travelli, Armando

    1988-01-01

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  3. Tape cast second generation orthorhombic-based titanium aluminide alloys for MMC applications. [Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Rosenberger, A.H. . Materials and Mfg. Directorate); Shepard, M.J. )

    1999-06-18

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TMCs) utilizing continuous SiC fiber reinforcement are considered important, if not, enabling materials for advanced Air Force propulsion systems, wherein combinations of high specific strength and elevated temperature capability are prerequisites to obtain desired increases in thrust-to-weight ratios and decreased specific fuel consumption. One such class of TMCs being assessed for use in rotating engine components are those based upon the orthorhombic titanium aluminide phase, Ti[sub 2]AlNb. These orthorhombic titanium matrix composites (O TMCs) are being examined for sustained use at temperatures up to 700 C. Previous studies have primarily focused on O TMCs made using the foil-fiber-foil fabrication process. More recently the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory has been focusing attention on an alternative powder metallurgy approach for fabrication of O TMCs via tape casting. This latter approach has the potential to produce significant cost reduction (<$70/lb) for the matrix input material (powder). Unfortunately, little work has been done to understand the effects of powder microstructures and the tape casting process itself on the mechanical performance of O TMCs. Therefore, the first objective of this study is to examine the microstructural evolution and mechanical performance (with and without heat treatment) of three unreinforced heat orthorhombic-based titanium aluminide matrices made via tape casting. A second objective is to assess the viability of powder metallurgy processing for the fabrication of O TMCs.

  4. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Surface Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB{sub 2} particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b) a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.

  5. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, X H; Qiao, J W; Jiao, Z M; Wang, Z H; Yang, H J; Xu, B S

    2015-09-10

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  6. Homogeneous metal matrix composites produced by a modified stir-casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, A.R.; McCartney, D.G.; Wood, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    Al-based metal matrix composites have been made by a novel liquid processing route which is not only cheap and versatile but produces composites with extremely uniform distributions of the reinforcing phase. Particles of TiB{sub 2}, TiC and B{sub 4}C have been spontaneously incorporated, that is without the use of external mechanical agitation, into Al and Al-alloy melts in volume fractions as high as 0.3. This has been achieved through the use of wetting agents which produce K-Al-F based slags on the melt surface. Spontaneous particle entry and the chemistry of the slag facilitate the generation of good distributions of the reinforcing phase in the solidified composite castings. Non-clustered, near homogeneous distributions have been achieved irrespective of the casting conditions and the volume fraction, type or size of the reinforcement. The majority of the reinforcement becomes engulfed into the solid metal grains during solidification rather than, what is more commonly the case, being pushed to the inter-granular regions. This intra-granular distribution of the reinforcement is likely to improve the mechanical properties of the material.

  7. A Phenomenological Model for Tool Wear in Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie J.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.; Gibson, Brian T.; Cox, Chase D.

    2013-08-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is advantageous because the solid-state nature of the process precludes formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which accompany melting. FSW of MMCs is complicated by rapid and severe wear of the welding tool, a consequence of contact between the tool and the much harder abrasive reinforcement which gives the workpiece material its enhanced strength. The current article demonstrates that Nunes's rotating plug model of material flow in FSW, which has been successfully applied in many other contexts, can also help us understand wear in FSW of MMCs. An equation for predicting the amount of wear in this application is developed and compared with experimental data. This phenomenological model explains the relationship between wear and FSW process parameters documented in previous studies.

  8. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  9. Specimen preparation techniques for the examination of ceramic and metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Saenz, N.T.; Parks, D.H.; Lavender, C.A.; Smith, M.T.

    1987-09-01

    The need for stronger and lighter materials in industry and government has opened the door for many material applications of composite materials. With the emergence of ceramic and metal-matrix composites, new specimen preparation techniques are required to address the problems of polishing materials with varying mechanical and physical properties. Concerns about edge retention, interfacial flatness between microstructural constituents, polishing deformities or artifacts must be handled appropriately for an accurate microstructural analysis to be possible. The techniques developed specifically for composite materials will show differences in specimen preparation and polishing procedures, and illustrate how these adjustments have been successful in alleviating the problems mentioned. With the use of light optical microscopy in conjunction with other analytical methods, such as scanning electron microscopy and/or electron microprobe, a more complete picture of material analysis can be performed. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Prediction of transverse fatigue behavior of unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.; Buchanan, D.J.; Larsen, J.M.

    1998-11-03

    Unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are targeted for use in many aerospace applications which require high specific strength and stiffness at elevated temperatures. Such applications include blings and disks. The primary weakness of a component made of unidirectionally reinforced MMC is its susceptibility to transverse loads. The strength of the component in the transverse direction is significantly lower than that in the longitudinal direction under monotonic, sustained and fatigue loading conditions. Hence, replacement of monolithic components with MMC components requires that the transverse strength of the MMC should be predicted accurately. This paper discusses the applicability of a net-section based model to predict the fatigue behavior of [909] MMC under transverse loading.

  11. Analysis of steady-state shallow cell solidification in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A.

    1996-11-01

    The influence of capillarity on the near-plane front solidification of metal matrix composites is examined by analysis of the one-sided solidification of a binary alloy in a planar interstice of constant width in the limit of low Peclet number. The authors assume that in this limit, solute isoconcentrates in the liquid are everywhere orthogonal to the growth direction. Capillary causes the alloy to solidify in a cellular mode, even in the absence of constitutional supercooling. Two solution branches are derived for this solidification mode, one for shallow symmetric cells, the other for asymmetric cells. Restricting attention to the former solution branch, as the growth velocity increases, or the temperature gradient decreases, the cell amplitude increases gradually, to reach a critical point which depends strongly on the contact angle along the reinforcement/solidification front triple line.

  12. Numerical homogenization of elastic and thermal material properties for metal matrix composites (MMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Stefan; Mergheim, Julia; Zimmermann, Marco; Aurich, Jan C.; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A two-scale material modeling approach is adopted in order to determine macroscopic thermal and elastic constitutive laws and the respective parameters for metal matrix composite (MMC). Since the common homogenization framework violates the thermodynamical consistency for non-constant temperature fields, i.e., the dissipation is not conserved through the scale transition, the respective error is calculated numerically in order to prove the applicability of the homogenization method. The thermomechanical homogenization is applied to compute the macroscopic mass density, thermal expansion, elasticity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity for two specific MMCs, i.e., aluminum alloy Al2024 reinforced with 17 or 30 % silicon carbide particles. The temperature dependency of the material properties has been considered in the range from 0 to 500°C, the melting temperature of the alloy. The numerically determined material properties are validated with experimental data from the literature as far as possible.

  13. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  14. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions (V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction (V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  15. Wear Behavior of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composite under various Corrosive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Smrutiranjan; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the wear behavior under corrosive environments of LM6 based metal matrix composite reinforced with 5 wt% SiC prepared through the stir casting method. The experiments are carried out in a pin-on-disk tribotester varying five levels of normal load and sliding speed. The duration of each experiment is fixed for 30 minutes. Three environments viz. dry, deionised and dilute acid environments are considered to carry out the tribological tests. The composite exhibits slightly good wear resistance under low load and speed condition but weight loss increases as these parameters increases in all three environments. Maximum weight loss occurs in case of acid environment as it is more corrosive than dry and deionised environment. The wear surface of the composite is examined through the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX).

  16. Dynamic Deformation Behaviors of an In Situ Ti-Based Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, R. F.; Zhang, T. W.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors, fracture characteristics, and microstructural evolution of an in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composite: Ti50Zr20V10Cu5Be15 within a wide range of strain rates are investigated. Compared with the quasi-static compression, the yielding stress increases, but the macroscopic plasticity significantly decreases upon dynamic compression. The effects of the strain rate on strain hardening upon quasi-static loading and flow stress upon dynamic loading are evaluated, respectively. The Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) model based on dendrite-dominated mechanism is employed to further uncover the dependence of the yielding stress on the strain rate.

  17. Reinforced Si3N4 matrix composites formed by the directed metal oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.B.

    1992-10-01

    Results of an exploratory study in which the DIMOX directed metal oxidation process was used to form reinforced Si3N4 matrix composites are reported. The study focused on C-fiber reinforcement, which is satisfactory for low-to-moderate temperature applications, including some aerospace and turbine engine applications. It is noted, however, that whenever C-fibers are used at high temperatures in an oxidizing environment, the oxidation resistance of the resulting composites must be addressed. The need for investigating more stable fibers, such as SiC, is emphasized. The approach offers the potential to produce lightweight materials with high room temperature and elevated temperature strength as well as the net or near-net shape capability. 15 refs.

  18. Solidification of SiC/Al fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.; Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in the development and improvement of near net shape manufacturing processes for the fabrication of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Among the techniques available today, the solidification processing technique, including a casting process, provides the most direct route to a finished shape and stands out as potentially simple and economical. In the present study, the solidification of fiber-reinforced composites was investigated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The finite element formulation of general heat conduction equations is typically done by Galerkin's method, which is one of the weighted residual methods. Numerical results from FEM are compared with analytical solutions for the phase change problems. The interface between the solid and liquid phases and the temperature distribution in the composite are analyzed as a function of volume fraction of fibers. ABAQUS, a general purpose commercially available finite element code, was used in this study.

  19. Automated Ultrasonic Disbond Inspection of Metal Matrix Composite Tank Track Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dan; Zhao, George; Raju, Basavaraju B.

