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Sample records for metal organometallic chemistry

  1. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  2. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes. PMID:25036259

  3. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes.

  4. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  5. Multifunctionality of organometallic quinonoid metal complexes: surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Pike, Robert D; Sweigart, Dwight A

    2013-11-19

    Quinonoid metal complexes have potential applications in surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts. Although quinonoid manganese tricarbonyl complexes have been used as secondary building units (SBUs) in the formation of novel metal-organometallic coordination networks and polymers, the potentially wider applications of these versatile linkers have not yet been recognized. In this Account, we focus on these diverse new applications of quinonoid metal complexes, and report on the variety of quinonoid metal complexes that we have synthesized. Through the use of [(η(6)-hydroquinone)Mn(CO)3](+), we are able to modify the surface of Fe3O4 and FePt nanoparticles (NPs). This process occurs either by the replacement of oleylamine with neutral [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface, or by the binding of anionic [(η(4)-quinone)Mn(CO)3](-) upon further deprotonation of [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface. We have demonstrated chemistry at the intersection of surface-modified NPs and coordination polymers through the growth of organometallic coordination polymers onto the surface modified Fe3O4 NPs. The resulting magnetic NP/organometallic coordination polymer hybrid material exhibited both the unique superparamagnetic behavior associated with Fe3O4 NPs and the paramagnetism attributable to the metal nodes, depending upon the magnetic range examined. By the use of functionalized [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] complexes, we attained the formation of an organometallic monolayer on the surface of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The resulting organometallic monolayer was not simply a random array of manganese atoms on the surface, but rather consisted of an alternating "up and down" spatial arrangement of Mn atoms extending from the HOPG surface due to hydrogen bonding of the quinonoid complexes. We also showed that the topology of metal atoms on the surface could be controlled through the use of quinonoid metal complexes. A quinonoid

  6. Multifunctionality of organometallic quinonoid metal complexes: surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Pike, Robert D; Sweigart, Dwight A

    2013-11-19

    Quinonoid metal complexes have potential applications in surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts. Although quinonoid manganese tricarbonyl complexes have been used as secondary building units (SBUs) in the formation of novel metal-organometallic coordination networks and polymers, the potentially wider applications of these versatile linkers have not yet been recognized. In this Account, we focus on these diverse new applications of quinonoid metal complexes, and report on the variety of quinonoid metal complexes that we have synthesized. Through the use of [(η(6)-hydroquinone)Mn(CO)3](+), we are able to modify the surface of Fe3O4 and FePt nanoparticles (NPs). This process occurs either by the replacement of oleylamine with neutral [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface, or by the binding of anionic [(η(4)-quinone)Mn(CO)3](-) upon further deprotonation of [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface. We have demonstrated chemistry at the intersection of surface-modified NPs and coordination polymers through the growth of organometallic coordination polymers onto the surface modified Fe3O4 NPs. The resulting magnetic NP/organometallic coordination polymer hybrid material exhibited both the unique superparamagnetic behavior associated with Fe3O4 NPs and the paramagnetism attributable to the metal nodes, depending upon the magnetic range examined. By the use of functionalized [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] complexes, we attained the formation of an organometallic monolayer on the surface of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The resulting organometallic monolayer was not simply a random array of manganese atoms on the surface, but rather consisted of an alternating "up and down" spatial arrangement of Mn atoms extending from the HOPG surface due to hydrogen bonding of the quinonoid complexes. We also showed that the topology of metal atoms on the surface could be controlled through the use of quinonoid metal complexes. A quinonoid

  7. Organometallic Chemistry and catalysis on gold metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Angelici, Robert J.

    2007-11-21

    As in transition metal complexes, C{triple_bond}N-R ligands adsorbed on powdered gold undergo attack by amines to give putative diaminocarbene groups on the gold surface. This reaction forms the basis for the discovery of a gold metal-catalyzed reaction of C{triple_bond}N-R, primary amines (R{prime}NH{sub 2}) and O{sub 2} to give carbodiimides (R{prime}-N{double_bond}C{double_bond}N-R). An analogous reaction of C{triple_bond}O, RNH{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} gives isocyanates (R-N{double_bond}C{double_bond}O), which react with additional amine to give urea (RNH){sub 2}C{double_bond}O products. The gold-catalyzed reaction of C{triple_bond}N-R with secondary amines (HNR{prime}{sub 2}) and O{sub 2} gives mixed ureas RNH(CO)NR{prime}{sub 2}. In another type of gold-catalyzed reaction, secondary amines HN(CH{sub 2}R){sub 2} react with O{sub 2} to undergo dehydrogenation to the imine product, RCH{double_bond}N(CH{sub 2}R). Of special interest is the high catalytic activity of gold powder, which is otherwise well-known for its poor catalytic properties.

  8. Patterns in Organometallic Chemistry with Application in Organic Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Jeffrey; Labinger, Jay A.

    1980-01-01

    Of interest in this discussion of organometallic complexes are stoichiometric or catalytic reagents for organic synthesis in the complex transformations observed during synthesis for transition metal organometallic complexes. Detailed are general reaction types from which the chemistry or many transition metal organometallic complexes can be…

  9. Modules for Introducing Organometallic Reactions: A Bridge between Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic reactions have become increasingly important in the synthesis of organic molecules. A new approach has been developed to introduce organometallic chemistry, along with organic and inorganic chemistry, at the foundational level. This change highlights applications of organometallic chemistry that have dramatically…

  10. Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parshall, George W.; Putscher, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the growth in the industrial usage of organometallic chemistry from 1950 to 1977, pointing out that this growth involved the production of commodity chemicals. Indicates that one of the early successes of organometallic chemistry was the discovery of ethylene polymerization catalysts. (JN)

  11. Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs).

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Murshid, Nimer; Wang, Xiaosong

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs) is difficult, mainly due to the instability of metal carbonyl complexes. Despite its challenge a number of MCMCOMs has been prepared by strategically using organometallic, organic, and polymer synthetic chemistry. Main contributions to this research field were reported by the groups of Tyler, Pannell, and Wang and are briefly summarized in this article.

  12. Transition metals in polymer chemistry: The search for {chi}({sup 2}) organometallic NLO polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.E.

    1993-12-31

    The author`s research program has been involved in the design and synthesis of new organometallic polymers which display nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. The primary focus of the organometallic NLO effort in the group has centered on ferrocene derivatives. Ferrocene is an efficient NLO-phore and combined with synthetic transformations developed in this program has succeeded in preparing dipolar main-chain ferrocene-based NLO polymers. The talk will discuss recent advances made in the polymer synthesis along with the physical and optical properties for the novel polymeric materials.

  13. 2012 ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY GRC/GRS, JULY 7-13, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Hillhouse, Gregory

    2012-07-13

    The 2012 Organometallic Chemistry Gordon Research Conference will highlight new basic science and fundamental applications of organometallic chemistry in industrial, academic, and national lab settings. Scientific themes of the conference will include chemical synthesis, reactivity, catalysis, polymer chemistry, bonding, and theory that involve transition-metal (and main-group) interactions with organic moieties.

  14. The organometallic chemistry of cycloheptatrienyl zirconium complexes.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Andreas; Tamm, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial review summarizes the organometallic chemistry derived from the half-sandwich complex [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))ZrCl(tmeda)], which was used as an efficient and versatile starting material for the incorporation of monoanionic ligands into the cycloheptatrienyl zirconium coordination sphere by conventional salt metathesis reactions. A broad variety of ligands was employed, affording novel and previously inaccessible cycloheptatrienyl (sandwich) complexes of the type [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))Zr(Y)]; Y comprises pentadienyl, cyclopentadienyl, allyl, phospholyl, boratabenzene, imidazolin-2-iminato and amido systems. The cycloheptatrienyl ring in these systems usually acts as an "innocent spectator ligand", but reactivity can arise from the second ligand Y or the Lewis acidity of the, formally, Zr(+iv) center, which was probed in selected examples and put in perspective to related studies. The corresponding results emphasize why the use of [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))ZrCl(tmeda)] is clearly an advancement in the chemistry of the still fairly unexplored area of cycloheptatrienyl transition metal complexes.

  15. Organometallic chemistry: A new metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Elisabeth T.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonyls and alkenes, two of the most common functional groups in organic chemistry, generally do not react with one another. Now, a simple Lewis acid has been shown to catalyse metathesis between alkenes and ketones in a new carbonyl olefination reaction.

  16. Organometallic chemistry of bimetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report consists of six sections: heterobimetallic dihydrides, early-late transition metal heterobimetallic compounds, amphiphilic carbene complexes and hydroxycarbene complexes, diiron compounds with bridging hydrocarbon ligands, diphosphine chelates with natural bite angles near 120 degrees, and synthesis and reactions of M=M compounds. (WET)

  17. A "Classic Papers" Approach to Teaching Undergraduate Organometallic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Andrew P.; Johnson, Adam R.

    2007-01-01

    We have structured an upper-level undergraduate course in organometallic chemistry on a selection of "classic" publications in the field. This approach offers students a richly contextual introduction to many of the fundamental tenets of the discipline. After a brief introduction to the field led by the faculty, the students themselves are…

  18. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  19. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  20. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27541575

  1. Organometallic chemistry: Fused ferrocenes come full circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrave, Rebecca A.; Manners, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Chemists have long been fascinated by electron delocalization, from both a fundamental and applied perspective. Macrocyclic oligomers containing fused ferrocenes provide a new structural framework -- containing strongly interacting metal centres -- that is capable of supporting substantial charge delocalization.

  2. Density functionals for inorganometallic and organometallic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nathan E; Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2005-12-15

    We present a database of 21 bond dissociation energies for breaking metal-ligand bonds. The molecules in the metal-ligand bond energy database are AgH, CoH, CoO+, CoOH+, CrCH3+, CuOH2+, FeH, Fe(CO)5, FeO, FeS, LiCl, LiO, MgO, MnCH3NiCH2+, Ni(CO)4, RhC, VCO+, VO, and VS. We have also created databases of metal-ligand bond lengths and atomic ionization potentials. The molecules used for bond lengths are AgH, BeO, CoH, CoO+, FeH, FeO, FeS, LiCl, LiO, MgO, RhC, VO, and VS and the ionization potentials are for the following atoms: C, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, O, and V. The data were chosen based on their diversity and expected reliability, and they are used along with three previously developed databases (transition metal dimer bond energies and bond lengths and main-group molecular atomization energies) for assessing the accuracy of several kinds of density functionals. In particular, we report tests for 42 previously defined functionals: 2 local spin density approximation (LSDA) functionals, 14 generalized gradient approximation (GGA) methods, 13 hybrid GGA methods, 7 meta GGA methods, and 8 hybrid meta GGA methods. In addition to these functionals, we also examine the effectiveness of scaling the correlation energy by testing 13 functionals with scaled or no gradient-corrected correlation energy, and we find that functionals of this kind are more accurate for metal-metal and metal-ligand bonds than any of the functionals already in the literature. We also present a readjusted GGA and a hybrid GGA with parameters adjusted for metals. When we consider these 57 functionals for metal-ligand and metal-metal bond energies simultaneously with main-group atomization energies, atomic ionization potentials, and bond lengths we find that the most accurate functional is G96LYP, followed closely by MPWLYP1M (new in this article), XLYP, BLYP, and MOHLYP (also new in this article). Four of these five functionals have no Hartree-Fock exchange, and the other has only 5%. As a byproduct of this

  3. 2011 Organometallic Chemistry (July 10-15, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, RI)

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Emilio Bunel

    2011-07-15

    Organometallic chemistry has played and will continue to play a significant role in helping us understand the way bonds are made or broken in the presence of a transition metal complex. Current challenges range from the efficient exploitation of energy resources to the creative use of natural and artificial enzymes. Most of the new advances in the area are due to our extended understanding of processes at a molecular level due to new mechanistic studies, techniques to detect reaction intermediates and theory. The conference will bring the most recent advances in the field including nanocatalysis, surface organometallic chemistry, characterization techniques, new chemical reactivity and theoretical approaches along with applications to organic synthesis and the discovery of new materials. The Conference will bring together a collection of investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Six outstanding posters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows should also consider participating in the Gordon Research Seminar on Organometallic Chemistry (July 9-10, same location) which is specially designed to promote interaction and discussion between junior scientists.

  4. Reactivity of seventeen- and nineteen-valence electron complexes in organometallic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, Albert E.; Tyler, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A guideline to the reactivity of 17- and 19-valence electron species in organometallic chemistry is proposed which the authors believe will supersede all others. The thesis holds that the reactions of 17-electron metal radicals are associatively activated with reactions proceeding through a 19-valence electron species. The disparate reaction chemistry of the 17-electron metal radicals are unified in terms of this associative reaction pathway, and the intermediacy of 19-valence electron complexes in producing the observed products is discussed. It is suggested that related associatively activated pathways need to be considered in some reactions that are thought to occur by more conventional routes involving 16- and 18-electron intermediates. The basic reaction chemistry and electronic structures of these species are briefly discussed.

  5. Ruthenium Vinylidene and Acetylide Complexes. An Advanced Undergraduate Multi-technique Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonagh, Andrew M.; Deeble, Geoffrey J.; Hurst, Steph; Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.

    2001-02-01

    This experiment describes the isolation and characterization of complexes containing examples of two important monohapto ligands, namely vinylidene (C=CHR) and alkynyl (C ? CR) ligands. The former is a tautomer of acetylene that has minimal (10-10 s) existence as an uncomplexed molecule, providing an interesting example of the stabilization of reactive organic species at transition metals--an important motif in organometallic chemistry. The latter ligand affords complexes that have attracted a great deal of interest recently for their potentially useful electronic or optical properties, illustrating a major focus of contemporary organometallic chemistry, the search for useful materials. The particular strength of this experiment is in demonstrating the utility of a range of spectroscopic and analytical techniques in inorganic complex identification. The students observe unusual chemical shifts in the 13C NMR (vinylidene metal-bound carbon), meet heteronuclear NMR (31P), assign intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands in the UV-visible spectra, observe the utility of mass spectra in characterizing complexes of poly-isotopic transition metals, and are introduced to redox potentials (cyclic voltammetry).

  6. Organometallic chemistry of bimetallic compounds. Progress report, January 1992--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.

    1994-07-01

    Four main projects at the interface between organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis were pursued. All were designed to give increased understanding of the mechanisms of organometallic reactions related to homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In addition, a minor study involving {eta}{sup 5}-to {eta}{sup 1}-cyclopentadienyl ring slippage in catalysis was completed.

  7. Zirconocene and Si-tethered diynes: a happy match directed toward organometallic chemistry and organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Zhang, Shaoguang; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2011-07-19

    Characterizing reactive organometallic intermediates is critical for understanding the mechanistic aspects of metal-mediated organic reactions. Moreover, the isolation of reactive organometallic intermediates can often result in the ability to design new synthetic methods. In this Account, we outline synthetic methods that we developed for a variety of diverse Zr/Si organo-bimetallic compounds and Si/N heteroatom-organic compounds through the detailed study of zirconacyclobutene-silacyclobutene fused compounds. Two basic components are involved in this chemistry. The first is the Si-tethered diyne, which owes its rich reactive palette to the combination of the Si-C bond and the C≡C triple bond. The second is the low-valent zirconocene species Cp(2)Zr(II), which has proven very useful in organic synthesis. The reaction of these two components affords the zirconacyclobutene-silacyclobutene fused compound, which is the key reactive Zr/Si organo-bimetallic intermediate discussed here. We discuss the three types of reactions that have been developed for the zirconacyclobutene-silacyclobutene fused intermediate. The reaction with nitriles (the C≡N triple bond) is introduced in the first section. In this one-pot reaction, up to four different components can be combined: the Si-tethered diyne can be reacted with three identical nitriles, with differing nitriles, or with a nitrile and other unsaturated organic substrates such as formamides, isocyanides, acid chlorides, aldehydes, carbodiimides, and azides. Several unexpected multiring, fused Zr/Si organo-bimetallic intermediates were isolated and characterized. A wide variety of N-heterocycles, such as 5-azaindole, pyrrole, and pyrroloazepine derivatives, were obtained. We then discuss the reaction with alkynes (the C≡C triple bond). A consecutive skeletal rearrangement, differing from that observed in the reactions with nitriles, takes place in this reaction. Finally, we discuss the reaction with the C═X substrates

  8. An Organometallic Future in Green and Energy Chemistry?

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-10

    The title topic is reviewed with selected examples taken from recent work, such as: the 'hydrogen borrowing' amine alkylation by alcohols; the dehydrogenative coupling of amine and alcohol to give amide; Ru complexes as solar cell photosensitizers; Ir organometallics as water oxidation catalyst precursors and as OLED emitters; as well as recent hydrogen storage strategies involving catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane and of organic heterocycles.

  9. Sulfur-bonded thiophenes in organometallic rhenium complexes and adsorption of isocyanides on gold

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.J.

    1993-08-01

    This dissertation contains results of research conducted in two different areas: (1) organometallic synthesis and reactivity, and (2) organometallic surface chemistry. In the synthesis and reactivity studies, sulfur coordination of thiophene and benzo[b]thiophene to the metal center in organometallic rhenium complexes is examined. In the surface chemistry studies, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is used to analyze the adsorption of several isocyanides on the surface of gold powder. Results are compared and contrasted to known organometallic chemistry.

  10. Polymer Synthesis and Organotransition Metal Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, Robert H.; Tumas, William

    1989-02-01

    Mechanistic and synthetic studies in organometallic chemistry have provided considerable insight into olefin metathesis and Ziegler-Natta polymerization. New homogeneous olefin metathesis catalysts based on high oxidation state transition metals have opened new opportunities in polymer synthesis by providing unprecedented control in ring-opening polymerization of cyclic alkenes. The recent development of living coordinative polymerization systems has led to the preparation of a number of new, interesting materials, including block copolymers, conducting polymers or precursors, and ionophoric polymeric substrates.

  11. Modular self-assembly, characterization, and host-guest chemistry of nanoscale organometallic architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, J.; Kuehl, C.J.; Stang, P.J.; Muddiman, D.C.; Smith, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The supramolecular synthesis and chemistry of organic macrocycles has been the focus of considerable study for over thirty years. In contrast, the chemistry of analogous inorganic and organometallic macrocycles is in it infancy; little is know about the stability, spectroscopic and physical properties, and chemistry of these species. We will report on the design of several unique supramolecular macrocycles and the characterization of these species by a range of spectroscopic techniques, including electrospray-ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry. Preliminary data concerning the host-guest chemistry of these macrocycles will also be presented.

  12. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  13. Organometallic chemistry of bimetallic compounds. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report consists of six sections: heterobimetallic dihydrides, early-late transition metal heterobimetallic compounds, amphiphilic carbene complexes and hydroxycarbene complexes, diiron compounds with bridging hydrocarbon ligands, diphosphine chelates with natural bite angles near 120 degrees, and synthesis and reactions of M=M compounds. (WET)

  14. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Organometallic Chemistry. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Carol

    2001-07-27

    The Gordon Research Conference on Organometallic Chemistry was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, July 22-27, 2001. The conference had 133 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was place on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions; poster sessions were held.

  15. Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Charles P

    2012-11-14

    Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis Charles P. Casey, Principal Investigator Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 Phone 608-262-0584 FAX: 608-262-7144 Email: casey@chem.wisc.edu http://www.chem.wisc.edu/main/people/faculty/casey.html Executive Summary. Our goal was to learn the intimate mechanistic details of reactions involved in homogeneous catalysis and to use the insight we gain to develop new and improved catalysts. Our work centered on the hydrogenation of polar functional groups such as aldehydes and ketones and on hydroformylation. Specifically, we concentrated on catalysts capable of simultaneously transferring hydride from a metal center and a proton from an acidic oxygen or nitrogen center to an aldehyde or ketone. An economical iron based catalyst was developed and patented. Better understanding of fundamental organometallic reactions and catalytic processes enabled design of energy and material efficient chemical processes. Our work contributed to the development of catalysts for the selective and mild hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes; this will provide a modern green alternative to reductions by LiAlH4 and NaBH4, which require extensive work-up procedures and produce waste streams. (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H Hydrogenation Catalysts. Youval Shvo described a remarkable catalytic system in which the key intermediate (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H (1) has an electronically coupled acidic OH unit and a hydridic RuH unit. Our efforts centered on understanding and improving upon this important catalyst for reduction of aldehydes and ketones. Our mechanistic studies established that the reduction of aldehydes by 1 to produce alcohols and a diruthenium bridging hydride species occurs much more rapidly than regeneration of the ruthenium hydride from the diruthenium bridging hydride species. Our mechanistic studies require simultaneous transfer of hydride from ruthenium to

  16. Atom-efficient metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of indium organometallics with organic electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Pérez, I; Sestelo, J P; Sarandeses, L A

    2001-05-01

    The novel metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of indium organometallics with organic electrophiles is described. Triorganoindium compounds (R(3)In) containing alkyl, vinyl, aryl, and alkynyl groups are efficiently prepared from the corresponding lithium or magnesium organometallics by reaction with indium trichloride. The cross-coupling reaction of R(3)In with aryl halides and pseudohalides (iodide 2, bromide 5, and triflate 4), vinyl triflates, benzyl bromides, and acid chlorides proceeds under palladium catalysis in excellent yields and with high chemoselectivity. Indium organometallics also react with aryl chlorides as under nickel catalysis. In the cross-coupling reaction the triorganoindium compounds transfer, in a clear example of atom economy, all three of the organic groups attached to the metal, as shown by the necessity of using only 34 mol % of indium. The feasibility of using R(3)In in reactions with different electrophiles, along with the high yields and chemoselectivities obtained, reveals indium organometallics to be useful alternatives to other organometallics in cross-coupling reactions.

  17. Metal-organometallic polymers and frameworks derived from facially metalated arylcarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumalah Robinson, Sayon A.

    The interest in coordination polymers, also known as metal-organic frameworks, has risen drastically over the past 2 decades. In this time, the field has matured and given rise to a diverse range of crystalline structures possessing various functionalities. Coordination polymers are typically formed from the self assembly of metal ions which serve as nodes and organic ligands which act as bridges. By the careful selection of the organic ligand and the metal ion, the overall physical properties of the material may be tuned. In this work, the use of organometallic bridging ligands are explored using facially metalated aryl carboxylates ligands to synthesize metal-organometallic frameworks (MOMFs). Therefore, with the aim of synthesizing [CpM]+-functionalized (M = FeII, RuII; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) coordination polymers and metal organic frameworks, various [CpFe]+and [CpRu] + functionalized aryl carboxylates were synthesized and characterized. In particular, the [CpFe]+-functionalized benzoic, terephthalic and trimesic acids as well as the [CpRu]+-functionalized terephthalic acid were made. Using the [CpFe]+ complexes of the benzoic and terephthalic acid as bridging ligands, a number of 1D and 2D coordination polymers were synthesized. For instance, the reaction of [CpFe]+-functionalized benzoic acid with CdCl2 yielded the 1D chain of [Cd(benzoate)Cl 2]˙H2O whilst the reaction of [CpFe]+-functionalized terephthalic acid with Cu(NO3)2˙6H2O yielded a 2D square grid sheet. Using the [CpFe]+-functionalized terephthalic acid, a series of polymorphic, 3D metal-organometallic frameworks of the general formula [M3(terephthalate)4(mu-H2O)2(H 2O)2][NO3]2˙xsolvent (M = Co II, NiII ; solvent = EtOH, DMF, H2O) were synthesized and fully characterized. The polymorphic nature of these frameworks may be attributed to the different orientations that the [CpFe]+ moiety may adapt within the cavities in the 3D frameworks. The selectivity of the desolvated forms of the polymorphs for

  18. Organometallic Nanostructures of 1,4-DIBROMO-2,5-DIIODOBENZENE by Metal Ions Construction on Hopg Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Zhongping; Leng, Xinli; Lu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Different organometallic nanostructures on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been synthesized by different metal ions coordinating with 1,4-Dibromo-2,5-diiodobenzene (C6H2Br2I2). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images directly demonstrated the transformation of the nanostructure from self-assembled nanostructures formed by C6H2Br2I2 through halogen bond into organometallic network, formed by the dehalogenated C6H2Br2I2 molecules covalent bonded with metal ions. Moreover, by varying the concentrations of C6H2Br2I2 molecules or valence states of metal ions, organometallic structures with different shapes and sizes have been fabricated, which illustrates that the concentrations and valence states of the metal ions play important roles in the organometallic nanostructures.

  19. Stabilized metal nanoparticles from organometallic precursors for low temperature fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Meneses, E; Dominguez-Crespo, M A; Torres-Huerta, A M

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a review of articles and patents related to the utilization of colloidal metal nanoparticles produced by the decomposition of organometallic precursors as supported electrocatalysts in different electrochemical reactions including hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) is discussed. In the case of stabilized metal nanoparticles, the kind of functional group contained in the stabilizer as well as the metal/stabilizer ratio, to evaluate the effect of particle size on the electrochemical performance, were also debated. Potential applications and perspectives of these electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are contended with reference to the role played by the coordination compounds and costs.

  20. New Twists and Turns for Actinide Chemistry: Organometallic Infinite Coordination Polymers of Thorium Diazide.

    PubMed

    Monreal, Marisa J; Seaman, Lani A; Goff, George S; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Morris, David E; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2016-03-01

    Two organometallic 1D infinite coordination polymers and two organometallic monometallic complexes of thorium diazide have been synthesized and characterized. Steric control of these self-assembled arrays, which are dense in thorium and nitrogen, has also been demonstrated: infinite chains can be circumvented by using steric bulk either at the metallocene or with a donor ligand in the wedge. PMID:26865502

  1. Unusually Strong Long-Distance Metal-Metal Coupling in Bis(ferrocene)-Containing BOPHY: An Introduction to Organometallic BOPHYs.

    PubMed

    Rhoda, Hannah M; Chanawanno, Kullapa; King, Alexander J; Zatsikha, Yuriy V; Ziegler, Christopher J; Nemykin, Victor N

    2015-12-01

    The first organometallic BOPHY (BOPHY=bis(difluoroboron)-1,2-bis{(pyrrol-2-yl)methylene}hydrazine) containing two ferrocene substituents was prepared through a Knoevenagel condensation between tetramethyl substituted BOPHY and ferrocene carboxaldehyde. An unprecedentedly strong long-range (≈17.2 Å) metal-metal coupling in this new complex was investigated using electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical, and chemical oxidation methods. Electrochemical data is indicative of a 200 mV separation between the first and the second ferrocene-centered oxidation processes. Formation of the mixed-valence states and appearance and disappearance of two NIR bands were observed during stepwise oxidation of the first organometallic BOPHY. The electronic structure and the nature of the excited states in this new chromophore were studied by DFT and TDDFT calculations.

  2. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  3. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  4. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements. PMID:27442286

  5. Determining the Quantum Efficiency for Activation of an Organometallic Photoinitiator for Cationic Polymerization: An Experiment for the Physical or Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David M.; Mahar, Maura; Schnabel, R. Chris; Shah, Paras; Lees, Alistair J.; Jakubek, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    We present a new laboratory experiment on the photochemistry of organometallic [eta][superscript 5],[eta][superscript 6]-mixed-sandwich compounds, which is suitable for both the physical chemistry and inorganic chemistry laboratory. Specifically, students use 1,10-phenanthroline to trap the intermediate formed when…

  6. Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, Roger

    Although molecular imaging agents have to be synthesized ultimately from aqueous solutions, organometallic complexes are becoming more and more important as flexible yet kinetically stable building blocks for radiopharmaceutical drug discovery. The diversity of ligands, targets, and targeting molecules related to these complexes is an essential base for finding novel, noninvasive imaging agents to diagnose and eventually treat widespread diseases such as cancer. This review article covers the most important findings toward these objectives accomplished during the past 3-4 years. The two major available organometallic building blocks will be discussed in the beginning together with constraints for market introduction as imposed by science and industry. Since targeting radiopharmaceuticals are a major focus of current research in molecular imaging, attempts toward so-called technetium essential radiopharmaceuticals will be briefly touched in the beginning followed by the main discussion about the labeling of targeting molecules such as folic acid, nucleosides, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. At the end, some new strategies for drug discovery will be introduced together with results from organometallic chemistry in water. The majority of the new results have been achieved with the [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ complex which will, though not exclusively, be a focus of this review.

  7. The design of a bipodal bis(pentafluorophenoxy)aluminate supported on silica as an activator for ethylene polymerization using surface organometallic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Dominique W; Popoff, Nicolas; Bashir, Muhammad Ahsan; Szeto, Kai C; Gauvin, Régis M; Delevoye, Laurent; Taoufik, Mostafa; Boisson, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A new class of well-defined activating supports for olefin polymerization was obtained via the surface organometallic chemistry approach. High activities in slurry polymerization of ethylene along with industrial-grade physical properties of the resulting polyethylene were obtained when these activators were combined with metallocene complexes in the presence of triisobutylaluminium.

  8. The design of a bipodal bis(pentafluorophenoxy)aluminate supported on silica as an activator for ethylene polymerization using surface organometallic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Dominique W; Popoff, Nicolas; Bashir, Muhammad Ahsan; Szeto, Kai C; Gauvin, Régis M; Delevoye, Laurent; Taoufik, Mostafa; Boisson, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A new class of well-defined activating supports for olefin polymerization was obtained via the surface organometallic chemistry approach. High activities in slurry polymerization of ethylene along with industrial-grade physical properties of the resulting polyethylene were obtained when these activators were combined with metallocene complexes in the presence of triisobutylaluminium. PMID:26899986

  9. The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides: The use of homoleptic alkyls

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, M.D.; Smith, D.C.; Springer, R.W.; Rubiano, R.R.; Springer, R.W.; Parmeter, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, and Cr) from tetraneopentyl-metal precursors has been carried out. Metal carbides can be deposited on Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and stainless steel substrates from M[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} at temperatures in the range of 300 to 750 C and pressures from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Thin films have also been grown using a carrier gas (Ar, H{sub 2}). The effects of variation of the metal center, deposition conditions, and reactor design on the resulting material have been examined by SEM, XPS, XRD, ERD and AES. Hydrocarbon fragments generated in the deposition chamber have been studied in by in-situ mass spectrometry. Complementary studies examining the UHV surface decomposition of Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} have allowed for a better understanding of the mechanism leading to film growth.

  10. Organometallic Probe for the Electronics of Base-Stabilized Group 11 Metal Cations.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Ewing, William C; Kramer, Thomas; Mattock, James D; Vargas, Alfredo; Werner, Christine

    2015-08-24

    A number of trimetalloborides have been synthesized through the reactions of base-stabilized coinage metal chlorides with a dimanganaborylene lithium salt in the hope of using this organometallic platform to compare and evaluate the electronics of these popular coinage metal fragments. The adducts of Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(I) ions, stabilized by tricyclohexylphosphine (PCy3), N-1,3-bis(4-methylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (ITol), or 1-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-3,3,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-2-ylidene (CAAC), with [{Cp(CO)2Mn}2B](-) were studied spectroscopically, structurally, and computationally. The geometries of the adducts fall into two classes, one symmetric and one asymmetric, each relying on the combined characteristics of both the metal and ligand. The energetic factors proposed as the causes of the structural differences were investigated by ETS-NOCV (extended transition state-natural orbitals for chemical valence) analysis, which showed the final geometry to be controlled by the competition between the tendency of the coinage metal to adopt a higher or lower coordination number and the willingness of the cationic fragment to participate in back-bonding interactions. PMID:26178571

  11. Reactions of organometallic compounds catalyzed by transition metal complexes. XIII. Comparison of the reactivity of organometallic compounds in aryldemetallation reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumagin, N.A.; Ponomarev, A.B.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1987-12-10

    The effect of the nature of the metal M and the organic group R on the reaction of organometallic compounds RM (R = Ph, PhC triple bond C, C/sub 3/H/sub 7/, Allyl; M = Li, Mg, Zn, Cd, Cu Al), produced in situ from Grignard reagents or organolithium compounds and the respective salts, with p-iodoanisole in the presence of palladium complexes PdCl/sub 2/L/sub 2/ (L = PPh/sub 3/, MeCN, dppf) was studied. The organozinc and organoaluminum compounds react with a high degree of selectivity. In the reactions of C/sub 3/H/sub 7/M with p-MeOC/sub 6/H/sub 4/I the highest yield from cross-coupling is obtained with catalysis by the PdCl/sub 2/ (dppf) complex. The mechanism of the formation of the homocoupling products is discussed.

  12. Chemistry of carcinogenic metals.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, A E

    1981-01-01

    The periodic distribution of known and suspected carcinogenic metal ions is described, and the chemical behavior of various types of metal ions is explained in terms of the general theory of hard and soft acids and bases. The chelate effect is elucidated, and the relatively high stability of metal chelates in very dilute solutions is discussed. The concepts employed for the chelate effect are extended to explain the high stabilities of macrocyclic and cryptate complexes. Procedures for the use of equilibrium data to determine the speciation of metal ions and complexes under varying solution conditions are described. Methods for assessing the interferences by hydrogen ion, competing metal ions, hydrolysis, and precipitation are explained, and are applied to systems containing iron(III) chelates of fourteen chelating agents designed for effective binding of the ferric ion. The donor groups available for the building up of multidentate ligands are presented, and the ways in which they may be combined to achieve high affinity and selectivity for certain types of metal ions are explained. PMID:6791915

  13. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  14. Advances in organometallic synthesis with mechanochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Rightmire, Nicholas R; Hanusa, Timothy P

    2016-02-14

    Solvent-based syntheses have long been normative in all areas of chemistry, although mechanochemical methods (specifically grinding and milling) have been used to good effect for decades in organic, and to a lesser but growing extent, inorganic coordination chemistry. Organometallic synthesis, in contrast, represents a relatively underdeveloped area for mechanochemical research, and the potential benefits are considerable. From access to new classes of unsolvated complexes, to control over stoichiometries that have not been observed in solution routes, mechanochemical (or 'M-chem') approaches have much to offer the synthetic chemist. It has already become clear that removing the solvent from an organometallic reaction can change reaction pathways considerably, so that prediction of the outcome is not always straightforward. This Perspective reviews recent developments in the field, and describes equipment that can be used in organometallic synthesis. Synthetic chemists are encouraged to add mechanochemical methods to their repertoire in the search for new and highly reactive metal complexes and novel types of organometallic transformations.

  15. Preparation of nanocrystalline metal oxides and intermetallic phases by controlled thermolysis of organometallic coordination polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, Marcus; Epple, Matthias; Fischer, R. Dieter

    2000-06-01

    Organometallic coordination polymers of the super-Prussian blue type [(Me 3Sn) nM(CN) 6] (Me=CH 3; n=3, 4; M=Fe, Co, Ru) were subjected to thermolysis in different atmospheres (air, argon, hydrogen/nitrogen). In air, oxides were found: Fe 2O 3/SnO 2 (crystalline and nanocrystalline), Co 2SnO 4 and RuO 2. In argon and in hydrogen, the intermetallic phases FeSn 2, CoSn 2, Ru 3Sn 7 and Fe 3SnC were obtained. A detailed mechanistic study was carried out using thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) at Fe, Co, Ru and Sn K-edges, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and elemental analysis. Below 250°C, Me 3SnCN and (CN) 2 are released, whereas above 250°C oxidation or pyrolysis leads to the corresponding oxides or intermetallic phases. Polymeric cyanides containing at least two metals have turned out to be suitable precursors to prepare well-defined oxides and intermetallic phases at comparatively low temperature.

  16. Magnetically-induced electric polarization in an organo-metallic magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Zapf, W S; Fabris, F W; Balakirev, F F; Francoual, S M; Kenzelmann, M; Chen, Y

    2009-01-01

    The coupling between magnetic order and ferroelectricity has been under intense investigation in a wide range of transition metal oxides. The strongest coupling is obtained in so-called magnetically induced multiferroics where ferroelectricity arises directly from magnetic order that breaks inversion symmetry. However, it has been difficult to find non-oxide based materials in which these effects occur. Here we present a study of copper dimethyl sulfoxide dichloride (CDC), an organometallic quantum magnet containing S =1/1 Cu spins, in which a switchable electric polarization arises from field-tuned magnetic order. Fast magnetic field pulses allow us to perform sensitive measurements of the electric polarization and demonstrate that the electric state is present only if the magnetic order is non-collinear. Furthermore, we show that the electric polarization can be switched in a stunning hysteretic fashion. Because the magnetic order in CDC is mediated by large organic molecules, our study shows that magnetoelectric interactions can exist in this important class of materials, opening the road to designing magnetoelectrics and multiferroics using large molecules as building blocks. Further, we demonstrate that CDC undergoes a magnetoelectric quantum phase transition -the first of its kind, where both ferroelectric and magnetic order emerge simultaneously as a function of magnetic field at very low temperatures.

  17. The growth of the complex oxide YBCO by pulsed organo-metallic beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Donald Bruce

    To address the problems associated with the thin film heteroepitaxial growth of complex oxides a deposition technique, called pulsed organo-metallic beam epitaxy (POMBE), is developed. POMBE is designed to grow films layer-by-layer. Organo-metallics are delivered to the substrate as a series of discrete pulses via a set of computer-controlled valves. The precursor sequence and the amount of precursor in each pulse is programmed as the computer. Quartz crystal microbalances monitor the precursor transport rates. Computer feedback control maintains the precursor pulses at their programmed values. The ability to grow films layer-by-layer and to control the amount of material in each layer is demonstrated by the growth of YBasb2CUsb3Osb{7-delta}/PrBasb2CUsb3Osb{7-delta} superlattices. This is the first report of a high temperature superconductor superlattice grown by a chemical vapor deposition technique. The ability to grow films layer-by-layer is used to investigate the effect of changing the type and amount of precursor used to start the film growth. The correct choice of these parameters allows the growth of (001) YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} with a single in-plane orientation and Jsb{c}(77 K,0T) = 1-2× 10sp6amp/cmsp2 on (100) LaAlOsb3, (100) NdGaOsb3, (100) MgO, and (100) YSZ. The ability to control the initial film layer provides a means to control the in-plane orientation of (001) YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} (YBCO) grown on (100) MgO. Depositions started with thin BaO layers ({}{≈}1.1× 10sp{15}Ba/cmsp2) grow lbrack 100rbrack YBCOVertlbrack 100rbrack MgO. A mechanism that relates the change of in-plane orientation to a structural change of the initial BaO layer is described. The in-plane orientation of (001) YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} grown on (100) MgO can also be controlled by the ex situ, low energy Arsp+ sputtering of the MgO surface prior to film growth. To simultaneously grow lbrack 110rbrack YBCOVertlbrack 100rbrack MgO on non-sputtered MgO and lbrack 100rbrack

  18. Incorporation of radiohalogens via versatile organometallic reactions: applications in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that must be considered for the design of radiohalogenated radio-pharmaceuticals include the stability and availability of the substrate, the physical half-life of the radiohalogen and the in vivo stability of the radiolabel. Vinyl and phenyl radiohalogen bonds show more in vivo stability than the alkyl radiohalogen bonds. Consequently, a variety of methods suitable for the synthesis of tissue specific radiopharmaceuticals bearing a vinyl or phenyl radiohalogen have been developed involving the synthesis and halogenation of metallovinyl and phenyl intermediates. The halogens and metallation reactions include iodine and bromine and alanation, boronation, mercuration, stannylation, and thallation, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Organometallic Chemistry of Carbon Dioxide. Final Report for June 1, 1986 - March 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D. H.

    2002-09-26

    Research focused on C{sub 1} transition metal complexes that are relevant to CO{sub 2} activation and fixation. First, we prepared and studied new metallocarboxylic acids, a class of compounds proposed as intermediates in the Water Gas Shift reaction and CO{sub 2} reductions, and the corresponding metallocarboxylate anions. Next, we prepared and structurally characterized a large number of CO{sub 2}-bridged bimetallic compounds (models for metal surface-bound CO{sub 2}) and established structure-spectra correlations for the three general types of compounds identified. The next phase involved the synthesis and studies of putative catalytic intermediates derived from rhenium and ruthenium polypyridyl complexes in order to establish their fundamental reaction characteristics. Finally, we progressed to the design of a possible catalytic sequence which could account for C{sub 2} products formed in ruthenium-catalyzed CO{sub 2} reductions and to the synthesis, characterization and studies of the reactions of expected intermediates in the catalytic sequence.

  20. Self-assembly of 1D mixed-metal tubular network with coordination bonds through the interconnection of organometallic metallamacrocycles by Ag(I) centers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Lin, Yue-Jian; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2011-05-21

    The combination of a ditopic ligand containing a functional "third site" as a bridge and organometallic half-sandwich iridium unit Cp*Ir as the corner leads to the formation of the tetranuclear metallamacrocycle 1, which is reacted with silver compound, resulting in the formation of mixed-metal infinitely tubular coordination network 2.

  1. Surface chemistry of liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Peebles, Henry; Peebles, Diamond; Rye, Robert; Yost, Fred

    1993-01-01

    The fundamental surface chemistry of the behavior of liquid metals spreading on a solid substrate is not at all well understood. Each of these questions involves knowing the details of the structure of interfaces and their dynamics. For example the structure of a monolayer of tin oxide on pure liquid tin is unknown. This is in contrast to the relatively large amount of data available on the structure of copper oxide monolayers on solid, pure copper. However, since liquid tin has a vapor pressure below 10(exp -10)torr for a reasonable temperature range above its melting point, it is possible to use the techniques of surface science to study the geometric, electronic and vibrational structures of these monolayers. In addition, certain techniques developed by surface chemists for the study of liquid systems can be applied to the ultra-high vacuum environment. In particular we have shown that light scattering spectroscopy can be used to study the surface tension tensor of these interfaces. The tin oxide layer in particular is very interesting in that the monolayer is rigid but admits of bending. Ellipsometric microscopy allows the visualization of monolayer thick films and show whether island formation occurs at various levels of dosing.

  2. Transition-metal catalyzed oxidative cross-coupling reactions to form C-C bonds involving organometallic reagents as nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Liu, Chao; Lei, Aiwen

    2011-05-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a versatile tool for chemical bond formation. From the variation of the coupling partners, coupling reactions can be classified into three models: traditional coupling, reductive coupling and oxidative coupling. The oxidative coupling, which is different from the traditional coupling, occurs between two nucleophiles. This critical review focuses on transition-metal-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions involving organometallic reagents as nucleophiles. Since the scope of the oxidative coupling is highly diversified, this paper only reviews the oxidative coupling reactions concerning C-C bond formation, including the coupling between organometal reagents and hydrocarbons as well as coupling between two organometal reagents. Since terminal alkynes are normally activated by metal salts and in situ form the alkynyl metal reagents in coupling reactions, they are directly considered as organometal reagents in this review. Intramolecular oxidative couplings and oxidative cyclizations are not included in this critical review. Moreover, there are many examples of oxidative coupling leading to the formation of functional materials, such as the oxidative polymerization of thiophenes. Since several reviews in these areas have been published they are not included in this review either (99 references).

  3. Electron beam chemistry produces high purity metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; May, C. E.; Marsik, S. J.; Lad, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Application of radiation chemistry for deposition of metals by irradiation of aqueous solutions with high energy electrons is presented. Design of reaction vessel for irradiation of solution is illustrated. Features of radiochemical technique and procedures followed are described.

  4. Imidazolium ionic liquids as promoters and stabilising agents for the preparation of metal(0) nanoparticles by reduction and decomposition of organometallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, Martin H G; Campbell, Paul S; Scholten, Jackson D; Fraser, Georgina B; Machado, Giovanna; Santini, Catherine C; Dupont, Jairton; Chauvin, Yves

    2010-12-01

    The organometallic complexes ([Ru(COD)(2-methylallyl)2] and [Ni(COD)2] (COD=1,5-cyclooctadiene) dissolved in imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) undergo reduction and decomposition, respectively, to afford stable ruthenium and nickel metal(0) nanoparticles (Ru(0)-NPs and Ni(0)-NPs) in the absence of classical reducing agents. Depending on the case, the reduction/auto-decomposition is promoted by either the cation and/or anion of the neat imidazolium ILs.

  5. Organometallic molecular wires as versatile modules for energy-level alignment of the metal-molecule-metal junction.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kaho; Tanaka, Yuya; Fujii, Shintaro; Tada, Tomofumi; Kiguchi, Manabu; Akita, Munetaka

    2016-04-30

    The organometallic Ru molecular wires 1-3 Ru(PR3)4(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC5H5N)2 [(PR3)4 = (dppe)2 (1), [P(OMe3)]4 (2), and (dmpe)2 (3)] show significantly higher conductance compared to their organic counterpart, 1,4-dipyridyl butadiyne (4). CV and UV-Vis measurements and DFT calculations suggest that the high-lying HOMOs of the Ru wires are the key factor for the high conductance.

  6. Volatile organometallic complexes suitable for use in chemical vapor depositions on metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Giolando, Dean M.

    2003-09-30

    Novel ligated compounds of tin, titanium, and zinc are useful as metal oxide CVD precursor compounds without the detriments of extreme reactivity yet maintaining the ability to produce high quality metal oxide coating by contact with heated substrates.

  7. A comparative topological study of different metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in polynuclear organometallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Maelen, Juan F.; García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-01-22

    The existence and characterization of a bond between the Zn atoms in the recently synthesized complex [Zn{sub 2}(η{sup 5}−C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}] (I), as well as between two of the three Ru atoms in [Ru{sub 3}(μ−H){sub 2}(μ{sub 3}−MeImCH)(CO{sub 9}] (Me{sub 2}Im = 1,3-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene) (II), are firmly based on low temperature X-ray synchrotron diffraction experiments. The multipolar refinement of the experimental electron densities and their topological analyses by means of the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory reveal the details of the Zn-Zn and Ru-Ru bonds, such as their open-shell intermediate character. The results are consistent with a typical metal-metal single σ bond for the former, whereas a delocalized kind of bond involving 5c-6e is present in the latter. In addition, experimental results are compared with theoretical ab initio calculations of the DFT (density functional theory) and MP2 (Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory) electron densities, giving a coherent view of the bonding in both complexes. Many other topological properties of both compounds are also studied, in particular the different metal-ligand interactions.

  8. A comparative topological study of different metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in polynuclear organometallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Maelen, Juan F.; García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The existence and characterization of a bond between the Zn atoms in the recently synthesized complex [Zn2(η5- C5Me5)2] (I), as well as between two of the three Ru atoms in [Ru3(μ- H )2(μ3- MeImCH )( CO9] (Me2Im = 1,3-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene) (II), are firmly based on low temperature X-ray synchrotron diffraction experiments. The multipolar refinement of the experimental electron densities and their topological analyses by means of the Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory reveal the details of the Zn-Zn and Ru-Ru bonds, such as their open-shell intermediate character. The results are consistent with a typical metal-metal single σ bond for the former, whereas a delocalized kind of bond involving 5c-6e is present in the latter. In addition, experimental results are compared with theoretical ab initio calculations of the DFT (density functional theory) and MP2 (Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory) electron densities, giving a coherent view of the bonding in both complexes. Many other topological properties of both compounds are also studied, in particular the different metal-ligand interactions.

  9. Introducing deep eutectic solvents to polar organometallic chemistry: chemoselective addition of organolithium and Grignard reagents to ketones in air.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Cristian; García-Álvarez, Joaquín; Hernán-Gómez, Alberto; Kennedy, Alan R; Hevia, Eva

    2014-06-01

    Despite their enormous synthetic relevance, the use of polar organolithium and Grignard reagents is greatly limited by their requirements of low temperatures in order to control their reactivity as well as the need of dry organic solvents and inert atmosphere protocols to avoid their fast decomposition. Breaking new ground on the applications of these commodity organometallics in synthesis under more environmentally friendly conditions, this work introduces deep eutetic solvents (DESs) as a green alternative media to carry out chemoselective additions of ketones in air at room temperature. Comparing their reactivities in DES with those observed in pure water suggest that a kinetic activation of the alkylating reagents is taking place, favoring nucleophilic addition over the competitive hydrolysis, which can be rationalized through formation of halide-rich magnesiate or lithiate species. PMID:24771680

  10. Chemistry in acetone complexes of metal dications: a remarkable ethylene production pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhua; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank; Park, Sung Soo; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A

    2007-06-01

    Electrospray ionization can generate microsolvated multiply charged metal ions for various metals and ligands, allowing exploration of chemistry within such clusters. The finite size of these systems permits comparing experimental results with accurate calculations, creating a natural laboratory to research ion solvation. Mass spectrometry has provided much insight into the stability and dissociation of ligated metal cations. While solvated singly charged ions tend to shrink by ligand evaporation, solvated polycations below a certain size exhibit charge reduction and/or ligand fragmentation due to organometallic reactions. Here we investigate the acetone complexes of representative divalent metals (Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu), comparing the results of collision-induced dissociation with the predictions of density functional theory. As for other solvated dications, channels involving proton or electron transfer compete with ligand loss and become dominant for smaller complexes. The heterolytic C-C bond cleavage is common, like in DMSO and acetonitrile complexes. Of primary interest is the unanticipated neutral ethylene loss, found for all metals studied except Cu and particularly intense for Ca and Mn. We focus on understanding that process in the context of competing dissociation pathways, as a function of metal identity and number of ligands. According to first-principles modeling, ethylene elimination proceeds along a complex path involving two intermediates. These results suggest that chemistry in microsolvated multiply charged ions may still hold major surprises. PMID:17503788

  11. Medicinal Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of Metal Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Maung Maung

    2012-06-01

    Metal complexes have been used as medicinal compounds. Metals have advantageous features over organic compounds. Significant applications of metal complexes are in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioisotopes used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The generalized targeting strategy for molecular imaging probe consists of three essential parts: (i) reporter unit or payload, (ii) carrier, and (iii) targeting system. Medicinal radiopharmaceutical chemistry pays special consideration to radioisotopes, as a reporter unit for diagnostic application or as a payload for therapeutic application. Targeting is achieved by a few approaches but the most common is the bifunctional chelator approach. While designing a radiopharmaceutical, a range of issues needs to be considered including properties of metal radioisotopes, bifunctional chelators, linkers, and targeting molecules. Designing radiopharmaceuticals requires consideration of two key words: "compounds of biological interest" and "fit for intended use." The ultimate goal is the development of new diagnostic methods and treatment. Diagnostic metal radiopharmaceuticals are used for SPECT and PET applications. Technetium chemistry constitutes a major portion of SPECT and gallium chemistry constitutes a major portion of PET. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be constructed by using alpha-, beta minus-, or Auger electron-emitting radiometals. Special uses of medicinal radiopharmaceuticals include internal radiation therapy, brachytherapy, immunoPET, radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide imaging and therapy.

  12. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal–ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  13. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  14. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  15. Lubricating oil compositions containing organometallic additives

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, J.F.; Croudance, M.C.; On, H.P.; Shen, S.Y.