    2010-02-01

    An automated disbond inspection system using an ultrasonic array for Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) tank track shoes has been developed. To ensure a reliable inspection, we investigated the test procedures and disbond identification criteria. A standard specimen was designed and fabricated for calibration of the transducer array. This specimen was also used to study the variables that affect the system performance, such as the repeatability and reproducibility with respect to acoustic coupling, and contact conditions, etc. Based on the statistic data analysis, an automated test procedure and criteria for detection and classification of MMC disbond have been established. By applying the inspection procedure to a set of track shoes, we have achieved more reproducible and reliable inspection results than previous tests. The inspection results were confirmed by ultrasonic C-scans.

  20. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions ( V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction ( V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  1. Characterization of novel borides in Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta + 2B metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Soumya; Samuel, Sonia; Puthucode, Anantha; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2009-02-15

    Metal-matrix composites consisting of a complex quaternary Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta alloy reinforced by borides have been successfully deposited from a powder feedstock consisting of a blend of elemental titanium, niobium, zirconium, tantalum, and, titanium diboride (TiB{sub 2}) powders, using the laser engineered net-shaping (LENS{sup TM}) process. The microstructures of the as-deposited composites have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, orientation microscopy, and, transmission electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic boride precipitates, exhibiting the orthorhombic B27 structure, are observed in these as-deposited composites. The complex primary borides exhibit an unusual compositional variation within the same precipitate, which has been investigated in detail using site-specific characterization with a transmission electron microscope. The ability to form near-net shape components using the Laser Engineered Net Shaping process makes these laser-deposited composites promising candidates for wear-resistant applications in biomedical implants.

  2. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste.

    PubMed

    Xavier, L Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  3. Metal-organic framework based mixed matrix membranes: a solution for highly efficient CO2 capture?

    PubMed

    Seoane, Beatriz; Coronas, Joaquin; Gascon, Ignacio; Etxeberria Benavides, Miren; Karvan, Oğuz; Caro, Jürgen; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-04-21

    The field of metal-organic framework based mixed matrix membranes (M(4)s) is critically reviewed, with special emphasis on their application in CO2 capture during energy generation. After introducing the most relevant parameters affecting membrane performance, we define targets in terms of selectivity and productivity based on existing literature on process design for pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture. Subsequently, the state of the art in M(4)s is reviewed against these targets. Because final application of these membranes will only be possible if thin separation layers can be produced, the latest advances in the manufacture of M(4) hollow fibers are discussed. Finally, the recent efforts in understanding the separation performance of these complex composite materials and future research directions are outlined.

  4. Application of neural networks in the acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of metal-matrix composite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Tjia, Robert E.; Vary, Alex; Kautz, Harold E.

    1992-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics (AU) is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique that was devised for the testing of various types of composite materials. A study has been done to determine how effectively the AU technique may be applied to metal-matrix composites (MMCs). The authors use the results and data obtained from that study and apply neural networks to them, particularly in the assessment of mechanical property variations of a specimen from AU measurements. It is assumed that there is no information concerning the important features of the AU signal which relate to the mechanical properties of the specimen. Minimally processed AU measurements are used while relying on the network's ability to extract the significant features of the signal.

  5. Design, analysis, and testing of a metal matrix composite web/flange intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggers, S. B.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Moran, S. G.; Olliffe, R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program to study the local design details of a typical T-shaped web/flange intersection made from a metal matrix composite is described. Loads creating flange bending were applied to specimens having different designs and boundary conditions. Finite element analyses were conducted on models of the test specimens to predict the structural response. The analyses correctly predict failure load, mode, and location in the fillet material in the intersection region of the web and the flange when specimen quality is good. The test program shows the importance of fabrication quality in the intersection region. The full-scale test program that led to the investigation of this local detail is also described.

  6. Abrasive wear behavior of P/M titanium metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Hawk, J.A.; Simmons, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The abrasive wear behavior of titanium metal-matrix composites produced by powder metallurgical techniques was studied. Ti powder was mixed with 0, 20, or 40 volume percent (v%) TiB2, TiC, TiN, SiC, an B4C powder to produce a composite powder blend. The blends were consolidated by hot-pressing at 1200° C and 20 MPa for 2 hours. Also a series of Ti-TiB2 composites was consolidated by press and sinter techniques. Two-body abrasive wear resistance, of the composites worn against either SiC or garnet particles, was evaluated using a pin-on-drum apparatus. The wear behavior of the composites was correlated to the physical properties (e.g., microstructure, sintered density, hardness, strength) of the composites, and compared to the behavior of conventional cast adn wrought Ti and other alloys.

  7. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, L. Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate. PMID:26989764

  8. Fabrication and Tribological Behavior of Stir Cast Mg/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Bala, Niraj

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) have emerged as good alternative material to conventional materials due to their promising advanced properties. In the present work, magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) reinforced with B4C particles were successfully fabricated by cost-effective conventional stir casting technique. MMMCs with an average particle size of 63 µm and different weight percent (wt pct) of B4C between 3 and 12 were fabricated. Wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk against a steel disk under dry sliding condition at loads that varied between 1 and 5 kg at fixed sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The wear data clearly showed that wear resistance of cast composites is better than that of unreinforced magnesium, which is attributed to dispersion hardening caused by carbide particles. An increase in wt pct of B4C showed the wear resistance and hardness to increase significantly. The wear rate and coefficient of friction increased with an increase in applied load. The SEM and EDS analysis of the worn surfaces delineated the dominant wear mechanisms to be abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation under the different sliding conditions. At lower loads, the wear mechanism transformed from severe abrasive wear in pure magnesium (Mg) to mild abrasion, slight delamination, and oxidation in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composite. At higher loads, severe abrasion, adhesion, delamination, and oxidation were found to be the major wear mechanisms in pure Mg, whereas in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composites the corresponding mechanisms were mild abrasion, mild adhesion, slight delamination, and oxidation.

  9. Fabrication and Tribological Behavior of Stir Cast Mg/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Bala, Niraj

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) have emerged as good alternative material to conventional materials due to their promising advanced properties. In the present work, magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) reinforced with B4C particles were successfully fabricated by cost-effective conventional stir casting technique. MMMCs with an average particle size of 63 µm and different weight percent (wt pct) of B4C between 3 and 12 were fabricated. Wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk against a steel disk under dry sliding condition at loads that varied between 1 and 5 kg at fixed sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The wear data clearly showed that wear resistance of cast composites is better than that of unreinforced magnesium, which is attributed to dispersion hardening caused by carbide particles. An increase in wt pct of B4C showed the wear resistance and hardness to increase significantly. The wear rate and coefficient of friction increased with an increase in applied load. The SEM and EDS analysis of the worn surfaces delineated the dominant wear mechanisms to be abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation under the different sliding conditions. At lower loads, the wear mechanism transformed from severe abrasive wear in pure magnesium (Mg) to mild abrasion, slight delamination, and oxidation in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composite. At higher loads, severe abrasion, adhesion, delamination, and oxidation were found to be the major wear mechanisms in pure Mg, whereas in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composites the corresponding mechanisms were mild abrasion, mild adhesion, slight delamination, and oxidation.

  10. The Application of Metal Matrix Composite Materials in Propulsion System Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laszar, John; Shah, Sandeep; Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2003-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials have been developed and used in many applications to reduce the weight of components where weight and deflection are the driving design requirement. MMC materials are being developed for use in some propulsion system components, such as turbo-pumps and thrust chambers. However, to date, no propulsion system valves have been developed that take advantage of the materials unique properties. The stiffness of MMC's could help keep valves light or improve life where deflection is the design constraint (such as seal and bearing locations). The low CTE of the materials might allow the designer to reduce tolerances and clearances producing better performance and lighter weight valves. Using unique manufacturing processes allow parts to be plated/coated for longer life and allow joining either by welding or threading/bolting. Additionally, casting of multi part pre-forms to form a single part can lead to designs that would be hard or impossible to manufacture with other methods. Therefore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed and tested a prototype propulsion system valve that utilizes these materials to demonstrate these advantages. Through design and testing, this effort will determine the best use of these materials in valves designed to achieve the goal of a highly reliable and lightweight propulsion system. This paper is a continuation of the paper, The Application of Metal Matrix Composite Materials In Propulsion System Valves, presented at the JANNAF Conference held in April, 2002. Fabrication techniques employed, valve development, and valve test results will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Gauri R.; Rauls, Michael B.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Hodge, Andrea M.; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding. PMID:26932846

  12. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    -sized titanium aluminide powders were rapidly consolidated to form near-net shape titanium aluminide parts in form of small discs and tiles. The rapidly consolidated titanium aluminide parts were found to be fully dense. The microstructure morphology was found to vary with consolidation conditions. The mechanical properties were found to be significantly dependent on microstructure morphology and grain size. Due to rapid consolidation, grain growth during consolidation was limited, which in turn led to enhanced mechanical properties. The high temperature mechanical properties for the consolidated titanium aluminide samples were characterized and were found to retain good mechanical performance up to 700°C. Micron-sized titanium aluminide powders with slightly less Aluminum and small Nb, and Cr additions were rapidly consolidated into near-net shape parts. The consolidated parts were found to exhibit enhanced mechanical performance in terms of ductility and yield strength. The negative effect of Oxygen on the flexural strength at high temperatures was found to be reduced with the addition of Nb. In an effort to further reduce the grain size of the consolidated titanium aluminide samples, the as-received titanium aluminide powders were milled in an attrition mill. The average powder particle size of the powders was reduced by 60% after milling. The milled powders were then rapidly consolidated. The grain size of the consolidated parts was found to be in the sub-micrometer range. The mechanical properties were found to be significantly enhanced due to reduction of grain size in the sub-micrometer range. In order to develop a metal matrix composite based on titanium aluminide matrix reinforced with titanium boride, an experiment to study the effect of rapid consolidation on titanium diboride powders was conducted. Micron-sized titanium diboride powders were consolidated and were found to be 93% dense and exhibited minimal grain growth. The low density of the consolidated part was