    1987-04-07

    This invention provides novel lubricating oil compositions comprising an organometallic additive, including a metal selected from Groups I, Ib, and VIII of the Periodic System of Elements, e.g. Na, K, Cu, Co, Ni or Fe, chelated with the reaction product of formaldehyde, an amino acid and a phenol, dissolved in a lubricating oil. Depending on the choice of the metal, the above organometallic additive imparts rust inhibition, sludge dispersant, wear reduction and anti-oxidant properties to the lubricating oil compositions.

  16. Transition-Metal-Free Cross-Coupling of Indium Organometallics with Chromene and Isochroman Acetals Mediated by BF3·OEt2.

    PubMed

    Gil-Negrete, José M; Pérez Sestelo, José; Sarandeses, Luis A

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free coupling of triorganoindium reagents with benzopyranyl acetals mediated by a Lewis acid has been developed. The reaction of R3In with chromene and isochroman acetals in the presence of BF3·OEt2 afforded 2-substituted chromenes and 1-substituted isochromans, respectively, in good yields. The reactions proceed with a variety of triorganoindium reagents (aryl, heteroaryl, alkynyl, alkenyl, alkyl) using only 50 mol % of the organometallic, thus demonstrating the efficiency of these species. Preliminary mechanistic studies indicate the formation of an oxocarbenium ion intermediate in the presence of the Lewis acid. PMID:27530143

  17. Drug delivery by water-soluble organometallic cages.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, organometallic derivatives were generally viewed as moisture- and air-sensitive compounds, and consequently very challenging to synthesise and very demanding in terms of laboratory requirements (Schlenk techniques, dried solvent, glove box). However, an increasing number of stable, water-soluble organometallic compounds are now available, and organometallic chemistry in aqueous phase is a flourishing area of research. As such, coordination-driven self-assemblies using organometallic building blocks are compatible with water, thus opening new perspectives in bio-organometallic chemistry.This chapter gives a short history of coordination-driven self-assembly, with a special attention to organometallic metalla-cycles, especially those composed of half-sandwich complexes. These metalla-assemblies have been used as sensors, as anticancer agents, as well as drug carriers.

  18. FT-IR observation of covalent labelling of lysozyme crystals by organometallic complexes of transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Darren; Salmain, Michèle; McArdle, Patrick; Jaouen, Gérard; Caro, Bertrand

    2002-03-01

    Electrophilic complexes of iron and chromium which have been reported to react with proteins in solution have been reacted with hen-egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in both the solution and crystal phases under similar pH and buffer conditions. This work was carried out with a view to developing novel side-chain selective heavy metal derivatives for protein X-ray crystallographic studies. Reaction of HEWL with a tricarbonyldienyliron cation (1) in aqueous solution led to modification of the sole histidine residue with concurrent reversible modification of other protein residues. Reaction of (1) with crystalline HEWL showed no covalent binding and only a build up of a hydrolysis product in the water channels of the crystal was observed. Reactions with a series of tricarbonylarylchromium pyrylium salts (2) led to the formation of stable covalent HEWL derivatives in solution. Chromatographic and IR spectroscopic studies showed that binding took place specifically at the ɛ-amino group of lysine residues to give a series of mono- and di-substituted products. When crystals of HEWL were soaked with the chromium reagents covalent binding to some of the lysine residues was also observed. In contrast, HEWL crystals which had their lysine side chains disabled did not bind any of the chromium reagents.

  19. Organometallic Catalysis in Diene and Cyclo-olefin Polymerisation Processes. II. The Metathesis Reaction in Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoplosk, B. A.; Korshak, Yu V.

    1984-01-01

    The development of ideas concerning the mechanism of the metathesis reaction and its employment in polymer chemistry are examined. The possible applications of the metathesis reaction in the synthesis of polymers by the polymerisation of cycloolefins and cyclodienes with ring opening and via the degradation of high-molecular-weight rubbers and their modification are discussed. The bibliography includes 160 references.

  20. Chemistry in Acetone Complexes of Metal Dications: A Remarkable Ethylene Production Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jianhua; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank; Park, Sung S.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2007-05-16

    Electrospray ionization can generate microsolvated multiply charged metal ions for various metals and ligands, allowing exploration of chemistry within such clusters. The finite size of these systems permits comparing experimental results with accurate calculations, creating a natural laboratory to research ion solvation. Mass spectrometry has provided much insight into the stability and dissociation of ligated metal cations. While solvated singly charged ions tend to shrink by ligand evaporation, solvated polycations below a certain size exhibit charge reduction and/or ligand fragmentation due to organometallic reactions. Here we investigate the acetone complexes of typical divalent metals (Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, and Cu), comparing the results of collision-induced dissociation with the predictions from density functional theory. As for other solvated dications, dissociation channels involving proton or electron transfer compete with ligand loss and become dominant for smaller complexes. The heterolytic C-C bond cleavage is common, as one would expect from previous work on DMSO and acetonitrile complexes. Of primary interest is the highly unintuitive neutral ethylene loss, found for all metals studied except Cu and particularly intense for Ca, Mn, and Fe. We focus on understanding that process in the context of competing dissociation channels, as a function of metal identity and number of ligands. According to first-principles modeling, ethylene elimination proceeds along a complex path involving a rearrangement of two acetone ligands and multiple transition states.

  1. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  2. Applications of and alternatives to pi-electron-deficient azine organometallics in metal catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Louis-Charles; Fagnou, Keith

    2007-07-01

    While the use of pi-deficient azine halides in palladium catalyzed cross-coupling reactions is common, the use of pi-electron deficient azine organometallics has been less intensively examined. In recent years, important advances have been made that are beginning to address this deficiency and need. The purpose of this tutorial review is to highlight and discuss the innovations that facilitate the synthesis of azine-containing biaryls with a focus on the pyridine structural motif. Given the number of important compounds which exhibit azine-heterobiaryls and the wide use of cross-coupling methods in their synthesis, this review should be of interest among synthetic organic chemists and organometallic chemists alike.

  3. The Surface Chemistry of Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nicholas Charles

    The surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is explored through several interrelated analytical investigations. After a brief discussion of the nanocrystal history and applications, molecular orbital theory is used to describe the electronic properties of semiconductors, and how these materials behave on the nanoscale. Quantum confinement plays a major role in dictating the optical properties of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, however surface states also have an equally significant contribution to the electronic properties of nanocrystals due to the high surface area to volume ratio of nanoscale semiconductors. Controlling surface chemistry is essential to functionalizing these materials for biological imaging and photovoltaic device applications. To better understand the surface chemistry of semiconducting nanocrystals, three competing surface chemistry models are presented: 1.) The TOPO model, 2.) the Non-stoichiometric model, and 3.) the Neutral Fragment model. Both the non-stoichiometric and neutral fragment models accurately describe the behavior of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. These models rely on the covalent bond classification system, which divides ligands into three classes: 1.) X-type, 1-electron donating ligands that balance charge with excess metal at the nanocrystal surface, 2.) L-type, 2-electron donors that bind metal sites, and 3.) Z-type, 2-electron acceptors that bind chalcogenide sites. Each of these ligand classes is explored in detail to better understand the surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. First, chloride-terminated, tri-n-butylphosphine (Bu 3P) bound CdSe nanocrystals were prepared by cleaving carboxylate ligands from CdSe nanocrystals with chlorotrimethylsilane in Bu3P solution. 1H and 31P{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the isolated nanocrystals allowed assignment of distinct signals from several free and bound species, including surface-bound Bu3P and [Bu3P-H]+[Cl]- ligands as well as a Bu

  4. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  5. Metals in the mesosphere: chemistry and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John; Marsh, Daniel; Höffner, Josef; Janches, Diego; Dawkins, Erin; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Feng, Wuhu; Chipperfield, Martyn

    2016-07-01

    The meteoric metal layers (e.g. Na, Fe, K and Ca) - which form as a result of the ablation of incoming meteors - act as unique tracers for chemical and dynamical processes that occur within the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere region. This presentation examines whether these metal layers are sensitive indicators of longer-term changes within the upper atmosphere. Output from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is used to assess the response of the Na, K and Fe layers across a 50-year period (1955-2005), while both model and observational data (satellite and lidar) is used to assess the response of the Na and K layers to the 11-year solar cycle extending between 2004-2013. On short time-scales, the K layer exhibits a very different seasonal behaviour compared to the other metals. This unusual behaviour is also exhibited at longer time-scales (both the 11-yr solar cycle and 50-yr periods); K displays a much more pronounced response to atmospheric changes at a 50-yr time scale than either Na or Fe. Underpinning this modelling work are two new laboratory systems developed at Leeds. First, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer with laser photo-ionization has been used to study the reactions of neutral metallic compounds in the gas phase which are not detectable by conventional spectroscopic probes. This has enabled significant advances in Na layer chemistry to be made. The second is a flowing afterglow/laser ablation experiment which has been used to study the dissociative recombination of metallic ions such as FeO ^{+} and CaO ^{+} with electrons; these processes are particularly important for modelling the phenomenon of sporadic metal layers.

  6. Chemistry of cyclopentadienyliron dicarbonyl dimer and ferrocene in zeolite Y cavities: Anchoring organometallic fragments into microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, K.; Borvornwattananont, A.; Bein, T. )

    1989-06-01

    The intracavity chemistry of (CpFe(CO){sub 2}){sub 2} (1) and ferrocene in different acid forms of zeolite Y has been studied with EXAFS, in situ FTIR, and TPD-MS spectroscopies. Depending on the stoichiometry of zeolite protons vs the amount of starting complex 1, the complex is either oxidatively cleaved into CpFe(CO){sub 3}{sup +} (2) and CpFe{sup +} coordinated to the zeolite, or protonated to form dimeric (CpFe(CO){sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub +} (3). It is shown that the stability of all complexes is influenced by the intracavity concentration of the zeolite-bridged hydroxyl groups. The cationic monomer 2 is stable up to 500 K in the highly acidic zeolite host, whereas the protonated dimer decomposes above 400 K. At higher temperatures, all carbonyl ligands are split off from the iron complexes, and the remaining dominant fragments are identified as CpFe(OZ){sub n} (n = 2-3), bonded to the zeolite host structure via oxygen coordination. Similar fragments are formed upon thermal decomposition of ferrocene in the zeolite.

  7. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION ON SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized ...

  8. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  9. Molecular orbital studies of the bonding in heavy element organometallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursten, B. E.

    1991-03-01

    A number of technological advances have allowed expanded studies of actinide systems in the past year. Expertise was developed in the use and administration of Digital Equipment DECstation 3100 UNIX-based worksystem, purchased with DOE funds. The access to this extremely powerful stand-alone computer, as well as its facility in tying into the Cray supercomputer at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, has allowed the expansion of the computational vistas greatly. The access to more powerful computers has allowed use of more sophisticated, albeit more complex, electronic structure methods in the investigations. These methods include local density functional (LDF) and ab initio approaches. Several projects were concluded and the program of actinide research was continued. The highlights of these projects are as follows: bonding in Np, Pu, and transplutonium organometallic compounds; application of the DV-X(alpha) (discrete variational X(alpha)) method to actinide chemistry; ad initio calculations on actinide molecules; experimental comparisons of organoactinide and organotransition metal chemistry.

  10. A click chemistry approach to 5,5'-disubstituted-3,3'-bisisoxazoles from dichloroglyoxime and alkynes: luminescent organometallic iridium and rhenium bisisoxazole complexes.

    PubMed

    van der Peet, Phillip L; Connell, Timothy U; Gunawan, Christian; White, Jonathan M; Donnelly, Paul S; Williams, Spencer J

    2013-07-19

    5,5'-Disubstituted-3,3'-bisisoxazoles are prepared in one step by the dropwise addition of aqueous potassium hydrogen carbonate to a mixture of dichloroglyoxime and terminal alkynes. The reaction exhibits a striking preference for the 5,5'-disubstituted 3,3'-bisisoxazole over the 4,5'-regioisomer. Organometallic iridium and rhenium bisisoxazole complexes are luminescent with emission wavelengths varying depending upon the identity of the 5,5'-substituent (phenyl, butyl).

  11. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  12. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  13. Metal centre effects on HNO binding in porphyrins and the electronic origin: metal's electronic configuration, position in the periodic table, and oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Fang, Weihai; Zhang, Yong

    2012-04-21

    HNO binds to many different metals in organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. To help understand experimentally observed metal centre effects, a quantum chemical investigation was performed, revealing clear general binding trends with respect to metal centre characteristics and the electronic origin for the first time.

  14. Chemistry of soluble β-diketiminatoalkaline-earth metal complexes with M-X bonds (M=Mg, Ca, Sr; X=OH, Halides, H).

    PubMed

    Sarish, Sankaranarayana Pillai; Nembenna, Sharanappa; Nagendran, Selvarajan; Roesky, Herbert W

    2011-03-15

    Victor Grignard's Nobel Prize-winning preparation of organomagnesium halides (Grignard reagents) marked the formal beginning of organometallic chemistry with alkaline earth metals. Further development of this invaluable synthetic route, RX+Mg→RMgX, with the heavier alkaline earth metals (Ca and Sr) was hampered by limitations in synthetic methodologies. Moreover, the lack of suitable ligands for stabilizing the reactive target molecules, particularly with the more electropositive Ca and Sr, was another obstacle. The absence in the literature, until just recently, of fundamental alkaline earth metal complexes with M-H, M-F, and M-OH (where M is the Group 2 metal Mg, Ca, or Sr) bonds amenable for organometallic reactions is remarkable. The progress in isolating various unstable compounds of p-block elements with β-diketiminate ligands was recently applied to Group 2 chemistry. The monoanionic β-diketiminate ligands are versatile tools for addressing synthetic challenges, as amply demonstrated with alkaline earth complexes: the synthesis and structural characterization of soluble β-diketiminatocalcium hydroxide, β-diketiminatostrontium hydroxide, and β-diketiminatocalcium fluoride are just a few examples of our contribution to this area of research. To advance the chemistry beyond synthesis, we have investigated the reactivity and potential for applications of these species, for example, through the demonstration of dip coating surfaces with CaCO(3) and CaF(2) with solutions of the calcium hydroxide and calcium fluoride complexes, respectively. In this Account, we summarize some recent developments in alkaline earth metal complex chemistry, particularly of Mg, Ca, and Sr, through the utilization of β-diketiminate ligands. We focus on results generated in our laboratory but give due mention to work from other groups as well. We also highlight the closely related chemistry of the Group 12 element Zn, as well as the important chemistry developed by other groups

  15. Polymeric, Metallic, and Other Glasses in Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Non-ceramic glasses are not adequately discussed in introductory chemistry. Such glasses include polycarbonate, which many corrective lenses are made of, amber, enamel, gelatin, hard candy, coal, refrigerated glycerol, and metallic glasses that have been marketed in recent decades. What is usually discussed in elementary texts is siliceous glass,…

  16. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    ScienceCinema

    Omar Yaghi

    2016-07-12

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  17. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Yaghi

    2012-07-23

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  18. Exploration of fluorine chemistry at the multidisciplinary interface of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Iwao

    2013-07-01

    Over the last three decades, my engagement in "fluorine chemistry" has evolved substantially because of the multidisciplinary nature of the research programs. I began my research career as a synthetic chemist in organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis directed toward organic synthesis. Then, I was brought into a very unique world of "fluorine chemistry" in the end of 1970s. I started exploring the interface of fluorine chemistry and transition metal homogeneous catalysis first, which was followed by amino acids, peptides, and peptidomimetics for medicinal chemistry. Since then, I have been exploring the interfaces of fluorine chemistry and multidisciplinary fields of research involving medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, cancer biology, and molecular imaging. This perspective intends to cover my fruitful endeavor in the exploration of fluorine chemistry at the multidisciplinary interface of chemistry and biology in a chronological order to show the evolution of my research interest and strategy.

  19. Non-metallocene organometallic complexes and related methods and systems

    DOEpatents

    Agapie, Theodor; Golisz, Suzanne Rose; Tofan, Daniel; Bercaw, John E.

    2010-12-07

    A non-metallocene organometallic complex comprising a tridentate ligand and a metal bonded to a tridentate ligand, wherein two substituted aryl groups in the tridentate ligand are connected to a cyclic group at the ortho position via semi-rigid ring-ring linkages, and selected so to provide the resulting non-metallocene organometallic complex with a C.sub.S geometry, a C.sub.1 geometry, a C.sub.2 geometry or a C.sub.2v geometry. Method for performing olefin polymerization with a non-metallocene organometallic complex as a catalyst, related catalytic systems, tridentate ligand and method for providing a non-metallocene organometallic complex.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of organometallic reaction dynamics, and, Enhancing achievement in chemistry for African American students through innovations in pedagogy aligned with supporting assessment and curriculum and integrated under an alternative research paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebane, Sheryl Dee

    Part I. Molecular dynamics simulation of organometallic reaction dynamics. To study the interplay of solute and solvent dynamics, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were employed. Lennard-Jones and electrostatic models of potential energies from solvent-only studies were combined with solute potentials generated from ab-initio calculations. Radial distribution functions and other measures revealed the polar solvent's response to solute dynamics following CO dissociation. In future studies, the time-scale for solvent coordination will be confirmed with ultrafast spectroscopy data. Part II. Enhancing achievement in chemistry for African American students through innovations in pedagogy aligned with supporting assessment and curriculum and integrated under an alternative research paradigm. Much progress has been made in the area of research in education that focuses on teaching and learning in science. Much effort has also centered on documenting and exploring the disparity in academic achievement between underrepresented minority students and students comprising a majority in academic circles. However, few research projects have probed educational inequities in the context of mainstream science education. In order to enrich this research area and to better reach underserved learning communities, the educational experience of African American students in an ethnically and academically diverse high school science class has been examined throughout one, largely successful, academic year. The bulk of data gathered during the study was obtained through several qualitative research methods and was interpreted using research literature that offered fresh theoretical perspectives on equity that may better support effective action.

  1. The chemistry of meteoric metals in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John M. C.

    The presence of thin layers of free metal atoms at around 90 km in the upper atmosphere has been known for about fifty years. Layers of the alkali metals Na, K and Li, as well as Ca and Fe, have been observed. This discovery has posed two important questions. First, what is the source of the metals: interplanetary or terrestrial? Secondly, what is the nature of the chemistry that causes reactive metals such as sodium to exist in their atomic form in the atmosphere? The first part of this review covers the techniques that have been developed to observe the metal layers, including ground-, rocket- and space-based photometers, and in particular metal lidars. The many curious phenomena that have been observed are then described, such as the small scale-heights of the layers, the quite different seasonal variations of the three alkali metals, the large depletions of Ca and Fe relative to Na, and the dramatic appearance of sporadic Na layers. The second part of the review describes the recent advances that have been made in laboratory kinetic studies of metal reactions of atmospheric interest. A number of specialized techniques for making low-temperature measurements are compared, and a compilation of recommended rate coefficients is given. The history of modelling of the chemistry of metals in the mesosphere is then reviewed, and the evidence that their major source is meteoric ablation is presented. A current model of sodium is then described and evaluated with sensitivity tests. This section ends by discussing the possible impact of these meteoric metals on the chlorine-catalysed removal of ozone in the stratosphere. The final part of the review summarizes the active current state of the field and identifies some of its future directions.

  2. Surface modification, organometallic and polyaryl polymer coatings, and flame spray technologies for preventing corrosion of metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1995-07-01

    To improve adherent properties of electrogalvanized steel (EGS) to polymeric topcoats, the surfaces of EGS were modified by polyelectrolyte-modified zinc phosphating solution. The electrochemical reaction between phosphating solution and EGS led to the complete coverage with fully grown hopeite crystals after only 5 sec treatment, thereby improving adhesion to topcoating and providing protection of EGS against corrosion. To evaluate the ability of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) polyaryl thermoplastic coatings to protect zinc phosphate (Zn{center_dot}Ph)treated steels from corrosion in a wet, harsh environment ( 1.0 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 3.0 wt % NaCl and 96.0 wt % water at temperatures from 25{degrees} to 200{degree}C), we exposed them in an autoclave to attempt heating-cooling cyclic fatigue tests (1 cycle = 12 hr at 200{degrees}C + 12 hr at 25{degrees}C) up to 90 times. The major chemical reaction at the interface between the PPS and Zn in the Zn-Ph layer during cycling led to the formation of ZnS reaction product, which enhanced the Zn-Ph-to-PPS adhesive bond; correspondingly, there were no signs of peeling and separation of the coating after 90 cycles. organometallosiloxane polymer (OMSP) was synthesized through the hydrolysis-condensation reaction of the mixed precursor solutions of the N-[3-(triethoxysily)propyl]-4,5,-dihydroimidazole and {Beta}-trimethoxysilylethyl-2-pyridine sols in liquor medium and the metal alkoxides and metallocene dichloride dissolved in water or tetrahydrofurane. The OMSP films (thickness, 0. 5 to 1. 0 {mu}m) deposited by simple dip-withdrawing coating methods to aluminum alloys displayed the impedance of > 10{sup 6} ohm-cm {sup 2} after exposure for 40 days in 0.5 N NaCl solution at 25{degrees}C and the 3000 hr-salt spray resistance. Using a flame spray coating process, the methacrylic acid-modified polyethylene copolymer was overlaid onto cold rolled steel surfaces.

  3. Ab Initio Calculations Applied to Problems in Metal Ion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations can provide accurate spectroscopic data (such as molecular structures) vibrational frequencies, binding energies, etc.) that have been very useful in explaining trends in experimental data and in identifying incorrect experimental measurements. In addition, ab initio calculations. have given considerable insight into the many interactions that make the chemistry of transition metal systems so diverse. In this review we focus on cases where calculations and experiment have been used to solve interesting chemical problems involving metal ions. The examples include cases where theory was used to differentiate between disparate experimental values and cases where theory was used to explain unexpected experimental results.

  4. Colloidal nickel/gallium nanoalloys obtained from organometallic precursors in conventional organic solvents and in ionic liquids: noble-metal-free alkyne semihydrogenation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Kai; Doddi, Adinarayana; Kroll, Clarissa; Meyer, Hajo; Wiktor, Christian; Gemel, Christian; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Fischer, Roland A.; Janiak, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to replace noble-metal catalysts by low-cost alternatives are of constant interest. The organometallic, non-aqueous wet-chemical synthesis of various hitherto unknown nanocrystalline Ni/Ga intermetallic materials and the use of NiGa for the selective semihydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes are reported. Thermal co-hydrogenolysis of the all-hydrocarbon precursors [Ni(COD)2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) and GaCp* (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) in high-boiling organic solvents mesitylene and n-decane in molar ratios of 1 : 1, 2 : 3 and 3 : 1 yields the nano-crystalline powder materials of the over-all compositions NiGa, Ni2Ga3 and Ni3Ga, respectively. Microwave induced co-pyrolysis of the same precursors without additional hydrogen in the ionic liquid [BMIm][BF4] (BMIm = 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium) selectively yields the intermetallic phases NiGa and Ni3Ga from the respective 1 : 1 and 3 : 1 molar ratios of the precursors. The obtained materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), IR, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The single-source precursor [Ni(GaCp*)(PMe3)3] with a fixed Ni : Ga stoichiometry of 1 : 1 was employed as well. In comparison with the co-hydrogenolytic dual precursor source approach it turned out to be less practical due to inefficient nickel incorporation caused by the parasitic formation of stable [Ni(PMe3)4]. The use of ionic liquid [BMIm][BF4] as a non-conventional solvent to control the reaction and stabilize the nanoparticles proved to be particularly advantageous and stable colloids of the nanoalloys NiGa and Ni3Ga were obtained. A phase-selective Ni/Ga colloid synthesis in conventional solvents and in the presence of surfactants such as hexadecylamine (HDA) was not feasible due to the undesired reactivity of HDA with GaCp* leading to inefficient gallium incorporation. Recyclable NiGa nanoparticles selectively

  5. Alkali Metal Suboxometalates-Structural Chemistry between Salts and Metals.

    PubMed

    Wörsching, Matthias; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-07-20

    The crystal structures of the new cesium-poor alkali metal suboxometalates Cs10MO5 (M = Al, Ga, Fe) show both metallic and ionic bonding following the formal description (Cs(+))10(MO4(5-))(O(2-))·3e(-). Comparable to the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4 (M = Al, Ga, In, Fe, Sc) with ionic subdivision (Cs(+))9(MO4(5-))·4e(-), they contain an oxometalate anion [M(III)O4](5-) embedded in a metallic matrix of cesium atoms. Columnlike building units form with prevalent ionic bonding inside and metallic bonding on the outer surface. In the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4, additional cesium atoms with no contact to any anion are inserted between columns of the formal composition [Cs8MO4]. In the cesium-poor suboxometalates Cs10MO5, the same columns are extended by face-sharing [Cs6O] units, and no additional cesium atoms are present. The terms "cesium-rich" and "cesium-poor" here refer to the Cs:O ratio. The new suboxometalates Cs10MO5 crystallize in two modifications with new structure types. The orthorhombic modification adopts a structure with four formula units per unit cell in space group Pnnm with a = 11.158(3) Å, b = 23.693(15) Å, and c = 12.229(3) Å for Cs10AlO5. The monoclinic modification crystallizes with eight formula units per unit cell in space group C2/c with a = 21.195(3) Å, b = 12.480(1) Å, c = 24.120(4) Å, and β = 98.06(1)° for Cs10AlO5. Limits to phase formation are given by the restriction that the M atoms must be trivalent and by geometric size restrictions for the insertion of [Cs6O] blocks in Cs10MO5. All of the suboxometalate structures show similar structural details and form mixed crystal series with statistical occupation for the M elements following the patterns Cs9(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O4 and Cs10(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O5. The suboxometalates are a new example of ordered intergrowth of ionic and metallic structure elements, allowing for the combination of properties related to both ionic and metallic materials.

  6. Syntheses and characterization of dichlorozirconium porphyrin complexes and their novel organometallic derivatives. X-ray structure of Zr(TPP)Cl[sub 2](THF)

    SciTech Connect

    Heejoon Kim; Dongmok Whang; Kimoon Kim ); Youngkyu Do )

    1993-02-03

    The chemistry of early transition metal porphyrin complexes, especially, that of the second- and third-row metal complexes has not been developed much due in part to their high oxophilicity. The authors have been interested in exploring zirconium and hafnium porphyrin complexes because they may show a rich organometallic chemistry as zirconocene derivatives do. The key entry to the organometallic zirconium porphyrin complexes would be Zr(porphyrin)Cl[sub 2], analogous to ZrCp[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The dichloride complex may be converted to organometallic [sigma]-complexes such as dialkyl complexes by the reactions with alkyllithium or Grignard reagents. It may also form organometallic [tau]-complexes by replacing the two chlorides with a cyclooctatetraenyl dianion or a dicarbollide dianion. Indeed, the authors have succeeded in preparing Zr(por)Cl[sub 2] (por = OEP, TPP) and their organometallic derivatives Zr(TPP)Me[sub 2] and Zr(OEP)([eta][sup 5]-C[sub 2]B[sub 9]H[sub 11]). They have presented the preliminary results on their syntheses and characterization by spectroscopy but have been unable to grow X-ray-quality crystals of either of the organometallic complexes until recently. When they finished the structural characterization of Zr(OEP)([eta][sup 5]C[sub 2]B[sub 9]H[sub 11]) by X-ray crystallography, however, Arnold and co-workers published the synthesis and characterization of Zr(OEP)Cl[sub 2] and several organometallic complexes derived from it, including Zr(OEP)(CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3])[sub 2] and Zr(OEP)([eta][sup 5]-C[sub 2]B[sub 9]H[sub 11]). Here they present their results on the syntheses and characterization of Zr(por)Cl[sub 2] (por = OEP, TPP), Zr(TPP)Me[sub 2], and Zr(OEP)([eta][sup 5]-C[sub 2]B[sub 9]H[sub 11]) and the X-ray structure of Zr(TPP)Cl[sub 2](THF). 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Studies on unusually reactive metal powders. Preparation of new organometallic and organic compounds including potential new catalysts. Final report, July 1, 1980-December 31, 1984. [Benzyl ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, R.D.

    1985-06-01

    This research project was involved with the preparation and study of highly reactive metal powders prepared by the reduction of metal salts with alkali metals. Studies concentrated on nickel, copper, cadmium, uranium, iron, and magnesium. The nickel powders have been found to react rapidly with benzylic halides, and the resulting organonickel complexes yield dibenzyl. Aryl halides react rapidly with the nickel powders to produce biaryl compounds in high yields. Benzylic halides react with the nickel powders in the presence of acylhalides to produce benzyl ketones in high yields. Reactions of ROCOCOC1 and benzylic halides with nickel powders yield benzyl ketones. These reactions proceed with a wide variety of substituents on the phenyl ring of the benzylic halides. Highly reactive uranium has been prepared, and found to react with a variety of oxygen containing substrates, such as nitrobenzene to yield azo benzene. Highly reactive magnesium has opened up a totally new area of low temperature Grignard chemistry. The preparation of highly reactive copper has allowed the direct preparation of organocopper species directly from organic halides. 16 refs., 6 tabs.

  8. The Renaissance of Metal-Pyrimidine Nucleobase Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Bernhard; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-08-16

    The significance of metal ions for the function and properties of DNA and RNA, long seen primarily under biological aspects and medicinal uses, has recently gained a renewed momentum. This is a consequence of the advent of novel applications in the fields of materials science, biotechnology, and analytical sensor chemistry that relate to the designed incorporation of transition metal ions into nucleic acid base pairs. Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ions, binding to pyrimidine (pym) nucleobases, represent major players in this development. Interestingly, these metal ions were the ones that some 60 years ago started the field! At the same time, the mentioned metal ions had demonstrated a "special relationship" with the pym nucleobases cytosine, thymine, and uracil! Parallel work conducted with oligonucleotides and model nucleobases fostered numerous significant details of these interactions, in particular when X-ray crystallography was involved, correcting earlier views occasionally. Our own activities during the past three to four decades have focused on, among others, the coordination chemistry of transition and main-group metal ions with pym model nucleobases, with an emphasis on Pt(II) and Pd(II). It has always been our goal to deduce, if possible, the potential relevance of our findings for biological processes. It is interesting to put our data, in particular for trans-a2Pt(II) (a = NH3 or amine), into perspective with those of other metal ions, notably Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Irrespective of major differences in kinetics and lability/inertness between d(8) and d(10) metal ions, there is also a lot of similarity in structural aspects as a result of the preferred linear coordination geometry of these species. Moreover, the apparent clustering of metal ions to the pym nucleobases, which is presumably essential for the formation of nanoclusters on oligonucleotide scaffolds, is impressively reflected in model systems, as are reasons for inter-nucleobase cross-links containing more

  9. The Renaissance of Metal-Pyrimidine Nucleobase Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Bernhard; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-08-16

    The significance of metal ions for the function and properties of DNA and RNA, long seen primarily under biological aspects and medicinal uses, has recently gained a renewed momentum. This is a consequence of the advent of novel applications in the fields of materials science, biotechnology, and analytical sensor chemistry that relate to the designed incorporation of transition metal ions into nucleic acid base pairs. Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ions, binding to pyrimidine (pym) nucleobases, represent major players in this development. Interestingly, these metal ions were the ones that some 60 years ago started the field! At the same time, the mentioned metal ions had demonstrated a "special relationship" with the pym nucleobases cytosine, thymine, and uracil! Parallel work conducted with oligonucleotides and model nucleobases fostered numerous significant details of these interactions, in particular when X-ray crystallography was involved, correcting earlier views occasionally. Our own activities during the past three to four decades have focused on, among others, the coordination chemistry of transition and main-group metal ions with pym model nucleobases, with an emphasis on Pt(II) and Pd(II). It has always been our goal to deduce, if possible, the potential relevance of our findings for biological processes. It is interesting to put our data, in particular for trans-a2Pt(II) (a = NH3 or amine), into perspective with those of other metal ions, notably Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Irrespective of major differences in kinetics and lability/inertness between d(8) and d(10) metal ions, there is also a lot of similarity in structural aspects as a result of the preferred linear coordination geometry of these species. Moreover, the apparent clustering of metal ions to the pym nucleobases, which is presumably essential for the formation of nanoclusters on oligonucleotide scaffolds, is impressively reflected in model systems, as are reasons for inter-nucleobase cross-links containing more

  10. The Systematic Study of the Organotransition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carriedo, Gabino A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is an extension of the conventional method for studying the organometallic chemistry of transition metals that may be useful to show how the various existing types of low-valence complexes can be constructed. This method allows students to design new types of complexes that may still be nonexistent. (CW)

  11. A primer on trace metal-sediment chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.

    1985-01-01

    In most aquatic systems, concentrations of trace metals in suspended sediment and the top few centimeters of bottom sediment are far greater than concentrations of trace metals dissolved in the water column. Consequently, the distribution, transport, and availability of these constituents can not be intelligently evaluated, nor can their environmental impact be determined or predicted solely through the sampling and analysis of dissolved phases. This Primer is designed to acquaint the reader with the basic principles that govern the concentration and distribution of trace metals associated with bottom and suspended sediments. The sampling and analysis of suspended and bottom sediments are very important for monitoring studies, not only because trace metal concentrations associated with them are orders of magnitude higher than in the dissolved phase, but also because of several other factors. Riverine transport of trace metals is dominated by sediment. In addition, bottom sediments serve as a source for suspended sediment and can provide a historical record of chemical conditions. This record will help establish area baseline metal levels against which existing conditions can be compared. Many physical and chemical factors affect a sediment's capacity to collect and concentrate trace metals. The physical factors include grain size, surface area, surface charge, cation exchange capacity, composition, and so forth. Increases in metal concentrations are strongly correlated with decreasing grain size and increasing surface area, surface charge, cation exchange capacity, and increasing concentrations of iron and manganese oxides, organic matter, and clay minerals. Chemical factors are equally important, especially for differentiating between samples having similar bulk chemistries and for inferring or predicting environmental availability. Chemical factors entail phase associations (with such sedimentary components as interstitial water, sulfides, carbonates, and organic

  12. Organometallic electrochemistry based on electrolytes containing weakly-coordinating fluoroarylborate anions.

    PubMed

    Geiger, William E; Barrière, Frédéric

    2010-07-20

    -deficient organometallic compounds are subject to nucleophilic attack by the traditional family of electrolyte anions. With a view to testing the scope of the much less nucleophililic WCAs in providing a benign electrolyte anion for the generation of organometallic cation radicals, we carried out a series of studies on transition metal sandwich and half-sandwich compounds. The model compounds were chosen both for their fundamental importance and because their radical cations had been neither isolated nor spectrally characterized, despite many previous electrochemical investigations with traditional anions. The oxidation of prototypical organometallic compounds, such as the sandwich-structured ruthenocene and the piano-stool structured Cr(eta(6)-C(6)H(6))(CO)(3), Mn(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(3), Re(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(3), and Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2), gave the first definitive in situ characterization of their radical cations. In several cases, the kinetic stabilization of the anodic products allowed the identification of dimers or unique dimer radicals having weak metal-metal bonds and provided new preparative options for organometallic systems. In terms of thermodynamic effects, the lower ion-pairing abilities of WCAs and their good solubility in a broad range of solvents, including those of lower polarity, permitted a systematic study that yielded an integrated model of how to use solvent-electrolyte combinations to manipulate the E(1/2) differences of compounds undergoing multiple electron-transfer reactions. Although the efficacy of WCA-based electrolytes in organometallic anodic chemistry is now established, WCAs might further expand applications of organic redox chemistry. Other WCAs, including those derived from carboranes and fluorinated alkoxyaluminates, merit additional studies. PMID:20345126

  13. Chemistry and Properties of Complex Intermetallics from Metallic Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-03-28

    This project investigated the reaction chemistry and synthesis of new intermetallic materials with complex compositions and structures using metallic fluxes as solvents. It was found that the metallic fluxes offer several key advantages in facilitating the formation and crystal growth of new materials. The fluxes mostly explored were liquid aluminum, gallium and indium. The main purpose of this project was to exploit the potential of metallic fluxes as high temperature solvent for materials discovery in the broad class of intermetallics. This work opened new paths to compound formation. We discovered many new Si (or Ge)-based compounds with novel structures, bonding and physicochemical properties. We created new insights about the reaction chemistry that is responsible for stabilizing the new materials. We also studied the structural and compositional relationships to understand their properties. We investigated the use of Group-13 metals Al, Ga and In as solvents and have generated a wide variety of new results including several new ternary and quaternary materials with fascinating structures and properties as well as new insights as to how these systems are stabilized in the fluxes. The project focused on reactions of metals from the rare earth element family in combination with transition metals with Si and Ge. For example molten gallium has serves both as a reactive and non-reactive solvent in the preparation and crystallization of intermetallics in the system RE/M/Ga/Ge(Si). Molten indium behaves similarly in that it too is an excellent reaction medium, but it gives compounds that are different from those obtained from gallium. Some of the new phase identified in the aluminide class are complex phases and may be present in many advanced Al-matrix alloys. Such phases play a key role in determining (either beneficially or detrimentally) the mechanical properties of advanced Al-matrix alloys. This project enhanced our basic knowledge of the solid state chemistry

  14. The Chemiluminescence of Organometallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikov, Genrikh A.; Bulgakov, Ramil G.; Kazakov, Valeri P.

    1985-11-01

    Studies on the liquid-phase and gas-phase reactions of organometallic compounds accompanied by the emission of light are described systematically and discussed. The influence of the magnetic field on the chemiluminescence of Grignard reagents and the study of the electrochemiluminescence of solutions of organometallic compounds are examined. The ways leading to further development of the field of the chemiluminescence of organometallic compounds and certain possible applications of the phenomenon in the monitoring of industrial processes are discussed. The bibliography includes 80 references.

  15. SO2 surface chemistry on metal substrates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.M.; Sloan, D.; White, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The surface chemistry, induced by thermal and non-thermal methods, of SO2 on metal substrates is reviewed. The substrate temperature during dosing is important; regardless of metal, adsorption is dissociative at 300 K and molecular at 100 K. On Ni, Pd, and Pt, molecular adsorption occurs through the S and one O atom, and the molecular plane is perpendicular to the surface. However, on Ag and Cu, adsorption occurs only through the S with the molecular plane perpendicular to the surface. The differences can be attributed to the structure of the metal`s molecular orbitals and their interactions with the SO2 orbitals. Upon heating, SO2 dissociates on all transition metal surfaces with the exception of Ag, Au, and Cu, where only molecular desorption occurs. On Pt, Fe, and Pd, additional reactions are observed between SO2 and its dissociation products. The nonthermal reactions induced by photons and electrons for monolayer coverages of SO2 on Ag (111) are dominated by molecular desorption. Desorption cross sections for 313 nm photons and 50 eV electrons were 2.8 x 10(exp {minus}20) sq cm and approx. 1 x 10(exp {minus}16) sq cm, respectively. Nonthermal excitation mechanisms and quenching processes as well as interesting characteristics of SO2 under irradiation are also reviewed.

  16. Exploration of Fluorine Chemistry at the Multidisciplinary Interface of Chemistry and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Over the last three decades, my engagement in “fluorine chemistry” has evolved substantially, because of the multidisciplinary nature of the research programs. I began my research career as a synthetic chemist in organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis directed toward organic synthesis. Then, I was brought into a very unique world of “fluorine chemistry” in the end of 1970s. I started exploring the interface of fluorine chemistry and transition metal homogeneous catalysis first, which was followed by amino acids, peptides, and peptidomimetics for medicinal chemistry. Since then, I have been exploring the interfaces of fluorine chemistry and multidisciplinary fields of research involving medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, cancer biology and molecular imaging. This perspective intends to cover my fruitful endeavor in the exploration of fluorine chemistry at the multidisciplinary interface of chemistry and biology in a chronological order to show the evolution of my research interest and strategy. PMID:23614876

  17. Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2002-07-16

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  18. Quantum Chemistry for Surface Segregation in Metal Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David

    2006-08-31

    Metal alloys are vital materials for the fabrication of high-flux, high-selectivity hydrogen separation membranes. A phenomenon that occurs in alloys that does not arise in pure metals is surface segregation, where the composition of the surface differs from the bulk composition. Little is known about the strength of surface segregation in the alloys usually considered for hydrogen membranes. Despite this lack of knowledge, surface segregation may play a decisive role in the ability of appropriately chosen alloys to be resistant to chemical poisoning, since membrane poisoning is controlled by surface chemistry. The aim of this Phase I project is to develop quantum chemistry approaches to assess surface segregation in a prototypical hydrogen membrane alloy, fcc Pd{sub 75}Cu{sub 25}. This alloy is known experimentally to have favorable surface properties as a poison resistant H{sub 2} purification membrane (Kamakoti et al., Science 307 (2005) 569-573), but previous efforts at modeling surfaces of this alloy have ignored the possible role of surface segregation (Alfonso et al., Surf. Sci. 546 (2003) 12-26).

  19. Modulation of human osteoblasts by metal surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Sehr, Harald; de Wild, Michael; Portenier, Jeannette; Gobrecht, Jens; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2013-08-01

    The use of metal implants in dental and orthopedic surgery is continuously expanding and highly successful. While today longevity and load-bearing capacity of the implants fulfill the expectations of the patients, acceleration of osseointegration would be of particular benefit to shorten the period of convalescence. To further clarify the options to accelerate the kinetics of osseointegration, within this study, the osteogenic properties of structurally identical surfaces with different metal coatings were investigated. To assess the development and function of primary human osteoblasts on metal surfaces, cell viability, differentiation, and gene expression were determined. Titanium surfaces were used as positive, and surfaces coated with gold were used as negative controls. Little differences in the cellular parameters tested for were found when the cells were grown on titanium discs sputter coated with titanium, zirconium, niobium, tantalum, gold, and chromium. Cell number, activity of cell layer-associated alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and levels of transcripts encoding COL1A1 and BGLAP did not vary significantly in dependence of the surface chemistry. Treatment of the cell cultures with 1,25(OH)2 D3 /Dex, however, significantly increased ALP activity and BGLAP messenger RNA levels. The data demonstrate that the metal layer coated onto the titanium discs exerted little modulatory effects on cell behavior. It is suggested that the microenvironment regulated by the peri-implant tissues is more effective in regulating the tissue response than is the material of the implant itself.

  20. The Chemistry of Meteoric Metals in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    The metals Na, Li, K, Ca and Fe have been observed around 90 km in the earth's upper atmosphere. Meteoric ablation is believed to be the source of these metals. The mesospheric chemistry of these metals and their impact on the general chemistry of the atmosphere are poorly understood. Therefore, a detailed investigation of processes affecting the gas -phase chemistry of these metals was undertaken. Both kinetic and photochemical studies were carried out using the techniques of pulsed photolysis of a suitable metal precursor and laser induced fluorescence of the resulting metal atoms. Ab initio calculations were also carried out to study the geometries of the metallic species and calculate their thermochemical properties. Kinetic investigations on the recombination reactions of the alkali metals with O_2 were performed over an extended temperature range (230-1100 K) in an attempt to understand their different seasonal behavior. The three reactions have very similar temperature dependences over the experimental temperature range. Use of the Troe formalism indicates that this dependency will continue into the mesospheric temperature range (140-240 K). The similarity suggests that differences in the temperature dependence of these reactions are not responsible for the different seasonal behavior of the alkali metals. The lower limits for the bond energies of the alkali superoxides were estimated from the kinetic decays obtained at 1100 K, and then combined with ab initio calculations to yield recommended bond energies. These values are of use in the Troe formalism and the mesospheric models. To assess the effectiveness of NaO_2 as a daytime sink, the absolute cross-section for photodissociation of NaO_2 was measured at 230 K. The photolysis rate of NaO_2 was derived above 70 km. The results indicate that above 85 km the reaction between NaO_2 and O is a more important loss term for NaO _2 than daytime photolysis and that between 80 and 65 km the photolysis of NaO_2 is

  1. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  2. Molecular switches in carbon-rich organometallic compounds: Theoretical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Costuas, Karine

    2015-01-22

    Organometallic complexes associated with an appropriate choice of ancillary ligands reveal to have a wide range of physical properties leading to promising applications when incorporated in nano-size devices. The challenge is to design innovative multifunctional compounds based on redox active carbon-rich organometallics associated with spin carriers and/or photochromic units. A multidisciplinary approach in this area has proved to be efficient in a series a systems combining carbon-rich bridging ligands and redox metallic moieties. In this domain, the role of theoretical investigations based on quantum mechanics tools have a crucial role in rationalizing and in helping designing systems possessing target properties.

  3. Sustainable metal alkynyl chemistry: 3d metals and polyaza macrocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tong

    2016-02-25

    We describe the chemistry of 3d metal alkynyls based on polyaza macrocyclic ligands, an emerging area of alkynyl chemistry that has previously been dominated by 4d and 5d metals with soft ligands. The abundance of 3d metals and low cost of tetraazacyclotetradecane ligands make these compounds more affordable, sustainable alternatives to metal alkynyls based on precious metals. Taking advantage of the rich variety of starting materials available in the literature, trans-[M(cyclam)(C2R)2]X (cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) compounds have been prepared from the reactions between [M(cyclam)X2]X (M = Cr, Fe and Co; X = Cl or OTf) and LiC2R. With [Co(cyclam)Cl2](+), both the {trans-[Co(cyclam)Cl]2(μ-(C≡C)n)}(2+) and trans-[Co(cyclam)(C2R)Cl](+) compounds have been prepared by a dehydrohalogenation reaction. The latter compounds undergo the second alkynylation reaction to afford dissymmetric trans-[Co(cyclam)(C2R)(C2R')](+) compounds. Similar alkynylation chemistry with complexes of the cyclam derivatives TMC (1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) and HMC (5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) has been demonstrated in studies of [Ni(TMC)(C2R)](+) and trans-/cis-[Cr(HMC)(C2R)2](+). Me3TACN (1,4,7-N,N',N''-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) is also a supporting ligand that has been observed in transition metal alkynyls. The trans-[M(cyclam)(C2D)(C2A)](+) compounds (D = donor chromophore, A = acceptor chromophore) are excellent candidates for probing photoinduced electron transfer and related photophysical and photochemical processes. 3d Metal ions are often in high-spin ground states, which make these alkynyl compounds promising building blocks for magnetic materials.

  4. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION ON SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY (LAKE BUENA VISTA, FL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized ...

  5. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Decarboxylation chemistry has a rich history, and in more recent times, it has been recruited in the quest to develop cheaper, cleaner, and more efficient bond-coupling reactions. Thus, over the past two decades, there has been intense investigation into new metal-catalyzed reactions of carboxylic substrates. Understanding the elementary steps of metal-mediated transformations is at the heart of inventing new reactions and improving the performance of existing ones. Fortunately, during the same time period, there has been a convergence in mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, which allows these catalytic processes to be examined efficiently in the gas phase. Thus, electrospray ionization (ESI) sources have been combined with ion-trap mass spectrometers, which in turn have been modified to either accept radiation from tunable OPO lasers for spectroscopy based structural assignment of ions or to allow the study of ion-molecule reactions (IMR). The resultant "complete" gas-phase chemical laboratories provide a platform to study the elementary steps of metal-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions in exquisite detail. In this Account, we illustrate how the powerful combination of ion trap mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations can be systematically used to examine the formation of organometallic ions and their chemical transformations. Specifically, ESI-MS allows the transfer of inorganic carboxylate complexes, [RCO2M(L)n](x), (x = charge) from the condensed to the gas phase. These mass selected ions serve as precursors to organometallic ions [RM(L)n](x) via neutral extrusion of CO2, accessible by slow heating in the ion trap using collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach provides access to an array of organometallic ions with well-defined stoichiometry. In terms of understanding the decarboxylation process, we highlight the role of the metal center (M), the organic group (R), and the auxiliary ligand (L), along with cluster nuclearity, in

  6. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Decarboxylation chemistry has a rich history, and in more recent times, it has been recruited in the quest to develop cheaper, cleaner, and more efficient bond-coupling reactions. Thus, over the past two decades, there has been intense investigation into new metal-catalyzed reactions of carboxylic substrates. Understanding the elementary steps of metal-mediated transformations is at the heart of inventing new reactions and improving the performance of existing ones. Fortunately, during the same time period, there has been a convergence in mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, which allows these catalytic processes to be examined efficiently in the gas phase. Thus, electrospray ionization (ESI) sources have been combined with ion-trap mass spectrometers, which in turn have been modified to either accept radiation from tunable OPO lasers for spectroscopy based structural assignment of ions or to allow the study of ion-molecule reactions (IMR). The resultant "complete" gas-phase chemical laboratories provide a platform to study the elementary steps of metal-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions in exquisite detail. In this Account, we illustrate how the powerful combination of ion trap mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations can be systematically used to examine the formation of organometallic ions and their chemical transformations. Specifically, ESI-MS allows the transfer of inorganic carboxylate complexes, [RCO2M(L)n](x), (x = charge) from the condensed to the gas phase. These mass selected ions serve as precursors to organometallic ions [RM(L)n](x) via neutral extrusion of CO2, accessible by slow heating in the ion trap using collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach provides access to an array of organometallic ions with well-defined stoichiometry. In terms of understanding the decarboxylation process, we highlight the role of the metal center (M), the organic group (R), and the auxiliary ligand (L), along with cluster nuclearity, in

  7. Quadrupolar Metal Nuclides in Bioinorganic Chemistry: Solid-State NMR Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Andrew S.; Ellis, Paul D.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2009-09-16

    Metal ions play an important role in bioinorganic chemistry, however, following their respective chemistries is often complicated because several relevant metal ions (such as V5+, Cu1+, Zn2+, and Mg2+) are not always amenable to conventional UV/Vis or EPR spectroscopy. Rather, what we know of these metal sites has come from the characterization of the various compounds and proteins via x-ray crystallographic methods or from using surrogate metal probes for conventional spectroscopy

  8. Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Richard F.

    2013-06-30

    The goals of this project were to design new electrophilic metal alkyl complexes and to exploit these systems in fundamental studies of olefin polymerization and other important and new catalytic reactions. A key target reaction is insertion copolymerization of olefins and polar CH2=CHX vinyl monomers such as vinyl halides and vinyl ethers. During the period covered by this report we (i) investigated the properties of ortho-alkoxy-arylphosphine ligands in Ni-based olefin polymerization catalysts, (ii) studied the synthesis of double-end-capped polyethylene using group 4 metal catalysts that contain tris-pyrazolylborate ligands, (iii) explored the ethylene insertion reactivity of group 4 metal tris-pyrazolyl-borate complexes, (iv) showed that (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species undergo multiple insertion of silyl vinyl ethers, (v) synthesized and explored the reactivity of base-free Ni benzyl complexes that contain ortho-phosphino-arene sulfonate ligands, (vi) established the mechanism of the reaction of vinyl chloride with (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} catalysts, (vii) explored the role of cationic polymerization and insertion chemistry in the reactions of vinyl ethers with (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species, (viii) discovered a new class of self-assembled tetranuclear Pd catalysts that produce high molecular weight linear polyethylene and copolymerize ethylene and vinyl fluoride, and (ix) developed model systems that enabled investigation of cis-trans isomerization of {phosphine-sulfonate}Pd(II) complexes.

  9. Ultrafast studies of organometallic photochemistry: The mechanism of carbon-hydrogen bond activation in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    When certain organometallic compounds are photoexcited in room temperature alkane solution, they are able to break or activate the C-H bonds of the solvent. Understanding this potentially practical reaction requires a detailed knowledge of the entire reaction mechanism. Because of the dynamic nature of chemical reactions, time-resolved spectroscopy is commonly employed to follow the important events that take place as reactants are converted to products. For the organometallic reactions examined here, the electronic/structural characteristics of the chemical systems along with the time scales for the key steps in the reaction make ultrafast UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy along with nanosecond Step-Scan FTIR spectroscopy the ideal techniques to use for this study. An initial study of the photophysics of (non-activating) model metal carbonyls centering on the photodissociation of M(CO){sub 6} (M = Cr, W, Mo) was carried out in alkane solutions using ultrafast IR spectroscopy. Next, picosecond UV/vis studies of the C-H bond activation reaction of Cp{sup *}M(CO){sub 2} (M = Rh, Ir), conducted in room temperature alkane solution, are described in an effort to investigate the origin of the low quantum yield for bond cleavage ({approximately}1%). To monitor the chemistry that takes place in the reaction after CO is lost, a system with higher quantum yield is required. The reaction of Tp{sup *}Rh(CO){sub 2} (Tp{sup *} = HB-Pz{sub 3}{sup *}, Pz{sup *} = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) in alkanes has a quantum yield of {approximately}30%, making time resolved spectroscopic measurements possible. From ultrafast IR experiments, two subsequently formed intermediates were observed. The nature of these intermediates are discussed and the first comprehensive reaction mechanism for a photochemical C-H activating organometallic complex is presented.

  10. Bridging organometallics and quantum chemical topology: Understanding electronic relocalisation during palladium-catalyzed reductive elimination.

    PubMed

    de Courcy, Benoit; Derat, Etienne; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-06-01

    This article proposes to bridge two fields, namely organometallics and quantum chemical topology. To do so, Palladium-catalyzed reductive elimination is studied. Such reaction is a classical elementary step in organometallic chemistry, where the directionality of electrons delocalization is not well understood. New computational evidences highlighting the accepted mechanism are proposed following a strategy coupling quantum theory of atoms in molecules and electron localization function topological analyses and enabling an extended quantification of donated/back-donated electrons fluxes along reaction paths going beyond the usual Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model. Indeed, if the ligands coordination mode (phosphine, carbene) is commonly described as dative, it appears that ligands lone pairs stay centered on ligands as electrons are shared between metal and ligand with strong delocalization toward the latter. Overall, through strong trans effects coming from the carbon involved in the reductive elimination, palladium delocalizes its valence electrons not only toward phosphines but interestingly also toward the carbene. As back-donation increases during reductive elimination, one of the reaction key components is the palladium ligands ability to accept electrons. The rationalization of such electronic phenomena gives new directions for the design of palladium-catalyzed systems. PMID:25899703

  11. Bridging organometallics and quantum chemical topology: Understanding electronic relocalisation during palladium-catalyzed reductive elimination.

    PubMed

    de Courcy, Benoit; Derat, Etienne; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-06-01

    This article proposes to bridge two fields, namely organometallics and quantum chemical topology. To do so, Palladium-catalyzed reductive elimination is studied. Such reaction is a classical elementary step in organometallic chemistry, where the directionality of electrons delocalization is not well understood. New computational evidences highlighting the accepted mechanism are proposed following a strategy coupling quantum theory of atoms in molecules and electron localization function topological analyses and enabling an extended quantification of donated/back-donated electrons fluxes along reaction paths going beyond the usual Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model. Indeed, if the ligands coordination mode (phosphine, carbene) is commonly described as dative, it appears that ligands lone pairs stay centered on ligands as electrons are shared between metal and ligand with strong delocalization toward the latter. Overall, through strong trans effects coming from the carbon involved in the reductive elimination, palladium delocalizes its valence electrons not only toward phosphines but interestingly also toward the carbene. As back-donation increases during reductive elimination, one of the reaction key components is the palladium ligands ability to accept electrons. The rationalization of such electronic phenomena gives new directions for the design of palladium-catalyzed systems.

  12. Precursor directed synthesis - ``molecular'' mechanisms in the Soft Chemistry approaches and their use for template-free synthesis of metal, metal oxide and metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2014-05-01

    This review provides an insight into the common reaction mechanisms in Soft Chemistry processes involved in nucleation, growth and aggregation of metal, metal oxide and chalcogenide nanoparticles starting from metal-organic precursors such as metal alkoxides, beta-diketonates, carboxylates and their chalcogene analogues and demonstrates how mastering the precursor chemistry permits us to control the chemical and phase composition, crystallinity, morphology, porosity and surface characteristics of produced nanomaterials.This review provides an insight into the common reaction mechanisms in Soft Chemistry processes involved in nucleation, growth and aggregation of metal, metal oxide and chalcogenide nanoparticles starting from metal-organic precursors such as metal alkoxides, beta-diketonates, carboxylates and their chalcogene analogues and demonstrates how mastering the precursor chemistry permits us to control the chemical and phase composition, crystallinity, morphology, porosity and surface characteristics of produced nanomaterials. To Professor David Avnir on his 65th birthday.

  13. All-metal clusters that mimic the chemistry of halogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianshan; Li, Yawei; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2013-10-01

    Owing to their s(2)p(5) electronic configuration, halogen atoms are highly electronegative and constitute the anionic components of salts. Whereas clusters that contain no halogen atoms, such as AlH(4), mimic the chemistry of halogens and readily form salts (e.g., Na(+)(AlH(4))(-)), clusters that are solely composed of metal atoms and yet behave in the same manner as a halogen are rare. Because coinage-metal atoms (Cu, Ag, and Au) only have one valence electron in their outermost electronic shell, as in H, we examined the possibility that, on interacting with Al, in particular as AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag, Au), these metal atoms may exhibit halogen-like properties. By using density functional theory, we show that AlAu(4) not only mimics the chemistry of halogens, but also, with a vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 3.98 eV in its anionic form, is a superhalogen. Similarly, analogous to XHX superhalogens (X=F, Cl, Br), XAuX species with VDEs of 4.65, 4.50, and 4.34 eV in their anionic form, respectively, also form superhalogens. In addition, Au can also form hyperhalogens, a recently discovered species that show electron affinities (EAs) that are even higher than those of their corresponding superhalogen building blocks. For example, the VDEs of M(AlAu(4))(2)(-) (M=Na and K) and anionic (FAuF)Au(FAuF) range from 4.06 to 5.70 eV. Au-based superhalogen anions, such as AlAu(4)(-) and AuF(2)(-), have the additional advantage that they exhibit wider optical absorption ranges than their H-based analogues, AlH(4)(-) and HF(2)(-). Because of the catalytic properties and the biocompatibility of Au, Au-based superhalogens may be multifunctional. However, similar studies that were carried out for Cu and Ag atoms have shown that, unlike AlAu(4), AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag) clusters are not superhalogens, a property that can be attributed to the large EA of the Au atom.

  14. Spectroscopy of Organometallic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Michael D.

    2015-12-14

    In this grant, we have been mainly concerned with characterization of the chemical bond between transition metals and carbon, although some work has also been directed toward understanding the bonding between transition metals and other main group elements. We have also undertaken some studies on the actinide metals, U and Th.

  15. Progress towards bioorthogonal catalysis with organometallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Völker, Timo; Dempwolff, Felix; Graumann, Peter L; Meggers, Eric

    2014-09-22

    The catalysis of bioorthogonal transformations inside living organisms is a formidable challenge--yet bears great potential for future applications in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry. We herein disclose highly active organometallic ruthenium complexes for bioorthogonal catalysis under biologically relevant conditions and inside living cells. The catalysts uncage allyl carbamate protected amines with unprecedented high turnover numbers of up to 270 cycles in the presence of water, air, and millimolar concentrations of thiols. By live-cell imaging of HeLa cells and with the aid of a caged fluorescent probe we could reveal a rapid development of intense fluorescence within the cellular cytoplasm and therefore support the proposed bioorthogonality of the catalysts. In addition, to illustrate the manifold applications of bioorthogonal catalysis, we developed a method for catalytic in-cell activation of a caged anticancer drug, which efficiently induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

  16. In –Situ Spectroscopic Investigation of Immobilized Organometallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert, J.

    2007-11-14

    Immobilized organometallic catalysts, in principle, can give high rates and selectivities like homogeneous catalysts with the ease of separation enjoyed by heterogeneous catalysts. However, the science of immobilized organometallics has not been developed because the field lies at the interface between the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis communities. By assembling an interdisciplinary research team that can probe all aspects of immobilized organometallic catalyst design, the entire reacting system can be considered, where the transition metal complex, the complex-support interface and the properties of the support can all be considered simultaneously from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Researchers at Georgia Tech and the University of Virginia are studying the fundamental principles that can be used to understand and design future classes of immobilized organometallic catalysts. In the framework of the overall collaborative project with Georgia Tech, our work focused on (a) the X-ray absorption spectroscopy of an immobilized Pd-SCS-O complex (b) the mode of metal leaching from supported Pd catalysts during Heck catalysis and (c) the mode of deactivation of Jacobsen’s Co-salen catalysts during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides. Catalysts containing supported Pd pincer complexes, functionalized supports containing mercapto and amine groups, and oligomeric Co-salen catalysts were synthesized at Georgia Tech and sent to the University of Virginia. Incorporation of Pd onto several different kinds of supports (silica, mercapto-functionalized silica, zeolite Y) was performed at the University of Virginia.

  17. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  18. Two-dimensional organometallic porous sheets with possible high-temperature ferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Kan, Erjun; Wu, Xiaojun; Lee, Changhoon; Shim, Ji Hoon; Lu, Ruifeng; Xiao, Chuanyun; Deng, Kaiming

    2012-09-01

    With the rapid development of modern nanotechnology, molecular self-assembly has become an important method to fabricate new functional devices, and to provide an arena for theoretical material designs. In this paper, we propose that freestanding two-dimensional organometallic porous sheets (PSs), which can be formed by molecular self-assembly on metal surfaces, are ideal low-dimensional magnetic materials with room-temperature ferromagnetism. Through comprehensive first-principles calculations, we show that the freestanding organometallic sheets, which are assembled by transition metals (TMs) (Mn and V) and benzene molecules, favor ferromagnetic coupling with strong exchange interactions. More importantly, we predict that the Curie-temperature of V-PS is close to room temperature using a simplified mean-field expression, compared to any organometallic sheets discovered previously. In terms of the recent progress in the molecular self-assembly approach, our results indicate great potential for building room-temperature magnetic organometallic sheets with small magnetic molecules.

  19. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Studies of Organometallic Complexes and Homogeneous Catalytic Processes.

    PubMed

    Vidossich, Pietro; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2016-06-21

    Computational chemistry is a valuable aid to complement experimental studies of organometallic systems and their reactivity. It allows probing mechanistic hypotheses and investigating molecular structures, shedding light on the behavior and properties of molecular assemblies at the atomic scale. When approaching a chemical problem, the computational chemist has to decide on the theoretical approach needed to describe electron/nuclear interactions and the composition of the model used to approximate the actual system. Both factors determine the reliability of the modeling study. The community dedicated much effort to developing and improving the performance and accuracy of theoretical approaches for electronic structure calculations, on which the description of (inter)atomic interactions rely. Here, the importance of the model system used in computational studies is highlighted through examples from our recent research focused on organometallic systems and homogeneous catalytic processes. We show how the inclusion of explicit solvent allows the characterization of molecular events that would otherwise not be accessible in reduced model systems (clusters). These include the stabilization of nascent charged fragments via microscopic solvation (notably, hydrogen bonding), transfer of charge (protons) between distant fragments mediated by solvent molecules, and solvent coordination to unsaturated metal centers. Furthermore, when weak interactions are involved, we show how conformational and solvation properties of organometallic complexes are also affected by the explicit inclusion of solvent molecules. Such extended model systems may be treated under periodic boundary conditions, thus removing the cluster/continuum (or vacuum) boundary, and require a statistical mechanics simulation technique to sample the accessible configurational space. First-principles molecular dynamics, in which atomic forces are computed from electronic structure calculations (namely, density

  20. An Advanced Organometallic Lab Experiment with Biological Implications: Synthesis and Characterization of Fe[subscript 2](µ-S[subscript 2])(C0)[subscript 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jacob; Spentzos, Ariana; Works, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The organometallic complex Fe[subscript 2](µ-S[subscript 2])(CO)[subscript 6] has interesting biological implications. The concepts of bio-organometallic chemistry are rarely discussed at the undergraduate level, but this experiment can start such a conversation and, in addition, teach valuable synthetic techniques. The lab experiment takes a…

  1. Late transition metal m-or chemistry and D6 metal complex photoeliminations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Paul

    2015-07-31

    With the goal of understanding and controlling photoreductive elimination reactions from d6 transition metal complexes as part of a solar energy storage cycle we have investigated the photochemistry of Pt(IV) bromo, chloro, hydroxo, and hydroperoxo complexes. Photoreductive elimination reactions occur for all of these complexes and appear to involve initial Pt-Br, Pt-Cl, or Pt-O bond fission. In the case of Pt-OH bond fission, the subsequent chemistry can be controlled through hydrogen bonding to the hydroxo group.

  2. Organometallic-inorganic hybrid electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Qian; Lemmon, John P.; Choi, Daiwon; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-09-13

    Disclosed are embodiments of active materials for organometallic and organometallic-inorganic hybrid electrodes and particularly active materials for organometallic and organometallic-inorganic hybrid cathodes for lithium-ion batteries. In certain embodiments the organometallic material comprises a ferrocene polymer.

  3. Filtrates & Residues: Hemoglobinometry--A Biochemistry Experiment that Utilizes the Principles of Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliano, Vincenzo; Rieck, John Paul

    1987-01-01

    Describes a chemistry experiment dealing with hemoglobinometry that can apply to transition metal chemistry, colorimetry, and biochemistry. Provides a detailed description of the experimental procedure, including discussions of the preparation of the cyanide reagent, colorimetric measurements, and waste disposal and treatment. (TW)

  4. Organic topological insulators in organometallic lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z F; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators are a recently discovered class of materials having insulating bulk electronic states but conducting boundary states distinguished by nontrivial topology. So far, several generations of topological insulators have been theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed, all based on inorganic materials. Here, based on first-principles calculations, we predict a family of two-dimensional organic topological insulators made of organometallic lattices. Designed by assembling molecular building blocks of triphenyl-metal compounds with strong spin-orbit coupling into a hexagonal lattice, this new classes of organic topological insulators are shown to exhibit nontrivial topological edge states that are robust against significant lattice strain. We envision that organic topological insulators will greatly broaden the scientific and technological impact of topological insulators.

  5. Solvothermal in situ metal/ligand reactions: a new bridge between coordination chemistry and organic synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2007-02-01

    Several important solvothermal (including hydrothermal) in situ metal/ligand reactions and their mechanisms, including dehydrogenative carbon-carbon coupling, hydroxylation of aromatic rings, cycloaddition of organic nitriles with azide and ammonia, transformation of inorganic and organic sulfur, as well as the CuII to CuI reduction, are outlined in this Account. The current progress clearly demonstrates the important potential of such reactions in the crystal engineering of functional coordination compounds and one-pot synthesis of some unusual organic ligands that are inaccessible or not easily obtainable via conventional methods, thereby substantiating our expectation that a new bridge has been created between coordination chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry.

  6. The synthesis and properties of novel organometallic polymers: (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, M.

    1988-07-21

    Object of this research is to synthesize a number of organometallic polymers based on complexes of 1,8-bis(cyclopentadienyl)naphthalene 1 as a basic structural unit, and to examine the physical properties of these substances, especially their electrical conductance, and magnetic behavior. In macromolecular arrays formally derived from transition metal complexation of 1, contiguous organometallic units are held face-to-face in a columnar array, so that charge conduction or spin correlation may be achieved through ..pi..-orbital interaction of neighboring cyclopentadienyl rings. The general structural form is illustrated by the polymetallocene 2. We have developed simple synthetic methodologies for the preparation of polymers such as 2, (M = Fe,Ru), and now propose to examine the synthesis of analogous polymers incorporating other transition metals, especially cobalt and nickel. A new and more general approach to the synthesis of this class of organometallic polymer, recently devised in our laboratories, should make it possible to prepare alternating mixed metal arrays of such polymers, as well as systems based on linear dimeric, trigonal trimeric and tetrahedral tetrameric cyclopentadienyl complexes. 61 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Convergent study of Ru-ligand interactions through QTAIM, ELF, NBO molecular descriptors and TDDFT analysis of organometallic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Coronilla, Antonio; Sánchez-Márquez, Jesús; Zorrilla, David; Martín, Elisa I.; de los Santos, Desireé M.; Navas, Javier; Fernández-Lorenzo, Concha; Alcántara, Rodrigo; Martín-Calleja, Joaquín

    2014-08-01

    We report a theoretical study of a series of Ru complexes of interest in dye-sensitised solar cells, in organic light-emitting diodes, and in the war against cancer. Other metal centres, such as Cr, Co, Ni, Rh, Pd, and Pt, have been included for comparison purposes. The metal-ligand trends in organometallic chemistry for those compounds are shown synergistically by using three molecular descriptors: quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), electron localisation function (ELF) and second-order perturbation theory analysis of the natural bond orbital (NBO). The metal-ligand bond order is addressed through both delocalisation index (DI) of QTAIM and fluctuation index (λ) of ELF. Correlation between DI and λ for Ru-N bond in those complexes is introduced for the first time. Electron transfer and stability was also assessed by the second-order perturbation theory analysis of the NBO. Electron transfer from the lone pair NBO of the ligands toward the antibonding lone pair NBO of the metal plays a relevant role in stabilising the complexes, providing useful insights into understanding the effect of the 'expanded ligand' principle in supramolecular chemistry. Finally, absorption wavelengths associated to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)--lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) characteristics were studied by time-dependent density functional theory.

  8. Use of ionic liquids as coordination ligands for organometallic catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Li, Zaiwei; Tang, Yongchun; Cheng; Jihong

    2009-11-10

    Aspects of the present invention relate to compositions and methods for the use of ionic liquids with dissolved metal compounds as catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions. Ionic liquids are salts that generally are liquids at room temperature, and are capable of dissolving a many types of compounds that are relatively insoluble in aqueous or organic solvent systems. Specifically, ionic liquids may dissolve metal compounds to produce homogeneous and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts. One industrially-important chemical reaction that may be catalyzed by metal-containing ionic liquid catalysts is the conversion of methane to methanol.

  9. Uncatalyzed hydroamination of electrophilic organometallic alkynes: fundamental, theoretical, and applied aspects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlan; Latouche, Camille; Rapakousiou, Amalia; Lopez, Colin; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Ruiz, Jaime; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Astruc, Didier

    2014-06-23

    Simple reactions of the most used functional groups allowing two molecular fragments to link under mild, sustainable conditions are among the crucial tools of molecular chemistry with multiple applications in materials science, nanomedicine, and organic synthesis as already exemplified by peptide synthesis and "click" chemistry. We are concerned with redox organometallic compounds that can potentially be used as biosensors and redox catalysts and report an uncatalyzed reaction between primary and secondary amines with organometallic electrophilic alkynes that is free of side products and fully "green". A strategy is first proposed to synthesize alkynyl organometallic precursors upon addition of electrophilic aromatic ligands of cationic complexes followed by endo hydride abstraction. Electrophilic alkynylated cyclopentadienyl or arene ligands of Fe, Ru, and Co complexes subsequently react with amines to yield trans-enamines that are conjugated with the organometallic group. The difference in reactivities of the various complexes is rationalized from the two-step reaction mechanism that was elucidated through DFT calculations. Applications are illustrated by the facile reaction of ethynylcobalticenium hexafluorophosphate with aminated silica nanoparticles. Spectroscopic, nonlinear-optical and electrochemical data, as well as DFT and TDDFT calculations, indicate a strong push-pull conjugation in these cobalticenium- and Fe- and Ru-arene-enamine complexes due to planarity or near-planarity between the organometallic and trans-enamine groups involving fulvalene iminium and cyclohexadienylidene iminium mesomeric forms.

  10. From Metalloproteins to Coordination Chemistry: A Learning Exercise to Teach Transition Metal Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reglinski, John; Graham, Duncan; Kennedy, Alan R.; Gibson, Lorraine T.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise is organized to reinforce the fundamental rules of coordination chemistry through a biological study of metalloproteins. The work, which is divided into four well-defined activities, involves a major application of computer databases to address chemical problems.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of New Organic, Inorganic, and Organometallic Tetrathiafulvalenes and Cadmium Selenide Hybrid Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belot, John Allen, Jr.

    1995-11-01

    A variety of new organic, inorganic, and organometallic complexes based on the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) backbone have been synthesized and characterized for the development of new materials. The organic research of this thesis outlines a novel one-pot synthetic procedure and new purification route for the selective recovery of unsymmetrical TTFs. The advancements regarding this chemistry center around the phosphorus mediated coupling of two different thione heterocycles, and are based on the results of mechanistic studies using ^{31}P NMR. In addition to this, the successful synthesis and characterization of three new classes of tetrathiafulvalenes is presented. These materials may be used for conductive liquid crystals, metal -ion sensor, or high-spin organic materials. The inorganic chemistry developed in this manuscript presents two firsts in TTF chemistry. The work begins with a synopsis of a new procedure for the selective generation and isolation of tetrathiafulvalene tetrathiolate (TTFS _4^{4-}); and following the discovery of this ligand synthesis, we succeeded in making the first reported homobimetallic TTFS_4 inorganic coordination complexes using the late transition metals Pt and Ni. The reactions to produce these complexes were accomplished by introducing TTFS _4^{4-} Li^+ 4 to the metal cis-dichlorides rm Cl_2Pt(PPh_3)_2, Cl _2Ni(DPPP), and rm Cl_2Ni(4,4 ^'-Mebipy) and subsequently isolating the products. These studies led to the recovery and characterization of first metal-TTF hybrid materials. As a direct consequence of the difficulties encountered with the late transition metal coordination complexes, we also synthesized the first early transition metal organometallic TTFS_4^ecies using the reaction of TTFS_4^{4-} Li^+_4 with rm Cl_2TiR_2 (R = Cp, Cp*, i-PrCp). An important result of this research was the first single crystal X-ray structure of a homobimetallic TTFS _4 complex. In addition to this, these materials proved useful in elucidating the

  12. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. The highest conductivities reported (approximately 4/Scm) were achieved with polythiophene in a polystyrene host polymer. The best films using a polyamide as base polymer were four orders of magnitude less conductive than the polystyrene films. The authors suggested that this was because polyimides were unable to swell sufficiently for infiltration of monomer as in the polystyrene. It was not clear, however, if the different conductivities obtained were merely the result of differing oxidation conditions. Oxidation time, temperature and oxidant concentration varied widely among the studies.

  13. Fundamental organometallic reactions: Applications on the CYBER 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappe, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Two of the most challenging problems of Organometallic chemistry (loosely defined) are pollution control with the large space velocities needed and nitrogen fixation, a process so capably done by nature and so relatively poorly done by man (industry). For a computational chemist these problems are on the fringe of what is possible with conventional computers (large models needed and accurate energetics required). A summary of the algorithmic modification needed to address these problems on a vector processor such as the CYBER 205 and a sketch of findings to date on deNOx catalysis and nitrogen fixation are presented.

  14. Defect Chemistry and Plasmon Physics of Colloidal Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lounis, SD; Runnerstrorm, EL; Llordes, A; Milliron, DJ

    2014-05-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals of highly doped metal oxides have seen rapid development in the past decade and represent a class of materials with unique optoelectronic properties. In this Perspective, we discuss doping mechanisms in metal oxides and the accompanying physics of free carrier scattering, both of which have implications in determining the properties of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in these nanocrystals. The balance between activation and compensation of dopants limits the free carrier concentration of the most common metal oxides, placing a ceiling on the LSPR frequency. Furthermore, because of ionized impurity scattering of the oscillating plasma by dopant ions, scattering must be treated in a fundamentally different way in semiconductor metal oxide materials when compared with conventional metals. Though these effects are well-understood in bulk metal oxides, further study is needed to understand their manifestation in nanocrystals and corresponding impact on plasmonic properties, and to develop materials that surpass current limitations in free carrier concentration.

  15. Analytical chemistry methods for metallic core components: Revision March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of alloys used to fabricate core components. These alloys are 302, 308, 316, 316-Ti, and 321 stainless steels and 600 and 718 Inconels and they may include other 300-series stainless steels.

  16. Unique reactivity of fluorinated molecules with transition metals.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Silvia; Munoz, Sócrates B; Fustero, Santos

    2014-01-01

    Organofluorine and organometallic chemistry by themselves constitute two potent areas in organic synthesis. Thus, the combination of both offers many chemical possibilities and represents a powerful tool for the design and development of new synthetic methodologies leading to diverse molecular structures in an efficient manner. Given the importance of the selective introduction of fluorine atoms into organic molecules and the effectiveness of transition metals in C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation, this review represents an interesting read for this aim.

  17. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngs, Wiley J.

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. Many aerospace applications require a combination of properties. Thus, hybrid films made from polyimides or other engineering resins are of primary interest, but only if conductivities on the same order as those obtained with a polystyrene base could be obtained. Hence, a series of experiments was performed to optimize the conductivity of polyimide-based composite films. The polyimide base chosen for this study was Kapton. 3-MethylThiophene (3MT) was used for the conductive phase. Three processing variables were identified for producing these composite films, namely time, temperature, and oxidant concentration for the in situ oxidation. Statistically designed experiments were used to examine the effects of these variables and synergistic/interactive effects among variables on the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength of the films. Multiple linear regression analysis of the tensile data revealed that temperature and time have the greatest effect on maximum stress. The response surface of maximum stress vs. temperature and time (for oxidant concentration at 1.2 M) is shown. Conductivity of the composite films was measured for

  18. Metal transport across biomembranes: emerging models for a distinct chemistry.

    PubMed

    Argüello, José M; Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2012-04-20

    Transition metals are essential components of important biomolecules, and their homeostasis is central to many life processes. Transmembrane transporters are key elements controlling the distribution of metals in various compartments. However, due to their chemical properties, transition elements require transporters with different structural-functional characteristics from those of alkali and alkali earth ions. Emerging structural information and functional studies have revealed distinctive features of metal transport. Among these are the relevance of multifaceted events involving metal transfer among participating proteins, the importance of coordination geometry at transmembrane transport sites, and the presence of the largely irreversible steps associated with vectorial transport. Here, we discuss how these characteristics shape novel transition metal ion transport models.

  19. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d sup 0 metal alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The long term goals of this project are to design and synthesize highly unsaturated, electrophilic metal complexes and to explore their use as catalysts, reagents, and/or model systems for olefin polymerization and C-H activation chemistry. During the 1990 budget year we have focused our attention on (i) the ligand C-H activation chemistry of Cp{sub 2}Zr(CH{sub 3})(THF){sup +} and related cationic, d{sup o} Zr alkyl complexes, and (ii) the synthesis of new classes of group 4 metal alkyl complexes with non-Cp{sub 2}M ligand environments.

  20. Surface chemistry of metal catalyst under carbon nanotube growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Tyson Cody

    The catalyst nanoparticle is critical to the yield, type, and diameter in the growth and nucleation of carbon nanotubes. The objective of this study is focused on determining what changes take place with the catalyst chemistry under growth conditions typically seen in chemical vapor deposition, CVD, experiments. It is well known that catalyst poisoning can occur and in turn effects the catalytic activity of the nanoparticle. A complete description of this mechanism is as of yet undetermined. In order to elucidate this process iron films were deposited onto Si substrates that contained a support layer of Al2O3 or SiO2. These samples were investigated with various surface chemistry techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In addition, structural characteristics were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface techniques were used in-situ in order to observe chemistries that might not be observable outside a CVD reactor. Two sets of experiments were performed on the silica and alumina supports. The first consisted of carbon nanotube growth at near atmospheric pressure, while the second was performed under vacuum. The oxide support was shown to have an affect on the type of nanotubes grown under identical conditions. The silica support films produced more MWNT, while the alumina support films produced more SWNT. This difference was due to the amount of ripening that takes place on the oxide supports. Also in-situ XPS revealed differences in the chemistry of iron catalyst during growth and these differences were attributed to substrate interactions between alumina and iron. Finally, in-situ XPS analysis showed no evidence of carbides or oxides acting as a catalyst during the nucleation process.

  1. Unveiling the chemistry behind the green synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sónia A O; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Rocha, Sílvia M; Marques, Paula A A P; Pascoal Neto, Carlos; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R

    2014-09-01

    Nanobiotechnology has emerged as a fundamental domain in modern science, and metallic nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the largest classes of NPs studied because of their wide spectrum of possible applications in several fields. The use of plant extracts as reducing and stabilizing agents in their synthesis is an interesting and reliable alternative to conventional methodologies. However, the role of the different components of such extracts in the reduction/stabilization of metal ions has not yet been understood clearly. Here we studied the behavior of the main components of a Eucalyptus globulus Labill. bark aqueous extract during metal-ion reduction followed by advanced chromatographic techniques, which allowed us to establish their specific role in the process. The obtained results showed that phenolic compounds, particularly galloyl derivatives, are mainly responsible for the metal-ion reduction, whereas sugars are essentially involved in the stabilization of the NPs. PMID:25088383

  2. The Heat Capacity of Metals: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigeishi, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Presented here are improvements in the original design of an introductory statistical thermodynamics experiment with the result that heat capacities of metals are routinely obtained within ten percent of literature values. (BB)

  3. Unveiling the chemistry behind the green synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sónia A O; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Rocha, Sílvia M; Marques, Paula A A P; Pascoal Neto, Carlos; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R

    2014-09-01

    Nanobiotechnology has emerged as a fundamental domain in modern science, and metallic nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the largest classes of NPs studied because of their wide spectrum of possible applications in several fields. The use of plant extracts as reducing and stabilizing agents in their synthesis is an interesting and reliable alternative to conventional methodologies. However, the role of the different components of such extracts in the reduction/stabilization of metal ions has not yet been understood clearly. Here we studied the behavior of the main components of a Eucalyptus globulus Labill. bark aqueous extract during metal-ion reduction followed by advanced chromatographic techniques, which allowed us to establish their specific role in the process. The obtained results showed that phenolic compounds, particularly galloyl derivatives, are mainly responsible for the metal-ion reduction, whereas sugars are essentially involved in the stabilization of the NPs.

  4. Chemistry of endohedral metallofullerenes: the role of metals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xing; Akasaka, Takeshi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2011-06-01

    Recent breakthroughs achieved in the chemical functionalization of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), especially single crystallographic X-ray characterizations of their derivatives, have presented fundamentally new insights into the structures and properties of these metal-carbon hybrid molecules, and have also brought immense potential applications. In particular, the interplay between the encapsulated metallic species and the fullerene cage has been well investigated. On one hand, the position and motion of the encapsulated metals can be effectively controlled by exohedral modification. On the other hand, the cage structures, the chemical behaviours of cage carbons and thus the chemical reactivity of the whole molecule are also apparently influenced by the electronic configuration and geometrical conformation of the internal metals via strong metal-cage interactions. In this article, we contribute a systematic review of the important chemical transformations of EMFs reported to date, including disilylation, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition with ylides, cyclopropanation with carbenes and carbanions, cycloaddition with dienes and benzyne, radical reactions, and other miscellaneous reactions, in addition to noncovalent interactions such as supramolecular complexation. The roles that internal metals play in controlling the reactivity of cage carbons are particularly emphasized. Finally, some applicable materials based on EMFs and their derivatives are summarized and practical perspectives are proposed.

  5. Organometallics as Structural Scaffolds for Enzyme Inhibitor Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Seann P.; Meggers, Eric

    Substitutionally inert metal-containing compounds provide new opportunities as structurally diverse and unique scaffolds for the design of protein binders. This review cites progress in this area by highlighting the use of metal complexes, including truly organometallic compounds, as inhibitors for enzymes of biological interest, such as esterases, proteases, and protein kinases. A common theme in all discussed examples is the use of the metal center as an anchor for the 3D display of organic ligands. While the metal center does not engage in any direct contacts to protein residues, it is the structural orientation of the ligands into previously unaccessible architectures that make metal complexes emerging candidates for bioactive agents with unique properties.

  6. Recovering ferromagnetic metal surfaces to fully exploit chemistry in molecular spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbiati, Marta; Delprat, Sophie; Mattera, Michele; Mañas-Valero, Samuel; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Tatay, Sergio; Deranlot, Cyrile; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard; Petroff, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    Organic spintronics is a new emerging field that promises to offer the full potential of chemistry to spintronics, as for example high versatility through chemical engineering and simple low cost processing. However, one key challenge that remains to be unlocked for further applications is the high incompatibility between spintronics key materials such as high Curie temperature Co, Ni, Fe (and their alloys) and wet chemistry. Indeed, the transition metal proneness to oxidation has so far hampered the integration of wet chemistry processes into the development of room temperature organic spintronics devices. As a result, they had mainly to rely on high vacuum physical processes, restraining the choice of available organic materials to a small set of sublimable molecules. In this letter, focusing on cobalt as an example, we show a wet chemistry method to easily and selectively recover a metallic surface from an air exposed oxidized surface for further integration into spintronics devices. The oxide etching process, using a glycolic acid based solution, proceeds without increasing the surface roughness and allows the retrieval of an oxygen-free chemically active cobalt layer. This unlocks the full potential of wet chemistry processes towards room temperature molecular spintronics with transition metals electrodes. We demonstrate this by the grafting of alkylthiols self-assembled monolayers on recovered oxidized cobalt surfaces.

  7. Wildfires and water chemistry: effect of metals associated with wood ash.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, José M; Blake, Johanna M; Hirani, Chris; Clark, Alexander L; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Peterson, Eric; Bixby, Rebecca J

    2016-08-10

    The reactivity of metals associated with ash from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and aqueous chemistry measurements were integrated to determine the chemical composition of wood ash and its effect on water chemistry. Climate change has caused dramatic impacts and stresses that have resulted in large-scale increases in wildfire activity in semi-arid areas of the world. Metals and other constituents associated with wildfire ash can be transported by storm event runoff and negatively affect the water quality in streams and rivers. Differences among ash from six tree species based on total concentrations of metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, Fe, and Mn were identified using non-metric multidimensional analysis. Metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction analyses and X-ray spectroscopy analyses. These metal-bearing carbonate phases were readily dissolved in the first 30 minutes of reaction with 18 MΩ water and 10 mM HCO3(-) in laboratory batch experiments which resulted in the release of metals and carbonates in the ash, causing water alkalinity to increase. However, metal concentrations decreased over the course of the experiment, suggesting that metals re-adsorb to ash. Our results suggest that the dissolution of metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases in ash and metal re-adsorption to ash are relevant processes affecting water chemistry after wildfire events. These results have important implications to better understand the impact of wildfire events on water quality.

  8. Wildfires and water chemistry: effect of metals associated with wood ash.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, José M; Blake, Johanna M; Hirani, Chris; Clark, Alexander L; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Peterson, Eric; Bixby, Rebecca J

    2016-08-10

    The reactivity of metals associated with ash from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and aqueous chemistry measurements were integrated to determine the chemical composition of wood ash and its effect on water chemistry. Climate change has caused dramatic impacts and stresses that have resulted in large-scale increases in wildfire activity in semi-arid areas of the world. Metals and other constituents associated with wildfire ash can be transported by storm event runoff and negatively affect the water quality in streams and rivers. Differences among ash from six tree species based on total concentrations of metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, Fe, and Mn were identified using non-metric multidimensional analysis. Metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction analyses and X-ray spectroscopy analyses. These metal-bearing carbonate phases were readily dissolved in the first 30 minutes of reaction with 18 MΩ water and 10 mM HCO3(-) in laboratory batch experiments which resulted in the release of metals and carbonates in the ash, causing water alkalinity to increase. However, metal concentrations decreased over the course of the experiment, suggesting that metals re-adsorb to ash. Our results suggest that the dissolution of metal-bearing carbonate and oxide phases in ash and metal re-adsorption to ash are relevant processes affecting water chemistry after wildfire events. These results have important implications to better understand the impact of wildfire events on water quality. PMID:27457586

  9. Biogenic synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and prospects toward green chemistry.

    PubMed

    Adil, Syed Farooq; Assal, Mohamed E; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-06-01

    The immense importance of nanoparticles and their applications is a strong motivation for exploring new synthetic techniques. However, due to strict regulations that manage the potential environmental impacts greener alternatives for conventional synthesis are the focus of intense research. In the scope of this perspective, a concise discussion about the use of green reducing and stabilizing agents toward the preparation of metal nanoparticles is presented. Reports on the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using plant extracts, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate as green reagents are summarized and discussed, pointing toward an urgent need of understanding the mechanistic aspects of the involved reactions. PMID:25633046

  10. Biogenic synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and prospects toward green chemistry.

    PubMed

    Adil, Syed Farooq; Assal, Mohamed E; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-06-01

    The immense importance of nanoparticles and their applications is a strong motivation for exploring new synthetic techniques. However, due to strict regulations that manage the potential environmental impacts greener alternatives for conventional synthesis are the focus of intense research. In the scope of this perspective, a concise discussion about the use of green reducing and stabilizing agents toward the preparation of metal nanoparticles is presented. Reports on the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using plant extracts, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate as green reagents are summarized and discussed, pointing toward an urgent need of understanding the mechanistic aspects of the involved reactions.

  11. Quantitative Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Trace-Metal Determination: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavilla, Isela; Costas, Marta; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Gil, Sandra; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is introduced to upper-level analytical chemistry students as a simple strategy focused on sample preparation for trace-metal determination in biological tissues. Nickel extraction in seafood samples and quantification by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are carried out by a team of four…

  12. Coloring a Superabsorbent Polymer with Metal Ions: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaung, Jing-Fun; Chen, Yueh-Huey

    2009-01-01

    A novel undergraduate chemistry experiment involving superabsorbent polymers commonly used in diapers and other personal care products is described. Students observe the removal of divalent transition-metal ions from aqueous solutions by the polymers. With the procedures provided, students are able to color the superabsorbent polymers with metal…

  13. Conjugated organometallic materials containing tungsten centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marya

    Our group is interested in the optical and electronic properties of organometallic analogues of conjugated organic compounds. Specifically, in this thesis we will discuss the properties of complexes in which W≡C moieties replace C≡C fragments within the framework of oligo(phenyleneethynylenes) and a C4-polyyne. A family of derivatives of the type Ph(C≡CC6H4 )m(L)4W≡C(C6H 4C≡C)nPh (m = 0, 1; n = 0, 1, 2) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, electronic-absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemistry. This substitution has allowed us to directly compare the electronic and optical properties of these organometallic complexes with those of their organic analogues. We found that while these systems exhibit redox and spectroscopic properties similar to those of their organic counterparts they also exhibit new characteristics that are due to the incorporation of the metal center. The design of these compounds has also allowed us to address how the position of the metal within the backbone affects the electronic and optical properties of these compounds. We found that the position of the metal is important in controlling the electronic structure of the material, thus suggesting that the properties of these compounds can be further tuned by changing the position of the metal within the conjugated carbon chain. In addition, we have appended sulfur and isocyanide functionalities to oligo(phenyleneethynylene) analogues. A family of compounds of the type Cl(dppe) 2W(≡CC6H4-4-(C≡CC6H 4)m-4'-R) (m = l, 2; R = N≡C, SCH2CH 2Si(CH3)3) have been prepared and characterized by electronic-absorption spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Differences between the sulfur and isocyanide functionalities are examined, along with the effects of extending conjugation along the arylidyne chain. Evidence that the sulfur-containing arylidyne complexes form self-assembled monolayers on Au and Pt electrodes is presented. In addition, the electron-transfer rates for

  14. Valence-Bond Concepts in Coordination Chemistry and the Nature of Metal-Metal Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the valence-bond method, applying it to some coordination compounds of metals, especially those involving metal-metal bonds. Suggests that transition metals can form as many as nine covalent bonds, permitting valence-theory to be extended to transition metal compounds in a more effective way than has been possible before. (JN)

  15. Organometallic precursors of nano-objects, a critical view.

    PubMed

    Cormary, Benoit; Dumestre, Frédéric; Liakakos, Nikolaos; Soulantica, Katerina; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-09-21

    The synthesis of nanoparticles has experienced a huge development over the past 20 years. However, this development has remained relatively limited to a few classes of nanomaterials such as iron oxides, semi-conducting oxides, plasmonic nanoparticles (essentially Au) and quantum dots. In these cases, a physical chemistry approach and standard recipes allow a good control of the size and shape of the resulting nano-objects. However, organometallic precursors have emerged as an important class allowing the preparation of a large variety of nano-objects, concerning a large number of elements and displaying a clean and controllable surface and therefore good physical and chemical properties. This perspective article is mostly devoted to the research efforts carried out by our group on the search for new classes of precursors and on the importance of knowing their exact structure and the molecular chemistry involved prior to the fabrication of the nano-objects. PMID:23736153

  16. [Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.

    1990-12-31

    We have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. In this summary we highlight our results on reactions (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve addition of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions.

  17. (Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes: Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. In this summary we highlight our results on reactions (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve addition of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions.

  18. Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  19. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  20. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  1. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  2. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory-Organometallic Anticancer Compounds.

    PubMed

    Păunescu, Emilia; McArthur, Sarah; Soudani, Mylène; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-15

    Compounds that combine metal-based drugs with covalently linked targeted organic agents have been shown, in some instances, to exhibit superior anticancer properties compared to the individual counterparts. Within this framework, we prepared a series of organometallic ruthenium(II)- and osmium(II)-p-cymene complexes modified with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin and diclofenac. The NSAIDs are attached to the organometallic moieties via monodentate (pyridine/phosphine) or bidentate (bipyridine) ligands, affording piano-stool Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes of general formula [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(N)], where N is a pyridine-based ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate}, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(P)], where P is a phosphine ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate, and [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(N,N')][Cl], where N,N' is a bipyridine-based ligand, (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetate), (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetate), (bis(2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate), or (bis(2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate). The antiproliferative properties of the complexes were assessed in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and A2780cisR, the latter being resistant to cisplatin) and nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Some of the complexes are considerably more cytotoxic than the original drugs and also display significant cancer cell selectivity. PMID:26824462

  3. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  4. Prebiotic coordination chemistry: The potential role of transition-metal complexes in the chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, M.

    1979-01-01

    In approaching the extremely involved and complex problem of the origin of life, consideration of the coordination chemistry appeared not only as a possibility but as a necessity. The first model experiments appear to be promising because of prebiotic-type synthesis by means of transition-metal complexes. It is especially significant that in some instances various types of vitally important substances (nucleic bases, amino acids) are formed simultaneously. There is ground to hope that systematic studies in this field will clarify the role of transition-metal complexes in the organizatorial phase of chemical evolution. It is obvious that researchers working in the fields of the chemistry of cyano and carbonyl complexes, and of the catalytic effect of transition-metal complexes are best suited to study these aspects of the attractive and interesting problem of the origin of life.

  5. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  6. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  7. Photoredox Catalysis Unlocks Single-Electron Elementary Steps in Transition Metal Catalyzed Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since initial reports, cross-coupling technologies employing photoredox catalysts to access novel reactivity have developed with increasing pace. In this Outlook, prominent examples from the recent literature are organized on the basis of the elementary transformation enabled by photoredox catalysis and are discussed in the context of relevant historical precedent in stoichiometric organometallic chemistry. This treatment allows mechanistic similarities inherent to odd-electron transition metal reactivity to be generalized to a set of lessons for future reaction development. PMID:27280163

  8. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors.

  9. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes: chemistry and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Graeme

    2012-10-01

    Dithiocarbamates are highly versatile mono-anionic chelating ligands which form stable complexes with all the transition elements and also the majority of main group, lanthanide and actinide elements. They are easily prepared from primary or secondary amines and depending upon the nature of the cation can show good solubility in water or organic solvents. They are related to the thiuram disulfides by a one-electron redox process (followed by dimerisation via sulfur-sulfur bond formation) which is easily carried out upon addition of iodide or ferric salts. Dithiocarbamates are lipophilic and generally bind to metals in a symmetrical chelate fashion but examples of other coordination modes are known, the monodentate and anisobidentate modes being most prevalent. They are planar sterically non-demanding ligands which can be electronically tuned by judicious choice of substituents. They stabilize metals in a wide range of oxidation states, this being attributed to the existence of soft dithiocarbamate and hard thioureide resonance forms, the latter formally resulting from delocalization of the nitrogen lone pair onto the sulfurs, and consequently their complexes tend to have a rich electrochemistry. Tetraethyl thiuramdisulfide (disulfiram or antabuse) has been used as a drug since the 1950s but it is only recently that dithiocarbamate complexes have been explored within the medicinal domain. Over the past two decades anti-cancer activity has been noted for gold and copper complexes, technetium and copper complexes have been used in PET-imaging, dithiocarbamates have been used to treat acute cadmium poisoning and copper complexes also have been investigated as SOD inhibitors. PMID:22931592

  10. Bonds Between Metal Atoms: A New Mode of Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, F. Albert; Chisholm, Malcolm H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses polynuclear metal clusters (containing two or more metal atoms bonded to one another as well as to nonmetallic elements), including their formation and applications. Studies of bonds between metal atoms reveal superconductors, organic-reaction catalysts, and photosensitive complexes that may play a role in solar energy. (JN)

  11. Atomic scale characterization and surface chemistry of metal modified titanate nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukovecz, Ákos; Kordás, Krisztián; Kiss, János; Kónya, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    Titanates are salts of polytitanic acid that can be synthesized as nanostructures in a great variety concerning crystallinity, morphology, size, metal content and surface chemistry. Titanate nanotubes (open-ended hollow cylinders measuring up to 200 nm in length and 15 nm in outer diameter) and nanowires (solid, elongated rectangular blocks with length up to 1500 nm and 30-60 nm diameter) are the most widespread representatives of the titanate nanomaterial family. This review covers the properties and applications of these two materials from the surface science point of view. Dielectric, vibrational, electron and X-ray spectroscopic results are comprehensively discussed first, then surface modification methods including covalent functionalization, ion exchange and metal loading are covered. The versatile surface chemistry of one-dimensional titanates renders them excellent candidates for heterogeneous catalytic, photocatalytic, photovoltaic and energy storage applications, therefore, these fields are also reviewed.

  12. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  13. Structural modifications due to interface chemistry at metal-nitride interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, S. K.; Shao, S.; Wang, J.; Liu, X.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on accurate first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, an unusual phenomenon of interfacial structural modifications, due to the interface chemistry influence is identified at two metal-nitride interfaces with strong metal-nitrogen affinity, Al/TiN {111} and Al/VN {111} interfaces. It is shown that at such interfaces, a faulted stacking structure is energetically preferred on the Al side of the interface. And both intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies in the vicinity Al layers are negligibly small. However, such phenomenon does not occur in Pt/TiN and Pt/VN interfaces because of the weak Pt-N affinity. Corresponding to structural energies of metal-nitride interfaces, the linear elasticity analysis predicts characteristics of interfacial misfit dislocations at metal-nitride interfaces. PMID:26611639

  14. Structural modifications due to interface chemistry at metal-nitride interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, S. K.; Shao, S.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2015-11-27

    Based on accurate first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, an unusual phenomenon of interfacial structural modifications, due to the interface chemistry influence is identified at two metal-nitride interfaces with strong metal-nitrogen affinity, Al/TiN {111} and Al/VN {111} interfaces. It is shown that at such interfaces, a faulted stacking structure is energetically preferred on the Al side of the interface. And both intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies in the vicinity Al layers are negligibly small. However, such phenomenon does not occur in Pt/TiN and Pt/VN interfaces because of the weak Pt-N affinity. As a result, corresponding to structural energiesmore » of metal-nitride interfaces, the linear elasticity analysis predicts characteristics of interfacial misfit dislocations at metal-nitride interfaces.« less

  15. Structural modifications due to interface chemistry at metal-nitride interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, S. K.; Shao, S.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2015-11-27

    Based on accurate first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, an unusual phenomenon of interfacial structural modifications, due to the interface chemistry influence is identified at two metal-nitride interfaces with strong metal-nitrogen affinity, Al/TiN {111} and Al/VN {111} interfaces. It is shown that at such interfaces, a faulted stacking structure is energetically preferred on the Al side of the interface. And both intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies in the vicinity Al layers are negligibly small. However, such phenomenon does not occur in Pt/TiN and Pt/VN interfaces because of the weak Pt-N affinity. As a result, corresponding to structural energies of metal-nitride interfaces, the linear elasticity analysis predicts characteristics of interfacial misfit dislocations at metal-nitride interfaces.

  16. Organometallic compounds: an opportunity for chemical biology?

    PubMed

    Patra, Malay; Gasser, Gilles

    2012-06-18

    Organometallic compounds are renowned for their remarkable applications in the field of catalysis, but much less is known about their potential in chemical biology. Indeed, such compounds have long been considered to be either unstable under physiological conditions or cytotoxic. As a consequence, little attention has been paid to their possible utilisation for biological purposes. Because of their outstanding physicochemical properties, which include chemical stability, structural diversity and unique photo- and electrochemical properties, however, organometallic compounds have the ability to play a leading role in the field of chemical biology. Indeed, remarkable examples of the use of such compounds-notably as enzyme inhibitors and as luminescent agents-have recently been reported. Here we summarise recent advances in the use of organometallic compounds for chemical biology purposes, an area that we define as "organometallic chemical biology". We also demonstrate that these recent discoveries are only a beginning and that many other organometallic complexes are likely to be found useful in this field of research in the near future.

  17. Hydrogen storage materials: room-temperature wet-chemistry approach toward mixed-metal borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Jaroń, Tomasz; Orłowski, Piotr A; Wegner, Wojciech; Fijałkowski, Karol J; Leszczyński, Piotr J; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-01-19

    The poor kinetics of hydrogen evolution and the irreversibility of the hydrogen discharge hamper the use of transition metal borohydrides as hydrogen storage materials, and the drawbacks of current synthetic methods obstruct the exploration of these systems. A wet-chemistry approach, which is based on solvent-mediated metathesis reactions of precursors containing bulky organic cations and weakly coordinating anions, leads to mixed-metal borohydrides that contain only a small amount of "dead mass". The applicability of this method is exemplified by Li[Zn2(BH4)5] and M[Zn(BH4)3] salts (M=Na, K), and its extension to other systems is discussed.