  13. Polymer-based metal nano-coated disposable target for matrix-assisted and matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bugovsky, Stefan; Winkler, Wolfgang; Balika, Werner; Koranda, Manfred; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-07-15

    The ideal MALDI/LDI mass spectrometry sample target for an axial TOF instrument possesses a variety of properties. Primarily, it should be chemically inert to the sample, i.e. analyte, matrix and solvents, highly planar across the whole target, without any previous chemical contact and provide a uniform surface to facilitate reproducible measurements without artifacts from previous sample or matrix compounds. This can be hard to achieve with a metal target, which has to be extensively cleaned every time after use. Any cleaning step may leave residues behind, may change the surface properties due to the type of cleaning method used or even cause microscopic scratches over time hence altering matrix crystallization behavior. Alternatively, use of disposable targets avoids these problems. As each possesses the same surface they therefore have the potential to replace the conventional full metal targets so commonly employed. Furthermore, low cost single-use targets with high planarity promise an easier compliance with GLP guidelines as they alleviate the problem of low reproducibility due to inconsistent sample/matrix crystallization and changes to the target surface properties. In our tests, polymeric metal nano-coated targets were compared to a stainless steel reference. The polymeric metal nano-coated targets exhibited all the performance characteristics for a MALDI MS sample support, and even surpassed the - in our lab commonly used - reference in some aspects like limit of detection. The target exhibits all necessary features such as electrical conductivity, vacuum, laser and solvent compatibility.

  14. Superplasticity in ceramic and metal matrix composites and the role of grain size, segregation, interfaces, and second phase morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1992-10-01

    Structural ceramics and ceramic composites have been shown to exhibit superplasticity in recent times and this discovery has attracted tremendous interest. Although the number of ceramics exhibits superplasticity is now quite large, there are gaps in understanding the requirements for superplasticity in ceramics. Also, superplastic behavior at very high strain rates (1 s{sup {minus}1}) in metallic-based materials is an area of increasing research. In this case, the phenomenon has been observed quite extensively in aluminum alloy-based metal matrix composites and mechanically alloyed aluminum- and nickel-based materials. Again, the details of the structural requirements of this phenomenon are not yet understood. In the present paper, experimental results on superplasticity in ceramic-based materials and on high strain rate behavior in metallic-based materials are presented. The roles of grain size, grain boundary and interface chemistry, and second phase morphology and compatibility with the matrix material will be emphasized.

  15. A Tensile Deformation Model for In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Yang, F. Q.; Liaw, P. K.; Pauly, S.; Xu, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17 exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

  16. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  17. Elastic-plastic deformation of a metal-matrix composite coupon with a center slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Joh, D.; Jo, J.; Guo, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental analysis of deformations of the surface of a metal-matrix specimen is reported. The specimen is a 6-ply 0 + or - 45 sub s boron-aluminum tensile coupon with a central slot. Moire interferometry is used for high-sensitivity whole-field measurements of in-plane displacements. Normal and shear strains are calculated from displacement gradients. Displacement fields are analyzed at various load levels from 15% to 95% of the failure load. Deformations of the boron fibers could be distinguished from those of the matrix. Highly localized plastic slip zones occur tangent to the ends of the slot. Shear strains and concurrent transverse compressive strains in the slip zones reach approximately 10% and 1%, respectively. Upon unloading, elastic recovery in surrounding regions causes a reverse plastic shear strain in the slip zone of about 4%. Longitudinal normal strains on the unslotted ligament peak at the slot boundary at about 1% strain. The strain concentration factor at the end of the slot decreases with load level and the advance of plasticity.

  18. RF Plasma Torch System for Metal Matrix Composite Production in Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie, III

    2007-10-01

    For the first time in 30 years, plans are afoot to build new fission power plants in the US. It is timely to develop technology that could improve the safety and efficiency of new reactors. A program of development for advanced fuel cycles and Generation IV reactors is underway. The path to greater efficiency is to increase the core operating temperature. That places particular challenges to the cladding tubes that contain the fission fuel. A promising material for this purpose is a metal matrix composite (MMC) in which ceramic fibers are bonded within a high-strength steel matrix, much like fiberglass. Current MMC technology lacks the ability to effectively bond traditional high-temperature alloys to ceramic strands. The purpose of this project is to design an rf plasma torch system to use titanium as a buffer between the ceramic fibers and the refractory outer material. The design and methods of using an rf plasma torch to produce a non-equilibrium phase reaction to bond together the MMC will be discussed. The effects of having a long lived fuel cladding in the design of future reactors will also be discussed.

  19. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  20. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  1. Between dreams and reality of metal-matrix composites -- a big gap?

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, H.D.; Kern, H.; Janczak, J.

    1993-12-31

    The potential benefits and the current state-of-the-art in MMCs will be presented through a discussion of their processing and related aspects. The advantages and limitations of most common manufacturing techniques of fiber reinforced metals, e.g. realized property potential and commercial possibilities, will be outlined. The emphasis will be given on novel powder metallurgy techniques such as rapid solidification (e.g. atomization techniques and plasma processes) and new materials systems (e.g. intermetallic matrix composites). The technical barriers which prevent the transition of MMCs from aerospace to a wider range of applications will be highlighted, Special attention will be drawn to the relation between processing parameters, fiber-matrix interface and composite properties. The challenge of composite modeling and design as well as interface controlling for successful processing utilization of MMCs will be mentioned. The benefits of use of computer techniques (databases, simulations, knowledge based systems) to aid the composite design and process control (fuzzy logic) will be shown on several examples. The technical possibilities of adaptation of interface tailoring approaches from the PMC area such as graded interphase or rubber-bumper interface will be studied. In addition, on the basis of recent forecasts by different experts on composite materials the question of the MMCs future will be discussed. Have they a chance in the next few years to meet the requirements of successful commercial applications, especially those of clients? The problems which have to be solved and options for solution will be dealt with.

  2. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  3. Twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) and work hardening in Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Qiao, J W; Wang, Z H; Rao, W; Kang, G Z

    2017-05-12

    The present study demonstrates that Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a normal composition of Ti43Zr32Ni6Ta5Be14 containing ductile dendrites dispersed in the glass matrix has been developed, and deformation mechanisms about the tensile property have been investigated by focusing on twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect. The Ti-based MGMC has excellent tensile properties and pronounced tensile work-hardening capacity, with a yield strength of 1100 MPa and homogeneous elongation of 4%. The distinguished strain hardening is ascribed to the formation of deformation twinning within the dendrites. Twinning generated in the dendrites works as an obstacle for the rapid propagation of shear bands, and then, the localized necking is avoided, which ensures the ductility of such kinds of composites. Besides, a finite-element model (FEM) has been established to explain the TWIP effect which brings out a work-hardening behavior in the present MGMC instead of a localized strain concentration. According to the plasticity theory of traditional crystal materials and some new alloys, TWIP effect is mainly controlled by stacking fault energy (SFE), which has been analyzed intensively in the present MGMC.

  4. Development of a sintering methodology through abnormal glow discharge for manufacturing metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, S.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento, A.; López, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a sintering methodology is presented by using abnormal glow discharge to metal matrix composites (MMC), consisting of 316 steel, reinforced with titanium carbide (TiC). The wear behaviour of these compounds was evaluated according to the standard ASTM G 99 in a tribometer pin-on-disk. The effect of the percentage of reinforcement (3, 6, and 9%), with 40 minutes of mixing in the planetary mill is analysed, using compaction pressure of 700MPa and sintering temperature of 1,100°C±5°C, gaseous atmosphere of H2 - N2, and sintering time of 30 minutes. As a result of the research, it shows that the best behaviour against wear is obtained when the MMC contains 6% TiC. Under this parameter the lowest percentage of pores and the lowest coefficient of friction are achieved, ensuring that the incorporation of ceramic particles (TiC) in 316 austenitic steel matrix significantly improves the wear resistance. Also, it is shown that it is possible to sinter such materials using the abnormal glow discharge, being a novel and effective method in which the working temperature is reached in a short time.

  5. Electrochemical Behavior of Al-B4C Metal Matrix Composites in NaCl Solution

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu-Mei; Chen, X.-Grant

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the automotive, aerospace and nuclear industries. One of the main challenges using Al-based MMCs is the influence of the reinforcement particles on the corrosion resistance. In the present study, the corrosion behavior of Al-B4C MMCs in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the composites decreased when increasing the B4C volume fraction. Al-B4C composite was susceptible to pitting corrosion and two types of pits were observed on the composite surface. The corrosion mechanism of the composite in the NaCl solution was primarily controlled by oxygen diffusion in the solution. In addition, the galvanic couples that formed between Al matrix and B4C particles could also be responsible for the lower corrosion resistance of the composites. PMID:28793574

  6. Continuum Damage Modeling for Dynamic Fracture Toughness of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Intaek; Ochi, Yasuo; Bae, Sungin; Song, Jungil

    Short fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) have widely adopted as structural materials and many experimental researches have been performed to study fracture toughness of it. Fracture toughness is often referred as the plane strain(maximum constraint) fracture toughness KIc determined by the well-established standard test method, such as ASTM E399. But the application for dynamic fracture toughness KId has not been popular yet, because of reliance in capturing the crack propagating time. This paper deals with dynamic fracture toughness testing and simulation using finite element method to evaluate fracture behaviors of MMCs manufactured by squeeze casting process when material combination is varied with the type of reinforcement (appearance, size), volume fraction and combination of reinforcements, and the matrix alloy. The instrumented Charphy impact test was used for KId determination and continuum damage model embedded in commercial FE program is used to investigate the dynamic fracture toughness with the influence of elasto-visco-plastic constitutive relation of quasi-brittle fracture that is typical examples of ceramics and some fibre reinforced composites. With Compared results between experimental method and FE simulation, the determination process for KId is presented. FE simulation coupled with continuum damage model is emphasized single shot simulation can predict the dynamic fracture toughness, KId and real time evolution of that directly.

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the quantitative analysis of metals in sediments using natural zeolite matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austria, E. S.; Fuentes, E. M.; Nuesca, G. M.; Lamorena, R. B.

    2017-10-01

    The dependence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the matrix of the sample remains an important consideration in performing quantitative analysis. In this study, a new matrix was introduced in the preparation of solid powder calibration curves. Heat-treated natural zeolite and KBr were mixed separately into high purity metal powders to generate calibration curves using a univariate approach. A LIBS technique was used in the detection and quantitative analysis of Cr, Cu and Pb in river sediment samples. The relative percent difference (RPD) was calculated to describe the variability measurements made using ICP/OES and LIBS as well as to evaluate the accuracy of the method. Calculated limits of detection in the matrices prepared were comparable with literature values and ranged from 0.41 to 6.1 ppm. The resulting metal concentrations indicate that the natural zeolite matrix were closer to the reference values compared to the KBr matrix. By employing principal component analysis (PCA), heat treated zeolite was shown as a potential diluent or binder for generating calibration curves and could provide matrix-matched standards in identification of target metals from unknown sediment samples. The natural zeolite appeared to closely simulate the ablation behavior and property of the samples, and it is found to be a potential suitable matrix for the quantitative LIBS analysis of sediments.

  8. An investigation of the thermoviscoplastic behavior of a metal matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogacki, John R.; Tuttle, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    This research investigates the response of a fiberless 13 layer hot isostatically pressed Ti-15-3 laminate to creep, constant strain rate, and cyclic constant strain rate loading at temperatures ranging from 482C to 649C. Creep stresses from 48 to 260 MPa and strain rates of .0001 to .01 m/m/sec were used. Material parameters for three unified constitutive models (Bodner-Partom, Miller, and Walker models) were determined for Ti-15-3 from the experimental data. Each of the three models was subsequently incorporated into a rule of mixtures and evaluated for accuracy and ease of use in predicting the thermoviscoplastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composite laminates (both 0 and 90). The laminates were comprised of a Ti-15-3 matrix with 29 volume percent SCS6 fibers. The predicted values were compared to experimentally determined creep and constant strain rate data. It was found that all three models predicted the viscoplastic response of the 0 specimens reasonably well, but seriously underestimated the viscoplastic response of the 90 specimens. It is believed that this discrepancy is due to compliant and/or weak fiber-matrix interphase. In general, it was found that of the three models studied, the Bodner-Partom model was easiest to implement, primarily because this model does not require the use of cyclic constant strain rate tests to determine the material parameters involved. However, the version of the Bodner-Partom model used in this study does not include back stress as an internal state variable, and hence may not be suitable for use with materials which exhibit a pronounced Baushinger effect. The back stress is accounted for in both the Walker and Miller models; determination of the material parameters associated with the Walker model was somewhat easier than in the Miller model.

  9. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticle synthesis from metal organic frameworks (MOFs): finding the border of metal and metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Raja; Pachfule, Pradip; Banerjee, Rahul; Poddar, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co3O4, ZnO, Mn2O3, MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2, whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2. Another point of interest is the fact that we have found a unique relationship between the nanoparticle size and the distance between the secondary building units inside the MOF precursors. Interestingly, the crystallinity of the carbon matrix was also found to be greatly influenced by the environment (N2 and air) during thermolysis. Moreover, these nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix showed promising H2 and CO2 adsorption properties depending on the environment used for the thermolysis of MOFs.Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co3O4, ZnO, Mn2O3, MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2, whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N2. Another point of interest is the fact that we have

  10. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  11. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  12. Dynamic mechanical properties of a Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinshan Cui, Jing; Bai, Jie; Kou, Hongchao; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Jichao

    2015-04-21

    Dynamic mechanical behavior of a Ti{sub 50}Zr{sub 20}Nb{sub 12}Cu{sub 5}Be{sub 13} bulk metallic glass composite was investigated using mechanical spectroscopy in both temperature and frequency domains. Storage modulus G′ and loss modulus G″ are determined by temperature, and three distinct regions corresponding to different states in the bulk metallic glass composite are characterized. Physical parameters, such as atomic mobility and correlation factor χ, are introduced to analyze dynamic mechanical behavior of the bulk metallic glass composite in the framework of quasi-point defects (QPD) model. The experimental results are in good agreement with the prediction of QPD model.

  13. Problems of Development and Application of Metal Matrix Composite Powders for Additive Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosteleva, Elena N.; Pribytkov, Gennadii A.; Krinitcyn, Maxim G.; Baranovskii, Anton V.; Korzhova, Victoria V.

    2016-07-01

    The paper considers the problem of structure formation in composites with carbide phase and a metal binder under self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of powder mixtures. The relation between metal binder content and their structure and wear resistance of coatings was studied. It has been shown that dispersion of the carbide phase and volume content of metal binder in the composite powders structure could be regulated purposefully for all of studied composites. It was found that the structure of surfaced coating was fully inherited of composite powders. Modification or coarsening of the structure at the expense of recrystallization or coagulation carbide phase during deposition and sputtering does not occur.

  14. Do adhesive systems leave resin coats on the surfaces of the metal matrix bands? An adhesive remnant characterization.

    PubMed

    Arhun, Neslihan; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Reestablishing proximal contacts with composite resins may prove challenging since the applied adhesives may lead to resin coating that produces additional thickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface of metal matrix bands after application of adhesive systems and blowing or wiping off the adhesive before polymerization. Seventeen groups of matrix bands were prepared. The remnant particles were characterized by energy dispersive spectrum and scanning electron microscopy. Total etch and two-step self-etch adhesives did not leave any resin residues by wiping and blowing off. All-in-one adhesive revealed resin residues despite wiping off. Prime and Bond NT did not leave any remnant with compomer. Clinicians must be made aware of the consequences of possible adhesive remnants on matrix bands that may lead to a defective definitive restoration. The adhesive resin used for Class II restorations may leave resin coats on metal matrix bands after polymerization, resulting in additional thickness on the metal matrix bands and poor quality of the proximal surface of the definitive restoration when the adhesive system is incorporated in the restoration.

  15. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  16. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and

  17. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  18. Emission spectrometric arcing procedure with minimal effect of chemical form of sample. [performed on refractory metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Matrix effects related to the chemical form of analyzed materials were studied. An arc in argon was used which was buffered with silver chloride. The effect of chemical form was minimal for a variety of metals, oxides, and carbides representing the most refractory compounds and thermally stable metal-containing molecules. Only four of the most refractory materials known showed significant emission depressions due to incomplete volatilization in the arc system. These results are discussed in terms of vapor pressures of the solid materials placed on the anodes and dissociation reactions of the molecules in the gaseous environment.

  19. Strain Rate Dependency of Bronze Metal Matrix Composite Mechanical Properties as a Function of Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd; Joyce, Peter; Radice, Joshua; Gregorian, Dro; Gobble, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of tungsten carbide (WC)-filled bronze castings fabricated by centrifugal and sedimentation-casting techniques are examined, in this study. Both casting techniques are an attempt to produce a functionally graded material with high wear resistance at a chosen surface. Potential applications of such materials include shaft bushings, electrical contact surfaces, and brake rotors. Knowledge of strain rate-dependent mechanical properties is recommended for predicting component response due to dynamic loading or impact events. A brief overview of the casting techniques for the materials considered in this study is followed by an explanation of the test matrix and testing techniques. Hardness testing, density measurement, and determination of the volume fraction of WC particles are performed throughout the castings using both image analysis and optical microscopy. The effects of particle filling on mechanical properties are first evaluated through a microhardness survey of the castings. The volume fraction of WC particles is validated using a thorough density survey and a rule-of-mixtures model. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) testing of various volume fraction specimens is conducted to determine strain dependence of mechanical properties and to compare the process-property relationships between the two casting techniques. The baseline performances of C95400 bronze are provided for comparison. The results show that the addition of WC particles improves microhardness significantly for the centrifugally cast specimens, and, to a lesser extent, in the sedimentation-cast specimens, largely because the WC particles are more concentrated as a result of the centrifugal-casting process. Both metal matrix composites (MMCs) demonstrate strain rate dependency, with sedimentation casting having a greater, but variable, effects on material response. This difference is attributed to legacy effects from the casting process, namely

  20. Surface modification of Al alloys and Al-based metal-matrix composites by chemical passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Lin, S.; Kim, S.; Shih, H.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical passivation by immersion of Aluminum 6061 and Aluminum 6061/Silicon Carbide and Al 6061/graphite metal matrix composites in a Cerous Chloride solution produces very corrosion resistant surfaces. Al 6061 which had been immersed in 1000 ppm Cerous Chloride for one week did not suffer from pitting corrosion during immersion in aerated 0.5 N Sodium Chloride for 90 days. A comparison with the corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloys treated with chromate conversion coatings shows that chemical passivation provides a valuable alternative to this process. The passivation process in CeCl3 and the corrosion process in NaCl have been monitored continuously with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) which has been shown to be a very sensitive technique for the evaluation of these reactions. Pitting can be detected by the occurrence of a new time constant at low frequencies and a decrease of the impedance in the capacitive region. A model which describes the impedance for a surface which undergoes pitting and a fitting procedure for the analysis of the experimental EIS-data are presented.