  18. Development of degradative techniques for coal chemistry based on ether cleavage reactions and metal arene chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    The degradation of C-O and C-C bonds have been examined using model compounds that are similar in structure to those found in coal and other natural products. The conditions to maximize ether cleavage and minimize the formation of undesirable side products were determined by varying the concentration of reagents, temperature, and reaction time. 2-Phenoxynaphthalene (1) and 1-methoxypyrene (2) were the compounds examined. The optimum conditions demonstrated complete disappearance of 1 and 2, mass recoveries were above 84%, and the formation of reduced dimers in less than 10 mole % yield. The possibility of cleaving a C-C bond by a (3+2) cycloaddition and subsequent cycloreversion reactions was examined by treating a variety of dipolarphiles with deprotonated (({eta}{sup 6}-arene)FeCp){sup +} complexes (arene = hexamethylbenzene or tetralin) Azides and ozone were found to add quantitatively to the metal-arene complexes. Upon decomplexation of the ring, moderated yields of benzyl substituted products were isolated. The mechanism of this reaction is yet unknown but is postulated to occur by direct nucleophilic addition of the complex anion to the most electropositive atom of the dipolarphile. Chemical and electrochemical oxidation techniques were applied to the deprotonated (({eta}{sup 6}-arene)FeCp){sup +} complexes. Only minor yields of benzylic oxidation products were observed.

  19. Redox chemistry and metal-insulator transitions intertwined in a nano-porous material.

    PubMed

    Maximoff, Sergey N; Smit, Berend

    2014-06-06

    Metal-organic frameworks are nano-porous adsorbents of relevance to gas separation and catalysis, and separation of oxygen from air is essential to diverse industrial applications. The ferrous salt of 2,5-dihydroxy-terephthalic acid, a metal-organic framework of the MOF74 family, can selectively adsorb oxygen in a manner that defies the classical picture: adsorption sites either do or do not share electrons over a long range. Here we propose, and then justify phenomenologically and computationally, a mechanism. Charge-transfer-mediated adsorption of electron acceptor oxygen molecules in the metal-organic framework, which is a quasi-one-dimensional electron-donor semiconductor, drives and is driven by quasi-one-dimensional metal-insulator-metal transitions that localize or delocalize the quasi-one-dimensional electrons. This mechanism agrees with the empirical evidence, and predicts a class of nano-porous semiconductors or metals and potential adsorbents and catalysts in which chemistry and metal-insulator-metal transitions intertwine.

  20. Methyl Complexes of the Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Peloso, Riccardo; Carmona, Ernesto

    2016-05-01

    Organometallic chemistry can be considered as a wide area of knowledge that combines concepts of classic organic chemistry, that is, based essentially on carbon, with molecular inorganic chemistry, especially with coordination compounds. Transition-metal methyl complexes probably represent the simplest and most fundamental way to view how these two major areas of chemistry combine and merge into novel species with intriguing features in terms of reactivity, structure, and bonding. Citing more than 500 bibliographic references, this review aims to offer a concise view of recent advances in the field of transition-metal complexes containing M-CH3 fragments. Taking into account the impressive amount of data that are continuously provided by organometallic chemists in this area, this review is mainly focused on results of the last five years. After a panoramic overview on M-CH3 compounds of Groups 3 to 11, which includes the most recent landmark findings in this area, two further sections are dedicated to methyl-bridged complexes and reactivity.

  1. (Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.

    1990-01-01

    During the course of Grant ER13775 we have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. The spectrometer combined conventional stopped-flow techniques with an infrared optical system comprised of a carbon monoxide laser, an IRTRAN flow-through cell and a mercury-cadium-telluride detector. In this summary we will highlight our results on reactions: (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve additional of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions. 12 refs.

  2. Synthesis and electrochemistry of organometallic cobaltadithiaazulenes.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Mitsushiro; Imamura, Fumiaki; Nga, Nguyen Ba Tuyet; Fujita-Takayama, Chikako; Sugiyama, Toru; Kajitani, Masatsugu

    2012-10-15

    Reaction of tropolone or hinokitiol with phosphorus pentasulfide (P(2)S(5)) directly gives the sulfurized precursor [PS(2)(SST)](2) or [PS(2)(SSH)](2) (SST = dithiotropolonato or SSH = dithiohinokitiolato). The resulting [PS(2)(SST)](2) or [PS(2)(SSH)](2) is further reacted with [CpCoI(2)(CO)] (Cp = η(5)-cyclopentadienyl) to form the organometallic [CpCo(I)(SST)] (1) or [CpCo(I)(SSH)] (2), respectively. 1 and 2 have a cobaltadithiaazulene ring containing one cobalt and two sulfur atoms in the five-membered ring of azulene. Although X-ray structure analysis of 1 reveals the iodide-coordinated structure, 1 becomes the iodide-free complex [CpCo(SST)](+) (4(+)) in solution. Electrochemical studies of 4(+) by CV and spectroelectrochemical measurements (ESR, UV-vis-NIR) in solution are carried out. 4(+) is stepwise reduced by 2e(-) to form the stable neutral radical (4(•)) and unstable anion (4(-)). It is proposed that the anion 4(-) undergoes dimerization to afford the dimer (6(2-)) by anion radical coupling at the 5 or 7 position in the seven-membered ring of the cobaltadithiaazulene, since the similar anion radical coupling of a reduced azulene has been reported. Electrochemical reoxidation of 6(2-) slowly undergoes monomerization, giving the original monomer 4(•). DFT calculation of 4(+) explains that there is a delocalized lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) in the whole molecule, and that of radical 4(•) has a delocalized singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO). In these CpCo-SST (or SSH) complexes, there could be metal/ligand electron transfer since the SST (or SSH) ligand is potentially redox active. The spin density distribution of 4(-) obtained by the DFT method supports the mechanism of the anion radical coupling at the 5 or 7 position in the seven-membered ring.

  3. Exploring Undergraduates' Understanding of Transition Metals Chemistry with the Use of Cognitive and Confidence Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreenivasulu, Bellam; Subramaniam, R.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to studies on school students' understanding of various topics in the sciences, studies involving university students have received relatively less attention in the science education literature. In this study, we investigated university students' understanding of transition metals chemistry, a topic in inorganic chemistry, which…

  4. Flat Chern Band in a Two-Dimensional Organometallic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a “romance of flatland” could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  5. Flat Chern Band in a Two-Dimensional Organometallic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band, namely the flat chern band (FCB), has recently been proposed, in which carriers experience strong Coulomb interaction as well as topological frustration that in together spawn unprecedented topological strongly-correlated electronic states, such as high-temperature fractional quantum hall state. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains a doubt whether such a ``romance of flatland'' could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design to realize a nearly FCB right around the Fermi level in a two-dimensional (2D) Indium-Phenylene Organometallic Framework (IPOF). Our design in addition provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials in virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology. Supported by DOE-BES and ARL

  6. Flat Chern band in a two-dimensional organometallic framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a "romance of flatland" could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  7. Flat Chern band in a two-dimensional organometallic framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a "romance of flatland" could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology. PMID:23521279

  8. Development of Li-Metal Battery Cell Chemistries at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-Art lithium-ion battery technology is limited by specific energy and thus not sufficiently advanced to support the energy storage necessary for aerospace needs, such as all-electric aircraft and many deep space NASA exploration missions. In response to this technological gap, our research team at NASA Glenn Research Center has been active in formulating concepts and developing testing hardware and components for Li-metal battery cell chemistries. Lithium metal anodes combined with advanced cathode materials could provide up to five times the specific energy versus state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells (1000 Whkg versus 200 Whkg). Although Lithium metal anodes offer very high theoretical capacity, they have not been shown to successfully operate reversibly.

  9. Exploring Undergraduates' Understanding of Transition Metals Chemistry with the use of Cognitive and Confidence Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasulu, Bellam; Subramaniam, R.

    2014-12-01

    Compared to studies on school students' understanding of various topics in the sciences, studies involving university students have received relatively less attention in the science education literature. In this study, we investigated university students' understanding of transition metals chemistry, a topic in inorganic chemistry, which has been only scarcely explored in the science education literature. A four-tier diagnostic instrument was used. The instrument comprises 25 questions, and each question has an answer tier, a confidence rating for this tier, a reason tier and a confidence rating for this tier. Versions of the instrument were refined iteratively during the preliminary and pilot phases of the study. This study reports on the results obtained from the main phase of the study, using a sample of 140 students. Overall, the diagnostic test was difficult for the students. The students had a mean score of 38 %, based on correct responses for both answer and reason tiers for the questions. It was accompanied by a mean confidence of only 3.49 out of 6 (that is, 58.2 %) for the whole test. The results indicate that transition metals chemistry is a difficult topic for the students. Twenty-four alternative conceptions have been identified in this study, including some indication of their strengths. Some implications of the study are discussed.

  10. CHEMISTRY OF SO{sub 2} ON MODEL METAL AND OXIDE CATALYSTS: PHOTOEMISSION AND XANES STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; JIRSAK,T.; CHATURVEDI,S.; HRBEK,J.; FREITAG,A.; LARESE,J.Z.

    2000-07-09

    High-resolution synchrotron based photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to study the interaction of SO{sub 2} with a series of metals and oxides. The chemistry of SO{sub 2} on metal surfaces is rich. At low coverages, the molecule fully decomposes into atomic S and O. At large coverages, the formation of SO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4} takes place. The following sequence was found for the reactivity of the metals towards SO{sub 2}: Pt {approx} Rh < Ru < Mo << Zn, Sn, Cs. Alloying can be useful for reducing the chemical affinity of a metal for SO{sub 2} and controlling S poisoning. Pd atoms bonded to Rh and Pt atoms bonded to Sn interact weakly with SO{sub 2}. In general, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers of metal oxides. SO{sub 4} is formed on CeO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} on ZnO. On these systems there is no decomposition of SO{sub 2}. Dissociation of the molecule is observed after introducing a large amount of Ce{sup 3+} sites in ceria, or after depositing Cu or alkali metals on the oxide surfaces. These promote the catalytic activity of the oxides during the destruction of SO{sub 2}.

  11. Bringing inorganic chemistry to life with inspiration from R. J. P. Williams.

    PubMed

    Hill, H Allen O; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Our appreciation of the scholarly ideas and thinking of Bob Williams is illustrated here by a few of the areas in which he inspired us. His journey to bring inorganic chemistry to life began with an early interest in analytical chemistry, rationalising the relative stabilities of metal coordination complexes (The Irving-Williams Series), and elucidating the organometallic redox chemistry of vitamin B12. He (and Vallee) recognised that metal ions are in energised (entatic) states in proteins and enzymes, which themselves are dynamic structures of rods and springs. He played a key role in helping Rosenberg to pave the road toward the clinic for the anticancer drug cisplatin. He believed that evolution is not just dependent on DNA, but also on the metallome. Organisms and the environment are one system: does DNA code directly for all the essential elements of life? PMID:26841789

  12. Bringing inorganic chemistry to life with inspiration from R. J. P. Williams.

    PubMed

    Hill, H Allen O; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Our appreciation of the scholarly ideas and thinking of Bob Williams is illustrated here by a few of the areas in which he inspired us. His journey to bring inorganic chemistry to life began with an early interest in analytical chemistry, rationalising the relative stabilities of metal coordination complexes (The Irving-Williams Series), and elucidating the organometallic redox chemistry of vitamin B12. He (and Vallee) recognised that metal ions are in energised (entatic) states in proteins and enzymes, which themselves are dynamic structures of rods and springs. He played a key role in helping Rosenberg to pave the road toward the clinic for the anticancer drug cisplatin. He believed that evolution is not just dependent on DNA, but also on the metallome. Organisms and the environment are one system: does DNA code directly for all the essential elements of life?

  13. Molecular Surface Chemistry by Metal Single Crystals and Nanoparticles from Vacuum to High Pressure.

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-04-05

    Model systems for studying molecular surface chemistry have evolved from single crystal surfaces at low pressure to colloidal nanoparticles at high pressure. Low pressure surface structure studies of platinum single crystals using molecular beam surface scattering and low energy electron diffraction techniques probe the unique activity of defects, steps and kinks at the surface for dissociation reactions (H-H, C-H, C-C, O{double_bond}O bonds). High-pressure investigations of platinum single crystals using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have revealed the presence and the nature of reaction intermediates. High pressure scanning tunneling microscopy of platinum single crystal surfaces showed adsorbate mobility during a catalytic reaction. Nanoparticle systems are used to determine the role of metal-oxide interfaces, site blocking and the role of surface structures in reactive surface chemistry. The size, shape and composition of nanoparticles play important roles in determining reaction activity and selectivity.

  14. Organometallic Salts Generate Optical Second Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, Seth R.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    Series of organometallic salts exhibit large second-order dielectric susceptibilities, as evidenced by generation of second harmonics when illuminated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Investigations of these and related compounds continue with view toward development of materials for use as optical second-harmonic generators, electro-optical modulators, optical switches, piezoelectric sensors, and parametric crystals.

  15. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  16. Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boffa, A B

    1994-07-01

    The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

  17. Structure vs chemistry: friction and wear of Pt-based metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caron, A; Louzguine-Luzguin, D V; Bennewitz, R

    2013-11-13

    In comparison of a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with a Pt(111) single crystal we find that wearless friction is determined by chemistry through bond formation alloying, while wear is determined by structure through plasticity mechanisms. In the wearless regime, friction is affected by the chemical composition of the counter body and involves the formation of a liquid-like neck and interfacial alloying. The wear behavior of Pt-based metallic surfaces is determined by their structural properties and corresponding mechanisms for plastic deformation. In the case of Pt(111) wear occurs by dislocation-mediated homogeneous plastic deformation. In contrast the wear of Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass occurs through localized plastic deformation in shear bands that merge together in a single shear zone above a critical load and corresponds to the shear softening of metallic glasses. These results open a new route in the control of friction and wear of metals and are relevant for the development of self-lubricated and wear-resistant mechanical devices.

  18. Micelle-Mediated Extraction of Heavy Metals from Environmental Samples: An Environmental Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giokas, Dimosthenis L.; Paleologos, Evangelos K.; Karayannis, Miltiades I.

    2003-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment in which students extract and analyze several metallic contaminants from environmental samples is presented. The experimental procedure employs extraction of the target analytes by using an environmentally-benign preconcentrating technique prior to the identifications, which are carried out with a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The extraction procedure employs complexation of the metallic species via a chelating agent, entrapment and solubilization via micelle formation, and isolation via phase separation when the solution temperature is raised. The overall process involves preparation of standard solutions and construction of a calibration curve, analysis of water samples, and evaluation of the matrix effect, through the analysis of several spiked samples. As a part of the evaluation protocol, a reference sample is also analyzed. Students become familiar with basic principles of analytical, environmental, and green chemistry through a "real world" application.

  19. Porewater chemistry in a treatment wetland: links to metal retention and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Zhang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Constructed wetlands are gaining increased support for treatment of nonpoint source pollutants. A subsurface flow wetland treating runoff from an agricultural milkhouse floor and roof drainage has been monitored for metal removal. Influent dissolved concentrations from 5 to 30 ppb Cu and 60 to 800 ppb Zn were observed. Effluent concentrations of Zn were always lower from about 3 to 60 ppb Zn, however, Cu was typically around 10 ppb, and much larger at certain points in time, up to 95 ppb Cu. The results were similar in vegetated and non-vegetated wetlands, suggesting abiotic chemistry or microbial activity is controlling metal mobility. Porewater samples were taken using soil moisture lysimeters during both non-storm and storm events to examine metal and related chemistry with depth and distance in the wetland. Under non storm conditions, Cu and Zn average porewater concentrations were 64 and 250 ppb, respectively and did not vary much along the length of the wetland. During a storm event, Zn concentrations in the porewater initially increased near the inlet shortly after a storm, but typically decreased along the length and depth of the wetland to less than 60 ppb. Observed porewater Cu concentrations also increased near the inlet in some cases up to 700 ppb, but dropped rapidly with distance to less than 30 ppb near the middle of the wetland and increased again near the outlet. The dissolved Fe and Mn concentrations follow nearly opposite trends as Cu, increasing and then decreasing along the length of the wetland, suggesting possibly different roles in controlling Cu retention in each stage of the wetland, either co-precipitation with Cu initially, or reductive dissolution and release of Cu in later stages. An understanding of what controls metal retention and release is relevant to optimizing future design parameters of these wetlands.

  20. Phenylthiolate as a sigma- and pi- donor ligand: synthesis of a 3-D organometallic coordination polymer [K2Fe(SPh)4]n.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Guo-Xin; Weng, Lin-Hong

    2004-07-01

    The synthesis and crystal structure of the first mixed-metal organometallic polymer network containing phenylthiolato ligands, [K2Fe(SPh)4]n, are investigated. The simple phenylthiolate acts as a sigma- and pi-donor ligand to give a 3-D potassium iron coordination polymer with both metal-carbon and metal-sulfur coordination interactions.

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  2. Surface chemistry and fundamental limitations on the plasma cleaning of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Emesh, Ismail; Shaviv, Roey; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2016-10-01

    In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies reveal that plasma cleaning of air-exposed Co or Cu transition metal surfaces results in the formation of a remnant C film 1-3 monolayers thick, which is not reduced upon extensive further plasma exposure. This effect is observed for H2 or NH3 plasma cleaning of Co, and He or NH3 plasma cleaning of Cu, and is observed with both inductively coupled (ICP) and capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP). Changes in C 1 s XPS spectra indicate that this remnant film formation is accompanied by the formation of carbidic C on Co and of graphitic C on Cu. This is in contrast to published work showing no such remnant carbidic/carbon layer after similar treatments of Si oxynitride surfaces. The observation of the remnant carbidic C film on Co and graphitic film on Cu, but not on silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy), regardless of plasma chemistry or type, indicates that this effect is due to plasma induced secondary electron emission from the metal surface, resulting in transformation of sp3 adventitious C to either a metal carbide or graphite. These results suggest fundamental limitations to plasma-based surface cleaning procedures on metal surfaces.

  3. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Vudamala, Krushna; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-02-01

    Distribution of metals in different binding phases of estuarine sediments provides chemically significant description of metal-sediment interactions. This study describes the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE), Jahn-Teller effect, and water exchange rate (k-w) on metal distribution in different binding phases of estuarine sediments. It was found that Cu had highest affinity for organic binding phases in the studied sediments followed by Ni and Pb. However, Pb showed strong association with Fe/Mn oxide phases followed by Ni and Cu. Faster k-w of Cu (II) (1 × 10(9) s(-1)) increased the rate of complex formation of Cu(2+) ion with ligand in the organic phases. The Cu-ligand (from organic phase) complexes gained extra stability by the Jahn-Teller effect. The combined effects of these two phenomena and high ionic potential increased the association of Cu with the organic phases of the sediments than Ni and Pb. The smaller ionic radii of Ni(2+) (0.72 Å) than Pb(2+) (1.20 Å) increase the stability of Ni-ligand complexes in the organic phase of the sediments. High LFSE of Ni(II) (compared with Pb(2+) ions) also make Ni-organic complexes increasingly stable than Pb. High k-w (7 × 10(9) s(-1)) of Pb did not help it to associate with organic phases in the sediments. The high concentration of Pb in the Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phase was probably due to co-precipitation of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+). High surface area or site availability for Pb(2+) ion on Fe oxyhydroxide phase was probably responsible for the high concentration of Pb in Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase. Increasing concentrations of Cu in organic phases with the increasing Cu loading suggest that enough binding sites were available for Cu in the organic binding phases of the sediments. This study also describes the influence of nature of sedimentary organic carbon (terrestrial and marine derived OC) in controlling these metal distribution and speciation in marine sediment.

  4. Physical chemistry of the organic analog of metal metal eutectic and monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, U. S.; Rai, R. N.

    1998-01-01

    The phase diagram of an organic analog of a metal-metal system involving succinonitrile (SCN) and carbontetrabromide (CTB) shows the formation of a eutectic (0.996 mole fraction of SCN) and a monotectic (0.040 mole fraction of SCN) with a wide range of miscibility gap in the system. The consolute temperature is 111.5°C above the monotectic horizontal. The growth data, determined by measuring the rate of movement of solid-liquid interface in a capillary, at different undercooling (Δ T) suggest that they obey the parabolic law, v= u(Δ T) n, where v is the linear velocity of crystallization and u and n are constants depending on the nature of materials involved. Using enthalpy of fusion of the pure components, the eutectic and the monotectic, entropy of fusion, Jackson's roughness parameter, interfacial energy, size of the critical nucleus and excess thermodynamic functions were calculated. While microstructural investigations of pure components give dendritic microstructures, those of eutectic and monotectic give characteristic lamellar structures.

  5. Organometallic synthesis, reactivity and catalysis in the solid state using well-defined single-site species

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Sebastian D.; Weller, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Acting as a bridge between the heterogeneous and homogeneous realms, the use of discrete, well-defined, solid-state organometallic complexes for synthesis and catalysis is a remarkably undeveloped field. Here, we present a review of this topic, focusing on describing the key transformations that can be observed at a transition-metal centre, as well as the use of well-defined organometallic complexes in the solid state as catalysts. There is a particular focus upon gas–solid reactivity/catalysis and single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations. PMID:25666064

  6. Electrically Conductive, Corrosion-Resistant Coatings Through Defect Chemistry for Metallic Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2006-12-31

    The principal objective of this work was to develop oxidation protective coatings for metallic interconnect based on a defect chemistry approach. It was reasoned that the effectiveness of a coating is dictated by oxygen permeation kinetics; the slower the permeation kinetics, the better the protection. All protective coating materials investigated to date are either perovskites or spinels containing metals exhibiting multiple valence states (Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, etc.). As a result, all of these oxides exhibit a reasonable level of electronic conductivity; typically at least about {approx}0.05 S/cm at 800 C. For a 5 micron coating, this equates to a maximum {approx}0.025 {Omega}cm{sup 2} area specific resistance due to the coating. This suggests that the coating should be based on oxygen ion conductivity (the lower the better) and not on electronic conductivity. Measurements of ionic conductivity of prospective coating materials were conducted using Hebb-Wagner method. It was demonstrated that special precautions need to be taken to measure oxygen ion conductivity in these materials with very low oxygen vacancy concentration. A model for oxidation under a protective coating is presented. Defect chemistry based approach was developed such that by suitably doping, oxygen vacancy concentration was suppressed, thus suppressing oxygen ion transport and increasing effectiveness of the coating. For the cathode side, the best coating material identified was LaMnO{sub 3} with Ti dopant on the Mn site (LTM). It was observed that LTM is more than 20 times as effective as Mn-containing spinels. On the anode side, LaCrO3 doped with Nb on the Cr site (LNC) was the material identified. Extensive oxidation kinetics studies were conducted on metallic alloy foils with coating {approx}1 micron in thickness. From these studies, it was projected that a 5 micron coating would be sufficient to ensure 40,000 h life.

  7. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Samuel R.; Guo, Yijun; Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Tavasoli, Elham; Vela, Javier

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  8. Marine Bioinorganic Chemistry: The Role of Trace Metals in the Oceanic Cycles of Major Nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, F. M. M.; Milligan, A. J.; Saito, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    The bulk of living biomass is chiefly made up of only a dozen "major" elements - carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, chlorine, calcium, magnesium, sulfur (and silicon in diatoms) - whose proportions vary within a relatively narrow range in most organisms. A number of trace elements, particularly first row transition metals - manganese, iron, nickel, cobalt, copper, and zinc - are also "essential" for the growth of organisms. At the molecular level, the chemical mechanisms by which such elements function as active centers or structural factors in enzymes and by which they are accumulated and stored by organisms is the central topic of bioinorganic chemistry. At the scale of ocean basins, the interplay of physical, chemical, and biological processes that govern the cycling of biologically essential elements in seawater is the subject of marine biogeochemistry. For those interested in the growth of marine organisms, particularly in the one-half of the Earth's primary production contributed by marine phytoplankton, bioinorganic chemistry and marine biogeochemistry are critically linked by the extraordinary paucity of essential trace elements in surface seawater, which results from their biological utilization and incorporation in sinking organic matter. How marine organisms acquire elements that are present at nano- or picomolar concentrations in surface seawater; how they perform critical enzymatic functions when necessary metal cofactors are almost unavailable are the central topics of "marine bioinorganic chemistry." The central aim of this field is to elucidate at the molecular level the metal-dependent biological processes involved in the major biogeochemical cycles.By examining the solutions that emerged from the problems posed by the scarcity of essential trace elements, marine bioinorganic chemists bring to light hitherto unknown ways to take up or utilize trace elements, new molecules, and newer "essential" elements. Focusing on

  9. Reactivity of TEMPO toward 16- and 17-electron organometallic reaction intermediates: a time-resolved IR study.

    PubMed

    Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2013-07-31

    The (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl radical (TEMPO) has been employed for an extensive range of chemical applications, ranging from organometallic catalysis to serving as a structural probe in biological systems. As a ligand in an organometallic complex, TEMPO can exhibit several distinct coordination modes. Here we use ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to study the reactivity of TEMPO toward coordinatively unsaturated 16- and 17-electron organometallic reaction intermediates. TEMPO coordinates to the metal centers of the 16-electron species CpCo(CO) and Fe(CO)4, and to the 17-electron species CpFe(CO)2 and Mn(CO)5, via an associative mechanism with concomitant oxidation of the metal center. In these adducts, TEMPO thus behaves as an anionic ligand, characterized by a pyramidal geometry about the nitrogen center. Density functional theory calculations are used to facilitate interpretation of the spectra and to further explore the structures of the TEMPO adducts. To our knowledge, this study represents the first direct characterization of the mechanism of the reaction of TEMPO with coordinatively unsaturated organometallic complexes, providing valuable insight into its reactions with commonly encountered reaction intermediates. The similar reactivity of TEMPO toward each of the species studied suggests that these results can be considered representative of TEMPO's reactivity toward all low-valent transition metal complexes.

  10. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  11. A Metal-free Click Chemistry Approach for the Assembly and Probing of Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sibaprasad; Viazovkina, Ekaterina; Gall, Alexander; Lyubchenko, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Probing of biomolecular complexes by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) methods including AFM requires proper and suitable coupling methods for immobilization of biomolecules onto the AFM tip and the surface. The use of flexible tethers for the coupling process has dual advantages. First, they allow the specific immobilization of interacting molecules, and second, their flexibility facilitates the proper orientation of the interacting partners. Recently, we developed an approach termed Flexible Nano Array (FNA) in which interacting partners are located on the same polymeric FNA molecule separated by a flexible segment with a defined length. In this paper, we modified the FNA tether approach by incorporating click chemistry with non-metal modification. FNA was synthesized using DNA synthesis chemistry, in which phosphoramidite (PA) spacers containing six ethylene glycol units were used instead of nucleoside triphosphates. During the synthesis, two T modifiers conjugated to two dibenzocyclooctyl (DBCO) residues were incorporated at selected positions within the FNA. The DBCO functionality allows for coupling azide labeled biomolecules via click chemistry. Amyloid peptide Aβ(14–23) terminated with azide was incorporated into the FNA and the reaction was controlled with mass-spectrometry. Assembly of tethered Aβ(14–23) peptides into dimers was characterized by AFM force spectroscopy experiments in which the AFM tip functionalized with FNA terminated with biotin probed a streptavidin-coated mica surface. The formation of the peptide dimer was verified with force spectroscopy that showed the appearance of a specific fingerprint for dimer dissociation followed by a rupture event for the biotin-streptavidin link. The developed approach is capable of multiple probing events to allow the collection of a large set of data for a quantitative analysis of the force spectroscopy events.

  12. Unravelling the surface chemistry of metal oxide nanocrystals, the role of acids and bases.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van den Broeck, Freya; De Keukeleere, Katrien; Martins, José C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Hens, Zeger

    2014-07-01

    We synthesized HfO2 nanocrystals from HfCl4 using a surfactant-free solvothermal process in benzyl alcohol and found that the resulting nanocrystals could be transferred to nonpolar media using a mixture of carboxylic acids and amines. Using solution (1)H NMR, FTIR, and elemental analysis, we studied the details of the transfer reaction and the surface chemistry of the resulting sterically stabilized nanocrystals. As-synthesized nanocrystals are charge-stabilized by protons, with chloride acting as the counterion. Treatment with only carboxylic acids does not lead to any binding of ligands to the HfO2 surface. On the other hand, we find that the addition of amines provides the basic environment in which carboxylic acids can dissociate and replace chloride. This results in stable, aggregate-free dispersions of HfO2 nanocrystals, sterically stabilized by carboxylate ligands. Moreover, titrations with deuterated carboxylic acid show that the charge on the carboxylate ligands is balanced by coadsorbed protons. Hence, opposite from the X-type/nonstoichiometric nanocrystals picture prevailing in literature, one should look at HfO2/carboxylate nanocrystals as systems where carboxylic acids are dissociatively adsorbed to bind to the nanocrystals. Similar results were obtained with ZrO2 NCs. Since proton accommodation on the surface is most likely due to the high Brønsted basicity of oxygen, our model could be a more general picture for the surface chemistry of metal oxide nanocrystals with important consequences on the chemistry of ligand exchange reactions.

  13. Application of machine-learning methods to solid-state chemistry: ferromagnetism in transition metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrum, Gregory A.; Genin, Hugh

    2003-12-01

    Machine-learning methods are a collection of techniques for building predictive models from experimental data. The algorithms are problem-independent: the chemistry and physics of the problem being studied are contained in the descriptors used to represent the known data. The application of a variety of machine-learning methods to the prediction of ferromagnetism in ordered and disordered transition metal alloys is presented. Applying a decision tree algorithm to build a predictive model for ordered phases results in a model that is 100% accurate. The same algorithm achieves 99% accuracy when trained on a data set containing both ordered and disordered phases. Details of the descriptor sets for both applications are also presented.

  14. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering. PMID:27640372

  15. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering.

  16. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, James Francis

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  17. Sweetening ruthenium and osmium: organometallic arene complexes containing aspartame.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jennifer C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Winnig, Marcel; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Sadler, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    The novel organometallic sandwich complexes [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Ru(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (1) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Os(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (2) incorporating the artificial sweetener aspartame have been synthesised and characterised. A number of properties of aspartame were found to be altered on binding to either metal. The pK(a) values of both the carboxyl and the amino groups of aspartame are lowered by between 0.35 and 0.57 pH units, causing partial deprotonation of the amino group at pH 7.4 (physiological pH). The rate of degradation of aspartame to 3,6-dioxo-5-phenylmethylpiperazine acetic acid (diketopiperazine) increased over threefold from 0.12 to 0.36 h(-1) for 1, and to 0.43 h(-1) for 2. Furthermore, the reduction potential of the ligand shifted from -1.133 to -0.619 V for 2. For the ruthenium complex 1 the process occurred in two steps, the first (at -0.38 V) within a biologically accessible range. This facilitates reactions with biological reductants such as ascorbate. Binding to and activation of the sweet taste receptor was not observed for these metal complexes up to concentrations of 1 mM. The factors which affect the ability of metal-bound aspartame to interact with the receptor site are discussed.

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  19. Use of column V alkyls in organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludowise, M. J.; Cooper, C. B., III

    1982-01-01

    The use of the column V-trialkyls trimethylarsenic (TMAs) and trimethylantimony (TMSb) for the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OM-VPE) of III-V compound semiconductors is reviewed. A general discussion of the interaction chemistry of common Group III and Group V reactants is presented. The practical application of TMSb and TMAs for OM-VPE is demonstrated using the growth of GaSb, GaAs(1-y)Sb(y), Al(x)Ga(1-x)Sb, and Ga(1-x)In(x)As as examples.

  20. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d sup 0 metal alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new types of electrophilic metal alkyl complexes for catalytic C-H activation and olefin polymerization chemistry, and associated fundamental mechanistic studies. We have focused our efforts on four classes of early metal alkyl complexes: (1) cationic group 4 Cp{sub 2}M(R){sup +} complexes (1) which are active species in Cp{sub 2}MX{sub 2}-based Ziegler-Natta olefin polymerization catalyst systems and which catalyze productive C-H activation reactions of heterocycles, (2) neutral (dicarbollide)(Cp*)M(R) complexes (2) which are structurally are electronically very similar to 1, (3) half-sandwich complexes CpM(R){sub 2}(L){sub n}{sup +} which are highly coordinatively and electronically unsaturated, and (4) new group 5 (dicarbollide)(Cp)MR{sub 2} and (dicarbollide){sub 2} MR complexes which are more unsaturated than group 5 Cp{sub 2}M systems due to incorporation of the dicarbollide ligand.

  1. Cytotoxic properties of a new organometallic platinum(II) complex and its gold(I) heterobimetallic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Serratrice, Maria; Maiore, Laura; Zucca, Antonio; Stoccoro, Sergio; Landini, Ida; Mini, Enrico; Massai, Lara; Ferraro, Giarita; Merlino, Antonello; Messori, Luigi; Cinellu, Maria Agostina

    2016-01-14

    A novel platinum(ii) organometallic complex, [Pt(pbi)(Me)(DMSO)], bearing the 2-(2'-pyridyl)-benzimidazole (pbiH) ligand, was synthesized and fully characterized. Interestingly, the reaction of this organometallic platinum(ii) complex with two distinct gold(i) phosphane compounds afforded the corresponding heterobimetallic derivatives with the pbi ligand bridging the two metal centers. The antiproliferative properties in vitro of [Pt(pbi)(Me)(DMSO)] and its gold(i) derivatives as well as those of the known coordination platinum(ii) and palladium(ii) complexes with the same ligand, of the general formula [MCl2(pbiH)], were comparatively evaluated against A2780 cancer cells, either sensitive or resistant to cisplatin. A superior biological activity of the organometallic compound clearly emerged compared to the corresponding platinum(ii) complex; the antiproliferative effects are further enhanced upon attaching the gold(i) triphenylphosphine moiety to the organometallic Pt compound. Remarkably, these novel metal species are able to overcome nearly complete resistance to cisplatin. Significant mechanistic insight into the study compounds was gained after investigating their reactions with a few representative biomolecules by electrospray mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The obtained results are comprehensively discussed.

  2. Major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne Aquifer, Southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radell, M.J.; Katz, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne aquifer was characterized as part of the Florida Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Network Program, a multiagency cooperative effort concerned with delineating baseline water quality for major aquifer systems in the State. The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined and serves as the sole source of drinking water for more than 3 million people in southeast Florida. The Biscayne aquifer consists of highly permeable interbedded limestone and sandstone of Pleistocene and Pliocene age underlying most of Dade and Broward Counties and parts of Palm Beach and Monroe Counties. The high permeability is largely caused by extensive carbonate dissolution. Water sampled from 189 wells tapping the Biscayne aquifer was predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type with some mixed types occurring in coastal areas and near major canals. Major - ion is areally uniform throughout the aquifer. According to nonparametric statistical tests of major ions and dissolved solids, the concentrations of calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids increased significantly with well depth ( 0.05 significance level ), probably a result of less circulation at depth. Potassium and nitrate concentrations decreased significantly with depth. Although the source of recharge to the aquifer varies seasonally, there was no statistical difference in the concentration of major ions in pared water samples from 27 shallow wells collected during wet and dry seasons. Median concentrations for barium, chromium, copper, lead, and manganese were below maximum or secondary maximum contaminant levels set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The median iron concentration only slightly exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level. The concentration of barium was significantly related (0.05 significance level) to calcium and bicarbonate concentration. No distinct areal pattern or vertical distribution of the selected trace metals was evident in water from

  3. Ozone in sea water. Part 1: Chemistry; Part 2: Corrosion of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wyllie, W.E. II; Brown, B.E.; Duquette, D.J.

    1995-12-01

    Ozonation of sea water for biofouling control is being utilized in desalination processes, heat exchange systems, as well as in salt water aquariums. The chemistry of ozone in sea water is much more complex than in fresh water due to the high concentration of easily oxidizable, ozone-demanding species and the formation of secondary oxidants. The major secondary oxidant is bromine in the form of hypobromite and hypobromous acid (BrO{sup {minus}}/HOBr) which are formed by oxidation of the bromide ion (Br{sup {minus}}), naturally found in sea water in concentrations of 65 mg/L. HOBr can react again with ozone to return Br{sup {minus}}, resulting in accelerated decomposition of ozone, or to form bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) The BrO ion is known to interfere with the measurement of residual ozone in sea water, so it is important that the feed gas conditions, solution pH, and the hypobromous and bromate concentrations be reported to quantify the amount of ozone introduced into a system. In 0.5 N NaCl and sea water solutions, ozone appears to stabilize the passivity of passivating metals, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion appears to increase in the same environments. The effect of BrO{sup {minus}}/HOBr on the corrosion of metals in sea water is believed to be similar to chlorine and ozone, in that it acts as a strong oxidizer. However, it is not certain whether BrO{sup {minus}}/HOBr and BrO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} have any damaging effects on protective metal films.

  4. Exploration geochemical technique for the determination of preconcentrated organometallic halides by ICP-AES

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Motooka, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    An atomic absorption extraction technique which is widely used in geochemical exploration for the determination of Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, and Zn has been modified and adapted to a simultaneous inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission instrument. the experimental and operating parameters are described for the preconcentration of the metals into their organometallic halides and for the determination of the metals. Lower limits of determination are equal to or improved over those for flame atomic absorption (except Au) and ICP results are very similar to the accepted AA values, with precision for the ICP data in excess of that necessary for exploration purposes.

  5. The Discovery-Oriented Approach to Organic Chemistry. 7. Rearrangement of "trans"-Stilbene Oxide with Bismuth Trifluoromethanesulfonate and Other Metal Triflates: A Microscale Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, James E.; Huddle, Matthew G.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Yung, Herbie; Mohan, Ram S.

    2008-01-01

    Although green chemistry principles are increasingly stressed in the undergraduate curriculum, there are only a few lab experiments wherein the toxicity of reagents is taken into consideration in the design of the experiment. We report a microscale green organic chemistry laboratory experiment that illustrates the utility of metal triflates,…

  6. Electron configuration and correlation effects in organometallic molecules from constraint density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kohji; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori; Weinert, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Interest in single organometallic molecule and that adsorbed on solid surfaces has rapidly increased because of possible novel applications. For molecules with transition metals (TMs), the d-electron configuration is an essential aspect of their electronic and magnetic properties, and correlation effects can not be excluded. Here, we investigate systematically the electron configuration and correlation effects for prototypical organometallic molecules of tridimensional metallocene (TMCp2) and planer phthalocyanine (TMPc). Calculations were carried out based on the constraint density functional theory (DFT) by using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method that incorporates an on-site Coulomb interaction correction + U . We find that these correlation effects play a key role in determining the ground state of the electron configuration for the organometallic molecules. The calculated ground states of TMCp2, where TM =Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, obtained by constraint DFT with +U reproduce the experimentally determined structures of 3E2 g , 6A1 g , 1A1 g , 2E1 g , and 3A2 g , respectively. Results for the TMPc will be also presented.

  7. Creating a Discovery Platform for Confined-Space Chemistry and Materials: Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Simmons, Blake

    2008-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) are a recently discovered class of nanoporous, defect-free crystalline materials that enable rational design and exploration of porous materials at the molecular level. MOFs have tunable monolithic pore sizes and cavity environments due to their crystalline nature, yielding properties exceeding those of most other porous materials. These include: the lowest known density (91% free space); highest surface area; tunable photoluminescence; selective molecular adsorption; and methane sorption rivaling gas cylinders. These properties are achieved by coupling inorganic metal complexes such as ZnO4 with tunable organic ligands that serve as struts, allowing facile manipulation of pore size and surface area through reactant selection. MOFs thus provide a discovery platform for generating both new understanding of chemistry in confined spaces and novel sensors and devices based on their unique properties. At the outset of this project in FY06, virtually nothing was known about how to couple MOFs to substrates and the science of MOF properties and how to tune them was in its infancy. An integrated approach was needed to establish the required knowledge base for nanoscale design and develop methodologies integrate MOFs with other materials. This report summarizes the key accomplishments of this project, which include creation of a new class of radiation detection materials based on MOFs, luminescent MOFs for chemical detection, use of MOFs as templates to create nanoparticles of hydrogen storage materials, MOF coatings for stress-based chemical detection using microcantilevers, and "flexible" force fields that account for structural changes in MOFs that occur upon molecular adsorption/desorption. Eight journal articles, twenty presentations at scientific conferences, and two patent applications resulted from the work. The project created a basis for continuing development of MOFs for many Sandia applications and succeeded in securing $2.75 M in

  8. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid–base chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid–base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p–n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid–base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  9. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti(4+) to form planar p-type [Ti(4+)n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B(3+), Al(3+) and Sn(4+)) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  10. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  11. Pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy of complex oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duray, S. J.; Buchholz, D. B.; Song, S. N.; Richeson, D. S.; Ketterson, J. B.; Marks, T. J.; Chang, R. P. H.

    1991-09-01

    The results are reported of a pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) process for growing complex oxide films at low background gas pressure and low substrate temperature using organometallic precursors in an oxygen plasma environment. The results show that POMBE can extend the capability of organometallic chemical vapor deposition to growing complex oxide films with high precision both in composition and structure without the need for post-deposition oxidation and heat treatments. The growth of phase-pure, highly oriented Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting oxide films is given as an example. Similar to the pulsed laser deposition process, the POMBE method has the potential for in situ processing of multilayer structures.

  12. Dihydrogen complexes as prototypes for the coordination chemistry of saturated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kubas, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    The binding of a dihydrogen molecule (H2) to a transition metal center in an organometallic complex was a major discovery because it changed the way chemists think about the reactivity of molecules with chemically “inert” strong bonds such as HH and CH. Before the seminal finding of side-on bonded H2 in W(CO)3(PR3)2(H2), it was generally believed that H2 could not bind to another atom in stable fashion and would split into two separate H atoms to form a metal dihydride before undergoing chemical reaction. Metal-bound saturated molecules such as H2, silanes, and alkanes (σ-complexes) have a chemistry of their own, with surprisingly varied structures, bonding, and dynamics. H2 complexes are of increased relevance for H2 production and storage in the hydrogen economy of the future. PMID:17442752

  13. Modulating the rate of charge transport in a metal-organic framework thin film using host:guest chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-01-28

    Herein we demonstrate the use of host-guest chemistry to modulate rates of charge transport in metal-organic framework (MOF) films. The kinetics of site-to-site of charge hopping and, in turn, the overall redox conductivity, of a ferrocene-modified MOF can be altered by up to 30-fold by coupling electron exchange to the oxidation-state-dependent formation of inclusion complexes between cyclodextrin and channel-tethered metallocenes.

  14. Cytocompatible in situ forming chitosan/hyaluronan hydrogels via a metal-free click chemistry for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Mao, Jiahui; Zhang, Ziwei; Tan, Huaping

    2015-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels are important cell scaffolding materials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a new class of biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide hydrogels derived from chitosan and hyaluronan via a metal-free click chemistry, without the addition of copper catalyst. For the metal-free click reaction, chitosan and hyaluronan were modified with oxanorbornadiene (OB) and 11-azido-3,6,9-trioxaundecan-1-amine (AA), respectively. The gelation is attributed to the triazole ring formation between OB and azido groups of polysaccharide derivatives. The molecular structures were verified by FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis, giving substitution degrees of 58% and 47% for chitosan-OB and hyaluronan-AA, respectively. The in vitro gelation, morphologies, equilibrium swelling, compressive modulus and degradation of the composite hydrogels were examined. The potential of the metal-free hydrogel as a cell scaffold was demonstrated by encapsulation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) within the gel matrix in vitro. Cell culture showed that this metal-free hydrogel could support survival and proliferation of ASCs. A preliminary in vivo study demonstrated the usefulness of the hydrogel as an injectable scaffold for adipose tissue engineering. These characteristics provide a potential opportunity to use the metal-free click chemistry in preparation of biocompatible hydrogels for soft tissue engineering applications.

  15. Organometallic Complexes Anchored to Conductive Carbon for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methane at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Madhura; Nguyen, Vinh; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Ngo, Chilan; Li, Quanning; O'Reilly, Matthew E; Gray, Tristan S; Hubbard, William A; Gunnoe, T Brent; Herring, Andrew M; Trewyn, Brian G

    2016-01-13

    Low-temperature direct methane fuel cells (DMEFCs) offer the opportunity to substantially improve the efficiency of energy production from natural gas. This study focuses on the development of well-defined platinum organometallic complexes covalently anchored to ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) for electrochemical oxidation of methane in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at 80 °C. A maximum normalized power of 403 μW/mg Pt was obtained, which was 5 times higher than the power obtained from a modern commercial catalyst and 2 orders of magnitude greater than that from a Pt black catalyst. The observed differences in catalytic activities for oxidation of methane are linked to the chemistry of the tethered catalysts, determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemistry/activity relationships demonstrate a tangible path for the design of electrocatalytic systems for C-H bond activation that afford superior performance in DMEFC for potential commercial applications. PMID:26492385

  16. Organometallic Complexes Anchored to Conductive Carbon for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methane at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Madhura; Nguyen, Vinh; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Ngo, Chilan; Li, Quanning; O'Reilly, Matthew E; Gray, Tristan S; Hubbard, William A; Gunnoe, T Brent; Herring, Andrew M; Trewyn, Brian G

    2016-01-13

    Low-temperature direct methane fuel cells (DMEFCs) offer the opportunity to substantially improve the efficiency of energy production from natural gas. This study focuses on the development of well-defined platinum organometallic complexes covalently anchored to ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) for electrochemical oxidation of methane in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at 80 °C. A maximum normalized power of 403 μW/mg Pt was obtained, which was 5 times higher than the power obtained from a modern commercial catalyst and 2 orders of magnitude greater than that from a Pt black catalyst. The observed differences in catalytic activities for oxidation of methane are linked to the chemistry of the tethered catalysts, determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemistry/activity relationships demonstrate a tangible path for the design of electrocatalytic systems for C-H bond activation that afford superior performance in DMEFC for potential commercial applications.

  17. Molecular orbital studies of the bonding in heavy element organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, B.E.

    1992-12-04

    The upgrade to the DECstation 3100 (and other workstations underway) has enabled the use of more sophisticated electronic structure methods. Research were done in the following fields: tris(cyclopentadienyl) actinide complexes; actinide-containing molecules with metal-metal bonds (U dimer, Th-Ru, Zr-Ru); and applications of fully relativistic DV-X[alpha] method to trivalent actinide chemistry (MCl[sub 3]).

  18. Underestimated potential of organometallic rhenium complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Leonidova, Anna; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-10-17

    In the recent years, organometallic compounds have become recognized as promising anti-cancer drug candidates. While radioactive (186/188)Re compounds are already used in clinics for cancer treatment, cold Re organometallic compounds have mostly been explored as luminescent probes for cell imaging and photosensitizers in photocatalysis. However, a growing number of studies have recently revealed the potential of Re organometallic complexes as anti-cancer agents. Several compounds have displayed cytotoxicity equaling or exceeding that of the well-established anti-cancer drug cisplatin. In this review, we present the currently known Re organometallic complexes that have shown anti-proliferative activity on cancer cell lines. A particular emphasis is placed on their cellular uptake and localization as well as their potential mechanism of action.

  19. Coordination of dibensothiophenes and corannulenes to organometallic ruthenium (II) fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Paul Anthony

    2005-05-01

    This dissertation contains five papers in the format required for journal publication which describe (in part) my research accomplishments as a graduate student at Iowa State University. This work can be broadly categorized as the binding of weakly-coordinating ligands to cationic organometallic ruthenium fragments, and consists of two main areas of study. Chapters 2-4 are investigations into factors that influence the binding of dibenzothiophenes to {l_brace}Cp'Ru(CO){sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +} fragments, where Cp' = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} (Cp) and {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 5} (Cp*). Chapters 5 and 6 present the synthesis and structural characterization of complexes containing corannulene buckybowls that are {eta}{sup 6}-coordinated to {l_brace}Cp*Ru{r_brace}{sup +} fragments. The first chapter contains a brief description of the difficulty in lowering sulfur levels in diesel fuel along with a review of corannulene derivatives and their metal complexes. After the final paper is a short summary of the work herein (Chapter 7). Each chapter is independent, and all equations, schemes, figures, tables, references, and appendices in this dissertation pertain only to the chapter in which they appear.

  20. Switching on Elusive Organometallic Mechanisms with Photoredox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Terrett, Jack A.; Cuthbertson, James D.; Shurtleff, Valerie W.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most utilized carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. More recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C–C bond forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki–Miyaura, Stille, Kumada, and Hiyama couplings1,2. Despite the tremendous advances in C–C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C–O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C–O bond forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that visible light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon–oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More significantly, we have developed a general strategy to “switch on” important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron transfer (SET) catalysts. PMID:26266976

  1. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Terrett, Jack A; Cuthbertson, James D; Shurtleff, Valerie W; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-08-20

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to 'switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts.

  2. Synthesis and Small Molecule Exchange Studies of a Magnesium Bisformate Metal-Organic Framework: An Experiment in Host-Guest Chemistry for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rood, Jeffrey A.; Henderson, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    concepts of host-guest chemistry and size exclusion in porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The experiment has been successfully carried out in both introductory and advanced-level inorganic chemistry laboratories. Students synthesized the porous MOF, alpha-Mg[subscript…

  3. Unravelling novel synergies between organometallic and biological partners: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of an artificial metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Lledós, Agustí; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the design of artificial metalloenzymes obtained by the insertion of homogeneous catalysts into biological macromolecules has become a major field of research. These hybrids, and the corresponding X-ray structures of several of them, are offering opportunities to better understand the synergy between organometallic and biological subsystems. In this work, we investigate the resting state and activation process of a hybrid inspired by an oxidative haemoenzyme but presenting an unexpected reactivity and structural features. An extensive series of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations show that the resting state and the activation processes of the novel enzyme differ from naturally occurring haemoenzymes in terms of the electronic state of the metal, participation of the first coordination sphere of the metal and the dynamic process. This study presents novel insights into the sensitivity of the association between organometallic and biological partners and illustrates the molecular challenge that represents the design of efficient enzymes based on this strategy.

  4. Unravelling novel synergies between organometallic and biological partners: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of an artificial metalloenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Carrasco, Elisabeth; Lledós, Agustí; Maréchal, Jean-Didier

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the design of artificial metalloenzymes obtained by the insertion of homogeneous catalysts into biological macromolecules has become a major field of research. These hybrids, and the corresponding X-ray structures of several of them, are offering opportunities to better understand the synergy between organometallic and biological subsystems. In this work, we investigate the resting state and activation process of a hybrid inspired by an oxidative haemoenzyme but presenting an unexpected reactivity and structural features. An extensive series of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations show that the resting state and the activation processes of the novel enzyme differ from naturally occurring haemoenzymes in terms of the electronic state of the metal, participation of the first coordination sphere of the metal and the dynamic process. This study presents novel insights into the sensitivity of the association between organometallic and biological partners and illustrates the molecular challenge that represents the design of efficient enzymes based on this strategy. PMID:24829279

  5. Design and compressibility of Langmuir monolayers from organometallic nanocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushevskaya, H. V.; Krylova, N. G.; Lipnevich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    We propose to control design of organometallic conducting Langmuir monolayer by utilizing geometrodynamic approach. By means of this approach the compressibility of the monolayer, which consists of molecules of thiophene-pyrrole series oligomer with covalently bound hydrophobic alkyl chain, has been analyzed for different subphase with iron salts. It has been discovered that the monolayers are polymerized and turn into monolayers of nanocyclic organometallic coordination compounds at a two-dimensional phase transition of the first order.