  1. Multi-Objective Optimization in Hot Machining of Al/SiCp Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, M. R.; Dabade, U. A.

    2016-02-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have been found to be useful in a number of engineering applications and particle reinforced MMCs have received considerable attention due to their excellent engineering properties. These materials are generally regarded as extremely difficult to machine, because of the abrasive characteristics of the reinforced particulates. These characteristics of MMCs affect the machined surface quality and integrity. This paper presents use of Taguchi Grey Relational Analyses (GRA) for optimization of Al/SiCp/10p (220 and 600 mesh) MMCs produced by stir casting. Experiments are performed using L16 orthogonal array by using hot machining technique. The objective of this study is to identify the optimum process parameters to improve the surface integrity on Al/SiCp MMCs. The machined surface integrity has been analyzed by process parameters such as speed, feed, depth of cut and preheating temperature. The significance of the process parameters on surface integrity has been evaluated quantitatively by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method and AOM plots. The grey relational analysis shows optimum machining conditions as 0.05 mm/rev feed, 0.4 mm depth of cut and 60 °C preheating temperature to enhance surface integrity for both Al/SiCp/10p (220 and 600 mesh) MMCs except for cutting speed 50 and 25 m/min respectively.

  2. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  3. On the Development of Microstructure in a Metal Matrix Composite Using Nano-Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, V A; Lesuer, D R; Kotov, I A; Ivanov, V V; Aksenov, A A; Khodos, I I; Klimenko, G L; Smirnov, O M; Murzakaev, A M; Zayats, S V

    2001-09-10

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) containing matrices with nanometer grain sizes have been produced from pure aluminum nano-powders (particle sizes 50-200 nm) with SiC reinforcement (particle sizes 3-10 {micro}m). The pure Al nano-powders were produced using an exploding wire technique. Dynamic loading using a magnetic impulse technique has been used to compact the MMC to high density. The dynamic compaction process results in excellent wetting of the SiC particles by the nanocrystalline Al powders, and the retention of a nano-crystalline grain size in the MMC. Microstructural analysis of the resulting MMC showed a highly uniform distribution of Sic particles with no visible defects or pores and the absence of deleterious phases (such as Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) at the interfaces between the aluminum nano-grains and the SiC particles. The microstructures produced and the evolution of microstructure during dynamic compaction has also been studied using TEM and found to progress in three stages. These three stages are described.

  4. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  5. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  6. Heavy metal stabilization by means of innovative alumino-silicate matrix.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, R; Pagliuca, C; Santoro, L; Verdolotti, L

    2003-05-01

    Powdered tuff mixed with NaOH solution has been hydrothermally cured at temperatures ranging from 90 to 150 degrees C. Hardening takes place due to the formation of an amorphous binding phase. At the lowest temperature tested a non-autoclaved process can be carried out. Values of unconfined compressive strength were found to vary from 15.5 MPa to 28.9 MPa depending on reaction conditions. The matrix was tested as a binder for the stabilization of model systems containing cadmium, chromium and lead and for a real system containing a secondary lead smelter slag. The stabilization process was tested from both the environmental and technological points of view by means of leahcing tests and compressive strength measurement. Basic characterization leaching tests carried out with the model systems showed that metal release from hardened paste is below 1%. Compliance leaching test carried out with the real system showed that lead release is below the limit set by law. From the technological pont of view, it was found that unconfined compressive strength is always higher for the real system. Specifically, this system showed compressive strength increasing with slag content to values exceeding 86.5 MPa.

  7. Anomalous Buckling Characteristics of Laminated Metal-Matrix Composite Plates with Central Square Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Compressive buckling analysis was performed on metal-matrix composite (MMC) plates with central square holes. The MMC plates have varying aspect ratios and hole sizes and are supported under different boundary conditions. The finite-element structural analysis method was used to study the effects of plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratio, hole size, and the composite stacking sequence on the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates. Studies show that by increasing the hole sizes, compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates could be considerably increased under certain boundary conditions and aspect ratios ("anomalous" buckling behavior); and that the plate buckling mode could be symmetrical or antisymmetrical, depending on the plate boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and the hole size. For same-sized plates with same-sized holes, the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates with [90/0/0/90]2 lamination could be as much as 10 percent higher or lower than those of the [45/- 45/- 45/45]2 laminations, depending on the plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratios, and the hole size. Clamping the plate edges induces far stronger "anomalous" buckling behavior (enhancing compressive buckling strengths at increasing hole sizes) of the perforated MMC plates than simply supporting the plate edges.

  8. Lamb waves propagation in a novel metal-matrix phononic crystals plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suobin; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xi, Yanhui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the propagation properties of Lamb waves in a novel phononic crystals (PCs) plate composed of a square array of double-sided composite taper stubs, which are deposited on a 2D locally resonant PC plate that composes of an array of rubber fillers embedded in the steel plate is studied. It is shown that the spring-mass system of the resonator will be decoupled by introducing the rubber filler, and then the out-of-plane band gap (BG) and the in-plane BG can be adjusted into the same lowest frequency range, respectively (the out-of-plane BG is adjusted by the rubber filler and the in-plane BG is adjusted by the taper stub). As a result, the frequency range of the generated complete BG is between 59-93 Hz due to the overlap between the in-plane and out-of-plane BG. Compared with the classic double-sided stubbed PC plate, the relative bandwidth of the BG is enlargement by a factor of 5.5 and the location of the BG is reduced by a factor of 5.5 in the proposed structure. It provides an effective way for metal-matrix PCs to obtain complete BGs in low-frequency range (below 100 Hz), which has potential for the reduction of the vibration at low frequency in practical case.

  9. Microstructures induced by excimer laser surface melting of the SiCp/Al metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, D. S.; Zhong, X. L.; Yan, Y. Z.; Hashimoto, T.; Liu, Z.

    2017-08-01

    Laser surface melting (LSM) was carried out on the SiCp/Al metal matrix composite (MMC) using a KrF excimer laser with a fluence of 7 J/cm2. The re-solidification microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It was found that a 2.5 μm thick melted layer was formed in the near-surface region, in which dissolution of the intermetallics and removal of the SiC particles occurred. The thermal and material response upon laser irradiation was simulated using three models, i.e. analytical model, finite element model (FEM) and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The effect of SiC particles on the LSM process, the mechanism of the SiC removal and the re-solidification microstructures in the melted layer were discussed. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results and contributed to the generic understanding of the re-solidification microstructures induced by ns-pulsed lasers.

  10. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior.

  11. Micro-strain Evolution and Toughening Mechanisms in a Trimodal Al-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzheng; Topping, Troy D.; Yang, Hanry; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2015-03-01

    A trimodal metal matrix composite (MMC) based on AA (Al alloy) 5083 (Al-4.4Mg-0.7Mn-0.15Cr wt pct) was synthesized by cryomilling powders followed by compaction of blended powders and ceramic particles using two successive dual mode dynamic forgings. The microstructure consisted of 66.5 vol pct ultrafine grain (UFG) region, 30 vol pct coarse grain (CG) region and 3.5 vol pct reinforcing boron carbide particles. The microstructure imparted high-tensile yield strength (581 MPa) compared to a conventional AA 5083 (242 MPa) and enhanced ductility compared to 100 pct UFG Al MMC. The deformation behavior of the heterogeneous structure and the effects of CG regions on crack propagation were investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy micro-tensile tests. The micro-strain evolution measured using digital image correlation showed early plastic strain localization in CG regions. Micro-voids due to the strain mismatch at CG/UFG interfaces were responsible for crack initiation. CG region toughening was realized by plasticity-induced crack closure and zone shielding of disconnected micro-cracks. However, these toughening mechanisms did not effectively suppress its brittle behavior. Further optimization of the CG distribution (spacing and morphology) is required to achieve toughness levels required for structural applications.

  12. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Tiwari, Prabhat

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  13. Plasticity in Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass matrix composites containing brass fibers synthesized by warm extrusion of powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, D. H.; Lee, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Sordelet, D. J.

    2003-09-01

    Deformation behavior of centimeter-scale Ni-based metallic glass matrix composites reinforced by brass fibers, synthesized by warm extrusion of gas atomized powders, has been investigated under the uniaxial compression condition at room temperature. Throughout the extrusion process, all blended spherical powders are elongated along the extrusion direction. The brass fibers are well distributed in the metallic glass matrix for the metallic glass matrix composites containing the brass up to 0.4 in volume fraction and no pores are visible. With increasing the brass content, elastic modulus and strength decrease due to the softness of the brass, but enhanced macroscopic plasticity is observed due to the formation of multiple shear bands, initiated from the interface between brass fiber and metallic glass matrix, as well as their confinement between the brass fibers. These behaviors are not observed in the sample synthesized by warm extrusion of only metallic glass powders.