  6. Unexpected metal ion-assisted transformations leading to unexplored bridging ligands in Ni(II) coordination chemistry: the case of PO3F(2-) group.

    PubMed

    Dermitzaki, Despina; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Escuer, Albert; Perlepes, Spyros P; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2014-10-21

    The initial 'accidental', metal ion-assisted hydrolysis of PF6(-) to PO3F(2-) has been evolved in a systematic investigation of the bridging affinity of the latter group in Ni(II)/oximate chemistry; mono-, di- and trinuclear complexes have been prepared and confirmed both the rich reactivity of PO3F(2-) and its potential for further use as bridging ligand in high-nuclearity 3d-metal cluster chemistry.

  7. Influence of soil chemistry on metal and bioessential element concentrations in nymphal and adult periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R.; Sibrell, P.L.; Boughton, C.J.; Yang, L.H.

    2007-01-01

    Metal and bioessential element concentrations were measured in three species of 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) to determine how cicada tissue chemistry is affected by soil chemistry, measure the bioavailability of metals from both uncontaminated and lead-arsenate-pesticide contaminated soils, and assess the potential risks of observed metal contamination for wildlife. Periodical cicada nymphs feed on root xylem fluids for 13 or 17??years of underground development. The nymphs then emerge synchronously at high densities, before leaving their nymphal keratin exoskeleton and molting into their adult form. Cicadas are an important food source for birds and animals during emergence events, and influence nutrient cycles in woodland ecosystems. Nymphal exoskeletons and whole adult cicadas were sampled in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia during the Brood X emergence in May and June, 2004. Elements, such as Al, Fe, and Pb, are strongly enriched in the nymphal exoskeleton relative to the adult body; Cu and Zn are enriched in bodies. Concentrations of Fe and Pb, when normalized to relatively inert soil constituents such as Al and Ce, are similar in both the molt exoskeleton and their host soil, implying that passive assimilation through prolonged soil contact (adhesion or adsorption) might control these metal concentrations. Normalized concentrations of bioessential elements, such as S, P, K, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Mo, and chalcophile (sulfur-loving) elements, such as As, Se, and Au, indicate strong enrichment in cicada tissues relative to soil, implying selective absorption and retention by xylem fluids, the cicada nymphs themselves, or both. Element enrichment patterns in cicada tissues are similar to enrichment patterns observed in xylem fluids from tree roots. Chalcophile elements and heavy metals accumulate in keratin-rich tissues and may bind to sulfhydryl groups. Metal concentrations in the nymphal

  8. Coinage metal coordination chemistry of stable primary, secondary and tertiary ferrocenylethyl-based phosphines.

    PubMed

    Azizpoor Fard, M; Rabiee Kenaree, A; Boyle, P D; Ragogna, P J; Gilroy, J B; Corrigan, J F

    2016-02-21

    Ferrocene-based phosphines constitute an important auxiliary ligand in inorganic chemistry. Utilizing the (ferrocenylethyl)phosphines (FcCH2CH2)3-nHnP (Fc = ferrocenyl; n = 2, 1; n = 1, 2; n = 0, 3) the synthesis of a series of coordination complexes [(FcCH2CH2)3-nHnPCuCl]4 (n = 2, 1-CuCl; n = 0, 3-CuCl), [(FcCH2CH2)2HPCuCl] (2-CuCl), {[(FcCH2CH2)H2P]2AgCl}2 (1-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)2HPAgCl] (2-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)3PAgCl]4 (3-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)3PM(OAc)]4 (M = Cu, 3-CuOAc M = Ag, 3-AgOAc), [(FcCH2CH2)3-nHnPAuCl] (n = 1, 2-AuCl; n = 0, 3-AuCl), via the reaction between the free phosphine and MX (M = Cu, Ag and Au; X = Cl, OAc), is described. The reaction between the respective phosphine with a suspension of metal-chloride or -acetate in a 1 : 1 ratio in THF at ambient temperature affords coordinated phosphine-coinage metal complexes. Varying structural motifs are observed in the solid state, as determined via single crystal X-ray analysis of 1-CuCl, 3-CuCl, 1-AgCl, 3-AgCl, 3-CuOAc, 3-AgOAc, 2-AuCl and 3-AuCl. Complexes 1-CuCl and 3-CuCl are tetrameric Cu(i) cubane-like structures with a Cu4Cl4 core, whereas silver complexes with primary and tertiary phosphine reveal two different structural types. The structure of 1-AgCl, unlike the rest, displays the coordination of two phosphines to each silver atom and shows a quadrangle defined by two Ag and two Cl atoms. In contrast, 3-AgCl is distorted from a cubane structure via elongation of one of the ClAg distances. 3-CuOAc and 3-AgOAc are isostructural with step-like cores, while complexes 2-AuCl and 3-AuCl reveal a linear geometry of a phosphine gold(i) chloride devoid of any aurophilic interactions. All of the complexes were characterized in solution by multinuclear (1)H, (13)C{(1)H} and (31)P NMR spectroscopic techniques; the redox chemistry of the series of complexes was examined using cyclic voltammetry. This class of complexes has been found to exhibit one reversible Fe(ii)/Fe(iii) oxidation couple, suggesting the

  9. Coinage metal coordination chemistry of stable primary, secondary and tertiary ferrocenylethyl-based phosphines.

    PubMed

    Azizpoor Fard, M; Rabiee Kenaree, A; Boyle, P D; Ragogna, P J; Gilroy, J B; Corrigan, J F

    2016-02-21

    Ferrocene-based phosphines constitute an important auxiliary ligand in inorganic chemistry. Utilizing the (ferrocenylethyl)phosphines (FcCH2CH2)3-nHnP (Fc = ferrocenyl; n = 2, 1; n = 1, 2; n = 0, 3) the synthesis of a series of coordination complexes [(FcCH2CH2)3-nHnPCuCl]4 (n = 2, 1-CuCl; n = 0, 3-CuCl), [(FcCH2CH2)2HPCuCl] (2-CuCl), {[(FcCH2CH2)H2P]2AgCl}2 (1-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)2HPAgCl] (2-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)3PAgCl]4 (3-AgCl), [(FcCH2CH2)3PM(OAc)]4 (M = Cu, 3-CuOAc M = Ag, 3-AgOAc), [(FcCH2CH2)3-nHnPAuCl] (n = 1, 2-AuCl; n = 0, 3-AuCl), via the reaction between the free phosphine and MX (M = Cu, Ag and Au; X = Cl, OAc), is described. The reaction between the respective phosphine with a suspension of metal-chloride or -acetate in a 1 : 1 ratio in THF at ambient temperature affords coordinated phosphine-coinage metal complexes. Varying structural motifs are observed in the solid state, as determined via single crystal X-ray analysis of 1-CuCl, 3-CuCl, 1-AgCl, 3-AgCl, 3-CuOAc, 3-AgOAc, 2-AuCl and 3-AuCl. Complexes 1-CuCl and 3-CuCl are tetrameric Cu(i) cubane-like structures with a Cu4Cl4 core, whereas silver complexes with primary and tertiary phosphine reveal two different structural types. The structure of 1-AgCl, unlike the rest, displays the coordination of two phosphines to each silver atom and shows a quadrangle defined by two Ag and two Cl atoms. In contrast, 3-AgCl is distorted from a cubane structure via elongation of one of the ClAg distances. 3-CuOAc and 3-AgOAc are isostructural with step-like cores, while complexes 2-AuCl and 3-AuCl reveal a linear geometry of a phosphine gold(i) chloride devoid of any aurophilic interactions. All of the complexes were characterized in solution by multinuclear (1)H, (13)C{(1)H} and (31)P NMR spectroscopic techniques; the redox chemistry of the series of complexes was examined using cyclic voltammetry. This class of complexes has been found to exhibit one reversible Fe(ii)/Fe(iii) oxidation couple, suggesting the

  10. Simulation and testing of a vertical organometallic vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, R. A.; Barmawi, M.; Mindara, J. Y.

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to design a single wafer vertical organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) reactor which gives a uniform deposition around the symmetry axis. The vertical reactor under the consideration consist of a diffuser and a system of coaxial cylinders to laminarize the flow which may lead to a uniform deposition without rotating the susceptor. The simulation shows that for a susceptor with a radius of 2.5 cm, a uniformity can be achieved in a region of a radius of 2 cm within 1% for certain operating condition. The result is compared with the experimental measurement of TiO2 deposition from TTIP.

  11. Lead toxicity to Lemna minor predicted using a metal speciation chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Paula M C; Kreager, Nancy J

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, predictive measures for Pb toxicity and Lemna minor were developed from bioassays with 7 surface waters having varied chemistries (0.5-12.5 mg/L dissolved organic carbon, pH of 5.4-8.3, and water hardness of 8-266 mg/L CaCO3 ). As expected based on water quality, 10%, 20%, and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC10, IC20, and IC50, respectively) values expressed as percent net root elongation (%NRE) varied widely (e.g., IC20s ranging from 306 nM to >6920 nM total dissolved Pb), with unbounded values limited by Pb solubility. In considering chemical speciation, %NRE variability was better explained when both Pb hydroxides and the free lead ion were defined as bioavailable (i.e., f{OH} ) and colloidal Fe(III)(OH)3 precipitates were permitted to form and sorb metals (using FeOx as the binding phase). Although cause and effect could not be established because of covariance with alkalinity (p = 0.08), water hardness correlated strongly (r(2)  = 0.998, p < 0.0001) with the concentration of total Pb in true solution ([Pb]T_True solution ). Using these correlations as the basis for predictions (i.e., [Pb]T_True solution vs water hardness and %NRE vs f{OH} ), IC20 and IC50 values produced were within a factor of 2.9 times and 2.2 times those measured, respectively. The results provide much needed effect data for L. minor and highlight the importance of chemical speciation in Pb-based risk assessments for aquatic macrophytes.

  12. Lead toxicity to Lemna minor predicted using a metal speciation chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Paula M C; Kreager, Nancy J

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, predictive measures for Pb toxicity and Lemna minor were developed from bioassays with 7 surface waters having varied chemistries (0.5-12.5 mg/L dissolved organic carbon, pH of 5.4-8.3, and water hardness of 8-266 mg/L CaCO3 ). As expected based on water quality, 10%, 20%, and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC10, IC20, and IC50, respectively) values expressed as percent net root elongation (%NRE) varied widely (e.g., IC20s ranging from 306 nM to >6920 nM total dissolved Pb), with unbounded values limited by Pb solubility. In considering chemical speciation, %NRE variability was better explained when both Pb hydroxides and the free lead ion were defined as bioavailable (i.e., f{OH} ) and colloidal Fe(III)(OH)3 precipitates were permitted to form and sorb metals (using FeOx as the binding phase). Although cause and effect could not be established because of covariance with alkalinity (p = 0.08), water hardness correlated strongly (r(2)  = 0.998, p < 0.0001) with the concentration of total Pb in true solution ([Pb]T_True solution ). Using these correlations as the basis for predictions (i.e., [Pb]T_True solution vs water hardness and %NRE vs f{OH} ), IC20 and IC50 values produced were within a factor of 2.9 times and 2.2 times those measured, respectively. The results provide much needed effect data for L. minor and highlight the importance of chemical speciation in Pb-based risk assessments for aquatic macrophytes. PMID:25044009

  13. Nanostructured silicon via metal assisted catalyzed etch (MACE): chemistry fundamentals and pattern engineering.

    PubMed

    Toor, Fatima; Miller, Jeffrey B; Davidson, Lauren M; Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Jura, Michael P; Yim, Joanne; Forziati, Joanne; Black, Marcie R

    2016-10-14

    There are a range of different methods to generate a nanostructured surface on silicon (Si) but the most cost effective and optically interesting is the metal assisted wet chemical etching (MACE) (Koynov et al 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 203107). MACE of Si is a controllable, room-temperature wet-chemical technique that uses a thin layer of metal to etch the surface of Si, leaving behind various nano- and micro-scale surface features or 'black silicon'. MACE-fabricated nanowires (NWs) provide improved antireflection and light trapping functionality (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66) compared with the traditional 'iso-texturing' (Campbell and Green 1987 J. Appl. Phys. 62 243-9). The resulting lower reflection and improved light trapping can lead to higher short circuit currents in NW solar cells (Toor et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 103501). In addition, NW cells can have higher fill factors and voltages than traditionally processed cells, thus leading to increased solar cell efficiencies (Cabrera et al 2013 IEEE J. Photovolt. 3 102-7). MACE NW processing also has synergy with next generation Si solar cell designs, such as thin epitaxial-Si and passivated emitter rear contact (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66). While several companies have begun manufacturing black Si, and many more are researching these techniques, much of the work has not been published in traditional journals and is publicly available only through conference proceedings and patent publications, which makes learning the field challenging. There have been three specialized review articles published recently on certain aspects of MACE or black Si, but do not present a full review that would benefit the industry (Liu et al 2014 Energy Environ. Sci. 7 3223-63; Yusufoglu et al 2015 IEEE J. Photovolt. 5 320-8; Huang et al 2011 Adv. Mater. 23 285-308). In this feature article, we review the chemistry of MACE and explore how changing parameters in the wet etch process effects the resulting texture

  14. Nanostructured silicon via metal assisted catalyzed etch (MACE): chemistry fundamentals and pattern engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Miller, Jeffrey B.; Davidson, Lauren M.; Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Jura, Michael P.; Yim, Joanne; Forziati, Joanne; Black, Marcie R.

    2016-10-01

    There are a range of different methods to generate a nanostructured surface on silicon (Si) but the most cost effective and optically interesting is the metal assisted wet chemical etching (MACE) (Koynov et al 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 203107). MACE of Si is a controllable, room-temperature wet-chemical technique that uses a thin layer of metal to etch the surface of Si, leaving behind various nano- and micro-scale surface features or ‘black silicon’. MACE-fabricated nanowires (NWs) provide improved antireflection and light trapping functionality (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66) compared with the traditional ‘iso-texturing’ (Campbell and Green 1987 J. Appl. Phys. 62 243-9). The resulting lower reflection and improved light trapping can lead to higher short circuit currents in NW solar cells (Toor et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 103501). In addition, NW cells can have higher fill factors and voltages than traditionally processed cells, thus leading to increased solar cell efficiencies (Cabrera et al 2013 IEEE J. Photovolt. 3 102-7). MACE NW processing also has synergy with next generation Si solar cell designs, such as thin epitaxial-Si and passivated emitter rear contact (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66). While several companies have begun manufacturing black Si, and many more are researching these techniques, much of the work has not been published in traditional journals and is publicly available only through conference proceedings and patent publications, which makes learning the field challenging. There have been three specialized review articles published recently on certain aspects of MACE or black Si, but do not present a full review that would benefit the industry (Liu et al 2014 Energy Environ. Sci. 7 3223-63 Yusufoglu et al 2015 IEEE J. Photovolt. 5 320-8 Huang et al 2011 Adv. Mater. 23 285-308). In this feature article, we review the chemistry of MACE and explore how changing parameters in the wet etch process effects the resulting

  15. The extreme chemistry of multiple stellar populations in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4833

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Gratton, R. G.; D'Orazi, V.; Lucatello, S.; Momany, Y.; Sollima, A.; Bellazzini, M.; Catanzaro, G.; Leone, F.

    2014-04-01

    Our FLAMES survey of Na-O anticorrelation in globular clusters (GCs) is extended to NGC 4833, a metal-poor GC with a long blue tail on the horizontal branch (HB). We present the abundance analysis for a large sample of 78 red giants based on UVES and GIRAFFE spectra acquired at the ESO-VLT. We derived abundances of Na, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Ba, La, and Nd. This is the first extensive study of this cluster from high resolution spectroscopy. On the scale of our survey, the metallicity of NGC 4833 is [Fe/H] = -2.015 ± 0.004 ± 0.084 dex (rms = 0.014 dex) from 12 stars observed with UVES, where the first error is from statistics and the second one refers to the systematic effects. The iron abundance in NGC 4833 is homogeneous at better than 6%. On the other hand, the light elements involved in proton-capture reactions at high temperature show the large star-to-star variations observed in almost all GCs studied so far. The Na-O anticorrelation in NGC 4833 is quite extended, as expected from the high temperatures reached by stars on the HB, and NGC 4833 contains a conspicuous fraction of stars with extreme [O/Na] ratios. More striking is the finding that large star-to-star variations are also seen for Mg, which spans a range of more than 0.5 dex in this GC. Depletions in Mg are correlated to the abundances of O and anti-correlated with Na, Al, and Si abundances. This pattern suggests the action of nuclear processing at unusually high temperatures, producing the extreme chemistry observed in the stellar generations of NGC 4833. These extreme changes are also seen in giants of the much more massive GCs M 54 and ω Cen, and our conclusion is that NGC 4833 has probably lost a conspicuous fraction of its original mass due to bulge shocking, as also indicated by its orbit. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programmes 083.D-0208 and 68.D-0265.Full Tables 2, 6-11 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  16. Nanostructured silicon via metal assisted catalyzed etch (MACE): chemistry fundamentals and pattern engineering.

    PubMed

    Toor, Fatima; Miller, Jeffrey B; Davidson, Lauren M; Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Jura, Michael P; Yim, Joanne; Forziati, Joanne; Black, Marcie R

    2016-10-14

    There are a range of different methods to generate a nanostructured surface on silicon (Si) but the most cost effective and optically interesting is the metal assisted wet chemical etching (MACE) (Koynov et al 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 203107). MACE of Si is a controllable, room-temperature wet-chemical technique that uses a thin layer of metal to etch the surface of Si, leaving behind various nano- and micro-scale surface features or 'black silicon'. MACE-fabricated nanowires (NWs) provide improved antireflection and light trapping functionality (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66) compared with the traditional 'iso-texturing' (Campbell and Green 1987 J. Appl. Phys. 62 243-9). The resulting lower reflection and improved light trapping can lead to higher short circuit currents in NW solar cells (Toor et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 103501). In addition, NW cells can have higher fill factors and voltages than traditionally processed cells, thus leading to increased solar cell efficiencies (Cabrera et al 2013 IEEE J. Photovolt. 3 102-7). MACE NW processing also has synergy with next generation Si solar cell designs, such as thin epitaxial-Si and passivated emitter rear contact (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66). While several companies have begun manufacturing black Si, and many more are researching these techniques, much of the work has not been published in traditional journals and is publicly available only through conference proceedings and patent publications, which makes learning the field challenging. There have been three specialized review articles published recently on certain aspects of MACE or black Si, but do not present a full review that would benefit the industry (Liu et al 2014 Energy Environ. Sci. 7 3223-63; Yusufoglu et al 2015 IEEE J. Photovolt. 5 320-8; Huang et al 2011 Adv. Mater. 23 285-308). In this feature article, we review the chemistry of MACE and explore how changing parameters in the wet etch process effects the resulting texture

  17. Constructing Chemical Concepts through a Study of Metals and Metal Ions: Guided Inquiry Experiments for General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, Ram S.; Sharma, Shiva; Lloyd, Baird W.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes a set of inquiry-based experiments designed to help students develop an understanding of basic chemical concepts within the framework of studying the properties and reactivity of metals and metal ions. The students perform these experiments before the concepts are discussed in class, with the emphasize on the construction of meaning from observation, measurement, and data analysis. The set includes: Are All Pennies the Same?, which introduces students to the differences between extensive and intensive quantities. How Much is Enough?, examines the quantitative aspects of the reaction between metals and hydrogen ions leading to the concept of the mole and stoichiometric calculations. How Much is Too Much?, which identifies and distinguishes between limiting reagents, excess reagents, spectator ions and reactant ions. What is an Active Metal?, provides the observations needed to sort common metals into an activity series and How Active are the Active Metals?, allows students to develop a quantitative model of metal activity.

  18. Structurally defined allyl compounds of main group metals: coordination and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Crispin; Okuda, Jun

    2013-05-10

    Organometallic allyl compounds are important as allylation reagents in organic synthesis, as polymerization catalysts, and as volatile metal precursors in material science. Whereas the allyl chemistry of synthetically relevant transition metals such as palladium and of the lanthanoids is well-established, that of main group metals has been lagging behind. Recent progress on allyl complexes of Groups 1, 2, and 12-16 now provides a more complete picture. This is based on a fundamental understanding of metal-allyl bonding interactions in solution and in the solid state. Furthermore, reactivity trends have been rationalized and new types of allyl-specific reactivity patterns have been uncovered. Key features include 1) the exploitation of the different types of metal-allyl bonding (highly ionic to predominantly covalent), 2) the use of synergistic effects in heterobimetallic compounds, and 3) the adjustment of Lewis acidity by variation of the charge of allyl compounds.

  19. Novel effects at metal-organic interfaces: Magnetic interactions between high-spin molecules and non-magnetic metals triggered by interface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya, Amilcar; Hueso, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules on metal surfaces presents a rich variety of physical phenomena, which move from the creation of interface dipoles to hybridization and charge-transfer via strong chemisorption. In the strong interaction regime, some metal-molecule systems could even undergo a surface rearrangement and lead to the formation of new magnetically active phases, which could be used as templates for spin-injection or magnetization switching. For this purpose, we study the interaction of novel high-spin quinoline molecules (Tb3q9) with non-magnetic metallic surfaces. The molecules preserve their structural, chemical and magnetic properties when deposited onto noble metal (Au) and passivated (Si02) surfaces; while the adsorption on reactive metals such as Cu induces a magnetic phase at the interface involving molecular Tb-atoms, as measured via SQUID magnetometry and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Remarkably, the magnetic ordering persists up to room-temperature for the Tb3q9/Cu system and is linked to a chemically-triggered change in structure and stoichiometry of the interfacial species. The occurrence of a molecular-driven magnetic phase at otherwise nonmagnetic metal surfaces highlights the importance of interface chemistry to tailor new magnetic interfaces and functional hybrid structures for spintronic applications. and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.

  20. Hydrodeoxygenation of coal using organometallic catalyst precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen R.

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this dissertation was to determine the desirability of organometallic compounds for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of coal during liquefaction. The primary focus of this study was the removal of phenol-like compounds from coal liquids for the production of a thermally stable jet fuel. Investigation of the HDO ability of an organometallic compound containing both cobalt and molybdenum (CoMo-T2) was achieved using a combination of model compound and coal experiments. Model compounds were chosen representing four oxygen functional groups present in a range of coals. Electron density and bond order calculations were performed for anthrone, dinaphthyl ether, xanthene, di-t-butylmethylphenol, and some of their derivatives to ascertain a potential order of hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation reactivity for these compounds. The four model compounds were then reacted with CoMo-T2, as well as ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM). Products of reaction were grouped as compounds that had undergone deoxygenation, those that had aromatic rings reduced, those that were products of both reaction pathways, and those produced through other routes. ATTM had an affinity for both reaction types. Its reaction order for the four model compounds with respect to deoxygenated compounds was the same as that estimated from electron density calculations for hydrogenolysis reactivity. CoMo-T2 appeared to show a preference toward hydrogenation, although deoxygenated products were still achieved in similar, or greater, yields, for almost all the model compounds. The reactivity order achieved for the four compounds with CoMo-T2 was similar to that estimated from bond order calculations for hydrogenation reactivity. Three coals were selected representing a range of coal ranks and oxygen contents. DECS-26 (Wyodak), DECS-24 (Illinois #6), and DECS-23 (Pittsburgh #8) were analyzed by CPMAS 13C NMR and pyrolysis-GC-MS to determine the functional groups comprising the oxygen content of these

  1. Dominance of interface chemistry over the bulk properties in determining the electronic structure of epitaxial metal/perovskite oxide heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Scott A.; Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Droubay, Timothy C.; Hepplestone, Steven; Sushko, Petr

    2015-06-09

    We show that despite very similar crystallographic properties and work function values in the bulk, epitaxial Fe and Cr metallizations on Nb:SrTiO3(001) generate completely different heterojunction electronic properties. Cr is Ohmic whereas Fe forms a Schottky barrier with a barrier height of 0.50 eV. This contrast arises because of differences in interface chemistry. In contrast to Cr [Chambers, S. A. et al., Adv. Mater. 2013, 25, 4001.], Fe exhibits a +2 oxidation state and occupies Ti sites in the perovskite lattice, resulting in negligible charge transfer to Ti, upward band bending, and Schottky barrier formation. The differences between Cr and Fe are understood by performing first-principles calculations of the energetics of defect formation which corroborate the observed interface chemistry and structure.

  2. A Titanium-Organic Framework as an Exemplar of Combining the Chemistry of Metal- and Covalent-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha L; Gándara, Felipe; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Doan, Tan L H; Cordova, Kyle E; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-04-01

    A crystalline material with a two-dimensional structure, termed metal-organic framework-901 (MOF-901), was prepared using a strategy that combines the chemistry of MOFs and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs). This strategy involves in situ generation of an amine-functionalized titanium oxo cluster, Ti6O6(OCH3)6(AB)6 (AB = 4-aminobenzoate), which was linked with benzene-1,4-dialdehyde using imine condensation reactions, typical of COFs. The crystal structure of MOF-901 is composed of hexagonal porous layers that are likely stacked in staggered conformation (hxl topology). This MOF represents the first example of combining metal cluster chemistry with dynamic organic covalent bond formation to give a new crystalline, extended framework of titanium metal, which is rarely used in MOFs. The incorporation of Ti(IV) units made MOF-901 useful in the photocatalyzed polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The resulting polyMMA product was obtained with a high-number-average molar mass (26 850 g mol(-1)) and low polydispersity index (1.6), which in many respects are better than those achieved by the commercially available photocatalyst (P-25 TiO2). Additionally, the catalyst can be isolated, reused, and recycled with no loss in performance.

  3. Multi-stimuli-responsive organometallic gels based on ferrocene-linked poly(aryl ether) dendrons: reversible redox switching and Pb2+-ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Neelakandan Vidhya; Mandal, Dipendu; Ghosh, Sundargopal; Prasad, Edamana

    2014-07-14

    We describe the design, synthesis, and "stimuli-responsive" study of ferrocene-linked Fréchet-type [poly(aryl ether)]-dendron-based organometallic gels, in which the ferrocene moiety is attached to the dendron framework through an acyl hydrazone linkage. The low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs) form robust gels in both polar and non-polar solvent/solvent mixtures. The organometallic gels undergo stimuli-responsive behavior through 1) thermal, 2) chemical, and 3) electrochemical methods. Among them, conditions 1 and 3 lead to seamlessly reversible with repeated cycles of identical efficiency. Results indicate that the flexible nature of the poly(aryl ether) dendron framework plays a key role in retaining the reversible electrochemical behavior of ferrocene moiety in the LMWGs. Further, the organometallic gelators have exhibited unique selectivity towards Pb(2+) ions (detection limit ≈10(-8)  M). The metal ion-sensing results in a gel-sol phase transition associated with a color change visible to the naked eye. Most importantly, decomplexing the metal ion from the system leads to the regeneration of the initial gel morphology, indicating the restoring ability of the organometallic gel. The metal-ligand binding nature has been analyzed by using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and DFT calculations.

  4. A nickel tripeptide as a metallodithiolate ligand anchor for resin-bound organometallics.

    PubMed

    Green, Kayla N; Jeffery, Stephen P; Reibenspies, Joseph H; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2006-05-17

    The molecular structure of the acetyl CoA synthase enzyme has clarified the role of individual nickel atoms in the dinickel active site which mediates C-C and C-S coupling reactions. The NiN2S2 portion of the biocatalyst (N2S2 = a cysteine-glycine-cysteine or CGC4- tripeptide ligand) serves as an S-donor ligand comparable to classical bidentate ligands operative in organometallic chemistry, ligating the second nickel which is redox and catalytically active. Inspired by this biological catalyst, the synthesis of NiN2S2 metalloligands, including the solid-phase synthesis of resin-bound Ni(CGC)2-, and sulfur-based derivatization with W(CO)5 and Rh(CO)2+ have been carried out. Through comparison to analogous well-characterized, solution-phase complexes, Attenuated Total Reflectance FTIR spectroscopy establishes the presence of unique heterobimetallic complexes, of the form [Ni(CGC)]M(CO)x, both in solution and immobilized on resin beads. This work provides the initial step toward exploitation of such an evolutionarily optimized nickel peptide as a solid support anchor for hybrid bioinorganic-organometallic catalysts.

  5. Highly reduced organometallics of the Group IV elements: Part One. The study of (trmpe) metal tetracarbonyl complexes of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium. Part Two. The study of bis-arene titanium complexes prepared from arene radical anions

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Potassium naphthalenide reduction of solutions of the Group IV transition metal salts MCl[sub 4][center dot]THF, M = Ti, Zr, and Hf, in the presence of the tridentate phosphine ligand 1,1,1-tris(dimethylphosphinomethyl)ethane (trmpe), at -70[degrees] under Ar, followed by carbonylation at atmospheric pressure, provides the zerovalent carbonylphosphine complexes M(CO)[sub 4](trmpe). Yields range from 5% for Hf to 50% for Ti. The complexes were characterized by [sup 31]P and [sup 13]C NMR studies, and the Zr complex additionally by X-ray crystallography. The titanium complex reacts with triphenylstannide to displace one carbon monoxide ligand, forming the [(trmpe)Ti(CO)[sub 3](Sn(C[sub 6]H[sub 5])[sub 3])] anion. The reduction of TiCl[sub 4][center dot]2THF with arene radical anions provides bis-arene sandwich complexes in high yield (80-95%). For arene = naphthalene, the 18-electron [Ti(C[sub 10]H[sub 8])[sub 2

  6. The biological chemistry of the transition metal "transportome" of Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Nies, Dietrich H

    2016-05-01

    This review tries to illuminate how the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is able to allocate essential transition metal cations to their target proteins although these metals have similar charge-to-surface ratios and chemical features, exert toxic effects, compete with each other, and occur in the bacterial environment over a huge range of concentrations and speciations. Central to this ability is the "transportome", the totality of all interacting metal import and export systems, which, as an emergent feature, transforms the environmental metal content and speciation into the cellular metal mélange. In a kinetic flow equilibrium resulting from controlled uptake and efflux reactions, the periplasmic and cytoplasmic metal content is adjusted in a way that minimizes toxic effects. A central core function of the transportome is to shape the metal ion composition using high-rate and low-specificity reactions to avoid time and/or energy-requiring metal discrimination reactions. This core is augmented by metal-specific channels that may even deliver metals all the way from outside of the cell to the cytoplasm. This review begins with a description of the basic chemical features of transition metal cations and the biochemical consequences of these attributes, and which transition metals are available to C. metallidurans. It then illustrates how the environment influences the metal content and speciation, and how the transportome adjusts this metal content. It concludes with an outlook on the fate of metals in the cytoplasm. By generalization, insights coming from C. metallidurans shed light on multiple transition metal homoeostatic mechanisms in all kinds of bacteria including pathogenic species, where the "battle" for metals is an important part of the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:27065183

  7. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future.

  8. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future. PMID:27268136

  9. Chemistry and thermal history of metal particles in Luna 20 soils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Blau, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Individual metal particles from Luna 20 thin sections 521, 513 and 514 as well as several small metallic inclusions in silicate particles from Luna 20 thin sections 501 and 502 were examined using optical microscopy and the electron microprobe. All the metallic particles and inclusions analyzed are of meteoritic Co-Ni content as are most of the metallic particles from the Fra Mauro and the Apollo 16 highlands sites. It is proposed that most of the metal at these 3 sites had its origin in the meteoritic projectiles that bombarded and accumulated in the early lunar crust. It is apparent that the metallic particles and some of the metallic inclusions in the Luna 20 soil have been subjected to reheating on the moon and this process has removed any evidence of the original meteoritic microstructure of the metal.

  10. The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 52 weld metal in cyclic hydrogenated and oxygenated water chemistry in high temperature water is studied by in situ monitoring corrosion potential (Ecorr), contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS), and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The Ecorr and film resistance show large change when the environment is changed from hydrogenated water to oxygenated water and changeable with changing environment while the morphology and composition only show obvious distinction in the first cycle. The main factor controlling the electric/electrochemical properties of the oxide film is Ecorr.

  11. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  12. Predicting metal effects and interactions on light output in bacteria (Photobacterium phosphoreum) using coordination chemistry data

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Previous studies have shown correlations between Log of the negative solubility product for the metal hydroxide (Log -KsoMOH) and bioaccumulation of metals. The concentration of metal at which light output was reduced 50% (EC-50) in a marine bacteria (Photobacterium phosphoreum) was determined for several metals using Microtox{reg_sign}. Median affect concentrations were corrected for the amount of free ion using MINTEQ and graphed against Log -KsoMOH. A negative relationship was found between 15 minute EC50`s for all metals tested and Log -KsoMOH. The interaction between metal pairs were then determined to see if the interaction between metals could be predicted from Log -KsoMOH. In general, metals with similar values of Log KsoMOH interacted more strongly than metals with very different values. The authors conclude that metal effects (EC-50) could be predicted based on the Log -KsoMOH and that for metals with similar mechanisms of toxicity, the interaction between metals was also predictable based on Log -KsoMOH.

  13. Surface chemistry, microstructure and friction properties of some ferrous-base metallic glasses at temperatures to 750 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, transmission electron microscopy, diffraction studies, and sliding friction experiments were conducted with ferrous-base metallic glasses in sliding contact with aluminum oxide at temperatures from room to 750 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on the friction properties, surface chemistry, and microstructure of metallic glasses. The relative concentrations of the various constituents at the surface of the sputtered specimens were very different from the normal bulk compositions. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the material to the surface upon heating and impart boric oxide and silicon oxide at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The coefficient of friction increased with increasing temperature to 350 C. Above 500 C the coefficient of friction decreased rapidly. The segregation of contaminants may be responsible for the friction behavior.

  14. The effects of metallicity, UV radiation and non-equilibrium chemistry in high-resolution simulations of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richings, A. J.; Schaye, Joop

    2016-05-01

    We present a series of hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies with stellar mass of 109 M⊙. The models use a resolution of 750 M⊙ per particle and include a treatment for the full non-equilibrium chemical evolution of ions and molecules (157 species in total), along with gas cooling rates computed self-consistently using the non-equilibrium abundances. We compare these to simulations evolved using cooling rates calculated assuming chemical (including ionization) equilibrium, and we consider a wide range of metallicities and UV radiation fields, including a local prescription for self-shielding by gas and dust. We find higher star formation rates and stronger outflows at higher metallicity and for weaker radiation fields, as gas can more easily cool to a cold (few hundred Kelvin) star-forming phase under such conditions. Contrary to variations in the metallicity and the radiation field, non-equilibrium chemistry generally has no strong effect on the total star formation rates or outflow properties. However, it is important for modelling molecular outflows. For example, the mass of H2 outflowing with velocities {>}50 {km} {s}^{-1} is enhanced by a factor ˜20 in non-equilibrium. We also compute the observable line emission from C II and CO. Both are stronger at higher metallicity, while C II and CO emission are higher for stronger and weaker radiation fields, respectively. We find that C II is generally unaffected by non-equilibrium chemistry. However, emission from CO varies by a factor of ˜2-4. This has implications for the mean XCO conversion factor between CO emission and H2 column density, which we find is lowered by up to a factor ˜2.3 in non-equilibrium, and for the fraction of CO-dark molecular gas.

  15. Transition-metal-catalyzed Chelation-assisted C-H Functionalization of Aromatic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binlin; Shi, Zhuangzhi; Yuan, Yu

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activations have been very popular in the research field of organometallic chemistry, and have been considered as efficient and convenient strategies to afford complex natural products, functional advanced materials, fluorescent compounds, and pharmaceutical compounds. In this account, we begin with a brief introduction to the development of transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation, especially the development of transition-metal-catalyzed chelation-assisted C-H activation. Then, a more detailed discussion is directed towards our recent studies on the transition-metal-catalyzed chelation-assisted oxidative C-H/C-H functionalization of aromatic substrates bearing directing functional groups.

  16. Transition-metal-catalyzed Chelation-assisted C-H Functionalization of Aromatic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binlin; Shi, Zhuangzhi; Yuan, Yu

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activations have been very popular in the research field of organometallic chemistry, and have been considered as efficient and convenient strategies to afford complex natural products, functional advanced materials, fluorescent compounds, and pharmaceutical compounds. In this account, we begin with a brief introduction to the development of transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation, especially the development of transition-metal-catalyzed chelation-assisted C-H activation. Then, a more detailed discussion is directed towards our recent studies on the transition-metal-catalyzed chelation-assisted oxidative C-H/C-H functionalization of aromatic substrates bearing directing functional groups. PMID:26968749

  17. Chemistry and pharmacological properties of some natural and synthetic antioxidants for heavy metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Flora, S J S; Shrivastava, Rupal; Mittal, Megha

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals are known to cause oxidative deterioration of bio-molecules by initiating free radical mediated chain reaction resulting in lipid per-oxidation, protein oxidation and oxidation of nucleic acid like DNA and RNA. The development of effective dual functioning antioxidants, possessing both metal-chelating and free radical-scavenging properties should bring into play. Administration of natural and synthetic antioxidants like, quercetin, catechin, taurine, captopril, gallic acid, melatonin, N-acetyl cysteine, α- lipoic acid and others have been recognized in the disease prevention and clinical recovery against heavy metal intoxication. These antioxidants affect biological systems not only through direct quenching of free radicals but also via chelation of toxic metal(s). These antioxidants also, have the capacity to enhance cellular antioxidant defense mechanism by regenerating endogenous antioxidants, such as glutathione and vitamin C and E. They also influence cellular signaling and trigger redox sensitive regulatory pathways. The reactivity of antioxidants in protecting against heavy metal induced oxidative stress depends upon their structural properties, their partitioning abilities between hydrophilic and lipophilic environment and their hydrogen donation antioxidant properties. Herein, we review the structural, biochemical and pharmacological properties of selected antioxidants with particular reference to their ability to (i) chelate heavy metals from its complex (ii) ameliorate free radical (iii) terminate heavy metal induced free radical chain reaction (iv) regenerate endogenous antioxidants and, (v) excretion of metal without its redistribution.

  18. Chemistry and pharmacological properties of some natural and synthetic antioxidants for heavy metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Flora, S J S; Shrivastava, Rupal; Mittal, Megha

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals are known to cause oxidative deterioration of bio-molecules by initiating free radical mediated chain reaction resulting in lipid per-oxidation, protein oxidation and oxidation of nucleic acid like DNA and RNA. The development of effective dual functioning antioxidants, possessing both metal-chelating and free radical-scavenging properties should bring into play. Administration of natural and synthetic antioxidants like, quercetin, catechin, taurine, captopril, gallic acid, melatonin, N-acetyl cysteine, α- lipoic acid and others have been recognized in the disease prevention and clinical recovery against heavy metal intoxication. These antioxidants affect biological systems not only through direct quenching of free radicals but also via chelation of toxic metal(s). These antioxidants also, have the capacity to enhance cellular antioxidant defense mechanism by regenerating endogenous antioxidants, such as glutathione and vitamin C and E. They also influence cellular signaling and trigger redox sensitive regulatory pathways. The reactivity of antioxidants in protecting against heavy metal induced oxidative stress depends upon their structural properties, their partitioning abilities between hydrophilic and lipophilic environment and their hydrogen donation antioxidant properties. Herein, we review the structural, biochemical and pharmacological properties of selected antioxidants with particular reference to their ability to (i) chelate heavy metals from its complex (ii) ameliorate free radical (iii) terminate heavy metal induced free radical chain reaction (iv) regenerate endogenous antioxidants and, (v) excretion of metal without its redistribution. PMID:24206124

  19. Influences of Mn(II) and V(IV) on Bacterial Surface Chemistry and Metal Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, S.; Fakra, S.; Glasauer, S.

    2009-05-01

    Microorganisms in terrestrial and marine environments are typically bathed in solutions that contain a range of metal ions, toxic and beneficial. Bacteria such as Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 are metabolically versatile in their respiration, and the reductive dissolution of widely dispersed metals such as Fe(III), Mn(IV), or V(V) can present unique challenges if nearby bodies of water are used for irrigation or drinking. In redox transition zones, dissimilatory metal reduction (DMR) by bacteria can lead to generation of high concentrations of soluble metals. It has been shown that metals will associate with negatively charged bacterial membranes, and the mechanisms of metal reduction are well defined for many species of bacteria. The interaction of metals with the cell wall during DMR is, however, not well documented; very little is known about the interaction of respired transition metals with membrane lipids. Furthermore, bacterial surfaces tend to change in response to their immediate environments. Variations in conditions such as oxygen or metal presence may affect surface component composition, including availability of metal reactive sites. Our research seeks to characterize the biochemical nature of metal-membrane interactions, as well as identify the unique changes at the cell surface that arise as a result of metal presence in their environments. We have utilized scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to examine the dynamics of soluble Mn(II) and V(IV) interactions with purified bacterial membranes rather than whole cells. This prevents intracellular interferences, and allows for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopic analyses of cell surface and surface-associated components. NEXAFS spectra for carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen edges indicate that Mn(II) and V(IV) induce biological modifications of the cell membrane in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These changes depend not only on the metal, but also on the presence of

  20. On-Surface Observation of the Formation of Organometallic Complex in a Supramolecular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yibao; Cheng, Linxiu; Liu, Chunhua; Liu, Wei; Fan, Yulan; Fan, Xiaolin; Zeng, Qingdao

    2015-06-01

    The on-surface formation of organometallic monomers or oligomers, especially in supramolecular network, attracts an extensive interest for chemists and material scientist. In this work, we have investigated metal coordination between zinc (II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and 1, 3-di (4-pyridyl) propane (dipy-pra) in the 2, 6, 11-tricarboxydecyloxy-3, 7, 10-triundecyloxy triphenylene (asym-TTT) supramolecular template by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate under ambient conditions. The experimental results demonstrate that every two ZnPc molecules in one nano-reactor connect with each other through one dipy-pra molecule by metal-coordination interaction. In this coordinating process, the template of asym-TTT supramolecular networks plays a significant role.

  1. On-Surface Observation of the Formation of Organometallic Complex in a Supramolecular Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yibao; Cheng, Linxiu; Liu, Chunhua; Liu, Wei; Fan, Yulan; Fan, Xiaolin; Zeng, Qingdao

    2015-01-01

    The on-surface formation of organometallic monomers or oligomers, especially in supramolecular network, attracts an extensive interest for chemists and material scientist. In this work, we have investigated metal coordination between zinc (II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and 1, 3-di (4-pyridyl) propane (dipy-pra) in the 2, 6, 11-tricarboxydecyloxy-3, 7, 10-triundecyloxy triphenylene (asym-TTT) supramolecular template by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate under ambient conditions. The experimental results demonstrate that every two ZnPc molecules in one nano-reactor connect with each other through one dipy-pra molecule by metal-coordination interaction. In this coordinating process, the template of asym-TTT supramolecular networks plays a significant role. PMID:26061532

  2. Difficulties in Interpreting Alkali Metal Trends at the Senior Chemistry Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Explores the reasons for the differences in alkali metal reactivity in water in terms of thermodynamics rather than ionization trends. Shows that differences in alkali metal reactivity with water are more appropriately explained in terms of the kinetics of the reactions. (MM)

  3. ALTERATION OF SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which contain both inorganic and organic adsorbents. Thus, addition of biosolids to soil not only increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) it alters the phytoavailability of these metals. This reduction in ph...

  4. The Development and Study of Surface Bound Ruthenium Organometallic Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Geoffrey Reuben

    The focus of this project has been on the use of mono-diimine ruthenium organometallic complexes, of the general structure [H(Ru)(CO)(L)2(L') 2][PF6] (L=PPh3, DPPENE and L'=Bpy, DcBpy, MBpyC, Phen, AminoPhen) bound to surfaces as luminescent probes. Both biological and inorganic/organic hybrid surfaces have been studied. The complexes were characterized both bound and unbound using standard analytical techniques such as NMR, IR and X-ray crystallography, as well as through several photophysical methods as well. Initially the study focused on how the photophyscial properties of the complexes were affected by incorporation into biological membranes. It was found that by conjugating the probes to a more rigid cholesterol moiety that luminescence was conserved, compared to conjugation with a far more flexible lipid moiety, where luminescence was either lost or reduced. Both the cholesterol and lipid conjugates were able to insert into a lipid membrane, and in the more rigid environment some of the lipid conjugates regained some of their luminescence, but often blue shifted and reduced, depending on the conjugation site. Silica Polyamine Composites (SPCs) were a hybrid material developed in the Rosenberg Lab as useful metal separation materials, that could be easily modified, and had several benefits over current commercially available polymers, or inorganic materials. These SPCs also provided an opportunity for the development of a heterogeneous platform for luminescent complexes as either catalysts or sensors. Upon binding of the luminescent Ru complexes to the surface no loss, or major change in luminescence was seen, however, when bound to the rigid surface a significant increase in excited state lifetime was measured. It is likely that through binding and interacting with the surface that the complexes lost non-radiative decay pathways, resulting in the increase in lifetime, however, these interactions do not seem to affect the energy level of the MLCT band in a

  5. Growth and characterization of an organometallic tri-allylthiourea complex nonlinear optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, R.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2008-04-01

    A novel family of allylthiourea metal complexes was identified for photonic applications with allylthiourea serving as a double ligand, and II (B) group metals were chosen as a co-ordination metal. This family belongs to an island-type organometallic category. A series of optically negative nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals (ATCC, ATCB, ATMC and ATMB) have been prepared. Their SHG efficiency was an order of magnitude higher than that of the well-known organic crystal, urea. The properties of allylthiourea complex with central atom Cd were compared with the crystals with another central atom Hg. The latter has longer transparency cut-off wavelength, higher thermal stability and SHG efficiencies. These organometallic tri-allylthiourea complex crystals were grown from the aqueous solution by temperature-lowering technique. Comprehensive studies of synthesis, solubility, crystal growth and the general properties including structural, spectral, optical and thermal properties were analyzed by conducting various characterization techniques. They were synthesized in the de-ionized water and the solubilities of each material were determined by employing thermogravimetric analysis. The growth conditions were analyzed in terms of the pH value of the mother solution because it plays a vital role during the growth. Their structural properties were examined by recording the powder X-ray diffraction pattern. The crystal formation and the metal co-ordination were confirmed by the spectral analysis. The transmission spectrum of these crystals shows a wide transparent UV-vis-NIR band. The thermal behavior of these complexes was studied from the thermal studies. Their NLO efficiencies were analyzed through the Kurt'z technique.

  6. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  7. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  8. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R; Mascareñas, José L

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  9. Accurate metal-site structures in proteins obtained by combining experimental data and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ryde, Ulf

    2007-02-14

    The use of molecular mechanics calculations to supplement experimental data in standard X-ray crystallography and NMR refinements is discussed and it is shown that structures can be locally improved by the use of quantum chemical calculations. Such calculations can also be used to interpret the structures, e.g. to decide the protonation state of metal-bound ligands. They have shown that metal sites in crystal structures are frequently photoreduced or disordered, which makes the interpretation of the structures hard. Similar methods can be used for EXAFS refinements to obtain a full atomic structure, rather than a set of metal-ligand distances.

  10. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  11. Ligand Rearrangements of Organometallic Complexes inSolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shanoski, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Many chemical reactions utilize organometallic complexes as catalysts. These complexes find use in reactions as varied as bond activation, polymerization, and isomerization. This thesis outlines the construction of a new ultrafast laser system with an emphasis on the generation of tunable mid-infrared pulses, data collection, and data analysis.

  12. Organometalic carbosilane polymers containing vanadium and their preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Fukuda, K.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention concerns a new organometallic polymer material containing in part a vanadium-siloxane linkage (V-0-Si), which has excellent resistance to heat and oxidation and a high residue ratio after high temperature treatment in a non-oxidizing atmosphere, for example, nitrogen, argon, helium, ammonia, or hydrogen.

  13. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine on metal(II) octacynaomolybdate(IV): role of double metal cyanides in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Kamaluddin

    2012-12-01

    Condensation reactions of amino acid (glycine and alanine) on the surface of metal(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV) (MOCMo) complexes are investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron spray ionizations-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The series of MOCMo have been synthesized and the effect of outer sphere metal ions present in the MOCMo on the oligomerization of glycine and alanine at different temperature and time found out. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 60 °C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90 °C. It has been found that zinc(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV) and cobalt(II) were the most effective metal cations present in outer sphere of the MOCMo for the production of high yield of oligomerized products. Surface area of MOCMo seems to play dominating parameter for the oligomerization of alanine and glycine. The results of the present study reveal the role of MOCMo in chemical evolution for the oligomerization of biomolecules.

  14. Emergence of electrophilic alumination as the counterpart of established nucleophilic lithiation: an academic sojourn in organometallics with William Kaska as fellow traveler.

    PubMed

    Eisch, John J

    2015-04-21

    William Kaska pursued doctoral studies with John Eisch in mechanistic organometallic chemistry, first with organolithium reactions at St. Louis University and then at the University of Michigan with organoaluminum reactions. Thereby he revealed the change in mechanism from nucleophilic lithiation and carbolithiation to that of electrophilic alumination, carboalumination and hydroalumination of organic substrates, which reactions were previously observed by Karl Ziegler in his empirical studies of organoaluminum reactions. Our findings were the first mechanistic studies attempting to set such Ziegler chemistry on a modern theoretical basis. PMID:25820225

  15. Emergence of electrophilic alumination as the counterpart of established nucleophilic lithiation: an academic sojourn in organometallics with William Kaska as fellow traveler.

    PubMed

    Eisch, John J

    2015-04-21

    William Kaska pursued doctoral studies with John Eisch in mechanistic organometallic chemistry, first with organolithium reactions at St. Louis University and then at the University of Michigan with organoaluminum reactions. Thereby he revealed the change in mechanism from nucleophilic lithiation and carbolithiation to that of electrophilic alumination, carboalumination and hydroalumination of organic substrates, which reactions were previously observed by Karl Ziegler in his empirical studies of organoaluminum reactions. Our findings were the first mechanistic studies attempting to set such Ziegler chemistry on a modern theoretical basis.

  16. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  17. A Bioanalytical Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Students: Biosensors Based on Metal Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niagi, John; Warner, John; Andreesco, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the development of new biosensors based on metal nanoparticles because of its high surface area and large binding ability. The adopted procedure is extremely simple and versatile and can be used in various applications of electrochemistry.