  14. Lithium-coated polymeric matrix as a minimum volume-change and dendrite-free lithium metal anode

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Liang, Zheng; Zhao, Jie; Yan, Kai; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium metal is the ideal anode for the next generation of high-energy-density batteries. Nevertheless, dendrite growth, side reactions and infinite relative volume change have prevented it from practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a promising metallic lithium anode design by infusing molten lithium into a polymeric matrix. The electrospun polyimide employed is stable against highly reactive molten lithium and, via a conformal layer of zinc oxide coating to render the surface lithiophilic, molten lithium can be drawn into the matrix, affording a nano-porous lithium electrode. Importantly, the polymeric backbone enables uniform lithium stripping/plating, which successfully confines lithium within the matrix, realizing minimum volume change and effective dendrite suppression. The porous electrode reduces the effective current density; thus, flat voltage profiles and stable cycling of more than 100 cycles is achieved even at a high current density of 5 mA cm−2 in both carbonate and ether electrolyte. The advantages of the porous, polymeric matrix provide important insights into the design principles of lithium metal anodes. PMID:26987481

  15. Lithium-coated polymeric matrix as a minimum volume-change and dendrite-free lithium metal anode

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Liang, Zheng; ...

    2016-03-18

    Lithium metal is the ideal anode for the next generation of high-energy-density batteries. Nevertheless, dendrite growth, side reactions and infinite relative volume change have prevented it from practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a promising metallic lithium anode design by infusing molten lithium into a polymeric matrix. The electrospun polyimide employed is stable against highly reactive molten lithium and, via a conformal layer of zinc oxide coating to render the surface lithiophilic, molten lithium can be drawn into the matrix, affording a nano-porous lithium electrode. Importantly, the polymeric backbone enables uniform lithium stripping/plating, which successfully confines lithium within the matrix, realizingmore » minimum volume change and effective dendrite suppression. The porous electrode reduces the effective current density; thus, flat voltage profiles and stable cycling of more than 100 cycles is achieved even at a high current density of 5 mA cm-2 in both carbonate and ether electrolyte. Furthermore, the advantages of the porous, polymeric matrix provide important insights into the design principles of lithium metal anodes.« less

  16. Lithium-coated polymeric matrix as a minimum volume-change and dendrite-free lithium metal anode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Liang, Zheng; Zhao, Jie; Yan, Kai; Cui, Yi

    2016-03-18

    Lithium metal is the ideal anode for the next generation of high-energy-density batteries. Nevertheless, dendrite growth, side reactions and infinite relative volume change have prevented it from practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a promising metallic lithium anode design by infusing molten lithium into a polymeric matrix. The electrospun polyimide employed is stable against highly reactive molten lithium and, via a conformal layer of zinc oxide coating to render the surface lithiophilic, molten lithium can be drawn into the matrix, affording a nano-porous lithium electrode. Importantly, the polymeric backbone enables uniform lithium stripping/plating, which successfully confines lithium within the matrix, realizing minimum volume change and effective dendrite suppression. The porous electrode reduces the effective current density; thus, flat voltage profiles and stable cycling of more than 100 cycles is achieved even at a high current density of 5 mA cm-2 in both carbonate and ether electrolyte. Furthermore, the advantages of the porous, polymeric matrix provide important insights into the design principles of lithium metal anodes.

  17. Lithium-coated polymeric matrix as a minimum volume-change and dendrite-free lithium metal anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Liang, Zheng; Zhao, Jie; Yan, Kai; Cui, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Lithium metal is the ideal anode for the next generation of high-energy-density batteries. Nevertheless, dendrite growth, side reactions and infinite relative volume change have prevented it from practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a promising metallic lithium anode design by infusing molten lithium into a polymeric matrix. The electrospun polyimide employed is stable against highly reactive molten lithium and, via a conformal layer of zinc oxide coating to render the surface lithiophilic, molten lithium can be drawn into the matrix, affording a nano-porous lithium electrode. Importantly, the polymeric backbone enables uniform lithium stripping/plating, which successfully confines lithium within the matrix, realizing minimum volume change and effective dendrite suppression. The porous electrode reduces the effective current density; thus, flat voltage profiles and stable cycling of more than 100 cycles is achieved even at a high current density of 5 mA cm-2 in both carbonate and ether electrolyte. The advantages of the porous, polymeric matrix provide important insights into the design principles of lithium metal anodes.

  18. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  19. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  20. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  1. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  2. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  3. Molybdenum metallization, and step-induced defects in active-matrix liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quli, Farhat Abbas

    The objective of this work was to identify the causes of the step-induced preferential etching which occurs during the patterning of molybdenum (Mo) interconnects for the source/drain line metallization of the thin-film transistor array of active matrix liquid crystal displays. The morphology of Mo films deposited on steps under various conditions using sputtering and electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) was studied to identify the causes of preferential etching, and determine processing conditions leading to defect-free interconnects. It was found that columnar growth domains grown from the steps were misaligned with the columnar growth from the substrate, causing the creation of high-angle grain boundaries where the columns impinged upon one another. This boundary region is believed to be responsible for the preferential etching in the Mo films. Columnar growth of silicon dioxide, an amorphous film, did not result in preferential etching due to the lack of grain boundaries. Neon (Ne) sputtering of Mo did not lead to amorphous films due to higher film bombardment during Ne sputtering, as reported by other researchers. Instead, the low rate of deposition during Ne sputtering was found to cause the incorporation of high amounts of impurities that lead to amorphization of the growing film. At extremely low rates and high impurity concentrations, it was found that the film grew in a fcc rather than bcc structure. Mo deposited under high levels of argon ion bombardment was found to have an isotropic rather than columnar morphology which led to interconnects that were free from preferential etching. The maximum ratio of depositing atoms to bombarding ions necessary to modify the microstructure was found to be 1.5 for Mo deposited by EB-PVD at 400°C substrate temperature and --600 volts substrate bias. The processing window for bias sputtering conditions leading to an isotropic morphology was also identified. Thermally induced grain growth in metal films was

  4. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticle synthesis from metal organic frameworks (MOFs): finding the border of metal and metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Das, Raja; Pachfule, Pradip; Banerjee, Rahul; Poddar, Pankaj

    2012-01-21

    Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co(3)O(4), ZnO, Mn(2)O(3), MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N(2), whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N(2). Another point of interest is the fact that we have found a unique relationship between the nanoparticle size and the distance between the secondary building units inside the MOF precursors. Interestingly, the crystallinity of the carbon matrix was also found to be greatly influenced by the environment (N(2) and air) during thermolysis. Moreover, these nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix showed promising H(2) and CO(2) adsorption properties depending on the environment used for the thermolysis of MOFs.

  5. One-step direct-laser metal writing of sub-100 nm 3D silver nanostructures in a gelatin matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, SeungYeon; Vora, Kevin; Mazur, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Developing an ability to fabricate high-resolution, 3D metal nanostructures in a stretchable 3D matrix is a critical step to realizing novel optoelectronic devices such as tunable bulk metal-dielectric optical devices and THz metamaterial devices that are not feasible with alternative techniques. We report a new chemistry method to fabricate high-resolution, 3D silver nanostructures using a femtosecond-laser direct metal writing technique. Previously, only fabrication of 3D polymeric structures or single-/few-layer metal structures was possible. Our method takes advantage of unique gelatin properties to overcome such previous limitations as limited freedom in 3D material design and short sample lifetime. We fabricate more than 15 layers of 3D silver nanostructures with a resolution of less than 100 nm in a stable dielectric matrix that is flexible and has high large transparency that is well-matched for potential applications in the optical and THz metamaterial regimes. This is a single-step process that does not require any further processing. This work will be of interest to those interested in fabrication methods that utilize nonlinear light-matter interactions and the realization of future metamaterials.

  6. Comparative study of the structural and electrochemical properties of noble metal inclusions in a UO2 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, S.; Petersmann, T.; Seibert, A.; Gouder, T.; Huber, F.; Brendebach, B.; Denecke, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    The intention of the presented study is to elucidate the influence of noble metal inclusions (fission products) on the structure as well as on the electrochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). To this aim, thin UO2 films doped with metal inclusions such as Pd, Mo and Au are prepared by sputter deposition. The films are characterized by spectroscopic (XPS, EXAFS, XRD) as well as by microscopic (AFM, SEM) methods. In a next step the electrochemical properties of these model systems are comparatively investigated by cyclo voltammetry (CV). The sputter technique in combination with the heating treatment of the films allows the formation of a crystalline UO2 matrix as it is found in SNF. The co-deposition with Au results in the dispersion of the pure metal in the oxide matrix. Pd as well as Mo are oxidized due to the deposition at RT. Heating the films involves a further oxidation of MoO2 to MoO3. By contrast Pd agglomerates and forms metallic -phases as it is found in SNF. Electrochemical investigations of the UO2-Pd samples indicate an inhibiting influence of Pd on the oxidative dissolution of UO2. When it comes to the formation of secondary phases under reducing conditions such influence is passivated. The precipitates finally dominate the overall redox behaviour of the model system.

  7. Early-life metal exposure and schizophrenia: A proof-of-concept study using novel tooth-matrix biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Modabbernia, A.; Velthorst, E.; Gennings, C.; De Haan, L.; Austin, C.; Sutterland, A.; Mollon, J.; Frangou, S.; Wright, R.; Arora, M.; Reichenberg, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite evidence for the effects of metals on neurodevelopment, the long-term effects on mental health remain unclear due to methodological limitations. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of studying metal exposure during critical neurodevelopmental periods and to explore the association between early-life metal exposure and adult schizophrenia. Methods We analyzed childhood-shed teeth from nine individuals with schizophrenia and five healthy controls. We investigated the association between exposure to lead (Pb2+), manganese (Mn2+), cadmium (Cd2+), copper (Cu2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and zinc (Zn2+), and schizophrenia, psychotic experiences, and intelligence quotient (IQ). We reconstructed the dose and timing of early-life metal exposures using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results We found higher early-life Pb2+ exposure among patients with schizophrenia than controls. The differences in log Mn2+ and log Cu2+ changed relatively linearly over time to postnatal negative values. There was a positive correlation between early-life Pb2+ levels and psychotic experiences in adulthood. Moreover, we found a negative correlation between Pb2+ levels and adult IQ. Conclusions In our proof-of-concept study, using tooth-matrix biomarker that provides direct measurement of exposure in the fetus and newborn, we provide support for the role of metal exposure during critical neurodevelopmental periods in psychosis. PMID:27311101

  8. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  9. The corrosion behavior of in-situ Zr-based metallic glass matrix composites in different corrosive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. F.; Qiao, J. W.; Yang, H. J.; Wang, Y. S.; Liaw, P. K.; Lan, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of Zr58.5Ti14.3Nb5.2Cu6.1Ni4.9Be11.0 metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) in different corrosive media, including 1 M NaCl, 1 M HCl, 0.5 M H2SO4, and 1 M NaOH solutions, was studied. The electrochemical characteristics of the composites were investigated by potentiodynamic-polarization measurements. The results show that the corrosion resistance in NaOH solution is the poorest in terms of the corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current density (icorr). For comparison, the chemical immersion tests were conducted. The corroded surface morphologies after electrochemical and immersion measurements both show that the amorphous matrix and crystalline dendrites exhibit different corrosion behaviors. The possible interpretation of the observed morphology evolution was proposed. The effect of a very base metallic element of beryllium on the corrosion dynamic process has been emphasized.

  10. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  11. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-04

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  12. Metals 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G.; Boensch, F.D.; Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M.

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  13. Thermoelectric transport in hybrid materials incorporating metallic nanowires in polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Lu, Tingyu; Wang, Biao; Liu, Jun; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi; Zhou, Jun; Li, Baowen

    2017-03-01

    We propose a type of thermoelectric materials incorporating metallic nanowires in insulating polymers. It is shown that the hybridization of poor thermoelectric materials such as metal and polymer can achieve high performance of thermoelectricity. The electrical conductivity of such hybrid materials is controllable by the volume fraction of metallic nanowires which is above a percolation critical value. Meanwhile, the Seebeck coefficient shows a weak dependence on the volume fraction. Low thermal conductivities required for achieving the high figure of merit can be fulfilled from both the low thermal conductivity of polymer and the interfacial thermal resistance between nanowires and polymer. In this regard, we propose the concept "electron-percolation thermal-insulator," providing a guide to design efficient hybrid thermoelectric materials.

  14. Formation of Splats from Suspension Particles with Solid Inclusions Finely Dispersed in a Melted Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, O. P.

    2012-12-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to describe the splats formation from composite particles of several tens of micrometers in size whose liquid metal binder contains a high volume concentration of ultra-fine refractory solid inclusions uniformly distributed in the binder. A theoretical solution was derived, enabling evaluation of splat thickness and diameter, and also the contact temperature at the particle-substrate interface, under complete control of key physical parameters (KPPs) of the spray process (impact velocity, temperature, and size of the particle, and substrate temperature) versus the concentration of solid inclusions suspended in the metal-binder melt. Using the solution obtained, the calculations performed demonstrate the possibility of formulating adequate requirements on the KPPs of particle-substrate interaction providing a deposition of ceramic-metal coatings with predictable splat thickness and degree of particle flattening on the substrate, and also with desired contact temperature during the formation of the first coating monolayer.

  15. Comparison of dislocation damping in aluminum-based metal-matrix composites with that in pure aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Cook, L. S.

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique was used at frequencies near 80 kHz and at temperatures in the range 300-1150 K to make measurements of mechanical damping, dynamic Young's modulus and strain amplitude on small specimens of pure aluminum and several metal matrix composites. The results permitted an elucidation of the dependence of damping level on strain amplitude and temperature. The study also permitted an examination of some aspects of the damping mechanisms, in particular dislocation damping.

  16. Fabrication of Porous Matrix Membrane (PMM) Using Metal-Organic Framework as Green Template for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei

    2014-01-01

    Pressure-driven membranes with high porosity can potentially be fabricated by removing template, such as low water stability metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) or other nanoparticles, in polymeric matrix. We report on the use of benign MOFs as green template to enhance porosity and interconnectivity of the water treatment membranes. Significantly enhanced separation performance was observed which might be attributed to the mass transfer coefficient of the substrate layer increased in ultrafiltration (UF) application. PMID:24435326

  17. Thermal diffusivity of Al-Mg based metallic matrix composite reinforced with Al2O3 ceramic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Orea, A.; Morales, J. E.; Saavedra S, R.; Carrasco, C.

    2010-03-01

    Thermal diffusivities of Al-Mg based metallic matrix composite reinforced with ceramic particles of Al2O3 are reported in this article. The samples were produced by rheocasting and the studied operational condition in this case is the shear rate: 800, 1400 and 2000 rpm. Additionally, the AlMg base alloy was tested. Measurements of thermal diffusivity were performed at room temperature by using photoacoustic technique.

  18. The effect of matrix temper on particulate integrity in an Al/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, M.; Munroe, P.R. . School of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-15

    Aluminium-based particulate metal-matrix composites (PMMC's) are being developed for application in both the aerospace and automotive industries. The near-isotropic properties of these materials allow them to be processed through the same conventional thermomechanical routes that are applied to unreinforced aluminium alloys. However, the microstructural behavior of these materials during such treatments has not been widely studied. It is also relevant to note that matrix prior to processing may strongly affect the behavior of these alloys during deformation. This paper describes the microstructural development during cold work of a PMMC consisting of a 2xxx series alloy matrix, reinforced with alumina particles, heat treated to two different starting tempers. Of particular importance is the effect of matrix temper on the integrity of the alumina particulates.

  19. Kinetics of heavy metal uptake by vegetation immobilized in a polysulfone or polycarbonate polymeric matrix.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Ann M; Admassu, Wudneh

    2005-11-11

    The ability of four common vegetations - wood, grass, compost, and peat moss - to remove cadmium, chromium, and lead from dilute aqueous solutions is investigated. Dried ground vegetations are immobilized in polysulfone, and poly (bisphenyl A) carbonate to form spherical beads through a phase inversion process. The beads are contacted with a dilute aqueous solution containing metal ions of interest. The removal of metal ions from the solution is monitored over the course of the experiment and the first-order kinetics parameters estimated. The rates of removal as well as the equilibrium bead loadings are shown to be affected by both the choice of vegetation and the choice of polymer.

  20. Wear Behaviour of Al-6061/SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Srivastava, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Aluminium Al-6061 base composites, reinforced with SiC particles having mesh size of 150 and 600, which is fabricated by stir casting method and their wear resistance and coefficient of friction has been investigated in the present study as a function of applied load and weight fraction of SiC varying from 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 %. The dry sliding wear properties of composites were investigated by using Pin-on-disk testing machine at sliding velocity of 2 m/s and sliding distance of 2000 m over a various loads of 10, 20 and 30 N. The result shows that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC particulates up to weight percentage of 35 % reduces the wear rate. The result also show that the wear of the test specimens increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction slightly decreases with increasing weight percentage of reinforcements. The wear surfaces are examined by optical microscopy which shows that the large grooved regions and cavities with ceramic particles are found on the worn surface of the composite alloy. This indicates an abrasive wear mechanism, which is essentially a result of hard ceramic particles exposed on the worn surfaces. Further, it was found from the experimentation that the wear rate decreases linearly with increasing weight fraction of SiC and average coefficient of friction decreases linearly with increasing applied load, weight fraction of SiC and mesh size of SiC. The best result has been obtained at 35 % weight fraction and 600 mesh size of SiC.

  1. Evaluation of titanium carbide metal matrix composites deposited via laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Daniel Thomas

    Metal matrix composites have been widely studied in terms of abrasion resistance, but a particular material system may behave differently as particle size, morphology, composition, and distribution of the hardening phase varies. The purpose of this thesis was to understand the mechanical and microstructural effects of combining titanium carbide with 431 series stainless steel to create a unique composite via laser cladding, particularly regarding wear properties. The most predominant effect in increasing abrasion resistance, measured via ASTM G65, was confirmed to be volume fraction of titanium carbide addition. Macrohardness was directly proportional to the amount of carbide, though there was an overall reduction in individual particle microhardness after cladding. The reduction in particle hardness was obscured by the effect of volume fraction carbide and did not substantially contribute to the wear resistance changes. A model evaluating effective mean free path of the titanium carbide particles was created and correlated to the measured data. The model proved successful in linking theoretical mean free path to overall abrasion resistance. The effects of the titanium carbide particle distributions were limited, while differences in particle size were noticeable. The mean free path model did not correlate well with the particle size, but it was shown that the fine carbides were completely removed by the coarse abrasive particles in the ASTM G65 test. The particle morphology showed indications of influencing the wear mode, but no statistical reduction was observed in the volume loss figures. Future studies may more specifically focus on particle morphology or compositional effects of the carbide particles.