  18. Transition metal complexes of phyllobilins – a new realm of bioinorganic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengjie

    2015-01-01

    Natural cyclic tetrapyrroles feature outstanding capacity for binding transition metal ions, furnishing Nature with the important metallo-porphyrinoid ‘Pigments of Life’, such as heme, chlorophyll (Chl) and vitamin B12. In contrast, linear tetrapyrroles are not generally ascribed a biologically relevant ability for metal-binding. Indeed, when heme or Chl are degraded to natural linear tetrapyrroles, their central Fe- or Mg-ions are set free. Some linear tetrapyrroles are, however, effective multi-dentate ligands and their transition metal complexes have remarkable chemical properties. The focus of this short review is centred on such complexes of the linear tetrapyrroles derived from natural Chl-breakdown, called phyllobilins. These natural bilin-type compounds are massively produced in Nature and in highly visible processes. Colourless non-fluorescing Chl-catabolites (NCCs) and the related dioxobilin-type NCCs, which typically accumulate in leaves as ‘final’ products of Chl-breakdown, show low affinity for transition metal-ions. However, NCCs are oxidized in leaves to give less saturated coloured phyllobilins, such as yellow or pink Chl-catabolites (YCCs or PiCCs). YCCs and PiCCs are ligands for various biologically relevant transition metal-ions, such as Zn(ii)-, Ni(ii)- and Cu(ii)-ions. Complexation of Zn(ii)- and Cd(ii)-ions by the effectively tridentate PiCC produces blue metal-complexes that exhibit an intense red fluorescence, thus providing a tool for the sensitive detection of these metal ions. Outlined here are fundamental aspects of structure and metal coordination of phyllobilins, including a comparison with the corresponding properties of bilins. This knowledge may be valuable in the quest of finding possible biological roles of the phyllobilins. Thanks to their capacity for metal-ion coordination, phyllobilins could, e.g., be involved in heavy-metal transport and detoxification, and some of their metal-complexes could act as sensitizers for

  19. The fate of metal (Fe) during diesel combustion: Morphology, chemistry, and formation pathways of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Art; Kittelson, David; Zachariah, Michael

    2007-04-15

    This report describes an investigation in which we used iron-doped diesel fuel to generate metal-bearing diesel particles and a subsequent analysis of the particles using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). For this study, DPM was generated by a 1.5-L diesel engine and the fuel was doped with ferrocene to enhance the level of iron in the system. The exhaust particles were collected on TEM grids and analyzed using the Philips CM12 TEM/EDS instrument. Results show that when the iron-to-carbon (soot) ratio (Fe/C) in the engine is low, the exhaust particles have morphologies similar to those for the undoped case, but at a threshold Fe/C value of 0.013 (for this engine), homogeneously nucleated metallic nanoparticles are formed and begin agglomerating. The number and size of these nanoparticles increase with level of doping. Metal-bearing particles that span a wider size range are also formed. Agglomeration of metallic and carbon particles is observed in two distinct modes: attachment of iron primary particles (5-10 nm in diameter) to carbon agglomerates, and coagulation of iron agglomerates (20-200 nm in diameter) with carbon agglomerates. Results of this work imply that as new engine technologies reduce soot levels in the engine and/or levels of trace metals in the fuel are increased, the generation of metallic nanoparticles may ensue, creating a potential health concern. (author)

  20. Oxidation by hydrogen in the chemistry and physics of the rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Simon, Arndt

    2012-04-27

    Rare-earth metals (RE) easily react with hydrogen. For decades the bonding of hydrogen has been discussed controversially in terms of either the "proton model" or the "anion model". Detailed investigations of metal-rich compounds of the rare-earth metals provide clear evidence for the incorporation of hydrogen as a hydride anion. Several categories of compounds can be distinguished regarding their behavior towards hydrogen. Low-valence compounds with metal-metal bonding frequently provide their excess electrons to form hydride ions as found with the halide hydrides REXH(n). However, there are exceptions, such as, LaI which does not react with hydrogen as a result of special electronic and electrostatic conditions. The opposite is true with La(2)C(3) although this compound does not provide excess metal valence electrons. An amorphous phase La(2)C(3)H(1.5) forms at very low temperature, around 450 K. The presence of hydrogen strongly influences the electrical and magnetic properties, for example, spin-glass formation and colossal magneto resistance arising in the presence of 4f(n) cores with the lanthanoid elements.

  1. Deposition and chemistry of pollutant metals in lakes around the smelters at Sudbury, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Nriagu, J.O.; Wong, H.K.T.; Coker, R.D.

    1982-09-01

    Analyses of the suspended particulates in lakes within a 30-km radius of the smelting complex at Sudbury show average Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations of 1500, 420, 540, and 360 ..mu..g g/sup -1/, respectively. Organic matter constitutes 35-60% of the suspended material in the lakes but plays a minor role in the transport of metals to the sediments. The rates of metal accumulation in the sediments have been estimated typically to be 100-600, 50-300, 10-60, and 5-30 mg m/sup -2/ year/sup -1/ for Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, respectively. The enrichment factors for metals in surficial sediments typically are 12-115 for Ni, 10-77 for Cu, 2-10 for Pb, and 2-8 for Zn. These enrichment factors and deposition rates for Ni and Cu are among the highest recorded anywhere in the world. Some of the lakes with pH values of 4.5 or less show no enrichment or accumulation of pollutant metals in their surface sediments, indicating that pollutant metals previously stored in the sediments have since been leached away. This documentation that the contaminated sediments can release substantial quantities of toxic metals to the overlying water must have interesting ramifications with regard to the limnological impacts of acid rains.

  2. Nanometallic chemistry: deciphering nanoparticle catalysis from the perspective of organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Yuan, Yuan; Dyson, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) catalysis is traditionally viewed as a sub-section of heterogeneous catalysis. However, certain properties of NP catalysts, especially NPs dispersed in solvents, indicate that there could be benefits from viewing them from the perspective of homogeneous catalysis. By applying the fundamental approaches and concepts routinely used in homogeneous catalysis to NP catalysts it should be possible to rationally design new nanocatalysts with superior properties to those currently in use.

  3. HARNESSING THE CHEMISTRY OF CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Janis

    2010-05-11

    Our research program is broadly focused on activating CO{sub 2} through the use of organic and organometallic based catalysts. Some of our methods have centered on annulation reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons (and carbonyl substrates) to provide a diverse array of carbocycles and heterocycles. We use a combination of catalyst discovery and optimization in conjunction with classical physical organic chemistry to elucidate the key mechanistic features of the cycloaddition reactions such that the next big advances in catalyst development can be made. Key to all of our cycloaddition reactions is the use of a sterically hindered, electron donating N heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, namely IPr (or SIPr), in conjunction with a low valent nickel pre-catalyst. The efficacy of this ligand is two-fold: (1) the high {delta}-donating ability of the NHC increases the nucleophilicity of the metal center which thereby facilitates interaction with the electrophilic carbonyl and (2) the steric hindrance prevents an otherwise competitive side reaction involving only the alkyne substrate. Such a system has allowed for the facile cycloaddition to prepare highly functionalized pyrones, pyridones, pyrans, as well as novel carbocycles. Importantly, all reactions proceed under extremely mild conditions (room temperature, atmospheric pressures, and short reaction times), require only catalytic amounts of Ni/NHC and readily available starting materials, and afford annulated products in excellent yields. Our current focus revolves around understanding the fundamental processes that govern these cycloadditions such that the next big advance in the cyclization chemistry of CO{sub 2} can be made. Concurrent to our annulation chemistry is our investigation of the potential for imidazolylidenes to function as thermally-actuated CO{sub 2} sequestering and delivery agents.

  4. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker. PMID:27517606

  5. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker.

  6. New chemistry for the growth of first-row transition metal films by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klesko, Joseph Peter

    Thin films containing first-row transition metals are widely used in microelectronic, photovoltaic, catalytic, and surface-coating applications. In particular, metallic films are essential for interconnects and seed, barrier, and capping layers in integrated circuitry. Traditional vapor deposition methods for film growth include PVD, CVD, or the use of plasma. However, these techniques lack the requisite precision for film growth at the nanoscale, and thus, are increasingly inadequate for many current and future applications. By contrast, ALD is the favored approach for depositing films with absolute surface conformality and thickness control on 3D architectures and in high aspect ratio features. However, the low-temperature chemical reduction of most first-row transition metal cations to their zero-valent state is very challenging due to their negative electrochemical potentials. A lack of strongly-reducing coreagents has rendered the thermal ALD of metallic films an intractable problem for many elements. Additionally, several established ALD processes for metal films are plagued by low growth rates, impurity incorporation, poor nucleation, high surface roughness, or the need for hazardous coreagents. Finally, stoichiometric control of ternary films grown by ALD is rare, but increasingly important, with emerging applications for metal borate films in catalysis and lithium ion batteries. The research herein is focused toward the development of new ALD processes for the broader application of metal, metal oxide, and metal borate thin films to future nanoscale technologies. These processes display self-limited growth and support the facile nucleation of smooth, continuous, high-purity films. Bis(trimethylsilyl) six-membered rings are employed as strongly-reducing organic coreagents for the ALD of titanium and antimony metal films. Additionally, new processes are developed for the growth of high-purity, low-resistivity cobalt and nickel metal films by exploiting the

  7. Controlling Surface Chemistry of Gallium Liquid Metal Alloys to Enhance their Fluidic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyas, Nahid; Cumby, Brad; Cook, Alexander; Durstock, Michael; Tabor, Christopher; Materials; Manufacturing Directorate Team

    Gallium liquid metal alloys (GaLMAs) are one of the key components of emerging technologies in reconfigurable electronics, such as tunable radio frequency antennas and electronic switches. Reversible flow of GaLMA in microchannels of these types of devices is hindered by the instantaneous formation of its oxide skin in ambient environment. The oxide film sticks to most surfaces leaving unwanted metallic residues that can cause undesired electronic properties. In this report, residue-free reversible flow of a binary alloy of gallium (eutectic gallium indium) is demonstrated via two types of surface modifications where the oxide film is either protected by an organic thin film or chemically removed. An interface modification layer (alkyl phosphonic acids) was introduced into the microfluidic system to modify the liquid metal surface and protect its oxide layer. Alternatively, an ion exchange membrane was utilized as a 'sponge-like' channel material to store and slowly release small amounts of HCl to react with the surface oxide of the liquid metal. Characterization of these interfaces at molecular level by surface spectroscopy and microscopy provided with mechanistic details for the interfacial interactions between the liquid metal surface and the channel materials.

  8. Shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals: simple chemistry meets complex physics?

    PubMed

    Xia, Younan; Xiong, Yujie; Lim, Byungkwon; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystals are fundamental to modern science and technology. Mastery over the shape of a nanocrystal enables control of its properties and enhancement of its usefulness for a given application. Our aim is to present a comprehensive review of current research activities that center on the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We begin with a brief introduction to nucleation and growth within the context of metal nanocrystal synthesis, followed by a discussion of the possible shapes that a metal nanocrystal might take under different conditions. We then focus on a variety of experimental parameters that have been explored to manipulate the nucleation and growth of metal nanocrystals in solution-phase syntheses in an effort to generate specific shapes. We then elaborate on these approaches by selecting examples in which there is already reasonable understanding for the observed shape control or at least the protocols have proven to be reproducible and controllable. Finally, we highlight a number of applications that have been enabled and/or enhanced by the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We conclude this article with personal perspectives on the directions toward which future research in this field might take.

  9. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Metal Nanocrystals: Simple Chemistry Meets Complex Physics?

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Younan; Xiong, Yujie; Lim, Byungkwon; Skrabalak, Sara E.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystals are fundamental to modern science and technology. Mastery over the shape of a nanocrystal enables control of its properties and enhancement of its usefulness for a given application. The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive review of current research activities that center on the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We begin with a brief introduction to nucleation and growth within the context of metal nanocrystal synthesis, followed by a discussion of the possible shapes that a metal nanocrystal might take under different conditions. We then focus on a variety of experimental parameters that have been explored to manipulate the nucleation and growth of metal nanocrystals in solution-phase syntheses in an effort to generate specific shapes. We then elaborate on these approaches by selecting examples in which there is already reasonable understanding for the observed shape control or at least the protocols have proven to be reproducible and controllable. Toward the end of this article, we highlight a number of applications that have been enabled and/or enhanced by the shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals. We conclude this article with personal perspectives on the directions toward which future research in this field might take. PMID:19053095

  10. Suppressing molecular motions for enhanced room-temperature phosphorescence of metal-free organic materials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Sang; Yu, Youngchang; Coburn, Caleb; Phillips, Andrew W.; Chung, Kyeongwoon; Shanker, Apoorv; Jung, Jaehun; Kim, Gunho; Pipe, Kevin; Forrest, Stephen R.; Youk, Ji Ho; Gierschner, Johannes; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-01-01

    Metal-free organic phosphorescent materials are attractive alternatives to the predominantly used organometallic phosphors but are generally dimmer and are relatively rare, as, without heavy-metal atoms, spin–orbit coupling is less efficient and phosphorescence usually cannot compete with radiationless relaxation processes. Here we present a general design rule and a method to effectively reduce radiationless transitions and hence greatly enhance phosphorescence efficiency of metal-free organic materials in a variety of amorphous polymer matrices, based on the restriction of molecular motions in the proximity of embedded phosphors. Covalent cross-linking between phosphors and polymer matrices via Diels–Alder click chemistry is devised as a method. A sharp increase in phosphorescence quantum efficiency is observed in a variety of polymer matrices with this method, which is ca. two to five times higher than that of phosphor-doped polymer systems having no such covalent linkage. PMID:26626796

  11. Suppressing molecular motions for enhanced room-temperature phosphorescence of metal-free organic materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Sang; Yu, Youngchang; Coburn, Caleb; Phillips, Andrew W; Chung, Kyeongwoon; Shanker, Apoorv; Jung, Jaehun; Kim, Gunho; Pipe, Kevin; Forrest, Stephen R; Youk, Ji Ho; Gierschner, Johannes; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-01-01

    Metal-free organic phosphorescent materials are attractive alternatives to the predominantly used organometallic phosphors but are generally dimmer and are relatively rare, as, without heavy-metal atoms, spin-orbit coupling is less efficient and phosphorescence usually cannot compete with radiationless relaxation processes. Here we present a general design rule and a method to effectively reduce radiationless transitions and hence greatly enhance phosphorescence efficiency of metal-free organic materials in a variety of amorphous polymer matrices, based on the restriction of molecular motions in the proximity of embedded phosphors. Covalent cross-linking between phosphors and polymer matrices via Diels-Alder click chemistry is devised as a method. A sharp increase in phosphorescence quantum efficiency is observed in a variety of polymer matrices with this method, which is ca. two to five times higher than that of phosphor-doped polymer systems having no such covalent linkage. PMID:26626796

  12. Molten metal processes reap profit from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, R.; Steckler, D.; Kimmel, S.; Tanner, A.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past few years, a new tool has been added to the waste-processing arsenal. The use of a reactor filled with molten metal has been proven for dissociating a wide range of organic, organometallic, metallic and inorganic wastes into their constituent elements. Such reactors allow users to manipulate the solution chemistry and operating conditions inside, to reconfigure the dissociated elements into useful products, such as synthesis gas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide), HCl, metal alloys and ceramics, while ensuring high levels of environmental performance. A commercial-scale, molten metal processing unit is being constructed at Hoechst Celanese Corp.`s Bay City, Tex., chemical manufacturing plant. The unit with an estimated capital cost of $25 million, will be constructed, owned and operated by Molten Metal Technology, Inc., and will use MMT`s Catalytic Extraction processing. Once online, the facility will process wastes from Hoechst Celanese`s Gulf Coast plants and from other nearby chemical manufacturers. In addition to processing wastes, the facility will generate a syngas product that will be used onsite as a raw material during chemical manufacturing. Presented are the results of commercial-scale demonstrations using a prototype molten metal reactor for a wide range of industrial waste streams.

  13. Friction and surface chemistry of some ferrous-base metallic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The friction properties of some ferrous-base metallic glasses were measured both in argon and in vacuum to a temperature of 350 C. The alloy surfaces were also analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to identify the compounds and elements present on the surface. The results of the investigation indicate that even when the surfaces of the amorphous alloys, or metallic glasses, are atomically clean, bulk contaminants such as boric oxide and silicon dioxide diffuse to the surfaces. Friction measurements in both argon and vacuum indicate that the alloys exhibit higher coefficients of friction in the crystalline state than they do in the amorphous state.

  14. Chemistry at the dirac point of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Santanu

    device mobility. To this end, we find that the organometallic hexahapto metal complexation chemistry of graphene, in which the graphene pi-band constructively hybridizes with the vacant d-orbitals of transition metals, allows the fabrication of field effect devices which retain a high degree of the mobility with enhanced on-off ratio. In summary, we find that the singular electronic structure of graphene at the Dirac point governs the chemical reactivity of graphene and this chemistry will play a vital role in propelling graphene to assume its role as the next generation electronic material beyond silicon.

  15. Bioorganometallic Chemistry and Malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biot, Christophe; Dive, Daniel

    This chapter summarizes recent developments in the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies of organometallic antimalarials. It begins with a general introduction to malaria and the biology of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, with a focus on the heme detoxification system. Then, a number of metal complexes from the literature are reported for their antiplasmodial activity. The second half of the chapter deals with the serendipitous discovery of ferroquine, its mechanism(s) of action, and the failure to induce a resistance. Last, but not least, we suggest that the bioorganometallic approach offers the potential for the design of novel therapeutic agents.

  16. Separation and Identification of a Mixture of Group 6 Transition-Metal Carbonyl Compounds Using GC-MS in the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Lawrence K.

    2004-01-01

    Students in the general chemistry course are advised to scrutinize data obtained by gas chromatograph (GC) for segregation, and mass spectroscopy (MS) for recognizing combination of group 6 transition-metal carbonyl compounds. The GC-MS method arouses students' interest, as it can be applied to real-world situations, such as the routine…

  17. Green chemistry: solvent- and metal-free Prins cyclization. Application to sequential reactions.

    PubMed

    Clarisse, Damien; Pelotier, Béatrice; Piva, Olivier; Fache, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Prins cyclization between a homoallylic alcohol and an aldehyde, promoted by trimethylsilyl halide, afforded 4-halo-tetrahydropyrans with good to excellent yields. Thanks to the absence of the solvent and metal, the THP thus obtained have been implicated without purification in several other reactions, in a sequential way, affording in particular new indole derivatives. PMID:22068454

  18. Shape, metal abundance, chemistry, and origin of chondrules in the Renazzo (CR) chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, D.S.; Weisberg, M.K.; Hertz, J.; Campbell, A.J.

    2009-03-31

    We used synchrotron X-ray microtomography to image in 3-dimensions (3D) eight whole chondrules in a {approx}1 cm{sup 3} piece of the Renazzo (CR) chondrite at {approx}17 {micro}m per volume element (voxel) edge. We report the first volumetric (3D) measurement of metal/silicate ratios in chondrules and quantify indices of chondrule sphericity. Volumetric metal abundances in whole chondrules range from 1 to 37 volume % in 8 measured chondrules and by inspection in tomography data. We show that metal abundances and metal grain locations in individual chondrules cannot be reliably obtained from single random 2D sections. Samples were physically cut to intersect representative chondrules multiple times and to verify 3D data. Detailed 2D chemical analysis combined with 3D data yield highly variable whole-chondrule Mg/Si ratios with a supra-chondritic mean value, yet the chemically diverse, independently formed chondrules are mutually complementary in preserving chondritic (solar) Fe/Si ratios in the aggregate CR chondrite. These results are consistent with localized chondrule formation and rapid accretion resulting in chondrule + matrix aggregates (meteorite parent bodies) that preserve the bulk chondritic composition of source regions.

  19. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  20. Controlling embedment and surface chemistry of nanoclusters in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Coupry, D E; Butson, J; Petkov, P S; Saunders, M; O'Donnell, K; Kim, H; Buckley, C; Addicoat, M; Heine, T; Szilágyi, P Á

    2016-04-14

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach demonstrates that nanocluster embedment into the pores of metal-organic frameworks (MOF) may be influenced by the chemical functionalisation of the MOF. Furthermore, this results in the surface functionalisation of the embedded nanoclusters, highlighting the potential of MOF scaffolds for the design and synthesis of novel functional materials.

  1. Green chemistry: solvent- and metal-free Prins cyclization. Application to sequential reactions.

    PubMed

    Clarisse, Damien; Pelotier, Béatrice; Piva, Olivier; Fache, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Prins cyclization between a homoallylic alcohol and an aldehyde, promoted by trimethylsilyl halide, afforded 4-halo-tetrahydropyrans with good to excellent yields. Thanks to the absence of the solvent and metal, the THP thus obtained have been implicated without purification in several other reactions, in a sequential way, affording in particular new indole derivatives.

  2. Stepwise formation of organometallic macrocycles and triangular prisms containing 2,2'-bisbenzimidazole ligands.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Lin, Yue-Jian; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2013-01-01

    A series of organometallic macrocycles have been constructed by an efficient “bottom-up” assembly methodology at ambient temperature. Treatment of [Cp*MCl2]2 (1a: M = Ir, 1b: M = Rh) with pyrazine or 4,4′-bipyridine (bpy) (1:1; Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) at room temperature resulted in the formation of binuclear complexes [Cp*MCl2]2(pyrazine) and [Cp*MCl2]2(bpy) (M = Ir or Rh), which were then further reacted with AgOTf (Tf = O2SCF3) and 2,2′-bisbenzimidazole ligand (BiBzIm). Four organometallic macrocyclic complexes formulated as [Cp*4Ir4(BiBzIm)2(pyrazine)2](OTf)4 (2a), [Cp*4Rh4(BiBzIm)2(pyrazine)2](OTf)4 (2b), [Cp*4Ir4(BiBzIm)2(bpy)2](OTf)4 (2c) and [Cp*4Rh4(BiBzIm)2(bpy)2](OTf)4 (2d) each bearing 2,2′-bisbenzimidazole ligand and the half-sandwich Ir, Rh fragments were finally obtained in good yields. In a similar process, if a rigid ligand L (3-pyridyl-bian) was used as the linker, two novel metallacycles (3a and 3b) which enchased a silver atom in the centre were obtained. Organometallic triangular prisms 4a were synthesized via methods similar to those of the rectangles. [Cp*IrCl2]2 reacted with tridentate ligand 2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (tpt) to give the corresponding trinuclear complexes [Cp*IrCl2]3(tpt), then further reacted with AgOTf and 2,2′-bisbenzimidazole ligand, leading to the formation of the prism-like complexes formulated as [Cp*6M6(BiBzIm)6(tpt)2](OTf)6 (3a: M = Ir, 3b: M = Rh). All complexes were well characterized by 1H NMR and IR spectroscopy, as well as elemental analyses. The molecular structures of 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b and 4a were characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. We found that the prism-like hexanuclear complexes 4a displayed interesting host–guest chemistry.

  3. High-Valent Organometallic Copper and Palladium in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Amanda J.; Sanford, Melanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Copper and palladium catalysts are critically important for numerous commercial chemical processes. Improvements in the activity, selectivity, and scope of these catalysts have the potential to dramatically reduce the environmental impact and increase the sustainability of chemical reactions. One rapidly emerging strategy to achieve these goals is to exploit “high-valent” copper and palladium intermediates in catalysis. This review describes exciting recent advances involving both the fundamental chemistry and the applications of these high-valent metal complexes in numerous synthetically useful catalytic transformations. PMID:22498623

  4. "Click" Chemistry: Application of Copper Metal in Cu-Catalyzed Azomethine Imine-Alkyne Cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Pušavec Kirar, Eva; Grošelj, Uroš; Mirri, Giorgio; Požgan, Franc; Strle, Gregor; Štefane, Bogdan; Jovanovski, Vasko; Svete, Jurij

    2016-07-15

    A series of 16 copper-catalyzed azomethine imine-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAIAC) reactions between four pyrazolidinone-1-azomethine imines and four terminal ynones gave the corresponding fluorescent cycloadducts as bimane analogues in very high yields. The applicability of CuAIAC was demonstrated by the fluorescent labeling of functionalized polystyrene and by using Cu-C and Cu-Fe as catalysts. Experimental evidence, kinetic measurements, and correlation between a clean catalyst surface and the reaction rate are in agreement with a homotopic catalytic system with catalytic Cu(I)-acetylide formed from Cu(0) by "in situ" oxidation. The availability of azomethine imines, mild reaction conditions, simple workup, and scalability make CuAIAC a viable supplement to the Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction in "click" chemistry. PMID:27305104

  5. Synthesis and chemistry of cationic d{sup 0} metal alkyl complexes. Progress report, July 1988--May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop new types of electrophilic metal alkyl complexes for catalytic C-H activation and olefin polymerization chemistry, and associated fundamental mechanistic studies. We have focused our efforts on four classes of early metal alkyl complexes: (1) cationic group 4 Cp{sub 2}M(R){sup +} complexes (1) which are active species in Cp{sub 2}MX{sub 2}-based Ziegler-Natta olefin polymerization catalyst systems and which catalyze productive C-H activation reactions of heterocycles, (2) neutral (dicarbollide)(Cp*)M(R) complexes (2) which are structurally are electronically very similar to 1, (3) half-sandwich complexes CpM(R){sub 2}(L){sub n}{sup +} which are highly coordinatively and electronically unsaturated, and (4) new group 5 (dicarbollide)(Cp)MR{sub 2} and (dicarbollide){sub 2} MR complexes which are more unsaturated than group 5 Cp{sub 2}M systems due to incorporation of the dicarbollide ligand.

  6. Lattice-Directed Formation of Covalent and Organometallic Molecular Wires by Terminal Alkynes on Ag Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Qiwei; Xiao, Lianghong; Shang, Jian; Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Shao, Xiang; Li, Jianlong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Guo Qin; Tang, Hao; Zhao, Dahui; Wu, Kai

    2015-06-23

    Surface reactions of 2,5-diethynyl-1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene on Ag(111), Ag(110), and Ag(100) were systematically explored and scrutinized by scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular mechanics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. On Ag(111), Glaser coupling reaction became dominant, yielding one-dimensional molecular wires formed by covalent bonds. On Ag(110) and Ag(100), however, the terminal alkynes reacted with surface metal atoms, leading to one-dimensional organometallic nanostructures. Detailed experimental and theoretical analyses revealed that such a lattice dependence of the terminal alkyne reaction at surfaces originated from the matching degree between the periodicities of the produced molecular wires and the substrate lattice structures.

  7. Optical nonlinearities of organometallic structures: Aryl and vinyl derivatives of ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S.; Samoc, M.; Prasad, P.N.; Tufariello, J.J. )

    1990-04-05

    With an objective to understand the nonlinear optical properties of organometallic structures, various aryl and vinyl derivatives of ferrocene were synthesized and their nonlinear optical properties were investigated by using degenerate four-wave mixing. The molecular second hyperpolarizability {gamma} increases strongly with the length of the conjugated {pi}-electron system. The results show that the effective conjugation is determined predominantly by the length of the aryl-vinyl system; the contribution from the ferrocenyl group is less significant. The d-d resonance of the metal in the ferrocene unit does not appear to make an important contribution to optical nonlinearity. The experimental results on ferrocene are compared with those from a recent theoretical study using semiempirical calculations.

  8. Absorption of organic compounds and organometallics on ceramic substrates for wear reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, P.J.; Agarwala, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The concept of employing thermally stable compounds (that is, metal oxides) as high temperature vapor phase ceramic lubricants was investigated. A major part of this study was devoted to the development of various calorimetric and tribological techniques that could be used to determine interfacial reactions between thermally stable compounds and ceramic substrates such as zirconia and alumina. This interaction is pivotal in understanding the mechanism of high temperature lubricity. The approach consisted of selecting low sublimation temperature materials and measuring their thermodynamic interactions as vapors with the ceramic substrates. The materials studied included two easily sublimable organic compounds (that is, naphthalene and salicylic acid) and several organometallics (for example, copper phthalocyanine). Thermodynamic data such as heat of adsorption, packing density, and reversibility of the adsorption were obtained on some of these compounds and were related to wear characteristics. All of these compounds provided effective lubrication at room temperature. Copper phthalocyanine was an effective lubricant at temperatures up to 400 C.

  9. Lattice-Directed Formation of Covalent and Organometallic Molecular Wires by Terminal Alkynes on Ag Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Qiwei; Xiao, Lianghong; Shang, Jian; Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Shao, Xiang; Li, Jianlong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Guo Qin; Tang, Hao; Zhao, Dahui; Wu, Kai

    2015-06-23

    Surface reactions of 2,5-diethynyl-1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene on Ag(111), Ag(110), and Ag(100) were systematically explored and scrutinized by scanning tunneling microscopy, molecular mechanics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. On Ag(111), Glaser coupling reaction became dominant, yielding one-dimensional molecular wires formed by covalent bonds. On Ag(110) and Ag(100), however, the terminal alkynes reacted with surface metal atoms, leading to one-dimensional organometallic nanostructures. Detailed experimental and theoretical analyses revealed that such a lattice dependence of the terminal alkyne reaction at surfaces originated from the matching degree between the periodicities of the produced molecular wires and the substrate lattice structures. PMID:25990647

  10. Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine chemistry in the synthesis of hydrogenase and nitrogenase metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2015-02-13

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. The FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. This minireview presents and discusses the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors.

  11. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core.

  12. Metal mediated sol-gel chemistry of 1,2-Bis(triethoxysilyl)-ethene

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.P.; Yamanaka, S.A.; McClain, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Ethenyl-bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels and aerogels were formed from the sol-gel polymerization of 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene. Gels were synthesized from the cis- and trans-isomers by both acid and base catalysis. While the trans-monomer exhibited relatively fast gelation times, the cis-monomer depending on the conditions either formed no gel of had very long gelation times. The addition of a coordinating metal such as Pd to the cis-monomer sol results in dramatically decreased gelation times. The addition of salts with noncoordinating metals did not significantly shorten the gelation times indicating that a template effect may be directing the polymerization of the cis-monomer. The ethenyl-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were characterized by solid state {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C NMR, nitrogen sorption porosimetry, and transmission electron microscopy.

  13. MALDI-TOFMS analysis of coordination and organometallic complexes: a nic(h)e area to work in.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Mark F

    2011-07-01

    A mini-review of the characterisation of metal-containing compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is presented. Organometallic and coordination compounds have many varied applications, most notably in industrial catalytic processes and also in the electronics and healthcare sectors. In general, the compounds discussed, be they small or large molecules, have a high percentage metal content, rather than simply containing 'a metal atom'. A brief history of the field is given, but the main scope over the last 5 years is covered in some detail. How MALDI-TOFMS compliments electrospray for metal-containing compounds is highlighted. Perspectives on recent advances, such as solvent-free and air/moisture-sensitive sample preparation, and potential future challenges and developments, such as nanomaterials and metallodrug/metallometabolite imaging, are given.

  14. Chemistry of guanidinate-stabilised diboranes: transition-metal-catalysed dehydrocoupling and hydride abstraction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Litters, Sebastian; Elias, Jana; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-09-22

    Herein, we analyse the catalytic boron-boron dehydrocoupling reaction that leads from the base-stabilised diborane(6) [H2 B(hpp)]2 (hpp=1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidinate) to the base-stabilised diborane(4) [H2 B(hpp)]2 . A number of potential transition-metal precatalysts was studied, including transition-metal complexes of the product diborane(4). The synthesis and structural characterisation of two further examples of such complexes is presented. The best results for the dehydrocoupling reactions were obtained with precatalysts of Group 9 metals in the oxidation state of +I. The active catalyst is formed in situ through a multistep process that involves reduction of the precatalyst by the substrate [H2 B(hpp)]2 , and mechanistic investigations indicate that both heterogeneous and (slower) homogeneous reaction pathways play a role in the dehydrocoupling reaction. In addition, hydride abstraction from [H2 B(hpp)]2 and related diboranes is analysed and the possibility for subsequent deprotonation is discussed by probing the protic character of the cationic boron-hydrogen compounds with NMR spectroscopic analysis. PMID:25168516

  15. Supramolecular fullerene-porphyrin chemistry. Fullerene complexation by metalated "jaws porphyrin" hosts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayong; Tham, Fook S; Reed, Christopher A; Chaker, Leila; Boyd, Peter D W

    2002-06-12

    Porphyrins and fullerenes are spontaneously attracted to each other. This new supramolecular recognition element is explored in discrete, soluble, coordinatively linked porphyrin and metalloporphyrin dimers. Jawlike clefts in these bis-porphyrins are effective hosts for fullerene guests. X-ray structures of the Cu complex with C60 and free-base complexes with C70 and a pyrrolidine-derivatized C60 have been obtained. The electron-rich 6:6 ring-juncture bonds of C60 show unusually close approach to the porphyrin or metalloporphyrin plane. Binding constants in toluene solution increase in the order Fe(II) < Pd(II) < Zn(II) < Mn(II) < Co(II) < Cu(II) < 2H and span the range 490-5200 M-1. Unexpectedly, the free-base porphyrin binds C60 more strongly than the metalated porphyrins. This is ascribed to electrostatic forces, enhancing the largely van der Waals forces of the pi-pi interaction. The ordering with metals is ascribed to a subtle interplay of solvation and weak interaction forces. Conflicting opinions on the relative importance of van der Waals forces, charge transfer, electrostatic attraction, and coordinate bonding are addressed. The supramolecular design principles arising from these studies have potential applications in the preparation of photophysical devices, molecular magnets, molecular conductors, and porous metal-organic frameworks. PMID:12047181

  16. Carbon–heteroatom bond formation catalysed by organometallic complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    At one time the synthetic chemist’s last resort, reactions catalysed by transition metals are now the preferred method for synthesizing many types of organic molecule. A recent success in this type of catalysis is the discovery of reactions that form bonds between carbon and heteroatoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, silicon and boron) via complexes of transition metals with amides, alkoxides, thiolates, silyl groups or boryl groups. The development of these catalytic processes has been supported by the discovery of new elementary reactions that occur at metal–heteroatom bonds and by the identification of factors that control these reactions. Together, these findings have led to new synthetic processes that are in daily use and have formed a foundation for the development of processes that are likely to be central to synthetic chemistry in the future. PMID:18800130

  17. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  18. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    DOE PAGES

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleteriousmore » nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.« less

  19. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  20. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management. PMID:25107347

  1. Effectiveness of various organometallics as antiwear additives in mineral oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with 1045 steel contacting 302 stainless steel and lubricated with various organometallics in mineral oil. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to determine the element present in the wear contact zone. The results indicate that there are organometallics which are as effective an antiwear additives as the commonly used zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate. These include dimethyl cadmium, triphenyl lead thiomethoxide, and triphenyl tin chloride. The additives were examined in concentrations to 1 weight percent. With dimethyl cadmium at concentrations of 0.5 weight percent and above, cadmium was detected in the contact zone. Coincident with the detection of cadmium, a marked decrease in the friction coefficient was observed. All additives examined reduced friction, but only the aforementioned reduced wear to a level comparable to that observed with zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate.

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  3. Latest approaches on green chemistry preconcentration methods for trace metal determination in seawater--a review.

    PubMed

    La Colla, Noelia Soledad; Domini, Claudia Elizabeth; Marcovecchio, Jorge Eduardo; Botté, Sandra Elizabeth

    2015-03-15

    Evaluation of trace metal levels in seawater samples is undertaken regularly by research groups all over the world, leading to a growing demand for techniques involving fewer toxic reagents, less time-consuming protocols and lower limits of detection. This review focuses on providing a brief but concise description of the latest methodologies developed to this end, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of the various protocols, chelating and dispersive agents and instruments used. Conclusions are drawn on the basis of the articles reviewed, highlighting improvements introduced in order to enhance the performance of the protocols. PMID:25532056

  4. Latest approaches on green chemistry preconcentration methods for trace metal determination in seawater--a review.

    PubMed

    La Colla, Noelia Soledad; Domini, Claudia Elizabeth; Marcovecchio, Jorge Eduardo; Botté, Sandra Elizabeth

    2015-03-15

    Evaluation of trace metal levels in seawater samples is undertaken regularly by research groups all over the world, leading to a growing demand for techniques involving fewer toxic reagents, less time-consuming protocols and lower limits of detection. This review focuses on providing a brief but concise description of the latest methodologies developed to this end, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of the various protocols, chelating and dispersive agents and instruments used. Conclusions are drawn on the basis of the articles reviewed, highlighting improvements introduced in order to enhance the performance of the protocols.

  5. A Selenium-Containing Diarylamido Pincer Ligand: Synthesis and Coordination Chemistry with Group 10 Metals.

    PubMed

    Charette, Bronte J; Ritch, Jamie S

    2016-06-20

    The synthesis of new bifunctional organoselenium diarylamine compounds RN(4-Me-2-SeMe-C6H3)2 (R = Me: 1; R = tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc): 2; R = H: 3-H) via aryllithium chemistry is disclosed. Compound 1 serves as a Se,Se-bidentate neutral ligand toward Pd(II), forming the coordination complex {PdCl2[MeN(4-Me-2-SeMe-C6H3)2-κ(2)Se)]} (1-Pd) in reaction with [PdCl2(COD)] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), while the protio ligand 3-H forms tridentate pincer complexes [MCl(N(4-Me-2-SeMe-C6H3)2)] (M = Pd: 3-Pd; M = Pt: 3-Pt) with [MCl2(COD)] (M = Pd, Pt) in the presence of triethylamine. Complex 1-Pd does not undergo N-C cleavage at high temperature, unlike related alkylphosphine-bearing complexes. All compounds have been characterized by multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, (77)Se) NMR spectroscopy, and crystal structures of 1, 1-Pd, 3-Pd, and 3-Pt are reported. Additionally, density functional theory calculations have been performed on the pincer complexes to contrast them with well-known analogues containing phosphine donor groups. PMID:27281450

  6. Modern Chemistry Techniques Applied to Metal Behavior and Chelation in Medical and Environmental Systems ? Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M; Andresen, B; Burastero, S R; Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Chinn, S C; Coronado, P R; Gash, A E; Perkins, J; Sawvel, A M; Szechenyi, S C

    2005-02-03

    This report details the research and findings generated over the course of a 3-year research project funded by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). Originally tasked with studying beryllium chemistry and chelation for the treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease and environmental remediation of beryllium-contaminated environments, this work has yielded results in beryllium and uranium solubility and speciation associated with toxicology; specific and effective chelation agents for beryllium, capable of lowering beryllium tissue burden and increasing urinary excretion in mice, and dissolution of beryllium contamination at LLNL Site 300; {sup 9}Be NMR studies previously unstudied at LLNL; secondary ionization mass spec (SIMS) imaging of beryllium in spleen and lung tissue; beryllium interactions with aerogel/GAC material for environmental cleanup. The results show that chelator development using modern chemical techniques such as chemical thermodynamic modeling, was successful in identifying and utilizing tried and tested beryllium chelators for use in medical and environmental scenarios. Additionally, a study of uranium speciation in simulated biological fluids identified uranium species present in urine, gastric juice, pancreatic fluid, airway surface fluid, simulated lung fluid, bile, saliva, plasma, interstitial fluid and intracellular fluid.

  7. Pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy of complex oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Duray, S.J.; Buchholz, D.B.; Song, S.N.; Richeson, D.S.; Ketterson, J.B.; Marks, T.J.; Chang, R.P.H. )

    1991-09-16

    We report the results of a pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) process for growing complex oxide films at low background gas pressure (10{sup {minus}4}--10{sup {minus}2} Torr) and low substrate temperature (600--680 {degree}C) using organometallic precursors in an oxygen plasma environment. Our results show that POMBE can extend the capability of organometallic chemical vapor deposition to growing complex oxide films with high precision both in composition and structure without the need for post-deposition oxidation and heat treatments. The growth of phase-pure, highly oriented Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting oxide films {l brace}({ital T}{sub {ital c}} ({ital R}=0)=90.5 K) and {ital J}{sub {ital c}} (77 K, 50 K gauss)=1.1{times}10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}{r brace} is given as an example. Similar to the pulsed laser deposition process, the POMBE method has the potential for {ital in} {ital situ} processing of multilayer structures (e.g., junctions).

  8. Antibodies labeled with metallic radionuclides: influence of nuclide chemistry on dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A T; Yankuba, S C; Anderson, P

    1987-01-01

    An antibody with human CEA specificity has been labeled with either yttrium-90, scandium-47, or indium-111, via a diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) link covalently bound to the protein. The clearance of these proteins from the blood of mice can be described by a single exponential; the half-life decreases in the order indium-111 greater than yttrium-90 greater than scandium-47. Associated with the blood clearance is an uptake of radioactivity into the liver; scandium-47 has the highest concentration, indium-111 has the least, and yttrium-90 is intermediate. There is no correlation between these results and the equilibrium stability constants of the metals with DTPA-like ligands. The results obtained show that, in vivo, scandium-47 and yttrium-90 are more easily displaced from DTPA by other ions than is indium-111. They also show that free DTPA is able to extract yttrium-90 and scandium-47, but not indium-111, from the liver of treated animals, indicating that indium-111 is resistant to ligand exchange reactions in vivo. These data indicate that 1) the equilibrium stability constant is not a good indicator of the in vivo stability of metal-labeled proteins and 2) it is possible to manipulate the ion distribution and therefore the dose from scandium-47 and yttrium-90 after injection of the labeled proteins. PMID:3029601

  9. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are examined. Two basic techniques for metal deposition are investigated; (1) photochemical decomposition of liquid or gas phase organometallic compounds utilizing either a focused, CW ultraviolet laser (System 1) or a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, such as that provided by a repetitively pulsed, defocused excimer laser (System 2), for pattern definition, and (2) thermal deposition of metals from organometallic solutions or vapors utilizing a focused, CW laser beam as a local heat source to draw the metallization pattern.

  10. Studies of the surface reactivity of metal oxyhydroxides and sulfides with relevance to environmental chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre-Louis, Andro-Marc

    With the benefits of an ever increasing advance of industrialization around the globe come formidable environmental problems. Three environmental problems that have relevance to the research described in this thesis are the 1) buildup of atmospheric CO2 gas through the burning of fossil fuels, 2) eutrophication of aquatic systems, and 3) the acidification of environments from acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal-mining activities. In particular research is presented in this thesis that investigated the surface chemistry of CO2 and phosphate (PO43-) on a suite of environmentally relevant iron oxyhydroxide materials and the chemistry of phospholipid molecules on environmentally relevant iron sulfide surfaces to suppress AMD. To develop a microscopic understanding of the surface chemistry of the different systems, an array of experimental and computational techniques were used in the research. Techniques included X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic adsorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission microscopy with electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM/EDS), ion chromatography (IC), and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR). Results from the latter technique were interpreted with the aid of density function theory (DFT) calculations. Iron oxyhydroxides, which consisted of ferrihydrite (FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH), ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite (FerriFh), and aluminum-doped iron oxyhydroxide (content from 0-100 mol%) were synthesized and studied before and after exposure to gaseous CO2, CO32-, and PO43- species. FeOOH and mixed Al/Fe oxyhydroxide surfaces showed high affinities for the formation of carbonate and bicarbonate species upon exposure to gaseous CO2. Within the Al/Fe oxyhydroxide circumstance, a low Al level of incorporation in the iron oxyhydroxide structure caused a slight increase in surface area and increase in the amount of oxyanion (e.g., CO32- or PO43-) adsorption up to an Al level of 30 mol%. Significant

  11. Studies of the surface reactivity of metal oxyhydroxides and sulfides with relevance to environmental chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre-Louis, Andro-Marc

    With the benefits of an ever increasing advance of industrialization around the globe come formidable environmental problems. Three environmental problems that have relevance to the research described in this thesis are the 1) buildup of atmospheric CO2 gas through the burning of fossil fuels, 2) eutrophication of aquatic systems, and 3) the acidification of environments from acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal-mining activities. In particular research is presented in this thesis that investigated the surface chemistry of CO2 and phosphate (PO43-) on a suite of environmentally relevant iron oxyhydroxide materials and the chemistry of phospholipid molecules on environmentally relevant iron sulfide surfaces to suppress AMD. To develop a microscopic understanding of the surface chemistry of the different systems, an array of experimental and computational techniques were used in the research. Techniques included X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic adsorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission microscopy with electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM/EDS), ion chromatography (IC), and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR). Results from the latter technique were interpreted with the aid of density function theory (DFT) calculations. Iron oxyhydroxides, which consisted of ferrihydrite (FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH), ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite (FerriFh), and aluminum-doped iron oxyhydroxide (content from 0-100 mol%) were synthesized and studied before and after exposure to gaseous CO2, CO32-, and PO43- species. FeOOH and mixed Al/Fe oxyhydroxide surfaces showed high affinities for the formation of carbonate and bicarbonate species upon exposure to gaseous CO2. Within the Al/Fe oxyhydroxide circumstance, a low Al level of incorporation in the iron oxyhydroxide structure caused a slight increase in surface area and increase in the amount of oxyanion (e.g., CO32- or PO43-) adsorption up to an Al level of 30 mol%. Significant

  12. Quantitative computational thermochemistry of transition metal species.

    PubMed

    Deyonker, Nathan J; Peterson, Kirk A; Steyl, Gideon; Wilson, Angela K; Cundari, Thomas R

    2007-11-01

    The correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA), which has been shown to achieve chemical accuracy (+/-1 kcal mol-1) for a large benchmark set of main group and s-block metal compounds, is used to compute enthalpies of formation for a set of 17 3d transition metal species. The training set includes a variety of metals, ligands, and bonding types. Using the correlation consistent basis sets for the 3d transition metals, we find that gas-phase enthalpies of formation can be efficiently calculated for inorganic and organometallic molecules with ccCA. However, until the reliability of gas-phase transition metal thermochemistry is improved, both experimentally and theoretically, a large experimental training set where uncertainties are near +/-1 kcal mol-1 (akin to commonly used main group benchmarking sets) remains an ambitious goal. For now, an average deviation of +/-3 kcal mol-1 appears to be the initial goal of "chemical accuracy" for ab initio transition metal model chemistries. The ccCA is also compared to a more robust but relatively expensive composite approach primarily utilizing large basis set coupled cluster computations. For a smaller training set of eight molecules, ccCA has a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 3.4 kcal mol-1 versus the large basis set coupled-cluster-based model chemistry, which has a MAD of 3.1 kcal mol-1. However, the agreement for transition metal complexes is more system dependent than observed in previous benchmark studies of composite methods and main group compounds. PMID:17500547

  13. Crystal phases, microstructure and surface chemistry of industry-relevant nanostructured metal oxides.

    SciTech Connect

    Loong, C.-K.

    1998-04-17

    Industries response keenly to two factors: the costs of materials and processing, and regulatory forces imposed by governments. The method of neutron scattering maybe applied to address these concerns. Slow (cold to epithermal) neutrons probe the organization and dynamic response of atomic nuclei and electrons in a substance thereby providing valuable knowledge toward the development of cost-effective means for materials preparation and possessing. Neutron facilities for basic research are funded by governments, thus these organizations are obliged to provide technical support to industries for the fulfillment of governmental policies. I hope to argue, based on these premises, the mutual beneficialness of a close collaboration between the industrial-research and neutron-scattering communities. In order to limit the scope of discussion, I shall illustrate the potential applications of neutron scattering for industrial problems by some recent studies of nanostructured metal-oxide catalysts.

  14. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 2} with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  15. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO[sub 3] and NaNO[sub 2] with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  16. Comparative chemistry of bipyrazyl and bipyridyl metal complexes: spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and photoanation

    SciTech Connect

    Crutchley, R.J.; Lever, A.B.P.

    1982-06-01

    The photoanation of the bipyrazyl complex Ru(bpz)/sub 3/(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/, in acetonitrile containing chloride ion, leads to the formation of cis-Ru(bpz)/sub 2/(CH/sub 3/CN)Cl/sup +/ (maximum quantium yield 0.37), cis-Ru(bpz)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (maximum quantum yield 0.001), and an unidentified mono(bipyrazl)ruthenium (II) derivative. The mechanism of this reaction is discussed. Reaction of M(CO)/sub 2/ (M = W, Mo) with bipyrazyl yields M(CO)/sub 4/bpz. The electronic, vibrational, and /sup 1/H NMR spetra and electrochemistry of these products were compared with those of their bipyridyl analogues. It is concluded that bipyrazyl is no better a ..pi.. acceptor than bipyridyl because of weaker sigma bonding leaving the metal ion more positively charged.

  17. Shape and surface chemistry effects on the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of metallic nanorods and nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Valencia, Mariana Morales; Elliott, Paul Robert; Restrepo, Alejandro; Gao, Ming; Huang, Hanchen; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-12-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (such as gold and silver) have been intensely studied for wound healing applications due to their ability to be easily functionalized, possess antibacterial properties, and their strong potential for targeted drug release. In this study, rod-shaped silver nanorods (AgNRs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) were fabricated by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD), and their cytotoxicity toward human skin fibroblasts were assessed and compared to sphere-shaped silver nanospheres (AgNSs) and gold nanospheres (AuNSs). Results showed that the 39.94 nm AgNSs showed the greatest toxicity with fibroblast cells followed by the 61.06 nm AuNSs, ∼556 nm × 47 nm (11.8:1 aspect ratio) AgNRs, and the ∼534 nm × 65 nm (8.2:1 aspect ratio) AuNRs demonstrated the least amount of toxicity. The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) value for the AgNRs exposed to fibroblasts was greater after 4 days of exposure (387.3 μg mL(-1)) compared to the AgNSs and AuNSs (4.3 and 23.4 μg mL(-1), respectively), indicating that these spherical metallic nanoparticles displayed a greater toxicity to fibroblast cells. The IC50 value could not be measured for the AuNRs due to an incomplete dose response curve. The reduced cell toxicity with the presently developed rod-shaped nanoparticles suggests that they may be promising materials for use in numerous biomedical applications.

  18. Shape and surface chemistry effects on the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of metallic nanorods and nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Valencia, Mariana Morales; Elliott, Paul Robert; Restrepo, Alejandro; Gao, Ming; Huang, Hanchen; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-12-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (such as gold and silver) have been intensely studied for wound healing applications due to their ability to be easily functionalized, possess antibacterial properties, and their strong potential for targeted drug release. In this study, rod-shaped silver nanorods (AgNRs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) were fabricated by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD), and their cytotoxicity toward human skin fibroblasts were assessed and compared to sphere-shaped silver nanospheres (AgNSs) and gold nanospheres (AuNSs). Results showed that the 39.94 nm AgNSs showed the greatest toxicity with fibroblast cells followed by the 61.06 nm AuNSs, ∼556 nm × 47 nm (11.8:1 aspect ratio) AgNRs, and the ∼534 nm × 65 nm (8.2:1 aspect ratio) AuNRs demonstrated the least amount of toxicity. The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) value for the AgNRs exposed to fibroblasts was greater after 4 days of exposure (387.3 μg mL(-1)) compared to the AgNSs and AuNSs (4.3 and 23.4 μg mL(-1), respectively), indicating that these spherical metallic nanoparticles displayed a greater toxicity to fibroblast cells. The IC50 value could not be measured for the AuNRs due to an incomplete dose response curve. The reduced cell toxicity with the presently developed rod-shaped nanoparticles suggests that they may be promising materials for use in numerous biomedical applications. PMID:26053238

  19. Synthesis and Metalation of a Ligand: An Interdisciplinary Laboratory Experiment for Second-Year Organic and Introductory Inorganic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasting, Benjamin J.; Bowser, Andrew K.; Anderson-Wile, Amelia M.; Wile, Bradley M.