  2. Wear Behaviour of Al-6061/SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Srivastava, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium Al-6061 base composites, reinforced with SiC particles having mesh size of 150 and 600, which is fabricated by stir casting method and their wear resistance and coefficient of friction has been investigated in the present study as a function of applied load and weight fraction of SiC varying from 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 %. The dry sliding wear properties of composites were investigated by using Pin-on-disk testing machine at sliding velocity of 2 m/s and sliding distance of 2000 m over a various loads of 10, 20 and 30 N. The result shows that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC particulates up to weight percentage of 35 % reduces the wear rate. The result also show that the wear of the test specimens increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction slightly decreases with increasing weight percentage of reinforcements. The wear surfaces are examined by optical microscopy which shows that the large grooved regions and cavities with ceramic particles are found on the worn surface of the composite alloy. This indicates an abrasive wear mechanism, which is essentially a result of hard ceramic particles exposed on the worn surfaces. Further, it was found from the experimentation that the wear rate decreases linearly with increasing weight fraction of SiC and average coefficient of friction decreases linearly with increasing applied load, weight fraction of SiC and mesh size of SiC. The best result has been obtained at 35 % weight fraction and 600 mesh size of SiC.

  3. Analytical and numerical modeling of the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfishawy, Karim Fouad

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to both external and thermal cycling loading can experience enhanced creep deformation, leading to dimensional instability in some cases. Three-dimensional finite element models have been constructed to predict the behavior of composites under such loading conditions. The different possible types of composite behavior are discussed in detail. The language and ideas developed in the continuum mechanics area of ratcheting and shakedown was shown to correlate quite closely to the thermal cycling behavior of composites and to apply to their analysis and design. Three composite configurations were analyzed analytically and their models were used to construct Composite Behavior Maps (CBMs). CBMs are diagrams which delineate regions of dimensionally stable and unstable composite behavior, and were shown to have a characteristic shape. Experimental and analytical methods are outlined for constructing conservative CBMs for complex composite configurations for which analytical solutions are not possible. The utility of such diagrams as both an analysis and design tool for MMCs on the microstructural scale is discussed in detail. The fundamental elastic and plastic properties of a new non-traditional alumina/aluminum composite where both phases are continuous, known as Csp4, were investigated analytically using finite element simulations and compared to experimental results. The composite behaves in a nearly bilinear manner defined by an elastic modulus and an elastic-plastic modulus. The apparent plasticity in the composite was shown to occur by true plastic deformation of aluminum and elastic accommodation of alumina. Effects of residual stresses and matrix strength on the tensile and compressive behavior of the composite were also investigated. The concept of selective reinforcement is discussed, along with its special considerations and limitations. The applicability and effectiveness of selective reinforcement as a design approach

  4. Metals--Endangered Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowder, William W.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests activities for elementary teachers to use in teaching about metals and their use. Specific areas addressed include: history of metals, metal use, consumption statistics, beauty of metals, sources of metals, conservation, and other projects. (JMB)

  5. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  6. Near-net-shape manufacturing: Spray-formed metal matrix composites and tooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    Spray forming is a materials processing technology in which a bulk liquid metal is converted to a spray of fine droplets and deposited onto a substrate or pattern to form a near-net-shape solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing a unique spray-forming method, the Controlled Aspiration Process (CAP), to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from two spray-accompanying technical and economic benefits. These programs involved spray forming aluminum strip reinforced with SiC particulate, and the production of tooling, such as injection molds and dies, using low-melting-point metals.

  7. Nonlinear Optics of Noble Metal Crystallites Embedded in a Dielectric Matrix.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of noble-metal nanoclusters embedded in fused silica are discussed in detail in both experimental and theoretical aspects. Experimental nonlinear optical studies of the composite material were conducted by means of z-scan and degenerate four-wave mixing. The samples were prepared by implanting Cu and Au ions into fused silica discs, and characterized by Rutherford back scattering, transmission electron microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy. The implanted noble-metal ions aggregated in the fused silica to form clusters with diameters ranging from 2 nm to 25 nm. The cluster size and size distribution were controlled by varying ion-implantation parameters. The clusters retain the geometrical structure of the bulk metal, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. However, the electronic properties are altered dramatically because the electrons are confined in a volume smaller than the mean free path in bulk metal. A theoretical calculation of dielectric confinement and quantum confinement effects is presented. The surface plasmon resonance resulting from the dielectric confinement has been investigated by both linear absorption and z-scan spectroscopy. A strong surface-plasmon enhancement effect was observed in the larger clusters. Intraband quantum confinement leads to a characteristic size-dependent third-order susceptibility of metal clusters. A new method was developed to examine and interpret the z-scan data. The method facilitates the separation of electronic and thermal contribution to the nonlinear refractive index. The electronic component of the intensity -dependent refractive index of our samples is on the order of 10^{-10} to 10 ^{-8} esu. The samples also exhibit strong two-photon absorption. The dephasing time of the excited state, determined indirectly from the nonlinear absorption measurements, is size dependent and ranges from 50 to 100 fs for Cu nanocrystallites. Time resolved measurements of the four

  8. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  9. Memristor comprising film with comb-like structure of nanocolumns of metal oxide embedded in a metal oxide matrix

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, Judith L; Lee, ShinBuhm; Jia, Quanxi

    2015-05-12

    Films having a comb-like structure of nanocolumns of Sm.sub.2O.sub.3 embedded in a SrTiO.sub.3 formed spontaneously on a substrate surface by pulsed laser deposition. In an embodiment, the nanocolumns had a width of about 20 nm with spaces between nanocolumns of about 10 nm. The films exhibited memristive behavior, and were extremely uniform and tunable. Oxygen deficiencies were located at vertical interfaces between the nanocolumns and the matrix. The substrates may be single-layered or multilayered.

  10. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  11. Analysis of four toxic metals in a single rice seed by matrix solid phase dispersion -inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiufen; Chen, Lixia; Chen, Xin; Yu, Huamei; Peng, Lixu; Han, Bingjun

    2016-12-01

    Toxic metals in rice pose great risks to human health. Metal bioaccumulation in rice grains is a criterion of breeding. Rice breeding requires a sensitive method to determine metal content in single rice grains to assist the variety selection. In the present study, four toxic metals of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a single rice grain were determined by a simple and rapid method. The developed method is based on matrix solid phase dispersion using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as dispersing agent and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) were 5.0, 0.6, 10 and 2.1 ng g-1 for As, Cd, Cr, and Pb, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of <7.7%, demonstrating the good sensitivity and precision of the method. The results of 30 real world rice samples analyzed by this method agreed well with those obtained by the standard microwave digestion. The amount of sample required was reduced approximately 100 fold in comparison with the microwave digestion. The method has a high application potential for other sample matrices and elements with high sensitivity and sample throughput.

  12. Analysis of four toxic metals in a single rice seed by matrix solid phase dispersion -inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiufen; Chen, Lixia; Chen, Xin; Yu, Huamei; Peng, Lixu; Han, Bingjun

    2016-01-01

    Toxic metals in rice pose great risks to human health. Metal bioaccumulation in rice grains is a criterion of breeding. Rice breeding requires a sensitive method to determine metal content in single rice grains to assist the variety selection. In the present study, four toxic metals of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a single rice grain were determined by a simple and rapid method. The developed method is based on matrix solid phase dispersion using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as dispersing agent and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) were 5.0, 0.6, 10 and 2.1 ng g−1 for As, Cd, Cr, and Pb, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of <7.7%, demonstrating the good sensitivity and precision of the method. The results of 30 real world rice samples analyzed by this method agreed well with those obtained by the standard microwave digestion. The amount of sample required was reduced approximately 100 fold in comparison with the microwave digestion. The method has a high application potential for other sample matrices and elements with high sensitivity and sample throughput. PMID:27922088

  13. Analysis of four toxic metals in a single rice seed by matrix solid phase dispersion -inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Xiufen; Chen, Lixia; Chen, Xin; Yu, Huamei; Peng, Lixu; Han, Bingjun

    2016-12-06

    Toxic metals in rice pose great risks to human health. Metal bioaccumulation in rice grains is a criterion of breeding. Rice breeding requires a sensitive method to determine metal content in single rice grains to assist the variety selection. In the present study, four toxic metals of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a single rice grain were determined by a simple and rapid method. The developed method is based on matrix solid phase dispersion using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as dispersing agent and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) were 5.0, 0.6, 10 and 2.1 ng g(-1) for As, Cd, Cr, and Pb, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of <7.7%, demonstrating the good sensitivity and precision of the method. The results of 30 real world rice samples analyzed by this method agreed well with those obtained by the standard microwave digestion. The amount of sample required was reduced approximately 100 fold in comparison with the microwave digestion. The method has a high application potential for other sample matrices and elements with high sensitivity and sample throughput.

  14. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary toolless pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  15. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  16. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and Fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub element tests will be presented.

  17. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary toolless pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  18. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Gentz, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and Fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub element tests will be presented.

  19. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Sung, Michael; Zhang, Shi-Yu; Gentz, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  20. Metallized Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, virtually all NASA spacecraft have used metallized films for a variety of purposes, principally thermal radiation insulation. King Seeley manufactures a broad line of industrial and consumer oriented metallized film, fabric, paper and foam in single layer sheets and multi-layer laminates. A few examples, commercialized by MPI Outdoor Safety Products, are the three ounce Thermos Emergency Blanket which reflects and retains up to 80 percent of the user's body heat helping prevent post accident shock or keeping a person warm for hours under emergency cold weather conditions.