    2015-01-01

    An interdisciplinary laboratory experiment involving second-year undergraduate organic chemistry and introductory inorganic chemistry undergraduate students is described. Organic chemistry students prepare a series of amine-bis(phenols) via a Mannich reaction, and characterize their products using melting point; FTIR; and [superscript 1]H,…

  20. Synthesis and properties of novel organometallic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-31

    1,1'-Diruthenocenylnaphthalene has been prepared and its molecular structure has been determined by x-ray diffraction, in order to compare its structure with that of its iron analog. The molecular structure of the half oxidized form of 1,1'-diferocenylnaphthalene has also be determined. Comparison of these structures has made it possible to assign the origins of observed deformations in these substances. Polymeric, face-to-face metallocenes related to the 1,8-dimetallocenylnaphthalenes (M=Fe, Ru) have also been prepared by coupling of 1,1'-bis(chlorozinc)metallocenes with 1,8- diiodonaphthalene. A more general approach to the synthesis of polymeric face-to-face metallocenes incorporating other transition metals has been developed. This involves the sequential replacement of iodo groups in 1,8-diiodonaphthalene with cyclopentadiene and the complexation of these rings with metals. A short synthesis of 4-n-butyl-1,8-diiodonaphthalene has been achieved. The molecular structure of a 2,3-oligomeric face-to-face ferrocene has been determined and shown to have the unexpected cis arrangement of naphthalene rings. 6 refs.

  1. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  2. Transport of two metal oxide nanoparticles in saturated granular porous media: role of water chemistry and particle coating.

    PubMed

    Petosa, Adamo Riccardo; Brennan, Spencer John; Rajput, Faraz; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2012-03-15

    The growing use of nanosized titanium dioxide (nTiO2) and zinc oxide (nZnO) in a large number of commercial products raises concerns regarding their release and subsequent mobility in natural aquatic environments. Laboratory-scale sand-packed column experiments were conducted with bare and polymer-coated nTiO2 and nZnO to improve our understanding of the mobility of these nanoparticles in natural or engineered water saturated granular systems. The nanoparticles are characterized over a range of environmentally relevant water chemistries using multiple complimentary techniques: dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Overall, bare (uncoated) nanoparticles exhibit high retention within the water saturated granular matrix at solution ionic strengths (IS) as low as 0.1 mM NaNO3 for bare nTiO2 and 0.01 mM NaNO3 for bare nZnO. Bare nTiO2 and nZnO also display dynamic (time-dependent) deposition behaviors under selected conditions. In contrast, the polymer-coated nanoparticles are much less likely to aggregate and exhibit significant transport potential at IS as high as 100 mM NaNO3 or 3 mM CaCl2. These findings illustrate the importance of considering the extent and type of surface modification when evaluating metal oxide contamination potential in granular aquatic environments.

  3. A Practical Guide on the Synthesis of Metal Chelates for Molecular Imaging and Therapy by Means of Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Notni, Johannes; Wester, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    The copper-catalyzed cycloaddition of organic azides and alkynes (CuAAC) is one of the most popular reactions for rapid assembly of multifunctional molecular frameworks from commercially available building blocks. It is also attractive for synthesis of conjugates of multidentate chelate ligands (chelators) with molecular targeting vectors, such as peptides or proteins, which serve as precursors for labeling with metal radionuclides or are useful as MRI contrast agents after Gd(III) complexation. However, applicability of CuAAC for such purposes is complicated by formation of unwanted copper chelates. The alternative use of copper-free click chemistry, for example, the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) or the Diels-Alder reaction of tetrazines and strained alkenes, entails other specific challenges: Introduction of large, isomerically non-homogeneous and hydrophobic linker groups affects product homogeneity and can severely change pharmacokinetic profiles. Against this background, this review elucidates scope and applicability of both Cu-catalyzed and Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions pertinent to the elaboration of radiometal chelates and MRI contrast agents, with an emphasis on strategies to tackle the problem of copper complexation during CuAAC. PMID:27333118

  4. Probing the chemistry of nickel/metal hydride battery cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, Bryan J.

    1994-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a valuable tool for investigating the chemical and physical processes occurring at electrode surfaces. It offers information about electron transfer at interfaces, kinetics of reactions, and diffusion characteristics of the bulk phase between the electrodes. For battery cells, this technique offers another advantage in that it can be done without taking the battery apart. This non-destructive analysis technique can thus be used to gain a better understanding of the processes occurring within a battery cell. This also raises the possibility of improvements in battery design and identification or prediction of battery characteristics useful in industry and aerospace applications. EIS as a technique is powerful and capable of yielding significant information about the cell, but it also requires that the many parameters under investigation can be resolved. This implies an understanding of the processes occurring in a battery cell. Many battery types were surveyed in this work, but the main emphasis was on nickel/metal hydride batteries.

  5. Carbonyl substitution chemistry of some trimetallic transition metal cluster complexes with polyfunctional ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Lindsay T.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Torabi, A. Asgar; White, Allan H.; Wild, S. Bruce

    2008-11-03

    phosphide ligands bridging the metal-metal bonds; the latter has the O atom symmetrically bridging one Ru-Ru bond, the P atom being attached to a non-bridged Ru atom.

  6. Multiscale approaches for simulation of nucleation, growth, and additive chemistry during electrochemical deposition of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ryan Mark

    Molecularly engineered deposition processes require computational algorithms that efficiently capture phenomena present at widely varying length and time scales. In this work, the island dynamics method was applied to simulation of kinetically-limited metal nucleation and growth by electrodeposition in the presence of additives. The model included additive kinetics, surface diffusion of adatoms, nucleation, and growth. The model was demonstrated for copper deposition in acid sulfate electrolyte containing [bis(3-sulfopropyl)disulfide], polyethylene glycol, and chloride. Simulation results were compared with kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) calculations and found to be within 1% for fractional coverage values, and within 10% for nucleation density. The computational time was more than 10X faster than comparable KMC simulations over the range studied. The island dynamics algorithm was applied to the electrodeposition of a metal onto a substrate initially configured with an array of hemispherical seed clusters. It was found that the presence of chloride in the model additive system caused high densities of nuclei on the substrate surrounding the initial seed clusters, which led to the formation of a continuous thin metal film. Simulations carried out under low-chloride conditions resulted in the growth only of the initial seed clusters, without significant nucleation or thin film formation. Additional phenomena were explored by linking the molecular scale island dynamics algorithm to a continuum model that described the migration and diffusion in the diffusion layer near the electrode surface. The multiscale linkage allowed simulation of nucleation, growth, and additive chemistry under mass transport limited conditions, including the formation of nucleation exclusion zones surrounding growing nuclei. A two-step approach was used to calculate the spatial distribution of nucleation events on an electrode undergoing deposition by electrolysis under the influence of mass

  7. Incorporation of metal related materials into electrically neutral polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Taylor, L. T.

    1981-01-01

    Developments in the field of metal-containing polymers are reviewed with emphasis on neutral polymers incorporating dissolved metal salts, metal complexes, organometallic compounds, and metals. Polymer systems discussed include: polyamides, polyimides, polyalcohols, polyesters, polyacetylene, polyethylene, and polysiloxane. Most of the studies focus on the modification of polymer properties such as adhesive properties, thermal behavior, electrical conductivity, polymer flammability, and mechanical properties.

  8. Metal-containing polymers: building blocks for functional (nano)materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosong; McHale, Ronan

    2010-02-16

    The incorporation of metallic units into polymer chains has emerged as a promising route towards functional metal-containing (nano)materials. The resulting polymers possess rich functions derived from their metallic elements, such as redox, optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. In addition, the directional and dynamic nature of metal coordination interactions provides further variables for the exploration of novel materials with designed nanostructures. These types of polymers can be synthesized through direct metal-ligand coordination or chain polymerization of metal containing monomers. Depending on the polymerization techniques and starting components, the resulting polymers, akin to their organic counterparts, can be produced in the form of insoluble networks, processible chain structures, gels or colloids. Research into this rising multidisciplinary subject has benefited from recent progress in several related areas such as supramolecular chemistry, colloidal chemistry etc., with the combination of the relative merits of each ensuring further developments in each individual discipline. For example, as a result of studies into organometallic block copolymers self-assembly behavior, living supramolecular polymerization has been unprecedentedly realized for the architectural design of micelles (see image on the right). Nevertheless, the field is still in a developmental stage and offers ample opportunities for fundamental research, as well as material exploration. In this Feature Article, we intend to overview the field with a brief survey of recent literature. PMID:21590911

  9. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, George W

    2015-02-16

    Executive Summary of Final Report for Award DE-FG02-88ER13937 Project Title: Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and its Precursors on Metal Surfaces Applicant/Institution: Columbia University Principal Investigator: George W. Flynn Objectives: The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material. Project Description: Our work treated specifically the surface chemistry aspects of carbon reactions by using proximal probe (atomic scale imaging) techniques to study model systems of graphene that have many features in common with soot forming reactions of importance in combustion flames. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is the main probe technique that we used to study the interfacial structure and chemistry of graphene, mainly because of its ability to elucidate surface structure and dynamics with molecular or even atomic resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), which measures the local density of quantum states over a single

  10. Sterically Hindered Square-Planar Nickel(II) Organometallic Complexes: Preparation, Characterization, and Substitution Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Manuel; Muller, Guillermo; Rocamora, Merce; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The series of experiments proposed for advanced undergraduate students deal with both standard organometallic preparative methods in dry anaerobic conditions and with a kinetic study of the mechanisms operating in the substitution of square-planar complexes. The preparation of organometallic compounds is carried out by transmetallation or…

  11. High Refraction Index Polysiloxanes via Organometallic Routes - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stańzyk, Włodzimierz A.; Czech, Anna; Duczmal, Wojciech; Ganicz, Tomasz; Noskowska, Małgorzata; Szeląg, Anna

    Processes based on four organometallic routes leading to phenylethenyl substituted siloxanes are reviewed. Such materials, exhibiting high refraction indices, can be made by hydrosilylation of phenylacetylenes with Si-H moieties containing siloxane oligomers and polymers. On the other hand reactions between vinyl containing siloxanes with haloaryls or styrenes lead to the same systems via Heck or metathetic and silylative coupling. The effectiveness of the catalytic processes is analyzed from the point of view of side reactions, required catalyst concentration and reaction conditions. At the current state of knowledge the Heck coupling offers synthesis of the desired phenylethenyl substituted silicone fluids using technologically most attractive pathway.

  12. Hydrogen atom abstraction from organometallic hydrogen sources: First kinetics of H atom abstraction by benzyl radical from `Mo-S-H`

    SciTech Connect

    Birbaum, J.C.; Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen transfers are very important in catalytic and stoichiometric organometallic reaction schemes, yet few kinetic studies of the transfers from a metal hydride to an organic radical have been performed. To our knowledge there are no kinetic studies of hydrogen atom transfers from atoms attached to metals such as sulfur or oxygen. We present the first study with the extremely fast hydrogen atom transfer from (CpMoSSH){sub 2} to benzyl radical. The rate constant for this reaction was found to be greater than 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}s{sup -1} at room temperature.

  13. Active photonic devices based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and organometallic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez Alvarez, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have arisen as outstanding materials to develop a new generation of optoelectronic devices. Their fabrication under simple and low cost colloidal chemistry methods results in cheap nanostructures able to provide a wide range of optical functionalities. Their attractive optical properties include a high absorption cross section below the band gap, a high quantum yield emission at room temperature, or the capability of tuning the band-gap with the size or the base material. In addition, their solution process nature enables an easy integration on several substrates and photonic structures. As a consequence, these nanoparticles have been extensively proposed to develop several photonic applications, such as detection of light, optical gain, generation of light or sensing. This manuscript reviews the great effort undertaken by the scientific community to construct active photonic devices based on these nanoparticles. The conditions to demonstrate stimulated emission are carefully studied by comparing the dependence of the optical properties of the nanocrystals with their size, shape and composition. In addition, this paper describes the design of different photonic architectures (waveguides and cavities) to enhance the generation of photoluminescence, and hence to reduce the threshold of optical gain. Finally, semiconductor nanocrystals are compared to organometallic halide perovskites, as this novel material has emerged as an alternative to colloidal nanoparticles.

  14. Quantum criticality in selected uranium intermetallic and organometallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasreen, Farzana

    My thesis presents the studies of the bulk properties of materials that exhibit unusual low-temperature properties due to the proximity of a quantum-critical point (QCP), for which long-range magnetic order can be suppressed to 0 K as a consequence of quantum fluctuations. A material can be tuned to the QCP by variation of a non-thermal control parameter such as hydrostatic pressure, magnetic field and chemical pressure/doping. Most of my experimental studies were performed at extreme conditions, such as high magnetic fields, low temperatures and/or high pressures. Two classes of materials were studied, namely uranium intermetallics and organometallics. The investigations on uranium intermetallics were done on compounds close to the edge of magnetism, i.e. the UCu4+xAl 8-x, UCuxAl5-x and UFe1-xNixAl compounds. Several of those compounds exhibit deviations from traditional Fermi-liquid theory and show non-Fermi liquid (NFL) scaling at low temperatures. Field-induced magnetic transitions were studied for some selected uranium compounds (UNiAl, UNiGa, UNiGe and UIrGe) as well. Furthermore, a study of organometallic quantum magnet (DTN: NiCl2-4SC(NH 2)2), which exhibits field-induced quantum criticality, is presented. In DTN, the magnetic-field induced polarization shows magneto-electric couplings between the antiferromagnetic Ni spins and the soft organic lattice.

  15. Two-Photon Absorption in Organometallic Bromide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Walters, Grant; Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Shi, Dong; Comin, Riccardo; Sellan, Daniel P; Bakr, Osman M; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-09-22

    Organometallic trihalide perovskites are solution-processed semiconductors that have made great strides in third-generation thin film light-harvesting and light-emitting optoelectronic devices. Recently, it has been demonstrated that large, high-purity single crystals of these perovskites can be synthesized from the solution phase. These crystals' large dimensions, clean bandgap, and solid-state order have provided us with a suitable medium to observe and quantify two-photon absorption in perovskites. When CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals are pumped with intense 800 nm light, we observe band-to-band photoluminescence at 572 nm, indicative of two-photon absorption. We report the nonlinear absorption coefficient of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites to be 8.6 cm GW(-1) at 800 nm, comparable to epitaxial single-crystal semiconductors of similar bandgap. We have leveraged this nonlinear process to electrically autocorrelate a 100 fs pulsed laser using a two-photon perovskite photodetector. This work demonstrates the viability of organometallic trihalide perovskites as a convenient and low-cost nonlinear absorber for applications in ultrafast photonics.

  16. Synthesis of high molecular weight PEO using non-metal initiators

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Jin; Sivanandan, Kulandaivelu; Pistorino, Jonathan; Eitouni, Hany Basam

    2015-05-19

    A new synthetic method to prepare high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) with a very narrow molecular weight distribution (PDI<1.5) is described. The method involves a metal free initiator system, thus avoiding dangerous, flammable organometallic compounds.

  17. Organometallic acetylides of Pt(II), Au(I) and Hg(II) as new generation optical power limiting materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gui-Jiang; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2011-05-01

    Within the scope of nonlinear optics, optical power limiting (OPL) materials are commonly regarded as an important class of compounds which can protect the delicate optical sensors or human eyes from sudden exposure to damaging intense laser beams. Recent efforts have been devoted to developing organometallic acetylide complexes, dendrimers and polymers as high performance OPL materials of the next generation which can favorably optimize the optical limiting/transparency trade-off issue. These metallated materials offer a new avenue towards a new family of highly transparent homo- and heterometallic optical limiters with good solution processability which outperform those of current state-of-the-art visible-light-absorbing competitors such as fullerenes, metalloporphyrins and metallophthalocyanines. This critical review aims to provide a detailed account on the recent advances of these novel OPL chromophores. Their OPL activity was shown to depend strongly on the electronic characters of the aryleneethynylene ligand and transition metal moieties as well as the conjugation chain length of the compounds. Strategies including copolymerization with other transition metals, change of structural geometry, use of a dendritic platform and variation of the type and content of transition metal ions would strongly govern their photophysical behavior and improve the resulting OPL responses. Special emphasis is placed on the structure-OPL response relationships of these organometallic acetylide materials. The research endeavors for realizing practical OPL devices based on these materials have also been presented. This article concludes with perspectives on the current status of the field, as well as opportunities that lie just beyond its frontier (106 references).

  18. A GREEN CHEMISTRY APPROACH TO PREPARATION OF CORE (FE OR CU)-SHELL (NOBLE METALS) NANOCOMPOSITES USING AQUEOUS ASCORBIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A greener method to fabricate novel core (Fe or Cu)-shell (noble metals) nanocomposites of transition metals such as Fe and Cu and noble metals such as Au, Pt, Pd, and Ag using aqueous ascorbic acid is described. Transition metal salts such as Cu and Fe were reduced using ascor...

  19. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported.

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, Absorption Spectra, and Luminescence Properties of Organometallic Platinum(II) Terpyridine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Arena, Giuseppe; Calogero, Giuseppe; Campagna, Sebastiano; Monsù Scolaro, Luigi; Ricevuto, Vittorio; Romeo, Raffaello

    1998-06-01

    A series of new organometallic platinum(II) complexes containing terdentate polypyridine ligands has been prepared and characterized. Their absorption spectra in 4:1 (v/v) MeOH/EtOH fluid solution at room temperature and luminescence in the same matrix at 77 K have been investigated. The new species are [Pt(terpy)Ph]Cl (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine, Ph = phenyl), [Pt(Ph-terpy)Cl]Cl (4, Ph-terpy = 4'-phenyl-2,2':6',2"-terpyridine), [Pt(Ph-terpy)Me]Cl (5), and [Pt(Ph-terpy)Ph]Cl (6). The results have been compared with those for [Pt(terpy)Cl]Cl (1) and [Pt(terpy)Me]Cl (2). NMR data evidence that all the complexes but 3 and 6 oligomerize in solution leading to stacked species. The absorption spectra are dominated by moderately intense metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) bands in the visible region and by intense ligand-centered (LC) bands in the UV region. All the compounds are luminescent in a 4:1 (v/v) MeOH/EtOH rigid matrix at 77 K, exhibiting a structured emission within the range 460-600 nm. This feature is assigned to formally (3)LC excited states which receive substantial contribution from closely lying (3)MLCT levels. Complexes 1, 2, 4, and 5 also exhibit a relatively narrow and unstructured luminescence band within the range 680-800 nm, which dominates the luminescence spectrum on increasing concentration and exciting at longer wavelengths. The band is assigned to a dsigma(metal) --> pi(polypyridine) ((3)MMLCT) state, originating from metal-metal interactions occurring in head-to-tail dimers (or polymers). A third broad band is shown by 1 and 4 under all concentration conditions and by 2 and 5 only in concentrated solutions and is attributed to excimeric species originating from pi-pi interactions due to stacking between polypyridine ligands.

  1. Catalytic arene hydrogenation using early transition metal hydride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, I.P.

    1993-03-15

    Progress was achieved in four areas: development of surface supported Group 5 metal organometallic compounds for catalytic arene hydrogenation, isolation and reactivity of possible intermediates in catalytic arene hydrogenation, synthesis and characterization of new d[sup 0]-metal hydride compounds, and stoichiometric reactivity of d[sup 0] metal hydrido, aryloxide compounds. (DLC)

  2. Metal complexes containing natural and and artificial radioactive elements and their applications.

    PubMed

    Kharissova, Oxana V; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A; Kharisov, Boris I; Méndez, Ubaldo Ortiz; Martínez, Perla Elizondo

    2014-07-24

    Recent advances (during the 2007-2014 period) in the coordination and organometallic chemistry of compounds containing natural and artificially prepared radionuclides (actinides and technetium), are reviewed. Radioactive isotopes of naturally stable elements are not included for discussion in this work. Actinide and technetium complexes with O-, N-, N,O, N,S-, P-containing ligands, as well π-organometallics are discussed from the view point of their synthesis, properties, and main applications. On the basis of their properties, several mono-, bi-, tri-, tetra- or polydentate ligands have been designed for specific recognition of some particular radionuclides, and can be used in the processes of nuclear waste remediation, i.e., recycling of nuclear fuel and the separation of actinides and fission products from waste solutions or for analytical determination of actinides in solutions; actinide metal complexes are also usefulas catalysts forcoupling gaseous carbon monoxide,as well as antimicrobial and anti-fungi agents due to their biological activity. Radioactive labeling based on the short-lived metastable nuclide technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) for biomedical use as heart, lung, kidney, bone, brain, liver or cancer imaging agents is also discussed. Finally, the promising applications of technetium labeling of nanomaterials, with potential applications as drug transport and delivery vehicles, radiotherapeutic agents or radiotracers for monitoring metabolic pathways, are also described.

  3. Electronic configurations and magnetic anisotropy in organometallic metallocenes

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kenji Kitaoka, Yukie; Nakamura, Kohji; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori

    2015-05-07

    Electronic configurations and magnetic anisotropy of organometallic metallocenes (MCp{sub 2}s) were investigated by means of first principles calculations based on the constraint density functional theory. The results predict that the ground states for M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni are the {sup 3}E{sub 2g}, {sup 2}E{sub 2g}, {sup 1}A{sub 1g}, {sup 2}E{sub 1g}, and {sup 3}A{sub 2g} states, respectively. The magnetizations of the CoCp{sub 2} and NiCp{sub 2} energetically favor highly orienting along the perpendicular and parallel directions to the cyclopentadienyl (Cp) plane, respectively, and the others show almost no preference for the magnetic easy axis.

  4. Organometallic Rhenium Complexes Divert Doxorubicin to the Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Imstepf, Sebastian; Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Felber, Michael; Fox, Thomas; Gasser, Gilles; Alberto, Roger

    2016-02-18

    Doxorubicin, a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, is known to accumulate in the cell nucleus. By using ICP-MS, we show that the conjugation of two small organometallic rhenium complexes to this structural motif results in a significant redirection of the conjugates from the nucleus to the mitochondria. Despite this relocation, the two bioconjugates display excellent toxicity toward HeLa cells. In addition, we carried out a preliminarily investigation of aspects of cytotoxicity and present evidence that the conjugates disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential, are strong inhibitors of human Topoisomerase II, and induce apoptosis. Such derivatives may enhance the therapeutic index of the aggressive parent drug and overcome drug resistance by influencing nuclear and mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26799241

  5. Organometallic Rhenium Complexes Divert Doxorubicin to the Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Imstepf, Sebastian; Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Felber, Michael; Fox, Thomas; Gasser, Gilles; Alberto, Roger

    2016-02-18

    Doxorubicin, a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, is known to accumulate in the cell nucleus. By using ICP-MS, we show that the conjugation of two small organometallic rhenium complexes to this structural motif results in a significant redirection of the conjugates from the nucleus to the mitochondria. Despite this relocation, the two bioconjugates display excellent toxicity toward HeLa cells. In addition, we carried out a preliminarily investigation of aspects of cytotoxicity and present evidence that the conjugates disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential, are strong inhibitors of human Topoisomerase II, and induce apoptosis. Such derivatives may enhance the therapeutic index of the aggressive parent drug and overcome drug resistance by influencing nuclear and mitochondrial homeostasis.

  6. Molecular orbital studies of the bonding in heavy element organometallics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, B.E.

    1992-12-04

    The upgrade to the DECstation 3100 (and other workstations underway) has enabled the use of more sophisticated electronic structure methods. Research were done in the following fields: tris(cyclopentadienyl) actinide complexes; actinide-containing molecules with metal-metal bonds (U dimer, Th-Ru, Zr-Ru); and applications of fully relativistic DV-X{alpha} method to trivalent actinide chemistry (MCl{sub 3}).

  7. Magnetism in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  8. A Review of the Tissue Residue Approach for Organic and Organometallic Compounds in Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the tissue residue approach (TRA) for toxicity assessment as it applies to organic chemicals and some organometallic compounds (tin, mercury, and lead). Specific emphasis was placed on evaluating key factors that influence interpretation of critical body resid...

  9. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N.; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios.

  10. Effect of organometallic fuel additives on nanoparticle emissions from a gasoline passenger car.

    PubMed

    Gidney, Jeremy T; Twigg, Martyn V; Kittelson, David B

    2010-04-01

    Particle size measurements were performed on the exhaust of a car operating on a chassis dynamometer fueled with standard gasoline and gasoline containing low levels of Pb, Fe, and Mn organometallic additives. When additives were present there was a distinct nucleation mode consisting primarily of sub-10 nm nanoparticles. At equal molar dosing Mn and Fe gave similar nanoparticle concentrations at the tailpipe, whereas Pb gave a considerably lower concentration. A catalytic stripper was used to remove the organic component of these particles and revealed that they were mainly solid and, because of their association with inorganic additives, presumably inorganic. Solid nucleation mode nanoparticles of similar size and concentration to those observed here from a gasoline engine with Mn and Fe additives have also been observed from modern heavy-duty diesel engines without aftertreatment at idle, but these solid particles are a small fraction of the primarily volatile nucleation mode particles emitted. The solid nucleation mode particles emitted by the diesel engines are likely derived from metal compounds in the lubrication oil, although carbonaceous particles cannot be ruled out. Significantly, most of these solid nanoparticles emitted by both engine types fall below the 23 nm cutoff of the PMP number regulation.

  11. Computational Raman spectroscopy of organometallic reaction products in lithium and sodium-based battery systems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carrera, Roel S; Kozinsky, Boris

    2014-11-28

    A common approach to understanding surface reaction mechanisms in rechargeable lithium-based battery systems involves spectroscopic characterization of the product mixtures and matching of spectroscopic features to spectra of pure candidate reference compounds. This strategy, however, requires separate chemical synthesis and accurate characterization of potential reference compounds. It also assumes that atomic structures are the same in the actual product mixture as in the reference samples. We propose an alternative approach that uses first-principles computations of spectra of the possible reaction products and by-products present in advanced battery systems. We construct a library of computed Raman spectra for possible products, achieving excellent agreement with reference experimental data, targeting solid-electrolyte interphase in Li-ion cells and discharge products of Li-air cells. However, the solid-state crystalline structure of Li(Na) metal-organic compounds is often not known, making the spectra computations difficult. We develop and apply a novel technique of simplifying spectra calculations by using dimer-like representations of the solid state structures. On the basis of a systematic investigation, we demonstrate that molecular dimers of Li(Na)-based organometallic material provide relevant information about the vibrational properties of many possible solid reaction products. Such an approach should serve as a basis to extend existing spectral libraries of molecular structures relevant for understanding the link between atomic structures and measured spectroscopic data of materials in novel battery systems.

  12. Scalable Synthesis of Piperazines Enabled by Visible-Light Irradiation and Aluminum Organometallics

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pantiga, Samuel; Colas, Kilian; Johansson, Magnus J; Mendoza, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The development of more active C–H oxidation catalysts has inspired a rapid, scalable, and stereoselective assembly of multifunctional piperazines through a [3+3] coupling of azomethine ylides. A combination of visible-light irradiation and aluminum organometallics is essential to promote this transformation, which introduces visible-light photochemistry of main-group organometallics and sets the basis for new and promising catalysts. PMID:26337253

  13. Vibrational spectral characterization, NLO studies and charge transfer analysis of the organometallic material L-Alanine cadmium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Sasi, B. S.; Bright, K. C.; James, C.

    2016-01-01

    An organometallic nonlinear crystal, L-Alanine Cadmium Chloride (LACC) was synthesized by slow evaporation technique. The effects of hydrogen bonding on the structure, binding of ligand to metal ion, natural orbital occupancies, and vibrational frequencies were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with the combined B3LYP and LANL2DZ basis set. Vibrational assignments were made on the basis of calculated potential energy distribution values from MOLVIB program. The topological analysis of electron localization function (ELF) provides basin population N (integrated density over the attractor basin), standard deviation (σ), and their relative fluctuation, defined as λ = σ2/N, which are sensitive criteria of delocalization. The molecular stability, electronic exchange interaction, and bond strength of the molecule were studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was determined using Kurtz and Perry method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to study various intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of the molecule.

  14. Mass spectrometry. [in organic ion and biorganic chemistry and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Cox, R. E.; Derrick, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the present status of mass spectrometry in the light of pertinent recent publications spanning the period from December 1971 to January 1974. Following an initial survey of techniques, instruments, and computer applications, a sharp distinction is made between the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions and analytical applications in biorganic chemistry and medicine. The emphasis is on the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions at the expense of inorganic, organometallic, and surface ion chemistry. Biochemistry and medicine are chosen because of their contemporary importance and because of the stupendous contributions of mass spectroscopy to these fields in the past two years. In the review of gas-phase organic ion chemistry, special attention is given to studies making significant contributions to the understanding of ion chemistry.

  15. FORUM: Bioinspired Heme, Heme/non-heme Diiron, Heme/copper and Inorganic NOx Chemistry: ·NO(g) Oxidation, Peroxynitrite-Metal Chemistry and ·NO(g) Reductive Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Schopfer, Mark P.; Wang, Jun; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Forum review highlights work from our own laboratories and those of others in the area of biochemical and biologically inspired inorganic chemistry dealing with nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, ·NO(g)) and its biological roles and reactions. The latter focus is on (i) oxidation of ·NO(g) to nitrate by nitric oxide dioxygenases (NOD’s), and (ii) reductive coupling of two molecules of ·NO(g) to give N2O(g). In the former case, NOD’s are described and the highlighting of possible peroxynitrite-heme intermediates and consequences of this are given by discussion of recent works with myoglobin and a synthetic heme model system for NOD action. Summaries of recent copper complex chemistries with ·NO(g) and O2(g) leading to peroxynitrite species are given. The coverage of biological reductive coupling of ·NO(g) deals with bacterial nitric oxide reductases (NOR’s) with heme/non-heme diiron active sites, and on heme/Cu oxidases such as cytochrome c oxidase which can mediate the same chemistry. Recent designed protein and synthetic model compound (heme/non-heme diiron or heme/copper) as functional mimics are discussed in some detail. We also highlight examples from the chemical literature, not necessarily involving biologically relevant metal ions, which describe the oxidation of ·NO(g) to nitrate (or nitrite) and possible peroxynitrite intermediates, or reductive coupling of ·NO(g) to give nitrous oxide. PMID:20666386

  16. Organo- and Organometallic-Catalytic Intramolecular [1,5]-Hydride Transfer/Cyclization Process through C(sp(3) )-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Su Jin; Kim, Dae Young

    2016-06-01

    The direct functionalization of C(sp(3) )-H bonds is one of the most synthetically powerful research areas in current organic synthesis. Organocatalytic C(sp(3) )-H bond activation reactions have recently been developed in addition to the traditional metal-catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H activation reactions. In this review, we aim to give a brief overview of organo- and organometallic internal redox cascade reactions with respect to the mechanism, the reactivity of hydrogen donors and acceptors, and the migration modes of hydrogen. PMID:27062480

  17. Tribromobenzene on Cu(111): Temperature-dependent formation of halogen-bonded, organometallic, and covalent nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Qitang; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Junfa; Liu, Liming; Zhao, Jin; Gottfried, J. Michael

    2015-03-14

    The temperature-controlled surface-assisted synthesis of halogen bonded, organometallic, and covalent nanostructures based on 1,3,5-tribromo-benzene (TriBB) was studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Vapor deposition of TriBB onto a Cu(111) surface held at 90 K leads to the formation of large domains of a honeycomb-like organic monolayer structure stabilized by triangular nodes with Br⋯Br intermolecular bonds. Upon annealing the organic monolayer to ∼140 K, a new hexagonal close-packed structure with intact TriBB molecules connected by Cu adatoms is formed. Further warming up the sample to 300 K gives rise to the scission of C–Br bonds and formation of C–Cu–C bonds between phenyl fragments such that stable dendritic organometallic networks are formed. Larger islands of organometallic networks are obtained by maintaining the temperature of Cu(111) at 420 K during deposition of TriBB. Simultaneously, large islands of Br atoms are formed around the organometallic networks. Annealing the more extended organometallic network (prepared at 420 K) to 520 K leads to the formation of a branched covalent organic framework (COF) which comprises structural elements of porous graphene and is surrounded by Br islands. These organometallic networks and COFs appear as small dendritic and branched domains, most likely due to the steric influence exerted by the Br islands.

  18. Synthesis of a sugar-organometallic compound 1,1‧-difurfurylferrocene and its microwave preparation of carbon/iron oxide nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shanyu; Cooper, Daniel C.; Xu, Haixun; Zhu, Pinghua; Suggs, J. William

    2013-01-01

    In order to synthesize a carbon-metal or metal oxide combination sphere, carbonaceous resource furfural 1 was introduced, which was nucleophilic treated with 1,1‧-dilithioferrocene 2 to form a sugar-organometallic compound: ferrocenyl monosaccharide derivative 1,1‧-difurfurylferrocene 3. 1,1‧-Difurfurylferrocene 3 can be hydrothermally treated in a microwave reactor to give 300-500 nm microspheres with the α-Fe2O3 or Fe3O4 nanocrystals formed on the surface, which may be favorable for new magnetic materials preparation or instead of iron with other metal ions, versatile carbon/metal composites will be possibly synthesized for catalysis, drug delivery and magnetic uses.

  19. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  20. Surface chemistry, friction, and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to the surfaces of the ferrites in sliding. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19901

  1. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  2. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  3. Model for the Vaporization of Mixed Organometallic Compounds in the Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Temperature Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guangyao; Zhou, Gang; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1993-01-01

    A model of the vaporization and mass transport of mixed organometallics from a single source for thin film metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. A stoichiometric gas phase can be obtained from a mixture of the organometallics in the desired mole ratios, in spite of differences in the volatilities of the individual compounds. Proper film composition and growth rates are obtained by controlling the velocity of a carriage containing the organometallics through the heating zone of a vaporizer.

  4. Studies of the hydrogenation of small unsaturated molecules using organometallic cluster compounds as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Progress under contract DE-AC02-78ER04900 and plans for continued investigations of the reactivity of transition metal hydride cluster compounds with small heteronuclear unsaturated molecules are described. Research will include further elucidation of the mechanisms of hydrogen transfer from metal atoms to unsaturated substrates and studies of the structure and bonding of partially hydrogenated substrates coordinated to polynuclear metal centers. Investigations of the reactivity of the bridging hydride ligand and the chemistry of alkyl groups in clusters are planned. The development of heteronuclear clusters as homogeneous CO hydrogenation catalysts will be attempted.

  5. Preparation, Characterization, and Postsynthetic Modification of Metal-Organic Frameworks: Synthetic Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course in Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumida, Kenji; Arnold, John

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline materials that are composed of an infinite array of metal nodes (single ions or clusters) linked to one another by polyfunctional organic compounds. Because of their extraordinary surface areas and high degree of control over the physical and chemical properties, these materials have received much…

  6. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  7. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  8. Coordination and organometallic chemistry of relevance to the rhodium-based catalyst for ethylene hydroamination.

    PubMed

    Béthegnies, Aurélien; Kirkina, Vladislava A; Filippov, Oleg A; Daran, Jean-Claude; Belkova, Natalia V; Shubina, Elena; Polic, Rinaldo

    2011-12-19

    The RhCl(3)·3H(2)O/PPh(3)/nBu(4)PI catalytic system for the hydroamination of ethylene by aniline is shown to be thermally stable by a recycle experiment and by a kinetic profile study. The hypothesis of the reduction under catalytic conditions to a Rh(I) species is supported by the observation of a high catalytic activity for complex [RhI(PPh(3))(2)](2). New solution equilibrium studies on [RhX(PPh(3))(2)](2) (X = Cl, I) in the presence of ligands of relevance to the catalytic reaction (PPh(3), C(2)H(4), PhNH(2), X(-), and the model Et(2)NH amine) are reported. Complex [RhCl(PPh(3))(2)](2) shows broadening of the (31)P NMR signal upon addition of PhNH(2), indicating rapid equilibrium with a less thermodynamically stable adduct. The reaction with Et(2)NH gives extensive conversion into cis-RhCl(PPh(3))(2)(NHEt(2)), which is however in equilibrium with the starting material and free Et(2)NH. Excess NHEt(2) yields a H-bonded adduct cis-RhCl(PPh(3))(2)(Et(2)NH)···NHEt(2), in equilibrium with the precursors, as shown by IR spectroscopy. The iodide analogue [RhI(PPh(3))(2)](2) shows less pronounced reactions (no change with PhNH(2), less extensive addition of Et(2)NH with formation of cis-RhI(PPh(3))(2)(NHEt(2)), less extensive reaction of the latter with additional Et(2)NH to yield cis-RhI(PPh(3))(2)(Et(2)NH)···NHEt(2). The two [RhX(PPh(3))(2)](2) compounds do not show any evidence for addition of the corresponding X(-) to yield a putative [RhX(2)(PPh(3))(2)](-) adduct. The product of C(2)H(4) addition to [RhI(PPh(3))(2)](2), trans-RhI(PPh(3))(2)(C(2)H(4)), has been characterized in solution. Treatment of the RhCl(3)·3H(2)O/PPh(3)/nBu(4)PI/PhNH(2) mixture under catalytic conditions yields mostly [RhCl(PPh(3))(2)](2), and no significant halide exchange, demonstrating that the promoting effect of iodide must take place at the level of high energy catalytic intermediates. The equilibria have also been investigated at the computational level by DFT with treatment at the full QM level including solvation effects. The calculations confirm that the bridge splitting reaction is slightly less favorable for the iodido derivative. Overall, the study confirms the active role of rhodium(I) species in ethylene hydroamination catalyzed by RhCl(3)·3H(2)O/PPh(3)/nBu(4)PI and suggest that the catalyst resting state is [RhCl(PPh(3))(2)](2) or its C(2)H(4) adduct, RhCl(PPh(3))(2)(C(2)H(4)), under high ethylene pressure. PMID:22082087

  9. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Keum, Jong; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Belianinov, Alex; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-20

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films, a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g., I(-), Cl(-), Br(-)) in the formation of the mixed-halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl(-) ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or, alternatively, where they are located is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br(-) or Cl(-) ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I(-) ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl(-) ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performing and cost-effective optoelectronic devices. PMID:26931634

  10. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  11. Heteroepitaxial oxide structures grown by pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, F. H.; Dai, J.-Y.; Markworth, P. R.; Buchholz, D. B.; Chang, R. P. H.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and use of pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE), a plasma-enhanced CVD technique to grow oxide heterostructures. Solid-state precursors are sampled in the gas line via quartz crystal monitors and injected into the O 2 microwave plasma with pulse time durations of a few seconds. The precursors are injected through pneumatic valves in a heated valve box. The valves and microwave power are under computer control. The microwave plasma is ramped between a forward power of 600 and 1500 W to improve film epitaxy. We use POMBE to grow epitaxial BaYZrO 3/MgO, Y-ZrO 2/LAO, and YBa 2Cu 3O 7/Y-ZrO 2/LAO structures. The processing parameters leading to the heteroepitaxy are described. The best epitaxy results in X-ray FWHM of 0.12°, 0.38°, and 0.87° for BaYZrO 3, Y-ZrO 2, and YBa 2Cu 3O 7, respectively. We show the advantages of the POMBE technique over that of plasma-enhanced CVD. Selected TEM results of the heteroepitaxial oxide structures are shown, and the role that temperature plays in the oxide epitaxy. The epitaxy of BaYZrO 3 is the first described in the literature, and that of YSZ is among the best reported.

  12. Development of Organometallic S6K1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is found in many diseases, including diabetes, aging, and cancer. We developed ATP competitive organometallic kinase inhibitors, EM5 and FL772, which are inspired by the structure of the pan-kinase inhibitor staurosporine, to specifically inhibit S6K1 using a strategy previously used to target other kinases. Biochemical data demonstrate that EM5 and FL772 inhibit the kinase with IC50 value in the low nanomolar range at 100 μM ATP and that the more potent FL772 compound has a greater than 100-fold specificity over S6K2. The crystal structures of S6K1 bound to staurosporine, EM5, and FL772 reveal that the EM5 and FL772 inhibitors bind in the ATP binding pocket and make S6K1-specific contacts, resulting in changes to the p-loop, αC helix, and αD helix when compared to the staurosporine-bound structure. Cellular data reveal that FL772 is able to inhibit S6K phosphorylation in yeast cells. Together, these studies demonstrate that potent, selective, and cell permeable S6K1 inhibitors can be prepared and provide a scaffold for future development of S6K inhibitors with possible therapeutic applications. PMID:25356520

  13. Investigation of optical nonlinearities, conductivity and magnetism in organometallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sita, Lawrence R.

    1990-01-01

    Substantial progress was made in several key areas of the proposed research. With regard to the production of new materials via the organometallic doping of polydiacetylenes with diorganostannylenes, the steric and electronic factors which govern the reactivity of stannylenes towards alkynes are elucidated. New classes of cyclic organostannane compounds were produced which include the first examples of stanna cyclopropenes and 1,2-distanna cyclobut-3-enes. Derivatives of the latter ring system were found to be both air and moisture stable which allows them to be used as important synthetic precursors to new cyclic systems containing tin. Oxidation of a 1,2-distanna cyclobutene with iodine was achieved to produce an air and moisture stable tin-centered cationic species. Future work is being performed to produce monomers for ring-open polymerization via olefin metathesis which contain the 1,2-distannacyclobutene moiety. Upon oxidative doping, new ionic polymers maybe formed. Finally ab initio molecular orbital calculations were performed on the metallacyclopropenes of silicon, germanium, and tin and this information supports the model of reactivity and stability that was formulated for alkynes and stannylenes.

  14. Facile Separation of Regioisomeric Compounds by a Heteronuclear Organometallic Capsule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Yue-Jian; Han, Ying-Feng; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2016-08-24

    Owing to the often-similar physical and chemical properties of structural isomers of organic molecules, large efforts have been made to develop efficient strategies to isolate specific isomers. However, facile separation of regioisomeric compounds remains difficult. Here we demonstrate a universal organometallic capsule in which two silver centers are rigidly separated from each other by two tetranuclear [Rh4] pyramidal frustums, which selectively encapsulate a specific isomer from mixtures. Not only is the present heterometallic capsule suitable as a host for the encapsulation of a series of aromatic compounds, but also the receptor shows widely differing specificity for the various isomers. Direct experimental evidence is provided for the selective encapsulation of a series of para (p)-disubstituted benzene derivatives, such as p-xylene, p-dichlorobenzene, p-dibromobenzene, and p-diiodobenzene. The size and shape matching, as well as the Ag-π interactions, are the main forces governing the extent of molecular recognition. The encapsulated guest p-xylene can be released by using the solid-liquid solvent washing strategy, and the other guest molecules are easily liberated by using light stimulus. PMID:27463561

  15. Organometallic Iridium(III) Anticancer Complexes with New Mechanisms of Action: NCI-60 Screening, Mitochondrial Targeting, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (IrIII) complexes [Ir(Cpx)(XY)Cl]+/0 (Cpx = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cpx ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cpx = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these IrIII complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic IrIII complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  16. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  17. Synthesis of heterometallic compounds with uncommon combinations of elements for oxide nanomaterials using organometallics.

    PubMed

    John, Łukasz; Sobota, Piotr

    2014-02-18

    Oxide nanomaterials with interesting electronic and magnetic properties have applications including superconductors, magnetic core materials, high-frequency devices, and gas sensors. They can also serve as efficient oxide lattices for luminescent ions. Highly phase-pure BaHfO3 nanopowders are extremely desirable as matrices for luminescent doping, and barium hafnate is an attractive host lattice for new X-ray phosphors, which are much more effective than the phosphors currently used in radiology and computed tomography. This wide range of applications creates a strong impetus for novel and inexpensive methods for their synthesis. Classically, mixed-cation oxide ceramics are synthesized according to conventional solid-state reactions involving oxides, carbonates, or nitrates at relatively high temperatures (∼1500 °C). These procedures are inefficient and often lead to inhomogeneous by-products and poor control over the stoichiometry and phase purity. Among the new preparation techniques are those involving metal alkoxides and aryloxides with strictly defined metal stoichiometries at the molecular level. In this Account, we describe several structurally interesting heterometallic alkoxoorganometallic compounds prepared via reactions of organometallic compounds (MMe3 where M = Al, In, Ga) with group 2 alkoxides having additional protonated hydroxyl group(s) in the alcohol molecule present in the metal coordination sphere. Using lower temperatures than in the conventional solid-state thermal routes involving carbonate/oxide mixtures, we can easily transform these new complexes, with rarely found combinations of metallic precursors (Ba/In, Sr/Al, and Ba/Ga), into highly pure binary oxide materials that can be used, in a similar manner to perovskites and spinels, as host matrices for various lanthanide ions. Furthermore, our studies on titanium, zirconium, and hafnium metallocenes showed them to be attractive and cheap precursors for an extensive range of novel

  18. Formation of Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces on Mbe-Grown Gallium ARSENIDE(100): Surface Photovoltage, Chemistry and Band Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Duli

    1992-01-01

    The chemical, structural and electronic properties of the metal-GaAs interfaces formed on the polar (100) surface are studied using high resolution core level photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The clean (4 x 2)-c(8 x 2) reconstructed GaAs(100) surface, prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and subsequent thermal decapping of an As protective layer, is characterized carefully. Ga 3d and As 3d core levels are analyzed using test square curve fitting. Two Ga surface components are resolved while only one surface component is necessary for As. The assignment of these surface components to different surface atomic arrangements is discussed. The surface Fermi level position with respect to the valence band maximum is also investigated as a function of decapping temperature. Metal (In, Ga, Au)/GaAs(100) interfaces, formed at both room (RT) and low temperature (LT), are studied. The morphology of these interfaces resembles that of metal/GaAs(110) interfaces formed at LT, in that the deposited metal atoms reside at the surface as isolated adatoms rather than as clusters at submonolayer coverage. Metal clustering is only important at coverages higher than a few monolayers and is more prominent at RT than at LT. The GaAs(100) band bending is studied as a function of metal coverage and deposition temperature. At submonolayer metal coverages, In and Ga both cause reduced band bending (~ 0.2eV) on n-type GaAs, a phenomenon similar to the Fermi level overshoot observed at LT-formed metal/p-GaAs(110) interfaces and indicative of formation of adatom-induced donor levels in the upper part of the band gap. With Au, In and Ga, the Fermi level is pinned at 0.4eV, 0.6eV and 0.68eV above the valence band maximum respectively, in good agreement with the results obtained at metal/GaAs(110) interfaces. This contradicts recent claims of near-Schottky limit for these interfaces. Evidence of correlation between pinning and overlayer metallization is

  19. First-row transition metal complexes of ENENES ligands: the ability of the thioether donor to impact the coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dub, Pavel A; Scott, Brian L; Gordon, John C

    2016-01-28

    The reactions of two variants of ENENES ligands, E(CH2)2NH(CH)2SR, where E = 4-morpholinyl, R = Ph (), Bn () with MCl2 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) in coordinating solvents (MeCN, EtOH) affords isolable complexes, whose magnetic susceptibility measurements suggest paramagnetism and a high-spin formulation. X-Ray diffraction studies of available crystals show that the ligand coordinates to the metal in either a bidentate κ(2)[N,N'] or tridentate κ(3)[N,N',S] fashion, depending on the nature of ligand and/or identity of the metal atom. In the case of a less basic SPh moiety, a bidentate coordination mode was identified for harder metals (Mn, Fe), whereas a tridentate coordination mode was identified in the case of a more basic SBn moiety with softer metals (Ni, Cu). In the intermediate case of Co, ligands and coordinate via κ(2)[N,N'] and κ(3)[N,N',S] coordination modes, which can be conveniently predicted by DFT calculations. For the softest metal (Cu), ligand coordinates in a κ(3)[N,N',S] fashion.

  20. Solid-state chemistry on a surface and in a beaker: Unconventional routes to transition metal chalcogenide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Stender, Christopher L.; Sekar, Perumal; Odom, Teri W.

    2008-07-15

    This article focuses on two different approaches to create nanoscale transition metal chalcogenide materials. First, we used chemical nanofabrication, a combination of top-down patterning and bottom-up solid-state synthesis, to achieve control over the shape, size, and ordering of the patterned nanomaterials. We demonstrated orientational control over nanocrystals within sub-300 nm patterns of MoS{sub 2} and formed free-standing nanostructures of crystalline NiS{sub 2}. In addition, crossed line arrays of mixed metal chalcogenide nanostructures were achieved, and TaS{sub 2} nanopatterns were made by the chemical transformation of tantalum oxide templates. Second, we developed a one-pot procedure using molecular precursors to synthesize two-dimensional NbSe{sub 2}, TaS{sub 2} and TaSe{sub 2} nanoplates and one-dimensional NbSe{sub 2} wires depending on the relative amount of surfactants in the reaction mixture. Prospects for these transition metal chalcogenide nanomaterials with controlled shapes and morphologies will be discussed. - Graphical abstract: This paper describes how transition metal chalcogenide nanomaterials can be produced by two approaches. First, chemical nanofabrication-a combination of top-down patterning and bottom-up solid-state synthesis-was used to achieve control over the shape, size, and ordering of patterned nanomaterials. Second, a one-pot procedure using molecular precursors was developed to synthesize two-dimensional nanoplates and one-dimensional nanowires of conducting transition metal dichalcogenides.

  1. Chemistry of glass-ceramic to metal bonding for header applications. I. Effect of treatments on Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276 metallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D P; Craven, S M; Schneider, R E; Moddeman, W E; Brohard, D W

    1984-02-02

    Auger electron spectroscopy and depth Auger profiling were used to study the surfaces of Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276. The metal surfaces were processed in the same manner as is presently being used in the manufacturing of glass-ceramic headers. At each step in the process, samples were studied with Auger spectroscopy to determine their resultant elemental surface composition and film thickness. In addition, the effect of a final plasma cleaning operation on the metal surface was examined. The results show that the type and concentration of surface species and the thickness of the surface oxides are dependent on the processing technique.

  2. Effects of long-term application of biosolids for mine land reclamation on groundwater chemistry: trace metals.

    PubMed

    Oladeji, Olawale O; Tian, Guanglong; Cox, Albert E; Granato, Thomas C; Pietz, Richard I; Carlson, Carl R; Abedin, Zainul

    2012-01-01

    Data collected for 35 yr from a 1790-ha strip mine reclamation site in Fulton County, Illinois, where biosolids were applied from 1972 to 2004, were used to evaluate the impacts of long-term biosolids application on metal concentrations in groundwater. Groundwater samples were collected between 1972 and 2006 from wells installed in seven strip-mined fields treated with biosolids at cumulative loading rates of 801 to 1815 dry Mg ha and from another seven fields (also strip mined) treated with mineral fertilizer. Samples were collected monthly between 1972 and 1986 and quarterly between 1987 and 2004 and were analyzed for total metals. The concentrations of metals in groundwater were generally below regulatory limits. Lead, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Hg concentrations in groundwater were similar for the biosolids-amended and fertilizer-treated sites across all sampling intervals. Zinc concentration was increased by biosolids application only for samples collected before the 1993 promulgation of the USEPA 40 CFR Part 503 rule. Iron and Mn were the only metals that were consistently increased after biosolids application; however, Mn concentrations did not exceed the 10 mg L regulatory limits. Zinc, Cu, Cd, Pb, Fe, Al, and Mn concentrations in groundwater decreased with time, coupled with the change from pre-part 503 to post-Part 503 biosolids. The concentrations of other metals, including Ni, Cr, and Hg, did not increase in groundwater with the prolonged biosolids application. The study suggests that the long-term application of biosolids at high loading rates does not result in trace metal pollution of groundwater.

  3. Formamide-based synthesis of nucleobases by metal(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV): implication in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Sharma, Rachana; Kamaluddin

    2014-09-01

    We propose that double metal cyanides that formed in primeval seas might have played a vital role in chemical evolution and the origin of life. An array of metal octacyanomolybdates (MOCMos) has been synthesized, and their role as catalyst in the formation of nucleobases from formamide has been studied. Formamide, a hydrolysis product of HCN, was taken as starting material for the formation of nucleobases. Recent studies support the presence of formamide on some celestial bodies. Metal octacyanomolybdates, MOCMos (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd), are found to be highly efficient catalysts in the conversion of formamide into different nucleobases. Neat formamide is converted to purine, 4(3H)-pyrimidinone, cytosine, adenine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl)-purine, and thymine in good yield when using MOCMos. The products formed were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry techniques. The results of our study show that insoluble double metal cyanides might have acted as efficient catalysts in the synthesis of various biologically important compounds (e.g., purines, pyrimidines) under primeval seas on Earth or elsewhere in our solar system.

  4. Heavy metal contents in the sediments of astatic ponds: Influence of geomorphology, hydroperiod, water chemistry and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Gołdyn, Bartłomiej; Chudzińska, Maria; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Celewicz-Gołdyn, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    The contents of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) were analysed in the bottom sediments of 30 small, astatic ponds located in the agricultural landscape of Western Poland. The samples were collected from 118 stations located in patches of four vegetation types. Relationships between the contents of particular elements and four groups of factors (geomorphology, hydroperiod, water quality and vegetation) were tested using Redundancy Analysis (RDA). The most important factors influencing the heavy metal contents were the maximum depth and area of the pond, its hydroperiod, water pH and conductivity values. In general, low quantities of heavy metals were recorded in the sediments of kettle-like ponds (small but located in deep depressions) and high in water bodies of the shore-bursting type (large but shallow). Moreover, quantities of particular elements were influenced by the structure of the vegetation covering the pond. Based on the results, we show which types of astatic ponds are most exposed to contamination and suggest some conservation practices that may reduce the influx of heavy metals.

  5. Heavy metal contents in the sediments of astatic ponds: Influence of geomorphology, hydroperiod, water chemistry and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Gołdyn, Bartłomiej; Chudzińska, Maria; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Celewicz-Gołdyn, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    The contents of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) were analysed in the bottom sediments of 30 small, astatic ponds located in the agricultural landscape of Western Poland. The samples were collected from 118 stations located in patches of four vegetation types. Relationships between the contents of particular elements and four groups of factors (geomorphology, hydroperiod, water quality and vegetation) were tested using Redundancy Analysis (RDA). The most important factors influencing the heavy metal contents were the maximum depth and area of the pond, its hydroperiod, water pH and conductivity values. In general, low quantities of heavy metals were recorded in the sediments of kettle-like ponds (small but located in deep depressions) and high in water bodies of the shore-bursting type (large but shallow). Moreover, quantities of particular elements were influenced by the structure of the vegetation covering the pond. Based on the results, we show which types of astatic ponds are most exposed to contamination and suggest some conservation practices that may reduce the influx of heavy metals. PMID:25919341

  6. Formamide-based synthesis of nucleobases by metal(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV): implication in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Sharma, Rachana; Kamaluddin

    2014-09-01

    We propose that double metal cyanides that formed in primeval seas might have played a vital role in chemical evolution and the origin of life. An array of metal octacyanomolybdates (MOCMos) has been synthesized, and their role as catalyst in the formation of nucleobases from formamide has been studied. Formamide, a hydrolysis product of HCN, was taken as starting material for the formation of nucleobases. Recent studies support the presence of formamide on some celestial bodies. Metal octacyanomolybdates, MOCMos (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd), are found to be highly efficient catalysts in the conversion of formamide into different nucleobases. Neat formamide is converted to purine, 4(3H)-pyrimidinone, cytosine, adenine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl)-purine, and thymine in good yield when using MOCMos. The products formed were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry techniques. The results of our study show that insoluble double metal cyanides might have acted as efficient catalysts in the synthesis of various biologically important compounds (e.g., purines, pyrimidines) under primeval seas on Earth or elsewhere in our solar system. PMID:25192494

  7. Catalytic arene hydrogenation using early transition metal hydride compounds. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, I.P.

    1993-03-15

    Progress was achieved in four areas: development of surface supported Group 5 metal organometallic compounds for catalytic arene hydrogenation, isolation and reactivity of possible intermediates in catalytic arene hydrogenation, synthesis and characterization of new d{sup 0}-metal hydride compounds, and stoichiometric reactivity of d{sup 0} metal hydrido, aryloxide compounds. (DLC)

  8. Organometallic photovoltaics: a new and versatile approach for harvesting solar energy using conjugated polymetallaynes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai-Yeung; Ho, Cheuk-Lam

    2010-09-21

    Energy remains one of the world's great challenges. Growing concerns about limited fossil fuel resources and the accumulation of CO(2) in the atmosphere from burning those fuels have stimulated tremendous academic and industrial interest. Researchers are focusing both on developing inexpensive renewable energy resources and on improving the technologies for energy conversion. Solar energy has the capacity to meet increasing global energy needs. Harvesting energy directly from sunlight using photovoltaic technology significantly reduces atmospheric emissions, avoiding the detrimental effects of these gases on the environment. Currently inorganic semiconductors dominate the solar cell production market, but these materials require high technology production and expensive materials, making electricity produced in this manner too costly to compete with conventional sources of electricity. Researchers have successfully fabricated efficient organic-based polymer solar cells (PSCs) as a lower cost alternative. Recently, metalated conjugated polymers have shown exceptional promise as donor materials in bulk-heterojunction solar cells and are emerging as viable alternatives to the all-organic congeners currently in use. Among these metalated conjugated polymers, soluble platinum(II)-containing poly(arylene ethynylene)s of variable bandgaps (∼1.4-3.0 eV) represent attractive candidates for a cost-effective, lightweight solar-energy conversion platform. This Account highlights and discusses the recent advances of this research frontier in organometallic photovoltaics. The emerging use of low-bandgap soluble platinum-acetylide polymers in PSCs offers a new and versatile strategy to capture sunlight for efficient solar power generation. Properties of these polyplatinynes--including their chemical structures, absorption coefficients, bandgaps, charge mobilities, accessibility of triplet excitons, molecular weights, and blend film morphologies--critically influence the device

  9. Microwave-assisted cross-coupling and hydrogenation chemistry by using heterogeneous transition-metal catalysts: an evaluation of the role of selective catalyst heating.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muhammed; Fuchs, Michael; Glasnov, Toma N; Kappe, C Oliver

    2009-11-01

    The concept of specific microwave effects in solid/liquid catalytic processes resulting from the selective heating of a microwave-absorbing heterogeneous transition-metal catalyst by using 2.45 GHz microwave irradiation was evaluated. As model transformations Ni/C-, Cu/C-, Pd/C-, and Pd/Al2O3-catalyzed carbon-carbon/carbon-heteroatom cross-couplings and hydrogenation reactions were investigated. To probe the existence of specific microwave effects by means of selective catalyst heating in these transformations, control experiments comparing microwave dielectric heating and conventional thermal heating at the same reaction temperature were performed. Although the supported metal catalysts were experimentally found to be strongly microwave absorbing, for all chemistry examples investigated herein no differences in reaction rate or selectivity between microwave and conventional heating experiments under carefully controlled conditions were observed. This was true also for reactions that use low-absorbing or microwave transparent solvents, and was independent of the microwave absorbtivity of the catalyst support material. In the case of hydrogenation reactions, the stirring speed was found to be a critical factor on the mass transfer between gas and liquid phase, influencing the rate of the hydrogenation in both microwave and conventionally heated experiments.

  10. Post-synthetic modification of metal-organic framework thin films using click chemistry: the importance of strained C-C triple bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengbang; Liu, Jinxuan; Arslan, Hasan K; Grosjean, Sylvain; Hagendorn, Tobias; Gliemann, Hartmut; Bräse, Stefan; Wöll, Christof

    2013-12-23

    In this work, we demonstrate that strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) yields virtually complete conversion in the context of the post-synthetic modification (PSM) of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We use surface-anchored MOF (SURMOF) thin films, [Zn2(N3-bdc)2(dabco)], grown on modified Au substrates using liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) as a model system to first show that, with standard click chemistry, presently, the most popular method for rendering additional functionality to MOFs via PSM, quantitative conversion yields, cannot be reached. In addition, it is virtually impossible to avoid contaminations of the product by the cytotoxic Cu(I) ions used as a catalyst, a substantial problem for applications in life sciences. Both problems could be overcome by SPAAC, where a metal catalyst is not needed. After optimization of reaction conditions, conversion yields of nearly 100% could be achieved. The consequences of these results for various applications of PSM-modified SURMOFs in the fields of membranes, optical coatings, catalysis, selective gas separation, and chemical sensing are briefly discussed. PMID:24283622

  11. Chemistry for Artists and Art Buffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1979-01-01

    This course provides an attractive introduction to chemistry for a group of students who would normally avoid traditional chemistry courses. Topics include color, pigments, metals, ceramics, glass, paints, plastics, fibers, and dyes. (BB)

  12. Bimodal X-ray and Infrared Imaging of an Organometallic Derivative of Praziquantel in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Clède, Sylvain; Cowan, Noemi; Lambert, François; Bertrand, Hélène C; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Patra, Malay; Hess, Jeannine; Sandt, Christophe; Trcera, Nicolas; Gasser, Gilles; Keiser, Jennifer; Policar, Clotilde

    2016-06-01

    An organometallic derivative of praziquantel was studied directly in worms by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for quantification and synchrotron-based imaging. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and IR absorption spectromicroscopy were used for the first time in combination to directly locate this organometallic drug candidate in schistosomes. The detection of both CO (IR) and Cr (XRF) signatures proved that the Cr(CO)3 core remained intact in the worms. Images showed a preferential accumulation at the worm's tegument, consistent with a possible targeting of the calcium channel but not excluding other biological targets inside the worm. PMID:26991635

  13. The direct synthesis of organic and organometallic-containing MICA-type aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.; Awaluddin, A.

    1993-08-01

    Layer-silicate clay structures can provide supramolecular organization for catalysis, chiral reactions, colloid science, and electron transfer. The authors have successfully modified the experimental preparations of several different layer silicates in order to incorporate a wide variety of organic and organometallic molecules in the clay galleries. Synthesis and physical characterization of these materials are described and compared to ion-exchanged natural clay analogs. In addition, the photophysical properties of organometallic Ru(II) complexes incorporated by direct hydrothermal crystallization into synthetic clays were measured. 3 tabs, 21 refs.

  14. Metal centers in the anaerobic microbial metabolism of CO and CO2

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Güneş; Pierce, Elizabeth; Hill, Jeffrey A.; Darty, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are important components of the carbon cycle. Major research efforts are underway to develop better technologies to utilize the abundant greenhouse gas, CO2, for harnessing ‘green’ energy and producing biofuels. One strategy is to convert CO2 into CO, which has been valued for many years as a synthetic feedstock for major industrial processes. Living organisms are masters of CO2 and CO chemistry and, here, we review the elegant ways that metalloenzymes catalyze reactions involving these simple compounds. After describing the chemical and physical properties of CO and CO2, we shift focus to the enzymes and the metal clusters in their active sites that catalyze transformations of these two molecules. We cover how the metal centers on CO dehydrogenase catalyze the interconversion of CO and CO2 and how pyruvate oxidoreductase, which contains thiamin pyrophosphate and multiple Fe4S4 clusters, catalyzes the addition and elimination of CO2 during intermediary metabolism. We also describe how the nickel center at the active site of acetyl-CoA synthase utilizes CO to generate the central metabolite, acetyl-CoA, as part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and how CO is channelled from the CO dehydrogenase to the acetyl-CoA synthase active site. We cover how the corrinoid iron–sulfur protein interacts with acetyl-CoA synthase. This protein uses vitamin B12 and a Fe4S4 cluster to catalyze a key methyltransferase reaction involving an organometallic methyl-Co3+ intermediate. Studies of CO and CO2 enzymology are of practical significance, and offer fundamental insights into important biochemical reactions involving metallocenters that act as nucleophiles to form organometallic intermediates and catalyze C–C and C–S bond formations. PMID:21647480

  15. Metal centers in the anaerobic microbial metabolism of CO and CO2.

    PubMed

    Bender, Güneş; Pierce, Elizabeth; Hill, Jeffrey A; Darty, Joseph E; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2011-08-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are important components of the carbon cycle. Major research efforts are underway to develop better technologies to utilize the abundant greenhouse gas, CO(2), for harnessing 'green' energy and producing biofuels. One strategy is to convert CO(2) into CO, which has been valued for many years as a synthetic feedstock for major industrial processes. Living organisms are masters of CO(2) and CO chemistry and, here, we review the elegant ways that metalloenzymes catalyze reactions involving these simple compounds. After describing the chemical and physical properties of CO and CO(2), we shift focus to the enzymes and the metal clusters in their active sites that catalyze transformations of these two molecules. We cover how the metal centers on CO dehydrogenase catalyze the interconversion of CO and CO(2) and how pyruvate oxidoreductase, which contains thiamin pyrophosphate and multiple Fe(4)S(4) clusters, catalyzes the addition and elimination of CO(2) during intermediary metabolism. We also describe how the nickel center at the active site of acetyl-CoA synthase utilizes CO to generate the central metabolite, acetyl-CoA, as part of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and how CO is channelled from the CO dehydrogenase to the acetyl-CoA synthase active site. We cover how the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein interacts with acetyl-CoA synthase. This protein uses vitamin B(12) and a Fe(4)S(4) cluster to catalyze a key methyltransferase reaction involving an organometallic methyl-Co(3+) intermediate. Studies of CO and CO(2) enzymology are of practical significance, and offer fundamental insights into important biochemical reactions involving metallocenters that act as nucleophiles to form organometallic intermediates and catalyze C-C and C-S bond formations. PMID:21647480

  16. A Coordination Chemistry Approach for Lithium-Ion Batteries: The Coexistence of Metal and Ligand Redox Activities in a One-Dimensional Metal-Organic Material.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaihua; Yang, Hao; Li, Fengcai; Cheng, Fangyi; Shi, Wei; Chen, Jun; Cheng, Peng

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate herein the use of a one-dimensional metal-organic material as a new type of electrode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in place of the classic porous three-dimensional materials, which are subject to the size of the channel for lithium-ion diffusion and blocking of the windows of the framework by organic solvents during the charging and discharging processes. Introducing a one-dimensional coordination compound can keep organic active substances insoluble in the electrolyte during the charging and discharging processes, providing a facile and general new system for further studies. The results show that both the aromatic ligand and the metal center can participate in lithium storage simultaneously, illustrating a new energy storage mechanism that has been well-characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the fact that the one-dimensional chains are linked by weak hydrogen bonds rather than strong π-π stacking interactions or covalent bonds is beneficial for the release of capacity entirely without the negative effect of burying the active sites.

  17. Divalent later transition metal complexes of the traditional chinese medicine (TCM) liriodenine: coordination chemistry, cytotoxicity and DNA binding studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cheng; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liu, Li-Min; Peng, Yan; Hong, Xue; Yang, Bin; Liu, Hua-Gang; Liang, Hong; Orvig, Chris

    2009-12-28

    Liriodenine (L), a natural alkaloid, was isolated as an active component from the anticancer traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Zanthoxylum nitidum. It reacted with Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) to afford four metal complexes: [MnCl(2)(L)(2)] (1), [FeCl(2)(L)(2)] (2), [Co(L)(2)(H(2)O)(2).Co(L)(2)(CH(3)CH(2)OH)(2)](ClO(4))(4) (3), and [Zn(2)(L)(2)(mu(2)-Cl)(2)Cl(2)] (4), which were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, ESI-MS. Their crystal structures were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction method. The in vitro cytotoxicity of L and complexes 1-4 against 10 human tumour cell lines was assayed. Some of these metal-based compounds exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity vs. free L to selected tumour cell lines. The binding properties of L and its complexes 1-4 to ct-DNA were investigated by spectroscopic methods and viscosity measurements. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiments were also carried out to evaluate their unwinding ability towards plasmid DNA and their inhibition towards Topoisomerase I. All the results indicate that complexes 1-4 may bind more intensively to the DNA helix than does L, and intercalative binding for complexes 1-4 and electrostatic interactions for complexes 3-4 to DNA should be considered. For complex 4, covalent binding to DNA may exist. Of special note, all these metal complexes effectively inhibit Topoisomerase I even at low concentration (< or = 10 microM). PMID:20023911

  18. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M; Balke, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L; Unocic, Raymond R

    2015-03-11

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and to track Li nucleation and growth mechanisms from a standard organic battery electrolyte (LiPF6 in EC:DMC), we used in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy (ec-S/TEM) to perform controlled electrochemical potential sweep measurements while simultaneously imaging site-specific structures resulting from electrochemical reactions. A combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and STEM imaging approach is used to demonstrate that chemically sensitive annular dark field STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of the evolving SEI and to identify Li-containing phases formed in the liquid cell. We report that the SEI is approximately twice as dense as the electrolyte as determined from imaging and electron scattering theory. We also observe site-specific locations where Li nucleates and grows on the surface and edge of the glassy carbon electrode. Lastly, this report demonstrates the investigative power of quantitative nanoscale imaging combined with electrochemical measurements for studying fluid-solid interfaces and their evolving chemistries.

  19. Textural manipulation of mesoporous materials for hosting of metallic nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junming; Bao, Xinhe

    2008-01-01

    The preparation and stabilization of nanoparticles are becoming very crucial issues in the field of so-called "nanocatalysis". Recent developments in supramolecular self-assembled porous materials have opened a new way to get nanoparticles hosted in the channels of such materials. In this paper, a new approach towards monodisperse and thermally stable metal nanoparticles by confining them in ordered mesoporous materials is presented, and three aspects are illustrated. Firstly, the recent progress in the functional control of mesoporous materials will be briefly introduced, and the rational tuning of the textures, pore size, and pore length is demonstrated by controlling supramolecular self-assembly behavior. A novel synthesis of short-pore mesoporous materials is emphasized for their easy mass transfer in both biomolecule absorption and the facile assembly of metal nanocomposites within their pore channels. In the second part, the different routes for encapsulating monodisperse nanoparticles inside channels of porous materials are discussed, which mainly includes the ion-exchange/conventional incipient wetness impregnation, in situ encapsulation routes, organometallic methodologies, and surface functionalization schemes. A facile in situ autoreduction route is highlighted to get monodisperse metal nanoparticles with tunable sizes inside the channels of mesoporous silica. Finally, confinement of mesoporous materials is demonstrated to improve the thermal stability of monodisperse metal nanoparticles catalysts and a special emphasis will be focused on the stabilization of the metal nanoparticles with a low Tammann temperature. Several catalytic reactions concerning the catalysis of nanoparticles will be presented. These uniform nanochannels, which confine monodisperse and stable metal nanoparticles catalysts, are of great importance in the exploration of size-dependent catalytic chemistry and further understanding the nature of catalytic reactions. PMID:18668502

  20. Surface Chemistry and Interface Evolution during the Atomic Layer Deposition of High-k Metal Oxides on InAs(100) and GaAs(100) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henegar, Alex J.

    Device scaling has been key for creating faster and more powerful electronic devices. Integral circuit components like the metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) now rely on material deposition techniques, like atomic layer deposition (ALD), that possess atomic-scale thickness precision. At the heart of the archetypal MOSFET is a SiO2/Si interface which can be formed to near perfection. However when the thickness of the SiO 2 layer is shrunk down to a few nanometers several complications arise like unacceptably high leakage current and power consumption. Replacing Si with III-V semiconductors and SiO2 with high-k dielectric materials is appealing but comes with its own set of challenges. While SiO2 is practically defect-free, the native oxides of III-Vs are poor dielectrics. In this dissertation, the surface chemistry and interface evolution during the ALD of high-k metal oxides on Si(100), GaAs(100) and InAs(100) was studied. In particular, the surface chemistry and crystallization of TiO2 films grown on Si(100) was investigated using transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Large, stable, and highly reactive anatase TiO2 grains were found to form during a post-deposition heat treatment after the ALD at 100 °C. The remainder of this work was focused on the evolution of the interfacial oxides during the deposition of TiO2 and Al2O3 on InAs(100) and GaAs(100) and during the deposition of Ta2O 5 on InAs(100). In summary the ALD precursor type, deposited film, and substrate had an influence in the evolution of the native oxides. Alkyl amine precursors fared better at removing the native oxides but the deposited films (TiO2 and Ta2O5) were susceptible to significant native oxide diffusion. The alkyl precursor used for the growth of Al 2O3 was relatively ineffective at removing the oxides but was

  1. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO.

  2. Highly selective electrocatalytic dehydrogenation at low applied potential catalyzed by an Ir organometallic complex.

    PubMed

    Bonitatibus, Peter J; Rainka, Matthew P; Peters, Andrea J; Simone, Davide L; Doherty, Mark D

    2013-11-21

    A homogeneous organometallic Ir complex was shown to catalyze the electro-oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol to p-anisaldehyde at a very low applied potential with remarkably high selectivity and Faradaic efficiency. In the chemical catalysis, when stoichiometric oxidant and anionic base were used to separately accept electrons and protons, aldehyde selectivity was in agreement with electrolysis results. PMID:24091876

  3. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO. PMID:25036387

  4. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  5. 40 CFR 721.10414 - Polycyclic polyamine diester organometallic compound (generic) (P-10-358).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... organometallic compound (generic) (P-10-358). 721.10414 Section 721.10414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... compound (generic) (P-10-358). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1...-.kappa.N3,.kappa.N7]-,chloride (1:1), (OC-6-63)-(PMN P-10-358, CAS No. 478945-46-9) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10414 - Polycyclic polyamine diester organometallic compound (generic) (P-10-358).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organometallic compound (generic) (P-10-358). 721.10414 Section 721.10414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... compound (generic) (P-10-358). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1...-.kappa.N3,.kappa.N7]-,chloride (1:1), (OC-6-63)-(PMN P-10-358, CAS No. 478945-46-9) is subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10414 - Polycyclic polyamine diester organometallic compound (generic) (P-10-358).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... organometallic compound (generic) (P-10-358). 721.10414 Section 721.10414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... compound (generic) (P-10-358). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1...-.kappa.N3,.kappa.N7]-,chloride (1:1), (OC-6-63)-(PMN P-10-358, CAS No. 478945-46-9) is subject...

  8. Application of Organometallic Catalysis to the Commercial Production of L-DOPA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how asymmetric organometallic catalysts can be used to make complex organic molecules with extremely high enantioselectivity. The molecule considered is l-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), an amino acid which was found to be effective in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. (JN)

  9. Spatial, Hysteretic, and Adaptive Host-Guest Chemistry in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Watson-Crick Sites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Li, Mian; Lin, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Wei; Chen, Guang-Hui; Huang, Xiao-Chun; Li, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Biological and artificial molecules and assemblies capable of supramolecular recognition, especially those with nucleobase pairing, usually rely on autonomous or collective binding to function. Advanced site-specific recognition takes advantage of cooperative spatial effects, as in local folding in protein-DNA binding. Herein, we report a new nucleobase-tagged metal-organic framework (MOF), namely ZnBTCA (BTC=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxyl, A=adenine), in which the exposed Watson-Crick faces of adenine residues are immobilized periodically on the interior crystalline surface. Systematic control experiments demonstrated the cooperation of the open Watson-Crick sites and spatial effects within the nanopores, and thermodynamic and kinetic studies revealed a hysteretic host-guest interaction attributed to mild chemisorption. We further exploited this behavior for adenine-thymine binding within the constrained pores, and a globally adaptive response of the MOF host was observed.

  10. MN15-L and MN-15: New Kohn-Sham Density Functionals with Board Accuracy for Main-Group and Transition Metal Chemistry and Noncovalent Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haoyu; He, Xiao; Truhlar, Donald G.; Donald G. Truhlar Team

    The accuracy of Kohn-Sham density functional theory depends on the exchange-correlation functional. Local functionals depending on only the density (ρ) , density gradient (grad), and possibly kinetic energy density (τ) have been popular because of their low cost and simplicity, but the most successful functionals for chemistry have involved nonlocal Hartree-Fock exchange (hybrid functionals). We have designed a new meta gradient approximation called MN15-L and a new hybrid meta gradient approximation called MN15 and tested them systematically for 17 absolute atomic energies, 51 noncovalent interaction energies, 56 data on transition metal atoms and molecules, and for 298 other atomic and molecular energetic data, including main-group and transition metal bond energies, ionization potentials, proton affinities, reaction barrier heights, hydrocarbon thermochemistry, excitation energies, and isomerization energies. When compared with 84 previous density MN15 and MN15-L give respectively the smallest and second smallest mean unsigned errors (MUEs, in kcal/mol) on all 422 data with errors for the 4 subsets above being: MN15: 6, 0.26, 4.4, 1.6; MN15-L: 7, 0.45, 4.3, 2.0. Third best: M06: 4, 0.35, 7.7, 2.2. Best previous local functional: M06-L: 7, 0.42, 6.0, 3.5. Other popular functionals: B3LYP: 18, 0.82, 8.2, 4.3; HSE06: 33, 0.58, 8.8, 3.6; TPSS: 18, 0.89, 7.25, 5.0; PBE, 47, 0.88, 9.1, 6.0. MN15-L also performs well for solid-state cohesive energies. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and inorganic catalyst design center from university of Minnesota.

  11. Sulfur and Trace Metal Chemistry of a Methane Charged Brine Pool and Adjacent Porewaters in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Cable, J. E.; Carney, R. S.; Macko, S. A.; Lyons, T. W.

    2007-12-01

    A systematic study of a methane brine pool on the Louisiana continental slope reveals the extent to which steep chemical gradients associated with an anoxic hypersaline basin control the establishment and distribution of chemosynthetic organisms. The seep site, located in the Green Canyon lease block (GC233), provides habitat for a bivalve-dominated community of chemosynthetic mussels ( Bathymodiolus childressi). The pool is a brine-filled pockmark centered over a salt diapir buried within 500 m of the seafloor along which methane and vent fluids migrate to the surface. The depression slopes along its southern margin where brine overflows onto the seafloor. This study sought to establish the chemistry of the brine in an effort to better understand fluid transport to the seafloor and the extent to which brine influences chemosynthetic activity at a methane seep site. Ten sediment push cores were collected during submersible operations within the brine spillway and in upslope background sediments distal to the pool. Initial chemical analyses indicate the brine (128 ppt) is anoxic, chloride-rich (1994.8 mM) and sulfur-poor ([SO42-] = 0.4 mM, [HS-] = 8.2 uM). Steep porewater Cl- and Sr2+ concentration gradients observed in sediments downslope of the brine pool clearly indicate mixing between brine and seawater end members. Porewater sulfur profiles from sediments within the brine outflow indicate complete sulfate consumption within 30 cm below seafloor and sulfide production as great as 5 mM. The paired isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate and sulfide (Δ34SSO4-HS = 40‰) is consistent with bacterial sulfate reduction, potentially driven by the anaerobic oxidation of methane or non-methane hydrocarbons. The brine was nearly devoid of dissolved Mo (22 nM) and enriched in Mn (6.3 uM), relative to measured seawater casts ([Mo] = 112 nM; [Mn] below detection). Dissolved Mo enrichments, up to 392.8 nM, in surficial sediments decrease with depth may indicate brine

  12. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  13. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Ran; Chai Xiaochuan; Mei Hongxin; Zhang Hanhui; Chen Yiping; Sun Yanqiong

    2010-07-15

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H{sub 2}L{sup 1}(HL{sup 1}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O 1, [Ni{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(L{sup 2})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, Mn(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}3 and Mn(phen)(HL{sup 2}) 4 (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}=p-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, H{sub 3}L{sup 2}=m-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni{sub 4} cluster units are connected by pairs of H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R{sub 2}{sup 2}(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H{sub 3}L{sup 1} and H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands in the compounds more efficiently. - Graphical abstract: A series of divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The figure displays 2D sheet structure with large windows in compound 2.

  14. Influence of biocompatible metal ions (Ag, Fe, Y) on the surface chemistry, corrosion behavior and cytocompatibility of Mg-1Ca alloy treated with MEVVA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Bian, Dong; Wu, Yuanhao; Li, Nan; Qiu, Kejin; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Mg-1Ca samples were implanted with biocompatible alloy ions Ag, Fe and Y respectively with a dose of 2×10(17)ionscm(-2) by metal vapor vacuum arc technique (MEVVA). The surface morphologies and surface chemistry were investigated by SEM, AES and XPS. Surface changes were observed after all three kinds of elemental ion implantation. The results revealed that the modified layer was composed of two sublayers, including an outer oxidized layer with mixture of oxides and an inner implanted layer, after Ag and Fe ion implantation. Y ion implantation induced an Mg/Ca-deficient outer oxidized layer and the distribution of Y along with depth was more homogeneous. Both electrochemical test and immersion test revealed accelerated corrosion rate of Ag-implanted Mg-1Ca and Fe-implanted Mg-1Ca, whereas Y ion implantation showed a short period of protection since enhanced corrosion resistance was obtained by electrochemical test, but accelerated corrosion rate was found by long period immersion test. Indirect cytotoxicity assay indicated good cytocompatibility of Y-implanted Mg-1Ca. Moreover, the corresponding corrosion mechanisms involving implanting ions into magnesium alloys were proposed, which might provide guidance for further application of plasma ion implantation to biodegradable Mg alloys.

  15. Driving Curie temperature towards room temperature in the half-metallic ferromagnet K2Cr8O16 by soft redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pirrotta, I; Fernández-Sanjulián, J; Moran, E; Alario-Franco, M A; Gonzalo, E; Kuhn, A; García-Alvarado, F

    2012-02-14

    The half-metallic ferromagnet K(2)Cr(8)O(16) with the hollandite structure has been chemically modified using soft chemistry methods to increase the average oxidation state of chromium. The synthesis of the parent material has been performed under high pressure/high temperature conditions. Following this, different redox reactions have been carried out on K(2)Cr(8)O(16). Oxidation to obtain potassium-de-inserted derivatives, K(2-x)Cr(8)O(16) (0 ≤x≤ 1), has been investigated with electrochemical methods, while the synthesis of sizeable amounts was achieved chemically by using nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate as a highly oxidizing agent. The maximum amount of extracted K ions corresponds to x = 0.8. Upon oxidation the hollandite structure is maintained and the products keep high crystallinity. The de-insertion of potassium changes the Cr(3+)/Cr(4+) ratio, and therefore the magnetic properties. Interestingly, the Curie temperature increases from ca. 175 K to 250 K, getting therefore closer to room temperature.

  16. Fluorescence sensor array for metal ion detection based on various coordination chemistries: general performance and potential application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Palacios, Manuel A; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2008-10-01

    A sensor array containing 9 cross-reactive sensing fluorescent elements with different affinity and selectivity to 10 metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Al(3+), Ga(3+)) is described. The discriminatory capacity of the array was tested at different ranges of pH and at different cation concentrations using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Qualitative identification of cations can be determined with over 96% of accuracy in a concentration range covering 3 orders of a magnitude (5-5000 microM). Quantitative analysis can be achieved with over 90% accuracy in the concentration range between 10 and 5000 microM. The array performance was also tested in identification of nine different mineral water brands utilizing their various electrolyte compositions and their Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+) levels. LDA cross-validation routine shows 100% correct classification for all trials. Preliminary results suggest that similar arrays could be used in testing of the consistency of the purification and manufacturing process of purified and mineral waters. PMID:18778035

  17. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ran; Chai, Xiaochuan; Mei, Hongxin; Zhang, Hanhui; Chen, Yiping; Sun, Yanqiong

    2010-07-01

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H 2L 1(HL 1) 2(H 2O) 2]·2H 2O 1, [Ni 2(4,4'-bipy)(L 2)(OH)(H 2O) 2]·3H 2O 2, Mn(phen) 2(H 2L 1) 23 and Mn(phen)(HL 2) 4 (H 3L 1= p-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, H 3L 2= m-H 2O 3PCH 2-C 6H 4-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni 4 cluster units are connected by pairs of H 3L 2 ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R 22(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H 3L 2 ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H 3L 1 and H 3L 2 ligands in the compounds more efficiently.

  18. Coordination Chemistry Inside Polymeric Nanoreactors: Interparticle Metal Exchange and Ionic Compound Vectorization in Phosphine-Functionalized Amphiphilic Polymer Latexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Gayet, Florence; Manoury, Eric; Joumaa, Ahmad; Lansalot, Muriel; D'Agosto, Franck; Poli, Rinaldo

    2016-04-25

    Stable latexes of hierarchically organized core-cross-linked polymer micelles that are functionalized at the core with triphenylphosphine (TPP@CCM) have been investigated by NMR spectroscopic analysis at both natural (ca. pH 5) and strongly basic (pH 13.6) pH values after core swelling with toluene. The core-shell interface structuring forces part of the hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains to reside inside the hydrophobic core at both pH values. Loading the particle cores with [Rh(acac)(CO)2 ] (acac=acetylacetonate) at various Rh/P ratios yielded polymer-supported [Rh(acac)(CO)(TPP)] (TPP=triphenylphosphine). The particle-to-particle rhodium migration is very fast at natural pH, but slows down dramatically at high pH, whereas the size distribution of the nanoreactors remains unchanged. The slow migration at pH 13.6 leads to the generation of polymer-anchored [Rh(OH)(CO)(TPP)2 ], which is also generated immediately upon the addition of NaOH to the particles with a [Rh(acac)(CO)] loading of 50 %. Similarly, treatment of the same particles with NaCl yielded polymer-anchored [RhCl(CO)(TPP)2 ]. Interparticle coupling occurs during these rapid processes. These experiments prove that the major contribution to metal migration is direct core-core contact. The slow migration at the high pH value, however, must result from a pathway that does not involve core-core contact. The facile penetration of the polymer cores by NaOH and NaCl results from the presence of shell-linked poly(ethylene oxide) methyl ether functions both outside and inside the polymer core-shell interface.

  19. The Evolving Chemistry Along Preferential Flow Paths in Alkaline Porous Media and its Significance for Heavy Metal Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendz, D.; Flyhammar, P.; Ginn, T. R.

    2001-12-01

    It is common knowledge that physical and chemical heterogeneity are prominent features of geological formations and that they may have a large impact on the fate of contaminants. However, the particular influence of any underlying chemical heterogeneity is difficult to distinguish from experimental data because its manifestation depends on the hydraulic and physical properties of the system as well as the chemical components involved. Physical and chemical heterogeneity are also important features of man-made formations such as landfills. The chemical composition of the leachate that is discharged at the lower boundary of a landfill reflects the processes that take place in the landfill interior. However, anomalous behavior have been observed for both municipal solid waste landfills and municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash landfills: the chemical composition of the leachate indicates that the (bio-) geochemical conditions in the landfill interior alternate between different states depending on the leachate flux. The main hypothesis here is that this is an effect of chemical heterogeneity and a preferential flow field exhibiting a distribution of travel times ranging from hours to years. The importance of a non uniform flow field should not be underestimated when making predictions of expected leaching behavior on short and intermediate time scales, mainly because doing so may render predictions that are not conservative risk-wise. Model simulations demonstrate the influence of partial pressure of CO2, organic content, buffering capacity and matrix diffusion for the formation and movement of reaction (pH- and redox-) fronts and transport of heavy metals in an ensemble of preferential flow paths in a municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash landfill receiving acid rain.

  20. Coordination Chemistry Inside Polymeric Nanoreactors: Interparticle Metal Exchange and Ionic Compound Vectorization in Phosphine-Functionalized Amphiphilic Polymer Latexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Gayet, Florence; Manoury, Eric; Joumaa, Ahmad; Lansalot, Muriel; D'Agosto, Franck; Poli, Rinaldo

    2016-04-25

    Stable latexes of hierarchically organized core-cross-linked polymer micelles that are functionalized at the core with triphenylphosphine (TPP@CCM) have been investigated by NMR spectroscopic analysis at both natural (ca. pH 5) and strongly basic (pH 13.6) pH values after core swelling with toluene. The core-shell interface structuring forces part of the hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains to reside inside the hydrophobic core at both pH values. Loading the particle cores with [Rh(acac)(CO)2 ] (acac=acetylacetonate) at various Rh/P ratios yielded polymer-supported [Rh(acac)(CO)(TPP)] (TPP=triphenylphosphine). The particle-to-particle rhodium migration is very fast at natural pH, but slows down dramatically at high pH, whereas the size distribution of the nanoreactors remains unchanged. The slow migration at pH 13.6 leads to the generation of polymer-anchored [Rh(OH)(CO)(TPP)2 ], which is also generated immediately upon the addition of NaOH to the particles with a [Rh(acac)(CO)] loading of 50 %. Similarly, treatment of the same particles with NaCl yielded polymer-anchored [RhCl(CO)(TPP)2 ]. Interparticle coupling occurs during these rapid processes. These experiments prove that the major contribution to metal migration is direct core-core contact. The slow migration at the high pH value, however, must result from a pathway that does not involve core-core contact. The facile penetration of the polymer cores by NaOH and NaCl results from the presence of shell-linked poly(ethylene oxide) methyl ether functions both outside and inside the polymer core-shell interface. PMID:27001452

  1. The Pimlico Chemistry Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes a chemistry "trail" (similar to a nature trail) which focuses on chemical phenomena in the environment. The trail includes 20 stops in and around a local school. Types of phenomena examined include building materials, air pollution, corrosion of metals, swimming pools, and others. Additional activities are also suggested. (DH)

  2. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  6. Colour Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  9. Experimental determination of contaminant metal mobility as a function of temperature, time and solution chemistry. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.; Bruton, C.; O'Day, P.; Sahai, N.

    1997-01-01

    'Strontium is significantly more mobile than other hazardous radioactive metals. Its partitioning between aqueous and solid phases is controlled by reactions that occur at the interface between natural waters and minerals. At a groundwater site in Hanford (200-BP-5), the aerial extent of the {sup 90}Sr plume is 100 times larger than the aerial extent of the {sup 137}Cs and the {sup 239}Pu plumes. Similarly, contaminated, perched watertables at INEL have much higher aqueous concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than {sup 137}Cs, presumably because Cs is preferentially sorbed to solids (Duncan 1995). Under high physical flow conditions, such as those in the highly fractured rock at Hanford and INEL, {sup 90}Sr present in plumes may spread off-site and cause contamination of aquifers or other water sources. Geochemical factors that may contribute to the overall mobility of Sr in natural waters are the solubilities of phases such as strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}) and formation of strong complexes with sulfate and nitrate. Although {sup 90}Sr is mobilized in natural waters in these examples, significant concentrations may also be present in solid phases. Sorption experiments using a wide variety of substrates at room temperature have shown that Sr is removed from solution under certain conditions. Additionally, strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}) may precipitate at low Sr concentrations in the pH range of waters in contact with basaltic rocks, which varies between pH 8 and 10. Waters contain variable amounts of carbonate owing to atmospheric interactions; the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} is about 10 x 3.5 atm in air and commonly as high as 10 x 2.5 atm in soils. The objective of this work is to determine the fundamental data needed to predict the behavior of strontium at temperature and time scales appropriate to thermal remediation. The authors approach combines macroscopic sorption/precipitation and desorption/dissolution kinetic experiments, which track changes in solution composition

  10. NEW APPLICATIONS OF LC-MS AND LC-MS2 TOWARD UNDERSTANDING THE ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF ORGANOMETALLICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last 40 years, many organometallic compounds have been synthesized and used in a variety of consumer, agricultural, and industrial products. Including wastewater effluents, leaching, and direct land and water applications, there are many pathways that can disperse organo...

  11. A new metalation complex for organic synthesis and polymerization reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshfield, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    Organometallic complex of N,N,N',N' tetramethyl ethylene diamine /TMEDA/ and lithium acts as metalation intermediate for controlled systhesis of aromatic organic compounds and polymer formation. Complex of TMEDA and lithium aids in preparation of various organic lithium compounds.

  12. Polystannanes: processible molecular metals with defined chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Caseri, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Polystannanes are a unique class of materials as those inorganic polymers (more precisely organometallic polymers) appear to be hitherto the only characterized polymers with a backbone of covalently bound metal atoms. This review reflects the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization (in particular (119)Sn NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy), physical properties and material properties of polystannanes, and their processing into (oriented) films and fiber blends.

  13. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  14. Synthetic Metal-Containing Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Ian

    2004-04-01

    The development of the field of synthetic metal-containing polymers - where metal atoms form an integral part of the main chain or side group structure of a polymer - aims to create new materials which combine the processability of organic polymers with the physical or chemical characteristics associated with the metallic element or complex. This book covers the major developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of synthetic metal-containing macromolecules, and includes chapters on the preparation and characterization of metal-containing polymers, metallocene-based polymers, rigid-rod organometallic polymers, coordination polymers, polymers containing main group metals, and also covers dendritic and supramolecular systems. The book describes both polymeric materials with metals in the main chain or side group structure and covers the literature up to the end of 2002.

  15. Mechanistic Insight into Ketone α-Alkylation with Unactivated Olefins via C-H Activation Promoted by Metal-Organic Cooperative Catalysis (MOCC): Enriching the MOCC Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanfeng; Qu, Shuanglin; Tao, Yuan; Deng, Xi; Wang, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-05-20

    Metal-organic cooperative catalysis (MOCC) has been successfully applied for hydroacylation of olefins with aldehydes via directed C(sp(2))-H functionalization. Most recently, it was reported that an elaborated MOCC system, containing Rh(I) catalyst and 7-azaindoline (L1) cocatalyst, could even catalyze ketone α-alkylation with unactivated olefins via C(sp(3))-H activation. Herein we present a density functional theory study to understand the mechanism of the challenging ketone α-alkylation. The transformation uses IMesRh(I)Cl(L1)(CH2═CH2) as an active catalyst and proceeds via sequential seven steps, including ketone condensation with L1, giving enamine 1b; 1b coordination to Rh(I) active catalyst, generating Rh(I)-1b intermediate; C(sp(2))-H oxidative addition, leading to a Rh(III)-H hydride; olefin migratory insertion into Rh(III)-H bond; reductive elimination, generating Rh(I)-1c(alkylated 1b) intermediate; decoordination of 1c, liberating 1c and regenerating Rh(I) active catalyst; and hydrolysis of 1c, furnishing the final α-alkylation product 1d and regenerating L1. Among the seven steps, reductive elimination is the rate-determining step. The C-H bond preactivation via agostic interaction is crucial for the bond activation. The mechanism rationalizes the experimental puzzles: why only L1 among several candidates performed perfectly, whereas others failed, and why Wilkinson's catalyst commonly used in MOCC systems performed poorly. Based on the established mechanism and stimulated by other relevant experimental reactions, we attempted to enrich MOCC chemistry computationally, exemplifying how to develop new organic catalysts and proposing L7 to be an alternative for L1 and demonstrating the great potential of expanding the hitherto exclusive use of Rh(I)/Rh(III) manifold to Co(0)/Co(II) redox cycling in developing MOCC systems.

  16. Ideal Spintronics in Molecule-Based Novel Organometallic Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Ma, Yandong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2015-01-01

    With the purpose of searching for new intriguing nanomaterial for spintronics, a series of novel metalloporphyrin nanowires (M-PPNW, M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) and hybrid nanowires fabricated by metalloporphyrin and metal-phthalocyanine (M-PCNW) are systematically investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Our results indicate that the transition metal atoms (TMs) embedded in the frameworks distribute regularly and separately, without any trend to form clusters, thus leading to the ideally ordered spin distribution. Except for the cases embedded with Ni and Zn, the others are spin-polarized. Remarkably, the Mn-PPNW, Mn-PCNW, MnCu-PPNW, MnCr-PCNW, and MnCu-PCNW frameworks all favor the long-ranged ferromagnetic spin ordering and display half-metallic nature, which are of greatest interest and importance for electronics and spintronics. The predicted Curie temperature for the Mn-PCNW is about 150 K. In addition, it is found that the discrepancy in magnetic coupling for these materials is related to the competition mechanisms of through-bond and through-space exchange interactions. In the present work, we propose not only two novel sets of 1D frameworks with appealing magnetic properties, but also a new strategy in obtaining the half-metallic materials by the combination of different neighboring TMs. PMID:26239021

  17. Ideal Spintronics in Molecule-Based Novel Organometallic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Ma, Yandong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2015-08-01

    With the purpose of searching for new intriguing nanomaterial for spintronics, a series of novel metalloporphyrin nanowires (M-PPNW, M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) and hybrid nanowires fabricated by metalloporphyrin and metal-phthalocyanine (M-PCNW) are systematically investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Our results indicate that the transition metal atoms (TMs) embedded in the frameworks distribute regularly and separately, without any trend to form clusters, thus leading to the ideally ordered spin distribution. Except for the cases embedded with Ni and Zn, the others are spin-polarized. Remarkably, the Mn-PPNW, Mn-PCNW, MnCu-PPNW, MnCr-PCNW, and MnCu-PCNW frameworks all favor the long-ranged ferromagnetic spin ordering and display half-metallic nature, which are of greatest interest and importance for electronics and spintronics. The predicted Curie temperature for the Mn-PCNW is about 150 K. In addition, it is found that the discrepancy in magnetic coupling for these materials is related to the competition mechanisms of through-bond and through-space exchange interactions. In the present work, we propose not only two novel sets of 1D frameworks with appealing magnetic properties, but also a new strategy in obtaining the half-metallic materials by the combination of different neighboring TMs.

  18. Ideal Spintronics in Molecule-Based Novel Organometallic Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Ma, Yandong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2015-08-04

    With the purpose of searching for new intriguing nanomaterial for spintronics, a series of novel metalloporphyrin nanowires (M-PPNW, M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) and hybrid nanowires fabricated by metalloporphyrin and metal-phthalocyanine (M-PCNW) are systematically investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Our results indicate that the transition metal atoms (TMs) embedded in the frameworks distribute regularly and separately, without any trend to form clusters, thus leading to the ideally ordered spin distribution. Except for the cases embedded with Ni and Zn, the others are spin-polarized. Remarkably, the Mn-PPNW, Mn-PCNW, MnCu-PPNW, MnCr-PCNW, and MnCu-PCNW frameworks all favor the long-ranged ferromagnetic spin ordering and display half-metallic nature, which are of greatest interest and importance for electronics and spintronics. The predicted Curie temperature for the Mn-PCNW is about 150 K. In addition, it is found that the discrepancy in magnetic coupling for these materials is related to the competition mechanisms of through-bond and through-space exchange interactions. In the present work, we propose not only two novel sets of 1D frameworks with appealing magnetic properties, but also a new strategy in obtaining the half-metallic materials by the combination of different neighboring TMs.

  19. Impact of donor-acceptor geometry and metal chelation on photophysical properties and applications of triarylboranes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Zachary M; Wang, Suning

    2009-10-20

    Three-coordinate organoboron compounds have recently found a wide range of applications in materials chemistry as nonlinear optical materials, chemical sensors, and emitters for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These compounds are excellent electron acceptors due to the empty p(pi) orbital on the boron center. When accompanied by electron donors such as amines, these molecules possess large electronic dipoles, which promote donor-acceptor charge-transfer upon excitation with light. Because of this, donor-acceptor triarylboranes are often highly luminescent both in the solid state and in solution. In this Account, we describe our research to develop donor-acceptor triarylboranes as efficient blue emitters for OLEDs. Through the use of hole-transporting donor groups such as 1-napthylphenylamines, we have prepared multifunctional triarylboranes that can act as the emissive, electron transport, or hole transport layers in OLEDs. We have also examined donor-acceptor compounds based on 2,2'-dipyridylamine or 7-azaindolyl donors, several of which have fluorescent quantum efficiencies approaching 100%. We are also investigating the chemistry of metal-containing triarylboranes. Our studies show that the electron-deficient boryl group can greatly facilitate metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions and phosphorescence. In addition, electronegative linker groups such as 2,2'-bipyridine can act in synergy with metal chelation to greatly improve the electron-accepting ability and Lewis acidity of triarylboranes. Donor-acceptor triarylboranes developed in our laboratory can also serve as a series of "switch-on" sensors for fluoride ions. When the donor and acceptor are linked by rigid naphthyl or nonrigid silane linkers, donor-acceptor conjugation is disrupted and charge transfer occurs primarily through space. The binding of fluoride ions to the boron center disrupts this charge transfer, activating alternative pi --> pi* transitions in the molecule and changing the

  20. Energy and chemicals from the selective electrooxidation of renewable diols by organometallic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Filippi, Jonathan; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Marchionni, Andrea; Miller, Hamish A; Oberhauser, Werner; Vizza, Francesco; Annen, Samuel P; Grützmacher, H

    2014-09-01

    Organometallic fuel cells catalyze the selective electrooxidation of renewable diols, simultaneously providing high power densities and chemicals of industrial importance. It is shown that the unique organometallic complex [Rh(OTf)(trop2NH)(PPh3)] employed as molecular active site in an anode of an OMFC selectively oxidizes a number of renewable diols, such as ethylene glycol , 1,2-propanediol (1,2-P), 1,3-propanediol (1,3-P), and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-B) to their corresponding mono-carboxylates. The electrochemical performance of this molecular catalyst is discussed, with the aim to achieve cogeneration of electricity and valuable chemicals in a highly selective electrooxidation from diol precursors.